WorldWideScience

Sample records for pion-nucleus interactions ii

  1. The Nuclear $\\sigma$ Term in the Skyrme Model Pion-Nucleus Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gammal, A

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear sigma term is calculated including the nuclear matrix element of the derivative of the NN interaction with respect to the quark mass, $m_q\\frac{\\partial V_{NN}}{\\partial m_q}$. The NN potential is evaluated in the skyrmion-skyrmion picture within the quantized product ansatz. The contribution of the NN potential to the nuclear sigma term provides repulsion to the pion-nucleus interaction. The strength of the s-wave pion-nucleus optical potential is estimated including such contribution. The results are consistent with the analysis of the experimental data.

  2. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, and at Indiana University (IUCF), as a collaborative effort among several laboratories and universities. The experimental activity at LAMPF involved measurements of new data on pion double-charge-exchange scattering, some initial work on a new Neutral Meson Spectrometer system, a search for deeply-bound pionic atoms, measurements of elastic scattering, and studies of the (n,p) reaction on various nuclei. At PSI measurements of pion quasielastic scattering were carried out, with detection of the recoil proton. Work on the analysis of data from a previous experiment at PSI on pion absorption in nuclei was continued. This experiment involved using a detector system that covered nearly the full solid angle.

  3. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. [New Mexico State Univ. , Las Cruces, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, and at Indiana University (IUCF), as a collaborative effort among several laboratories and universities. The experimental activity at LAMPF involved measurements of new data on pion double-charge-exchange scattering, some initial work on a new Neutral Meson Spectrometer system, a search for deeply-bound pionic atoms, measurements of elastic scattering, and studies of the (n,p) reaction on various nuclei. At PSI measurements of pion quasielastic scattering were carried out, with detection of the recoil proton. Work on the analysis of data from a previous experiment at PSI on pion absorption in nuclei was continued. This experiment involved using a detector system that covered nearly the full solid angle.

  4. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus and nucleon-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. Progress report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-30

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out at New Mexico State University in 1991-94 under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. Most of these studies involved investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, at Indiana University (IUCF), and at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada, as collaborative efforts among several laboratories and universities. We have also worked on plans and preparations for new experiments involving studies of the quark structure of nucleons and nuclei, which would be carried out at Fermilab (FNAL), near Chicago, and at the HERA facility at the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany. The NMSU personnel included two faculty members, five postdoctoral research associates, nine graduate students, and one undergraduate student.

  5. Pion-nucleus elastic scattering on $^{12}C$, $^{40}Ca$, $^{90}Zr$, and $^{208}Pb$ at 400 and 500 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Kahrimanis, G; Chen, C M; Clark, B C; Dhuga, K S; Ernst, D J; Faucett, J A; Fortune, H T; Hama, S; Hussein, A; Jiang, M F; Johnson, K W; Kerr, L K; Mathews, S; McGill, J A; Moore, C F; Mordechai, S; Morris, C L; O'Donnell, J; Snell, M; Rawool-Sullivan, M; Ray, L; Whitley, C; Williams, A L; Kahrimanis, George; Burleson, George; Dhuga, Kalvir; Hussein, Ahmed; Mathews, Scott; Gill, John Mc; Mordechai, Shaul; Morris, Christopher L.; Donnell, John O'; Snell, Mike; Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Whitley, Charles; Williams, Allen L.

    1997-01-01

    Pion-nucleus elastic scattering at energies above the Delta(1232) resonance is studied using both pi+ and pi- beams on 12C, 40Ca, 90Zr, and 208Pb. The present data provide an opportunity to study the interaction of pions with nuclei at energies where second-order corrections to impulse approximation calculations should be small. The results are compared with other data sets at similar energies, and with four different first-order impulse approximation calculations. Significant disagreement exists between the calculations and the data from this experiment.

  6. Pion-nucleus total cross-section data from LAMPF and BNL. [Neutron and proton radii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    New measurements of pion-nucleus total cross sections were made at LAMPF and BNL. The results from LAMPF include measurement of the difference of the rms neutron and proton radii of /sup 48/Ca to be 0.08 +- 0.02 and that of /sup 18/O to be 0.19 +- 0.02. The BNL measurements provide a new phenomenology on the downshift and spreading of the (3-3) resonance in nuclei from the first data on heavy nuclei. A new technique for handling the Coulomb effects in total cross section measurements is discussed.

  7. Pion-nucleus interactions and the STAR experiment at RHIC. Progress report, 1990--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, C.F.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out by personnel from the University of Texas at Austin at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) during the calendar years 1990--1993 and on the STAR experiment at RHIC under grant DE-FGO5-87ER40343 between the University of Texas at Austin and the United States Department of Energy. A brief overview of work supported by this grant is given in Section 2. An account of the study of the double giant resonances in pion double charge exchange forms Section 3. This report contains a list of published papers and preprints in Section 6, invited talks in Section 7, and abstracts in Section 8. These papers summarize experiments involving participants supported by this grant and indicate the work accomplished by these participants in this program of medium energy nuclear physics research. Section 9 contains a list of personnel who have participated in this research program.

  8. Applicability of pion-nucleus Drell-Yan data in global analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions

    CERN Document Server

    Paakkinen, Petja; Paukkunen, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success of modern nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) in describing nuclear hard-process data, they still suffer from large uncertainties. One of the poorly constrained features is the possible asymmetry in nuclear modifications of valence $u$ and $d$ quarks. We study the possibility of using pion-nucleus Drell-Yan dilepton data as a new constraint in the global analysis of nPDFs. We find that the nuclear cross-section ratios from the NA3, NA10 and E615 experiments can be used without imposing significant new theoretical uncertainties and, in particular, that these datasets may have some constraining power on the $u$/$d$ -asymmetry in nuclei.

  9. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  10. In Vivo Probe of Lipid II-Interacting Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sourav; Libby, Elizabeth A; Pidgeon, Sean E; Dworkin, Jonathan; Pires, Marcos M

    2016-07-11

    β-Lactams represent one of the most important classes of antibiotics discovered to date. These agents block Lipid II processing and cell wall biosynthesis through inactivation of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). PBPs enzymatically load cell wall building blocks from Lipid II carrier molecules onto the growing cell wall scaffold during growth and division. Lipid II, a bottleneck in cell wall biosynthesis, is the target of some of the most potent antibiotics in clinical use. Despite the immense therapeutic value of this biosynthetic pathway, the PBP-Lipid II association has not been established in live cells. To determine this key interaction, we designed an unnatural d-amino acid dipeptide that is metabolically incorporated into Lipid II molecules. By hijacking the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery, photoaffinity probes were installed in combination with click partners within Lipid II, thereby allowing, for the first time, demonstration of PBP interactions in vivo with Lipid II.

  11. A quantitative study to assess synergistic interactions between urotensin II and angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarre, Neil S; Tallarida, Ronald J

    2008-05-31

    Interaction between the vasoactive peptides, urotensin II and angiotensin II, could have important implications in various disease states. We examined this interaction using isolated rat aortic rings with intact adventitia and endothelium. The fixed-ratio combination we tested produced effect levels significantly greater than predicted by additivity. Thus, the interaction was synergistic, and this is illustrated in a response surface plot that shows the predicted additive effect for all possible combinations.

  12. The interaction between mercury(II and sulfathiazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellú Sebastián

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of mercury(II with sulfathiazole has been analyzed. IR and NMR spectral studies suggest a coordination of Hg(II with the Nthiazolic atom, unlike related Hg-sulfadrugs compounds. The complex was screened for its activity against Escherichia coli, showing an appreciable antimicrobial activity compared with the ligand.

  13. Canadian Scientific Journals: Part II, Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhaber, H.

    1975-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity in Canadian science is considered from the point of view of the interaction of significant Canadian journals. Most of these journals cite themselves primarily, and journals in other or related sciences receive few citations. Thus, it can be concluded that the degree of interdisciplinarity is very low in Canadian science.…

  14. Modeling interactions of Hg(II) and bauxitic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasooriya, Rohan; Tobschall, Heinz J; Bandara, Atula

    2007-11-01

    The adsorptive interactions of Hg(II) with gibbsite-rich soils (hereafter SOIL-g) were modeled by 1-pK surface complexation theory using charge distribution multi-site ion competition model (CD MUSIC) incorporating basic Stern layer model (BSM) to account for electrostatic effects. The model calibrations were performed for the experimental data of synthetic gibbsite-Hg(II) adsorption. When [NaNO(3)] > or = 0.01M, the Hg(II) adsorption density values, of gibbsite, Gamma(Hg(II)), showed a negligible variation with ionic strength. However, Gamma(Hg(II)) values show a marked variation with the [Cl(-)]. When [Cl(-)] > or = 0.01M, the Gamma(Hg(II)) values showed a significant reduction with the pH. The Hg(II) adsorption behavior in NaNO(3) was modeled assuming homogeneous solid surface. The introduction of high affinity sites, i.e., >Al(s)OH at a low concentration (typically about 0.045 sites nm(-2)) is required to model Hg(II) adsorption in NaCl. According to IR spectroscopic data, the bauxitic soil (SOIL-g) is characterized by gibbsite and bayerite. These mineral phases were not treated discretely in modeling of Hg(II) and soil interactions. The CD MUSIC/BSM model combination can be used to model Hg(II) adsorption on bauxitic soil. The role of organic matter seems to play a role on Hg(II) binding when pH>8. The Hg(II) adsorption in the presence of excess Cl(-) ions required the selection of high affinity sites in modeling.

  15. Plasma-wall-interaction in ECRIS II

    CERN Document Server

    Mannel, C; Wiesemann, K

    1999-01-01

    In an ECR-discharge, where the plasma is confined inside a copper-resonator by a simple magnetic mirror, it could be shown that sputtering of wall material has an important influence upon the plasma [1]. Spectroscopic measurements in ECRIS II with a copper vessel confirmed this model. Evidence for the presence of copper atoms and ions in the plasma could be found by ion extraction as well as with VUV-spectrometry. In a nitrogen discharge by adding helium as a mixing-gas we found that the extracted current of Cu-ions decreased and measured line intensities of copper emission lines dropped down. [1] D. Meyer, "Einfluss der Plasmainstabilitaet auf die Produktion hochgeladener Ionen in einer ECR-Entladung", Dissertation, Bochum, 1997

  16. Galaxy interactions II: High density environments

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Sol; Padilla, Nelson; Lambas, Diego G

    2011-01-01

    With the aim to assess the role of dense environments in galaxy interactions, properties we present an analysis of close galaxy pairs in groups and clusters, obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7). We identified pairs that reside in groups by cross-correlating the total galaxy pair catalogue with the SDSS-DR7 group catalogue from Zapata et al. (2009). We classify pair galaxies according to the intensity of interaction. We analysed the effect of high density environments on different classes of galaxy-galaxy interactions and we have also studied the impact of the group global environment on pair galaxies. We find that galaxy pairs are more concentrated towards the group centres with respect to the other group galaxy members, and disturbed pairs show a preference to contain the brightest galaxy in the groups. The color-magnitude relation exhibits significant differences between pair galaxies and the control sample, consisting in color tails with a clear excess of extremely blue and...

  17. On the interaction of copper(II) with disulfiram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David J; Deshmukh, Parikshit; Tedstone, Aleksander A; Tuna, Floriana; O'Brien, Paul

    2014-11-11

    In combination with copper(II) ions, disulfiram (DSF) has been reported to be a potentially potent anticancer agent based on in vitro results. The interaction of DSF with copper(II) chloride in solution has been studied using a range of spectroscopic techniques. There is strong evidence for the rapid formation of the bis(N,N-diethyl dithiocarbamato)copper(II) complex in situ. Kinetic experiments were used to determine rate laws for the reaction that give insight into the mechanism of the process which may help to explain the observed in vitro cytotoxicity.

  18. Central interactions of aldosterone and angiotensin II in aldosterone- and angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Baojian; Beltz, Terry G; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2011-02-01

    Many studies have implicated both angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (Aldo) in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the progression of renal injury, and cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. In several cases, ANG II and Aldo have been shown to have synergistic interactions in the periphery. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that ANG II and Aldo interact centrally in Aldo- and ANG II-induced hypertension in male rats. In rats with blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measured by DSI telemetry, intracerebroventricular (icv) infusions of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and RU28318 or the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist irbesartan significantly inhibited Aldo-induced hypertension. In ANG II-induced hypertension, icv infusion of RU28318 significantly reduced the increase in BP. Moreover, icv infusions of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger tempol or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin attenuated Aldo-induced hypertension. To confirm these effects of pharmacological antagonists, icv injections of either recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying siRNA silencers of AT1aR (AT1aR-siRNA) or MR (MR-siRNA) significantly attenuated the development of Aldo-induced hypertension. The immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses of AT1aR-siRNA- or MR-siRNA-injected rats showed a marked reduction in the expression of AT1R or MR in the paraventricular nucleus compared with scrambled siRNA rats. When animals from all studies underwent ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium, there was a smaller reduction in the fall of BP in animals receiving icv AT1R or MR antagonists. These results suggest that ANG II and Aldo interact in the brain in a mutually cooperative manner such that the functional integrity of both brain AT1R and MR are necessary for hypertension to be induced by either systemic ANG II or Aldo. The pressor effects produced by systemic ANG II or Aldo involve increased central ROS and

  19. Electrochemical studies of DNA interaction and antimicrobial activities of MnII, FeIII, CoII and NiII Schiff base tetraazamacrocyclic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anuj; Vashistha, Vinod Kumar; Tevatia, Prashant; Singh, Randhir

    2017-04-01

    Tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of MnII, FeIII, CoII and NiII have been synthesized by template method. These tetraazamacrocycles have been analyzed with various techniques like molar conductance, IR, UV-vis, mass spectral and cyclic voltammetric studies. On the basis of all these studies, octahedral geometry has been assigned to these tetraazamacrocyclic complexes. The DNA binding properties of these macrocyclic complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, cyclic voltammetric and differential pulse voltammetric studies. The cyclic voltammetric data showed that ipc and ipa were effectively decreased in the presence of calf thymus DNA, which is a strong evidence for the interaction of these macrocyclic complexes with the calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA). The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant found in the order: KCoII > KNiII > KMnII which indicates that CoII macrocyclic complex has formed a strong intercalated intermediate. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (KSV) and voltammetric binding constant were found in the order KSV(CoII) > KSV(NiII) > KSV(MnII) and K+(CoII) > K+(NiII) > K+(MnII) which shows that CoII macrocyclic complex exhibits the high interaction affinity towards ct-DNA by the intercalation binding. Biological studies of the macrocyclic complexes compared with the standard drug like Gentamycin, have shown antibacterial activities against E. coli, P. aeruginosa, B. cereus, S. aureus and antifungal activity against C. albicans.

  20. The effect of interaction between Lipoprotein Lipase and ApoVLDL-II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of interaction between Lipoprotein Lipase and ApoVLDL-II genes on fat and serum biochemical levels. ... Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in apoVLDL-II and lipoprotein lipase genes was screened by ... Article Metrics.

  1. Adsorbent-adsorbate interactions in the adsorption of Cd(II) and Hg(II) on ozonized activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2002-09-01

    The present work investigated the effect of surface oxygenated groups on the adsorption of Cd(II) and Hg(II) by activated carbon. A study was undertaken to determine the adsorption isotherms and the influence of the pH on the adsorption of each metallic ion by a series of ozonized activated carbons. In the case of Cd(II), the adsorption capacity and the affinity of the adsorbent augmented with the increase in acid-oxygenated groups on the activated carbon surface. These results imply that electrostatic-type interactions predominate in this adsorption process. The adsorption observed at solution pH values below the pH(PZC) of the carbon indicates that other forces also participate in this process. Ionic exchange between -C pi-H3O+ interaction protons and Cd(II) ions would account for these findings. In the case of Hg(II), the adsorption diminished with an increase in the degree of oxidation of the activated carbon. The presence of electron-withdrawing groups on oxidized carbons decreases the electronic density of their surface, producing a reduction in the adsorbent-adsorbate dispersion interactions and in their reductive capacity, thus decreasing the adsorption of Hg(II) on the activated carbon. At pH values above 3, the pH had no influence on the adsorption of Hg(II) by the activated carbon, confirming that electrostatic interactions do not have a determinant influence on Hg(II) adsorption.

  2. Highly cytotoxic DNA-interacting copper(II) coordination compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissos, Rosa F; Torrents, Ester; dos Santos Mello, Francyelli Mariana; Carvalho Pires, Wanessa; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de Paula; Caballero, Ana B; Caubet, Amparo; Massera, Chiara; Roubeau, Olivier; Teat, Simon J; Gamez, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Four new Schiff-base ligands have been designed and prepared by condensation reaction between hydrazine derivatives (i.e. 2-hydrazinopyridine or 2-hydrazinoquinoline) and mono- or dialdehyde (3-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 5-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyisophthalaldehyde, respectively). Six copper(II) coordination compounds of various nuclearities have been obtained from these ligands, which are formulated as [Cu(L1)Cl](CH3OH) (1), [Cu(L2)NO3] (2), [Cu2(L3)(ClO4)2(CH3O)(CH3OH)](CH3OH) (3), [Cu2(L4)(ClO4)(OH)(CH3OH)](ClO4) (4), [Cu8(L3)4(NO3)4(OH)5](NO3)3(CH3OH)5(H2O)8 (5) and [Cu3(HL2')4Cl6](CH3OH)6 (6), as revealed by single-crystal X-ray studies. Their DNA-interacting abilities have been investigated using different characterization techniques, which suggest that the metal complexes act as efficient DNA binders. Moreover, cytotoxicity assays with several cancer cell lines show that some of them are very active, as evidenced by the sub-micromolar IC50 values achieved in some cases.

  3. The cyclin-dependent kinase 8 module sterically blocks Mediator interactions with RNA polymerase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmlund, Hans; Baraznenok, Vera; Lindahl, Martin

    2006-01-01

    CDK8 (cyclin-dependent kinase 8), along with CycC, Med12, and Med13, form a repressive module (the Cdk8 module) that prevents RNA polymerase II (pol II) interactions with Mediator. Here, we report that the ability of the Cdk8 module to prevent pol II interactions is independent of the Cdk8......-dependent kinase activity. We use electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction to demonstrate that the Cdk8 module forms a distinct structural entity that binds to the head and middle region of Mediator, thereby sterically blocking interactions with pol II....

  4. Heavy metal/polyacid interaction. An electrochemical study of the binding of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) to polycarboxylic and humic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleven, R.F.M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte effects in the interaction of heavy metal ions with model polycarboxylic acids have been described, in order to establish the relevance of these effects in the interaction of heavy metal ions with naturally occurring humic and fulvic acids. The model systems consisted of Cd(II), Pb(I

  5. Dinuclear Metallacycles with Single M-X-M Bridges (X = Cl(-), Br(-); M = Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II)): Strong Antiferromagnetic Superexchange Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Daniel L; Pascui, Andrea E; Foley, Elizabeth A; Smith, Mark D; Jezierska, Julia; Wojciechowska, Agnieszka; Stoian, Sebastian A; Ozarowski, Andrew

    2017-03-06

    A series of monochloride-bridged, dinuclear metallacycles of the general formula [M2(μ-Cl)(μ-L)2](ClO4)3 have been prepared using the third-generation, ditopic bis(pyrazolyl)methane ligands L = m-bis[bis(1-pyrazolyl)methyl]benzene (Lm), M = Cu(II), Zn(II), and L = m-bis[bis(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)methyl]benzene (Lm*), M = Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II). These complexes were synthesized from the direct reactions of M(ClO4)2·6H2O, MCl2, and the ligand, Lm or Lm*, in the appropriate stoichiometric amounts. Three analogous complexes of the formula [M2(μ-Cl)(μ-L)2](BF4)3, L = Lm, M = Cu(II), and L = Lm*, M = Co(II), Cu(II), were prepared from the reaction of [M2(μ-F)(μ-L)2](BF4)3 and (CH3)3SiCl. The bromide-bridged complex [Cu2(μ-Br)(μ-Lm*)2](ClO4)3 was prepared by the first method. Three acyclic complexes, [Co2(μ-Lm)μ-Cl4], [Co2(μ-Lm*)Cl4], and [Co2(μ-Lm*)Br4], were also prepared. The structures of all [M2(μ-X)(μ-L)2](3+) (X = Cl(-), Br(-)) complexes have two ditopic bis(pyrazolyl)methane ligands bridging two metals in a metallacyclic arrangement. The fifth coordination site of the distorted trigonal bipyramidal metal centers is filled by a bridging halide ligand that has an unusual linear or nearly linear M-X-M angle. The NMR spectra of [Zn2(μ-Cl)(μ-Lm*)2](ClO4)3 and especially [Cd2(μ-Cl)(μ-Lm*)2](ClO4)3 demonstrate that the metallacycle structure is maintained in solution. Solid state magnetic susceptibility data for the copper(II) compounds show very strong antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, with -J values of 536 cm(-1) for [Cu2(μ-Cl)(μ-Lm)2](ClO4)3·xCH3CN, 720 cm(-1) for [Cu2(μ-Cl)(μ-Lm*)2](ClO4)3, and 945 cm(-1) for [Cu2(μ-Br)(μ-Lm*)2](ClO4)3·2CH3CN. Smaller but still substantial antiferromagnetic interactions are observed with other first row transition metals, with -J values of 98 cm(-1) for [Ni2(μ-Cl)(μ-Lm*)2](ClO4)3, 55 cm(-1) for [Co2(μ-Cl)(μ-Lm*)2](ClO4)3, and 34 cm(-1) for [Fe2(μ-Cl)(μ-Lm*)2](ClO4

  6. Gravity and Antigravity with Discrete Interactions Alternatives I and II

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M

    2001-01-01

    Questioning the experimental basis of continuous descriptions of fundamental interactions we discuss classical gravity as an effective continuous first-order approximation of a discrete interaction. The sub-dominant contributions produce a residual interaction that may be repulsive and whose physical meaning is of a correction of the excess contained in the continuous approximation. These residual interactions become important (or even dominate) at asymptotical conditions of very large distances from where there are data (rotation curves of galaxies, inflation, accelerated expansion, etc) and cosmological theoretical motivations that suggest new physics (new forms of interactions) or new forms (dark) of matter and energy. We show that a discrete picture of the world (of matter and of its interactions) produce, as an approximation, the standard continuous picture and more. The flat rotation curve of galaxies, for example, may have a simple and natural explanation.

  7. Design, synthesis, spectral characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity studies of copper(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes of 6-amino benzothiazole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daravath, Sreenu; Kumar, Marri Pradeep; Rambabu, Aveli; Vamsikrishna, Narendrula; Ganji, Nirmala; Shivaraj

    2017-09-01

    Two novel Schiff bases, L1 = (2-benzo[d]thiazol-6-ylimino)methyl)-4,6-dichlorophenol), L2 = (1-benzo[d]thiazol-6-ylimino)methyl)-6-bromo-4-chlorophenol) and their bivalent transition metal complexes [M(L1)2] and [M(L2)2], where M = Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, IR, UV-visible, mass, magnetic moments, ESR, TGA, SEM, EDX and powder XRD. Based on the experimental data a square planar geometry around the metal ion is assigned to all the complexes (1a-2c). The interaction of synthesized metal complexes with calf thymus DNA was explored using UV-visible absorption spectra, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The experimental evidence indicated that all the metal complexes strongly bound to CT-DNA through an intercalation mode. DNA cleavage experiments of metal(II) complexes with supercoiled pBR322 DNA have also been explored by gel electrophoresis in the presence of H2O2 as well as UV light, and it is found that the Cu(II) complexes cleaved DNA more effectively compared to Co(II), Ni(II) complexes. In addition, the ligands and their metal complexes were screened for antimicrobial activity and it is found that all the metal complexes were more potent than free ligands.

  8. Genotype X environment interactions. II. Some genetical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, K

    1975-08-01

    An algebraic formulation, alternative to that of Mather and Jones (1958) and hierarchial rather than factorial in nauture, is presented for describing the differences among the phenotypes produced by a number of genotypes each grown in each of a number of environments. This formuationdoes not include terms representing statistical interactions between genotypes and environments: it depends instead on comparisons between the different genotypes in their variation over the relevant ranges of environemnts. The two-line case is considered ant eht condition established for linearity of the regress ion of genotype X enviroment interaction (g in Mather and Jones' formulation) on overall effect of the envirronment (e in Mather and Jones' formulation)...

  9. Effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of proton transfer pathways in human carbonic anhydrase II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arijit Roy; Srabani Taraphder

    2007-09-01

    We report here a theoretical study on the effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of dynamical, proton-conducting hydrogen-bonded networks in the protein HCA II. The conformational fluctuations of His-64 is found to contribute crucially to the mechanism of such path formation irrespective of the way electrostatic interactions are modelled.

  10. Transcription initiation factor IID-interactive histone chaperone CIA-II implicated in mammalian spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Takashi; Horikoshi, Masami

    2003-09-12

    Histones are thought to have specific roles in mammalian spermatogenesis, because several subtypes of histones emerge that are post-translationally modified during spermatogenesis. Though regular assembly of nucleosome is guaranteed by histone chaperones, their involvement in spermatogenesis is yet to be characterized. Here we identified a histone chaperone-related factor, which we designated as CCG1-interacting factor A-II (CIA-II), through interaction with bromodomains of TAFII250/CCG1, which is the largest subunit of human transcription initiation factor IID (TFIID). We found that human CIA-II (hCIA-II) localizes in HeLa nuclei and is highly expressed in testis and other proliferating cell-containing tissues. Expression of mouse CIA-II (mCIA-II) does not occur in the germ cell-lacking testes of adult WBB6F1-W/Wv mutant mice, indicating its expression in testis to be specific to germ cells. Fractionation of testicular germ cells revealed that mCIA-II transcripts accumulate in pachytene spermatocytes but not in spermatids. In addition, the mCIA-II transcripts in testis were present as early as 4 days after birth and decreased at 56 days after birth. These findings indicate that mCIA-II expression in testis is restricted to premeiotic to meiotic stages during spermatogenesis. Also, we found that hCIA-II interacts with histone H3 in vivo and with histones H3/H4 in vitro and that it facilitates supercoiling of circular DNA when it is incubated with core histones and topoisomerase I in vitro. These data suggest that CIA-II is a histone chaperone and is implicated in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  11. Transboundary water interaction II: the influence of 'soft' power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeitoun, M.; Mirumachi, N.; Warner, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to broaden the analysis of transboundary water interaction, by examining and interpreting the influence of ‘soft’ power therein. The ‘soft’ power of persuasion is understood to be exercised through discursive and to a lesser extent ideational means, and is interpreted in terms of

  12. ACII 2009, Affective Computing & Intelligent Interaction : Proceedings Volume II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühl, Christian; Heylen, Dirk; Nijholt, Anton

    2009-01-01

    These are the proceedings of ABCI 2009, Affective Brain Computer Interfaces, a workshop that was organized in conjunction with ACII 2009, the International Conference on Affective Computation and Intelligent Interaction, held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 2009. The workshop took place on

  13. Transboundary water interaction II: the influence of 'soft' power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeitoun, M.; Mirumachi, N.; Warner, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to broaden the analysis of transboundary water interaction, by examining and interpreting the influence of ‘soft’ power therein. The ‘soft’ power of persuasion is understood to be exercised through discursive and to a lesser extent ideational means, and is interpreted in terms of co

  14. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moutsianas, Loukas; Jostins, Luke; Beecham, Ashley H;

    2015-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on ...

  15. Interaction of coffee compounds with serum albumins. Part II: Diterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guercia, Elena; Forzato, Cristina; Navarini, Luciano; Berti, Federico

    2016-05-15

    Cafestol and 16-O-methylcafestol are diterpenes present in coffee, but whilst cafestol is found in both Coffea canephora and Coffea arabica, 16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC) was reported to be specific of only C. canephora. The interactions of such compounds, with serum albumins, have been studied. Three albumins have been considered, namely human serum albumin (HSA), fatty acid free HSA (ffHSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The proteins interact with the diterpenes at the interface between Sudlow site I and the fatty acid binding site 6 in a very peculiar way, leading to a significant change in the secondary structure. The diterpenes do not displace reference binding drugs of site 2, but rather they enhance the affinity of the site for the drugs. They, therefore, may alter the pharmacokinetic profile of albumin - bound drugs.

  16. Study of Interaction Platinum Salts (Ii and Palladium (Ii on the Biologically Active Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmat Nizami Kyzy Azizova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studied complexing ability of platinum (II and palladium (II with a time of personal gray-oxygen and sulfur-containing ligands donor nitrogens in different taniyah. A combination of functional groups. It is found that the complexation unimportant role nature of the starting metal salts, the pH of the medium, the nature of the solvent and the ratio of reactants. Determine the actual denticity tiodiuksusnoy, tiodipro propionic acid, mercaptoethanol, and bis -- hydroxyethyl sulfide. Discovered that a molecule entering the reaction of cysteamine origin walks splitting S–S communication and the resulting deproto-bined mercamine enter into complexation. In non-aqueous medium splitting S–S communication occurs.

  17. Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II interacts with the leucin rich repeat of NLR family member Ipaf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Cividini

    Full Text Available IMP/GMP preferring cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II is a bifunctional enzyme whose activities and expression play crucial roles in nucleotide pool maintenance, nucleotide-dependent pathways and programmed cell death. Alignment of primary amino acid sequences of cN-II from human and other organisms show a strong conservation throughout the entire vertebrata taxon suggesting a fundamental role in eukaryotic cells. With the aim to investigate the potential role of this homology in protein-protein interactions, a two hybrid system screening of cN-II interactors was performed in S. cerevisiae. Among the X positive hits, the Leucin Rich Repeat (LRR domain of Ipaf was found to interact with cN-II. Recombinant Ipaf isoform B (lacking the Nucleotide Binding Domain was used in an in vitro affinity chromatography assay confirming the interaction obtained in the screening. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation with proteins from wild type Human Embryonic Kidney 293 T cells demonstrated that endogenous cN-II co-immunoprecipitated both with wild type Ipaf and its LRR domain after transfection with corresponding expression vectors, but not with Ipaf lacking the LRR domain. These results suggest that the interaction takes place through the LRR domain of Ipaf. In addition, a proximity ligation assay was performed in A549 lung carcinoma cells and in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and showed a positive cytosolic signal, confirming that this interaction occurs in human cells. This is the first report of a protein-protein interaction involving cN-II, suggesting either novel functions or an additional level of regulation of this complex enzyme.

  18. Understanding Dermatan Sulfate-Heparin Cofactor II Interaction through Virtual Library Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, Arjun; Mosier, Philip D; Desai, Umesh R

    2010-09-09

    Dermatan sulfate, an important member of the glycosaminoglycan family, interacts with heparin cofactor II, a member of the serpin family of proteins, to modulate antithrombotic response. Yet, the nature of this interaction remains poorly understood at a molecular level. We report the genetic algorithm-based combinatorial virtual library screening study of a natural, high-affinity dermatan sulfate hexasaccharide with heparin cofactor II. Of the 192 topologies possible for the hexasaccharide, only 16 satisfied the "high-specificity" criteria used in computational study. Of these, 13 topologies were predicted to bind in the heparin-binding site of heparin cofactor II at a ∼60° angle to helix D, a novel binding mode. This new binding geometry satisfies all known solution and mutagenesis data and supports thrombin ternary complexation through a template mechanism. The study is expected to facilitate the design of allosteric agonists of heparin cofactor II as antithrombotic agents.

  19. Deciphering protein-protein interactions. Part II. Computational methods to predict protein and domain interaction partners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Panchenko, Anna R

    2007-01-01

    .... In this review we describe different approaches to predict protein interaction partners as well as highlight recent achievements in the prediction of specific domains mediating protein-protein interactions...

  20. A STUDY ON INTERACTION OF Cd(II) AND DIATOMACEOUS EARTH IN ADSORPTION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Nuryono, Nuryono; Suyanta, Suyanta

    2010-01-01

    In this research, interaction occurring in adsorption process between Cd(II) and active site of diatomaceous earth has been studied. The study was carried out by evaluating Cd(II) adsorption on diatomaceous earth at various pHs, either for the earths without treatment, those after being heated or those treated with sulfuric acid and hydrogen chloride. Adsorption was performed by mixing diatomaceous earth, without and with treatments, and Cd(II) solution for one hour at various pHs (2 - 7), an...

  1. Beta-scorpion toxin effects suggest electrostatic interactions in domain II of voltage-dependent sodium channels. : Electrostatic interactions between segments IIS2, IIS3 and IIS4 of Na+ channel.

    OpenAIRE

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Cestèle, Sandrine

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Beta-scorpion toxins specifically modulate the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by acting through a voltage-sensor trapping model. We used mutagenesis, functional analysis and the action of beta-toxin as tools to investigate the existence and role in channel activation of molecular interactions between the charged residues of the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II of sodium channels. Mutating to arginine the acidic residues of the S2 and S3 transmembran...

  2. Model membrane interaction and DNA-binding of antimicrobial peptide Lasioglossin II derived from bee venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Lee, Meryl; Sivaraman, J; Chatterjee, Chiradip

    2013-01-01

    Lasioglossins, a new family of antimicrobial peptide, have been shown to have strong antimicrobial activity with low haemo-lytic and mast cell degranulation activity, and exhibit cytotoxic activity against various cancer cells in vitro. In order to understand the active conformation of these pentadecapeptides in membranes, we have studied the interaction of Lasioglossin II (LL-II), one of the members of Lasioglossins family with membrane mimetic micelle Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) by fluorescence, Circular Dichroism (CD) and two dimensional (2D) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Fluorescence experiments provide evidence of interaction of the N-terminal tryptophan residue of LL-II with the hydrophobic core of DPC micelle. CD results show an extended chain conformation of LL-II in water which is converted to a partial helical conformation in the presence of DPC micelle. Moreover we have determined the first three-dimensional NMR structure of LL-II bound to DPC micelle with rmsd of 0.36Å. The solution structure of LL-II shows hydrophobic and hydrophilic core formation in peptide pointing towards different direction in the presence of DPC. This amphipathic structure may allow this peptide to penetrate deeply into the interfacial region of negatively charged membranes and leading to local membrane destabilization. Further we have elucidated the DNA binding ability of LL-II by agarose gel retardation and fluorescence quenching experiments.

  3. Acceleration and Particle Field Interactions of Cosmic Rays II: Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A; Ghoneim, M T; Hady, A

    2010-01-01

    Based on the generic acceleration model, which suggests different types of electromagnetic interactions between the cosmic charged particles and the different configurations of the electromagnetic (plasma) fields, the ultra high energy cosmic rays are studied. The plasma fields are assumed to vary, spatially and temporally. The well-known Fermi accelerations are excluded. Seeking for simplicity, it is assumed that the energy loss due to different physical processes is negligibly small. The energy available to the plasma sector is calculated in four types of electromagnetic fields. It has been found that the drift in a time--varying magnetic field is extremely energetic. The energy scale widely exceeds the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff. The polarization drift in a time--varying electric field is also able to raise the energy of cosmic rays to an extreme value. It can be compared with the Hillas mechanism. The drift in a spatially--varying magnetic field is almost as strong as the polarization drift. The...

  4. QGSjet II and EPOS hadronic interaction models: comparison with the Yakutsk EAS array data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knurenko, S.P.; Sabourov, A.V. [Yu. G. Shafer Institute for Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-15

    Various hadronic interaction models were used in extensive air showers simulations. This resulted in ambiguous estimation of primary energy, cosmic ray flux intensity, mass composition, etc. Several revisions of models have been made recently; for example, third major version of QGSjet II (QGSjet II-03) model was released, new models based on actual accelerator data appeared (EPOS). Employment of newer models always leads to new comprehension of experimental results. Nevertheless, in this case there still is some ambiguity. It is a matter of how correct does the model extrapolate characteristics of primary particle interaction with nuclei of the air from high energies to ultra-high.

  5. Asphericity, Interaction, and Dust in the Type II-P/II-L Supernova 2013ej in Messier 74

    CERN Document Server

    Mauerhan, Jon C; Johansson, Joel; Hu, Maokai; Fox, Ori D; Wang, Lifan; Graham, Melissa L; Filippenko, Alexei V; Shivvers, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    SN 2013ej is a well-studied core-collapse supernova (SN) that stemmed from a directly identified red supergiant (RSG) progenitor in galaxy M74. The source exhibits signs of substantial geometric asphericity, X-rays from persistent interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), thermal emission from warm dust, and a light curve that appears intermediate between supernovae of Types II-P and II-L. The proximity of this source motivates a close inspection of these physical characteristics and their potential interconnection. We present multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SN 2013ej during the first 107 days, and deep optical spectroscopy and ultraviolet through infrared photometry past ~800 days. SN 2013ej exhibits the strongest and most persistent continuum and line polarization ever observed for a SN of its class during the recombination phase. Modeling indicates that the data are consistent with an oblate ellipsoidal photosphere, viewed nearly edge-on, and probably augmented by optical scattering from circumstell...

  6. Asphericity, Interaction, and Dust in the Type II-P/II-L Supernova 2013EJ in Messier 74

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauerhan, Jon C.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Johansson, Joel; Hu, Maokai; Fox, Ori D.; Wang, Lifan; Graham, Melissa L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Shivvers, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    SN 2013ej is a well-studied core-collapse supernova (SN) that stemmed from a directly identified red supergiant (RSG) progenitor in galaxy M74. The source exhibits signs of substantial geometric asphericity, X-rays from persistent interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), thermal emission from warm dust, and a light curve that appears intermediate between supernovae of Types II-P and II-L. The proximity of this source motivates a close inspection of these physical characteristics and their potential interconnection. We present multiepoch spectropolarimetry of SN 2013ej during the first 107 days and deep optical spectroscopy and ultraviolet through infrared photometry past ∼800 days. SN 2013ej exhibits the strongest and most persistent continuum and line polarization ever observed for a SN of its class during the recombination phase. Modeling indicates that the data are consistent with an oblate ellipsoidal photosphere, viewed nearly edge-on and probably augmented by optical scattering from circumstellar dust. We suggest that interaction with an equatorial distribution of CSM, perhaps the result of binary evolution, is responsible for generating the photospheric asphericity. Relatedly, our late-time optical imaging and spectroscopy show that asymmetric CSM interaction is ongoing, and the morphology of broad Hα emission from shock-excited ejecta provides additional evidence that the geometry of the interaction region is ellipsoidal. Alternatively, a prolate ellipsoidal geometry from an intrinsically bipolar explosion is also a plausible interpretation of the data but would probably require a ballistic jet of radioactive material capable of penetrating the hydrogen envelope early in the recombination phase. Finally, our latest space-based optical imaging confirms that the late interaction-powered light curve dropped below the stellar progenitor level, confirming the RSG star’s association with the explosion.

  7. Interactions among energy consumption, economic development and greenhouse gas emissions in Japan after World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long-term dynamic changes in the triad, energy consumption, economic development, and Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, in Japan after World War II were quantified, and the interactions among them were analyzed based on an integrated suite of energy, emergy and economic indices...

  8. Extended-soft-core baryon-baryon model. II. Hyperon-nucleon interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, T.A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The YN results are presented from the extended soft-core (ESC) interactions. They consist of local and nonlocal potentials because of (i) one-boson exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar, vector, scalar, and axial mesons; (ii) diffractive exchanges; (iii) two-pseudoscalar

  9. Interactions among energy consumption, economic development and greenhouse gas emissions in Japan after World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long-term dynamic changes in the triad, energy consumption, economic development, and Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, in Japan after World War II were quantified, and the interactions among them were analyzed based on an integrated suite of energy, emergy and economic indices...

  10. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and witho

  11. Interaction of copper (II) complexes by bovine serum albumin: spectroscopic and calorimetric insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Pagariya, Darshana; Jain, Surbhi; Naik, Sunil; Kishore, Nand

    2017-07-28

    Serum albumins being the most abundant proteins in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid are significant carriers of essential transition metal ions in the human body. Studies of copper (II) complexes have gained attention because of their potential applications in synthetic, biological, and industrial processes. Study of binding interactions of such bioinorganic complexes with serum albumins improves our understanding of biomolecular recognition process essential for rational drug design. In the present investigation, we have applied quantitative approach to explore interactions of novel synthesized copper (II) complexes viz. [Cu(L(1))(L(2))ClO4] (complex I), [Cu(L(2))(L(3))]ClO4] (complex II) and [Cu(L(4))2(H2O)2] (complex III) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) to evaluate their binding characteristics, site and mode of interaction. The fluorescence quenching of BSA initiated by complexation has been observed to be static in nature. The binding interactions are endothermic driven by entropic factors as confirmed by high sensitivity isothermal titration calorimetry. Changes in secondary and tertiary structure of protein have been studied by circular dichroism and significant reduction in α-helical content of BSA was observed upon binding. Site marking experiments with warfarin and ibuprofen indicated that copper complexes bind at site II of the protein.

  12. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun-Ping; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and

  13. New dinuclear copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes for the investigation of sugar-metal ion interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Manindranath; Patra, Ayan

    2011-10-18

    We have studied the binding interactions of biologically important carbohydrates (D-glucose, D-xylose and D-mannose) with the newly synthesized five-coordinate dinuclear copper(II) complex, [Cu(2)(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (1) and zinc(II) complex, [Zn(2)(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (2) [H(3)hpnbpda=N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-hydroxy-1,3-propanediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid] in aqueous alkaline solution. The complexes 1 and 2 are fully characterized both in solid and solution using different analytical techniques. A geometrical optimization was made of the ligand H(3)hpnbpda and the complexes 1 and 2 by molecular mechanics (MM+) method in order to establish the stable conformations. All carbohydrates bind to the metal complexes in a 1:1 molar ratio. The binding events have been investigated by a combined approach of FTIR, UV-vis and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. UV-vis spectra indicate a significant blue shift of the absorption maximum of complex 1 during carbohydrate coordination highlighting the sugar binding ability of complex 1. The apparent binding constants of the substrate-bound copper(II) complexes have been determined from the UV-vis titration experiments. The binding ability and mode of binding of these sugar substrates with complex 2 are indicated by their characteristic coordination induced shift (CIS) values in (13)C NMR spectra for carbon atoms C1, C2, and C3 of sugar substrates.

  14. Synthesis and characterisation of platinum (II) salphen complex and its interaction with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukri, Shahratul Ain Mohd; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43650 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A platinum (II) salphen complex was synthesised by condensation reaction of 2,4-dihydroxylbenzaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine with potassium tetrachloroplatinate to obtain N,N′-Bis-4-(hydroxysalicylidene)-phenylenediamine-platinum (II). The structure of the complex was confirmed by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, CHN elemental analyses and ESI-MS spectrometry. The platinum (II) salphen complex with four donor atoms N{sub 2}O{sub 2} from its salphen ligand coordinated to platinum (II) metal centre were determined. The binding mode and interaction of this complex with calf thymus DNA was determined by UV/Vis DNA titration and emission titration. The intercalation between the DNA bases by π-π stacking due to its square planar geometry and aromatic rings structures was proposed.

  15. Synthesis and characterisation of platinum (II) salphen complex and its interaction with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukri, Shahratul Ain Mohd; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd

    2014-09-01

    A platinum (II) salphen complex was synthesised by condensation reaction of 2,4-dihydroxylbenzaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine with potassium tetrachloroplatinate to obtain N,N'-Bis-4-(hydroxysalicylidene)-phenylenediamine-platinum (II). The structure of the complex was confirmed by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, CHN elemental analyses and ESI-MS spectrometry. The platinum (II) salphen complex with four donor atoms N2O2 from its salphen ligand coordinated to platinum (II) metal centre were determined. The binding mode and interaction of this complex with calf thymus DNA was determined by UV/Vis DNA titration and emission titration. The intercalation between the DNA bases by π-π stacking due to its square planar geometry and aromatic rings structures was proposed.

  16. The use of MAVIS II to integrate the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, R.; Kwon, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    The MAVIS II computer program provides for the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions. This report describes the individual components of the program and how MAVIS II is used with other available tools to integrate the design and understanding of explosive valves. The rationale and model used for each valve interaction is described. Comparisons of the calculated results with available data have demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of using MAVIS II for analytical studies of explosive valve interactions. The model used for the explosive or pyrotechnic used as the driving force in explosive valves is the most critical to be understood and modeled. MAVIS II is an advanced version that incorporates a plastic, as well as elastic, modeling of the deformations experienced when plungers are forced into a bore. The inclusion of a plastic model has greatly expanded the use of MAVIS for all categories (opening, closure, or combined) of valves, especially for the closure valves in which the sealing operation requires the plastic deformation of either a plunger or bore over a relatively large area. In order to increase its effectiveness, the use of MAVIS II should be integrated with the results from available experimental hardware. Test hardware such as the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Velocity Generator test provide experimental data for accurate comparison of the actual valve functions. Variable Explosive Chamber (VEC) and Constant Explosive Volume (CEV) tests are used to provide the proper explosive equation-of-state for the MAVIS calculations of the explosive driving forces. The rationale and logistics of this integration is demonstrated through an example. A recent valve design is used to demonstrate how MAVIS II can be integrated with experimental tools to provide an understanding of the interactions in this valve.

  17. Mechanistic understanding and significance of small peptides interaction with MHC class II molecules for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Saifullah; Hoessli, Daniel C; Hameed, Muhammad Waqar

    2016-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are expressed by antigen-presenting cells and stimulate CD4(+) T cells, which initiate humoral immune responses. Over the past decade, interest has developed to therapeutically impact the peptides to be exposed to CD4(+) T cells. Structurally diverse small molecules have been discovered that act on the endogenous peptide exchanger HLA-DM by different mechanisms. Exogenously delivered peptides are highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage in vivo; however, it is only when successfully incorporated into stable MHC II-peptide complexes that these peptides can induce an immune response. Many of the small molecules so far discovered have highlighted the molecular interactions mediating the formation of MHC II-peptide complexes. As potential drugs, these small molecules open new therapeutic approaches to modulate MHC II antigen presentation pathways and influence the quality and specificity of immune responses. This review briefly introduces how CD4(+) T cells recognize antigen when displayed by MHC class II molecules, as well as MHC class II-peptide-loading pathways, structural basis of peptide binding and stabilization of the peptide-MHC complexes. We discuss the concept of MHC-loading enhancers, how they could modulate immune responses and how these molecules have been identified. Finally, we suggest mechanisms whereby MHC-loading enhancers could act upon MHC class II molecules.

  18. Functional Interaction between Class II Histone Deacetylases and ICP0 of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomonte, Patrick; Thomas, Joëlle; Texier, Pascale; Caron, Cécile; Khochbin, Saadi; Epstein, Alberto L.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the physical and functional interactions between ICP0 of herpes simplex virus type 1 and class II histone deacetylases (HDACs) 4, 5, and 7. Class II HDACs are mainly known for their participation in the control of cell differentiation through the regulation of the activity of the transcription factor MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2), implicated in muscle development and neuronal survival. Immunofluorescence experiments performed on transfected cells showed that ICP0 colocalizes with and reorganizes the nuclear distribution of ectopically expressed class I and II HDACs. In addition, endogenous HDAC4 and at least one of its binding partners, the corepressor protein SMRT (for silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptor), undergo changes in their nuclear distribution in ICP0-transfected cells. As a result, during infection endogenous HDAC4 colocalizes with ICP0. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays confirmed that class II but not class I HDACs specifically interacted with ICP0 through their amino-terminal regions. This region, which is not conserved in class I HDACs but homologous to the MITR (MEF2-interacting transcription repressor) protein, is responsible for the repression, in a deacetylase-independent manner, of MEF2 by sequestering it under an inactive form in the nucleus. Consequently, we show that ICP0 is able to overcome the HDAC5 amino-terminal- and MITR-induced MEF2A repression in gene reporter assays. This is the first report of a viral protein interacting with and controlling the repressor activity of class II HDACs. We discuss the putative consequences of such an interaction for the biology of the virus both during lytic infection and reactivation from latency. PMID:15194749

  19. Validation of Multibody Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II Parachute Simulation with Interacting Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Queen, Eric M.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.

    2009-01-01

    A capability to simulate trajectories of multiple interacting rigid bodies has been developed, tested and validated. This capability uses the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2). The standard version of POST 2 allows trajectory simulation of multiple bodies without force interaction. In the current implementation, the force interaction between the parachute and the suspended bodies has been modeled using flexible lines, allowing accurate trajectory simulation of the individual bodies in flight. The POST 2 multibody capability is intended to be general purpose and applicable to any parachute entry trajectory simulation. This research paper explains the motivation for multibody parachute simulation, discusses implementation methods, and presents validation of this capability.

  20. Interaction of Lubricin with Collagen II Surfaces: Adsorption, Friction, and Normal Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Debby P.; Guilak, Farshid; Jay, Gregory; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    One of the major constituents of the synovial fluid that is thought to be responsible for chondroprotection and boundary lubrication is the glycoprotein lubricin (PRG4); however, the molecular mechanisms by which lubricin carries out its critical functions still remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that the interaction of lubricin with type II collagen, the main component of the cartilage extracellular matrix, results in enhanced tribological and wear properties. In this study, we examined: i) the molecular details by which lubricin interacts with type II collagen and how binding is related to boundary lubrication and adhesive interactions; and, ii) whether collagen structure can affect lubricin adsorption and its chondroprotective properties. We found that lubricin adsorbs strongly onto denatured, amorphous, and fibrillar collagen surfaces. Furthermore, we found large repulsive interactions between the collagen surfaces in presence of lubricin, which increased with increasing lubricin concentration. Lubricin attenuated the large friction and also the long-range adhesion between fibrillar collagen surfaces. Interestingly, lubricin adsorbed onto and mediated the frictional response between the denatured and native amorphous collagen surfaces equally and showed no preference on the supramolecular architecture of collagen. However, the coefficient of friction was lowest on fibrillar collagen in the presence of lubricin. We speculate that an important role of lubricin in mediating interactions at the cartilage surface is to attach to the cartilage surface and provide a protective coating that maintains the contacting surfaces in a sterically repulsive state. PMID:24406099

  1. Interaction of lubricin with type II collagen surfaces: adsorption, friction, and normal forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Debby P; Guilak, Farshid; Jay, Gregory D; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    One of the major constituents of the synovial fluid that is thought to be responsible for chondroprotection and boundary lubrication is the glycoprotein lubricin (PRG4); however, the molecular mechanisms by which lubricin carries out its critical functions still remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that the interaction of lubricin with type II collagen, the main component of the cartilage extracellular matrix, results in enhanced tribological and wear properties. In this study, we examined: (i) the molecular details by which lubricin interacts with type II collagen and how binding is related to boundary lubrication and adhesive interactions; and (ii) whether collagen structure can affect lubricin adsorption and its chondroprotective properties. We found that lubricin adsorbs strongly onto denatured, amorphous, and fibrillar collagen surfaces. Furthermore, we found large repulsive interactions between the collagen surfaces in presence of lubricin, which increased with increasing lubricin concentration. Lubricin attenuated the large friction and also the long-range adhesion between fibrillar collagen surfaces. Interestingly, lubricin adsorbed onto and mediated the frictional response between the denatured and native amorphous collagen surfaces equally and showed no preference on the supramolecular architecture of collagen. However, the coefficient of friction was lowest on fibrillar collagen in the presence of lubricin. We speculate that an important role of lubricin in mediating interactions at the cartilage surface is to attach to the cartilage surface and provide a protective coating that maintains the contacting surfaces in a sterically repulsive state.

  2. Starburst in the interacting HII galaxy II Zw 40 and in non-interacting HII galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Telles, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    I summarize the results of our integral field spectroscopic observations of the nearby prototype of HII galaxies, II Zw 40. Observations with GMOS-IFU on GEMINI-North in the optical allowed us to make a detailed kinematic picture of the central starburst, while SINFONI with adaptive optics on the ESO-VLT gave us a near-IR view of the interplay between the ISM phases. Here, I also address the question that not all starbursts require an external trigger such as a galaxy-galaxy encounter, as it seems to be the case for a fraction of low luminosity HII galaxies. We speculate that these may form stars spontaneously like "pop-corn in a pan".

  3. PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

  4. Synapsin II desynchronizes neurotransmitter release at inhibitory synapses by interacting with presynaptic calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrihan, Lucian; Cesca, Fabrizia; Raimondi, Andrea; Lignani, Gabriele; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    In the central nervous system, most synapses show a fast mode of neurotransmitter release known as synchronous release followed by a phase of asynchronous release, which extends over tens of milliseconds to seconds. Synapsin II (SYN2) is a member of the multigene synapsin family (SYN1/2/3) of synaptic vesicle phosphoproteins that modulate synaptic transmission and plasticity, and are mutated in epileptic patients. Here we report that inhibitory synapses of the dentate gyrus of Syn II knockout mice display an upregulation of synchronous neurotransmitter release and a concomitant loss of delayed asynchronous release. Syn II promotes γ-aminobutyric acid asynchronous release in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner by a functional interaction with presynaptic Ca(2+) channels, revealing a new role in synaptic transmission for synapsins.

  5. Synthesis of dihydromyricetin-manganese (II) complex and interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingquan; Yuan, Juan; Zeng, Jinhua; He, Xiangzhu; Li, Daguang

    2012-11-01

    Dihydromyricetin has many physiological functions and its metal complex could have better effects. DNA is very important in biological body, but little attention has been devoted to the relationship between dihydromyricetin-metal complex and the DNA. In this paper, dihydromyricetin-Mn (II) complex has been prepared and characterized using UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TG-DTA Analysis). The interaction of dihydromyricetin-Mn (II) complex with DNA was investigated using UV-vis spectra, fluorescence measurements and viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the dihydromyricetin-manganese (II) complex can intercalate into the stacked base pairs of DNA with binding constant Kb = 5.64 × 104 M and compete with the strong intercalator ethidium bromide for the intercalative binding sites with Stern-Volmer quenching constant, Ksq = 1.16.

  6. Copper(II) ions interactions in the systems with triamines and ATP. Potentiometric and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Bregier-Jarzebowska, R; Gasowska, A; Zalewska, A; Lomozik, L

    2017-09-09

    The mode of interaction and thermodynamic stability of complexes formed in binary and ternary Cu(II)/ATP/triamines systems were studied using potentiometric and spectroscopic (NMR, EPR, UV-Vis) methods. It was found that in binary metal-free systems ATP/HxPA species are formed (PA: Spd=spermidine or 3,3-tri=1,7-diamino-4-azaheptane) where the phosphate groups from nucleotides are preferred negative centers and protonated amine groups of amines are positive centers of reaction. In the ternary systems Cu/ATP/Hx(PA) as well as Cu/(ATP)(PA) species are formed. The type of the formed Cu(II) complexes depends on pH of the solution. For a low pH value the complexation appears between Cu(II) and ATP molecules via oxygen atoms of phosphate groups. For a very high pH value, where ATP is hydrolyzed, the Cu(II) ions are bound to the nitrogen atoms of polyamine molecules. We did not detect any direct coordination of the N7 nitrogen atom of adenosine to Cu(II) ions. It means that the CuN7 interaction is an indirect type and can be due to noncovalent interplay including water molecule. EPR studies were performed at glassy state (77K) after a fast freezing both for binary and ternary systems. The glassy state EPR spectra do not reflect species identified in titration studies indicating significant effect of rapid temperature decrease on equilibrium of Cu(II) complexes. We propose the molecular structure of all the studied complexes at the glassy state deduced from EPR and optical spectroscopy results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Iron(II) Ion Interactions on Silicon Nanoparticle Electronic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantey, Kevin; Nayfeh, Munir

    2010-03-01

    A better understanding of the interaction of silicon nanoparticles with ions can lead to diverse applications including biomedical sensing, filtering, and optoelectronics. Density functional theory is employed to investigate a simple ion test case, the interaction of an Iron(II) ion with a 1nm silicon nanoparticle (Si29H24). In the ground state the iron atom is found to sit below a six membered silicon ring on the particle surface. The effect on the molecular orbitals and charge distribution is presented, and time dependent density functional theory is used to investigate the excited state energy levels and oscillator strengths compared to the silicon nanoparticle alone. Absorption measurements of Iron(II) ions in solution with silicon nanoparticles are made for comparison.

  8. Islamic Educational Transformation through Inmate Social Interaction at Palu Correctional Facility Class II A, Central Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation system adopted by correctional facility is based on Pancasila. All incarcerated men are rehabilitated there with the goal to make them repent, be law-abiding citizens, and uphold moral values. Correctional facility comes as a rehabilitation place to improve social interaction so that inmates can be received by their social environment once they are released from prison. At this point, the researcher focuses on Islamic educational transformation through inmate social interaction training program at Palu correctional facility class II A. This research uses descriptive quantitative design with social legal approach to observe patterns of inmate social interaction. The result of research points out that Islamic educational transformation which is packed into rehabilitation programs and correctional educational activities is remarkably emphasized in inmate social interaction. In this case, Islamic educational transformation applied in Palu correctional facility class II A is defined as ultimum remidium, correctional activities emphasizing on process-based approach. Rehabilitation process given to inmates is able to improve insight and awareness of ethical and moral values in their social interaction. Therefore, when returning to society they can be accepted by social environtment as good responsible people.

  9. Interaction of Bis-Zn(II) salphen complex with calf thymus-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yussof, Aida Mastura Binti Mohd; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd

    2014-09-01

    Metal salphen family has been extensively studied over the past few years and has been reported to be good DNA stabilizers due to its high binding affinity. Binding studies of metal complex with DNA are useful for understanding the interaction mechanism and to provide an insight about the application and design of a novel effective drug target to DNA. In this study, a bis-zinc (II) salphen metal complex derived from 4-methyl-2,6-diformylphenol and 1,2-diaminobenzene (H2L) via condensation reactions has been synthesised. The zinc(II) macrocyclic complex is characterised using standard spectroscopic and structural techniques such as 1H NMR spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. The binding interaction between the synthesised metal complex with calf thymus-DNA (ct-DNA) has been investigated by preliminary UV/Vis DNA study. From the preliminary UV/Vis DNA study, it shows that Bis-Zn(II) salphen complex has interaction with ct-DNA.

  10. Uncovering the Sensitivity of Amide-II Vibration to Peptide-Ion Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Wang, Jianping

    2016-09-15

    In this work, linear infrared spectroscopy was used to examine the effect of salt on the amide-II mode in a model β-peptide (N-ethylpropionamide, NEPA) in its deuterated form, to reveal the sensitivity of this mode in reporting peptide-ion interactions. In comparison to the case of NEPA in water, the amide-II spectra mainly showed a red-shifted component in four typical saline solutions (NaCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, and AlCl3) examined in this work. Our results suggest that highly populated hydrated ion complexes under high salt concentration conditions destroy the hydration layer of the model peptide and result in mostly a salting-out state of the peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the hydrated cation mainly interacts with the peptide backbone on the amide C═O side, whereas the hydrated anion interacts on the amide N-H side. As the amide-II mode is mainly a combination of the C-N stretching and N-H in-plane-bending vibrations, this mode is advantageous in being responsive to ionic interaction from both the C═O and N-H sides. Such a dual sensitivity should be very useful in probing the breaking and/or formation of the interamide hydrogen bond between the C═O and N-H groups, which is a very important interaction involved in the solvation and stabilization, as well as folding/unfolding of proteins.

  11. Interaction of angiotensin II with the C-terminal 300-320 fragment of the rat angiotensin II receptor AT1a monitored by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Nicola; Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Lozzi, Luisa; Neri, Paolo; Valensin, Daniela; Valensin, Gianni

    2003-10-01

    Interaction between angiotensin II (Ang II) and the fragment peptide 300-320 (fCT300-320) of the rat angiotensin II receptor AT1a was demonstrated by relaxation measurements, NOE effects, chemical shift variations, and CD measurements. The correlation times modulating dipolar interactions for the bound and free forms of Ang II were estimated by the ratio of the nonselective and single-selective longitudinal relaxation rates. The intermolecular NOEs observed in NOESY spectra between HN protons of 9Lys(fCT) and 6His(ang), 10Phe(fCT) and 8Phe(ang), HN proton of 3Tyr(fCT) and Halpha of 4Tyr(ang), 5Phe(fCT)Hdelta and Halpha of 4Tyr(ang) indicated that Ang II aromatic residues are directly involved in the interaction, as also verified by relaxation data. Some fCT300-320 backbone features were inferred by the CSI method and CD experiments revealing that the presence of Ang II enhances the existential probability of helical conformations in the fCT fragment. Restrained molecular dynamics using the simulated annealing protocol was performed with intermolecular NOEs as constraints, imposing an alpha-helix backbone structure to fCT300-320 fragment. In the built model, one strongly preferred interaction was found that allows intermolecular stacking between aromatic rings and forces the peptide to wrap around the 6Leu side chain of the receptor fragment.

  12. Optical probing of spin-dependent interactions in II-VI semiconductor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaj, J.A.; Golnik, A.; Goryca, M.; Kossacki, P.; Kowalik, K.; Kudelski, A.; Maslana, W.; Nawrocki, M.; Pacuski, W.; Plochocka, P.; Senellart, P. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warszawa (Poland); Cibert, J.; Ferrand, D.; Tatarenko, S. [CNRS-CEA-UJF Joint Group ' ' Nanophysique et semiconducteurs' ' , Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique, BP 87, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Karczewski, G.; Kossut, J.; Kutrowski, M. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Krebs, O.; Lemaitre, A.; Voisin, P. [Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures, CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Wojtowicz, T.

    2006-03-15

    We present a selection of optical experiments, providing information on several spin-dependent interactions in II-VI semiconductor structures. Exciton-exciton and exciton-carrier interactions were studied by time-resolved picosecond pump-probe measurements. Several examples of recent studies involving ion-carrier exchange interaction in quantum wells and layers are discussed, concerning the quest for room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors, spin temperature of Mn ions in (Cd,Mn)Te quantum wells, and spin relaxation in such wells under pulsed magnetic field. Finally, anisotropic electron-hole exchange in semiconductor quantum dots is discussed in the context of efforts to obtain generation of entangled photon pairs in a biexciton-exciton cascade in a semiconductor quantum dot. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Interactions of Francisella tularensis with Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and the Murine Respiratory Epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Faron

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is classified as a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC due to its low infectious dose and the possibility that the organism can be used as a bioweapon. The low dose of infection suggests that Francisella is unusually efficient at evading host defenses. Although ~50 cfu are necessary to cause human respiratory infection, the early interactions of virulent Francisella with the lung environment are not well understood. To provide additional insights into these interactions during early Francisella infection of mice, we performed TEM analysis on mouse lungs infected with F. tularensis strains Schu S4, LVS and the O-antigen mutant Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn. For all three strains, the majority of the bacteria that we could detect were observed within alveolar type II epithelial cells at 16 hours post infection. Although there were no detectable differences in the amount of bacteria within an infected cell between the three strains, there was a significant increase in the amount of cellular debris observed in the air spaces of the lungs in the Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant compared to either the Schu S4 or LVS strain. We also studied the interactions of Francisella strains with human AT-II cells in vitro by characterizing the ability of these three strains to invade and replicate within these cells. Gentamicin assay and confocal microscopy both confirmed that F. tularensis Schu S4 replicated robustly within these cells while F. tularensis LVS displayed significantly lower levels of growth over 24 hours, although the strain was able to enter these cells at about the same level as Schu S4 (1 organism per cell, as determined by confocal imaging. The Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant that we have previously described as attenuated for growth in macrophages and mouse virulence displayed interesting properties as well. This mutant induced significant airway inflammation (cell debris and had an attenuated growth phenotype in the human AT-II cells. These

  14. Potential RNA polymerase II-induced interactions of transcription factor TFIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S; Lee, D K; Roeder, R G

    1993-10-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor TFIIB is required for initiation by RNA polymerase II and serves as a target of some regulatory factors. The carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB contains a large imperfect direct repeat reminiscent of the structural organization of the TATA-binding component (TBP) of TFIID, as well as sequence homology to conserved regions of bacterial sigma factors. The present study shows that the carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB, like that of TBP, is folded into a compact protease-resistant core. The TFIIB core, unlike the TBP core, is inactive in transcription but retains structural features that enable it to form a complex with promoter-bound TFIID. The protease-susceptible amino terminus appears to contain components responsible for direct interaction with RNA polymerase II (in association with TFIIF) either on the promoter (in association with TFIID) or independently. In addition, core TFIIB (but not intact TFIIB) extends the footprint of TBP on promoter DNA, suggesting that TFIIB has a cryptic DNA-binding potential. These results are consistent with a model in which TFIIB, in a manner functionally analogous to that of bacterial sigma factors, undergoes an RNA polymerase II-dependent conformational change with resultant DNA interactions during the pathway leading to a functional preinitiation complex.

  15. SHIELD II: AGC 198507 - An Extremely Rare Low-Mass Galaxy Interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolina Borg Stevens, Karin; Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Teich, Yaron; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. New HST imaging of one of these sample galaxies, AGC 198507, has revealed it to be a very rare interacting system; to our knowledge this is one of only a few known interactions in this extreme mass range. WSRT imaging indicates that the bulk of the HI is associated with the more luminous AGC 198507, while low surface brightness gas extends toward and coincides with the less luminous companion, which is separated by roughly 1.5 kpc from AGC 198507. Here we present new VLA B configuration HI imaging that allows us to localize the HI gas, to examine the rotational dynamics of AGC 198507, and to study the nature of star formation in this unique low-mass interacting system.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  16. Calorimetric comparison of the interactions between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.

    2007-01-01

    Antigen I/II can be found on streptococcal cell surfaces and is involved in their interaction with salivary proteins. In this paper, we determine the adsorption enthalpies of salivary proteins to Streptococcus mutans LT11 and S. mutans IB03987 with and without antigen I/II, respectively, using isoth

  17. Calorimetric comparison of the interactions between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun-Ping; Belt-Gritter, van de Betsy; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Antigen I/II can be found on streptococcal cell surfaces and is involved in their interaction with salivary proteins. In this paper, we determine the adsorption enthalpies of salivary proteins to Streptococcus mutans LT 11 and S. mutans IB03987 with and without antigen I/II, respectively, using isot

  18. Calorimetric comparison of the interactions between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun-Ping; Belt-Gritter, van de Betsy; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Antigen I/II can be found on streptococcal cell surfaces and is involved in their interaction with salivary proteins. In this paper, we determine the adsorption enthalpies of salivary proteins to Streptococcus mutans LT 11 and S. mutans IB03987 with and without antigen I/II, respectively, using

  19. Calorimetric comparison of the interactions between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.

    2007-01-01

    Antigen I/II can be found on streptococcal cell surfaces and is involved in their interaction with salivary proteins. In this paper, we determine the adsorption enthalpies of salivary proteins to Streptococcus mutans LT11 and S. mutans IB03987 with and without antigen I/II, respectively, using

  20. Cytotoxicity and DNA interactions of some platinum(II) complexes with substituted benzimidazole ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Azime Berna; Utku, Semra; Gümüş, Fatma; Keskin, Ayten Çelebi; Açık, Leyla; Yılmaz, Sükran; Ozgüngör, Adeviye

    2012-06-01

    In the present study, four Pt(II) complexes with 2-ethyl (1)/or benzyl (2)/or p-chlorobenzyl (3)/or 2-phenoxymethyl (4) benzimidazole carrier ligands were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activities against the human HeLa cervix, oestrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast, and oestrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cell lines. The plasmid DNA interactions and inhibition of the BamHI restriction enzyme activities of the complexes were also studied. Complex 3 was found to be more active than carboplatin for all examined cell lines and comparable with cisplatin, except for the HeLa cell line.

  1. Chromium-chromium interaction in a binuclear mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamly, Ahmed; Gorelsky, Serge I; Gambarotta, Sandro; Korobkov, Ilia; Le Roy, Jennifer; Murugesu, Muralee

    2014-11-03

    A mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) binuclear complex, {κ(1),κ(2),κ(3)-N,P,P-cyclo[(Ph)PCH2N(CH2Ph)CH2]}2(CrCl2)[Cr(μ-Cl)(AlClMe2)]·4toluene (1), of a P2N2 cyclic ligand was obtained upon treatment of the chromium precursor with alkylaluminum. Complex 1 was accessible from either its trivalent or divalent precursors, and density functional theory calculations revealed the presence of only σ- and π-orbital interactions in the Cr-Cr bond.

  2. Nickel (II) Ions Interaction with Polynucleotides and DNA of Different GC Composition

    CERN Document Server

    Bregadze, Vasil G; Melikishvili, Sophie Z; Melikishvili, Zaza G

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the work was to study the role of GC alternative dimmers in the binding of DNA with Ni (II) ions. The method of ultraviolet difference spectroscopy has been applied to investigate Ni (II) ions interactions with DNA extracted from Clostridium perfringens, Mice liver (C3HA line), Calf thymus, Salmon sperm, Herring sperm, E.coli, Micrococcus luteus and polynucleotides Poly (dA-dT)xPoly (dA-dT), Poly (dG)x Poly (dC), Poly (dG-dC)xPoly (dG-dC). It is shown that Ni (II) ions at outer-spherical binding with DNA double helix from the side of the major groove choose more stable dimmers 3^'-C-G-5^' . . 5^'-G-C-3^' and get bound with N7 atoms of both guanines in dimmer forming G-G interstrand crosslink. It directly correlates to the process of forming point defects of Watson-Crick wrong pair type (creation of rare keto-enolic and amino-imino tautomeric forms) and depurinization.

  3. [Fe II] emissions associated with the young interacting binary UY Aurige

    CERN Document Server

    Pyo, Tae-Soo; Beck, Tracy; Davis, Christopher J; Takami, Michihiro

    2014-01-01

    We present high resolution 1.06 -- 1.28 micron spectra toward the interacting binary UY Aur obtained with GEMINI/NIFS and the AO system Altair. We have detected [FeII] $\\lambda$~1.257 micron and [He I] $\\lambda$~1.083 micron lines from both UY Aur A (the primary source) and UY Aur B (the secondary). In [Fe II] UY Aur A drives fast and widely opening outflows with an opening angle of ~ 90 degree along a position angle of ~40 degree, while UY Aur B is associated with a redshifted knot. The blueshifted and redshifted emissions show complicated structure between the primary and secondary. The radial velocities of the [Fe II] emission features are similar for UY Aur A and B: ~ -100 km/s for the blueshifted emission and ~ +130 km/s for the red-shifted component. The [He I] line profile observed toward UY Aur A comprises a central emission feature with deep absorptions at both blueshifted and redshifted velocities. These absorption features may be explained by stellar wind models. The [He I] line profile of UY Aur B...

  4. [Fe II] emissions associated with the young interacting binary UY Aurigae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyo, Tae-Soo [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hayashi, Masahiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Beck, Tracy L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Davis, Christopher J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Takami, Michihiro, E-mail: pyo@subaru.naoj.org [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-01

    We present high-resolution 1.06-1.28 μm spectra toward the interacting binary UY Aur obtained with GEMINI/NIFS and the adaptive optics system Altair. We have detected [Fe II] λ1.257 μm and He I λ1.083 μm lines from both UY Aur A (the primary source) and UY Aur B (the secondary). In [Fe II] UY Aur A drives fast and widely opening outflows with an opening angle of ∼90° along a position angle of ∼40°, while UY Aur B is associated with a redshifted knot. The blueshifted and redshifted emissions show a complicated structure between the primary and secondary. The radial velocities of the [Fe II] emission features are similar for UY Aur A and B: ∼ –100 km s{sup –1} for the blueshifted emission and ∼ +130 km s{sup –1} for the redshifted component. The He I line profile observed toward UY Aur A comprises a central emission feature with deep absorptions at both blueshifted and redshifted velocities. These absorption features may be explained by stellar wind models. The He I line profile of UY Aur B shows only an emission feature.

  5. Ni(II) complexes of arginine Schiff-bases and its interaction with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallam, S.A., E-mail: shehabsallam@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Isamilia (Egypt); Abbas, A.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Isamilia (Egypt)

    2013-04-15

    Ni(II) complexes with Schiff-bases obtained by condensation of arginine with salicylaldehyde; 2,3-; 2,4-; 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde have been synthesized using the template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and {sup 1}H NMR spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG and DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate donors and the complexes have diamagnetic square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy. -- Highlights: ► Arginine Schiff-bases and their nickel(II) complexes have been synthesized. ► Magnetic and spectral data show diamagnetic square planar and octahedral complexes. ► The complexes thermally decompose in three stages. Interaction with FM-DNA shows hyperchromism with blue shift.

  6. Intercalation of organic molecules in 2D copper (II) nitroprusside: Intermolecular interactions and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Rodríguez, A. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico); Carbonio, R.E. [INFIQC-CONICET, Departamento de Físico Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    This contribution discusses the intercalation of imidazole and its 2-ethyl derivative, and pyridine in 2D copper nitroprusside. In the interlayer region, neighboring molecules remain interacting throu gh their dipole and quadrupole moments, which supports the solid 3D crystal structure. The crystal structure of this series of intercalation compounds was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction patterns complemented with spectroscopic information. The intermolecular interactions were studied from the refined crystal structures and low temperature magnetic measurements. Due to strong attractive forces between neighboring molecules, the resulting π–π cloud overlapping enables the ferromagnetic coupling between metal centers on neighboring layers, which was actually observed for the solids containing imidazole and pyridine as intercalated molecules. For these two solids, the magnetic data were properly described with a model of six neighbors. For the solid containing 2-ethylimidazole and for 2D copper nitroprusside, a model of four neighbors in a plane is sufficient to obtain a reliable data fitting. - Highlights: • Intercalation of organic molecules in 2D copper (II) nitroprusside. • Molecular properties of intercalation compounds of 2D copper (II) nitroprusside. • Magnetic properties of hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Hybrid inorganic–organic 3D framework.

  7. The coat protein complex II, COPII, protein Sec13 directly interacts with presenilin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Anders Lade, E-mail: aln@humgen.au.dk [Department of Human Genetics, The Bartholin Building, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2009-10-23

    Mutations in the human gene encoding presenilin-1, PS1, account for most cases of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. PS1 has nine transmembrane domains and a large loop orientated towards the cytoplasm. PS1 locates to cellular compartments as endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus, vesicular structures, and plasma membrane, and is an integral member of {gamma}-secretase, a protein protease complex with specificity for intra-membranous cleavage of substrates such as {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. Here, an interaction between PS1 and the Sec13 protein is described. Sec13 takes part in coat protein complex II, COPII, vesicular trafficking, nuclear pore function, and ER directed protein sequestering and degradation control. The interaction maps to the N-terminal part of the large hydrophilic PS1 loop and the first of the six WD40-repeats present in Sec13. The identified Sec13 interaction to PS1 is a new candidate interaction for linking PS1 to secretory and protein degrading vesicular circuits.

  8. Interaction of a copper (II) complex containing an artificial sweetener (aspartame) with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2014-01-01

    A copper (II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied at physiological pH. The interaction was studied using different methods: spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment, circular dichroism (CD) and viscosimetric techniques. Hyperchromicity was observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O was observed and the binding constants (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be+89.3 kJ mol(-1) and+379.3 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Experimental results from spectroscopic methods were comparable and further supported by viscosity measurements. We suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 8×10+4 M(-1). Binding of this copper complex to DNA was found to be stronger compared to aspartame which was studied recently.

  9. Biophysical study on the interaction between two palladium(II) complexes and human serum albumin by Multispectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidifar, Maryam, E-mail: saeidifar@merc.ac.ir [Department of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Materials and Energy Research Center, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan [Department of Chemistry, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbar Saboury, Ali [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The interaction of [Pd(bpy)(n-pr-dtc)]Br (I) and ([Pd(phen)(n-pr-dtc)]Br (II) (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline and n-pr-dtc=n-propyldithiocarbamate) with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using fluorescence, UV–vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy techniques under simulative physiological conditions (pH=7.4). It was observed that the two complexes interact with HSA via static fluorescence quenching. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding process was spontaneous and that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces play a major role in the association of the HSA–Pd(II) complexes. The activation energy (E{sub a}), binding constant (K{sub b}) and number of binding sites (n) of the HSA–Pd(II) complexes were calculated from fluorescence data at 293 K, 303 K and 311 K. The conformational alternations of protein secondary structure in the presence of Pd(II) complexes were demonstrated using synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, UV–vis absorption and circular dichroism techniques. Furthermore, the apparent distance between donor (HSA) and acceptor (Pd(II) complexes) was determined using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The binding studies between these complexes and HSA give us key insights into the transportation, distribution and toxicity of newly design antitumor Pd(II) complexes in human blood. - Highlights: • The HSA binding properties of two Palladium (II) complexes were studied. • Static quenching mechanism is effective in the interaction of HSA with Pd(II) complexes. • Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces were involved in the Pd(II) complexes–HSA interaction. • 3D fluorescence was used to study the interaction between two complexes and HSA.

  10. Magnetic interactions in CuII-LnIII cyclic tetranuclear complexes: is it possible to explain the occurrence of SMM behavior in CuII-TbIII and CuII-DyIII complexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamatsu, Takefumi; Yabe, Kazuya; Towatari, Masaaki; Osa, Shutaro; Matsumoto, Naohide; Re, Nazzareno; Pochaba, Andrzej; Mrozinski, Jerzy; Gallani, Jean-Louis; Barla, Alessandro; Imperia, Paolo; Paulsen, Carley; Kappler, Jean-Paul

    2007-05-28

    An extensive series of tetranuclear CuII2LnIII2 complexes [CuIILLnIII(hfac)2]2 (with LnIII being all lanthanide(III) ions except for the radioactive PmIII) has been prepared in order to investigate the nature of the CuII-LnIII magnetic interactions and to try to answer the following question: What makes the CuII2TbIII2 and CuII2DyIII2 complexes single molecule magnets while the other complexes are not? All the complexes within this series possess a similar cyclic tetranuclear structure, in which the CuII and LnIII ions are arrayed alternately via bridges of ligand complex (CuIIL). Regular SQUID magnetometry measurements have been performed on the series. The temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibilities from 2 to 300 K and the field-dependent magnetizations from 0 to 5 T at 2 K have been measured for the CuII2LnIII2 and NiII2LnIII2 complexes, with the NiII2LnIII2 complex containing diamagnetic NiII ions being used as a reference for the evaluation of the CuII-LnIII magnetic interactions. These measurements have revealed that the interactions between CuII and LnIII ions are very weakly antiferromagnetic if Ln=Ce, Nd, Sm, Yb, ferromagnetic if Ln=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and negligible if Ln=La, Eu, Pr, Lu. With the same goal of better understanding the evolution of the intramolecular magnetic interactions, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) has also been measured on CuII2TbIII2, CuII2DyIII2, and NiII2TbIII2 complexes, either at the L- and M-edges of the metal ions or at the K-edge of the N and O atoms. Last, the CuII2TbIII2 complex exhibiting SMM behavior has received a closer examination of its low temperature magnetic properties down to 0.1 K. These particular measurements have revealed the unusual very slow setting-up of a 3D order below 0.6 K.

  11. Dissecting the chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures governing RNA polymerase II trigger loop closure by synthetic nucleic acid analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Liang; Butler, Kyle Vincent; Chong, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    The trigger loop (TL) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a conserved structural motif that is crucial for Pol II catalytic activity and transcriptional fidelity. The TL remains in an inactive open conformation when the mismatched substrate is bound. In contrast, TL switches from an inactive open...... II. This study reveals novel insights into understanding the molecular basis of TL conformational transition upon substrate binding during Pol II transcription. This synthetic chemical biology approach may be extended to understand the mechanisms of other RNA polymerases as well as other nucleic acid...... state to a closed active state to facilitate nucleotide addition upon the binding of the cognate substrate to the Pol II active site. However, a comprehensive understanding of the specific chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures that are essential to this TL conformational change...

  12. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates interfere with the HIV-1 Tat–TAR RNA interaction critical for viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Jaroslav; Hannon, Michael J.; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between the HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat and TAR (transactivation responsive region) RNA, plays a critical role in HIV-1 transcription. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates were evaluated for their in vitro activity to inhibit Tat–TAR RNA interaction using UV melting studies, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and RNase A footprinting. The results demonstrate that iron(II) supramolecular helicates inhibit Tat-TAR interaction at nanomolar concentrations by binding to TAR RNA. These studies provide a new insight into the biological potential of metallosupramolecular helicates.

  13. Magnetic interactions in a copper(II) trimer encapsulated in a molecular metal oxide cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokoszka, G.F.; Padula, F.; Goldstein, A.S.; Venturini, E.L.; Azevedo, L.; Siedle, A.R.

    1988-01-13

    This paper presents EPR and magnetic susceptibility data on the trimeric Cu(II) complex (W/sub 9/AsO/sub 33/)/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/(H/sub 2/O)/sub 2//sup 12/minus//, with emphasis on the intramolecular spin-exchange coupling processes. The exchange interaction arises from the coupling of one unpaired electron centered on each of the three Cu(II) ions, which are arranged in an isosceles triangle (Cu-Cu distances = 4.669 and 4.707 /angstrom/). An isotropic antiferromagnetic interaction means that the highest spin state (S = 3/2) is above the two S = 1/2 states. The observed quartet state is quite normal in its EPR behavior and shows the allowed transitions centered at about 3000 G (g/sub 11/ = 2.075, g/sub 1/ = 2.243, D = 1.9 /times/ 10/sup /minus/2/ cm/sup /minus/1/, and E < 30 g) as well as the two sets of forbidden lines at about one-half and one-third of that field value over the range 10-300 K. The quartet spectrum was observed, with some changes in shape and intensity, down to 2 K. Additional EPR lines are found both below and above the S = 3/2 EPR absorptions and have a pronounced temperature dependence with a maximum intensity at about 40 K. The most prominent of these lines is at g /approximately/ 10 at both 9 and 53 GHz. The magnetic susceptibility data in the 10-300 K range can be fit with an equation of the form C/(T + T/sub c/) + A with T/sub c/ = 3.3 K, C = 2.54 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4/ cm/sup 3/K/g and A = /minus/8.7 /times/ 10/sup /minus/8/. This value of C yields a typical Cu(II) g value based on the value of S = 1/2 for each of the unpaired electrons centered on three Cu(II) ions. Below 10 K, the magnetic susceptibility deviates from a Curie temperature dependence and can be interpreted with an intramolecular antiferromagnetic coupling with J = /minus/7.5 K; intermolecular effects may play a role at the lowest temperature (2 K). 17 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Topological invariants for interacting topological insulators. II. Breakdown of single-particle Green's function formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan-Yao; Wu, Han-Qing; Meng, Zi Yang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2016-05-01

    Topological phase transitions in free fermion systems can be characterized by the closing of single-particle gap and the change in topological invariants. However, in the presence of electronic interactions, topological phase transitions can be more complicated. In paper I of this series [Phys. Rev. B 93, 195163 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.195163], we have proposed an efficient scheme to evaluate the topological invariants based on the single-particle Green's function formalism. Here, in paper II, we demonstrate several interaction-driven topological phase transitions (TPTs) in two-dimensional (2D) interacting topological insulators (TIs) via large-scale quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, based on the scheme of evaluating topological invariants presented in paper I. Across these transitions, the defining symmetries of the TIs have been neither explicitly nor spontaneously broken. In the first two models, the topological invariants calculated from the Green's function formalism succeed in characterizing the topologically distinct phases and identifying interaction-driven TPTs. However, in the other two models, we find that the single-particle gap does not close and the topological invariants constructed from the single-particle Green's function acquire no change across the TPTs. Unexpected breakdown of the Green's function formalism in constructing the topological invariants is thus discovered. We thence classify the topological phase transitions in interacting TIs into two categories in practical computation: Those that have noninteracting correspondence can be characterized successfully by the topological invariants constructed from the Green's functions, while for the others that do not have noninteracting correspondence, the Green's function formalism experiences a breakdown, but more interesting and exciting phenomena, such as emergent collective critical modes at the transition, arise. Discussion on the success and breakdown of topological invariants

  15. DNA Interaction Studies of a New Platinum(II) Complex Containing Different Aromatic Dinitrogen Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Mohammadi, Somaye; Alizadeh, Robabeh

    2011-01-01

    A new mononuclear Pt(II) complex, [Pt(DMP)(DIP)]Cl(2).H(2)O, in which DMP is 4,4-dimethyl-2,2-bipyridine and DIP is 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenantroline, has been synthesized and characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding interaction of this complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated using fluorimetry, spectrophotometry, circular dichroism, viscosimetry and cyclic voltametry (CV). UV-VIS spectrum showed 4 nm bathochromic shift of the absorption band at 280 nm along with significant hypochromicity for the absorption band of the complex. The intrnisic binding constant (K(b) = 2 × 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with intercalators and suggests this binding mode. The viscosity measurements showed that the complex-DNA interaction can be hydrophobic and confirm intercalation. Moreover, the complex induced detectable changes in the CD spectrum of CT-DNA. The fluorescence studies revealed that the probable quenching mechanism of fluorescence of the complex by CT-DNA is static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH > 0 and ΔS > 0) showed that main interaction with hydrogenic forces occurred that is intercalation mode. Also, CV results confirm this mode because, with increasing the CT-DNA concentration, shift to higher potential was observed.

  16. Interaction of Cu(II and Ni(II with Ypk9 Protein Fragment via NMR Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Francesco Peana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available P1D2E3K4H5E6L7 (PK9-H, a fragment of Ypk9, the yeast homologue of the human Park9 protein, was studied for its coordination abilities towards Ni(II and Cu(II ions through mono- and bi-dimensional NMR techniques. Both proteins are involved in the transportation of metal ions, including manganese and nickel, from the cytosol to the lysosomal lumen. Ypk9 showed manganese detoxification role, preventing a Mn-induced Parkinsonism (PD besides mutations in Park9, linked to a juvenile form of the disease. Here, we tested PK9-H with Cu(II and Ni(II ions, the former because it is an essential element ubiquitous in the human body, so its trafficking should be strictly regulated and one cannot exclude that Ypk9 may play a role in it, and the latter because, besides being a toxic element for many organisms and involved in different pathologies and inflammation states, it seems that the protein confers protection against it. NMR experiments showed that both cations can bind PK9-H in an effective way, leading to complexes whose coordination mode depends on the pH of the solution. NMR data have been used to build a model for the structure of the major Cu(II and Ni(II complexes. Structural changes in the conformation of the peptide with organized side chain orientation promoted by nickel coordination were detected.

  17. Pion-Nucleus potentials in the energy range of 0-80 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirav, O.; Friedman, E.; Altman, A.; Hannah, M.; Johnson, R. R.; Gill, D. R.

    1987-12-01

    Data for the elastic scattering of 30-80 MeV positive and negative pions by a wide range of nuclei is analysed with an Ericson-Ericson MSU type optical potential. By use of consistent sets of data for π+ and π- and of experimental results for total reaction cross sections we obtain for the first time optical potentials that describe well all the data without the need of introducing non-standard charge-dependent effects.

  18. Results on two-photon interactions from Mark II at SPEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.

    1979-10-01

    Preliminary results on two-photon interactions from the SLAC-LBL Mark II magnetic detector at SPEAR are presented. The cross section for eta' production by the reaction e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. e/sup +/e/sup -/ eta' has been measured over the beam energy range from 2 to 4 GeV. The radiative width GAMMA/sub ..gamma gamma../(eta') has been determined to be 5.8 +- 1.1 keV (+- 20% systematic uncertainty). Upper limits on the radiative widths of the f(1270), and A/sub 2/(1310) and f'(1515) mesons have been determined.

  19. An ATIPical family of angiotensin II AT2 receptor-interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Ferreira, Sylvie; Nahmias, Clara

    2010-11-01

    AT2, the second subtype of angiotensin II receptors, is a major component of the renin-angiotensin system involved in cardiovascular and neuronal functions. AT2 belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors, but its intracellular signaling pathways have long remained elusive. Over the past few years, efforts to characterize this atypical receptor have led to the identification of novel molecular scaffolds that directly bind to its intracellular tail. The present review focuses on a family of AT2 receptor-interacting proteins (ATIPs) involved in neuronal differentiation, vascular remodeling and tumor suppression. Recent findings that ATIPs and ATIP-related proteins associate with microtubules suggest that they might constitute a novel family of multifunctional proteins regulating a wide range of physiopathological functions.

  20. Jet-Intracluster Medium interaction in Hydra A. II The Effect of Jet Precession

    CERN Document Server

    Nawaz, M A; Wagner, A Y; Sutherland, R S; McNamara, B R

    2016-01-01

    We present three dimensional relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of a precessing jet interacting with the intracluster medium and compare the simulated jet structure with the observed structure of the Hydra A northern jet. For the simulations, we use jet parameters obtained in the parameter space study of the first paper in this series and probe different values for the precession period and precession angle. We find that for a precession period P = 1 Myr and a precession angle = 20 degree the model reproduces i) the curvature of the jet, ii) the correct number of bright knots within 20 kpc at approximately correct locations, and iii) the turbulent transition of the jet to a plume. The Mach number of the advancing bow shock = 1.85 is indicative of gentle cluster atmosphere heating during the early stages of the AGN's activity.

  1. Enthalpic Contribution of Ni(II in the Interaction between Carbonaceous Material and Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid adsorbents were prepared from corn cob that was modified with a solution of HNO3 6 M at different contact times. The solids are characterized by physical N2 adsorption at 77 K to know their surface area by applying the BET model and surface chemistry is determined using the Bohem method. Once we have prepared the adsorbents we determine the immersion enthalpy, ΔHim, of the solids in Ni(II aqueous solutions of different concentrations between 20 and 800 mg·L−1, with values for ΔHim between 10.0 and 35.3 J·g−1. From the results obtained for the immersion enthalpy in function of the ion Ni(II concentration we calculate the contribution to the immersion enthalpy that corresponds to the ion when it is treated with the system adsorbent-solution as a mixture in which the solid, the solvent, and the adsorbate are involved. The solution thermodynamics allows for establishing the enthalpic changes that bring the ion in function of the concentration and the intensity of the interaction of solid-metal ion that is favored by the presence of acid groups in the solid.

  2. Mechanism of interaction of Al3+ with the proteins composition of photosystem II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Hasni

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effect of Al3+on photosystem II (PSII electron transport was investigated using several biophysical and biochemical techniques such as oxygen evolution, chlorophyll fluorescence induction and emission, SDS-polyacrylamide and native green gel electrophoresis, and FTIR spectroscopy. In order to understand the mechanism of its inhibitory action, we have analyzed the interaction of this toxic cation with proteins subunits of PSII submembrane fractions isolated from spinach. Our results show that Al 3+, especially above 3 mM, strongly inhibits oxygen evolution and affects the advancement of the S states of the Mn4O5Ca cluster. This inhibition was due to the release of the extrinsic polypeptides and the disorganization of the Mn4O5Ca cluster associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC of PSII. This fact was accompanied by a significant decline of maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm together with a strong damping of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induction. The energy transfer from light harvesting antenna to reaction centers of PSII was impaired following the alteration of the light harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII. The latter result was revealed by the drop of chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra at low temperature (77 K, increase of F0 and confirmed by the native green gel electrophoresis. FTIR measurements indicated that the interaction of Al 3+ with the intrinsic and extrinsic polypeptides of PSII induces major alterations of the protein secondary structure leading to conformational changes. This was reflected by a major reduction of α-helix with an increase of β-sheet and random coil structures in Al 3+-PSII complexes. These structural changes are closely related with the functional alteration of PSII activity revealed by the inhibition of the electron transport chain of PSII.

  3. Interaction of gold nanoparticles and nickel(II) sulfate affects dendritic cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Sarah; Baré, Birgit; Piella, Jordi; Tirez, Kristof; Hoet, Peter; Monopoli, Marco P; Dawson, Kenneth A; Puntes, Victor F; Nelissen, Inge

    2016-12-01

    Despite many investigations have focused on the pristine toxicity of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), little is known about the outcome of co-exposure and interaction of GNPs with heavy metals which can possibly detoxify or potentiate them. Here, the combined exposure of nickel (II) sulfate (NiSO4) and GNPs on the maturation response of dendritic cells (DCs) was explored. Exposure to GNPs or NiSO4 separately induced cell activation. When cells were exposed to a mixture of both, however, the observed cell activation pattern indicated a competitive rather than an additive effect of both inducers with levels similar to those induced by NiSO4 alone. Quantification of the GNP uptake by DCs demonstrated a significant decrease in intracellular gold content during co-incubation with NiSO4. An extensive physiochemical characterization was performed to determine the interaction between GNPs and NiSO4 in the complex physiological media using nanoparticle tracking analyses, disc centrifugation, UV-visible spectroscopy, ICP-MS analyses, zeta potential measurements, electron microscopy, and proteomics. Although GNPs and NiSO4 did not directly interact with each other, the presence of NiSO4 in the physiological media resulted in changes in GNPs' charge and their associated protein corona (content and composition), which may contribute to a decreased cellular uptake of GNPs and sustaining the nickel-induced DC maturation. The presented results provide new insights in the interaction of heavy metals and NPs in complex physiological media. Moreover, this study highlights the necessity of mixture toxicology, since these combined exposures are highly relevant for human subjection to NPs and risk assessment of nanomaterials.

  4. Isobolographic analysis of the interaction between cadmium (II) and sodium sulphate: toxicological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Roi; Torres, Enrique; Abalde, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Sulphate is an essential nutrient for autotrophic organisms and has been shown to have important implications in certain processes of tolerance to cadmium toxicity. Sodium sulphate is the main salt of sulphate in the natural environments. The concentration of this salt is increasing in the aquatic environments due to environmental pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate, using an analysis of isobolograms, the type and the degree of the interaction between Cd(II) and sodium sulphate in the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii. Two blocks of experiments were performed, one at sub-optimal sodium sulphate concentrations (14.2 mg/L). Three fixed ratios (2:1, 1:1, and 1:2) of the individual EC50 for cadmium and sodium sulphate were used within each block. The isobolographic analysis of interaction at sub-optimal concentrations showed a stronger antagonistic effect with values of interaction index (γ) between 1.46 and 3.4. However, the isobologram with sodium sulphate at supra-optimal concentrations revealed a slight but significant synergistic effect between both chemicals with an interaction index between 0.54 and 0.64. This synergic effect resulted in the potentiation of the toxic effects of cadmium, synergy that was related to the increase of the ionic strength and of two species of cadmium, CdSO4 (aq), and Cd(SO4)2(2-) , in the medium. Results of the current study suggest that sodium sulphate is able to perform a dual antagonist/synergist effect on cadmium toxicity. This role was concentration dependent.

  5. Interaction between the H II region and AFGL 333-Ridge: Implications for the star formation scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Makoto; Soejima, Takashi; Chibueze, James O.; Nagayama, Takumi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Sunada, Kazuyoshi; Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Burns, Ross A.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the star formation activities in the AFGL 333 region, which is in the vicinity of the W 4 expanding bubble, by conducting NH3 (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) mapping observations with the 45 m Nobeyama Radio Telescope an angular resolution of 75″. The morphology of the NH3 (1,1) map shows a bow-shaped structure with the size of 2.0 × 0.6 pc as seen in the dust continuum. At the interface between the W 4 bubble and the dense NH3 cloud, the compact H II region G134.2+0.8, associated with IRAS 02245+6115, is located. Interestingly, just at the north and south of G134.2+0.8 we found NH3 emission exhibiting large velocity widths of ˜2.8 km s-1, compared to 1.8 km s-1 at the other positions. As the possibility of mechanical energy injection through the activity of young stellar objects (YSOs) is low, we considered the origin of the large turbulent gas motion as an indication of interaction between the compact H II region and the periphery of the dense molecular cloud. We also found expanding motion of the CO emission associated with G134.2+0.8. The overall structure of the AFGL 333-Ridge might have been formed by the expanding bubble of W 4. However, the small velocity widths observed to the west of IRAS 02245+6115, around the center of the dense molecular cloud, suggest that interaction with the compact H II region is limited. Therefore the YSOs (dominantly Class 0/I) in the core of the AFGL 333-Ridge dense molecular cloud most likely formed in quiescent mode. As previously suggested for the large-scale star formation in the W 3 giant molecular cloud, our results show an apparent coexistence of induced and quiescent star formations in this region. It appears that star formation in the AFGL 333 region has proceeded without significant external triggers, but accompanying stellar feedback environment.

  6. Prognostic interaction patterns in diabetes mellitus II: A random-matrix-theory relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Aparna; Pawar, Amit Kumar; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    We analyze protein-protein interactions in diabetes mellitus II and its normal counterpart under the combined framework of random matrix theory and network biology. This disease is the fifth-leading cause of death in high-income countries and an epidemic in developing countries, affecting around 8 % of the total adult population in the world. Treatment at the advanced stage is difficult and challenging, making early detection a high priority in the cure of the disease. Our investigation reveals specific structural patterns important for the occurrence of the disease. In addition to the structural parameters, the spectral properties reveal the top contributing nodes from localized eigenvectors, which turn out to be significant for the occurrence of the disease. Our analysis is time-efficient and cost-effective, bringing a new horizon in the field of medicine by highlighting major pathways involved in the disease. The analysis provides a direction for the development of novel drugs and therapies in curing the disease by targeting specific interaction patterns instead of a single protein.

  7. Interaction of tRNA with domain II of 23S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, W E; Tassanakajohn, A; Tapprich, W E

    1990-08-27

    The interaction of tRNA with domain II of 23S rRNA in E. coli ribosomes has been probed using short, complementary DNA oligodeoxyribonucleotides. Specifically, cDNA oligomers to the region 801-811 of the 23S rRNA were used to ascertain the interaction of this region with tRNA. It was found that when tRNA was bound to the P site, considerable competition occurred between tRNA and the cDNA oligomers which base paired with the nucleotides 807-811. However, A-site bound tRNA neither displaced, nor was displaced, by cDNA oligomers to this region. Additionally, the binding of tRNA lacking the CACCA nucleotides on the 3' terminus was unaffected by the presence a cDNA oligomer complementary to nucleotides 803-811, indicating that the cDNA-tRNA competition was dependent on the 3' terminal nucleotides of tRNA.

  8. Prognostic interaction patterns in diabetes mellitus II: A random-matrix-theory relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Aparna; Pawar, Amit Kumar; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    We analyze protein-protein interactions in diabetes mellitus II and its normal counterpart under the combined framework of random matrix theory and network biology. This disease is the fifth-leading cause of death in high-income countries and an epidemic in developing countries, affecting around 8% of the total adult population in the world. Treatment at the advanced stage is difficult and challenging, making early detection a high priority in the cure of the disease. Our investigation reveals specific structural patterns important for the occurrence of the disease. In addition to the structural parameters, the spectral properties reveal the top contributing nodes from localized eigenvectors, which turn out to be significant for the occurrence of the disease. Our analysis is time-efficient and cost-effective, bringing a new horizon in the field of medicine by highlighting major pathways involved in the disease. The analysis provides a direction for the development of novel drugs and therapies in curing the disease by targeting specific interaction patterns instead of a single protein.

  9. Interactions between Human Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II and Urea-Based Inhibitors: Structural Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barinka, Cyril; Byun, Youngjoo; Dusich, Crystal L.; Banerjee, Sangeeta R.; Chen, Ying; Castanares, Mark; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.; Lubkowski, Jacek (NCI); (JHMI); (UIC)

    2009-01-21

    Urea-based, low molecular weight ligands of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) have demonstrated efficacy in various models of neurological disorders and can serve as imaging agents for prostate cancer. To enhance further development of such compounds, we determined X-ray structures of four complexes between human GCPII and urea-based inhibitors at high resolution. All ligands demonstrate an invariant glutarate moiety within the S1{prime} pocket of the enzyme. The ureido linkage between P1 and P1{prime} inhibitor sites interacts with the active-site Zn{sub 1}{sup 2+} ion and the side chains of Tyr552 and His553. Interactions within the S1 pocket are defined primarily by a network of hydrogen bonds between the P1 carboxylate group of the inhibitors and the side chains of Arg534, Arg536, and Asn519. Importantly, we have identified a hydrophobic pocket accessory to the S1 site that can be exploited for structure-based design of novel GCPII inhibitors with increased lipophilicity.

  10. Interaction of polyamines with proteins of photosystem II: Cation binding and photosynthetic oxygen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, R.; Harnois, J.; Rouillon, R.; Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.; Carpentier, R.

    2007-05-01

    Polyamines are organic cations that function in diverse physiological processes that share as a common thread a close relationship to cell proliferation and growth. Polyamines also affect photosynthetic oxygen evolution and therefore, this study was designed to investigate the interaction of 1,3-diaminopropane, 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine), and 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) cations with proteins of photosystem II (PSII) using PSII-enriched submembrane fractions with diamine concentrations between 0.01 and 20 mM. Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy with its self-deconvolution and second derivative resolution enhancement, as well as curve-fitting procedures were applied in order to determine the diamine binding mode, the protein conformational changes, and the structural properties of diamine-protein complexes. Spectroscopic evidence showed that diamines interact with proteins (H-bonding) through polypeptide C dbnd O groups with no major perturbations of protein secondary structure. At very low diamine concentration (0.01 mM), no inhibition of oxygen-evolution occurred, while at higher diamine content (5-10 mM), 100% inhibition was observed. Chorophyll fluorescence measurements demonstrated that the inhibition mainly affects the oxygen evolving complex of PSII. Comparisons of the effects of these dipositive organic cations with divalent metal cations on one hand and with polyvalent spermine and spermidine on the other hand, show major alterations of the protein secondary structure as positive charge increases.

  11. Interaction of manganese(II) complex with apotransferrin and the apotransferrin enhanced anticancer activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ling; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Xu, Xiao-Lei; Li, Zan; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Apotransferrin could bind a number of metal ions besides Fe, which makes it an attractive delivery vehicle for metal-based medicines. In order to evaluate whether anticancer Mn(II) complex of [(Adpa)Mn(Cl)(H2O)] Adpa = bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amino-2-propionic acid) (AdpaMn) could be transported by apotransferrin, we investigated its interaction with human apotransferrin by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD). The association dynamics show that AdpaMn could bind to apotransferrin spontaneously in Hepes buffer. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and CD spectroscopy show that the conjugation of AdpaMn and apotransferrin by hydrophobic interactions induces the change of the microenvironment and conformation of apotransferrin. The reversible binding and release of AdpaMn was studied with fluorescence titration method. The AdpaMn complex can be released from the AdpaMn-apotransferrin entity in weak acid environments. MTT assay in vitro confirms that apotransferrin can enhance the inhibition rate of AdpaMn on the proliferation of HepG-2 cells, so we deduce that AdpaMn could be transported by apotransferrin in vivo.

  12. Low-temperature, non-stoichiometric oxygen isotope exchange coupled to Fe(II)-goethite interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frierdich, Andrew J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Beard, Brian L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Scherer, Michelle M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Spicuzza, Michael J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Valley, John W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Johnson, Clark M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of natural iron oxide minerals has been widely used as a paleoclimate proxy. Interpretation of their stable isotope compositions, however, requires accurate knowledge of isotopic fractionation factors and an understanding of their isotopic exchange kinetics, the latter of which informs us how diagenetic processes may alter their isotopic compositions. Prior work has demonstrated that crystalline iron oxides do not significantly exchange oxygen isotopes with pure water at low temperature, which has restricted studies of isotopic fractionation factors to precipitation experiments or theoretical calculations. Using a double three-isotope method (¹⁸O-¹⁷O-¹⁶O and ⁵⁷Fe-⁵⁶Fe-⁵⁴Fe) we compare O and Fe isotope exchange kinetics, and demonstrate, for the first time, that O isotope exchange between structural O in crystalline goethite and water occurs in the presence of aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) at ambient temperature (i.e., 22–50 °C). The three-isotope method was used to extrapolate partial exchange results to infer the equilibrium, mass-dependent isotope fractionations between goethite and water. In addition, this was combined with a reversal approach to equilibrium by reacting goethite in two unique waters that vary in composition by about 16‰ in ¹⁸O/¹⁶O ratios. Our results show that interactions between Fe(II)aq and goethite catalyzes O isotope exchange between the mineral and bulk fluid; no exchange (within error) is observed when goethite is suspended in ¹⁷O-enriched water in the absence of Fe(II)aq. In contrast, Fe(II)-catalyzed O isotope exchange is accompanied by significant changes in ¹⁸O/¹⁶O ratios. Despite significant O exchange, however, we observed disproportionate amounts of Fe versus O exchange, where Fe isotope exchange in goethite was roughly three times that of O. This disparity provides novel insight into the reactivity of oxide minerals in aqueous

  13. The 2010 August 01 type II burst: A CME-CME Interaction, and its radio and white-light manifestations

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martínez; Bain, Hazel M; Liu, Ying; Krupar, Vratislav; Bale, Stuart; Krucker, Säm

    2012-01-01

    We present observational results of a type II burst associated with a CME-CME interaction observed in the radio and white-light wavelength range. We applied radio direction-finding techniques to observations from the STEREO and Wind spacecraft, the results of which were interpreted using white-light coronagraphic measurements for context. The results of the multiple radio-direction finding techniques applied were found to be consistent both with each other and with those derived from the white-light observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The results suggest that the Type II burst radio emission is causally related to the CMEs interaction.

  14. 1D μ-glycine-briged copper (II) chain in complex [Cu(μ-Gly)Im(ClO4)]n and ferromagnetic interactions among copper (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lu; Lv, Xue-Chuan; Luo, Guan-Hua; Gao, Xiao-Han; Tan, Zhi-Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Complex [Cu(μ-Gly)Im(ClO4)]n(Im = imidazole, and Gly = glycine) with μ-glycine-briged copper (II) chain, containing six-coordination distorted elongated octahedron, was synthesized and characterized. The complex belongs to space group P 21/c measured by X-ray single crystal diffraction. In the cluster, each Cu2+ ion are six-coordination by one nitrogen atom and two oxygen atoms of glycine, one nitrogen atoms of imidazole, and two of oxygen atoms of two perchlorate. Each Cu2+ ion has an N2O4 donor set, which forms the distorted elongated octahedron due to the Jahn-Teller (JT) effect. The magnetic and thermodynamic properties were researched. Magnetic susceptibilities of the complex showed that ferromagnetic interactions occurred between the Cu (II) atoms. The Curie-Weiss constant C = 0.565 cm3 K·mol-1 and the Weiss constant θ = 1.0585 K were given by the Curie-Weiss law The ferromagnetic nature of the interaction could be deduced as the exchange pathway of Cusbnd Osbnd Csbnd Osbnd Cu, which involved an equatorial position at one copper (II) ion and an axial position of the nearest copper (II). The complex decomposed from 511 to 538 K as two steps.

  15. Galaxy interactions in compact groups - II. Abundance and kinematic anomalies in HCG 91c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M.; Yun, Min S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.

    2015-07-01

    Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 91 (HCG 91) were observed with the WiFeS integral field spectrograph as part of our ongoing campaign targeting the ionized gas physics and kinematics inside star-forming members of compact groups. Here, we report the discovery of H II regions with abundance and kinematic offsets in the otherwise unremarkable star-forming spiral HCG 91c. The optical emission line analysis of this galaxy reveals that at least three H II regions harbour an oxygen abundance ˜0.15 dex lower than expected from their immediate surroundings and from the abundance gradient present in the inner regions of HCG 91c. The same star-forming regions are also associated with a small kinematic offset in the form of a lag of 5-10 km s-1 with respect to the local circular rotation of the gas. H I observations of HCG 91 from the Very Large Array and broad-band optical images from Pan-STARRS (Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System) suggest that HCG 91c is caught early in its interaction with the other members of HCG 91. We discuss different scenarios to explain the origin of the peculiar star-forming regions detected with WiFeS, and show that evidence points towards infalling and collapsing extraplanar gas clouds at the disc-halo interface, possibly as a consequence of long-range gravitational perturbations of HCG 91c from the other group members. As such, HCG 91c provides evidence that some of the perturbations possibly associated with the early phase of galaxy evolution in compact groups impact the star-forming disc locally, and on sub-kpc scales.

  16. Interaction of TNF with angiotensin II contributes to mitochondrial oxidative stress and cardiac damage in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithya Mariappan

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF and angiotensin II (ANGII induce oxidative stress contribute to cardiovascular disease progression. Here, we examined whether an interaction between TNF and ANGII contributes to altered cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis and ATP production to cause cardiac damage in rats. Rats received intraperitoneal injections of TNF (30 µg/kg, TNF + losartan (LOS, 1 mg/kg, or vehicle for 5 days. Left ventricular (LV function was measured using echocardiography. Rats were sacrificed and LV tissues removed for gene expression, electron paramagnetic resonance and mitochondrial assays. TNF administration significantly increased expression of the NADPH oxidase subunit, gp91phox, and the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT-1R and decreased eNOS in the LV of rats. Rats that received TNF only had increased production rates of superoxide, peroxynitrite and total reactive oxygen species (ROS in the cytosol and increased production rates of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in mitochondria. Decreased activities of mitochondrial complexes I, II, and III and mitochondrial genes were observed in rats given TNF. In addition, TNF administration also resulted in a decrease in fractional shortening and an increase in Tei index, suggesting diastolic dysfunction. TNF administration with concomitant LOS treatment attenuated mitochondrial damage, restored cardiac function, and decreased expression of AT1-R and NADPH oxidase subunits. Mitochondrial biogenesis and function is severely impaired by TNF as evidenced by downregulation of mitochondrial genes and increased free radical production, and may contribute to cardiac damage. These defects are independent of the downregulation of mitochondrial gene expression, suggesting novel mechanisms for mitochondrial dysfunction in rats given TNF.

  17. DNA interaction, antimicrobial, antioxidant and anticancer studies on Cu(II) complexes of Luotonin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavan, M P; Vinoth Kumar, G G; Dhaveethu Raja, J; Anitha, K; Karthikeyan, S; Rajesh, J

    2017-02-01

    Luotonin A (L), a novel natural cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory alkaloid, chelated with copper(II) to improve its cytotoxic effect against the cancer cells. The complexes [Cu(L)H2OCl]Cl (1) and [Cu(L)2]Cl2 (2) are prepared by using copper(II) chloride and L with ligand/metal molar ratio of 1:1 and 2:1 respectively. A solution of complexes 1 &2 are characterized by physical spectroscopic methods using Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer, Fourier Transform-Infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Electron Para magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR) and by electrochemical methods. The interaction of these complexes 1 &2 with calf thymus (CT-DNA) have been investigated by physical methods to propose the modes of DNA binding with the complexes 1 &2. Absorption spectral titration studies of complex 1 with CT-DNA shows a red-shift of 5nm with the DNA binding affinity of Kb, 8.65×10(3)M(-1), but complex 2does not show any red-shift with binding constant Kb, 7.32×10(3)M(-1) reveals that the complex 1 binding with DNA strongly than complex 2 and the binding occurs in between the base pairs of DNA as intercalation. Strong interactions of the two complexes 1 & 2 with CT-DNA have also been confirmed by fluorescence spectral titration studies. The evaluated values of KSV and Kass shows that, the complexes 1 &2 interact with DNA through the intercalation, coincide with other partial intercalators strongly than the free ligand L. Complex 1 exhibits potent antioxidant activity with SC50 value of 23.9±0.69μM is evaluated by DPPH radical scavenging assay and which has potent antimicrobial activity against pathogens than 2 and L. The anticancer activity of L, complexes 1 &2 against human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) has also been studied by using fluorescence staining method. The IC50 values of L, complexes 1&2 against MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines with the incubation time intervals of 24hrs are 1 (5.0±0.25, 12.0±0.30μM)<2 (6.5±0.27, 15.0

  18. Formation of Andromeda II via a gas-rich major merger and an interaction with M31

    CERN Document Server

    Fouquet, Sylvain; del Pino, Andres; Ebrova, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Andromeda II (And II) has been known for a few decades but only recently observations have unveiled new properties of this dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The presence of two stellar populations, the bimodal star formation history (SFH) and an unusual rotation velocity of And II put strong constrains on its formation and evolution. Following Lokas et al. (2014), we propose a detailed model to explain the main properties of And II involving (1) a gas-rich major merger between two dwarf galaxies at high redshift in the field and (2) a close interaction with M31 about 5 Gyr ago. The model is based on N-body/hydrodynamical simulations including gas dynamics, star formation and feedback. One simulation is designed to reproduce the gas-rich major merger explaining the origin of stellar populations and the SFH. Other simulations are used to study the effects of tidal forces and the ram pressure stripping during the interaction between And II and M31. The model successfully reproduces the SFH of And II including the propert...

  19. Interaction of Pb(II) and biofilm associated extracellular polymeric substances of a marine bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NP103

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Supriya; Mangwani, Neelam; Das, Surajit

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to evaluate the interaction of biofilm associated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of a marine bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NP103 with lead [Pb(II)]. EEM fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of one protein-like fluorophore in the EPS of P. pseudoalcaligenes NP103. Stern-Volmer equation indicated the existence of only one binding site (n = 0.789) in the EPS of P. pseudoalcaligenes NP103. The interaction of Pb(II) with EPS was spontaneous at room temperature (∆ G = - 2.78 kJ/K/mol) having binding constant (Kb) of 2.59 M- 1. ATR-FTIR analysis asserted the involvement of various functional groups such as sulphydryl, phosphate and hydroxyl and amide groups of protein in Pb(II) binding. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy analysis displayed reduced growth of biofilm with altered surface topology in Pb(II) supplemented medium. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis revealed the entrapment of Pb in the EPS. Uronic acid, a characteristic functional group of biofilm, was observed in 1H NMR spectroscopy. The findings suggest that biofilm associated EPS are perfect organic ligands for Pb(II) complexation and may significantly augment the bioavailability of Pb(II) in the metal contaminated environment for subsequent sequestration.

  20. Formation of Andromeda II via a gas-rich major merger and an interaction with M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Sylvain; Łokas, Ewa L.; del Pino, Andrés; Ebrová, Ivana

    2016-10-01

    Andromeda II (And II) has been known for a few decades but only recently observations have unveiled new properties of this dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The presence of two stellar populations, the bimodal star formation history (SFH) and an unusual rotation velocity of And II put strong constrains on its formation and evolution. Following Lokas et al. (2014), we propose a detailed model to explain the main properties of And II involving (1) a gas-rich major merger between two dwarf galaxies at high redshift in the field and (2) a close interaction with M31 about 5 Gyr ago. The model is based on N-body/hydrodynamical simulations including gas dynamics, star formation and feedback. One simulation is designed to reproduce the gas-rich major merger explaining the origin of stellar populations and the SFH. Other simulations are used to study the effects of tidal forces and the ram pressure stripping during the interaction between And II and M31. The model successfully reproduces the SFH of And II including the properties of stellar populations, its morphology, kinematics and the lack of gas. Further improvements to the model are possible via joint modelling of all processes and better treatment of baryonic physics.

  1. Copper(ii) complexes of macrocyclic and open-chain pseudopeptidic ligands: synthesis, characterization and interaction with dicarboxylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggi, Enrico; Gavara, Raquel; Bolte, Michael; Fajarí, Lluís; Juliá, Luís; Rodríguez, Laura; Alfonso, Ignacio

    2015-07-28

    Mono- and dinuclear Cu(ii) complexes were prepared with pseudopeptidic open chain and macrocyclic ligands, respectively. They were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, EPR, HRMS and X-ray diffraction. The Cu(ii) cation is coordinated by two amines and two deprotonated amides, in a slightly distorted square planar coordination geometry. The complexes interact with several substituted dicarboxylates, as shown by UV-vis titrations and EPR experiments. The interaction of both mono- and dinuclear complexes with very similar dicarboxylates of biological interest (malate and aspartate) resulted in strikingly different outcomes: in the first case a ternary complex [ligand...metal...dicarboxylate] was obtained almost quantitatively, while in the latter, the Cu(ii) displacement to form Cu(Asp)2 was predominant.

  2. The Relationship between the Interactive Computer Interview System and the "Praxis II" Principles of Learning and Teaching Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the relationships between the subtests of the Interactive Computer Interview System and the ETS "Praxis II" Principles of Learning and Teaching examination. In particular, this study compares scores on the ICIS instrument subtests to those gathered from the same classroom teachers on the…

  3. The interaction of quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment and the acceptor side of photosystem II in photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaas, W.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described which are directed towards a further characterization of the interaction of the native bound plastoquinone Q B , artificial quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of Photosystem II in the thylakoid

  4. Interactions of radiation and adriamycin, bleomycin, mitomycin C or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II in intestinal crypt cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von der Maase, H

    1984-01-01

    The interactions of radiation and adriamycin (ADM), bleomycin (BLM), mitomycin C (MM-C), or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cis-DDP) in mouse jejunal crypt cells were studied using the microcolony survival assay. ADM administered from 24 h before to 48 h after irradiation resulted in an almost...

  5. The interaction of quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of photosystem II in photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaas, W.F.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described which are directed towards a further characterization of the interaction of the native bound plastoquinone Q B , artificial quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of Photosystem II in

  6. Interaction-Point Phase-Space Characterization using Single-Beam and Luminous-Region Measurements at PEP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozanecki, W; /Saclay; Bevan, A.J.; /Queen Mary, U. of London; Viaud, B.F.; /Montreal U.; Cai, Y.; Fisher, A.S.; O' Grady, C.; Lindquist, B.; Roodman, A.; J.M.Thompson, M.Weaver; /SLAC

    2008-09-09

    We present an extensive experimental characterization of the e{sup {+-}} phase space at the interaction point of the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory, that combines a detailed mapping of luminous-region observables using the BABAR detector, with stored-beam measurements by accelerator techniques.

  7. Proteomic analysis of cPKCβII-interacting proteins involved in HPC-induced neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xiangning; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Xuan; Liu, Yanyan; Du, Jianli; Liang, Jing; Xu, Qunyuan; Li, Junfa

    2011-04-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) initiates intracellular signaling pathway to provide protection against subsequent cerebral ischemic injuries, and its mechanism may provide molecular targets for therapy in stroke. According to our study of conventional protein kinase C βII (cPKCβII) activation in HPC, the role of cPKCβII in HPC-induced neuroprotection and its interacting proteins were determined in this study. The autohypoxia-induced HPC and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced cerebral ischemia mouse models were prepared as reported. We found that HPC reduced 6 h MCAO-induced neurological deficits, infarct volume, edema ratio and cell apoptosis in peri-infarct region (penumbra), but cPKCβII inhibitors Go6983 and LY333531 blocked HPC-induced neuroprotection. Proteomic analysis revealed that the expression of four proteins in cytosol and eight proteins in particulate fraction changed significantly among 49 identified cPKCβII-interacting proteins in cortex of HPC mice. In addition, HPC could inhibit the decrease of phosphorylated collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP-2) level and increase of CRMP-2 breakdown product. TAT-CRMP-2 peptide, which prevents the cleavage of endogenous CRMP-2, could inhibit CRMP-2 dephosphorylation and proteolysis as well as the infarct volume of 6 h MCAO mice. This study is the first to report multiple cPKCβII-interacting proteins in HPC mouse brain and the role of cPKCβII-CRMP-2 in HPC-induced neuroprotection against early stages of ischemic injuries in mice.

  8. Edge and Plasma -Wall Interaction Diagnostics in the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F. L.; Tafalla, D.; Branas, B.; Hidalgo, A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Ortiz, P.

    2003-07-01

    The operation of the TJ-II stellarator, carried out under ECR heating conditions until now, the plasma edge parameters and those processes has been identified. Therefore, an important , has implieda careful control of partied e sources and the associated plasma-wall interaction processes. A clear coupling between the plasma edge parameters and those processes has been identified. Therefore, an important effort has been devoted to the development of dedicated diagnostics in both fields. Remarkable success has been attained in the development of atomic-beam based edge diagnostics, namely, thermal Li and supersonic He beams. In particular, fast (up to 200 Hz) sampling of temperature and density profiles has been made possible thorough an upgraded version of the pulsed, supersonic He beam diagnostic. In this paper, whorl devoted to the upgrading of these techniques is described. Also, preliminary experiments oriented to the validation of the collisional radiative models use din the beam-based diagnostic interpretaron as well as simulations of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) studies of level populations of electronically excited He atoms are shown. (Author) 17 refs.

  9. Interaction of protein C inhibitor with the type II transmembrane serine protease enteropeptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Prohaska

    Full Text Available The serine protease inhibitor protein C inhibitor (PCI is expressed in many human tissues and exhibits broad protease reactivity. PCI binds glycosaminoglycans and certain phospholipids, which modulate its inhibitory activity. Enteropeptidase (EP is a type II transmembrane serine protease mainly found on the brush border membrane of epithelial cells in the duodenum, where it activates trypsinogen to initiate the digestion of food proteins. Some active EP is also present in duodenal fluid and has been made responsible for causing pancreatitis in case of duodeno-pancreatic reflux. Together with its substrate trypsinogen, EP is furthermore present in the epidermis and in some cancer cells. In this report, we show that PCI inhibited EP with an apparent 2nd order rate constant of 4.48 × 10(4 M(-1 s(-1. Low molecular weight (LMWH and unfractionated heparin (UFH slightly reduced the inhibitory effect of PCI. The SI (stoichiometry of inhibition value for the inhibition of EP by PCI was 10.8 in the absence and 17.9 in the presence of UFH (10 U/ml. By inhibiting trypsin, chymotrypsin, and additionally EP, PCI might play a role in the protection of the pancreas from autodigestion. Furthermore the interaction of PCI with EP may influence the regulation of epithelial differentiation.

  10. Spectroscopic investigation into the interaction of a diazacyclam-based macrocyclic copper(ii) complex with bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hakimi, Mohammad; Morovati, Teimoor; Hadidi, Saba; Moeini, Keyvan

    2017-02-01

    Cyclam-based ligands and their complexes are known to show antitumor activity. This study was undertaken to examine the interaction of a diazacyclam-based macrocyclic copper(II) complex with bovine serum albumin (BSA) under physiological conditions. The interactions of different metal-based drugs with blood proteins, especially those with serum albumin, may affect the concentration and deactivation of metal drugs, and thereby influence their availability and toxicity during chemotherapy. In this vein, several spectral methods including UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy techniques were used. Spectroscopic analysis of the fluorescence quenching confirmed that the Cu(II) complex quenched BSA fluorescence intensity by a dynamic mechanism. In order to further determine the quenching mechanism, an analysis of Stern-Volmer plots at various concentrations of BSA was carried out. It was found that the KSV value increased with the BSA concentration. It was suggested that the fluorescence quenching process was a dynamic quenching rather than a static quenching mechanism. Based on Förster's theory, the average binding distance between the Cu(II) complex and BSA (r) was found to be 4.98 nm; as the binding distance was less than 8 nm, energy transfer from BSA to the Cu(II) complex had a high possibility of occurrence. Thermodynamic parameters (positive ΔH and ΔS values) and measurement of competitive fluorescence with 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid (1,8-ANS) indicated that hydrophobic interaction plays a major role in the Cu(II) complex interaction with BSA. A Job's plot of the results confirmed that there was one binding site in BSA for the Cu(II) complex (1:1 stoichiometry). The site marker competitive experiment confirmed that the Cu(II) complex was located in site I (subdomain IIA) of BSA. Finally, CD data indicated that interaction of the Cu(II) complex with BSA caused a small increase in the α-helical content. Copyright

  11. Emission solvatochromic behavior of a pentacoordinated Zn(II) complex: A viable tool for studying the metallodrug–protein interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricciardi, Loredana, E-mail: loredana.ricciardi@unical.it [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende (CS) (Italy); Centre of Excellence “Functional Nanostructured Materials” CEMIF.CAL, LASCAMM and CR INSTM, INSTM Calabria Unit, and CNR-IPCF-UOS Cosenza - Licryl Laboratory, I-87036 Rende (CS) (Italy); Pucci, Daniela; Pirillo, Sante; La Deda, Massimo [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende (CS) (Italy); Centre of Excellence “Functional Nanostructured Materials” CEMIF.CAL, LASCAMM and CR INSTM, INSTM Calabria Unit, and CNR-IPCF-UOS Cosenza - Licryl Laboratory, I-87036 Rende (CS) (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    A metal complex with antitumoral activity, Zn(Curcumin)(bypiridine)Cl, was characterized from a photophysical point of view, showing a green emission and a positive solvatochromism. These characteristics can be conveniently used to study its interaction with Human Serum Albumin (HSA), a protein carrier of many non-aqueous biologically-active compounds in the blood stream. The intrinsic fluorescence of HSA was quenched by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer toward the Zn(II) complex, and the Stern–Volmer equation was applied to determine the bimolecular quenching rate constant of the interaction. - Highlights: • Albumin binding information is a key characteristic of drug pharmacology. • Fluorescence spectroscopy offers a simple method for revealing drug–protein interaction. • The fluorescence of the Zn(II) complex and its solvatochromisms has allowed studying the binding from a dual perspective.

  12. Differential effects of prenylation and s-acylation on type I and II ROPS membrane interaction and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Nadav; Gutman, Orit; Bar, Einat; Abu-Abied, Mohamad; Feng, Xuehui; Running, Mark P; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Ori, Naomi; Sadot, Einat; Henis, Yoav I; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-02-01

    Prenylation primarily by geranylgeranylation is required for membrane attachment and function of type I Rho of Plants (ROPs) and Gγ proteins, while type II ROPs are attached to the plasma membrane by S-acylation. Yet, it is not known how prenylation affects ROP membrane interaction dynamics and what are the functional redundancy and specificity of type I and type II ROPs. Here, we have used the expression of ROPs in mammalian cells together with geranylgeranylation and CaaX prenylation-deficient mutants to answer these questions. Our results show that the mechanism of type II ROP S-acylation and membrane attachment is unique to plants and likely responsible for the viability of plants in the absence of CaaX prenylation activity. The prenylation of ROPs determines their steady-state distribution between the plasma membrane and the cytosol but has little effect on membrane interaction dynamics. In addition, the prenyl group type has only minor effects on ROP function. Phenotypic analysis of the CaaX prenylation-deficient pluripetala mutant epidermal cells revealed that type I ROPs affect cell structure primarily on the adaxial side, while type II ROPs are functional and induce a novel cell division phenotype in this genetic background. Taken together, our studies show how prenyl and S-acyl lipid modifications affect ROP subcellular distribution, membrane interaction dynamics, and function.

  13. Exploring Protein Interactions on a Minimal Type II Polyketide Synthase Using a Yeast Two-Hybrid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Castaldo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins that form the ’minimal’ type II polyketide synthase in the doxorubicin producing biosynthetic pathway from Streptomyces peucetius were investigated using a yeast two-hybrid system (Y2H. Proteins that function as the so called ’chain length factor’ (DpsB and putative transacylase (DpsD were found to interact with the ketosynthase subunit (DpsA, which can also interact with itself. On the basis of these results we propose a head-to-tail homodimeric structure, which is consistent with previously published in vivo mutagenesis studies. No interactions were found between the acyl-carrier protein (DpsG and any of the other constituents of the complex, however, transient interactions, not detectable using the Y2H system, cannot be discounted and warrant further investigation.

  14. Synergistic interaction of levetiracetam with gabapentin in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model – a type II isobolographic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wlaz Aleksandra; Kondrat-Wrobel Maria W.; Zaluska Katarzyna; Kochman Ewelina; Rekas Anna R.; Luszczki Jarogniew J.

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing the anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam in combination with gabapentin, in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. Herein, psychomotor seizures were evoked in male albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3 s stimulus duration) delivered via ocular electrodes. Type II isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the anticonvulsant interactions between the drugs in combination, for fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10. The type II isobolog...

  15. Combined spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques to study interaction of Zn (II) DiAmsar with serum albumins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade, E-mail: rezanejad@pnu.ac.ir; Hooshyar, Zari; Shafagh, Pegah; Ghiasvand, Samira; Kakavand, Nahaleh

    2014-12-15

    Zinc (II) diamine-sarcophagine (Zn (II) DiAmsar) as a water soluble hexadentate ligand was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and UV–visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy. The bindings of Zn (II) DiAmsar with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated under the simulative physiological conditions. To study this binding, the fluorescence spectra in combination with FT-IR, UV–vis, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and molecular docking techniques were used in the present work. The results indicate that Zn (II) DiAmsar quenched effectively the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA and BSA via a static quenching process. The fluorescence quenching data was also used to determine binding sites and binding constants at different temperatures. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (∆G°, ∆H°, and ∆S°) suggest that the binding process occurs spontaneously by involving hydrogen bond and van der Waals interactions. The distance between HSA (or BSA) as a donor and Zn (II) DiAmsar as an acceptor was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In addition, the docking results revealed the possible binding sites and assess the microenvironment around the bounded Zn (II) DiAmsar.

  16. Effects of interaction on the properties of spiral galaxies. II. Isolated galaxies: The zero point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, I.; Moles, M.

    1999-04-01

    We analyse the properties of a sample of 22 bright isolated spiral galaxies on the basis of Johnson B,V,I images and optical rotation curves. The fraction of early morphological types in our sample of isolated galaxies (or in other samples of non-interacting spiral galaxies) appears to be smaller than in samples including interacting systems. The overall morphological aspect is regular and symmetric, but all the galaxies present non-axisymmetric components in the form of bars or rings. We find that the color indices become bluer towards the outer parts and that their central values are well correlated with the total colors. The properties of the bulges span a larger range than those of the disks, that thus are more alike between them. None of the galaxies shows a truncated, type II disk profile. It is found that the relation between surface brightness and size for the bulges, the Kormendy relation, is tighter when only isolated galaxies are considered. We find a similar relation for the disk parameters with an unprecedented low scatter. A Principal Component Analysis of the measured parameters shows that 2 eigenvectors suffice to explain more than 95 % of the total variance. These are, as found for other samples including spiral galaxies in different environmental situations, a scale parameter given by the mass or, equivalently, the luminosity or the size; and a form parameter given by the bulge to disk luminosity ratio, B/D, or, equivalently, by the gradient of the solid-body rotation region of the rotation curve, the G-parameter. We report here a tight correlation between G and B/D for our sample of isolated spirals that could be used as a new distance indicator. Based on data obtained at the 1.5m telescope of the Estacion de Observacion de Calar Alto, Instituto Geografico Nacional, which is jointly operated by the Instituto Geografico Nacional and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas through the Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia

  17. Interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein interacts with the type II interleukin-1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, D; Lundkvist, J; Layé, S; Bartfai, T

    1998-06-16

    Stably transfected HEK-293 cells express on their surface the murine type II IL-1 receptor (mIL-1RII) as demonstrated by FACS analysis using the mAb 4E2, however binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta to these cells is nearly absent. Saturable high affinity binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta is observed when the murine IL-1 receptor accessory protein (mIL-1RAcP) is coexpressed with mIL-1RII. Binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta to mIL-1RII-mIL-1RAcP complex can be inhibited either with antibodies to mIL-1RII (mAb 4E2), or by antibodies to mIL-1RAcP (mAb 4C5). The number of high affinity binding sites in cells stably transfected with the cDNA for mIL-1RII is dependent on the dose of cDNA for mIL-1RAcP used to transfect the cells. The high affinity complex between mIL-1RII and mIL-1RAcP is not preformed by interaction between the intracellular domains of these two transmembrane proteins, rather it appears to require the extracellular portions of mIL-1RII and mIL-1RAcP and the presence of a ligand. We suggest that in addition to its earlier described decoy receptor role, IL-1RII may modulate the responsiveness of cells to IL-1 by binding the IL-1RAcP in unproductive/non-signalling complexes and thus reducing the number of signalling IL-1RI-IL-1RAcP-agonist complexes when IL-1 is bound.

  18. A spectroscopic investigation of the interaction between c-MYC DNA and tetrapyridinoporphyrazinatozinc(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Leila; Fazeli, Zahra; Safaei, Elham; Rastegar, Hossein; Akbari, Minoo

    2014-06-01

    The c-MYC gene plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and growth and it is overexpressed in a wide variety of human cancers. Around 90% of c-MYC transcription is controlled by the nuclease-hypersensitive element III1 (NHE III1), whose 27-nt purine-rich strand has the ability to form a G-quadruplex structure under physiological conditions. Therefore, c-MYC DNA is an attractive target for drug design, especially for cancer chemotherapy. Here, the interaction of water-soluble tetrapyridinoporphyrazinatozinc(II) with 27-nt G-rich strand (G/c-MYC), its equimolar mixture with the complementary sequence (GC/c-MYC) and related C-rich oligonucleotide (C/c-MYC) is investigated. Circular dichroism (CD) measurements of the G-rich 27-mer oligonucleotide in 150 mM KCl, pH 7 demonstrate a spectral signature consistent with parallel G-quadruplex DNA. Furthermore, the CD spectrum of the GC rich oligonucleotide shows characteristics of both duplex and quadruplex structures. Absorption spectroscopy implies that the complex binding of G/c-MYC and GC/c-MYC is a two-step process; in the first step, a very small red shift and hypochromicity and in the second step, a large red shift and hyperchromicity are observed in the Q band. Emission spectra of zinc porphyrazine are quenched upon addition of three types of DNA. According to the results of spectroscopy, it can be concluded the dominant binding mode is probably, outside binding and end stacking.

  19. Quantum chemical topology study of the water-platinum(II) interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergès, Jacqueline; Fourré, Isabelle; Pilmé, Julien; Kozelka, Jiri

    2013-02-04

    The "inverse hydration" of neutral complexes of Pt(II) by an axial water molecule, whose one OH-bond is oriented toward Pt, has been the subject of recent works, theoretical as well as experimental. To study the influence of the ligands on this non-conventional H-bond, we extend here our previous energy calculations, using the second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) method together with the Dolg-Pélissier pseudopotential for platinum, to various neutral complexes including the well-known chemotherapeutic agent "cisplatin". The stabilization energy, depending on the nature and the configuration of platinum ligands, is dominated by the same important dispersive component, for all the investigated complexes. For a further characterization of this particular H-bond, we used the atoms in molecules theory (AIM) and the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF). The charge transfer occurring from the complex to the water molecule and the Laplacian of the density at the bond critical point between water and Pt are identified as interesting AIM descriptors of this non-conventional H-bond. Beyond this AIM analysis, we show that the polarization of the ELF bonding O-H basin involved in the non-conventional H-bond is enhanced during the approach of the water molecule to the Pt complexes. When the water medium, treated in an implicit solvation model, is taken into account, the interaction energies become independent on the nature and configuration of platinum ligands. However, the topological descriptors remain qualitatively unchanged.

  20. Investigation of the interaction of copper(II) oxide and electron beam irradiation crosslinkable polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bee, Soo-Tueen, E-mail: direct.beest@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sin, Lee Tin, E-mail: direct.tinsin@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ratnam, C.T. [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Haraveen, K.J.S.; Tee, Tiam-Ting [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahmat, A.R. [Department of Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the effects of electron beam irradiation on the properties of copper(II) oxide when added to low-density polyethylene (LDPE) blends were investigated. It was found that the addition of low loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩽2 phr) to LDPE results in significantly poorer gel content and hot set results. However, the incorporation of higher loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩾3 phr) could slightly increase the degree of crosslinking in all irradiated LDPE composites. This is due to the fact that higher amounts of copper(II) oxide could slightly induce the formation of free radicals in LDPE matrix. Besides, increasing irradiation doses was also found to gradually increase the gel content of LDPE composites by generating higher amounts of free radicals. As a consequence, these higher amounts of free radicals released in the LDPE matrix could significantly increase the degree of crosslinking. The addition of copper(II) oxide could reduce the tensile strength and fracture strain (elongation at break) of LDPE composites because of poorer interfacial adhesion effect between copper(II) oxide particles and LDPE matrix. Meanwhile, increasing irradiation doses on all copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites could marginally increase the tensile strength. In addition, increasing irradiation dose could enhance the thermal stability of LDPE composites by increasing the decomposition temperature. The oxidation induction time (OIT) analysis showed that, because of the crosslinking network in the copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites, oxidation reaction is much delayed.

  1. Abiotic and microbial interactions during anaerobic transformations of Fe(II and NOx-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flynn ePicardal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial Fe(II oxidation using NO3- as the terminal electron acceptor (nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation; NDFO has been studied for over 15 years. Although there are reports of autotrophic isolates and stable enrichments, many of the bacteria capable of NDFO are known organotrophic NO3- -reducers that require the presence of an organic, primary substrate, e.g., acetate, for significant amounts of Fe(II oxidation. Although the thermodynamics of Fe(II oxidation are favorable when coupled to either NO3- or NO2- reduction, the kinetics of abiotic Fe(II oxidation by NO3- are relatively slow except under special conditions. NDFO is typically studied in batch cultures containing millimolar concentrations of Fe(II, NO3-, and the primary substrate. In such systems, NO2- is often observed to accumulate in culture media during Fe(II oxidation. Compared to NO3-, abiotic reactions of biogenic NO2- and Fe(II are relatively rapid. The kinetics and reaction pathways of Fe(II oxidation by NO2- are strongly affected by medium composition and pH, reactant concentration, and the presence of Fe(II-sorptive surfaces, e.g., Fe(III oxyhydroxides and cellular surfaces. In batch cultures, the combination of abiotic and microbial Fe(II oxidation can alter product distribution and, more importantly, results in the formation of intracellular precipitates and extracellular Fe(III oxyhydroxide encrustations that apparently limit further cell growth and Fe(II oxidation. Unless steps are taken to minimize or account for potential abiotic reactions, results of microbial NDFO studies can be obfuscated by artifacts of the chosen experimental conditions, the use of inappropriate analytical methods, and the resulting uncertainties about the relative importance of abiotic and microbial reactions.In this manuscript, abiotic reactions of NO3- and NO2- with aqueous Fe2+, chelated Fe(II, and solid-phase Fe(II are reviewed along with factors that can influence overall NDFO reac

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, and Interaction with Biomolecules of Platinum(II Complexes with Shikimic Acid-Based Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the active ingredient shikimic acid (SA of traditional Chinese medicine and NH2(CH2nOH, (n=2–6, we have synthesized a series of new water-soluble Pt(II complexes PtLa–eCl2, where La–e are chelating diamine ligands with carbon chain covalently attached to SA (La–e = SA-NH(CH2nNHCH2CH2NH2; La, n=2; Lb, n=3; Lc, n=4; Ld, n=5; Le, n=6. The results of the elemental analysis, LC-MS, capillary electrophoresis, and 1H, 13C NMR indicated that there was only one product (isomer formed under the present experimental conditions, in which the coordinate mode of PtLa–eCl2 was two-amine bidentate. Their in vitro cytotoxic activities were evaluated by MTT method, where these compounds only exhibited low cytotoxicity towards BEL7404, which should correlate their low lipophilicity. The interactions of the five Pt(II complexes with DNA were investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis, which suggests that the Pt(II complexes could induce DNA alteration. We also studied the interactions of the Pt(II complexes with 5′-GMP with ESI-MS and 1H NMR and found that PtLbCl2, PtLcCl2, and PtLdCl2 could react with 5′-GMP to form mono-GMP and bis-GMP adducts. Furthermore, the cell-cycle analysis revealed that PtLbCl2, PtLcCl2 cause cell G2-phase arrest after incubation for 72 h. Overall, these water-soluble Pt(II complexes interact with DNA mainly through covalent binding, which blocks the DNA synthesis and replication and thus induces cytotoxicity that weakens as the length of carbon chain increases.

  3. EPR of Cu(II) in sarcosine cadmium chloride: probe into dopant site - symmetry and copper-sarcosine interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Pathinettam-Padiyan, D; Murugesan, R

    2000-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of Cu(II) doped sarcosine cadmium chloride single crystals have been investigated at room temperature. Experimental results reveal that the Cu(II) ion enters the lattice interstitially. The observed superhyperfine lines indicate the superposition of two sets of quintet structure with interaction of nitrogen atoms and the two isotopes of copper. The spin Hamiltonian parameters are evaluated by Schonland method and the electric field symmetry around the copper ion is rhombic. An admixture of d sub z sup 2 orbital with the d sub x sub sup 2 sub - sub y sub sup 2 ground state is observed. Evaluation of MO coefficients reveals that the in-plane interaction between copper and nitrogen is strong in this lattice.

  4. Study of Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions with Atmospheric Neutrino Data in Super-Kamiokande I and II

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsuka, G; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Ikeda, M; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Watanabe, H; Yamada, S; Hazama, S; Higuchi, I; Ishihara, C; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Nishino, H; Okumura, K; Tanimoto, N; Dufour, F; Kearns, E; Litos, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Bays, K; Cravens, J P; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Watanabe, Y; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Yokoyama, M; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Tanaka, T; Jung, C K; Lopez, G; McGrew, C; Yanagisawa, C; Tamura, N; Idehara, Y; Sakuda, M; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Seo, H K; Furuse, Y; Nishijima, K; Yokosawa, Y; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Chen, S; Liu, J; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Connolly, K; Thrane, E; Wilkes, R J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study non-standard neutrino interactions as an example of physics beyond the standard model using atmospheric neutrino data collected during the Super-Kamiokande I(1996-2001) and II(2003-2005) periods. We focus on flavor-changing-neutral-currents (FCNC), which allow neutrino flavor transitions via neutral current interactions, and effects which violate lepton non-universality (NU) and give rise to different neutral-current interaction-amplitudes for different neutrino flavors. We obtain a limit on the FCNC coupling parameter, varepsilon_{mu tau}, |varepsilon_{mu tau}|<1.1 x 10^{-2} at 90%C.L. and various constraints on other FCNC parameters as a function of the NU coupling, varepsilon_{e e}. We find no evidence of non-standard neutrino interactions in the Super-Kamiokande atmospheric data.

  5. Rich spectroscopic and molecular dynamic studies on the interaction of cytotoxic Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes of glycine derivatives with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami Moghadam, Mahboube; Saidifar, Maryam; Divsalar, Adeleh; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Farhangian, Hossein; Ghadamgahi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Some amino acid derivatives, such as R-glycine, have been synthesized together with their full spectroscopic characterization. The sodium salts of these bidentate amino acid ligands have been interacted with [M(bpy)(H2O)2](NO3)2 giving the corresponding some new complexes with formula [M(bpy)(R-gly)]NO3 (where M is Pt(II) or Pd(II), bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine and R-gly is butyl-, hexyl- and octyl-glycine). Due to less solubility of octyl derivatives, the biological activities of butyl and hexyl derivatives have been tested against chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, K562. The interaction of these complexes with highly polymerized calf thymus DNA has been extensively studied by means of electronic absorption, fluorescence and other measurements. The experimental results suggest that these complexes positive cooperatively bind to DNA presumably via groove binding. Molecular dynamic results show that the DNA structure is largely maintained its native structure in hexylglycine derivative-water mixtures and at lower temperatures. The simulation data indicates that the more destabilizing effect of butylglycine is induced by preferential accumulation of these molecules around the DNA and due to their more negative free energy of binding via groove binding.

  6. A doppel alpha-helix peptide fragment mimics the copper(II) interactions with the whole protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Campagna, Tiziana; Campitiello, Maria Anna; Raiola, Luca; Isernia, Carla; Hansson, Orjan; Bonomo, Raffaele P; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2010-06-01

    The doppel protein (Dpl) is the first homologue of the prion protein (PrP(C)) to be discovered; it is overexpressed in transgenic mice that lack the prion gene, resulting in neurotoxicity. The whole prion protein is able to inhibit Dpl neurotoxicity, and its N-terminal domain is the determinant part of the protein function. This region represents the main copper(II) binding site of PrP(C). Dpl is able to bind at least one copper ion, and the specific metal-binding site has been identified as the histidine residue at the beginning of the third helical region. However, a reliable characterization of copper(II) coordination features has not been reported. In a previous paper, we studied the copper(II) interaction with a peptide that encompasses only the loop region potentially involved in metal binding. Nevertheless, we did not find a complete match between the EPR spectroscopic parameters of the copper(II) complexes formed with the synthesized peptide and those reported for the copper(II) binding sites of the whole protein. Herein, the synthesis of the human Dpl peptide fragment hDpl(122-139) (Ac-KPDNKLHQQVLWRLVQEL-NH(2)) and its copper(II) complex species are reported. This peptide encompasses the third alpha helix and part of the loop linking the second and the third helix of human doppel protein. The single-point-mutated peptide, hDpl(122-139)D124N, in which aspartate 124 replaces an asparagine residue, was also synthesized. This peptide was used to highlight the role of the carboxylate group on both the conformation preference of the Dpl fragment and its copper(II) coordination features. NMR spectroscopic measurements show that the hDpl(122-139) peptide fragment is in the prevailing alpha-helix conformation. It is localized within the 127-137 amino acid residue region that represents a reliable conformational mimic of the related protein domain. A comparison with the single-point-mutated hDpl(122-139)D124N reveals the significant role played by the aspartic

  7. Fluorescent copper(II complexes: The electron transfer mechanism, interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA and antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Hazra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dinuclear copper(II complexes with formula [Cu2(L2(N32] (1 and [Cu2(L2(NCS2] (2 HL = (1-[(3-methyl-pyridine-2-ylimino-methyl]-naphthalen-2-ol were synthesized by controlling the molar ratio of Cu(OAC2·6H2O, HL, sodium azide (1 and ammonium thiocyanate (2. The end on bridges appear exclusively in azide and thiocyanate to copper complexes. The electron transfer mechanism of copper(II complexes is examined by cyclic voltammetry indicating copper(II complexes are Cu(II/Cu(I couple. The interactions of copper(II complexes towards bovine serum albumin (BSA were examined with the help of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic tools. We report a superficial solution-based route for the synthesis of micro crystals of copper complexes with BSA. The antibacterial activity of the Schiff base and its copper complexes were investigated by the agar disc diffusion method against some species of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Streptococcus pneumonia and Bacillus cereus. It has been observed that the antibacterial activity of all complexes is higher than the ligand.

  8. Insight into the interactive residues between two domains of human somatic Angiotensin-converting enzyme and Angiotensin II by MM-PBSA calculation and steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shan-shan; Han, Wei-wei; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Song; Shan, Ya-ming

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), a membrane-bound zinc metallopeptidase, catalyzes the formation of Angiotensin-II (AngII) and the deactivation of bradykinin in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and kallikrein-kinin systems. As a hydrolysis product of ACE, AngII is regarded as an inhibitor and displays stronger competitive inhibition in the C-domain than the N-domain of ACE. However, the AngII binding differences between the two domains and the mechanisms behind AngII dissociation from the C-domain are rarely explored. In this work, molecular docking, Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area calculation, and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) are applied to explore the structures and interactions in the binding or unbinding of AngII with the two domains of human somatic ACE. Calculated free energy values suggest that the C-domain-AngII complex is more stable than the N-domain-AngII complex, consistent with available experimental data. SMD simulation results imply that electrostatic interaction is dominant in the dissociation of AngII from the C-domain. Moreover, Gln106, Asp121, Glu123, and Tyr213 may be the key residues in the unbinding pathway of AngII. The simulation results in our work provide insights into the interactions between the two domains of ACE and its natural peptide inhibitor AngII at a molecular level. Moreover, the results provide theoretical clues for the design of new inhibitors.

  9. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) < Cd(II) < Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  10. The interaction of disrupted type II neuregulin 1 and chronic adolescent stress on adult anxiety- and fear-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S B; Taylor, A R; Koenig, J I

    2013-09-26

    The incidence of anxiety, mood, substance abuse disorders and schizophrenia increases during adolescence. Epidemiological evidence confirms that exposure to stress during sensitive periods of development can create vulnerabilities that put genetically predisposed individuals at increased risk for psychiatric disorders. Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a frequently identified schizophrenia susceptibility gene that has also been associated with the psychotic features of bipolar disorder. Previously, we established that Type II NRG1 is expressed in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis neurocircuitry. We also found, using a line of Nrg1 hypomorphic rats (Nrg1(Tn)), that genetic disruption of Type II NRG1 results in altered HPA axis function and environmental reactivity. The present studies used the Nrg1(Tn) rats to test whether Type II NRG1 gene disruption and chronic stress exposure during adolescence interact to alter adult anxiety- and fear-related behaviors. Male and female Nrg1(Tn) and wild-type rats were exposed to chronic variable stress (CVS) during mid-adolescence and then tested for anxiety-like behavior, cued fear conditioning and basal corticosterone secretion in adulthood. The disruption of Type II NRG1 alone significantly impacts rat anxiety-related behavior by reversing normal sex-related differences and impairs the ability to acquire cued fear conditioning. Sex-specific interactions between genotype and adolescent stress also were identified such that CVS-treated wild-type females exhibited a slight reduction in anxiety-like behavior and basal corticosterone, while CVS-treated Nrg1(Tn) females exhibited a significant increase in cued fear extinction. These studies confirm the importance of Type II NRG1 in anxiety and fear behaviors and point to adolescence as a time when stressful experiences can shape adult behavior and HPA axis function.

  11. Study on the interaction of a copper(II) complex containing the artificial sweetener aspartame with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh; Filli, Soraya Moradi

    2014-05-01

    A copper(II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied at physiological pH. Binding studies of this complex with HSA are useful for understanding the Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O-HSA interaction mechanism and providing guidance for the application and design of new and more efficient artificial sweeteners drive. The interaction was investigated by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment and circular dichroism. Hyperchromicity observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of HSA to Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O was observed and the binding constant (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (∆H) and entropy change (∆S) were calculated to be -458.67 kJ mol(-1) and -1,339 J mol(-1 )K(-1) respectively. According to the van't Hoff equation, the reaction is predominantly enthalpically driven. In conformity with experimental results, we suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O interacts with HSA. In comparison with previous study, it is found that the Cu(II) complex binds stronger than aspartame.

  12. DNA interaction studies of a platinum (II) complex containing an antiviral drug, ribavirin: the effect of metal on DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Mirzaei kalar, Zeinab; Moghadam, Neda Hosseinpour

    2012-10-01

    The water-soluble Pt (II) complex, [PtCl (DMSO)(N(4)N(7)-ribavirin)]· H(2)O (ribavirin is an antiviral drug) has been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding interactions of this complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated using fluorimetry, spectrophotometry, circular dichroism and viscosimetry. The complex binds to CT-DNA in an intercalative mode. The calculated binding constant, K(b), was 7.2×10(5) M(-1). In fluorimetric studies, the enthalpy (ΔH0) changes of the reaction between the Pt (II) complex with CT-DNA showed hydrophobic interaction. In addition, CD study showed stabilization of the right-handed B form of CT-DNA. All these results prove that the complex interacts with CT-DNA via intercalative mode of binding. In comparison with the previous study of the DNA interaction with ribavirin, these results show that platinum complex has greater affinity to CT-DNA.

  13. Angiotensin II and renal prostaglandin release in the dog. Interactions in controlling renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, J F; Stokke, E S

    1994-04-01

    The relationship between angiotensin II and renal prostaglandins, and their interactions in controlling renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were investigated in 18 anaesthetized dogs with acutely denervated kidneys. Intrarenal angiotensin II infusion increased renal PGE2 release (veno-arterial concentration difference times renal plasma flow) from 1.7 +/- 0.9 to 9.1 +/- 0.4 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha release from 0.1 +/- 0.1 to 5.3 +/- 2.1 pmol min-1. An angiotensin II induced reduction in RBF of 20% did not measurably change GFR whereas a 30% reduction reduced GFR by 18 +/- 8%. Blockade of prostaglandin synthesis approximately doubled the vasoconstrictory action of angiotensin II, and all reductions in RBF were accompanied by parallel reductions in GFR. When prostaglandin release was stimulated by infusion of arachidonic acid (46.8 +/- 13.3 and 15.9 +/- 5.4 pmol min-1 for PGE2, and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, respectively), angiotensin II did not change prostaglandin release, but had similar effects on the relationship between RBF and GFR as during control. In an ureteral occlusion model with stopped glomerular filtration measurements of ureteral pressure and intrarenal venous pressure permitted calculations of afferent and efferent vascular resistances. Until RBF was reduced by 25-30% angiotensin II increased both afferent and efferent resistances almost equally, keeping the ureteral pressure constant. At greater reductions in RBF, afferent resistance increased more than the efferent leading to reductions in ureteral pressure. This pattern was not changed by blockade of prostaglandin synthesis indicating no influence of prostaglandins on the distribution of afferent and efferent vascular resistances during angiotensin II infusion. In this ureteral occlusion model glomerular effects of angiotensin II will not be detected, and it might well be that the shift from an effect predominantly on RBF to a combined effect on both RBF and GFR induced by inhibition

  14. Study of the interaction mechanism in the biosorption of copper(II) ions onto posidonia oceanica and peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, Marta; Marzal, Paula; Gabaldon, Carmen [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Silvetti, Margherita; Castaldi, Paola [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali e Agrarie e Biotecnologie Agro-Alimentari, Sez. Chimica Agraria ed Ambientale, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    A systematic approach was used to characterize the biosorption of copper(II) onto two biosorbents, Posidonia oceanica and peat, focusing on the interaction mechanisms, the copper(II) sorption-desorption process and the thermal behavior of the biosorbents. Sorption isotherms at pH 4-6 were obtained and the experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir model with a maximum uptake (q{sub max}) at pH 6 of 85.78 and 49.69 mg g{sup -1}, for P. oceanica and peat, respectively. A sequential desorption (SD) with water, Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and EDTA was applied to copper-saturated biosorbents. Around 65-70% copper(II) were desorbed with EDTA, indicating that this heavy metal was strongly bound. The reversibility of copper(II) sorption was obtained by desorption with HCl and SD. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis detected the presence of peaks associated with OH groups in aromatic and aliphatic structures, CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} in aliphatic structures, COO{sup -} and COOH groups and unsaturated aromatic structures on the surface of both biosorbents, as well as peaks corresponding to Si-O groups on the surface of peat. The results of SEM-EDX and FTIR analysis of copper-saturated samples demonstrated that ion exchange was one of the mechanisms involved in copper(II) retention. Thermal analysis of biosorbent samples showed that copper(II) sorption-desorption processes affected the thermal stability of the biosorbents. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. White light-mediated Cu (II)-5FU interaction augments the chemotherapeutic potential of 5-FU: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibber, Sandesh; Farhan, Mohd; Hassan, Iftekhar; Naseem, Imrana

    2011-10-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a potent photosensitizer used in colon and rectal cancers. 5-FU on galvanostatic electrolysis or radiation-induced oxidation of aqueous solution yields N(1)-C(5)-linked dimmer hydrate of 5-FU. Copper is presently associated with chromatin; in cancer cells the concentration of copper is very high. It has been shown to be capable of mediating the action of several anticancer drugs through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The objective of the present study is to determine the Cu (II)-mediated anticancer mechanism of 5-FU under photo-illumination as well as 5-FU alone. We have shown that a pro-oxidant action was enhanced when Cu (II) was used with 5-FU as compared to 5-FU alone. This may be due to the inhibition of dimerization of 5-FU when present in combination with Cu (II) under photo-illumination. It was also shown that 5-FU alone as well as in combination with Cu (II) was able to generate oxidative stress in lymphocyte which is inhibited by scavengers of ROS. Moreover, the results of Fourier-transformed infrared spectra lead to the conclusion that the dimerization of 5-FU was inhibited when used in combination with Cu (II). It was due to the interaction of 5-FU with Cu (II). Hence, we propose that during chemoradiotherapy with 5-FU, the endogenous copper is mobilized by 5-FU, leading to the generation of ROS which cause oxidative stress and possibly cancer cell death by apoptosis.

  16. Source Regions of the Type II Radio Burst Observed During a CME-CME Interaction on 2013 May 22

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, P Mäkelä N; Akiyama, S; Krupar, V

    2016-01-01

    We report on our study of radio source regions during the type II radio burst on 2013 May 22 based on direction finding (DF) analysis of the Wind/WAVES and STEREO/WAVES (SWAVES) radio observations at decameter-hectometric (DH) wavelengths. The type II emission showed an enhancement that coincided with interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched in sequence along closely spaced trajectories. The triangulation of the SWAVES source directions posited the ecliptic projections of the radio sources near the line connecting the Sun and the STEREO-A spacecraft. The WAVES and SWAVES source directions revealed shifts in the latitude of the radio source indicating that the spatial location of the dominant source of the type II emission varies during the CME-CME interaction. The WAVES source directions close to 1 MHz frequencies matched the location of the leading edge of the primary CME seen in the images of the LASCO/C3 coronagraph. This correspondence of spatial locations at both wavelengths confirms tha...

  17. Multispectroscopic studies on the interaction of a copper(ii) complex of ibuprofen drug with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Shiri, Farshad

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of copper(II)-ibuprofenato complex with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) has been explored following, UV-visible spectrophotometry, fluorescence measurement, dynamic viscosity measurements, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In spectrophotometric studies of ct-DNA it was found that [Cu(ibp)2]2 can form a complex with double-helical DNA. The association constant of [Cu(ibp)2]2 with DNA from UV-Vis study was found to be 6.19 × 10(4) L mol(-1). The values of Kf from fluorescence measurement clearly underscore the high affinity of [Cu(ibp)2]2 to DNA. The experimental results showed that the conformational changes in DNA helix induced by [Cu(ibp)2]2 are the reason for the fluorescence quenching of the DNA-Hoechst system. In addition, the fluorescence emission spectra of intercalated methylene blue (MB) with increasing concentrations of [Cu(ibp)2]2 represented a significant increase of MB intensity as to release MB from MB-DNA system. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that copper(II)-ibuprofenato complex can change the conformation of DNA. In addition, the results of viscosity measurements suggest that copper(II)-ibuprofenato complex may bind with non-classical intercalative mode. From spectroscopic and hydrodynamic studies, it has been found that [Cu(ibp)2]2 interacts with DNA by partial intercalation mode which contains intercalation and groove properties.

  18. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of human serum albumin with copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Bhargab; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Das, Suman; Bandyopadhyay, Nirmalya; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Naskar, Jnan Prakash

    2017-02-01

    Two osazone based ligands, butane-2,3-dione bis(2‧-pyridylhydrazone) (BDBPH) and hexane-3,4-dione bis(2‧-pyridylhydrazone) (HDBPH), were synthesized out of the 2:1 M Schiff base condensation of 2-hydrazino pyridine respectively with 2,3-butanedione and 3,4-hexanedione. The X-ray crystal structures of both the ligands have been determined. The copper(II) complex of HDBPH has also been synthesized and structurally characterized. HDBPH and its copper(II) complex have thoroughly been characterized through various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The X-ray crystal structure of the copper complex of HDBPH shows that it is a monomeric Cu(II) complex having 'N4O2' co-ordination chromophore. Interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with these ligands and their monomeric copper(II) complexes have been studied by various spectroscopic means. The experimental findings show that the ligands as well as their copper complexes are good HSA binders. Molecular docking investigations have also been done to unravel the mode of binding of the species with HSA.

  19. Copper(II) interaction with peptide fragments of histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein: Speciation, stability and binding details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Santoro, Anna Maria; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2012-06-01

    GHHPH is the peptide repeat present in histidine-proline rich glycoprotein (HPRG), a plasma glycoprotein involved in angiogenesis process. The copper(II) ions interaction with mono (Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2)) and its bis-repeat (Ac-GHHPHGHHPHG-NH(2)) was investigated by means of potentiometric and spectroscopic techniques. To single out the copper(II) coordination environments of different species formed with Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2), three single point mutated peptides were also synthesized and their ability to coordinate Cu(2+) investigated. Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2) binds Cu(2+) by the imidazole side chain and the amide nitrogen deprotonation that takes place towards the N-terminus. The bis-repeat is able to bind Cu(2+) more efficiently than Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2). This difference is not only due to the number of His residues in the sequence but also to the different binding sites. In fact, the comparison of the potentiometric and spectroscopic data of the copper(II) complexes with a bis-repeatPeg construct Ac-(GHHPHG)-Peg-(GHHPHG)-NH(2) and those of the metal complexes with Ac-HGHH-NH(2), indicates that the central HGHH amino acid sequence is the main copper(II) binding site.

  20. Quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs interacting with copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II) and zinc(II): structural features, biological evaluation and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psomas, George; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P

    2013-05-14

    The structural features of copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II) and zinc(II) complexes with the antimicrobial drugs quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as ligands are discussed. The binding properties of these complexes to biomolecules (calf-thymus DNA, bovine or human serum albumin) are presented and evaluated. The biological activity (antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiproliferative) of selected complexes is investigated. Further perspectives concerning the synthesis and the biological activity of novel complexes with quinolones or NSAIDs attractive to synthetic chemists, biochemists and/or biologists are presented.

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, DNA interaction and biological activities of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with [(1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-ylimino)methyl]naphthalene-2-ol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Mohamed; El-Wakiel, Nadia A.; El-Ghamry, Hoda; Fathalla, Shaimaa K.

    2014-11-01

    Manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes of [(1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-ylimino)methyl]naphthalene-2-ol have been synthesized. The structure of complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment measurements and spectral (IR, 1H NMR, EI-mass, UV-Vis and ESR), and thermal studies. The results showed that the chloro and nitrato Cu(II) complexes have octahedral geometry while Ni(II), Co(II) and Mn(II) complexes in addition to acetato Cu(II) complex have tetrahedral geometry. The possible structures of the metal complexes have been computed using the molecular mechanic calculations using the hyper chem. 8.03 molecular modeling program to confirm the proposed structures. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the thermal decomposition steps were calculated from the TG curves. The binding modes of the complexes with DNA have been investigated by UV-Vis absorption titration. The results showed that the mode of binding of the complexes to DNA is intercalative or non-intercalative binding modes. Schiff base and its metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pesudomonas aeruginosa), fungi (Asperigllus flavus and Mucer) and yeast (Candida albicans and Malassezia furfur).

  2. Investigation of the interaction between human serum albumin and antitumor palladium(II) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline and dithiocarbamate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidifar, Maryam; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between [Pd(But-dtc)(phen)]NO3 (where But-dtc = butyldithiocarbamate and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) with HSA (Human Serum Albumin) was investigated by applying fluorescence, UV-Vis and circular dichroism techniques under physiological conditions. The results of fluorescence spectra indicated that the Pd(II) complex could effectively quench the fluorescence intensity of HSA molecules via static mechanism. The number of binding sites and binding constant of HSA-Pd(II) complex were calculated. Analysis of absorption titration data on the interaction between Pd(II) complex and HSA revealed the formation of HSA-Pd(II) complex with high-binding affinity. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that hydrophobic forces play a major role in this interaction. Furthermore, CD measurements were taken to explore changes in HSA secondary structure induced by the Pd(II) complex.

  3. Study of the interaction of ions iron (II) with poly aniline by X-ray, Moessbauer spectroscopy and conductivity;Estudo da interacao de ions ferro (II) com polianilina por espectroscopia Moessbauer, raios-X e condutividade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornazier Filho, Yonis; Silva Filho, Eloi Alves da, E-mail: yonis.fornazier@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (DQ/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Filho, Evaristo N. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (DF/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    The study of the interaction of ions Fe (II) with polyaniline was done by obtaining this polymer in the form of salt esmeraldine (Pani-ES) on addition of salt Fe(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}centre dot6H{sub 2}O in equimolar quantities in the temperature environment. We used the techniques of Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measures of conductivity with application of pressure. The results showed that the occurs formation of the complex Pani-Fe (II) and indicate that the ion Fe (II) interacted with the benzenoid nitrogens groups of the polymeric chain. (author)

  4. Interaction of a copper(II)-Schiff base complexes with calf thymus DNA and their antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabolová, D; Kožurková, M; Plichta, T; Ondrušová, Z; Hudecová, D; Simkovič, M; Paulíková, H; Valent, A

    2011-03-01

    The interaction of a copper complexes containing Schiff bases with calf thymus (CT) DNA was investigated by spectroscopic methods. UV-vis, fluorescence and CD spectroscopies were conducted to assess their binding ability with CT DNA. The binding constants K have been estimated from 0.8 to 9.1×10(4) M(-1). The percentage of hypochromism is found to be over 70% (from spectral titrations). The results showed that the copper(II) complexes could bind to DNA with an intercalative mode. Synergic action of Cu(II) complexes with ascorbic acid against Candida albicans induced the generation of free radicals and increased (more than 60 times) antimicrobial effect of these complexes.

  5. Palladium(II) complexes as biologically potent metallo-drugs: Synthesis, spectral characterization, DNA interaction studies and antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kollur Shiva; Kumar, Linganna Shiva; Chandan, Shivamallu; Naveen Kumar, R. M.; Revanasiddappa, Hosakere D.

    2013-04-01

    Four novel mononuclear Pd(II) complexes have been synthesized with the biologically active Schiff base ligands (L1-L4) derived from 3-amino-2-methyl-4(3H)-quinazolinone. The structure of the complexes has been proposed by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR, 1H NMR, mass, UV-Vis spectrometric and thermal studies. The investigation of interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been performed with absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The nuclease activity was done using pUC19 supercoiled DNA by gel-electrophoresis. All the ligands and their Pd(II) complexes have also been screened for their antibacterial activity by discolor diffusion technique.

  6. Geometry and Framework Interactions of Zeolite-Encapsulated Copper(II)-Histidine Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Grommen, R.; Manikandan, P.; Gao, Y.; Shane, T.; Shane, J.J.; Schoonheydt, R.A.; Goldfarb, D.

    2000-01-01

    The coordination geometry of zeolite-encapsulated copper(II)-histidine (CuHis) complexes, prepared by ion exchange of the complexes from aqueous solutions into zeolite NaY, was determined by a combination of UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-band EPR, electron-spin-echo envelope m

  7. Interaction between Sex and Social Support in the Control of Type II Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzmann, Carma A.; Kaplan, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the role of social support in the control of Type II diabetes mellitus. Participants (N=37) in a behavioral program in diabetes care completed questionnaires and provided blood samples. For women, satisfaction with supportive relationships was associated with control of diabetes. The opposite was true for men. (BH)

  8. Geometry and Framework Interactions of Zeolite-Encapsulated Copper(II)-Histidine Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Grommen, R.; Manikandan, P.; Gao, Y.; Shane, T.; Shane, J.J.; Schoonheydt, R.A.; Goldfarb, D.

    2000-01-01

    The coordination geometry of zeolite-encapsulated copper(II)-histidine (CuHis) complexes, prepared by ion exchange of the complexes from aqueous solutions into zeolite NaY, was determined by a combination of UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-band EPR, electron-spin-echo envelope m

  9. Ruthenium(II) arene complexes with oligocationic triarylphosphine ligands: synthesis, DNA interactions and in vitro properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelders, D.J.M.; Casini, A.; Edafe, F.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.; Dyson, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis, DNA binding properties and cytotoxicity of a series of Ru(II)-arene complexes containing oligocationic ammonium-functionalized triarylphosphines, of the type Ru(p-cymene)Cl2(L) (L ¼ oligocationic phosphine), are reported. The complexes are highly charged (the overall charge states bei

  10. Available for the Apple II: FIRM: Florida InteRactive Modeler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, C. Michael; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The Apple II microcomputer program described allows instructors with minimal programing experience to construct computer models of psychological phenomena for students to investigate. Use of these models eliminates need to maintain/house/breed animals or purchase sophisticated laboratory equipment. Several content models are also described,…

  11. The effect of interaction between Lipoprotein Lipase and ApoVLDL-II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... non-significantly different in fat chicken. SNP in apoVLDL-II and ... stage in the control of adipose tissue accretion is the removal of triglycerides ..... of absorbed fat is the same, lower body fat deposition may be attributed to.

  12. Interaction of a non-peptide agonist with angiotensin II AT1 receptor mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Miyakawa, Ayumi A; Pesquero, João B;

    2002-01-01

    To identify residues of the rat AT1A angiotensin II receptor involved with signal transduction and binding of the non-peptide agonist L-162,313 (5,7-dimethyl-2-ethyl-3-[[4-[2(n-butyloxycarbonylsulfonamido)-5-isobutyl-3-thienyl]phenyl]methyl]imidazol[4,5,6]-pyridine) we have performed ligand bindi...

  13. DNA binding, BSA interaction and SOD activity of two new nickel(II) complexes with glutamine Schiff base ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiang; Dong, Jianfang; Zhao, Peiran; Li, Manman; Cheng, Fengling; Kong, Jinming; Li, Lianzhi

    2016-08-01

    Two hexacoordinated octahedral nickel(II) complexes, [Ni(o-van-gln)(phen)(H2O)](1) and [Ni(sal-gln)(phen)(H2O)](2) [o-van-gln=a Schiff base derived from o-vanillin and glutamine, sal-gln=a Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and glutamine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline], have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. X-ray studies showed that nickel atoms of both 1 and 2 exhibit distorted NiN3O3 octahedral geometry. In each crystal, intermolecular hydrogen bonds form a two-dimensional network structure. DNA-binding properties of these two nickel(II) complexes were investigated by using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that the two complexes can bind to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) via an intercalative mode, and complex 1 exhibits higher interaction with CT-DNA than complex 2. Furthermore, the interactions between the nickel(II) complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been studied by spectroscopies. The results indicated that both complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA in a static quenching process. The binding constants (Kb) and the numbers of binding sites (n) obtained are 1.10×10(5)M(-1) and 1.05 for complex 1 and 5.05×10(4)M(-1) and 0.997 for complex 2, respectively. Site-selective competitive binding investigation indicated that the binding sites of both the complexes are located in site I of sub-domains IIA of BSA. Assay of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of the nickel(II) complexes revealed that they exhibit significant superoxide scavenging activity with IC50=3.4×10(-5)M for complex 1 and 4.3×10(-5)M for complex 2, respectively.

  14. Speciation of phytate ion in aqueous solution. Cadmium(II) interactions in aqueous NaCl at different ionic strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefano, Concetta de; Milea, Demetrio; Porcino, Nunziatina; Sammartano, Silvio [Universita di Messina, Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica, Chimica Analitica e Chimica Fisica, Messina (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    Interactions between myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis(dihydrogen phosphate) (phytic acid) and cadmium(II) were studied by using potentiometry (at 25 C with the ISE-H{sup +} glass electrode) in different metal to ligand (Phy) ratios (1:1{<=}Cd{sup 2+}:Phy{<=}4:1) in NaCl{sub aq} at different ionic strengths (0.1{<=}I/mol L{sup -1}{<=}1). Nine Cd{sub i}H{sub j}Phy{sup (12-2i-j)-} species are formed with i=1 and 2 and 4{<=}j{<=}7; and trinuclear Cd{sub 3}H{sub 4}Phy{sup 2-}. Dependence of complex formation constants on ionic strength was modeled by using Specific ion Interaction Theory (SIT) equations. Phytate and cadmium speciation are also dependent on the metal to ligand ratio. Stability of Cd{sub i}H{sub j}Phy{sup (12-2i-j)-} species was modeled as a function of both the ligand protonation step (j) and the number of metal cations bound to phytate (i), and relationships found were used for the prediction of species other than those experimentally determined (mainly di- and tri-protonated complexes), allowing the possibility of modeling Phy and Cd(II) behavior in natural waters and biological fluids. A critical evaluation of phytate sequestering ability toward cadmium(II) has been made under several experimental conditions, and the determination of an empirical parameter has been proposed for an objective ''quantification'' of this ability. A thorough analysis of literature data on phytate-cadmium(II) complexes has been performed. (orig.)

  15. Antisymmetric Magnetic Interactions in Oxo-Bridged Copper(II) Bimetallic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurice, R.; Pradipto, A. M.; Guihery, N.; Broer, R; de Graaf, C.

    2010-01-01

    The antisymmetric magnetic interaction is studied using correlated wave-function-based calculations in oxo-bridged copper bimetallic complexes. All of the anisotropic multispin Hamiltonian parameters are extracted using spin orbit state interaction and effective Hamiltonian theory. It is shown that

  16. Hydrodynamic Interactions between Two Forced Objects of Arbitrary Shape: II Relative Translation

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfriend, Tomer; Witten, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    We study the relative translation of two arbitrarily shaped objects, caused by their hydrodynamic interaction as they are forced through a viscous fluid in the limit of zero Reynolds number. It is well known that in the case of two rigid spheres in an unbounded fluid, the hydrodynamic interaction does not produce relative translation. More generally such an effective pair-interaction vanishes in configurations with spatial inversion symmetry, for example, an enantiomorphic pair in mirror image positions has no relative translation. We show that the breaking of inversion symmetry by boundaries of the system accounts for the interactions between two spheres in confined geometries, as observed in experiments. The same general principle also provides new predictions for interactions in other object configurations near obstacles. We examine the time-dependent relative translation of two self-aligning objects, extending the numerical analysis of our preceding publication [Goldfriend, Diamant and Witten, arXiv:1502....

  17. Characterisation of the interactions between substrate, copper(II) complex and DNA and their role in rate acceleration in DNA-based asymmetric catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of the azachalcone derived substrate Aza with copper(II) complexes in the presence and absence of st-DNA were studied in detail by UV/Vis absorption, EPR and Raman and (UV and vis) resonance Raman spectroscopies. The binding of Aza to the Lewis acidic copper(II) complexes, which results

  18. Characterisation of the interactions between substrate, copper(II) complex and DNA and their role in rate acceleration in DNA-based asymmetric catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of the azachalcone derived substrate Aza with copper(II) complexes in the presence and absence of st-DNA were studied in detail by UV/Vis absorption, EPR and Raman and (UV and vis) resonance Raman spectroscopies. The binding of Aza to the Lewis acidic copper(II) complexes, which results

  19. Macrolide-ketolide inhibition of MLS-resistant ribosomes is improved by alternative drug interaction with domain II of 23S rRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Hansen, L H; Mauvais, P

    2000-01-01

    to A752 via alkyl-aryl groups linked to a carbamate at the drug 11/12 position (in the ketolide antibiotics HMR 3647 and HMR 3004). The data indicate that simultaneous drug interactions with domains II and V strengthen binding and that the domain II contact is of particular importance to achieve...

  20. DNA interaction, antimicrobial, anticancer activities and molecular docking study of some new VO(II), Cr(III), Mn(II) and Ni(II) mononuclear chelates encompassing quaridentate imine ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M; Aboelez, Moustafa O; Hassan Abdel-Mawgoud, Azza A

    2017-05-01

    The present study was conducted to synthesis of some new imine Cr(III), VO(II), Mn(II) and Ni(II) complexes derived from the condensation of 2-amino phenol with 2-hydroxynapthaldehyde were synthesized. The prepared HNPN imine ligand was analyzed by its melting point, IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopies. The investigated HNPN imine complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, FT IR, UV-vis and thermal analysis (TGA) under nitrogen atmosphere from ambient temperature to 750°C. The experimental results revealed that the investigated complexes contain hydrated water molecules. The molar conductance values of complexes are relatively low, indicating the non-electrolytic nature of these complexes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show that the investigated complexes are paramagnetic. Moreover, the stability constants of the preparing complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. All the complexes were found to be monomeric 1:1 (M:L) stoichiometry in nature with octahedral geometry for Cr(III), tetrahedral for Mn(II), square planner for Ni(II) and square pyramidal for VO(II). Moreover, the prepared HNPN imine ligand and its complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial effect against some types of bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis (+ve), Escherichia coli(-ve) and Staphylococcus aureus (+ve) and some types of fungi such as Aspergillusniger, Candida glabrata and Trichophyton rubrum. The results of these studies indicate that the metal complexes exhibit a stronger antibacterial and antifungal efficiency compared to their corresponding imine ligand. Moreover, the interaction of the investigated complexes with CT-DNA was checked using spectral studies, viscosity measurements and gel electrophoreses. The absorption titration studies revealed that each of these complexes is an avid binder to calf thymus-DNA. Also, there was appreciable changes in the relative viscosity of DNA, which is consistent with enhanced hydrophobic interaction of the aromatic rings and

  1. The spatial-temporal interaction in the LTP induction between layer IV to layer II/III and layer II/III to layer II/III connections in rats' visual cortex during the development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Ke; Zhang, Chao; Gu, Yu; Zhang, She-Hong; Shi, Jian; Chen, Xian-Hua

    2017-03-20

    During the early developmental period, long-term potentiation (LTP) can be induced in both vertical and horizontal connections in the rat visual cortex. However, the temporal difference in LTP change between the two pathways during animal development remains unclear. In this study, LTP in vertical (from layer IV to layer II/III) and horizontal (from layer II/III to layer II/III) synaptic connections were recorded in brain slices from the same rats, and the developmental changes of LTP in both directions were compared within the animals' eye-opening period. The results showed that the LTP amplitudes declined to unobservable levels on P16 in the horizontal connections and on P20 in the vertical synaptic connections. Meanwhile, V-LTP (LTP induced in the vertical direction) was always stronger than H-LTP (LTP induced in the horizontal direction) under the same conditions of pairing stimulus (PS). Next, H-LTP and V-LTP were induced from the same neuron in layer II/III to determine the spatiotemporal interactions between layer II/III horizontal inputs and ascending synaptic inputs during the maturation of rat visual cortex. The data show that the weak PS, which failed to induce H-LTP alone, was able to induce H-LTP effectively while V-LTP was performed on P10. Our results suggest that V-LTP can strengthen H-LTP induction in the visual cortex during the early developmental period. In contrast, the regulatory effect of H-LTP on V-LTP was much weaker.

  2. Second-order corrections to mean-field evolution of weakly interacting Bosons, II

    CERN Document Server

    Grillakis, M; Margetis, D

    2010-01-01

    We study the evolution of a N-body weakly interacting system of Bosons. Our work forms an extension of our previous paper I, in which we derived a second-order correction to a mean-field evolution law for coherent states in the presence of small interaction potential. Here, we remove the assumption of smallness of the interaction potential and prove global existence of solutions to the equation for the second-order correction. This implies an improved Fock-space estimate for our approximation of the N-body state.

  3. Theoretical Studies on the Spin Exchange Interaction in Copper(II) Complexes Coordinated with Nitronyl Nitroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie REN; Hai Yan WEI; Qi Hua ZHAO; Zhi Da CHEN

    2003-01-01

    Nitronyl nitroxide radical 1, NIT (4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazolyl-1-oxyl-3-oxide) and copper(II) chloride complexes with nitronyl nitroxide 2, [Cu(NITPh)2Cl2] (NITPh=2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) were studied with density functional theory (DFT). The magnetic orbital analysis reveals that the antiferromagnetic coupling for complex 2 is due to the antibonding σ*-orbital overlap between (Cu) and π* (NO) orbitals. Also, spin population and atomic charge distribution analysis suggest that for AFS of complex 2 the antiferromagnetic coupling between the radical ligands and the copper(II) ion originates from the spin delocalization induced by the α electron transfer from π*(NO) to (Cu) orbital.

  4. Zinc(II) complexes of carboxamide derivatives: Crystal structures and interaction with calf thymus DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biplab Mondal; Buddhadeb Sen; Ennio Zangrando; Pabitra Chattopadhyay

    2015-10-01

    Two mononuclear zinc(II) complexes of newly designed carboxamide derivatives, formulated as [Zn(L1)3](ClO4)2 (1) and [Zn(L2)3](ClO4)2 (2) [where L1 = -(furan-2-ylmethyl)-2-pyridinecarboxamide and L2 = -(thiophen-2-ylmethyl)-2-pyridine-carboxamide], have been isolated in pure form in the reaction of perchlorate salts of Zn(II) with ligands L1 and L2, respectively. The two complexes were characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic tools, and by X-ray crystal structures of both ligands and the complex 1. In complex 1, zinc(II) is chelated by three ligands with a distorted octahedral geometry. The DNA-binding properties of zinc complexes 1 and 2 have been investigated by spectroscopic methods and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that both complexes 1 and 2 bind to DNA in an intercalation mode between the uncoordinated furan or thiophene chromophore and the base pairs of DNA.

  5. Interaction of 2-aminopyrimidine with dichloro-[1-alkyl-2-(naphthylazo imidazole]palladium(II complexes : Kinetic and mechanistic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saha Sushanta

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anticancer properties of cisplatin and palladium(II complexes stem from the ability of the cis-MCl2 fragment to bind to DNA bases. However, cisplatin also interacts with non-cancer cells, mainly through bonding molecules containing -SH groups, resulting in nephrotoxicity. This has aroused interest in the design of palladium(II complexes of improved activity and lower toxicity. The reaction of DNA bases with palladium(II complexes with chelating N,N/donors of the cis-MCl2 configuration constitutes a model system that may help explore the mechanism of cisplatin's anticancer activity. Heterocyclic compounds are found widely in nature and are essential to many biochemical processes. Amongst these naturally occurring compounds, the most thoroughly studied is that of pyrimidine. This was one of the factors that encouraged this study into the kinetics and mechanism of the interaction of 2-aminopyrimidine (2-NH2-Pym with dichloro-{1-alkyl-2-(α-naphthylazoimidazole}palladium(II [Pd(α-NaiRCl2, 1] and dichloro-{1-alkyl-2-(β-naphthylazoimidazole}palladium(II [Pd(β-NaiRCl2, 2] complexes where the alkyl R = Me (a, Et (b, or Bz (c. Results 2-NH2-Pym reacts with 1a, 1b, and 1c to yield [{1-alkyl-2-(α-naphthylazoimidazole}bis(2-aminopyrimidine]palladium(II (3a, 3b, 3c dichloride and with 2a, 2b, and 2c to yield [{1-alkyl-2-(β-naphthylazoimidazole}bis(2-aminopyrimidine]palladium(II (4a, 4b, 4c dichloride in an acetonitrile (MeCN medium. The products were characterized using spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR, UV-Vis, NMR. The ligand substitution reactions follow second order kinetics – first order dependence on the concentration of the Pd(II complex and 2-NH2-Pym. Addition of LiCl to the reaction does not influence its rate. The thermodynamic parameters (standard enthalpy of activation, Δ‡H° and standard entropy of activation, Δ‡S° were determined from variable temperature kinetic studies. The magnitude of the second order

  6. Atrazine immobilization on sludge derived biochar and the interactive influence of coexisting Pb(II) or Cr(VI) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Zheng, Juan; Zheng, Pingping; Qiu, Rongliang

    2015-09-01

    Sludge derived biochars (SDBCs) may have the potential to simultaneously remove heavy metals and organic contaminants in relation to their various active sorption sites for both metal ions and organic compounds. SDBCs have been proven to provide a considerable capacity for immobilizing Pb(II) and Cr(VI) ions in solution, and in this study their ability to sorb atrazine, in addition to their corresponding interactive influences with coexisting metal ions, is extensively investigated. The results indicate that all atrazine adsorption isotherms fit well with the Freundlich equation, and the greatest value of 16.8 mg g(-1) sorption capacity occurred with SDBCs pyrolyzed at 400°C for 2h. The slow sorption kinetics fit well with the Lagergren's 2nd order reaction, and depend upon the initial atrazine concentration, indicating the significance of a site-specific process. The ionic strength-dependence of the atrazine adsorption behavior further consolidates the involvement of the mechanism of the H-bond with hydroxyl groups on SDBC. However, when Pb(II)/Cr(VI) metal ions coexist in solution, they substantially suppress atrazine adsorption, probably because the inner complex between the hydroxyl groups on SDBCs and Pb(II)/Cr(III) ions intrude the weak H-bond with atrazine. As a result, metal adsorption was found to be unaffected by the coexisting atrazine. Therefore, although SDBC is applicable for atrazine removal/immobilization in most of environmentally relevant conditions, a two-step process may be required if heavy metal ions coexist.

  7. DNA interaction studies of a novel Cu(II) complex as an intercalator containing curcumin and bathophenanthroline ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh; Moghadam, Neda Hosseinpour

    2013-05-05

    A new copper(II) complex; [Cu(Cur)(DIP)](+2) in which Cur=curcumin and DIP=4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, was synthesized and characterized using different physico-chemical methods. Binding interaction of this complex with calf thymus (CT-DNA) has been investigated by emission, absorption, circular dichroism, viscosity, and differential pulse voltammetry and fluorescence techniques. The complex displays significant binding properties to the CT-DNA. In fluorimeteric studies, the binding mode of the complex with CT-DNA was investigated using methylene blue as a fluorescence probe. Fluorescence of methylene blue-DNA solution increased in the presence of increasing amounts of the complex. It was found that the complex is able to displace the methylene blue completely. This indicate intercalation of the complex between base pairs of DNA. The cleavage of plasmid DNA by the complex was also studied. We found that the copper(II) complex can cleave puC18 DNA. Furthermore, mentioned complex induces detectable changes in the CD spectrum of CT-DNA, a decrease in absorption spectrum, and an increase in its viscosity. All of the experimental results showed that the Cu(II) complex bound to DNA by an intercalative mode of binding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Acid-base characterization, coordination properties towards copper(II) ions and DNA interaction studies of ribavirin, an antiviral drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaj, Justyna; Starosta, Radosław; Jeżowska-Bojczuk, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    We have studied processes of copper(II) ion binding by ribavirin, an antiviral agent used in treating hepatitis C, which is accompanied usually by an increased copper level in the serum and liver tissue. Protonation equilibria and Cu(II) binding were investigated using the UV-visible, EPR and NMR spectroscopic techniques as well as the DFT (density functional theory) calculations. The spectroscopic data suggest that the first complex is formed in the water solution at pH as low as 0.5. In this compound Cu(II) ion is bound to one of the nitrogen atoms from the triazole ring. Above pH6.0, the metal ion is surrounded by two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms from two ligand molecules. The DFT calculations allowed to determine the exact structure of this complex. We found that in the lowest energy isomer two molecules of the ligand coordinate via O and N4 atoms in trans positions. The hypothetical oxidative properties of the investigated system were also examined. It proved not to generate plasmid DNA scission products. However, the calf thymus (CT)-DNA binding studies showed that it reacts with ribavirin and its cupric complex. Moreover, the interaction with the complex is much more efficient.

  9. Synergistic interaction of levetiracetam with gabapentin in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model – a type II isobolographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wlaz Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at characterizing the anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam in combination with gabapentin, in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. Herein, psychomotor seizures were evoked in male albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3 s stimulus duration delivered via ocular electrodes. Type II isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the anticonvulsant interactions between the drugs in combination, for fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10. The type II isobolographic analysis revealed that the combinations of levetiracetam with gabapentin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 were supra-additive (synergistic; P<0.05 in terms of seizure suppression, while the combinations for the fixed-ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 were additive in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. We conclude that, as the combinations of levetiracetam with gabapentin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 exerted supra-additive (synergistic interaction in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model, this may be considered as particularly favorable combinations in further clinical practice.

  10. Yeast myosin light chain, Mlc1p, interacts with both IQGAP and class II myosin to effect cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyne, J R; Yosuf, H M; Bieganowski, P; Brenner, C; Price, C

    2000-12-01

    MLC1 (myosin light chain) acts as a dosage suppressor of a temperature sensitive mutation in the gene encoding the S. cerevisiae IQGAP protein. Both proteins localize to the bud neck in mitosis although Mlc1p localisation precedes Iqg1p. Mlc1p is also found at the incipient bud site in G(1) and the growing bud tip during S and G(2) phases of the cell cycle. A dominant negative GST-Mlc1p fusion protein specifically blocks cytokinesis and prevents Iqg1p localisation to the bud neck, as does depletion of Mlc1p. These data support a direct interaction between the two proteins and immunoprecipitation experiments confirm this prediction. Mlc1p is also shown to interact with the class II conventional myosin (Myo1p). All three proteins form a complex, however, the interaction between Mlc1p and Iqg1p can be separated from the Mlc1p/Myo1p interaction. Mlc1p localisation and maintenance at the bud neck is independent of actin, Myo1p and Iqg1p. It is proposed that Mlc1p therefore functions to recruit Iqg1p and in turn actin to the actomyosin ring and that it is also required for Myo1p function during ring contraction.

  11. Development of soil-structure interaction analysis method (II) - Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. P.; Ko, H. M.; Park, H. K. and others [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    This project includes following six items : free field analysis for the determination of site input motions, impedance analysis which simplifies the effects of soil-structure interaction by using lumped parameters, soil-structure interaction analysis including the material nonlinearity of soil depending on the level of strains, strong geometric nonlinearity due to the uplifting of the base, seismic analysis of underground structure such as varied pipes, seismic analysis of liquid storage tanks. Each item contains following contents respectively : state-of-the-art review on each item and data base construction on the past researches, theoretical review on the technology of soil-structure interaction analysis, proposing preferable technology and estimating the domestic applicability, proposing guidelines for evaluation of safety and analysis scheme.

  12. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of morphine, codeine, and their derivatives: theory and clinical reality, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Scott C; Cozza, Kelly L

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions with codeine, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, and buprenorphine are reviewed in this column. These compounds have a very similar chemical structure to morphine. Unlike morphine, which is metabolized chiefly through conjugation reactions with uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) enzymes, these five drugs are metabolized both through oxidative reactions by the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme and conjugation by UGT enzymes. There is controversy as to whether codeine, dihydrocodeine, and hydrocodone are actually prodrugs requiring activation by the CYP450 2D6 enzyme or UGT enzymes. Oxycodone and buprenorphine, however, are clearly not prodrugs and are metabolized by the CYP450 2D6 and 3A4 enzymes, respectively. Knowledge of this metabolism assists in the understanding for the potential of drug-drug interactions with these drugs. This understanding is important so that clinicians can choose the proper dosages for analgesia and anticipate potential drug-drug interactions.

  13. Kinetic theory of spatially homogeneous systems with long-range interactions: II. Basic equations

    OpenAIRE

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2013-01-01

    We provide a short historic of the early development of kinetic theory in plasma physics and synthesize the basic kinetic equations describing the evolution of systems with long-range interactions derived in Paper I. We describe the evolution of the system as a whole and the relaxation of a test particle in a bath at equilibrium or out-of-equilibrium. We write these equations for an arbitrary long-range potential of interaction in a space of arbitrary dimension d. We discuss the scaling of th...

  14. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  15. Pharmacodynamic interaction study of Allium sativum (garlic with cilostazol in patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Mateen

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Coadministration of aged garlic extract and cilostazol did not enhance the antiplatelet activity compared with individual drugs. Large randomized trials are needed to further evaluate the possible interaction of garlic in higher doses and in combination with other antiplatelet activity drugs.

  16. Genotype x diet interactions in mice predisposed to mammary cancer: II. Tumors and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Ryan R; Hunter, Kent W; Merrill, Michele La

    2008-01-01

    effects of diet on mammary tumor and metastases phenotypes, mapping of tumor/metastasis modifier genes, and the interaction between dietary fat levels and effects of cancer modifiers. Results demonstrate that animals fed a high-fat diet are not only more likely to experience decreased mammary cancer...

  17. Interactions in protein mixtures. Part II: A virial approach to predict phase behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersch, C.; Linden, E. van der; Martin, A.; Venema, P.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of proteins (b-lactoglobulin, Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), gelatins and whey protein isolate (WPI)) in solution was quantified by measuring their second virial coefficient using membrane osmometry. At neutral pH below 20e40 mM ionic strength, electrostatic repulsion dominated the

  18. Ecology of dark matter haloes -II. Effects of interactions on the alignment of halo pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Huillier, Benjamin; Park, Changbom; Kim, Juhan

    2017-01-01

    We use the Horizon Run 4 cosmological N-body simulation to study the effects of distant and close interactions on the alignments of the shapes, spins, and orbits of targets haloes with their neighbours, and their dependence on the local density environment and neighbour separation. Interacting targets have a significantly lower spin and higher sphericity and oblateness than all targets. Interacting pairs initially have anti-parallel spins, but the spins develop parallel alignment as time goes on. Neighbours tend to evolve in the plane of rotation of the target, and in the direction of the major axis of prolate haloes. Moreover, interactions are preferentially radial, while pairs with non-radial orbits are preferentially prograde. The alignment signals are stronger at high-mass and for close separations, and independent on the large-scale density. Positive alignment signals are found at redshifts up to 4, and increase with decreasing redshifts. Moreover, the orbits tend to become prograde at low redshift, while no alignment is found at high redshift (z = 4).

  19. Microscopic Conductivity of Lattice Fermions at Equilibrium. Part II: Interacting Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru, Jean-Bernard; de Siqueira Pedra, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We apply Lieb-Robinson bounds for multi-commutators we recently derived (Bru and de Siqueira Pedra, Lieb-Robinson bounds for multi-commutators and applications to response theory, 2015) to study the (possibly non-linear) response of interacting fermions at thermal equilibrium to perturbations of the external electromagnetic field. This analysis leads to an extension of the results for quasi-free fermions of (Bru et al. Commun Pure Appl Math 68(6):964-1013, 2015; Bru et al. J Math Phys 56:051901-1-051901-51, 2015) to fermion systems on the lattice with short-range interactions. More precisely, we investigate entropy production and charge transport properties of non-autonomous C*-dynamical systems associated with interacting lattice fermions within bounded static potentials and in presence of an electric field that is time and space dependent. We verify the 1st law of thermodynamics for the heat production of the system under consideration. In linear response theory, the latter is related with Ohm and Joule's laws. These laws are proven here to hold at the microscopic scale, uniformly with respect to the size of the (microscopic) region where the electric field is applied. An important outcome is the extension of the notion of conductivity measures to interacting fermions.

  20. An Interactive Activation Model of the Effect of Context in Perception. Part II. Report No. 8003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumelhart, David E.; McClelland, James L.

    This report is the second in a two-part series introducing an interactive activation model of context effects in perception. In the first part, a model for the perception of letters in words and other contexts was described and applied to a number of experiments. This second part applies the same model to a number of new experiments designed to…

  1. Electrostatic Molecular Interaction from X-ray Diffraction Data. II. Test on Theoretical Pyrazine Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feil, Dirk; Moss, Grant

    1983-01-01

    In a previous paper [Moss & Feil (1981). Acta Cryst. A37, 414-421] a method was reported to calculate the electrostatic potential and the electrostatic interaction energy from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The method was applied to experimental pyrazine data; however, owing to the relativel

  2. Interactions in protein mixtures. Part II: A virial approach to predict phase behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersch, C.; Linden, E. van der; Martin, A.; Venema, P.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of proteins (b-lactoglobulin, Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), gelatins and whey protein isolate (WPI)) in solution was quantified by measuring their second virial coefficient using membrane osmometry. At neutral pH below 20e40 mM ionic strength, electrostatic repulsion dominated the inte

  3. An Interactive Activation Model of the Effect of Context in Perception. Part II. Report No. 8003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumelhart, David E.; McClelland, James L.

    This report is the second in a two-part series introducing an interactive activation model of context effects in perception. In the first part, a model for the perception of letters in words and other contexts was described and applied to a number of experiments. This second part applies the same model to a number of new experiments designed to…

  4. Nucleic acid interaction and antibacterial behaviours of a ternary palladium(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Dosi, Promise A.; Bhatt, Bhupesh S.

    2012-02-01

    The bidentate ligands and Pd(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis (C, H, N), 1H NMR, 13C NMR, electronic spectra, FT-IR and FAB mass spectroscopy. The binding of palladium complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) has been explored using absorption titration, DNA melting temperature and viscosity measurements. The cleavage reaction on pUC19 DNA has been monitored by agarose gel electrophoresis. The results suggest that complexes can bind to DNA by intercalative modes and exhibit nuclease activities in which supercoil form is converted to open circular form. The antibacterial activity of ligands and complexes has been performed against three Gram(-ve) and two Gram(+ve) microorganisms and the study indicates that all the complexes show better microbial inhibition activity than ligands and palladium salt.

  5. Ruthenium(II) complexes containing quinone based ligands: Synthesis, characterization, catalytic applications and DNA interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, P.; Manikandan, R.; Endo, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Viswanathamurthi, P.

    2012-12-01

    1,2-Naphthaquinone reacts with amines such as semicarbazide, isonicotinylhydrazide and thiosemicarbazide in high yield procedure with the formation of tridentate ligands HLn (n = 1-3). By reaction of ruthenium(II) starting complexes and quinone based ligands HLn (n = 1-3), a series of ruthenium complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental and spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, electronic, 1H, 13C, 31P NMR and ESI-MS). The ligands were coordinated to ruthenium through quinone oxygen, imine nitrogen and enolate oxygen/thiolato sulfur. On the basis of spectral studies an octahedral geometry may be assigned for all the complexes. Further, the catalytic oxidation of primary, secondary alcohol and transfer hydrogenation of ketone was carried out. The DNA cleavage efficiency of new complexes has also been tested.

  6. Dielectric spectra broadening as the signature of dipole-matrix interaction. II. Water in ionic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Evgeniya; Puzenko, Alexander; Kaatze, Udo; Ben Ishai, Paul; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-03-21

    In this, the second part of our series on the dielectric spectrum symmetrical broadening of water, we consider ionic aqueous solutions. If in Part I, dipole-dipole interaction was the dominant feature, now ion-dipole interplay is shown to be the critical element in the dipole-matrix interaction. We present the results of high-frequency dielectric measurements of different concentrations of NaCl/KCl aqueous solutions. We observed Cole-Cole broadening of the main relaxation peak of the solvent in the both electrolytes. The 3D trajectory approach (described in detail in Part I) is applied in order to highlight the differences between the dynamics and structure of solutions of salts on one hand and dipolar solutes on the other hand.

  7. Direct methods of soil-structure interaction analysis for earthquake loadings(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Chung Bang; Lee, S. R.; Kim, J. M.; Park, K. L.; Oh, S. B.; Choi, J. S.; Kim, Y. S. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    In this study, methods for 3-D soil-structure interaction analysis have been studied. They are 3-D axisymmetric analysis method, 3-D axisymmetric finite element method incorporating infinite elements, and 3-D boundary element methods. The computer code, named as 'KIESSI - PF', has been developed which is based on the 3-D axisymmetric finite element method coupled with infinite element method. It is able to simulate forced vibration test results of a soil-structure interaction system. The Hualien FVT post-correlation analysis before backfill and the blind prediction analysis after backfill have been carried out using the developed computer code 'KIESSI - PF'.

  8. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. II. Feed-forward interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M; Tkacik, Gasper; Bialek, William

    2010-04-01

    Central to the functioning of a living cell is its ability to control the readout or expression of information encoded in the genome. In many cases, a single transcription factor protein activates or represses the expression of many genes. As the concentration of the transcription factor varies, the target genes thus undergo correlated changes, and this redundancy limits the ability of the cell to transmit information about input signals. We explore how interactions among the target genes can reduce this redundancy and optimize information transmission. Our discussion builds on recent work [Tkacik, Phys. Rev. E 80, 031920 (2009)], and there are connections to much earlier work on the role of lateral inhibition in enhancing the efficiency of information transmission in neural circuits; for simplicity we consider here the case where the interactions have a feed forward structure, with no loops. Even with this limitation, the networks that optimize information transmission have a structure reminiscent of the networks found in real biological systems.

  9. Anvil Forecast Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System, Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2008-01-01

    Meteorologists from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and Spaceflight Meteorology Group have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violations of the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria and Space Light Rules. As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) created a graphical overlay tool for the Meteorological Interactive Data Display Systems (MIDDS) to indicate the threat of thunderstorm anvil clouds, using either observed or model forecast winds as input.

  10. The Raspberry model for hydrodynamic interactions revisited. II. The effect of confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Joost; Peter, Toni; Fischer, Lukas P.; Holm, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The so-called "raspberry" model refers to the hybrid lattice-Boltzmann (LB) and Langevin molecular dynamics schemes for simulating the dynamics of suspensions of colloidal particles, originally developed by Lobaskin and Dünweg [New J. Phys. 6, 54 (2004)], wherein discrete surface points are used to achieve fluid-particle coupling. In this paper, we present a follow up to our study of the effectiveness of the raspberry model in reproducing hydrodynamic interactions in the Stokes regime for spheres arranged in a simple-cubic crystal [Fischer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 084107 (2015)]. Here, we consider the accuracy with which the raspberry model is able to reproduce such interactions for particles confined between two parallel plates. To this end, we compare our LB simulation results to established theoretical expressions and finite-element calculations. We show that there is a discrepancy between the translational and rotational mobilities when only surface coupling points are used, as also found in Part I of our joint publication. We demonstrate that adding internal coupling points to the raspberry can be used to correct said discrepancy in confining geometries as well. Finally, we show that the raspberry model accurately reproduces hydrodynamic interactions between a spherical colloid and planar walls up to roughly one LB lattice spacing.

  11. Fcp1 directly recognizes the C-terminal domain (CTD) and interacts with a site on RNA polymerase II distinct from the CTD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Man-Hee; Ye, Ping; Zhang, Mincheng; Hausmann, Stéphane; Shuman, Stewart; Gnatt, Averell L.; Fu, Jianhua

    2005-01-01

    Fcp1 is an essential protein phosphatase that hydrolyzes phosphoserines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Fcp1 plays a major role in the regulation of CTD phosphorylation and, hence, critically influences the function of Pol II throughout the transcription cycle. The basic understanding of Fcp1–CTD interaction has remained ambiguous because two different modes have been proposed: the “dockingsite” model versus the “distributive” mechanism. Here we demonstrate biochemically that Fcp1 recognizes and dephosphorylates the CTD directly, independent of the globular non-CTD part of the Pol II structure. We point out that the recognition of CTD by the phosphatase is based on random access and is not driven by Pol II conformation. Results from three different types of experiments reveal that the overall interaction between Fcp1 and Pol II is not stable but dynamic. In addition, we show that Fcp1 also interacts with a region on the polymerase distinct from the CTD. We emphasize that this non-CTD site is functionally distinct from the docking site invoked previously as essential for the CTD phosphatase activity of Fcp1. We speculate that Fcp1 interaction with the non-CTD site may mediate its stimulatory effect on transcription elongation reported previously. PMID:16301539

  12. Interaction of alpha-lactalbumin with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles. II. A fluorescence polarization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreman, W; van Tornout, P; van Cauwelaert, F H; Hanssens, I

    1981-01-22

    The interaction of alpha-lactalbumin with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles was studied as a function of temperature, pH and the molar ratio of phospholipid to protein. The method consisted of measuring the fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene used as a probe embedded in the vesicles. After incubation of the protein with the phospholipid for 2 h at 23 degrees C, the polarization of the light emitted by this probe shifted to higher values; the shift was greater at acidic pH than at neutral pH. After incubation at 37 degrees C, no shift in polarization was found at pH 7, 6 and 5 while a strong increase occurred at pH 4. Lowering the temperature, after incubation at 37 degrees C, had little effect on the polarization at neutral pH. At pH 5, however, and in the transition range of the phospholipid, the polarization increased greatly. A kinetic study of the interaction carried out around the transition temperature of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine as a function of pH shows that the speed of complex formation between alpha-lactalbumin and the lipid increases from neutral to acidic pH. From the present results and in agreement with our earlier calorimetric and fluorescence data (Hanssens, I., Houthuys, C., Herreman, W. and van Cauwelaert, F.H. (1980) Biochim. Biophys, Acta 602, 539--557), it is concluded that at neutral pH the interaction mechanism is probably different from that at acidic pH. At neutral pH and at all temperatures, alpha-lactalbumin is mainly absorbed electrostatically to the outer surface of the vesicle with little or no influence on the transition temperature of the phospholipid. At this pH, only around the transition temperature is penetration possible. At pH 4, however, the protein is able to penetrate the vesicle at all temperatures and to interact hydrophobically with the phospholipid fatty acid chains. As a result of this interaction, the transition temperature is increased by about 4 degrees C. This different

  13. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9 and Rac1 activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Sabbir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1 gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9, plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype.

  14. Effective scalar four-fermion interaction for Ge-phobic exothermic dark matter and the CDMS-II Silicon excess

    CERN Document Server

    Scopel, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We discuss within the framework of effective four-fermion scalar interaction the phenomenology of a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) Dirac Dark Matter candidate which is exothermic (i.e. is metastable and interacts with nuclear targets down-scattering to a lower-mass state) and $Ge$-phobic (i.e. whose couplings to quarks violate isospin symmetry leading to a suppression of its cross section off Germanium targets). We discuss the specific example of the CDMS-II Silicon three-candidate effect showing that a region of the parameter space of the model exists where WIMP scatterings can explain the excess in compliance with other experimental constraints, while at the same time the Dark Matter particle can have a thermal relic density compatible with observation. In this scenario the metastable state $\\chi$ and the lowest-mass one $\\chi^{\\prime}$ have approximately the same density in the present Universe and in our Galaxy, but direct detection experiments are only sensitive to the down-scatters of $\\chi$...

  15. Exchange interactions in [2 × 2] Cu(II) grids: on the reliability of the fitting spin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Carmen J; Evangelisti, Stefano

    2014-02-21

    This paper reports a theoretical analysis of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of a ferromagnetic Cu(II) [2 × 2] grid. The calculations confirm a quintet (S = 2) ground state and an energy-level distribution of the magnetic states in accordance with Heisenberg behaviour. The whole set of first- and second-neighbour magnetic coupling constants has been evaluated, all in agreement with the structure and arrangement of the Cu 3dx(2) - y(2) magnetic orbitals. The results indicate that the dominant interaction in the system is the ferromagnetic coupling between the nearest Cu sites. The calculated J values suggest a C(2v) spin-spin interaction pattern, instead of the D(4h) model employed in the magnetic data fit. However, both spin models provide similar plots of the thermal dependence of the susceptibility and magnetic moment data. This study highlights the fact that the spin models resulting from the fittings can be just effective models, capable of correctly reproducing the macroscopic properties, although not always in accordance with the microscopic interactions governing these properties.

  16. Synthesis, antibacterial, antifungal activity and interaction of CT-DNA with a new benzimidazole derived Cu(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Farukh; Mohani, Bhawana; Ahmad, Shamim

    2005-11-01

    The ligand [C(16)H(10)O(2)N(4)S(2)] L has been synthesized by the condensation reaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole and diethyloxalate. The ligand L was allowed to react with bis(ethylenediamine)Cu(II)/Ni(II) complexes to yield [C(20)H(22)N(8)S(2)Cu]Cl(2)1 and [C(20)H(22)N(8)S(2)Ni]Cl(2)2 complexes. The Ni(II) complex was synthesized only to elucidate the structure of the complex. The complexes 1 and 2 were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, NMR, EPR, UV-vis spectroscopy and molar conductance measurements. Both the complexes are ionic in nature and possess square-planar geometry. The binding of the complex 1 to calf thymus DNA was investigated spectrophotometrically. The absorption spectra of complex 1 exhibits a slight red shift with "hyperchromic effect" in presence of CTDNA. Electrochemical analysis and viscosity measurements were also carried out to ascertain the mode of binding. The complex 1 in the absence and in presence of CT DNA in aqueous solution exhibits one quasi-reversible redox wave corresponding to Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox couple at a scan rate of 0.2 V s(-1). The shift in DeltaE(p), E(1/2) and I(pa)/I(pc) values ascertain the interaction of calf thymus DNA with copper(II) complex. There is decrease in viscosity of CTDNA which indicates that the complex 1 binds to CTDNA through a partial intercalative mode. The antibacterial and antifungal studies of the [C(7)H(6)N(2)S], [C(4)H(16)N(4)Cu]Cl(2,) [C(16)H(10)N(4)S(2)O(2)] and [C(20)H(22)N(8)S(2)Cu]Cl(2) were carried out against S. aureus, E. coli and A. niger. All the results reveal that the complex 1 is highly active against the bacterial strains and also inhibits fungal growth.

  17. Calculation of hyperfine coupling constant by symmetry adapted cluster expansion configuration interaction theory. II. Anisotropic constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Takamasa; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Shida, Tadamasa

    1990-11-01

    Following the previous work on the isotropic hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) of polyatomic radicals the symmetry adapted cluster expansion-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) theory is applied to calculate anisotropic HFCCs also. The results are compared with available experimental data from diatomic to polyatomic radicals such as the vinoxy. For radicals consisting of only the first row atoms Dunning's double zeta (DZ) basis set is shown to be adequate, but for those containing the second row atoms inclusion of polarization functions is required. Compared with the isotropic HFCC the calculation of the anisotropic HFCC is less formidable. However, ignorance of electron correlation causes serious disagreements with experimental data.

  18. Eigenvectors and scalar products for long range interacting spin chains II: the finite size effects

    CERN Document Server

    Serban, D

    2013-01-01

    In this note, we study the eigenvectors and the scalar products the integrable long-range deformation of a XXX spin chain which is solved exactly by algebraic Bethe ansatz, and it coincides in the bulk with the Inozemtsev spin chain. At the closing point it contains a defect which effectively removes the wrapping interactions. Here we concentrate on determining the defect term for the first non-trivial order in perturbation in the deformation parameter and how it affects the Bethe ansatz equations. Our study is motivated by the relation with the dilatation operator of the N = 4 gauge theory in the su(2) sector.

  19. Highly inclined and eccentric massive planets. II. Planet-planet interactions during the disc phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriadis, Sotiris; Libert, Anne-Sophie; Bitsch, Bertram; Crida, Aurélien

    2017-02-01

    Context. Observational evidence indicates that the orbits of extrasolar planets are more various than the circular and coplanar ones of the solar system. Planet-planet interactions during migration in the protoplanetary disc have been invoked to explain the formation of these eccentric and inclined orbits. However, our companion paper (Paper I) on the planet-disc interactions of highly inclined and eccentric massive planets has shown that the damping induced by the disc is significant for a massive planet, leading the planet back to the midplane with its eccentricity possibly increasing over time. Aims: We aim to investigate the influence of the eccentricity and inclination damping due to planet-disc interactions on the final configurations of the systems, generalizing previous studies on the combined action of the gas disc and planet-planet scattering during the disc phase. Methods: Instead of the simplistic K-prescription, our N-body simulations adopt the damping formulae for eccentricity and inclination provided by the hydrodynamical simulations of our companion paper. We follow the orbital evolution of 11 000 numerical experiments of three giant planets in the late stage of the gas disc, exploring different initial configurations, planetary mass ratios and disc masses. Results: The dynamical evolutions of the planetary systems are studied along the simulations, with a particular emphasis on the resonance captures and inclination-growth mechanisms. Most of the systems are found with small inclinations (≤ 10°) at the dispersal of the disc. Even though many systems enter an inclination-type resonance during the migration, the disc usually damps the inclinations on a short timescale. Although the majority of the multiple systems in our simulations are quasi-coplanar, 5% of them end up with high mutual inclinations (≥ 10°). Half of these highly mutually inclined systems result from two- or three-body mean-motion resonance captures, the other half being

  20. Interaction of dinuclear cadmium(II) 5-Cl-salicylaldehyde complexes with calf-thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristovic, Maja Sumar; Zianna, Ariadni; Psomas, George; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios G; Coutouli-Argyropoulou, Evdoxia; Lalia-Kantouri, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Five dinuclear Cd(II) complexes with the anion of 5-Cl-salicylaldehyde (5-Cl-saloH) were synthesized in the absence or presence of the α-diimines: 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (neoc) or 2,2'-dipyridylamine (dpamH) and characterized as [Cd(5-Cl-salo)2(CH3OH)]2 (1), [Cd(5-Cl-salo)2(bipy)]2 (2), [Cd(5-Cl-salo)2(phen)]2 (3), [Cd(5-Cl-salo)(neoc)(ONO2)]2 (4) and [Cd(5-Cl-salo)(dpamΗ)(ONO2)]2 (5). The complexes were characterized by spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-vis, (1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR), elemental analysis and molar conductivity measurements. The structures of four complexes (1-3 and 5) were determined by X-ray crystallography, providing all three possible coordination modes of the ligand 5-Cl-salicylaldehyde, i.e. bidentate or tridentate chelating and/or bridging mode. The complexes bind to calf-thymus (CT) DNA mainly by intercalation, as concluded by the viscosity measurements and present relatively high DNA-binding constants. The complexes exhibit significant ability to displace ethidium bromide (EB) from the EB-DNA complex, thus indirectly proving the intercalation as the most possible binding mode to CT DNA.

  1. Effect of interactions between nitric oxide and angiotensin II on pressure diuresis and natriuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, M I; García-Salom, M; Tornel, J; De Gasparo, M; Fenoy, F J

    1997-11-01

    The present study examined the effect of an angiotensin II AT1 or AT2 receptor antagonist on the impairment of the pressure diuresis and natriuresis response produced by nitric oxide (NO) synthesis blockade. N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 37 nmol.kg-1.min-1) lowered renal blood flow and reduced the slopes of the pressure diuresis and natriuresis responses by 44 and 40%, respectively. Blockade of AT1 receptors with valsartan increased slightly sodium and water excretion at low renal perfusion pressure (RPP). Blockade of AT2 receptors with PD-123319 had no effect on renal function. The administration of valsartan or PD-123319 to rats given L-NAME had no effect on the renal vasoconstriction induced by NO synthesis blockade. In addition, in rats given L-NAME, valsartan elevated baseline excretory values at all RPP studied, but it had no effect on the sensitivity of the pressure diuresis and natriuresis response. However, the administration of PD-123319 to L-NAME-pretreated rats shifted the slopes of the pressure diuresis and natriuresis responses toward control values, indicating that the impairment produced by NO synthesis blockade on pressure diuresis is dependent on the activation of AT2 angiotensin receptors.

  2. Some new nano-sized Fe(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) Schiff base complexes as precursor for metal oxides: Sonochemical synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction, in vitro antimicrobial and anticancer activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M; El-Khatib, Rafat M; Abdel-Fatah, Shimaa Mahdy

    2016-12-01

    The complexes of Fe(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) with Schiff base derived from 2-amino-3-hydroxypyridine and 3-methoxysalicylaldehyde have been prepared. Melting points, decomposition temperatures, Elemental analyses, TGA, conductance measurements, infrared (IR) and UV-Visible spectrophotometric studies were utilized in characterizing the compounds. The UV-Visible spectrophotometric analysis revealed 1:1 (metal-ligand) stoichiometry for the three complexes. In addition to, the prepared complexes have been used as precursors for preparing their corresponding metal oxides nanoparticles via thermal decomposition. The structures of the nano-sized complexes and their metal oxides were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and transmittance electron microscopy. Moreover, the prepared Schiff base ligand, its complexes and their corresponding nano-sized metal oxides have been screened in vitro for their antibacterial activity against three bacteria, gram-positive (Microccus luteus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescence) and three strains of fungus. The metal chelates were shown to possess more antimicrobial activity than the free Schiff-base chelate and their nano-sized metal oxides have the highest activity. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA have been investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity mensuration and gel electrophoresis. The DNA binding constants reveal that all these complexes interact with DNA through intercalative binding mode. Furthermore, the cytotoxic activity of the prepared Schiff base complexes on human colon carcinoma cells, (HCT-116 cell line) and hepatic cellular carcinoma cells, (HepG-2) showed potent cytotoxicity effect against growth of carcinoma cells compared to the clinically used Vinblastine standard. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transport Induced by Mean-Eddy Interaction: II. Analysis of Transport Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ide, Kayo

    2011-01-01

    We present a framework for the analysis of transport processes resulting from the mean-eddy interaction in a flow. The framework is based on the {\\bf T}ransport {\\bf I}nduced by the {\\bf M}ean-{\\bf E}ddy {\\bf I}nteraction (TIME) method presented in a companion paper \\cite{ide_wiggins_pd06a}. The TIME method estimates the (Lagrangian) transport across stationary (Eulerian) boundaries defined by chosen streamlines of the mean flow. Our framework proceeds after first carrying out a sequence of preparatory steps that link the flow dynamics to the transport processes. This includes the construction of the so-called "instantaneous flux" as the Hovm\\"{o}ller diagram. Transport processes are studied by linking the signals of the instantaneous flux field to the dynamical variability of the flow. This linkage also reveals how the variability of the flow contributes to the transport. The spatio-temporal analysis of the flux diagram can be used to assess the efficiency of the variability in transport processes. We apply ...

  4. Binary Disk interaction II: Gap-Opening criteria for unequal mass binaries

    CERN Document Server

    del Valle, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    We study the interaction between an unequal mass binary with an isothermal circumbinary disk, motivated by the theoretical and observational evidence that after a major merger of gas-rich galaxies, a massive gaseous disk with a SMBH binary will be formed in the nuclear region. We focus on the gravitational torques that the binary exerts onto the disk and how these torques can drive the formation of a gap in the disk. This exchange of angular momentum between the binary and the disk is mainly driven by the gravitational interaction between the binary and a strong non-axisymmetric density perturbation that is produced in the disk, as response to the presence of the binary. Using SPH numerical simulations we tested two gap-opening criterion, one that assumes that the geometry of the density perturbation is an ellipsoid/thick-spirals and another that assumes a geometry of flat-spirals for the density perturbation. We find that the flat-spirals gap opening criterion successfully predicts which simulations will hav...

  5. Interaction of zinc(II) with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarushi, Alketa; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Psycharis, Vassilis; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P; Papadopoulos, Athanasios N; Psomas, George

    2017-09-01

    The reaction of ZnCl2 with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid (Hnif) resulted in the formation of complex [Zn(nif-O)2(MeOH)4], 1. When this reaction was performed in the presence of a N,N'-donor heterocyclic ligand such as 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 2,2'-bipyridylamine (bipyam), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and 2,2'-dipyridylketone oxime (Hpko), the complexes [Zn(nif-O,O')(bipy)Cl], 2, [Zn(nif-O)(nif-O,O')2(bipyam)], 3, [Zn(nif-O,O')2(phen)], 4 and [Zn(nif-O)2(Hpko-N,N')2], 5 were formed, respectively. The complexes were characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques and X-ray crystallography (for complexes 1-3). The complexes can scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and hydroxyl radicals, may inhibit soybean lipoxygenase and are more active compounds than free Hnif. The interaction of the complexes with serum albumins was monitored by fluorescence emission spectroscopy and the corresponding binding constants were calculated. The affinity of the complexes with calf-thymus DNA was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, viscosity measurements and fluorescence emission spectroscopy for the competitive studies of the complexes with ethidium bromide revealing their interaction probably via intercalation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Binary-disk interaction. II. Gap-opening criteria for unequal-mass binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Valle, Luciano; Escala, Andrés, E-mail: ldelvalleb@gmail.com [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-01-01

    We study the interaction of an unequal-mass binary with an isothermal circumbinary disk, motivated by the theoretical and observational evidence that after a major merger of gas-rich galaxies, a massive gaseous disk with a supermassive black hole binary will be formed in the nuclear region. We focus on the gravitational torques that the binary exerts on the disk and how these torques can drive the formation of a gap in the disk. This exchange of angular momentum between the binary and the disk is mainly driven by the gravitational interaction between the binary and a strong nonaxisymmetric density perturbation that is produced in the disk, in response to the presence of the binary. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamics numerical simulations, we test two gap-opening criteria, one that assumes the geometry of the density perturbation is an ellipsoid/thick spiral and another that assumes a flat spiral geometry for the density perturbation. We find that the flat spiral gap-opening criterion successfully predicts which simulations will have a gap in the disk and which will not. We also study the limiting cases predicted by the gap-opening criteria. Since the viscosity in our simulations is considerably smaller than the expected value in the nuclear regions of gas-rich merging galaxies, we conclude that in such environments the formation of a circumbinary gap is unlikely.

  7. A unified field theory II: Gravity interacting with a Yang-Mills and Higgs field

    CERN Document Server

    Gerhardt, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We quantize the interaction of gravity with a Yang-Mills and Higgs field using canonical quantization. Similar to the approach in a previous paper we discard the Wheeler-DeWitt equation and express the Hamilton constraint by the evolution equation of the mean curvature of the hypersurfaces in the foliation defined by the Hamiltonian setting. Expressing the time derivative of the mean curvature with the help of the Poisson brackets the canonical quantization of this equation leads to a wave equation in $Q=(0,\\infty)\\times \\cal{S}_o$, where $\\cal{S}_o$ is one of the Cauchy hypersurfaces in the Hamiltonian setting. The wave equation describes the interaction of an arbitrary Riemannian metric in $\\cal{S}_o$ and a given Yang-Mills and Higgs field. If the metric is complete $Q$ is globally hyperbolic. In case $\\cal{S}_o$ is compact we also prove a spectral resolution of the wave equation and establish sufficient conditions guaranteeing a mass gap.

  8. DINUCLEAR NICKEL(II PIVALATE WITH µ-AQUA AND DI-µ-PIVALATO BRIDGES SHOWING A FERROMAGNETIC INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Mikuriya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dinuclear nickel(II complex, [Ni2{O2CC(CH33}4(OH2{HO2CC(CH33}4] (1, was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy, and temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibilities (4.5—300 K. Single-crystal X-ray crystallography revealed a dinuclear core with µ-aqua and di-µ-pivalato bridges having monodentate pivalato and monodentate pivalic acid molecules. Magnetic data analysis showed a ferromagnetic interactions between the two nickel atoms with g = 2.251, J = 2.78 cm−1, D = 3.75 cm–1, and tip = 184 x 10–6 cm3 mol–1; g = 2.253, J = 2.73 cm−1, D = –3.26 cm–1, and tip = 176 x 10–6 cm3 mol–1.

  9. The piroxicam complex of copper(II), trans-[Cu(Pir)2(THF)2], and its interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Salimi, Mona; Weil, Matthias; Jannesari, Zahra; Darabi, Farivash; Abdi, Khatereh; Khalaji, Aliakbar Dehno; Sardari, Soroush; Ahangari, Reza

    2012-08-01

    The mononuclear Cu(II) complex, trans-[Cu(Pir)2(THF)2], where Pir is 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-2-pyridyl-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide-1,1-dioxide (piroxicam), has been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis, IR, and 1H NMR) and single crystal X-ray structure analysis. The molecular structure of the centrosymmetric complex is made up of two monoanionic bidentate Pir ligands coordinated to the Cu(II) atom through the pyridyl N atom and the carbonyl O atom of the amide group in equatorial positions. The elongated rhombic octahedral (ERO) coordination of the CuNONOO2″ chromophore is completed by the O atoms of two THF molecules in axial positions. A strong intramolecular hydrogen bond between the amide N-H function and the enolate O atom confirms the ZZZ conformation of piroxicam. In addition, CD spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis assays have been used to investigate the interaction of the complex with DNA. The results revealed that the binding of the complex with DNA led to DNA backbone distortion.

  10. Star-planet interactions. II. Is planet engulfment the origin of fast rotating red giants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privitera, Giovanni; Meynet, Georges; Eggenberger, Patrick; Vidotto, Aline A.; Villaver, Eva; Bianda, Michele

    2016-10-01

    Context. Fast rotating red giants in the upper part of the red giant branch have surface velocities that cannot be explained by single star evolution. Aims: We check whether tides between a star and a planet followed by planet engulfment can indeed accelerate the surface rotation of red giants for a sufficiently long time to produce these fast rotating red giants. Methods: We studied how the surface rotation velocity at the stellar surface evolves using rotating stellar models, accounting for the redistribution of the angular momentum inside the star by different transport mechanisms, the exchanges of angular momentum between the planet orbit and the star before the engulfment, and for the deposition of angular momentum inside the star at the engulfment. We considered different situations with masses of stars in the range between 1.5 and 2.5 M⊙, masses of the planets between 1 and 15 MJ (Jupiter mass), and initial semimajor axis between 0.5 and 1.5 au. The metallicity Z for our stellar models is 0.02. Results: We show that the surface velocities reached at the end of the orbital decay due to tidal forces and planet engulfment can be similar to values observed for fast rotating red giants. This surface velocity then decreases when the star evolves along the red giant branch but at a sufficiently slow pace to allowing stars to be detected with such a high velocity. More quantitatively, star-planet interaction can produce a rapid acceleration of the surface of the star, above values equal to 8 km s-1, for periods lasting up to more than 30% the red giant branch phase. As found already by previous works, the changes of the surface carbon isotopic ratios produced by the dilution of the planetary material into the convective envelope is modest. The increase of the lithium abundance due to this effect might be much more important, however lithium may be affected by many different, still uncertain, processes. Thus any lithium measurement can hardly be taken as a support

  11. Experimental studies of the quark-gluon structure of nucleons and nuclei and of pion- and proton-nucleus interactions. Progress report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out by New Mexico State University from April 1, 1994, through March 31, 1996 under a grant from the US Department of Energy. During this period we began phasing out our programs of study of pion-nucleus and pion-nucleon interaction and of nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions, which have been our major focus of the past two or three years. At the same time we continued moving in a new direction of research on studies of the internal structure of nucleons and nuclei in terms of quarks and gluons. The pion and nucleon work has been aimed at improving our understanding of the nature of pion and proton interactions in the nuclear medium and of various aspects of nuclear structure. The studies of the quark-gluon structure of nucleons are aimed at clarifying such problems as the nature of the quark sea and the relation of the nucleon spin to the spins of the quarks within the nucleon, questions which are of a very fundamental nature.

  12. Interaction of Fanaroff-Riley class II radio jets with a randomly magnetized intracluster medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huarte-Espinosa, M.; Krause, M.; Alexander, P.

    2011-12-01

    A combination of 3D magnetohydrodynamics and synthetic numerical simulations are presented to follow the evolution of a randomly magnetized plasma that models the intracluster medium, under the isolated effects of powerful, light, hypersonic and bipolar Fanaroff-Riley class II jets. We prescribe the cluster magnetic field (CMF) as a Gaussian random field with a Kolmogorov-like energy spectrum. Both the power of the jets and the viewing angle that is used for the synthetic rotation measure (RM) observations are investigated. We find the model radio sources introduce and amplify fluctuations on the RM statistical properties which we analyse as a function of time as well as the viewing angle. The average RM and the RM standard deviation are increased by the action of the jets. Energetics, RM statistics and magnetic power spectral analysis consistently show that the effects also correlate with the jets' power, and that the lightest, fastest jets produce the strongest changes in their environment. We see jets distort and amplify the CMFs especially near the edges of the lobes and the jets' heads. This process leads to a flattening of the RM structure functions at scales comparable to the source size. The edge features we find are similar to ones observed in Hydra A. The results show that jet-produced RM enhancements are more apparent in quasars than in radio galaxies. Globally, jets tend to enhance the RM standard deviation which may lead to overestimations of the CMFs' strength by about 70 per cent. This study means to serve as a pathfinder for the SKA, EVLA and LOFAR to follow the evolution of cosmic magnetic fields.

  13. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Semiclassical electrodynamics of alien atoms in interacting media II. Two-level systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elçi, Ahmet

    1985-03-01

    The previously developed self-consistent mean field theory of atoms entering an interacting medium is specialized to two-level alien atoms. It is shown that the medium may invert or split the original two levels, and that there is an intimate connection between the dressed atom spectrum and the statistical nature of the ensemble of alien atoms in the self-consistent mean field approximation. The optical susceptibility of alien atoms while inside the medium is calculated, and the lineshape and position of the optical resonance are shown to depend on the intensity of the optical field applied. There may be more than one phase possible for the atomic ensemble as a result of optical excitation.

  15. Genetic interactions between the ESS1 prolyl-isomerase and the RSP5 ubiquitin ligase reveal opposing effects on RNA polymerase II function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X; Chang, A; Sudol, M; Hanes, S D

    2001-12-01

    Transcription of protein-coding genes by RNA polymerase II (pol II) is a highly coordinated process that requires the stepwise association of distinct protein complexes with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpbl, the largest subunit of RNA pol II. Interaction of these complexes with the CTD might be subject to regulation by proteins such as Ess1 and Rsp5. Ess1, a prolyl-isomerase, binds the CTD and is thought to play a positive role in pol II transcription by generating conformational isomers of the CTD. Rsp5, a ubiquitin ligase, binds the CTD and is thought to play a negative role in transcription by mediating Rpbl ubiquitination and degradation. In this paper, we demonstrate that ESS1 and RSP5 interact genetically and that these interactions occur via RPBI. We show that over-expression of RSP5 enhances the growth defect of ess1ts cells and this effect is reversed by introducing extra copies of RPB1. Over-expression of RSP5 also mimics the sensitivity of ess1ts mutant cells to the toxicity of plasmids carrying dominant-negative CTD mutations, whereas mutations in RSP5 suppress this effect. Using a modified two-hybrid assay, we also demonstrate that Essl and Rsp5 compete directly for binding to the CTD. The results suggest a model in which Essl and Rsp5 act opposingly on pol II function to control the level of pol II available for transcription.

  16. Interaction of dinuclear cadmium(II) 5-Cl-salicylaldehyde complexes with calf-thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristovic, Maja Sumar [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studenski Trg 12-16, Belgrade (Serbia); Zianna, Ariadni; Psomas, George; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios G. [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Coutouli-Argyropoulou, Evdoxia [Department of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Lalia-Kantouri, Maria, E-mail: lalia@chem.auth.gr [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2016-04-01

    Five dinuclear Cd(II) complexes with the anion of 5-Cl-salicylaldehyde (5-Cl-saloH) were synthesized in the absence or presence of the α-diimines: 2,2′-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (neoc) or 2,2′-dipyridylamine (dpamH) and characterized as [Cd(5-Cl-salo){sub 2}(CH{sub 3}OH)]{sub 2} (1), [Cd(5-Cl-salo){sub 2}(bipy)]{sub 2} (2), [Cd(5-Cl-salo){sub 2}(phen)]{sub 2} (3), [Cd(5-Cl-salo)(neoc)(ONO{sub 2})]{sub 2} (4) and [Cd(5-Cl-salo)(dpamΗ)(ONO{sub 2})]{sub 2} (5). The complexes were characterized by spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV‐vis, {sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C–NMR), elemental analysis and molar conductivity measurements. The structures of four complexes (1–3 and 5) were determined by X-ray crystallography, providing all three possible coordination modes of the ligand 5-Cl-salicylaldehyde, i.e. bidentate or tridentate chelating and/or bridging mode. The complexes bind to calf-thymus (CT) DNA mainly by intercalation, as concluded by the viscosity measurements and present relatively high DNA-binding constants. The complexes exhibit significant ability to displace ethidium bromide (EB) from the EB-DNA complex, thus indirectly proving the intercalation as the most possible binding mode to CT DNA. - Graphical abstract: Cadmium complexes of the formulae [Cd(5-Cl-salo){sub 2}(CH{sub 3}OH)]{sub 2} and [Cd(5-Cl-salo){sub 2}(α-diimine)]{sub 2} or [Cd(5-Cl-salo)(α-diimine)(ONO{sub 2})]{sub 2} have been synthesized and characterized. The complexes bind tightly to CT DNA probably by intercalation competing with ethidium bromide for the intercalation site of DNA. - Highlights: • Synthesis of a series of dinuclear Cd complexes • The complexes characterized by diverse techniques. • The crystal structures of four complexes have been determined. • Intercalation is the most possible binding mode of the complexes to DNA. • The complexes compete with ethidium bromide for the DNA-intercalating sites.

  17. Interaction and Binding Modes of bis-Ruthenium(II Complex to Synthetic DNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasi Rani Barai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available [μ-(linkerL2(dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine2(phenanthroline2Ru(II2]2+ with linker: 1,3-bis-(4-pyridyl-propane, L: PF6 (bis-Ru-bpp was synthesized and their binding properties to a various polynucleotides were investigated by spectroscopy, including normal absorption, circular dichroism(CD, linear dichroism(LD, and luminescence techniques in this study. On binding to polynucleotides, the bis-Ru-bpp complex with poly[d(A-T2], and poly[d(I-C2] exhibited a negative LDr signal whose intensity was as large as that in the DNA absorption region, followed by a complicated LDr signal in the metal-to-ligand charge transfer region. Also, the emission intensity and equilibrium constant of the bis-Ru-bpp complex with poly[d(A-T2], and poly[d(I-C2] were enhanced. It was reported that both of dppz ligand of the bis-Ru-bpp complex intercalated between DNA base-pairs when bound to native, mixed sequence DNA. Observed spectral properties resemble to those observed for poly[d(A-T2] and poly[d(I-C2], led us to be concluded that both dppz ligands intercalate between alternated AT and IC bases-pairs In contrast when bis-Ru-bpp complex was bound to poly[d(G-C2], the magnitude of the LDr in the dppz absorption region, as well as the emission intensity, was half in comparison to that of bound to poly[d(A-T2], and poly[d(I-C2]. Therefore the spectral properties of the bis-Ru-bpp-poly[d(G-C2] complex suggested deviation from bis-intercalation model in the poly[d(G-C2] case. These results can be explained by a model whereby one of the dppz ligands is intercalated while the other is exposed to solvent or may exist near to phosphate. Also it is indicative that the amine group of guanine in the minor groove provides the steric hindrance for incoming intercalation binder and it also takes an important role in a difference in binding of bis-Ru-bpp bound to poly[d(A-T2] and poly[d(I-C2].

  18. Use of protein cross-linking and radiolytic footprinting to elucidate PsbP and PsbQ interactions within higher plant Photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummadisetti, Manjula P.; Frankel, Laurie K.; Bellamy, Henry D.; Sallans, Larry; Goettert, Jost S.; Brylinski, Michal; Limbach, Patrick A.; Bricker, Terry M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein cross-linking and radiolytic footprinting coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry were used to examine the structure of PsbP and PsbQ when they are bound to Photosystem II. In its bound state, the N-terminal 15-amino-acid residue domain of PsbP, which is unresolved in current crystal structures, interacts with domains in the C terminus of the protein. These interactions may serve to stabilize the structure of the N terminus and may facilitate PsbP binding and function. These interactions place strong structural constraints on the organization of PsbP when associated with the Photosystem II complex. Additionally, amino acid residues in the structurally unresolved loop 3A domain of PsbP (90K–107V), 93Y and 96K, are in close proximity (≤11.4 Å) to the N-terminal 1E residue of PsbQ. These findings are the first, to our knowledge, to identify a putative region of interaction between these two components. Cross-linked domains within PsbQ were also identified, indicating that two PsbQ molecules can interact in higher plants in a manner similar to that observed by Liu et al. [(2014) Proc Natl Acad Sci 111(12):4638–4643] in cyanobacterial Photosystem II. This interaction is consistent with either intra-Photosystem II dimer or inter-Photosystem II dimer models in higher plants. Finally, OH• produced by synchrotron radiolysis of water was used to oxidatively modify surface residues on PsbP and PsbQ. Domains on the surface of both protein subunits were resistant to modification, indicating that they were shielded from water and appear to define buried regions that are in contact with other Photosystem II components. PMID:25349426

  19. Thermodynamic aspects of the glass transition phenomenon. II. Molecular liquids with variable interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Simionesco, C.; Fan, J.; Angell, C. A.

    1999-03-01

    As a contribution to the understanding of the thermodynamics of the glass transition phenomenon a series of molecules having the same steric character, but differing in the strength and nature of intermolecular interactions, has been investigated. The series is based on systematic changes of substituents on disubstituted benzene ring compounds, the simplest example of which is meta-xylene. Meta-isomers are chosen in each instance because of their greater tendency to supercool. In particular, m-fluoroaniline cannot be crystallized at ambient pressure. The principal measurements performed were of heat capacity and enthalpy change, using the technique of differential scanning calorimetry, and these have been examined in the light of literature data on the liquid viscosities and some recent data for dielectric relaxation. As the strength of hydrogen-bonding interactions between the ring substituents on adjacent molecules increases, the glass transition temperature Tg increases by almost 100 degrees from the lowest value in the series, 122.5 K, for m-fluorotoluene. Empirical rules involving Tb/Tm and Tg/Tm are found wanting. The important thermodynamic characteristic of the glass transition, viz., the change in heat capacity at the glass transition, ΔCp, remains approximately constant until the -OH substituent is introduced, whereupon a new element appears. This is a specific component of ΔCp which appears at temperatures above an initially small jump at Tg. It is well accounted for by the addition of a two-state H-bond breaking component (with the usual H⋯-OH bond energy) to the total excess heat capacity. The liquid ground state (or Kauzmann) temperature TK assessed from thermodynamic data acquired in this study, falls 20%-30% below the glass transition temperature. From the limited transport data available, these liquids appear to be quite fragile in character implying that the phenyl group influence dominates the hydrogen bond factor which has often seemed

  20. An interaction of renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin systems contributes to vascular hypertrophy in angiotensin II-induced hypertension: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela S Ceravolo

    Full Text Available The kallikrein-kinin and renin-angiotensin systems interact at multiple levels. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the B1 kinin receptor (B1R contributes to vascular hypertrophy in angiotensin II (ANG II-induced hypertension, through a mechanism involving reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 activation. Male Wistar rats were infused with vehicle (control rats, 400 ng/Kg/min ANG II (ANG II rats or 400 ng/Kg/min ANG II plus B1 receptor antagonist, 350 ng/Kg/min des-Arg(9-Leu(8-bradykinin (ANGII+DAL rats, via osmotic mini-pumps (14 days or received ANG II plus losartan (10 mg/Kg, 14 days, gavage - ANG II+LOS rats. After 14 days, ANG II rats exhibited increased systolic arterial pressure [(mmHg 184 ± 5.9 vs 115 ± 2.3], aortic hypertrophy; increased ROS generation [2-hydroxyethidium/dihydroethidium (EOH/DHE: 21.8 ± 2.7 vs 6.0 ± 1.8] and ERK1/2 phosphorylation (% of control: 218.3 ± 29.4 vs 100 ± 0.25]. B1R expression was increased in aortas from ANG II and ANG II+DAL rats than in aortas from the ANG II+LOS and control groups. B1R antagonism reduced aorta hypertrophy, prevented ROS generation (EOH/DHE: 9.17 ± 3.1 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation (137 ± 20.7% in ANG II rats. Cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC stimulated with low concentrations (0.1 nM of ANG II plus B1R agonist exhibited increased ROS generation, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, proliferating-cell nuclear antigen expression and [H3]leucine incorporation. At this concentration, neither ANG II nor the B1R agonist produced any effects when tested individually. The ANG II/B1R agonist synergism was inhibited by losartan (AT1 blocker, 10 µM, B1R antagonist (10 µM and Tiron (superoxide anion scavenger, 10 mM. These data suggest that B1R activation contributes to ANG II-induced aortic hypertrophy. This is associated with activation of redox-regulated ERK1/2 pathway that controls aortic smooth muscle cells growth

  1. A Sequential Logic iLab Utilizing NI ELVIS II+ and the Interactive iLab Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmas Mwikirize

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent trends in development and utilization of online laboratories have resulted into standard platforms that are not lab-specific, which can be leveraged to develop laboratories in diverse fields. One such platform is the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT interactive iLab Shared Architecture. This paper presents work undertaken at Makerere University to develop a synchronous sequential logic iLab based on this architecture. The research was carried out by a Graduate researcher, under joint supervision in the confines of the iLab Africa Graduate Fellowship Programme. The research builds on previous work undertaken by the same researcher, in which a combinational digital logic iLab was developed. The sequential logic iLab utilizes the National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Suite (NI ELVIS II+ hardware, with its interactive user interface developed using the Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW. The generic platform supports experiments in the fields of counters, shift registers, frequency dividers and digital clocks, with appropriate electronic component selection and configuration. The design methodologies and implementation strategies for each experiment category are presented as well as the respective test runs. The laboratory has been used to support courses in the curricula of the Bachelor of Science (B.Sc in Computer, Electrical and Telecommunication Engineering Programmes at Makerere University.

  2. Theoretical investigation of the magnetic exchange interactions in copper(II) oxides under chemical and physical pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocquefelte, Xavier; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Blaha, Peter

    2012-01-01

    It remains a challenge to understand the unconventional mechanisms that cause high-T(C) superconductivity in cuprate superconductors, high-T(C) multiferroicity in CuO, or low-dimensional magnetism in the spin-Peierls transition compounds such as CuGeO(3). A common feature of all these copper oxide compounds (containing Cu(2+) ions) is the presence of large magnetic superexchange interactions J. It is a general strategy to apply chemical and/or physical pressure in order to tune these exotic properties. Here we show theoretically, for the first time, the impact of physical pressure on J on CuO, for which we predict a strong enhancement of the low-dimensionality of the magnetic interactions and the spin-frustration at high-pressures. Such modifications are expected to strongly influence the multiferroic properties of CuO. We finally demonstrate that PBE0 hybrid DFT calculations provide reliable J values for a wide range of copper(II) oxides compounds, i.e. CuGeO(3), BaCu(2)Si(2)O(7), BaCu(2)Ge(2)O(7), and La(2)CuO(4).

  3. The Crystal Structure of Cdc42 in Complex with Collybisin II, a Gephyrin-Interacting Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang,S.; Kim, E.; Connelly, J.; Nassar, N.; Kirsch, J.; WinkingSchwartz, G.; Schindelin, H.

    2006-01-01

    The synaptic localization of ion channel receptors is essential for efficient synaptic transmission and the precise regulation of diverse neuronal functions. In the central nervous system, ion channel receptors reside in the postsynaptic membrane where they are juxtaposed to presynaptic terminals. For proper function, these ion channels have to be anchored to the cytoskeleton, and in the case of the inhibitory glycine and {gamma}-amino-butyric acid type A (GABA{sub A}) receptors this interaction is mediated by a gephyrin centered scaffold. Highlighting its central role in this receptor anchoring scaffold, gephyrin interacts with a number of proteins, including the neurospecific guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin. Collybistin belongs to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors, occurs in multiple splice variants, and is specific for Cdc42, a small GTPase belonging to the Rho family. The 2.3 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of the Cdc42--collybistin II complex reveals a novel conformation of the switch I region of Cdc42. It also provides the first direct observation of structural changes in the relative orientation of the Dbl-homology domain and the pleckstrin-homology domain in the same Dbl family protein. Biochemical data indicate that gephyrin negatively regulates collybistin activity.

  4. Synthesis, DNA/HSA Interaction Spectroscopic Studies and In Vitro Cytotoxicity of a New Mixed Ligand Cu(II) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qian; Fu, Xiabing; Chen, Weijiang; Xiong, Yahong; Fu, Yinlian; Chen, Shi; Le, Xueyi

    2016-05-01

    A new mixed ligand copper(II)-dipeptide complex with 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzothiazole (pbt), [Cu(Gly-L-leu)(pbt)(H2O)]·ClO4 (Gly-L-leu = Glycyl-L-leucine anion) was synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical means. The DNA binding and cleavage properties of the complex investigated by viscosity, agarose gel electrophoresis and multi-spectroscopic techniques (UV, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence) showed that the complex was bound to CT-DNA through intercalation mode with moderate binding constant (K b = 3.132 × 10(4) M(-1)), and cleaved pBR322 DNA efficiently (~ 5 μM) in the presence of Vc, probably via an oxidative mechanism induced by •OH. Additionally, the interaction of the complex with human serum albumin (HSA) was explored by UV-visible, CD, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy. The complex exhibits desired affinity to HSA through hydrophobic interaction. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of the complex against three human carcinoma cell lines (HeLa, HepG2 and A549) was evaluated by MTT assay, which showed that the complex had effective cytotoxicity and higher inhibition toward A549 cell lines with IC50 of 38.0 ± 3.2 μM.

  5. Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Luminescent Property of a Novel Pt(II) Complex with Weak Metal-metal Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Cheng-Yang; JIANG Fei-Long; FENG Rui; HONG Mao-Chun

    2008-01-01

    The title complex cis-bis(tetrahydrothiophene)-bis(nitrate) platinum(II), (tht)2Pt(NO3)2, was the reducing product from potassium hexachloroplatinate(IV) K2PtCl6 where the platinum is tetra-valenced. Crystal data for C8H16N2O6PtS2: monoclinic, space group P21/c, a = 9.8833(5), b = 8.6744(4), c = 18.6407(9) (A), β = 114.401(3)°, V = 1455.35(12) (A)3, Z = 4, Mr = 495.44, Dc = 2.261 g/cm3, F(000) = 944, μ = 9.950 mm-1, λ(MoKα) = 0.71073 (A), T = 293(2) K, 2θmax = 54.96o, GOOF = 1.033, R = 0.0350 and wR = 0.0785 for 2572 observed reflections with I > 2σ(I). X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the title complex has interesting weak metal-metal interactions and two molecules linked by metal-metal interaction exist as a group. Luminescent spectrum illuminates red emission of the complex at room temperature.

  6. Electromagnetic Pulses Generated From Laser Target Interactions at Shenguang II Laser Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinwen; Li, Tingshuai; Yi, Tao; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Ming; Yang, Weiming; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-10-01

    Significant electromagnetic pulses (EMP) can be generated by the intensive laser irradiating solid targets in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). To evaluate the EMP intensity and distribution in and outside the laser chamber, we designed and fabricated a discone antenna with ultra-wide bands of over 10 GHz. The return loss (S11 parameter) of this antenna was below -10 dB and could even achieve under -30 dB at 3.1 GHz. The EMP intensity in this study at 80 cm and 40 cm away from the target chamber center (TCC) reached 400 kV/m and 2000 kV/m. The current results are expected to offer preliminary information to study physics regarding laser plasma interactions and will also lay experimental foundation for EMI shielding design to protect various diagnostics. supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. ZYGX2015J108) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575166 and 51581140)

  7. Galaxy Interactions in Compact Groups II: abundance and kinematic anomalies in HCG 91c

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, F P A; Borthakur, S; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Heckman, T M; Yun, M S; Chambers, K C

    2015-01-01

    Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 91 (HCG 91) were observed with the WiFeS integral field spectrograph as part of our ongoing campaign targeting the ionized gas physics and kinematics inside star forming members of compact groups. Here, we report the discovery of HII regions with abundance and kinematic offsets in the otherwise unremarkable star forming spiral HCG 91c. The optical emission line analysis of this galaxy reveals that at least three HII regions harbor an oxygen abundance ~0.15 dex lower than expected from their immediate surroundings and from the abundance gradient present in the inner regions of HCG 91c. The same star forming regions are also associated with a small kinematic offset in the form of a lag of 5-10 km/s with respect to the local circular rotation of the gas. HI observations of HCG 91 from the Very Large Array and broadband optical images from Pan-STARRS suggest that HCG 91c is caught early in its interaction with the other members of HCG 91. We discuss different scenarios to explain...

  8. Cosmic-Ray Transport in Heliospheric Magnetic Structures. II. Modeling Particle Transport through Corotating Interaction Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Andreas; Wiengarten, Tobias; Fichtner, Horst; Effenberger, Frederic; Kühl, Patrick; Heber, Bernd; Raath, Jan-Louis; Potgieter, Marius S.

    2017-03-01

    The transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the heliosphere is determined by the properties of the solar wind plasma. The heliospheric plasma environment has been probed by spacecraft for decades and provides a unique opportunity for testing transport theories. Of particular interest for the three-dimensional (3D) heliospheric CR transport are structures such as corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which, due to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength and magnetic fluctuations within and due to the associated shocks as well as stream interfaces, do influence the CR diffusion and drift. In a three-fold series of papers, we investigate these effects by modeling inner-heliospheric solar wind conditions with the numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework Cronos (Wiengarten et al., referred as Paper I), and the results serve as input to a transport code employing a stochastic differential equation approach (this paper). While, in Paper I, we presented results from 3D simulations with Cronos, the MHD output is now taken as an input to the CR transport modeling. We discuss the diffusion and drift behavior of Galactic cosmic rays using the example of different theories, and study the effects of CIRs on these transport processes. In particular, we point out the wide range of possible particle fluxes at a given point in space resulting from these different theories. The restriction of this variety by fitting the numerical results to spacecraft data will be the subject of the third paper of this series.

  9. Interactions of nitric oxide with copper(II) dithiocarbamates in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Alicia; Ortiz, Mayreli; Sánchez, Ileana; Cao, Roberto; Mederos, Alfredo; Sanchiz, Joaquin; Brito, Felipe

    2003-07-01

    This is the first report on the formation of air-stable copper nitrosyl complexes. The interaction of nitric oxide, NO, with Cu(DTC)(2).3H(2)O (DTC: dithiocarbamate) and was studied in aqueous solution at pH 7.4 and 293 K. The stability constants were determined from UV-Vis data, using LETAGROP program. The high values obtained, log beta(1)=9.743(5) and log beta(2)=15.44(2) for Cu(ProDTC)(2)-NO, (ProDTC=L-prolinedithiocarbamate) and log beta(1)=8.723(5) and log beta(2)=11.45(2) for Cu(MorDTC)(2)-NO system, (MorDTC=morpholyldithiocarbamate), indicate the formation of two stable nitrosyl complexes, Cu(DTC)(2)NO and Cu(DTC)(2)(NO)(2). Coordinated NO is neither affected by the presence of air nor when the solution is purged with Ar. Cu(MorDTC)(2)NO.3H(2)O was isolated in the solid state and its nuNO (IR) band at 1682 cm(-1), but affected by temperature variations over 333 K.

  10. Fluids with competing interactions. II. Validating a free energy model for equilibrium cluster size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Jonathan A.; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-08-01

    Using computer simulations, we validate a simple free energy model that can be analytically solved to predict the equilibrium size of self-limiting clusters of particles in the fluid state governed by a combination of short-range attractive and long-range repulsive pair potentials. The model is a semi-empirical adaptation and extension of the canonical free energy-based result due to Groenewold and Kegel [J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 11702-11709 (2001)], where we use new computer simulation data to systematically improve the cluster-size scalings with respect to the strengths of the competing interactions driving aggregation. We find that one can adapt a classical nucleation like theory for small energetically frustrated aggregates provided one appropriately accounts for a size-dependent, microscopic energy penalty of interface formation, which requires new scaling arguments. This framework is verified in part by considering the extensive scaling of intracluster bonding, where we uncover a superlinear scaling regime distinct from (and located between) the known regimes for small and large aggregates. We validate our model based on comparisons against approximately 100 different simulated systems comprising compact spherical aggregates with characteristic (terminal) sizes between six and sixty monomers, which correspond to wide ranges in experimentally controllable parameters.

  11. Nonlinear instability and chaos in plasma wave-wave interactions. II. Numerical methods and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueny, C.S.; Morrison, P.J.

    1995-05-01

    In Part I of this work and Physics of Plasmas, June 1995, the behavior of linearly stable, integrable systems of waves in a simple plasma model was described using a Hamiltonian formulation. It was shown that explosive instability arises from nonlinear coupling between modes of positive and negative energy, with well-defined threshold amplitudes depending on the physical parameters. In this concluding paper, the nonintegrable case is treated numerically. Several sets of waves are considered, comprising systems of two and three degrees of freedom. The time evolution is modelled with an explicit symplectic integration algorithm derived using Lie algebraic methods. When initial wave amplitudes are large enough to support two-wave decay interactions, strongly chaotic motion destroys the separatrix bounding the stable region for explosive triplets. Phase space orbits then experience diffusive growth to amplitudes that are sufficient for explosive instability, thus effectively reducing the threshold amplitude. For initial amplitudes too small to drive decay instability, small perturbations might still grow to arbitrary size via Arnold diffusion. Numerical experiments do not show diffusion in this case, although the actual diffusion rate is probably underestimated due to the simplicity of the model.

  12. Effects of Fe(II) and hydrogen peroxide interaction upon dissolving UO2 under geologic repository conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amme, M; Bors, W; Michel, C; Stettmaier, K; Rasmussen, G; Betti, M

    2005-01-01

    Iron redox cycling is supposed to be one of the major mechanisms that control the geochemical boundary conditions in the near field of a geologic repository for UO2 spent nuclear fuel. This work investigates the impact of reactions between hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and iron (Fe2+/Fe3+) on UO2 dissolution. The reaction partners were contacted with UO2 in oxygen-free batch reactor tests. The interaction in absence of UO2 gives a stoichiometric redox reaction of Fe2+ and H2O2 when the reactants are present in equal concentration. Predomination of H202 results in its delayed catalytic decomposition. With UO2 present, its dissolution is controlled by either a slow mechanism (as typical for anoxic environments) or uranium peroxide precipitation, depending strongly on the reactant ratio. Uranium peroxide (UO4 x nH2O, m-studtite), detected on UO2 surfaces after exposure to H2O2, was not found on the surfaces exposed to solutions with stoichometric Fe(II)/ H2O2 ratios. This suggests that H2O2 was deactivated in redox reactions before a formation of UO4 took place. ESR measurements employing the spin trapping technique revealed only the DMPO-OH adduct within the first minutes after the reaction start (high initial concentrations of the OH radical); however, in the case of Fe(II) and H2O2 reacting at 10(-4) mol/L with UO2, dissolved oxygen and Fe2+ concentrations indicate the participation of further Fe intermediates and, therefore, Fenton redox activities.

  13. Characterization of the physiology and cell-mineral interactions of the marine anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizer Rhodovulum iodosum--implications for Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenfang; Swanner, Elizabeth D; Hao, Likai; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Pan, Yongxin; Kappler, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (photoferrotrophs) are suggested to have contributed to the deposition of banded iron formations (BIFs) from oxygen-poor seawater. However, most studies evaluating the contribution of photoferrotrophs to Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation have used freshwater and not marine strains. Therefore, we investigated the physiology and mineral products of Fe(II) oxidation by the marine photoferrotroph Rhodovulum iodosum. Poorly crystalline Fe(III) minerals formed initially and transformed to more crystalline goethite over time. During Fe(II) oxidation, cell surfaces were largely free of minerals. Instead, the minerals were co-localized with EPS suggesting that EPS plays a critical role in preventing cell encrustation, likely by binding Fe(III) and directing precipitation away from cell surfaces. Fe(II) oxidation rates increased with increasing initial Fe(II) concentration (0.43-4.07 mM) under a light intensity of 12 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1). Rates also increased as light intensity increased (from 3 to 20 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)), while the addition of Si did not significantly change Fe(II) oxidation rates. These results elaborate on how the physical and chemical conditions present in the Precambrian ocean controlled the activity of marine photoferrotrophs and confirm the possibility that such microorganisms could have oxidized Fe(II), generating the primary Fe(III) minerals that were then deposited to some Precambrian BIFs. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. HLA Class II Antigens and Their Interactive Effect on Perinatal Mother-To-Child HIV-1 Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Luo

    Full Text Available HLA class II antigens are central in initiating antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses to HIV-1. Specific alleles have been associated with differential responses to HIV-1 infection and disease among adults. This study aims to determine the influence of HLA class II genes and their interactive effect on mother-child perinatal transmission in a drug naïve, Mother-Child HIV transmission cohort established in Kenya, Africa in 1986. Our study showed that DRB concordance between mother and child increased risk of perinatal HIV transmission by three fold (P = 0.00035/Pc = 0.0014, OR: 3.09, 95%CI, 1.64-5.83. Whereas, DPA1, DPB1 and DQB1 concordance between mother and child had no significant influence on perinatal HIV transmission. In addition, stratified analysis showed that DRB1*15:03+ phenotype (mother or child significantly increases the risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission. Without DRB1*15:03, DRB1 discordance between mother and child provided 5 fold protection (P = 0.00008, OR: 0.186, 95%CI: 0.081-0.427. However, the protective effect of DRB discordance was diminished if either the mother or the child was DRB1*15:03+ phenotype (P = 0.49-0.98, OR: 0.7-0.99, 95%CI: 0.246-2.956. DRB3+ children were less likely to be infected perinatally (P = 0.0006, Pc = 0.014; OR:0.343, 95%CI:0.183-0.642. However, there is a 4 fold increase in risk of being infected at birth if DRB3+ children were born to DRB1*15:03+ mother compared to those with DRB1*15:03- mother. Our study showed that DRB concordance/discordance, DRB1*15:03, children's DRB3 phenotype and their interactions play an important role in perinatal HIV transmission. Identification of genetic factors associated with protection or increased risk in perinatal transmission will help develop alternative prevention and treatment methods in the event of increases in drug resistance of ARV.

  15. Physicochemical laws of the interaction of nickel aluminides with alloying elements: II. Interaction of nickel aluminides with alloying elements and/or interstitial phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povarova, K. B.; Kazanskaya, N. K.; Drozdov, A. A.; Morozov, A. E.

    2007-10-01

    The Ni-Al- X ( X is an interstitial element or phase) phase diagrams are analyzed to reveal systems that can be used as the basis for designing promising alloys and natural composites based on nickel aluminides reinforced by interstitial phases (natural composites I). The most thermally stable materials are shown to be heterophase alloys and composite materials (CMs) located in the eutectic-type (including degenerate eutectic) pseudobinary sections of ternary or multicomponent phase diagrams. They exhibit insignificant (or zero) dissolution of interstitial phases at operating temperatures and the absence of an intense interaction between CM components (natural composites II). Natural composites I based on the NiAl-or Ni3Al-interstitial phase alloys produced upon cooling from a melt can be reinforced by the refractory thermally stable rigid interstitial phases, namely, borides and carbides, that are present in pseudobinary sections in equilibrium with these nickel aluminides, since the elements forming these phases dissolve completely in matrix melts and the mutual solubility of these phases in the solid state is low. Such borides are TiB2 and HfB2 in equilibrium with β-NiAl, and such carbides are, e.g., TiC and HfC in equilibrium with β-NiAl and La2C3, NbC, and TaC in equilibrium with γ'-Ni3Al. Natural composites II should be produced using solid-phase methods (NiAl with AlN, Y2O3, Al2O3) or a combination of methods, where a refractory interstitial phase of the Al2O3 or Y2O3 type is solid and the intermetallic NiAl or Ni3Al matrix is liquid. NiAl-TiB2 (HfB2), NiAl-Al2O3 (Y2O3), and Ni3Al-La2C3 (NbC, TaC) composites are considered as examples.

  16. 1-(2-biphenyl)-3-methyltriazenide-N-oxide as a template for intramolecular copper(II)⋯arene-π interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraginski, Gustavo Luiz; Hörner, Manfredo; Back, Davi Fernando; Wohlmuth Alves dos Santos, Aline Joana Rolina; Beck, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Deprotonated triazene N-oxides are able to chelate metal ions resulting in five-membered rings without carbon atoms. A new ligand 1-(2-biphenyl)-3-methyltriazenide-N-oxide (1) and its mononuclear Cu(II) complex (2) were synthesized to verify the capability of this ligand to promote Cu(II)⋯arene-π interactions. Ligand 1 and complex 2 have been characterized by elemental analysis, mass spectrometry (ESI(+)-TOF), IR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. In addition, ligand 1 was characterized by 1H and 13C NMR and complex 2 by X-ray diffraction on single crystal. The crystal structure of complex 2 reveals a distorted tetrahedral geometry of Cu(II) in the first coordination sphere, which expands to a distorted octahedral environment by two symmetrically independent intramolecular metal⋯arene-π interactions. These interactions are provided by ortho-phenyl rings of both triazene N-oxide ligands 1. The aim of this work was to contribute to the architecture of new Cu(II)⋯arene-π complexes based on the synthesis of appropriated ligand for intramolecular interactions

  17. Effects of clonidine and alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists on motor activity in DSP4-treated mice II: interactions with apomorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, A; Archer, T

    2000-04-01

    Adult mice were administered either the noradrenaline (NA) neurotoxin, N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) or distilled water (control), 10-12 days before motor activity testing, and 6 h before testing all the mice were administered reserpine (10 mg/kg), the monoamine-depleting agent. The interactive effects of (I) clonidine, the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, with the dopamine (DA) agonist, apomorphine, and the alpha(2)-antagonist, yohimbine, and (II) with either yohimbine or the alpha(1)-antagonist, prazosin, upon motor behaviour in activity test chambers were studied in reserpinized DSP4-treated and control mice. It was shown that apomorphine (3 mg/kg) increased locomotor and total activity in both reserpinized DSP4-treated and control mice but the effect was attenuated in the DSP4 mice. Co-administration of clonidine (3 mg/kg) with apomorphine potentiated the effects of apomorphine on motor activity and this effect was enhanced markedly by DSP4 pretreatment. Yohimbine (10 mg/kg) antagonized the motor activity-stimulating effects of apomorphine in both DSP4-treated and control mice. Co-administration of clonidine with apomorphine, following yohimbine, restored motor activity levels to those obtained in the absence of yohimbine and this effect upon locomotor activity was enhanced by DSP4 pretreatment. The effects of clonidine on motor activity were enhanced by NA-denervation. Prazzosin (3 mg/kg) enhanced the locomotor activity of both reserpinized DSP4-treated and control mice after the initial 30-min period but was not affected by DSP4 treatment. Analysis of post-decapitation convulsions (PDCs) indicated loss of the reflex by DSP4 pretreatment. Reserpine pretreatment abolished the initial, exploratory phase (30 min) of motor activity. These results demonstrate interactions between NA and DA systems that may bear eventual relevance to neurologic disorders such as parkinsonism.

  18. catena-Poly[[(pentaaqua)(4-nitrobenzoato-O,O')barium(II)] (-4-nitrobenzoato-O,O')]: A barium(II) coordination polymer showing O-H$\\cdots$O and C-H$\\cdots$O interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bikshandarkoil R Srinivasan; Jyoti V Sawant; Sarvesh C Sawant; Pallepogu Raghavaiah

    2007-11-01

    The reaction of barium carbonate with 4-nitrobenzoic acid (4-nbaH) results in the formation of a Ba(II) coordination polymer, catena-poly[[(pentaaqua)(4-nitrobenzoato-O,O')barium(II)](-4-nitrobenzoato-O,O')] 1. The polymeric compound [[Ba(H2O)5(4-nba-O,O')](-4-nba-O,O')] 1 was characterized by elemental analysis, IR and UV-Vis spectra, weight loss studies, X-ray powder diffraction and its structure determined. In 1 five water molecules are coordinated to the central metal and one of the 4-nba ligands is bonded to Ba(II) in a bidentate manner (4-nba-O,O') through the carboxylate O atoms. The [(pentaaqua)(4-nitrobenzoato-O,O')barium(II)] units are linked into an infinite one-dimensional chain along -axis with the aid of the second 4-nba anion, which functions as a bridging bidentate (-4-nba-O,O') ligand. This results in nine coordination around each Ba(II) ion in the coordination polymer. A long Ba$\\cdots$Ba distance of 6.750(1) Å is observed between adjacent Ba(II) ions in the chain and the oxygen atoms of the carboxylate group and the nitro functionalities of the 4-nba ligand are involved in several O-H$\\cdots$O and C-H$\\cdots$O interactions.

  19. Charge transfer interactions of a Ru(II) dye complex and related ligand molecules adsorbed on Au(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Andrew J.; Weston, Matthew; O' Shea, James N. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Nottingham Nanotechnology and Nanoscience Centre (NNNC), University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Taylor, J. Ben; Rienzo, Anna; Mayor, Louise C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-28

    The interaction of the dye molecule, N3 (cis-bis(isothiocyanato)bis(2,2{sup '}-bipyridyl-4,4{sup '}-dicarboxylato) -ruthenium(II)), and related ligand molecules with a Au(111) surface has been studied using synchrotron radiation-based electron spectroscopy. Resonant photoemission spectroscopy (RPES) and autoionization of the adsorbed molecules have been used to probe the coupling between the molecules and the substrate. Evidence of charge transfer from the states near the Fermi level of the gold substrate into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the molecules is found in the monolayer RPES spectra of both isonicotinic acid and bi-isonicotinic acid (a ligand of N3), but not for the N3 molecule itself. Calibrated x-ray absorption spectroscopy and valence band spectra of the monolayers reveals that the LUMO crosses the Fermi level of the surface in all cases, showing that charge transfer is energetically possible both from and to the molecule. A core-hole clock analysis of the resonant photoemission reveals a charge transfer time of around 4 fs from the LUMO of the N3 dye molecule to the surface. The lack of charge transfer in the opposite direction is understood in terms of the lack of spatial overlap between the {pi}*-orbitals in the aromatic rings of the bi-isonicotinic acid ligands of N3 and the gold surface.

  20. Synthesis, physicochemical studies, embryos toxicity and DNA interaction of some new Iron(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.

    2013-05-01

    New Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, and conductance measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. The investigated Schiff bases exhibited tridentate coordination mode with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O for all amino acids except L-histidine. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their toxicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. The interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA cleavage activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. The thermodynamic Profile of the binding of nphali complex and CT-DNA was constructed by analyzing the experimental data of absorption titration and UV melting studies with the McGhee equation, van't Hoff's equation, and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

  1. Specific interaction between DNA polymerase II (PolD) and RadB, a Rad51/Dmc1 homolog, in Pyrococcus furiosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, I; Morikawa, K; ISHINO, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus has an operon containing the DNA polymerase II (PolD) gene and three other genes. Using a two-hybrid screening to examine the interactions of the proteins encoded by the operon, we identified a specific interaction between the second subunit of PolD (DP1) and a Rad51/Dmc1 homologous protein (RadB). To ensure the specific interaction between these two proteins, each gene in the operon was expressed in Escherichia coli or insect cells separately and the products were purifie...

  2. The crucial role of chelate-chelate stacking interactions in the crystal structure of a square planar copper(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Subrata; Khan, Samim; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Chattopadhyay, Shouvik

    2017-01-01

    A square planar copper(II) complex has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction study. The X-ray structure of the complex is used to analyze the crucial role of the π-interactions in the solid state. The complex also shows significant hydrogen-bonding interactions. Moreover, we have evaluated energetically both interactions by means of high level DFT calculations (BP86-D3/def2-TZVP) and characterized them using the Bader's theory of "atoms-in-molecules".

  3. Specific interaction between DNA polymerase II (PolD) and RadB, a Rad51/Dmc1 homolog, in Pyrococcus furiosus.

    OpenAIRE

    I. Hayashi; Morikawa, K.; Ishino, Y

    1999-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus has an operon containing the DNA polymerase II (PolD) gene and three other genes. Using a two-hybrid screening to examine the interactions of the proteins encoded by the operon, we identified a specific interaction between the second subunit of PolD (DP1) and a Rad51/Dmc1 homologous protein (RadB). To ensure the specific interaction between these two proteins, each gene in the operon was expressed in Escherichia coli or insect cells separately and the products were purifie...

  4. CD8 T cell memory recall is enhanced by novel direct interactions with CD4 T cells enabled by MHC class II transferred from APCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo A Romagnoli

    Full Text Available Protection against many intracellular pathogens is provided by CD8 T cells, which are thought to need CD4 T cell help to develop into effective memory CD8 T cells. Because murine CD8 T cells do not transcribe MHC class II (MHC-II genes, several models have proposed antigen presenting cells (APCs as intermediaries required for CD4 T cells to deliver their help to CD8 T cells. Here, we demonstrate the presence of MHC-II molecules on activated murine CD8 T cells in vitro as well as in vivo. These MHC-II molecules are acquired via trogocytosis by CD8 T cells from their activating APCs, particularly CD11c positive dendritic cells (DCs. Transferred MHC-II molecules on activated murine CD8 T cells were functionally competent in stimulating specific indicator CD4 T cells. CD8 T cells that were "helped" in vitro and subsequently allowed to rest in vivo showed enhanced recall responses upon challenge compared to "helpless" CD8 T cells; in contrast, no differences were seen upon immediate challenge. These data indicate that direct CD8:CD4 T cell interactions may significantly contribute to help for CD8 T cells. Furthermore, this mechanism may enable CD8 T cells to communicate with different subsets of interacting CD4 T cells that could modulate immune responses.

  5. Interaction with DNA and different effect on the nucleus of cancer cells for copper(II) complexes of N-benzyl di(pyridylmethyl)amine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiu-Yun; Fu, Hai-Jian; Zhu, Wei-Hua; Qi, Yan; Ma, Zheng-Ping; Zhao, Kai-Di; Gao, Jing

    2011-05-01

    Three new copper(II) complexes of N-benzyl di(pyridylmethyl)amine (phdpa) were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic methods. The interaction between CT-DNA and the complexes was studied by UV and fluorescence titration methods. It was found that the complex [(phdpa)Cu(H(2)O)Ac)](Ac), with the non-planar aromatic heterocyclic ring ligand (phdpa), showed good anticancer properties and could cause the fragmentation of the nucleus, although its interaction with CT-DNA was weaker than that of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)-based copper(II) complexes. The anticancer activities of copper(II) complexes with phdpa and phen based ligands are correlated to their binding constants with DNA, but phen-based copper(II) complexes did not cause the nucleus fragmentation of HeLa cells. [(phdpa)Cu(H(2)O)Ac)](Ac) can noticeably decrease the oxygen content of a culture solution and of HeLa cells, which make it a new nucleus and oxygen related anticancer copper(II) complex. Information obtained here would be helpful in the design of new antitumor complexes in oxidative therapy.

  6. DNA interaction, antimicrobial, electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of metal(II) complexes with tridentate heterocyclic Schiff base derived from 2‧-methylacetoacetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Natarajan; Pothiraj, Krishnan; Baskaran, Thanasekaran

    2011-08-01

    A new Schiff base ligand (HL) was synthesized by the condensation reaction between 2'-methyleacetoacetanilide and 2-amino-3-hydroxypyridine. Its Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes were prepared by the interaction of the ligand with metal(II) chloride. They were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, EPR, UV-Vis, magnetic susceptibility measurements, conductivity measurements and FAB-mass spectra. The interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated by UV absorption, viscosity and cyclic voltammetry methods, and the mode of CT-DNA binding to the complexes has been explored. Furthermore, the DNA cleavage activity by the complexes was performed. It was found to be oxidative hydroxyl radical cleavage in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). The Schiff base and its complexes have been screened for their antibacterial ( Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal ( Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus stolonifer, Rhizoctonia bataicola and Candida albicans) activities and the data reveal that the complexes have higher activity than the free ligand.

  7. Differential Effects of Prenylation and S-Acylation on Type I and II ROPS Membrane Interaction and Function1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Nadav; Gutman, Orit; Bar, Einat; Abu-Abied, Mohamad; Feng, Xuehui; Running, Mark P.; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Ori, Naomi; Sadot, Einat; Henis, Yoav I.; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-01-01

    Prenylation primarily by geranylgeranylation is required for membrane attachment and function of type I Rho of Plants (ROPs) and Gγ proteins, while type II ROPs are attached to the plasma membrane by S-acylation. Yet, it is not known how prenylation affects ROP membrane interaction dynamics and what are the functional redundancy and specificity of type I and type II ROPs. Here, we have used the expression of ROPs in mammalian cells together with geranylgeranylation and CaaX prenylation-deficient mutants to answer these questions. Our results show that the mechanism of type II ROP S-acylation and membrane attachment is unique to plants and likely responsible for the viability of plants in the absence of CaaX prenylation activity. The prenylation of ROPs determines their steady-state distribution between the plasma membrane and the cytosol but has little effect on membrane interaction dynamics. In addition, the prenyl group type has only minor effects on ROP function. Phenotypic analysis of the CaaX prenylation-deficient pluripetala mutant epidermal cells revealed that type I ROPs affect cell structure primarily on the adaxial side, while type II ROPs are functional and induce a novel cell division phenotype in this genetic background. Taken together, our studies show how prenyl and S-acyl lipid modifications affect ROP subcellular distribution, membrane interaction dynamics, and function. PMID:21139084

  8. Cu(II)-vitamin D interaction leads to free radical-mediated cellular DNA damage: a novel putative mechanism for its selective cytotoxic action against malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Asim; Chibber, Sandesh; Naseem, Imrana

    2015-03-01

    Vitamin D (vit D) is a known anticancer molecule, and cancer cells are reported to have elevated levels of Cu(II) ions. In this study, we show that interaction of vit D and Cu(II) leads to the formation of hydroxyl free radicals, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, which causes severe oxidative stress, selectively in malignant cells. We show that the production of these reactive oxygen species causes cellular DNA fragmentation which may cause cell death. A novel putative chemical mechanism explaining how vit D causes cell death by DNA damage, selectively in malignant cells, is proposed.

  9. Characterisation of the interactions between substrate, copper(II) complex and DNA and their role in rate acceleration in DNA-based asymmetric catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-02-28

    Interactions of the azachalcone derived substrate Aza with copper(II) complexes in the presence and absence of st-DNA were studied in detail by UV/Vis absorption, EPR and Raman and (UV and vis) resonance Raman spectroscopies. The binding of Aza to the Lewis acidic copper(II) complexes, which results in activation of the substrate, was established spectroscopically. It was shown that the binding of Aza differs between Cu(II)dmbpy and Cu(II)terpy, consistent with the observed differences in catalytic asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions with regard to both the rate and enantiomeric preference. Finally, it was shown that DNA has a major beneficial effect on the binding of Aza to the copper(II) complex due to the fact that both bind to the DNA. The result is a high effective molarity of both the copper complexes and the Aza substrate, which leads to a significant increase in binding of Aza to the copper(II) complex. This effect is a key reason for the observed rate acceleration in the catalyzed reactions brought about by the presence of DNA.

  10. Metal-nitroxyl interactions. 28. EPR studies of spin-labeled nickel(II) complexes in fluid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafid, Slimane; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    Three spin-labeled four-coordinate nickel(II) complexes were prepared. In these complexes the nickel(II) was diamagnetic and the EPR spectra in fluid solution were typical nitroxyl spectra. Coordination of pyridine or 2,2'-bipyridyl to the spin-labeled nickel(II) complexes produced high-spin nickel(II) and a disappearance of the nitroxyl EPR signal. Similarly when a spin-labeled bidentate ligang coordinated to a nickel xanthate with diamagnetic ligands, no EPR signal was observed for the six-coordinate complex in fluid solution. The nickel-nitroxyl distances in these complexes were 6 to 10 Å.

  11. INTERACT-II campaign:comparison of commercial lidars and ceilometers with advanced multi-wavelength Raman lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Vande Hey, Joshua; Zheng, Yunhui; Vaisala Team

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of aerosol spatio-temporal distribution in troposphere is essential for the study of climate and air quality. For this purpose, global scale high resolution continuous measurements of tropospheric aerosols are needed. Global coverage high resolution networks of ground-based low-cost and low-maintenance remote sensing instruments, such as commercial automatic lidars and ceilometers, can strongly contribute to this scientific mission. Therefore, it is very interesting for scientific community to understand to which extent these instruments are able to provide reliable aerosol measurements and fill in the geographical gaps of existing networks of the advanced lidars, like EARLINET (European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork). The INTERACT-II (INTERcomparison of Aerosol and Cloud Tracking) campaign, carried out at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory) in Tito Scalo, Potenza, Italy (760m a.s.l., 40.60°N, 15.72°E), aims to evaluate the performances of commercial automatic lidars and ceilometers for tropospheric aerosol profiling. The campaign has been performed in the period from July 2016 to January 2017 in the framework of ACTRIS-2 (Aerosol Clouds Trace gases Research InfraStructure) H2020 research infrastructure project. Besides the commercial ceilometers operational at CIAO (VAISALA CT25K and Luftt CHM15k), the performance of a CL51 VAISALA ceilometer, a Campbell CS135 ceilometer and a mini-Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) have been assessed using the EARLINET multi-wavelengths Raman lidars operative at CIAO as reference. Following a similar approach used in the first INTERACT campaign (Madonna et al., AMT 2015), attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles and signals obtained from all the instruments have been compared, over a vertical resolution of 60 meters and a temporal integration ranging between 1 and 2 hours, depending on the observed atmospheric scenario. CIAO lidars signals have been processed using the EARLINET Single Calculus Chain (SCC) also with the

  12. New cyclic tetranuclear copper(II) complexes containing quadrilateral cores: Synthesis, structure, spectroscopy and their interactions with DNA in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Gopal C.; Haldar, Shobhraj; Ghosh, Aloke Kumar; Chowdhury, Priyanka; Carrella, Luca; Ghosh, Utpal; Bera, Manindranath

    2017-08-01

    Three new cyclic tetranuclear copper(II) complexes, Tetrakis{3-[(2-pyridylmethyl)-amino]-propionato}(tetrachloro)tetracopper(II)methanolhydrate (1·CH3OH·H2O), Tetrakis{3-[(2-pyridylmethyl)-amino]-propionato}(tetrathiocyanato)tetracopper(II) (2) and Tetrakis{3-[(2-pyridylmethyl)-amino]-propionato}(tetraazido)tetracopper(II) (3) have been synthesized by exploiting the chelating ability and bridging potential of a carboxyamine functionalized tridentate ligand, HL (HL = 3-[(2-Pyridylmethyl)-amino]-propionic acid). Complexes 1, 2 and 3 have been synthesized by carrying out reaction of the ligand HL with stoichiometric amounts of CuCl2·2H2O, CuCl2·2H2O/NH4SCN, and CuCl2·2H2O/NaN3, respectively, in the presence of NMe4OH at ambient temperature. Various analytical techniques have been employed to characterize the complexes, including single crystal X-ray diffraction study of 1. Structures of complexes 2 and 3 have been optimized by DFT calculation at B3LYP/6-311G level. Analysis of X-ray crystal structure reveals that the metallic core of complex 1 contains four distorted square pyramidal Cu(II) ions. The Cu(II) ions in each complex are arranged at the corners of a quadrilateral showing a μ2:η1:η1syn-anti bidentate bridging mode of four carboxylate groups of L- ligands with each bridging between two Cu(II) ions. These complexes represent a new family of 16-MCCuII-4 metallocoronates with repeating -[CuIIsbnd Osbnd Csbnd O]- units. In aqueous solution (pH∼7.5), the interactions of complexes with DNA have been investigated by UV-Vis and fluorescence titration spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements.

  13. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) as a neuropeptide: Interaction with angiotensin II on volume control and renal sodium handling

    OpenAIRE

    Unger, Th.; Badoer, E.; Gareis, C.; Girchev, R.; Kotrba, M.; Qadri, F; Rettig, R.; Rohmeiss, P

    1990-01-01

    1 Angiotensin II (ANG II) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are functionally antagonistic circulating hormones involved in blood pressure and body fluid regulation. An inappropriate atrial secretion of ANP has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, but clinical and experimental results on the role of ANP in hypertension are still conflicting.

  14. Uterine-embryonic interaction in pit : activin, follistatin, and activin receptor II in uterus and embryo during early gestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavert, van de S.A.; Boerjan, M.L.; Stroband, H.W.J.; Taverne, M.A.M.; Hurk, van der R.

    2001-01-01

    The mRNA expression patterns of activin A and follistatin in the uterus and embryo, the mRNA expression of the activin receptor II in the embryo, and the localization in the uterus of the immunoreactive activin A and the receptor II proteins in the uterus were examined at gestation days 7-12 after o

  15. Interaction analysis between HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles and MHC class II transactivator CIITA gene with regard to risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ronninger

    Full Text Available HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE alleles are the strongest genetic determinants for autoantibody positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA. One of the key regulators in expression of HLA class II receptors is MHC class II transactivator (CIITA. A variant of the CIITA gene has been found to associate with inflammatory diseases.We wanted to explore whether the risk variant rs3087456 in the CIITA gene interacts with the HLA-DRB1 SE alleles regarding the risk of developing RA. We tested this hypothesis in a case-control study with 11767 individuals from four European Caucasian populations (6649 RA cases and 5118 controls.We found no significant additive interaction for risk alleles among Swedish Caucasians with RA (n = 3869, attributable proportion due to interaction (AP = 0.2, 95%CI: -0.2-0.5 or when stratifying for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA presence (ACPA positive disease: n = 2945, AP = 0.3, 95%CI: -0.05-0.6, ACPA negative: n = 2268, AP = -0.2, 95%CI: -1.0-0.6. We further found no significant interaction between the main subgroups of SE alleles (DRB1*01, DRB1*04 or DRB1*10 and CIITA. Similar analysis of three independent RA cohorts from British, Dutch and Norwegian populations also indicated an absence of significant interaction between genetic variants in CIITA and SE alleles with regard to RA risk.Our data suggest that risk from the CIITA locus is independent of the major risk for RA from HLA-DRB1 SE alleles, given that no significant interaction between rs3087456 and SE alleles was observed. Since a biological link between products of these genes is evident, the genetic contribution from CIITA and class II antigens in the autoimmune process may involve additional unidentified factors.

  16. Metal-pyrazolyl diazine interaction: synthesis, structure and electrochemistry of binuclear transition metal(II) complexes derived from an 'end-off' compartmental Schiff base ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagumpi, Srinivasa; Revankar, Vidyanand K

    2010-09-15

    Pyrazolyl diazine (mu-NN) bridged late first row transition metal(II) complexes have been prepared by the interaction of metal(II) chlorides with an 'end-off' compartmental Schiff base ligand. The ligand system has a strong diazine bridging component and obtained as a condensation product between 1H-pyrazole-3,5-dicarbohydrazide and 3-acetylcoumarin in absolute ethanol. All synthesized compounds are characterized on the basis of various spectral and analytical techniques. Complexes are found to be non-electrolytes and monomeric in nature. The magnetic exchange interactions are very weak because of the more electronegative exogenous chloride, though diazine bridging group bring metal centers in a close proximity.

  17. Pro-oxidant DNA breakage induced by the interaction of L-DOPA with Cu(II): a putative mechanism of neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perveen, Asma; Khan, Husain Yar; Hadi, S M; Damanhouri, Ghazi A; Alharrasi, Ahmed; Tabrez, Shams; Ashraf, Ghulam Md

    2015-01-01

    There are reports in scientific literature that the concentration of copper ions in Parkinsonian brain is at a level that could promote oxidative DNA damage. The possibility of copper chelation by antioxidants excited us to explore the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage by the interaction of L-DOPA with Cu(II) ions. In the present manuscript, L-DOPA was tested for its ability to bind with Cu(II) and reduce it to Cu(I). The generation of ROS, such as superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) and hydroxyl radical (OH(•)), was also ascertained. As a result of L-DOPA and Cu(II) interaction, the generation of O(2)(-) was found to be increased in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, the formation of OH(•) was also found to be enhanced with increasing concentrations of L-DOPA. Furthermore, Comet assay results clearly showed significantly higher cellular DNA breakage in lymphocytes treated with L-DOPA and Cu(II) as compared to those that were treated with L-DOPA alone. However, such DNA degradation was inhibited to a significant extent by scavengers of ROS and neocuproine, a membrane permeable Cu(I)-specific sequestering agent. These findings demonstrate that L-DOPA exhibits a pro-oxidant activity in the presence of copper ions.

  18. Correlation of electronic carotenoid-chlorophyll interactions and fluorescence quenching with the aggregation of native LHC II and chlorophyll deficient mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Pen-Nan; Bode, Stefan [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Wilk, Laura [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hafi, Nour [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Walla, Peter J., E-mail: pwalla@gwdg.de [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of Spectroscopy and Photochemical Kinetics, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-07-19

    The aggregation dependent correlation between fluorescence quenching and the electronic carotenoid-chlorophyll interactions, {phi}{sub Coupling}{sup Car S{sub 1}-Chl}, as measured by comparing chlorophyll fluorescence observed after two- and one-photon excitation, has been investigated using native LHC II samples as well as mutants lacking Chl 2 and Chl 13. For native LHC II the same linear correlation between {phi}{sub Coupling}{sup Car S{sub 1}-Chl} and the fluorescence quenching was observed as previously reported for the pH and Zea-dependent quenching of LHC II . In order to elucidate which carotenoid-chlorophyll pair might dominate this correlation we also investigated the mutants lacking Chl 2 and Chl 13. However, also with these mutants the same linear correlation as for native LHC II was observed. This provides indication that these two chlorophylls play only a minor role for the observed effects. Nevertheless, we also conclude that this does not exclude that their neighboured carotenoids, lutein 1 and neoxanthin, might interact electronically with other chlorophylls close by.

  19. Nickel(II) complexes of N2S2 donor set ligand and halide/pseudohalides: Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA and bovine/human serum albumin interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Animesh Patra; Biplab Mondal; Buddhadeb Sen; Ennio Zangrando; Pabitra Chattopadhyay

    2015-11-01

    A series of neutral hexacoordinated nickel(II) complexes of formula [NiII (L)X2] (where L = 3,4-bis(2-pyridylmethylthio)toluene with tetradentate N2S2 donor set and X = chloride (1), azide (2), cyanate (3) and isothiocyanate anion (4)) have been synthesized and isolated in pure form. The complexes were characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic methods along with detailed structural characterization of 1,2 and 3 by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The structural study showed that the nickel(II) ion has a distorted octahedral geometry being chelated by the tetradentate N2S2 ligand and bound to cis- located choride or pseudohalide anions. In dimethylformamide solution the complexes showed quasi-reversible NiII/NiIII redox couples in cyclic voltammograms with E1/2 values of +0.723, +0.749, +0.768 and +0.868 V for 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. The study of interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) using spectroscopic and physicochemical tools clearly indicates that the complexes interact with DNA via groove binding mode.

  20. Study of solute-solvent interaction of chlorosubstituted pyrazoles with Cu (II) and Tb (III) and dioxane-water at various temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramteke, Avinash A.; Chavan, Sugam P.

    2016-05-01

    The solute-solvent interactions of complexes of chloro substituted pyrazole with Cu (II) and Tb (III) metal ions as a function of temperature has been studied by measuring density and ultrasonic velocity at different temperatures. The values of density and ultrasonic velocity have been used to determine the adiabatic compressibility βs, apparent molal volume ϕv, apparent adiabatic compressibility ϕk, intermolecular free length Lf, relative association RA and acoustic impendence Z. The obtained results from the acoustic parameters show the significant interaction between the complex and solvent.

  1. Syntheses and characterization of three diphenyl phosphate based Cu(II) complexes and the effect of non-covalent interactions on their supramolecular framework

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DILIP KUMAR MAITY; FAZLE HAQUE; BASUDEB DUTTA; BISWAJIT BHATTACHARYA; DEBAJYOTI GHOSHAL

    2016-12-01

    Assembly of diphenylphosphate (dpp) with Cu(II) salts in combination with the different Ndonor linkers, e.g., pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (pmdeta), bis-(3-aminopropyl)amine (bapa) and 4-Picolene (4-pic), yielded three new metal-organic coordination complexes, namely {[Cu(dpp)(pmdeta)]·ClO₄.H₂O}₂ (1), {[{[Cu(dpp)(bapa)H₂O]·ClO₄} (2) and [Cu(dpp)2(4-pic)₂]₂ (3) by stirring the constituent reactants at room temperature. Complexes 1–3 were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and were further characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) studies. Compound 1 exhibits a dimeric Cu(II) complex which forms a 1D supramolecular chain along the crystallographic c-axis by means of intermolecular π .. .π interactions. Compounds 2 and 3 form a monomeric and dimeric complex of Cu(II) respectively, which are further extended into a supramolecular 2D structure viaC-H..π interactions for 2 and a 3D structure for 3 with the help of both intermolecular C-H..π and π . . . π interactions for 3. In addition, the solid state UV-Vis spectra of compounds 1-3 and free dpp ligand have beeninvestigated at room temperature.

  2. Statistical Analysis of Main and Interaction Effects on Cu(II) and Cr(VI) Decontamination by Nitrogen-Doped Magnetic Graphene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinjiang; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yunguo

    2016-10-01

    A nitrogen-doped magnetic graphene oxide (NMGO) was synthesized and applied as an adsorbent to remove Cu(II) and Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The individual and combined effects of various factors (A: pH, B: temperature, C: initial concentration of metal ions, D: CaCl2, and E: humic acid [HA]) on the adsorption were analyzed by a 25-1 fractional factorial design (FFD). The results from this study indicated that the NMGO had higher adsorption capacities for Cu(II) ions than for Cr(VI) ions under most conditions, and the five selected variables affected the two adsorption processes to different extents. A, AC, and C were the very important factors and interactions for Cu(II) adsorption. For Cr(VI) adsorption, A, B, C, AB, and BC were found to be very important influencing variables. The solution pH (A) was the most important influencing factor for removal of both the ions. The main effects of A-E on the removal of Cu(II) were positive. For Cr(VI) adsorption, the main effects of A and D were negative, while B, C, and E were observed to have positive effects. The maximum adsorption capacities for Cu(II) and Cr(VI) ions over NMGO were 146.365 and 72.978 mg/g, respectively, under optimal process conditions.

  3. The activation threshold of CD4+ T cells is defined by TCR/peptide-MHC class II interactions in the thymic medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Tom Li; Tikhonova, Anastasia; Riberdy, Janice M; Laufer, Terri M

    2009-11-01

    Immature thymocytes that are positively selected based upon their response to self-peptide-MHC complexes develop into mature T cells that are not overtly reactive to those same complexes. Developmental tuning is the active process through which TCR-associated signaling pathways of single-positive thymocytes are attenuated to respond appropriately to the peptide-MHC molecules that will be encountered in the periphery. In this study, we explore the mechanisms that regulate the tuning of CD4(+) single-positive T cells to MHC class II encountered in the thymic medulla. Experiments with murine BM chimeras demonstrate that tuning can be mediated by MHC class II expressed by either thymic medullary epithelial cells or thymic dendritic cells. Tuning does not require the engagement of CD4 by MHC class II on stromal cells. Rather, it is mediated by interactions between MHC class II and the TCR. To understand the molecular changes that distinguish immature hyperactive T cells from tuned mature CD4(+) T cells, we compared their responses to TCR stimulation. The altered response of mature CD4 single-positive thymocytes is characterized by the inhibition of ERK activation by low-affinity self-ligands and increased expression of the inhibitory tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. Thus, persistent TCR engagement by peptide-MHC class II on thymic medullary stroma inhibits reactivity to self-Ags and prevents autoreactivity in the mature repertoire.

  4. Statistical Analysis of Main and Interaction Effects on Cu(II) and Cr(VI) Decontamination by Nitrogen–Doped Magnetic Graphene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinjiang; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yunguo

    2016-01-01

    A nitrogen–doped magnetic graphene oxide (NMGO) was synthesized and applied as an adsorbent to remove Cu(II) and Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The individual and combined effects of various factors (A: pH, B: temperature, C: initial concentration of metal ions, D: CaCl2, and E: humic acid [HA]) on the adsorption were analyzed by a 25−1 fractional factorial design (FFD). The results from this study indicated that the NMGO had higher adsorption capacities for Cu(II) ions than for Cr(VI) ions under most conditions, and the five selected variables affected the two adsorption processes to different extents. A, AC, and C were the very important factors and interactions for Cu(II) adsorption. For Cr(VI) adsorption, A, B, C, AB, and BC were found to be very important influencing variables. The solution pH (A) was the most important influencing factor for removal of both the ions. The main effects of A–E on the removal of Cu(II) were positive. For Cr(VI) adsorption, the main effects of A and D were negative, while B, C, and E were observed to have positive effects. The maximum adsorption capacities for Cu(II) and Cr(VI) ions over NMGO were 146.365 and 72.978 mg/g, respectively, under optimal process conditions. PMID:27694891

  5. Ruthenium(II) complexes of saccharin with dipyridoquinoxaline and dipyridophenazine: Structures, biological interactions and photoinduced DNA damage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Priyaranjan; Dasari, Srikanth; Patra, Ashis K

    2017-08-18

    Ruthenium complexes trans-[Ru(sac)2(dpq)2] (1) and trans-[Ru(sac)2(dppz)2] (2) where sac is artificial sweetener saccharin (o-sulfobenzimide; 1,2-benzothiazole-3(2H)-one1,1-dioxide (Hsac)), dpq = dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine have been synthesized and thoroughly characterized using various analytical and spectral techniques. Saccharin known to act as carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) inhibitor which is a biomarker for highly aggressive and proliferative tumor in hypoxic stress, so inhibition of CA IX is a potential strategy for anticancer chemotherapy. The solid state structures, photophysical properties, photostability, DNA and protein binding affinity, and DNA photocleavage activity were explored. The structural analysis revealed Ru(II) centre is in discrete mononuclear, distorted octahedral {RuN6} coordination geometry with two monoanionic nitrogen donor saccharinate ligands and two neutral bidentate nitrogen donors ligands dpq and dppz. cis-[Ru(sac)2(dppz)2] (cis-2) geometrical isomer was also isolated and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The photo-induced dissociation of monodentate saccharin ligand is observed when irradiated at UV-A light of 365 nm. The complexes show significant binding affinity to the calf thymus DNA (Kb ∼ 10(5) M(-1)) through significant intercalation through planar dpq and dppz ligands. Interaction of complexes 1 and 2 with bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed remarkable tryptophan emission quenching (KBSA ∼10(5) M(-1)). The complexes showed appreciable photoinduced DNA cleavage activity upon irradiation of low power UV-A light of 365 nm from supercoiled (SC) to its nicked circular (NC) form at micromolar complex concentrations. Photocleavage mechanistic studies in presence of O2 reveals involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated through ligand-centered (3)ππ* and/or (3)MLCT excited states generated upon photoactivation leads to nicking of

  6. Synthesis, characterization, DNA/protein interaction and cytotoxicity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes derived from dipyridyl triazole ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Di; Wei, Yi; Tang, Jie; Bian, He-Dong; Huang, Fu-Ping; Liang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Four different transition metal complexes containing dipyridyl triazole ligands, namely [Cu(abpt)2Cl2]·2H2O (1), [Cu(abpt)2(ClO4)2] (2), [Co2(abpt)2(H2O)2Cl2]·Cl2·4H2O (3) and [Co2(Hbpt)2(CH3OH)2(NO3)2] (4) have been designed, synthesized and further structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, ESI-MS, elemental analysis, IR and Raman spectroscopy. In these complexes, the both ligands act as bidentate ligands with N, N donors. DNA binding interactions with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) of the ligand and its complexes 1 ~ 4 were investigated via electronic absorption, fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism and viscosity measurements as well as confocal Laser Raman spectroscopy. The results show these complexes are able to bind to DNA via the non-covalent mode i.e. intercalation and groove binding or electrostatic interactions. The interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also studied using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods which indicated that fluorescence quenching of BSA by these compounds was the presence of both static and dynamic quenching. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxic effects of the complexes against four cell lines SK-OV-3, HL-7702, BEL7404 and NCI-H460 showed the necessity of the coordination action on the biological properties on the respective complex and that all four complexes exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, DNA/protein interaction and cytotoxicity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes derived from dipyridyl triazole ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Di; Wei, Yi; Tang, Jie; Bian, He-Dong; Huang, Fu-Ping; Liang, Hong

    2016-06-15

    Four different transition metal complexes containing dipyridyl triazole ligands, namely [Cu(abpt)2Cl2]·2H2O (1), [Cu(abpt)2(ClO4)2] (2), [Co2(abpt)2(H2O)2Cl2]·Cl2·4H2O (3) and [Co2(Hbpt)2(CH3OH)2(NO3)2] (4) have been designed, synthesized and further structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, ESI-MS, elemental analysis, IR and Raman spectroscopy. In these complexes, the both ligands act as bidentate ligands with N, N donors. DNA binding interactions with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) of the ligand and its complexes 1~4 were investigated via electronic absorption, fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism and viscosity measurements as well as confocal Laser Raman spectroscopy. The results show these complexes are able to bind to DNA via the non-covalent mode i.e. intercalation and groove binding or electrostatic interactions. The interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also studied using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods which indicated that fluorescence quenching of BSA by these compounds was the presence of both static and dynamic quenching. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxic effects of the complexes against four cell lines SK-OV-3, HL-7702, BEL7404 and NCI-H460 showed the necessity of the coordination action on the biological properties on the respective complex and that all four complexes exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity.

  8. Study of the interaction between two newly synthesized cyclometallated platinum (II) complexes and human serum albumin: Spectroscopic characterization and docking simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefi, Reza, E-mail: ryousefi@shirazu.ac.ir [Protein Chemistry Laboratory (PCL), Department of Biology, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Roghayeh [Protein Chemistry Laboratory (PCL), Department of Biology, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagher Shahsavani, Mohammad [Protein Chemistry Laboratory (PCL), Department of Biology, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadkhah Aseman, Marzieh; Masoud Nabavizadeh, S.; Rashidi, Mehdi [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poursasan, Najmeh; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali-Akbar [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics (IBB), the University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    This study describes HSA binding properties of two cyclometalated platinum (II) complexes with non-leaving lipophilic ligands; deprotonated 2-phenylpyridine (ppy): C{sub 1} and deprotonated benzo [h]quinolone (bhq): C{sub 2}, using UV–vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The absorption spectra of HSA decreased in the presence of increasing concentration of these complexes, reflecting HSA structural alteration after drug's binding. Also the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) that obtained from Trp fluorescence study revealed that the interaction between these complexes and HSA were spontaneous. In addition, C{sub 1} with flexible chemical structure indicated significantly higher fluorescence quenching and binding affinity to HSA than C{sub 2} which possesses a higher structural rigidity. The ANS fluorescence results also indicated that two Pt (II) complexes were competing for binding to the hydrophobic regions of HSA. Moreover, CD results demonstrated that C{sub 2} complex induced alteration of HSA conformation to more significant extent compared to C{sub 1}. The molecular docking results revealed the involvement of π–π stacking and hydrophobic interaction between these complexes and the protein. Overall, this study may highlight the significance of structural flexibility in designing of future anticancer Pt (II) complexes with improved binding affinity for HSA. - Highlights: • HSA is a general transport carrier for a wide variety of ligands such as metabolites and pharmaceutical drugs. • The HSA binding properties of two structurally related cyclometallated platinum (II) complexes (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) were studied. • The complexes can bind to HSA and induce structural alteration in this protein. • The thermodynamic parameters revealed that the interactions were spontaneous and mainly hydrophobic driven. • C{sub 1} with flexible chemical structure indicated a higher binding affinity for HSA than C{sub 2}.

  9. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  10. Nickel-quinolones interaction. Part 5-Biological evaluation of nickel(II) complexes with first-, second- and third-generation quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyrianou, Kalliopi C; Perdih, Franc; Papadopoulos, Athanasios N; Turel, Iztok; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P; Psomas, George

    2011-10-01

    The nickel(II) complexes with the quinolone antibacterial agents oxolinic acid, flumequine, enrofloxacin and sparfloxacin in the presence of the N,N'-donor heterocyclic ligand 2,2'-bipyridylamine have been synthesized and characterized. The quinolones act as bidentate ligands coordinated to Ni(II) ion through the pyridone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. The crystal structure of [(2,2'-bipyridylamine)bis(sparfloxacinato)nickel(II)] has been determined by X-ray crystallography. UV study of the interaction of the complexes with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has shown that they bind to CT DNA with [(2,2'-bipyridylamine)bis(flumequinato)nickel(II)] exhibiting the highest binding constant to CT DNA. The cyclic voltammograms of the complexes have shown that in the presence of CT DNA the complexes can bind to CT DNA by the intercalative binding mode which has also been verified by DNA solution viscosity measurements. Competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) has shown that the complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB indicating that they bind to DNA in strong competition with EB. The complexes exhibit good binding propensity to human or bovine serum albumin protein having relatively high binding constant values. The biological properties of the [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(2,2'-bipyridylamine)] complexes have been evaluated in comparison to the previously reported Ni(II) quinolone complexes [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(2,2'-bipyridine)] and [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(1,10-phenanthroline)]. The quinolones and their Ni(II) complexes have been tested for their antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity. They have been also tested in vitro for their inhibitory activity against soybean lipoxygenase.

  11. Spin-Dependent Weakly-Interacting-Massive-Particle-Nucleon Cross Section Limits from First Data of PandaX-II Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Changbo; Cui, Xiangyi; Zhou, Xiaopeng; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yunhua; Fang, Deqing; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Han, Ke; Huang, Xingtao; Ji, Xiangdong; Ju, Yonglin; Lei, Siao; Li, Shaoli; Liu, Huaxuan; Liu, Jianglai; Ma, Yugang; Mao, Yajun; Ren, Xiangxiang; Tan, Andi; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jiming; Wang, Meng; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Xuming; Wang, Zhou; Wu, Shiyong; Xiao, Mengjiao; Xie, Pengwei; Yan, Binbin; Yang, Yong; Yue, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hongguang; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Ning; PandaX-II Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    New constraints are presented on the spin-dependent weakly-interacting-massive-particle- (WIMP-)nucleon interaction from the PandaX-II experiment, using a data set corresponding to a total exposure of 3.3 ×104 kg day . Assuming a standard axial-vector spin-dependent WIMP interaction with Xe 129 and Xe 131 nuclei, the most stringent upper limits on WIMP-neutron cross sections for WIMPs with masses above 10 GeV /c2 are set in all dark matter direct detection experiments. The minimum upper limit of 4.1 ×10-41 cm2 at 90% confidence level is obtained for a WIMP mass of 40 GeV /c2 . This represents more than a factor of 2 improvement on the best available limits at this and higher masses. These improved cross-section limits provide more stringent constraints on the effective WIMP-proton and WIMP-neutron couplings.

  12. An in vitro study of interactions between insulin-mimetic zinc(II) complexes and selected plasma components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyedy, Eva Anna; Horváth, László; Gajda-Schrantz, Krisztina; Galbács, Gábor; Kiss, Tamás

    2006-12-01

    The speciations of some potent insulin-mimetic zinc(II) complexes of bidentate ligands: maltol and 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridinone with (O,O) and picolinic acid with (N,O) coordination modes, were studied via solution equilibrium investigations of the ternary complex formation in the presence of small relevant bioligands of the blood serum such as cysteine, histidine and citric acid. Results show that formation of the ternary complexes, especially with cysteine, is favoured at physiological pH range in almost all systems studied. Besides these low molecular mass binders, serum proteins among others albumin and transferrin can bind zinc(II) or its complexes. Accordingly, the distribution of zinc(II) between the small and high molecular mass fractions of the serum was also studied by ultrafiltration. Modelling calculations relating to the distribution of zinc(II), using the stability constants of the ternary complexes studied and those of the serum proteins reported in the literature, confirmed the ultrafiltration results, namely, the primary role of albumin in zinc(II) binding among the low and high molecular mass components of the serum.

  13. Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Cas1 and Its Interaction with Csn2 in the Type II CRISPR-Cas System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Donghyun; Lee, Hasup; Jung, Yi-Deun; Kim, Kyunggon; Seok, Chaok; Suh, Nayoung; Bae, Euiyoung

    2016-01-01

    CRISPRs and Cas proteins constitute an RNA-guided microbial immune system against invading nucleic acids. Cas1 is a universal Cas protein found in all three types of CRISPR-Cas systems, and its role is implicated in new spacer acquisition during CRISPR-mediated adaptive immunity. Here, we report the crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Cas1 (SpCas1) in a type II CRISPR-Cas system and characterize its interaction with S. pyogenes Csn2 (SpCsn2). The SpCas1 structure reveals a unique conformational state distinct from type I Cas1 structures, resulting in a more extensive dimerization interface, a more globular overall structure, and a disruption of potential metal-binding sites for catalysis. We demonstrate that SpCas1 directly interacts with SpCsn2, and identify the binding interface and key residues for Cas complex formation. These results provide structural information for a type II Cas1 protein, and lay a foundation for studying multiprotein Cas complexes functioning in type II CRISPR-Cas systems.

  14. A density functional study on magnetic exchange interaction between Mn(II) ion and nitronyl nitroxide radical in trans- and cis-metal-radical complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; Haiyan; WANG; Fan; CHEN; Zhida

    2005-01-01

    The magneto-structural correlation between a Mn(II) ion, coordinated in an octahedral environment, and two nitronyl nitroxide radical ligands in trans- and cis-metal-radical complexes is investigated by the broken symmetry (BS) approach within density functional theory (DFT). The dependences of coupling constants J on three structural parameters: (i) bond angle(∈) (Mn-O-N (nitroxide)); (ii) rotating angle(∈), defined by the nitronyl nitroxide radical plane rotating around the axial Mn-O (nitroxide); (iii) bond distance R (Mn-O (nitroxide)) are directly calculated. Our calculations showed that both trans- and cis-Mn(II)-radical complexes behave a stronger antiferromagnetic interaction, consistent with experiments. In view of molecular orbital theory, the direct exchanges, including σ-type and π-type exchanges, are responsible for the magnetic exchange pathways. There is a preferable linear correlation between the calculated coupling constants J and the overlap integral squares between the local magnetic orbitals at the various rotating angle(∈) at the fixed bond angle(∈) and bond distance R, in both trans- and cis-Mn(II)- radical complexes.

  15. Aspartic acid interaction with cobalt(II) in dilute aqueous solution: A 57Co emission Mössbauer spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; Kovács, Krisztina; Homonnay, Zoltan; Kuzmann, Erno; Vértes, Attila

    2012-03-01

    Emission (57Co) Mössbauer spectra of the aspartic acid—57CoCl2 system were measured at T = 80 K in frozen aqueous solution and in the form of a dried residue of this solution. The Mössbauer spectra, besides a weak contribution from after-effects, showed two Fe2 + /Co2 + components which were ascribed to octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated 57CoII microenvironments in the Asp-cobalt(II) complex. This dual coordination mode may be due to the involvement of the second terminal carboxylic group of aspartic acid in the coordination sphere of Co.

  16. Aspartic acid interaction with cobalt(II) in dilute aqueous solution: A {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Tugarova, Anna V. [Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kovacs, Krisztina; Homonnay, Zoltan, E-mail: homonnay@ludens.elte.hu; Kuzmann, Erno; Vertes, Attila [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary)

    2012-03-15

    Emission ({sup 57}Co) Moessbauer spectra of the aspartic acid-{sup 57}CoCl{sub 2} system were measured at T = 80 K in frozen aqueous solution and in the form of a dried residue of this solution. The Moessbauer spectra, besides a weak contribution from after-effects, showed two Fe{sup 2 + }/Co{sup 2 + } components which were ascribed to octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated {sup 57}Co{sup II} microenvironments in the Asp-cobalt(II) complex. This dual coordination mode may be due to the involvement of the second terminal carboxylic group of aspartic acid in the coordination sphere of Co.

  17. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David P; Hann, Zachary S; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-11-01

    An ever-increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, zinc(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design of new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins.

  18. Photoinduced interactions of supramolecular ruthenium(II) complexes with plasmid DNA: synthesis and spectroscopic, electrochemical, and DNA photocleavage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swavey, Shawn; DeBeer, Madeleine; Li, Kaiyu

    2015-04-06

    Two new bridging ligands have been synthesized by combining substituted benzaldehydes with phenanthrolinopyrrole (php), resulting in new polyazine bridging ligands. The ligands have been characterized by (1)H NMR, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. These new ligands display π-π* transitions above 500 nm with modest molar absorptivities. Upon excitation at the ligand-centered charge-transfer transition, weak emission with a maximum wavelength of 612 nm is observed. When coordinated to two ruthenium(II) bis(bipyridyl) groups, the new bimetallic complexes generated give an overall 4+ charge. The electronic transitions of the bimetallic ruthenium(II) complexes display traditional π-π* transitions at 287 nm and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions at 452 nm with molar absorptivities greater than 30000 M(-1) cm(-1). Oxidation of the ruthenium(II) metal centers to ruthenium(III) occurs at potentials above 1.4 V versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements indicate that the ruthenium(II) moieties behave independently. Both complexes are water-soluble and show the ability to photonick plasmid DNA when irradiated with low-energy light above 550 nm. In addition, one of the complexes, [Ru(bpy)2php]2Van(4+), shows the ability to linearize plasmid DNA and gives evidence, by gel electrophoresis, of photoinduced binding to plasmid DNA.

  19. Enantioseparation of Amino Acids by Micelle-Enhanced Ultrafiltration : Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Copper(II) Amino Acid Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de T.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    A micelle-enhanced ultrafiltration system, which can potentially be used for large scale separations, has been used to investigate the resolution of amino acid enantiomers. For this purpose amino acid derivatives were synthesized, which in combination with copper(II) ions were used as chiral selecto

  20. A novel Schiff base derived from the gabapentin drug and copper (II) complex: Synthesis, characterization, interaction with DNA/protein and cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokohi-Pour, Zahra; Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Momtazi-Borojeni, Amir Abbas; Notash, Behrouz

    2016-09-01

    A novel Schiff base [C20H23NO3], has been prepared and characterized using FT-IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and X-ray crystallography. A copper (II) complex [Cu(C20H22NO3)2]·H2O has also been synthesized and characterized. The new ligand and complex thus obtained were investigated by their interaction with calf thymus DNA and BSA using electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and thermal denaturation. The intrinsic binding constants Kb of the ligand and Cu (II) complex, with CT-DNA obtained from UV-vis absorption studies were 1.53×10(4)M(-1) and 3.71×10(5)M(-1), respectively. Moreover the addition of the two compounds to CT-DNA (1:2) led to an increase of the melting temperature of DNA up to around 2.61°C for the ligand and 3.99°C for the Cu (II) complex. The ligand and Cu (II) complex bind to CT-DNA via a partial intercalative, as shown by the experimental data. In addition, the albumin interactions of the two compounds were studied by fluorescence quenching spectra, the results indicating that the binding mechanism is a static quenching process. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the two compounds on three different cancer cell lines was evaluated by MTT assay. The results showed that the copper complex exerted enhanced cytotoxicity compared with the Schiff base ligand; thereby, this complex clearly implies a positive synergistic effect. Furthermore, the copper complex showed a high, selective, and dose-dependent cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines.

  1. Studying the interactions of a platinum(II) 9-aminoacridine complex with proteins and oligonucleotides by ESI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, Katia G; Vicente, Consuelo; Rodríguez, Venancio; Atrian, Sílvia; Cutillas, Natalia; Capdevila, Mercè; Ruiz, José; Palacios, Òscar

    2012-01-07

    The interaction of a novel Pt complex, [Pt(dmba)(N9-9AA)(PPh(3))](+)1 (dmba = N,N-dimethylbenzylamine-κN,κC; 9AA = 9-aminoacridine), which exhibits anti-tumor activity, with certain key proteins has been monitored by ESI-MS. Also, the interaction of 1 with a designed double-stranded oligonucleotide containing the GG motif has been followed by mass spectrometry as well as by fluorimetry. The results obtained show the low interaction of 1 with the considered proteins and the absence of covalent interaction with the oligonucleotides, but the fluorimetric data confirm the π-π interaction of 1 with the double-stranded DNA, which is probably the reason of the previously reported activity of 1 in several tumor cell lines.

  2. Interactions of levetiracetam with carbamazepine, phenytoin, topiramate and vigabatrin in the mouse 6Hz psychomotor seizure model - a type II isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Wlaz, Aleksandra; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2014-01-15

    The aim of the presented study was to characterize the anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam in combination with various antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenytoin, topiramate and vigabatrin) in the mouse 6Hz psychomotor seizure model. Limbic (psychomotor) seizure activity was evoked in albino Swiss mice by a current (32mA, 6Hz, 3s stimulus duration) delivered via ocular electrodes; type II isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the consequent anticonvulsant interactions between the various drug combinations for fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10. With type II isobolographic analysis, the combinations of levetiracetam with carbamazepine and phenytoin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 were supra-additive (synergistic; P<0.01) in terms of seizure suppression, while the combinations for the fixed-ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 were additive. Levetiracetam combined with topiramate and vigabatrin for the fixed-ratio of 1:10 exerted supra-additive interaction (P<0.05), and simultaneously, the two-drug combinations for the fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:5 produced additive interaction in the mouse 6Hz psychomotor seizure model. The combinations of levetiracetam with carbamazepine and phenytoin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10, as well as the combinations of levetiracetam with topiramate and vigabatrin for the fixed-ratio of 1:10 appear to be particularly favorable combinations exerting supra-additive interaction in the mouse 6Hz psychomotor seizure model. Finally, it may be concluded that because of the synergistic interactions between levetiracetam and carbamazepine, phenytoin, topiramate and vigabatrin, the combinations might be useful in clinical practice.

  3. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  4. Crystal structure and characterization of a novel layered copper-lithium phosphonate with antiferromagnetic intrachain Cu(II)···Cu(II) interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbaky, Mohammed S. M.; Amghouz, Zakariae; Blanco, David Martínez; García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R.

    2017-04-01

    Novel metal phosphonate [CuLi(PPA)] [H3PPA=3-phosphonopropionic acid] was synthesized hydrothermally and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. It crystallizes in the space group C2/c, with cell parameters a=21.617(2) Å, b=4.9269(2) Å, c=14.342(1) Å, β=132.3(2)°, and Z=8. Its framework is built up from a main trimer, acting as a secondary building unit (SBU), which is formed by vertex-shared between two {LiO4} and one {Cu(1)O4} polyhedra. These units repeat along b-axis forming infinite inorganic chains, these chains are in turn cross-linked by corner sharing with {Cu(2)O4} polyhedra to produce inorganic layers lying in the bc-plane. The neighboring layers are connected through the PPA ligand, leading to a 3D pillared-layered structure. The topological analysis reveals that the compound exhibits 3,4,10-c net. Finally, magnetic susceptibility measurement of this compound over the temperature range of 2-300 K reveals the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic intrachain interactions.

  5. DNA interaction, antimicrobial studies of newly synthesized copper (II) complexes with 2-amino-6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzothiazole Schiff base ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambabu, Aveli; Pradeep Kumar, Marri; Tejaswi, Somapangu; Vamsikrishna, Narendrula; Shivaraj

    2016-12-01

    Four novel Schiff base ligands, L(1) (1-((E)-(6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)naphthalen-2-ol, C19H11F3N2O2S), L(2) (3-((E)-(6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)benzene-1,2-diol, C15H9F3N2O3S), L(3) (2-((E)-(6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)-5-methoxyphenol, C16H11F3N2O3S) and L(4) (2-((E)-(6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)-4-bromophenol, C15H8BrF3N2O2S) and their binary copper(II) complexes 1 [Cu(L(1))2], 2 [Cu(L(2))2], 3 [Cu(L(3))2] and 4 [Cu(L(4))2] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, ESI mass, FT-IR, ESR, UV-Visible, magnetic susceptibility, TGA, SEM and powder XRD studies. Based on spectral and analytical data, a square planar geometry is assigned for all Cu(II) complexes. The ligands and their Cu(II) complexes have been screened for antimicrobial activity against bacterial species E. coli, P. aeruginosa, B. amyloliquefaciens and S. aureus and fungal species S. rolfsii and M. phaseolina and it is observed that all Cu(II) complexes are more potent than corresponding ligands. DNA binding (UV absorption, fluorescence and viscosity titrations) and cleavage (oxidative and photo cleavage) studies of Cu(II) complexes have also been investigated against calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and supercoiled pBR322 DNA respectively. From the experimental results, it is found that the complexes bound effectively to CT-DNA through an intercalative mode and also cleaved pBR322 DNA in an efficient manner. The DNA binding and cleavage affinities of newly synthesized Cu(II) complexes are in the order of 2>1>3>4.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis class II apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III exhibits DNA regulated modes of interaction with the sliding DNA β-clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Taran; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-10-01

    The class-II AP-endonuclease (XthA) acts on abasic sites of damaged DNA in bacterial base excision repair. We identified that the sliding DNA β-clamp forms in vivo and in vitro complexes with XthA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel 239 QLRFPKK245 motif in the DNA-binding domain of XthA was found to be important for the interactions. Likewise, the peptide binding-groove (PBG) and the C-terminal of β-clamp located on different domains interact with XthA. The β-clamp-XthA complex can be disrupted by clamp binding peptides and also by a specific bacterial clamp inhibitor that binds at the PBG. We also identified that β-clamp stimulates the activities of XthA primarily by increasing its affinity for the substrate and its processivity. Additionally, loading of the β-clamp onto DNA is required for activity stimulation. A reduction in XthA activity stimulation was observed in the presence of β-clamp binding peptides supporting that direct interactions between the proteins are necessary to cause stimulation. Finally, we found that in the absence of DNA, the PBG located on the second domain of the β-clamp is important for interactions with XthA, while the C-terminal domain predominantly mediates functional interactions in the substrate's presence.

  7. kT-scale colloidal interactions in high-frequency inhomogeneous AC electric fields. II. Concentrated ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Jaime J; Liu, Brian G; Cui, Jing-Qin; Bevan, Michael A

    2011-08-02

    We report nonintrusive optical microscopy measurements of ensembles of polystyrene colloids in inhomogeneous AC electric fields as a function of field frequency and particle size. By using an inverse Monte Carlo (MC) simulation analysis of time-averaged particle microstructures, we sensitively measure induced dipole-dipole interactions on the kT energy scale. Measurements are reported for frequencies when the particle polarizability is greater and less than the medium, as well as the crossover between these conditions when dipole-dipole interactions vanish. By using measured single dipole-field interactions and associated parameters from Part I as input in the inverse analysis, the dipole-dipole interactions in this work are accurately modeled with no adjustable parameters for conditions away from the crossover frequency (i.e., |f(CM)| > 0). As dipolar interactions vanish at the crossover, a single frequency-dependent parameter is introduced to account for microstructures that appear to result from weak AC electro-osmotic flow induced interactions. By connecting quantitative measures of equilibrium microstructures and kT-scale dipole-field and dipole-dipole interactions, our findings provide a basis to understand colloidal assembly in inhomogeneous AC electric fields.

  8. Screened Coulomb interactions in metallic alloys. II. Screening beyond the single-site and atomic-sphere approximations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Simak, S.I.; Korzhavyi, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    -electron potential and energy. In the case of a random alloy such interactions can be accounted for only by lifting the atomic-sphere and single-site approximations, in order to include the polarization due to local environment effects. Nevertheless, a simple parametrization of the screened Coulomb interactions...... for the ordinary single-site methods, including the generalized perturbation method, is still possible. We obtained such a parametrization for bulk and surface NiPt alloys, which allows one to obtain quantitatively accurate effective interactions in this system....

  9. Interaction between paraventricular nucleus and septal area in the control of physiological responses induced by angiotensin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camargo L.A.A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the effects of losartan (40 nmol and PD 123319 (40 nmol (both non-peptides and selective antagonists of the AT1 and AT2 angiotensin receptors, respectively, and [Sar¹, Ala8] angiotensin II (ANG II (40 nmol (a non-selective peptide antagonist of angiotensin receptors injected into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN on the water and salt appetite, diuresis and natriuresis and mean arterial pressure (MAP induced by administration of 10 nmol of ANG II into the medial septal area (MSA of male Holtzman rats weighing 250-300 g. The volume of drug solution injected was 0.5 µl over a period of 10-15 s. The responses were measured over a period of 120 min. ANG II alone injected into the MSA induced an increase in all the above parameters (8.1 ± 1.2, 1.8 ± 0.3, and 17.1 ± 1.0 ml, 217 ± 25 µEq/120 min, and 24 ± 4 mmHg, respectively, N = 10-12 compared with vehicle-treated rats (1.4 ± 0.2, 0.6 ± 0.1, and 9.3 ± 0.5 ml, 47 ± 5 µEq/120 min, and 4.1 ± 0.8 mmHg, respectively, N = 10-14. Pretreatment with losartan and [Sar¹, Ala8] ANG II completely abolished the water and sodium intake, and the pressor increase (0.5 ± 0.2, 1.1 ± 0.2, 0.5 ± 0.2, and 0.8 ± 0.2 ml, and 1.2 ± 3.9, 31 ± 4.6 mmHg, respectively, N = 9-12, whereas losartan blunted the urinary and sodium excretion induced by ANG II (13.9 ± 1.0 ml and 187 ± 10 µEq/120 min, respectively, N = 9. Pretreatment with PD 123319 and [Sar¹, Ala8] ANG II blocked the urinary and sodium excretion (10.7 ± 0.8, 9.8 ± 0.7 ml, and 67 ± 13 and 57 ± 17 µEq/120 min, respectively, N = 9, whereas pretreatment with PD 123319 partially blocked the water and sodium intake, and the MAP induced by ANG II administration (2.3 ± 0.3, 1.1 ± 0.1 ml, and 12 ± 3 mmHg, respectively, N = 9-10. These results suggest the angiotensinergic effect of the MSA on the AT1 and AT2 receptors of the PVN in terms of water and sodium homeostasis and MAP modulation.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activity, SOD mimic and interaction with DNA of drug based copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Dosi, Promise A.; Bhatt, Bhupesh S.; Thakkar, Vasudev R.

    2011-02-01

    Novel metal complexes of the second-generation quinolone antibacterial agent enrofloxacin with copper(II) and neutral bidentate ligands have been prepared and characterized with elemental analysis reflectance, IR and mass spectroscopy. Complexes have been screened for their in-vitro antibacterial activity against two Gram (+ve)Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and three Gram (-ve)Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa organisms using the double dilution technique. The binding of this complex with CT-DNA has been investigated by absorption titration, salt effect and viscosity measurements. Binding constant is ranging from 1.3 × 10 4-3.7 × 10 4. The cleavage ability of complexes has been assessed by gel electrophoresis using pUC19 DNA. The catalytic activity of the copper(II) complexes towards the superoxide anion (O 2rad -) dismutation was assayed by their ability to inhibit the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT).

  11. Hydrogen bonding interactions and supramolecular networks of pyridine-aryl based thiosemicarbazides and their Zn(II) complexes

    OpenAIRE

    GUNNLAUGSSON, THORFINNUR; PANDURANGAN, KOMALA; MC CABE, THOMAS; KITCHEN, JOANNE

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED The synthesis of five pyridyl derived thiosemicarbazides, 1-5, is presented. All five were formed in a single step from 2-hydrazinopyridine with commercially available isothiocyanates using microwave assisted synthesis. Compounds 1-4 were structurally characterised by single crystal diffraction analysis, and showed extended supramolecular hydrogen bonding arrays. Furthermore, the Zn(ii) complexes 6 and 7 have been prepared using ligands 1 and 5, and structurally characterised, ag...

  12. Synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and pharmacological studies of substituted benzophenone derived Schiff base metal(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Subbaraj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A new bidentate NO type Schiff base ligand (HL, derived from 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylphenylmethanone with aniline and its metal(II [M = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn] complexes has been synthesized. The synthesized ligand and the metal(II complexes were structurally characterized by analytical, spectral (FT-IR, UV–vis., 1H NMR, FAB-Mass, TGA/DTA and EPR as well as molar conductance and magnetic studies. All the complexes are non-electrolytes having 1:2 stoichiometry. They adopt tetrahedral and octahedral geometry. Thermal behavior of metal(II complexes (1a–1c shows loss of coordinated water molecules in the first step followed by the decomposition of ligand moieties in a respective manner and leads to form an air stable metal oxide as the final residue. Micro crystalline nature and the presence of coordinated water molecules have been confirmed by powder XRD, SEM and thermal analyses. The ligand and its complexes have efficient bio-efficacy, DNA binding and cleavage ability.

  13. Potentiometric and electrokinetic signatures of iron(II) interactions with (a,y)-Fe2O3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toczydlowska, Diana; Kedra-Krolik, Karolina; Nejbert, Krzysztof; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zarzycki, Piotr P.

    2015-05-29

    The role of surface electrostatics on the reductive dissolution of iron (III) oxides is poorly understood, despite its importance in controlling the amount of mobilized iron. We report the potentiometric titration of the a; y -Fe2O3 oxides exposed to reductants and complexing ligands (Fe(II), ascorbate, oxalate, malonate). We monitored in situ surface and potentials, the ratio of mobilized ferric to ferrous ions, and periodically analyzed nanoparticle crystal structure using X-ray diffraction. We found that addition of Fe2+ ions produces a response consistent with the iron solubilityactivity curve, whereas the presence of ascorbate significantly decreases the amount of mobilized Fe(III) due to reduction to Fe(II). In addition, XRD analysis proved that y-Fe2O3 particles remain structurally unchanged along the titration pathway despite iron cycling between aqueous and solid reservoirs. Our studies, suggest that the surface redoxactivity of iron oxides is primarily governed by the balance between Fe(III) and Fe(II) ions in aqueous phase, which may be easily altered by complexing and reducing agents.

  14. Photodissociation of a ruthenium(II) arene complex and its subsequent interactions with biomolecules: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanlu; DeYonker, Nathan J; Zhang, Xiting; Zhao, Cunyuan; Ji, Liangnian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2012-10-01

    The piano-stool Ru(II) arene complex [(η⁶-benz)Ru(bpm)(py)]²⁺ (benz = benzene, bpm = 2,2'-bipyrimidine, and py = pyridine), which is conventionally nonlabile (on a timescale and under conditions relevant for biological reactivity), can be activated by visible light to selectively photodissociate the monodentate ligand (py). In the present study, the aquation and binding of the photocontrolled ruthenium(II) arene complex [(η⁶-benz)Ru(bpm)(py)]²⁺ to various biomolecules are studied by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT). Potential energy curves (PECs) calculated for the Ru-N (py) bonds in [(η⁶-benz)Ru(bpm)(py)]²⁺ in the singlet and triplet state give useful insights into the photodissociation mechanism of py. The binding energies of the various biomolecules are calculated, which allows the order of binding affinities among the considered nuleic-acid- or protein-binding sites to be discerned. The kinetics for the replacement of water in the aqua complex with biomolecules is also considered, and the results demonstrate that guanine is superior to other biomolecules in terms of coordinating with the Ru(II) aqua adduct, which is in reasonable agreement with experimental observations.

  15. The Buried Starburst in the Interacting Galaxy II Zw 096 as Revealed by the Spitzer Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Inami, Hanae; Surace, J A; Mazzarella, J M; Evans, A S; Sanders, D B; Howell, J H; Petric, A; Vavilkin, T; Iwasawa, K; Haan, S; Murphy, E J; Stierwalt, S; Appleton, P N; Barnes, J E; Bothun, G; Bridge, C R; Chan, B; Charmandaris, V; Frayer, D T; Kewley, L J; Kim, D C; Lord, S; Madore, B F; Marshall, J A; Matsuhara, H; Melbourne, J E; Rich, J; Schulz, B; Spoon, H W W; Sturm, E; U, V; Veilleux, S; Xu, K

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite is presented for the z=0.036 merging galaxy system II Zw 096 (CGCG 448-020). Because II Zw 096 has an infrared luminosity of log(L_IR/L_sun) = 11.94, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG), and was observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The Spitzer data suggest that 80% of the total infrared luminosity comes from an extremely compact, red source not associated with the nuclei of the merging galaxies. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectra indicate no high-ionization lines from a buried active galactic nucleus in this source. The strong detection of the 3.3 micron and 6.2 micron PAH emission features in the AKARI and Spitzer spectra also implies that the energy source of II Zw 096 is a starburst. Based on Spitzer infrared imaging and AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy, the star formation rate is estimated to be 120 M_sun/yr and ...

  16. Studies on the Interaction Mechanism of 1,10-Phenanthroline Cobalt(II Complex with DNA and Preparation of Electrochemical DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiying Wang

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectroscopy and ultraviolet (UV spectroscopy techniques coupled with cyclic voltammetry (CV were used to study the interaction between salmon sperm DNA and 1,10-Phenanthroline cobalt(II complex, [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]Cl·H2O, where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline. The interaction between [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]+ and double-strand DNA (dsDNA was identified to be intercalative mode. An electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed by covalent immobilization of probe single-strand DNA (ssDNA related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV on the activated glassy carbon electrode (GCE. With [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]+ being the novel electrochemical hybridization indicator, the selectivity of ssDNA-modified electrode was investigated and selective detection of complementary ssDNA was achieved using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV.

  17. Synergistic interaction between a novel mixed ligand copper(II) chelate complex and a panel of anticancer agents in T47D human breast cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geromichalos, G D; Katsoulos, G A; Trafalis, D T; Hadjikostas, C C; Papageorgiou, A

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a novel copper(II) chelate complex with a tridentate ONN-Schiff base ligand and the anion of salicylate, which presented a potent cytotoxic activity against a panel of human and murine cancer cell lines. In this experiment we explored the combined effect between Cu(SalNEt(2))salicylate (Cu-Sal) complex and the widely used anticancer drugs carboplatin (CBDCA), cyclophosphamide (CTX) and paclitaxel (TXL) against T47D human breast cancer cells. Theoretical (quantum-chemical) study of this complex and its adducts with biological molecules were carried out, aiming at the elucidation of the underlying mechanism of action. Cells grown in adherence in 96-well microplates were exposed simultaneously to both agents for 48 h. Drug cytotoxicity was assessed via the XTT colorimetric assay. The combined drug interaction was assessed with the median-effect analysis and the combination index (CI). Copper(II) salicylate complex was proved active against T47D human breast cancer cells. Concurrent treatment of cells with Cu-Sal complex and the chemotherapeutic drugs CBDCA, CTX and TXL, mainly showed a synergistic interaction in most concentration ratios. Cu-Sal complex interacts synergistically with tested chemotherapeutic drugs for most schedules of administration, and only occasionally an additive or antagonistic effect was apparent. With the aid of quantum-chemical calculations it was demonstrated that the mechanism of action of this complex involves binding to DNA and RNA. These findings prompt to search for possible interaction of this complex with other cellular elements of fundamental importance in cell proliferation.

  18. Rising CO2 interacts with growth light and growth rate to alter photosystem II photoinactivation of the coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available We studied the interactive effects of pCO(2 and growth light on the coastal marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana CCMP 1335 growing under ambient and expected end-of-the-century pCO(2 (750 ppmv, and a range of growth light from 30 to 380 µmol photons·m(-2·s(-1. Elevated pCO(2 significantly stimulated the growth of T. pseudonana under sub-saturating growth light, but not under saturating to super-saturating growth light. Under ambient pCO(2 susceptibility to photoinactivation of photosystem II (σ(i increased with increasing growth rate, but cells growing under elevated pCO(2 showed no dependence between growth rate and σ(i, so under high growth light cells under elevated pCO(2 were less susceptible to photoinactivation of photosystem II, and thus incurred a lower running cost to maintain photosystem II function. Growth light altered the contents of RbcL (RUBISCO and PsaC (PSI protein subunits, and the ratios among the subunits, but there were only limited effects on these and other protein pools between cells grown under ambient and elevated pCO(2.

  19. An anti-ferromagnetic terephthalate-bridged trigonal prismatic dinuclear manganese(II) complex: Synthon of rare anion $^{\\ldots}$ interaction promoting dimensionality

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Somnath Choubey; Soumi Chattopadhayay; Kishalay Bhar; Subhasis Roy; Sumitava Khan; Joan Ribas; Barindra Kumar Ghosh

    2014-11-01

    A dinuclear compound [Mn2(L)2(-tp)](PF6)2·3.57H2O (1) [L = N,N′-(bis(pyridin-2-yl)benzylidene)-1,3-propanediamine and tp = terephthalate dianion] has been isolated and characterized on the basis of microanalytical, spectroscopic and other physicochemical properties. X-ray structural study showed interesting bis(bidentate) bridging motif of tp in the dicationic dinuclear unit [Mn2(-tp)]2+. Each manganese(II) centre adopts a rare distorted trigonal prismatic geometry with an MnN4O2 chromophore.Chelation of the tetradentate Schiff base (L) along with bis(bidentate) bridging of two O atoms of tp complete hexacoordination around each manganese(II) centre. The dinuclear units of 1 are associated through cooperative C-H$\\cdots$F hydrogen bonds and $^{\\cdot}$ , C-H$^{\\cdots}$ and rare anion$^{\\cdots}$ interactions to promote the dimensionality in a graded manner. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurement of 1 in the 2-300 K temperature range revealed weak antiferromagnetic interaction presumably due to long bridging arm of tp.

  20. Quinoxaline-2-carboxamide as a carrier ligand in two new platinum(II) compounds: Synthesis, crystal structure, cytotoxic activity and DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqués-Gallego, Patricia; Gamiz-Gonzalez, M Amparo; Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Lutz, Martin; Spek, Anthony L; Pevec, Andrej; Kozlevčar, Bojan; Reedijk, Jan

    2010-06-01

    The search for platinum compounds structurally different from cisplatin has led to two new platinum(II) compounds containing quinoxaline-2-carboxamide as a carrier ligand, i.e. cis-[Pt(qnxca)(MeCN)Cl2] (1) and the [Pt(qnxca-H)(dmso)Cl] (2). Both compounds have been synthesized and characterized using different spectroscopic methods. In addition, single-crystal structures have been determined by X-Ray diffraction for both compounds. In each case a square planar Pt(II) is present; in (1) the qnxca is monodentate and neutral, whereas in (2) the ligand has lost a hydrogen, to form the anionic chelating ligand abbreviated as qnxca-H. The biological activity of both compounds has been investigated in a panel of seven human tumour cells, displaying poor cytotoxic activity, compared to cisplatin. The interaction of the new compounds with 1 or 2 equiv. of 9-ethylguanine has been studied using (1)H NMR, (195)Pt NMR and ESI-MS spectroscopy, finding poor reactivity of 1 towards the model base, forming only the monosubstituted adduct. Surprisingly, compound 2, which is more sterically crowded, interacts more efficiently with the 9-EtG, forming a bifunctional adduct with two 9-EtG with substitution of the dmso and the chloride ligand. Unwinding studies of pUC19 plasmid DNA by compound 1 show similar unwinding properties to cisplatin.

  1. Identification of Tight-Binding Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 Inhibitors in Aqueous Extracts of Marine Invertebrates by the Combination of Enzymatic and Interaction-Based Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Sarduy, Emir; Guerra, Yasel; Covaleda Cortés, Giovanni; Avilés, Francesc Xavier; Chávez Planes, María A.

    2017-01-01

    Natural products from marine origin constitute a very promising and underexplored source of interesting compounds for modern biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries. However, their evaluation is quite challenging and requires specifically designed assays to reliably identify the compounds of interest in a highly heterogeneous and interfering context. In the present study, we describe a general strategy for the confident identification of tight-binding protease inhibitors in the aqueous extracts of 62 Cuban marine invertebrates, using Plasmodium falciparum hemoglobinases Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 as model enzymes. To this end, we first developed a screening strategy that combined enzymatic with interaction-based assays and then validated screening conditions using five reference extracts. Interferences were evaluated and minimized. The results from the massive screening of such extracts, the validation of several hits by a variety of interaction-based assays and the purification and functional characterization of PhPI, a multifunctional and reversible tight-binding inhibitor for Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 from the gorgonian Plexaura homomalla, are presented. PMID:28430158

  2. Mixed-ligand copper(II) phenolate complexes: Synthesis, spectral characterization, phosphate-hydrolysis, antioxidant, DNA interaction and cytotoxic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurumoorthy, Perumal; Mahendiran, Dharmasivam; Prabhu, Durai; Arulvasu, Chinnasamy; Rahiman, Aziz Kalilur

    2015-01-01

    A series of phenol-based mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes of the type [CuL1-4(diimine)] (1-8), where L1-4 = N1,N2-bis(5-substituted-2-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-ethylene/phenylenediimine and diimine = 2,2‧-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), have been isolated and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. Electronic spectra of complexes suggest Cu(II) cation has a d9 electronic configuration, adopting distorted octahedral geometry with axial elongation, due to Jahn-Teller effect. Electrochemical studies of complexes evidenced one-electron irreversible reduction wave in the cathodic region. The observed rate constant (k) values for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylphosphate (4-NPP) are in the range of 0.25-3.82 × 10-2 min-1. The obtained room temperature magnetic moment values (1.79-1.90 BM) lies within the range observed for octahedral copper(II) complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that these complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed intercalation with minor-groove binding, and the complex 4 exhibits highest binding activity than the other complexes. The cleavage activity on supercoiled pBR322 DNA revealed the involvement of hydroxyl radical and singlet-oxygen as reactive oxygen species, and complexes encourage binding to minor-groove. Further, the cytotoxicity of complex 4 on human hepatocellular liver carcinoma HepG2 cell line implies the cell death through apoptosis.

  3. Disruption of Annexin II /p11 Interaction Suppresses Leukemia Cell Binding, Homing and Engraftment, and Sensitizes the Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Mason, Robert W; Napper, Andrew; Barwe, Sonali P

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment plays an important role in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell proliferation, maintenance, and resistance to chemotherapy. Annexin II (ANX2) is abundantly expressed on bone marrow cells and complexes with p11 to form ANX2/p11-hetero-tetramer (ANX2T). We present evidence that p11 is upregulated in refractory ALL cell lines and patient samples. A small molecule inhibitor that disrupts ANX2/p11 interaction (ANX2T inhibitor), an anti-ANX2 antibody, and knockdown of p11, abrogated ALL cell adhesion to osteoblasts, indicating that ANX2/p11 interaction facilitates binding and retention of ALL cells in the bone marrow. Furthermore, ANX2T inhibitor increased the sensitivity of primary ALL cells co-cultured with osteoblasts to dexamethasone and vincristine induced cell death. Finally, in an orthotopic leukemia xenograft mouse model, the number of ALL cells homing to the bone marrow was reduced by 40-50% in mice injected with anti-ANX2 antibody, anti-p11 antibody or ANX2T inhibitor compared to respective controls. In a long-term engraftment assay, the percentage of ALL cells in mouse blood, bone marrow and spleen was reduced in mice treated with agents that disrupt ANX2/p11 interaction. These data show that disruption of ANX2/p11 interaction results in reduced ALL cell adhesion to osteoblasts, increased ALL cell sensitization to chemotherapy, and suppression of ALL cell homing and engraftment.

  4. Synergistic interaction between a mixed ligand copper (II) chelate complex and two anticancer agents in T47D human breast cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geromichalos, G D; Trafalis, D T; Katsoulos, G A; Papageorgiou, A; Dalezis, P; Triandafillidis, E B; Hadjikostas, C C; Athanassiou, A

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a copper(II) chelate complex with a tridentate ONN-Schiff ligand and the anion of salicylate, showing a potent cytotoxic activity against a panel of human and murine cancer cell lines. In this experiment we have explored the combination effect between Cu(SalNEt(2))salicylate (Cu-Sal) complex and two widely used drugs in cancer chemotherapy, bleomycin (BLM) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), against T47D human breast cancer cells. Previous theoretical quantum-chemical studies of this complex and ass adducts with biological molecules elucidated the underlying mechanism of action of this complex. Cells grown in adherence in 96-well microplates were exposed simultaneously to both agents for 48 h. During cytotoxicity was assessed via the XTT colorimetric assay. The combined drug interaction was assessed with the median-effect analysis and the combination index (CI). Concurrent treatment of cells with Cu-Sal complex and the chemotherapeutic drugs BLM and 5-FU and the antioxidant agent ascorbic acid (AsA) resulted mainly in synergistic interaction for most concentration ratios. Cu-Sal complex interacts synergistically with the chemotherapeutic drugs for most schedules of administration. These findings call for prompting to search for possible interaction of this complex with other cellular elements of fundamental importance in cell proliferation.

  5. Platinum(II Complexes with Tetradentate Schiff Bases as Ligands: Synthesis, Characterization and Detection of DNA Interaction by Differential Pulse Voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Five sterically hindered platinum(II complexes with tetradentate schiff bases as ligands, [Pt(L] (L= N,N′-bisalicylidene-1,2-ethylenediamine (L1, N,N′-bisalicylidene-1,2-cyclohexanediamine (L2, N,N′-bis(5-hydroxyl-salicylidene-1,2-cyclohexanediamine (L3, N,N′-bisalicylidene-1,2-diphenyl-ethylenediamine (L4 and N,N′-bis(3-tert-butyl-5-methyl-salicylidene-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine (L5 have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The sterical hindrance of antitumor drug candidates potentially makes them less susceptible to deactivation by sulphur containing proteins and helping to overcome resistance mechanisms. The interaction of these metal complexes with fish sperm single-stranded DNA (ssDNA was studied electrochemically based on the oxidation signals of guanine and adenine. Differential pulse voltammetry was employed to monitor the DNA interaction in solution by using renewable pencil graphite electrode. The results indicate that ligands with different groups can strongly affect the interaction between [Pt(L] complexes and ssDNA due to sterical hindrances and complex [Pt(L1] has the best interaction with DNA among the five complexes.

  6. Specific interaction between DNA polymerase II (PolD) and RadB, a Rad51/Dmc1 homolog, in Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, I; Morikawa, K; Ishino, Y

    1999-12-15

    Pyrococcus furiosus has an operon containing the DNA polymerase II (PolD) gene and three other genes. Using a two-hybrid screening to examine the interactions of the proteins encoded by the operon, we identified a specific interaction between the second subunit of PolD (DP1) and a Rad51/Dmc1 homologous protein (RadB). To ensure the specific interaction between these two proteins, each gene in the operon was expressed in Escherichia coli or insect cells separately and the products were purified. The in vitro analyses using the purified proteins also showed the interaction between DP1 and RadB. The deletion mutant analysis of DP1 revealed that a region important for binding with RadB is located in the central part of the sequence (amino acid residues 206-498). This region has an overlap to the C-terminal half (amino acids 334-613), which is highly conserved among euryarchaeal DP1s and is essential for the activity of PolD. Our results suggest that, although RadB does not noticeably affect the primer extension ability of PolD in vitro, PolD may utilize the RadB protein in DNA synthesis under certain conditions.

  7. Calmodulin Kinase II Interacts with the Dopamine Transporter C Terminus to Regulate Amphetamine-Induced Reverse Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Jacob U; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Holy, Marion

    2006-01-01

    Efflux of dopamine through the dopamine transporter (DAT) is critical for the psychostimulatory properties of amphetamines, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a key role in this efflux. CaMKIIalpha bound to the d...... in response to the CaMKII inhibitor KN93. Our data suggest that CaMKIIalpha binding to the DAT C terminus facilitates phosphorylation of the DAT N terminus and mediates amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux....

  8. Calmodulin kinase II interacts with the dopamine transporter C terminus to regulate amphetamine-induced reverse transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Jacob U; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Holy, Marion

    2006-01-01

    Efflux of dopamine through the dopamine transporter (DAT) is critical for the psychostimulatory properties of amphetamines, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a key role in this efflux. CaMKIIalpha bound to the d...... in response to the CaMKII inhibitor KN93. Our data suggest that CaMKIIalpha binding to the DAT C terminus facilitates phosphorylation of the DAT N terminus and mediates amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux....

  9. Self-assembly through secondary interactions in formation of two-dimensional lead(II) supramolecular polymer with nanosheets morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Yasamin; Akhbari, Kamran; Phuruangrat, Anukorn; Costantino, Ferdinando

    2017-02-01

    In order to study the role of self-assembly through secondary interactions in formation of [Pb(3-AB)2]n (1), [3-ABbar = 3-aminobenzoate], we designed some experiments and synthesized two samples of 1 under ultrasonic irradiations. Nanosheets of 1 were synthesized under these conditions. Compound 1 is a one-dimensional coordination polymer. Self-assembly through hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions between these chains results in formation of two-dimensional supramolecular polymer. It seems that self-assembly through secondary interactions between these chain structures is responsible for formation of 1 with nanosheet morphology. Formation nanoparticles of [Pb(2,6-DHB)2]n (2), [2,6-DHBbar = 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate], under the same condition applied for 1, which has three-dimensional coordination network in its crystalline structure, approved our hypotheses. These microstructures were characterized by IR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  10. Effect of the metal environment on the ferromagnetic interaction in the Co-NC-W pairs of octacyanotungstate(V)-Cobalt(II) three-dimensional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clima, Sergiu; Hendrickx, Marc F A; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Soncini, Alessandro; Mironov, Vladimir; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2007-04-02

    State of the art CASSCF and CASPT2 calculations have been performed to elucidate the nature of ferromagnetism of CoII-NC-WV pairs in the three-dimensional compound [[WV(CN)2]2[(micro-CN)4CoII(H2O)2]3.4H2O]n, which has been recently synthesized and investigated by a number of experimental techniques (Herrera, J. M.; Bleuzen, A.; Dromzée, Y.; Julve, M.; Lloret, F.; Verdaguer, M. Inorg. Chem. 2003, 42, 7052-7059). In this network, the Co ions are in the high-spin (S = 3/2) state, while the single unpaired electron on the W centers occupies the lowest orbital of the dz2 type of the 5d shell. In agreement with the suggestion made by Herrera et al., we find that the ferromagnetism is due to a certain occupation scheme of the orbitals from the parent octahedral t2g shell on CoII sites, in which the orbital accommodating the unpaired electron is orthogonal to the dz2 orbitals of the surrounding W ions. We investigate the stabilization of such an orbital configuration on the Co sites and find that it cannot be achieved in the ground state of isolated mononuclear fragments [CoII(NC)4(OH2)2]2- for any conformations of the coordinated water molecules and Co-N-C bond angles. On the other hand, it is stabilized by the interaction of the complex with neighboring W ions, which are simulated here by effective potentials. The calculated exchange coupling constants for the CoII-NC-WV binuclear fragments are in reasonable agreement with the measured Curie-Weiss constant for this compound. As additional evidence for the inferred electronic configuration on the Co sites, the ligand-field transitions, the temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility, and the field-dependent low-temperature magnetization, simulated ab initio for the mononuclear Co fragments, are in agreement with the available data for another compound [WIV[(micro-CN)4-CoII(H2O)2]2.4H2O]n containing diamagnetic W and high-spin Co ions in an isostructural environment.

  11. COMMUNITTY HEALTH II – SUBJECT THAT PROMOTES THE LEARNING- SERVING-COMUNITTY INTERACTION AIMING THE PROMOTION OF HEALTH, CARE AND COMFORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onã Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the context of the teaching and learning process, the communication between the fields of study and their subjects is important, once such integration reflects on the formation and the learning-serving-community triad. This pedagogical basis figures in the syllabi of the subjects Community Health II and its Training Course, offered by the Nursing Program. Objective: Reporting the teaching and learning process for the academic subject Community Health II, as being an inclusive part of learning-serving-community triad, with regards of developing care for the health of individuals, family and community, according to the reports of the experiences of this author during the training course. Methodological Description: It was reported the events dealing with the data experienced by the author over the second term of 2012. The following places were used in that report. In the academic environment and in the training course which took place in one of the administrative regions of Distrito Federal. The pedagogical theoretical basis was made on Paulo Freire. Data were collected from the studied subjects, legislation, theoretical and practical meetings, communication materials on the virtual environment among other sources. Results and discussion: this experience revealed that the subject CH-II presents an interdisciplinary, multiprofessional and inclusive view of learning-serving-community triad. The participants mediated by the problematization contributed for the construction of theoretical and practical knowledge using reflections, debates, and discussions according to the Pedagogy of Autonomy. The teaching and learning methods permitted the development of independence, competencies and abilities contained in the political project. Conclusion: The training course experienced in the environment of CH-II was an unique experience, generating benefits to all the people involved in the process, besides the resignification of their practices

  12. Cross-talk between the octarepeat domain and the fifth binding site of prion protein driven by the interaction of copper(II) with the N-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Natale, Giuseppe; Turi, Ildikó; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Sóvágó, Imre; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2015-03-02

    Prion diseases are a group of neurodegenerative diseases based on the conformational conversion of the normal form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) to the disease-related scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)). Copper(II) coordination to PrP(C) has attracted considerable interest for almost 20 years, mainly due to the possibility that such an interaction would be an important event for the physiological function of PrP(C). In this work, we report the copper(II) coordination features of the peptide fragment Ac(PEG11)3PrP(60-114) [Ac = acetyl] as a model for the whole N-terminus of the PrP(C) metal-binding domain. We studied the complexation properties of the peptide by means of potentiometric, UV/Vis, circular dichroism and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry techniques. The results revealed that the preferred histidyl binding sites largely depend on the pH and copper(II)/peptide ratio. Formation of macrochelate species occurs up to a 2:1 metal/peptide ratio in the physiological pH range and simultaneously involves the histidyl residues present both inside and outside the octarepeat domain. However, at increased copper(II)/peptide ratios amide-bound species form, especially within the octarepeat domain. On the contrary, at basic pH the amide-bound species predominate at any copper/peptide ratio and are formed preferably with the binding sites of His96 and His111, which is similar to the metal-binding-affinity order observed in our previous studies.

  13. Interaction of Fanaroff-Riley class II radio jets with a randomly magnetised intra-cluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Huarte-Espinosa, Martín; Alexander, Paul

    2011-01-01

    A combination of three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and synthetic numerical simulations are presented to follow the evolution of a randomly magnetised plasma that models the intra-cluster medium (ICM), under the isolated effects of powerful, light, hypersonic and bipolar Fanaroff-Riley class II (FR II) jets. We prescribe the cluster magnetic field (CMF) as a Gaussian random field with a Kolmogorov-like energy spectrum. Both the power of the jets and the viewing angle that is used for the synthetic Rotation Measure (RM) observations are investigated. We find the model radio sources introduce and amplify fluctuations on the RM statistical properties which we analyse as a function of time as well as the viewing angle. The average RM and the RM standard deviation are increased by the action of the jets. Energetics, RM statistics and magnetic power spectral analysis consistently show that the effects also correlate with the jets' power, and that the lightest, fastest jets produce the strongest chang...

  14. Metal-selenium interactions. Crystal structure of binuclear [(1 -iodo)-(2 - -iodo) (triphenyl selenophosphorane-Se)mercury(II)]2 complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarlok S Lobana; Amarjeet Singh; Mandeep Kaur; Alfonso Castineiras

    2001-04-01

    Reaction of mercury(II) diiodide with triphenyl selenophosphorane-Se (1:1 mole ratio) in acetone followed by recrystallisation of the product from chloroform formed crystals of stoichiometry {HgI2(Ph3PSe)}(1). Compound 1 existsas a centrosymmetric homobimetallic dimer, {Hg( -I)I(Ph3PSe)}2, as monoclinic crystals of space group 21/. The dimer comprises two 2-iodo atoms that form unequal Hg-I bonds {2 8230(10), 3 1135(9) Å} and two equal terminal Hg-I bonds {2 6524(10) Å}. The Se atom of Ph3PSe forms terminal Hg-Se bond {2 5914(11)Å} and thus the geometry about each Hg centre is distorted tetrahedral and the range of tetrahedral bond angles is 92 97(2) to 130 85(3)°, the largest being that of Se(1)-Hg(1)-I(1) and the shortest, I(2)-Hg(1)-I(2)∗. Hg-Hg and I-I separations of {4 0930(11)Å} and {4 3097(15)Å} are more than the sums of their respective van der Waal radii {3 00 Å and 4 24 Å}.

  15. Synthesis, structural characterization and biological activity of a trinuclear zinc(II) complex: DNA interaction study and antimicrobial activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhaskar Biswas; Niranjan Kole; Moumita Patra; Shampa Dutta; Mousumi Ganguly

    2013-11-01

    A trinuclear zinc(II) complex [Zn3L2(-O2CCH3)2(H2O)2]·H2O·2CH3OH (1) was synthesized from an in situ reaction between zinc acetate and a Schiff base ligand (H2L = 2-((2-hydroxyphenylimino) methyl)-6-methoxyphenol). The ligand was prepared by (1:1) condensation of ortho-vanillin and ortho-aminophenol. The ligand and zinc(II) complex were characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), UV-Vis spectroscopy, Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD) and thermogravimetric analysis. 1 crystallizes in P-1 space group with = 11.9241(3) Å, = 12.19746 Å, = 20.47784 Å with unit cell volume is 2674.440 (Å)3. Binding property of the complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated using absorption and emission studies. Thermal melting and viscosity experiments were further performed to determine the mode of binding of 1 with CT-DNA. Spectroscopic and viscosity investigations revealed an intercalative binding mode of 1 with CT-DNA. The ligand and its zinc complex were screened for their biological activity against bacterial species and fungi. Activity data show that the metal complex has more antibacterial and antifungal activity than the parent Schiff base ligand and against those bacterial or fungi species.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and DNA interaction of new copper(II) complexes of Schiff base-aroylhydrazones bearing naphthalene ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, Cansu; Gup, Ramazan

    2013-05-05

    Two new copper(II) complexes with the condensation products of methyl 2-naphthyl ketone with 4-hydroxybenzohydrazide, 4-hydroxy-N'-[(1Z)-1-(naphthalen-2-yl)ethylidene]benzohydrazide [HL(1)] and (Z)-ethyl 2-(4-(2-(1-(naphthalen-2-yl)ethylidene)hydrazinecarbonyl)phenoxy)acetate (HL(2)) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra, UV-Vis electronic absorption spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurements, TGA, powder XRD and SEM-EDS. The binding properties of the copper(II) complexes with calf thymus DNA were studied by using the absorption titration method. DNA cleavage activities of the synthesized copper complexes were examined by using agarose gel electrophoresis. The effect of complex concentration on the DNA cleavage reactions in the absence and presence of H2O2 was also investigated. The experimental results suggest that the copper complexes bind significantly to calf thymus DNA by both groove binding and intercalation modes and cleavage effectively pBR322 DNA. The mechanistic studies demonstrate that a hydrogen peroxide-derived species and singlet oxygen ((1)O2) are the active oxidative species for DNA cleavage.

  17. The interaction of young massive stars with their environment: A millimeter and submillimeter line study of NGC6334 FIR II

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J S; Mauersberger, R; Chin, Y N; Menten, K M; Tieftrunk, A R; Belloche, A

    2007-01-01

    Using the 15-m Swedish ESO Sub-millimeter Telescope (SEST), CO, HCN, and HCO+ observations of the galactic star-forming region NGC6334 FIR II are presented, complemented by [C I] 3^P_1--3^P_0 and 3^P_2--3^P_1 data from the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX 12-m telescope). Embedded in the extended molecular cloud and associated with the H II region NGC6334--D, there is a molecular "void". [C I] correlates well with 13^CO and other molecular lines and shows no rim brightening relative to molecular cloud regions farther off the void. While an interpretation in terms of a highly clumped cloud morphology is possible, with photon dominated regions (PDRs) reaching deep into the cloud, the data do not provide any direct evidence for a close association of [C I] with PDRs. Kinetic temperatures are ~40--50K in the molecular cloud and >=200K toward the void. CO and [C I] excitation temperatures are similar. A comparison of molecular and atomic fine structure line emission with the far infrared and radio continuum as ...

  18. Interaction of a moving charged particle with a spatially dispersive medium. II. Čerenkov and transition radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenders, B.J.; Pattanayak, D.N.

    1976-01-01

    In the preceding paper, we obtained expressions for the electromagnetic field generated by the interaction of a uniformly moving electron with a spatially dispersive half-space. One part of the field was identified with Čerenkov radiation and the other part with transition radiation. In this paper i

  19. Benzene on Cu(111): II. Molecular assembly due to Lateral van der Waals and Surface-State-Mediated Indirect Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Berland, Kristian; Einstein, T. L.

    2010-03-01

    Experiments show that benzene condenses into two different structural phases: a compact and a sparse phase, both of approximately hexagonal symmetry. The vdW-DF calculations demonstrate that the denser benzene-overlayer phase, with lattice constant 6.74 ,s due to direct benzene-benzene vdW attraction. The structure of the second, sparser phase, with lattice spacing 10.24 ,s attributed to the indirect electronic interactions mediated by the well-known metallic surface state on Cu(111). To support this claim, we use a formal Harris-functional approach to evaluate nonperturbatively the asymptotic form of this indirect interaction. Our extended vdW-DF scheme---which combines calculations of molecular physisorption, of direct intermolecular vdW coupling, and of indirect electronic interactions between the molecular adsorbates---accounts well for the structural phases of benzene on Cu(111). Our preliminary vdW-DF study of acene and quinone interactions provides building blocks for modeling of anthraquinone assembly on Cu(111).footnotetextG. Pawin, , L. Bartels, Science 313 (2006) 961

  20. Ferrimagnetic/ferroelastic domain interactions in magnetite below the Verwey transition: Part II. Micromagnetic and image simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryson, James F.J.; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.;

    2013-01-01

    Micromagnetic simulations have been used to explore the interaction between ferrimagnetic domain walls (DWs) and ferroelastic twin walls (TWs) below the Verwey transition in magnetite (Fe3O4). Simulations were performed using a thin-foil geometry in order to replicate the domain patterns observed...

  1. Training in Interaction Analysis as a Means of Staff Development for Master Teachers, Classroom Teachers and Paraprofessionals. Maxi II Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph H.

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of an inservice staff development program in promoting change in patterns of teacher-child interaction. The program used (1) the combined techniques of systematic analysis of teaching behavior with the Behavior Ratings and Analysis of Communication in Education (BRACE) observation system, (2)…

  2. Synthesis, crystal structure and investigation of mononuclear copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of a new carboxylate rich tripodal ligand and their interaction with carbohydrates in alkaline aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Christopher D; Pedraza, Mayra; Arman, Hadi; Fan, Hua-Jun; Schilling, Eduardo Luiz; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Musie, Ghezai T

    2015-08-01

    A new carboxylate rich asymmetric tripodal ligand, N-[2-carboxybenzomethyl]-N-[carboxymethyl]-β-alanine (H3camb), and its di-copper(II), (NH4)2[1]2, and di-zinc(II), ((CH3)4N)2[2]2, complexes have been synthesized as carbohydrate binding models in aqueous solutions. The ligand and complexes have been fully characterized using several techniques, including single crystal X-ray diffraction. The interactions of (NH4)2[1]2 and ((CH3)4N)2[2]2 with D-glucose, D-mannose, D-xylose and xylitol in aqueous alkaline media were investigated using UV-Vis and (13)C-NMR spectroscopic techniques, respectively. The molar conductance, NMR and ESI-MS studies indicate that the complexes dissociate in solution to produce the respective complex anions, 1(-) and 2(-). Complexes 1(-) and 2(-) showed chelating ability towards the naturally abundant and biologically relevant sugars, D-glucose, D-mannose, D-xylose, and xylitol. The complex ions bind to one molar equivalent of the sugars, even in the presence of stoichiometric excess of the substrates, in solution. Experimentally obtained spectroscopic data and computational results suggest that the substrates bind to the metal center in a bidentate fashion. Apparent binding constant values, pK(app), between the complexes and the substrates were determined and a specific mode of substrate binding is proposed. The pK(app) and relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculated Gibbs free energy values indicate that D-mannose displayed the strongest interaction with the complexes. Syntheses, characterizations, detailed substrate binding studies using spectroscopic techniques, single crystal X-ray diffraction and geometry optimizations of the complex-substrates with DFT calculations are also reported.

  3. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – ... temperature and coordinated water were determined ... indicating fairly stable complex compounds (Table 1). The complex compounds are insoluble [Table 2] in water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in ...

  4. NMR structure of d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:tren-microgonotropen-b:Zn(II) complex and solution studies of metal ion complexes of tren-microgonotropen-b interacting with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskó, A; Browne, K A; Bruice, T C

    1995-06-01

    The solution structure of a 1:1 complex of zinc tren-microgonotropen-b [6b:Zn(II)] with d(CGCAAATTTGCG)2 has been determined by 2D nuclear Overhauser effect 1H NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular modeling. The exchangeable and nonexchangeable proton resonances of d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b:Zn(II) indicate that the Zn(II) is interacting in the A+T-rich region of the dsDNA and the tren region of 6b, while 31P NMR shows interaction of the Zn(II) with the phosphate backbone. Proton chemical shift differences between d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b:Zn(II) and d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b are in agreement with the polyamino substituent of 6b [-(CH2)4N(CH2CH2)N-(CH2CH2NH2)2] forming a four-coordinated Zn(II) complex similar to that found in the X-ray structure of 'tren-chloride':Zn(II). The P9 and P10 phosphate oxygens that are held by hydrogen bonding to the tren substituent of 6b in the DNA:6b complex become ligands to the tren-complexed Zn(II) in DNA:6b:Zn(II). To do so there is a 2 A decrease in the adjacent phosphate-to-phosphate distance at the Zn(II) binding site. This motion brings about an increased bend of 14.6 degrees in the helical axis of d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b:Zn(II) compared to that found in d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b. Single stranded cleavage of linear DNA fragments was not observed in the presence of 6b and Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), La(III) or Ce(III); this is likely due to the metal ion being sequestered as in the structure of d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b:Zn(II) complex. Supercoiled DNA was susceptible to cleavage by 6b:Cu(II) in the presence of O2 and a reducing agent.

  5. Dinuclear manganese(II) complexes of hexaazamacrocycles bearing N-benzoylated pendant separated by aromatic spacers: Antibacterial, DNA interaction, cytotoxic and molecular docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthi, P; Shobana, S; Srinivasan, P; Prabhu, D; Arulvasu, C; Kalilur Rahiman, A

    2015-12-01

    Three new homodinuclear manganese(II) complexes of the type [Mn2L(1-3)(ClO4)(H2O)](ClO4)3 (1-3) have been synthesized via cyclocondensation of terephthalaldehyde with three different benzoylated pendants in the presence of manganese(II) perchlorate and characterized by spectroscopic methods. Cyclic voltammetric investigation of complexes (1-3) depict two quasi-reversible one electron reduction processes in the cathodic potential region (E(1)pc=-0.73 to-0.83 V, E(2)pc=-1.31 to -1.40 V) and two quasi-reversible one electron oxidation processes in the anodic potential region (E(1)pa=1.03 to 1.10 V, E(2)pa=1.69 to 1.77 V). Electronic absorption spectra of the complexes suggested tetrahedral geometry around the central metal ion. The observed low magnetic moment values (μeff, 5.60-5.68 B.M.) of the complexes indicate the presence of an antiferromagnetic spin-exchange interaction between two metal centers, which was also supported by the broad EPR signal. All the compounds were tested for antibacterial activity against Gram (-ve) and Gram (+ve) bacterial strains. The binding studies of complexes with CT-DNA suggested minor-groove mode of interaction. Molecular docking studies were carried out in order to find the binding affinity of complexes with DNA and protein EGFR Kinase. The complexes are stabilized by additional electrostatic and van der Waals interaction with the DNA, and support minor groove mode of binding. The cleavage activity of complexes on pBR322 plasmid DNA displays efficient activity through a mechanistic pathway involving hydroxyl radicals. The cytotoxicity of complexes 2 and 3 have been tested against human liver adenocarcinoma (HepG2) cell line. Nuclear-chromatin cleavage has also been observed with propidium iodide (PI) staining and alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) techniques.

  6. DNA interaction and cytotoxic activities of square planar platinum(II) complexes with N, S-donor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Patel, Chintan R.; Joshi, Hardik N.; Thakor, Khyati P.

    2014-06-01

    The platinum(II) complexes with N, S-donor ligands have been synthesized and characterized by physicochemical methods viz. elemental, electronic, FT-IR, 1H NMR and LC-MS spectra. The binding mode and potency of the complexes with HS DNA (Herring Sperm) have been examined by absorption titration and viscosity measurement studies. The results revealed that complexes bind to HS DNA via covalent mode with the intrinsic binding constant (Kb) in the range 1.37-7.76 × 105 M-1. Decrease in the relative viscosity of HS DNA also supports the covalent mode of binding. The DNA cleavage activity of synthesized complexes has been carried out by gel electrophoresis experiment using supercoiled form of pUC19 DNA; showing the unwinding of the negatively charged supercoiled DNA. Brine shrimp (Artemia Cysts) lethality bioassay technique has been applied for the determination of toxic property of synthesized complexes in terms of μM.

  7. Quenching of the long-lived Ru(II)bathophenanthroline luminescence for the detection of supramolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Rolf A; Kainmüller, Eva K; Flehr, Roman; Kumke, Michael U; Bannwarth, Willi

    2008-07-07

    A feasibility study based on tailor-made peptide sequences for a new robust luminescence probe-system using the long-lived luminescence of a Ru(II)-bathophenanthroline complex in combination with an efficient anthraquinone-type quencher is presented. Due do their high chemical stability, both dyes can be introduced during solid-phase peptide synthesis avoiding post-synthetic labelling. Photophysical measurements revealed an intense quenching of the luminescence of the Ru-complex (65-68%) which was also confirmed by calculations resulting from decay time measurements. The long-lived luminescence allows for a time-gated detection scheme, which can reduce any luminescence contribution from matrix components.

  8. The disintegrin and metalloproteinase ADAM12 contributes to TGF-beta signaling through interaction with the type II receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atfi, Azeddine; Dumont, Emmanuelle; Colland, Frédéric;

    2007-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates a wide variety of biological processes through two types of Ser/Thr transmembrane receptors: the TGF-beta type I receptor and the TGF-beta type II receptor (TbetaRII). Upon ligand binding, TGF-beta type I receptor activated by TbetaRII propagates...... signals to Smad proteins, which mediate the activation of TGF-beta target genes. In this study, we identify ADAM12 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 12) as a component of the TGF-beta signaling pathway that acts through association with TbetaRII. We found that ADAM12 functions by a mechanism...... independent of its protease activity to facilitate the activation of TGF-beta signaling, including the phosphorylation of Smad2, association of Smad2 with Smad4, and transcriptional activation. Furthermore, ADAM12 induces the accumulation of TbetaRII in early endosomal vesicles and stabilizes the Tbeta...

  9. An anilinoquinazoline derivative inhibits tumor growth through interaction with hCAP-G2, a subunit of condensin II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Shiheido

    Full Text Available We screened 46 novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives for activity to inhibit proliferation of a panel of human cancer cell lines. Among them, Q15 showed potent in vitro growth-inhibitory activity towards cancer cell lines derived from colorectal cancer, lung cancer and multiple myeloma. It also showed antitumor activity towards multiple myeloma KMS34 tumor xenografts in lcr/scid mice in vivo. Unlike the known anilinoquinazoline derivative gefitinib, Q15 did not inhibit cytokine-mediated intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation. Using our mRNA display technology, we identified hCAP-G2, a subunit of condensin II complex, which is regarded as a key player in mitotic chromosome condensation, as a Q15 binding partner. Immunofluorescence study indicated that Q15 compromises normal segregation of chromosomes, and therefore might induce apoptosis. Thus, our results indicate that hCAP-G2 is a novel therapeutic target for development of drugs active against currently intractable neoplasms.

  10. Novel platinum(II) compounds with O,S bidentate ligands: synthesis, characterization, antiproliferative properties and biomolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mügge, Carolin; Liu, Ruiqi; Görls, Helmar; Gabbiani, Chiara; Michelucci, Elena; Rüdiger, Nadine; Clement, Joachim H; Messori, Luigi; Weigand, Wolfgang

    2014-02-28

    Cisplatin and its analogues are first-line chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of numerous human cancers. A major inconvenience in their clinical use is their strong tendency to link to sulfur compounds, especially in kidney, ultimately leading to severe nephrotoxicity. To overcome this drawback we prepared a variety of platinum complexes with sulfur ligands and analyzed their biological profiles. Here, a series of six platinum(II) compounds bearing a conserved O,S binding moiety have been synthesized and characterized as experimental anticancer agents. The six compounds differ in the nature of the O,S bidentate β-hydroxydithiocinnamic alkyl ester ligand where both the substituents on the aromatic ring and the length of the alkyl chain may be varied. The two remaining coordination positions at the square-planar platinum(II) center are occupied by a chloride ion and a DMSO molecule. These novel platinum compounds showed an acceptable solubility profile in mixed DMSO-buffer solutions and an appreciable stability at physiological pH as judged from analysis of their time-course UV-visible absorption spectra. Their anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities were tested against the cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cell line A549. Assays revealed significant effects of the sample drugs at low concentrations (in the μmolar range); initial structure-activity-relationships are proposed. The activity of the apoptosis-promoting protein caspase 3/7 was determined; results proved that these novel platinum compounds, under the chosen experimental conditions, preferentially induce apoptosis over necrosis. Reactions with the model proteins cytochrome c, lysozyme and albumin were studied by ESI MS and ICP-OES to gain preliminary mechanistic information. The tested compounds turned out to metalate the mentioned proteins to a large extent. In view of the obtained results these novel platinum complexes qualify themselves as promising cytotoxic agents and merit, in our

  11. Mor-Dalphos-Pd (II) oxidative addition complexes and related NH3 adducts: Insights into bonding and nonbonding interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Batista, Ana P.; Braga, Ataualpa A. C.

    2016-09-01

    The stabilizing effects and bonding properties of the Pd metallic center in [(κ2 -P,N-Mor-Dalphos)Pd(Ar)Cl] complexes and related NH3 adducts were investigated by density functional theory (DFT), the intrinsic bond orbital (IBO) approach and the Su-Li energy decomposition method (Su-Li EDA). The IBO analysis showed that the P atom from the P,N-Mor-Dalphos structure has stabilizing contributions in all Pd-Cl and Pd-NH3 bonds in the complexes. According to the Su-Li energy decomposition analysis, the main energy that drives the interaction between the [Mor-Dalphos-Pd(Ar)] moiety and Cl- is the electrostatic term, therefore, the electrostatic energy interaction between them might be an important factor for taking into account when designing other [Mor-Dalphos-Pd(Ar)]-Cl precatalysts.

  12. Ground state correlations and mean field in 16O. II. Effects of a three-nucleon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen H.

    2000-05-01

    We continue the investigations of the 16O ground state using the coupled-cluster expansion [exp(S)] method with realistic nuclear interaction. In this stage of the project, we take into account the three nucleon interaction, and examine in some detail the definition of the internal Hamiltonian, thus trying to correct for the center-of-mass motion. We show that this may result in a better separation of the internal and center-of-mass degrees of freedom in the many-body nuclear wave function. The resulting ground state wave function is used to calculate the ``theoretical'' charge form factor and charge density. Using the ``theoretical'' charge density, we generate the charge form factor in the DWBA picture, which is then compared with the available experimental data. The longitudinal response function in inclusive electron scattering for 16O is also computed.

  13. Optimal and robust energy transport in light-harvesting complexes: (II) A quantum interplay of multichromophoric geometries and environmental interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mohseni, Masoud; Lloyd, Seth; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-01-01

    Today, the physical principles for the high efficiency of excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes are still not fully understood. Notably, the degree of robustness of these systems for transporting energy is not known considering their realistic interactions with vibrational and radiative environments within the surrounding solvent and scaffold proteins. In this work, we employ an efficient technique to simulate ultrafast quantum dynamics of such complex excitonic systems in their non-equilibrium environment in the non-perturbative and non-Markovian regimes. We demonstrate that the natural dynamics of the FMO complex leads to optimum and stable energy transport due to a convergence of energy/time scales among important internal and external parameters. In particular, we show that the FMO energy transfer efficiency is optimal and robust with respect to all the relevant parameters of environmental interactions and Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian including reorganization energy \\lambda, bath frequen...

  14. Signal and binding. II. Converting physico-chemical responses to macromolecule-ligand interactions into thermodynamic binding isotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J; Bujalowski, Paul J

    2017-03-01

    Physico-chemical titration techniques are the most commonly used methods in characterizing molecular interactions. These methods are mainly based on spectroscopic, calorimetric, hydrodynamic, etc., measurements. However, truly quantitative physico-chemical methods are absolutely based on the determination of the relationship between the measured signal and the total average degree of binding in order to obtain meaningful interaction parameters. The relationship between the observed physico-chemical signal of whatever nature and the degree of binding must be determined and not assumed, based on some ad hoc intuitive relationship/model, leading to determination of the true binding isotherm. The quantitative methods reviewed and discussed here allow an experimenter to rigorously determine the degree of binding and the free ligand concentration, i.e., they lead to the construction of the thermodynamic binding isotherm in a model-independent fashion from physico-chemical titration curves. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Gravitational wave generation by interaction of high power lasers with matter. Part II: Ablation and Piston models

    CERN Document Server

    Kadlecová, Hedvika; Weber, Stefan; Korn, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We analyze theoretical models of gravitational waves generation in the interaction of high intensity laser with matter, namely ablation and piston models. We analyse the generated gravitational waves in linear approximation of gravitational theory. We derive the analytical formulas and estimates for the metric perturbations and the radiated power of generated gravitational waves. Furthermore we investigate the characteristics of polarization and the behaviour of test particles in the presence of gravitational wave which will be important for the detection.

  16. Differences in the ionic interaction of actin with the motor domains of nonmuscle and muscle myosin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, J; Furch, M; Derancourt, J; Batra, R; Knetsch, M L; Manstein, D J; Chaussepied, P

    1999-03-01

    Changes in the actin-myosin interface are thought to play an important role in microfilament-linked cellular movements. In this study, we compared the actin binding properties of the motor domain of Dictyostelium discoideum (M765) and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 (S1). The Dictyostelium motor domain resembles S1(A2) (S1 carrying the A2 light chain) in its interaction with G-actin. Similar to S1(A2), none of the Dictyostelium motor domain constructs induced G-actin polymerization. The affinity of monomeric actin (G-actin) was 20-fold lower for M765 than for S1(A2) but increasing the number of positive charges in the loop 2 region of the D. discoideum motor domain (residues 613-623) resulted in equivalent affinities of G-actin for M765 and for S1. Proteolytic cleavage and cross-linking approaches were used to show that M765, like S1, interacts via the loop 2 region with filamentous actin (F-actin). For both types of myosin, F-actin prevents trypsin cleavage in the loop 2 region and F-actin segment 1-28 can be cross-linked to loop 2 residues by a carbodiimide-induced reaction. In contrast with the S1, loop residues 559-565 of D. discoideum myosin was not cross-linked to F-actin, probably due to the lower number of positive charges. These results confirm the importance of the loop 2 region of myosin for the interaction with both G-actin and F-actin, regardless of the source of myosin. The differences observed in the way in which M765 and S1 interact with actin may be linked to more general differences in the structure of the actomyosin interface of muscle and nonmuscle myosins.

  17. A theoretical study on the frequency-dependent electric conductivity of electrolyte solutions. II. Effect of hydrodynamic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Matsuoka, T; Koda, S

    2009-03-07

    The theory on the frequency-dependent electric conductivity of electrolyte solutions proposed previously by Yamaguchi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 234501 (2007)] is extended to include the hydrodynamic interaction between ions. The theory is applied to the aqueous solution of NaCl and the concentration dependence of the conductivity agrees well with that determined by experiments. The effects of the hydrodynamic and relaxation effects are highly nonadditive in the concentrated solution, because the hydrodynamic interaction between ions affects the time-dependent response of the ionic atmosphere. The decrease in the electric conductivity is divided into the contributions of ion pair distribution at various distances. The long-range ionic atmosphere plays a major role at the concentration as low as 0.01 mol/kg, whereas the contribution of the contact ion pair region is important at 1 mol/kg. The magnitude of the contribution of the contact ion pair region is scarcely dependent on the presence of the hydrodynamic interaction. The transport number of cation is calculated to be a decreasing function of concentration as is observed in experiments.

  18. Long-range interactions of hydrogen atoms in excited states. II. Hyperfine-resolved (2 S -2 S ) systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentschura, U. D.; Debierre, V.; Adhikari, C. M.; Matveev, A.; Kolachevsky, N.

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of two excited hydrogen atoms in metastable states constitutes a theoretically interesting problem because of the quasidegenerate 2 P1 /2 levels that are removed from the 2 S states only by the Lamb shift. The total Hamiltonian of the system is composed of the van der Waals Hamiltonian, the Lamb shift, and the hyperfine effects. The van der Waals shift becomes commensurate with the 2 S -2 P3 /2 fine-structure splitting only for close approach (R Hamiltonian matrix a priori is of dimension 64. A careful analysis of the symmetries of the the problem allows one to reduce the dimensionality of the most involved irreducible submatrix to 12. We determine the Hamiltonian matrices and the leading-order van der Waals shifts for states that are degenerate under the action of the unperturbed Hamiltonian (Lamb shift plus hyperfine structure). The leading first- and second-order van der Waals shifts lead to interaction energies proportional to 1 /R3 and 1 /R6 and are evaluated within the hyperfine manifolds. When both atoms are metastable 2 S states, we find an interaction energy of order Ehχ (a0/R ) 6 , where Eh and L are the Hartree and Lamb shift energies, respectively, and χ =Eh/L ≈6.22 ×106 is their ratio.

  19. Origin of the Strong Interaction between Polar Molecules and Copper(II) Paddle-Wheels in Metal Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The copper paddle-wheel is the building unit of many metal organic frameworks. Because of the ability of the copper cations to attract polar molecules, copper paddle-wheels are promising for carbon dioxide adsorption and separation. They have therefore been studied extensively, both experimentally and computationally. In this work we investigate the copper–CO2 interaction in HKUST-1 and in two different cluster models of HKUST-1: monocopper Cu(formate)2 and dicopper Cu2(formate)4. We show that density functional theory methods severely underestimate the interaction energy between copper paddle-wheels and CO2, even including corrections for the dispersion forces. In contrast, a multireference wave function followed by perturbation theory to second order using the CASPT2 method correctly describes this interaction. The restricted open-shell Møller–Plesset 2 method (ROS-MP2, equivalent to (2,2) CASPT2) was also found to be adequate in describing the system and used to develop a novel force field. Our parametrization is able to predict the experimental CO2 adsorption isotherms in HKUST-1, and it is shown to be transferable to other copper paddle-wheel systems. PMID:28751926

  20. New type of single chain magnet: pseudo-one-dimensional chain of high-spin Co(II) exhibiting ferromagnetic intrachain interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangoulis, V; Lalia-Kantouri, M; Gdaniec, M; Papadopoulos, Ch; Miletic, V; Czapik, A

    2013-06-03

    Two new six-coordinated high-spin Co(II) complexes have been synthesized through the reactions of Co(II) salts with dipyridylamine (dpamH) and 5-nitro-salicylaldehyde (5-NO2-saloH) or 3-methoxy-salicylaldehyde (3-OCH3-saloH) under argon atmosphere: [Co(dpamH)2(5-NO2-salo)]NO3 (1) and [Co(dpamH)2(3-OCH3-salo)]NO3·1.3 EtOH·0.4H2O (2). According to the crystal packing of compound 1, two coordination cations are linked with two nitrate anions into a cyclic dimeric arrangement via N-H···O and C-H···O hydrogen bonds. In turn, these dimers are assembled into (100) layers through π-π stacking interactions between inversion-center related pyridine rings of the dpamH ligands. The crystal packing of compound 2 reveals a 1D assembly consisting solely from the coordination cations, which is formed by π-π stacking interactions between pyridine rings of one of the dpamH along the [010] and another 1D assembly of the coordination cations and nitrate anions through the N-H···O hydrogen-bonding interactions along the [001] direction. All complexes were magnetically characterized, and a new approximation method was used to fit the magnetic susceptibility data in the whole temperature range 2-300 K on the basis of an empirical expression which allows the treatment of each cobalt(II) ion in axial symmetry as an effective spin S(eff) = 1/2. In zero-field, dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements show slow magnetic relaxation below 5.5 K for compound 2. The slow dynamics may originate from the motion of broad domain walls and is characterized by an Arrhenius law with a single energy barrier Δr/k(B) = 55(1) K for the [10-1488 Hz] frequency range. In order to reveal the importance of the crystal packing in the SCM behavior, a gentle heating process to 180 °C was carried out to remove the solvent molecules. The system, after heating, undergoes a major but not complete collapse of the network retaining to a small percentage its SCM character.

  1. An analysis of lethal and sublethal interactions among type I and type II pyrethroid pesticide mixtures using standard Hyalella azteca water column toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Krista Callinan; Deanovic, Linda; Werner, Inge; Stillway, Marie; Fong, Stephanie; Teh, Swee

    2016-10-01

    A novel 2-tiered analytical approach was used to characterize and quantify interactions between type I and type II pyrethroids in Hyalella azteca using standardized water column toxicity tests. Bifenthrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin were tested in all possible binary combinations across 6 experiments. All mixtures were analyzed for 4-d lethality, and 2 of the 6 mixtures (permethrin-bifenthrin and permethrin-cyfluthrin) were tested for subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal effects on swimming motility and growth. Mixtures were initially analyzed for interactions using regression analyses, and subsequently compared with the additive models of concentration addition and independent action to further characterize mixture responses. Negative interactions (antagonistic) were significant in 2 of the 6 mixtures tested, including cyfluthrin-bifenthrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin, but only on the acute 4-d lethality endpoint. In both cases mixture responses fell between the additive models of concentration addition and independent action. All other mixtures were additive across 4-d lethality, and bifenthrin-permethrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin were also additive in terms of subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal responses. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2542-2549. © 2016 SETAC.

  2. A Microcalorimetry and Spectroscopy Study on the Interaction of BSA with 2,2′-Bipyridine Octylglycinato Palladium(II) Nitrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MANSOORI-TORSHIZI Hassan; ISLAMI-MOGHADDAM Mahbobe; SABOURY Ali Akbar

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with a new palladium(II) complex [Pd(bpy)(Oct-Gly)]NO3 (bpy, 2,2′-bipyridine; Oct-Gly, octyl-glycine) was studied by isothermal titration UV-visible spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry in 30 mmol/L Tris buffer, pH 7.0. There is a set of 18 binding sites for this complex on BSA at 300 and 310 K with positive cooperativity in the binding process. The Hill coefficients at 300 and 310 K are 2.2 and 2.4, respectively. The binding of this palladium complex on BSA is endothermic with mean association binding constant of 21.0 and 16.4 (mmol/L)-1 at 300 and 310 K, respectively. The complex can denature the protein as surfactants. The stability of BSA in the interaction study with the complex is 84 and 58 kJ/mol at 300 and 310 K, respectively. Also, the enthalpy of BSA denaturation due to the interaction with the complex is 842 kJ/mol.

  3. Synthesis, interaction with DNA and antiproliferative activities of two novel Cu(II) complexes with Schiff base of benzimidazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wen-Ji; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Jiang, Dong-Hua; Guo, Li; Cai, Meng-Fei; Yang, Hu-Bin; Lin, Qiu-Yue

    2014-03-01

    Two novel copper(II) complexes with Schiff base of benzimidazole [Cu(L)Cl]2·CH3OH have been synthesized. HL1 (N-(benzimidazol-2-ymethyl)-5-chlorosalicylideneimine, C15H11ClN3O) and HL2 (N-(benzimidazol-2-ymethyl)-salicylideneimine, C15H12N3O) are ligands of complex (1) and complex (2), respectively. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, TGA and X-ray diffraction. Within the complexes, Cu(II) ions were four coordinated by two nitrogen atom of azomethine and imine, one phenolic oxygen atom from HL and one chloride atom. A distorted quadrilateral structure was formed. Complex (1) crystallized in the triclinic crystal system. Results showed that π-π stacking effect occurred due to the existence of aromatic ring from Schiff base and hydrogen bonding between methanol and adjacent atoms. The DNA binding properties of the complexes were investigated by electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that complexes bound to DNA via partial intercalation mode. The DNA binding constants Kb/(L mol-1) were 1.81 × 104 (1), 1.37 × 104 (2), 6.27 × 103 (HL1) and 3.14 × 103 (HL2) at 298 K. The title complexes could quench the emission intensities of EB-DNA system significantly. The results of agarose gel electrophoresis indicated complex (1) could cleave supercoiled DNA through the oxidative mechanism. The inhibition ratios revealed that complex (1) and HL1 had strong antiproliferative activities against human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) lines and human colorectal cancer cells (COLO205) lines in vitro. The antiproliferative activities of complex (1) against MCF-7 lines (IC50 = 16.9 ± 1.5 μmol L-1) and against COLO205 lines (IC50 = 16.5 ± 3.4 μmol L-1) is much stronger than that of HL1, which had the potential to develop anti-cancer drug.

  4. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  5. Evaluation of arene ruthenium(II) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes as organometallics interacting with thiol and selenol containing biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehninger, Luciano; Stefanopoulou, Maria; Alborzinia, Hamed; Schur, Julia; Ludewig, Stephanie; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Muñoz-Castro, Alvaro; Köster, Reinhard W; Baumann, Knut; Wölfl, Stefan; Sheldrick, William S; Ott, Ingo

    2013-02-07

    Metal complexes with N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands have been widely used in catalytic chemistry and are now increasingly considered for the development of new chemical tools and metal based drugs. Ruthenium complexes of the type (p-cymene)(NHC)RuCl(2) interacted with biologically relevant thiols and selenols, which resulted in the inhibition of enzymes such as thioredoxin reductase or cathepsin B. Pronounced antiproliferative effects could be obtained provided that an appropriate cellular uptake was achieved. Inhibition of tumor cell growth was accompanied by a perturbation of metabolic parameters such as cellular respiration.

  6. Cu(II)-coumestrol interaction leads to ROS-mediated DNA damage and cell death: a putative mechanism for anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Atif; Singh, Swarnendra; Naseem, Imrana

    2016-07-01

    Phytoestrogens have attracted considerable interest as natural alternatives to hormone replacement therapy and their potential as cancer therapeutic agents. Among phytoestrogens, coumestrol has shown multipharmacological properties such as antiinflammatory, neuroprotective, osteoblastic differentiation and anticancer. Though several studies have described anticancer effects of coumestrol, a clear underlying molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Unlike normal cells, cancer cells contain elevated copper levels that play an integral role in angiogenesis. Copper is an important metal ion associated with the chromatin DNA, particularly with guanine. Thus, targeting copper in cancer cells can serve as effective anticancer strategy. Using human peripheral lymphocytes, we assessed lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage and apoptosis by coumestrol in the presence of exogenously added Cu(II) in cells to simulate malignancy-like condition. Results showed that Cu(II)-coumestrol interaction leads to lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation (markers of oxidative stress), DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in treated lymphocytes. Further, incubation of lymphocytes with ROS scavengers and membrane-permeant copper chelator, neocuproine, resulted in inhibition of DNA damage and apoptosis. This suggests that coumestrol engages in redox cycling of Cu(II) to generate ROS that leads to DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that coumestrol targets cellular copper to induce prooxidant death in malignant cells. We believe that such a prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity of coumestrol. These findings will provide significant insights into the development of new chemical molecules with better copper-chelating and prooxidant properties against cancer cells.

  7. Crystallization of copper(II) sulfate based minerals and MOF from solution: Chemical insights into the supramolecular interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Singh; D Kumar; J Thomas; A Ramanan

    2010-09-01

    Crystallization of solids, molecular or non-molecular from solution is a supramolecular reaction. Nucleation of a lattice structure at supersaturation can be conceived to result from a critical nucleus, a high energy intermediate (supramolecular transition state). Conceptualization of a structure for the critical nucleus in terms of aggregation of tectons through non-covalent interactions provides chemical insights into the architecture of a solid. The retrosynthetic analysis of copper-based minerals and materials offers an elegant description for the crystal packing. It addresses the influence of the geometry, functionality and reactivity of copper tecton(s) in directing a specific supramolecular aggregation. The mechanistic approach provides guiding principles to chemists to account for the experimentally crystallized solids and a platform to practice structure-synthesis correlation. Rationalization of the same composition with different atomic arrangements (polymorphs), compositional variation leading to different pseudopolymorphs, degree of hydration (anhydrous to hydrated), water clusters, role of solvent, etc. can all be justified on molecular basis. Also, the method gives predictive components including directions to synthesize new solids. In a nutshell, the paper is an attempt to generalize the crystallization of inorganic solids from solution by recognizing supramolecular interactions between metal tectons and gain insights for designing new MOF.

  8. An Investigation of Glutathione-Platinum(II Interactions by Means of the Flow Injection Analysis Using Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite very intensive research in the synthesising of new cytostatics, cisplatin isstill one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs. Therefore, an investigation ofinteractions of cisplatin with different biologically important amino acids, peptides andproteins is very topical. In the present paper, we utilized flow injection analysis coupledwith electrochemical detection to study and characterize the behaviour of various forms ofglutathione (reduced glutathione – GSH, oxidized glutathione – GSSG and S-nitrosoglutathione – GSNO. The optimized conditions were as follows: mobile phase consistedof acetate buffer (pH 3 with a flow rate of 1 mL min-1. Based on results obtained we chose850 mV as the optimal potential for detection of GSH and 1,100 mV as the optimalpotential for detection of GSSG and GSNO. The detection limits of GSH, GSSG andGSNO were 100 pg mL-1, 50 ng mL-1 and 300 pg mL-1, respectively. Further, the optimized technique was used for investigation of interactions between cisplatin and GSH. We were able to observe the interaction between GSH and cisplatin via decrease in the signal corresponding to glutathione. Moreover, we evaluated the formation of the complex by spectrometry. The spectrometric results obtained were in good agreement with electrochemical ones.

  9. Simulations of Winds of Weak-Lined T Tauri Stars. II.: The Effects of a Tilted Magnetosphere and Planetary Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Vidotto, A A; Jatenco-Pereira, V; Gombosi, T I

    2010-01-01

    Based on our previous work (Vidotto et al. 2009a), we investigate the effects on the wind and magnetospheric structures of weak-lined T Tauri stars due to a misalignment between the axis of rotation of the star and its magnetic dipole moment vector. In such configuration, the system loses the axisymmetry presented in the aligned case, requiring a fully 3D approach. We perform 3D numerical MHD simulations of stellar winds and study the effects caused by different model parameters. The system reaches a periodic behavior with the same rotational period of the star. We show that the magnetic field lines present an oscillatory pattern and that by increasing the misalignment angle, the wind velocity increases. Our wind models allow us to study the interaction of a magnetized wind with a magnetized extra-solar planet. Such interaction gives rise to reconnection, generating electrons that propagate along the planet's magnetic field lines and produce electron cyclotron radiation at radio wavelengths. We find that a cl...

  10. Cobalt (II) complex with novel unsymmetrical tetradentate Schiff base (ON) ligand: in vitro cytotoxicity studies of complex, interaction with DNA/protein, molecular docking studies, and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokohi-Pour, Zahra; Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Sabzalian, Mohammad R; Esmaeili, Seyed-Alireza; Momtazi-Borojeni, Amir Abbas

    2017-03-08

    [C20H17N3O2] and cobalt (II) complex [Co(L(2))(MeOH)2].ClO4, (L(2) = 4-((E)-1-((2-(((E)-pyridin-2-ylmethylene) amino) phenyl) imino) ethyl) benzene-1, 3-diol) novel Schiff base has been synthesiszed and chracterized by Fourier transform infrared, UV-vis, (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis techniques. The interaction of Co(II) complex with DNA and BSA was investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and thermal denaturation studies. Our experiments indicate that this complex could strongly bind to CT-DNA via minor groove mechanism. In addition, fluorescence spectrometry of BSA with the complex showed that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of BSA was of static type. The complex exhibited significant in vitro cytotoxicity against three human cancer cell lines (JURKAT, SKOV3, and U87). The molecular docking experiment effectively proved the binding of complex to DNA and BSA. Finally, antibacterial assay over gram-positive and gram-negative pathogenic bacterial strains was studied.

  11. Structure of Ctk3, a subunit of the RNA polymerase II CTD kinase complex, reveals a noncanonical CTD-interacting domain fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Wolfgang; Mayer, Andreas; Sun, Mai; Remmert, Michael; Cheung, Alan C M; Niesser, Jürgen; Soeding, Johannes; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    CTDK-I is a yeast kinase complex that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to promote transcription elongation. CTDK-I contains the cyclin-dependent kinase Ctk1 (homologous to human CDK9/CDK12), the cyclin Ctk2 (human cyclin K), and the yeast-specific subunit Ctk3, which is required for CTDK-I stability and activity. Here we predict that Ctk3 consists of a N-terminal CTD-interacting domain (CID) and a C-terminal three-helix bundle domain. We determine the X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of the Ctk3 homologue Lsg1 from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight helices arranged into a right-handed superhelical fold that resembles the CID domain present in transcription termination factors Pcf11, Nrd1, and Rtt103. Ctk3 however shows different surface properties and no binding to CTD peptides. Together with the known structure of Ctk1 and Ctk2 homologues, our results lead to a molecular framework for analyzing the structure and function of the CTDK-I complex.

  12. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes of dipicolylamine and 1,10-phenanthrolines: The role of diimines in the interaction of the complexes with DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramakrishnan; M Palaniandavar

    2005-03-01

    Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(dipica)(diimine)](ClO4)2, where dipica is di(2-picolyl)amine and diimine is 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-dmp), 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (2,9-dmp) or dipyridoquinoxaline (dpq), have been isolated and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. The copper(II) complexes exhibit a broad band in the visible region around 675 nm and axial EPR spectra in acetonitrile glass (77 K) with ∥ and ∥ values of ~2.22 and 185 × 10-4 cm-1 respectively, suggesting the presence of a square-based coordination geometry for the CuN5 chromophore involving strong axial interaction. The interaction of the complexes with CT DNA has been studied using absorption, emission and circular dichroic spectral methods and viscosity measurements. Absorption spectral titrations reveal that the intrinsic DNA binding affinities are dependent upon the nature of the diimine ligand: dpq > 5,6-dmp > phen > 2,9-dmp. This suggests the involvement of the diimine rather than the dipica `face’ of the complexes in DNA binding. An intercalative mode of DNA interaction, which involves the insertion of dpq and to a lesser extent the phen ring of the complexes in between the DNA base pairs, is proposed. However, interestingly, the 5,6-dmp complex is involved in hydrophobic interaction of the 5,6-dmp ring in the grooves of DNA. The large enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA on binding to the dpq and 5,6-dmp complexes supports the proposed DNA binding modes. Further, remarkably, the 5,6-dmp complex is selective in exhibiting a positive-induced CD band on binding to DNA suggesting the transition of the B form of CT DNA to A-like conformation. The variation in relative emission intensities of DNA-bound ethidium bromide observed upon treatment with the complexes parallels the trend in DNA binding affinities.

  13. Synthesis, CMC determination, and intercalative binding interaction with nucleic acid of a surfactant-copper(II) complex with modified phenanthroline ligand (dpq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Ambika, Subramanian; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam

    2015-01-01

    A surfactant-copper(II) complex, [Cu(dpq)2DA](ClO4)2 (dpq = dipyrido[3,2-d:2'-3'-f]quinoxaline; DA-dodecylamine), was synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, UV-vis, IR, and EPR spectra. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of this surfactant-copper(II) complex in aqueous solution was found out from conductance measurements. Specific conductivity data at different temperature served for the evaluation of the temperature-dependent CMC and the thermodynamics of micellization (ΔG°(m), ΔH°(m) and ΔS°(m)). In addition, the complex has been examined by its ability to bind to nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) in tris-HCl buffer by UV-vis absorption, emission spectroscopy techniques, and viscosity measurements. The complex has been found to bind strongly to nucleic acids with apparent binding constants at DNA and RNA is 4.3 × 10(5), 9.0 × 10(5) M(-1), respectively. UV-vis studies of the interaction of the complex with DNA/RNA have revealed that the complex can bind to both DNA and RNA by the intercalative binding mode via ligand dpq into the base pairs of DNA and RNA which has been verified by viscosity measurements. The presence of long aliphatic chain in the surfactant complex increases this hydrophobic interaction. The binding constants have been calculated. The cytotoxic activity of this complex on human liver carcinoma cancer cells was determined by adopting 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5- diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and specific staining techniques. The antimicrobial and antifungal screening tests of this complex have shown good results.

  14. The standard molar enthalpy of formation of a new copper(II) Schiff-base complex and its interaction with bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jin-Qi [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Xiangnan Rare-Precious Metals Compounds and Applications, Department of Chemistry and Life Science, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000, Hunan (China); Li, Chuan-Hua, E-mail: lichuanhua0526@126.com [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Xiangnan Rare-Precious Metals Compounds and Applications, Department of Chemistry and Life Science, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000, Hunan (China); Dong, Jia-Xin [School of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004 (China); Qu, Wei; Pan, Lan; Peng, Meng-La; Xie, Ming-An; Tao, Xu; Yu, Cheng-Mao; Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Ping-Hua; Tang, Chun-Guang [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Xiangnan Rare-Precious Metals Compounds and Applications, Department of Chemistry and Life Science, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000, Hunan (China); Li, Qiang-Guo, E-mail: liqiangguo@163.com [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Xiangnan Rare-Precious Metals Compounds and Applications, Department of Chemistry and Life Science, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000, Hunan (China)

    2014-12-20

    Highlights: • A new copper(II) Valen Schiff-base complex was synthesized and characterized. • The standard molar enthalpy of formation of the title complex was obtained. • The interaction between the complex and bovine serum albumin was investigated. - Abstract: A new copper(II) Schiff-base complex [Cu(HL)·NO{sub 3}·MeOH] was prepared by using equivalent molar of Valen Schiff-base ligand [H{sub 2}L=N,N′-ethylene-bis(3-methoxysalicylideneimine)] and Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O. The structure of the complex was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Based on an ideal and feasible thermochemical cycle, the standard molar enthalpy of formation of the complex was estimated to be: Δ{sub f}H{sub m}{sup θ} [Cu(HL)·NO{sub 3}·MeOH(s), 298.15 K] = –(945.40 ± 2.44) kJ mol{sup −1} by an advanced solution-reaction isoperibol calorimeter. In particular, the interaction between the complex and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using the fluorescence quenching method. Fluorescence quenching data showed that the quenching mechanism of BSA treated by the complex was static quenching, which was highly accord with the non-radioactive energy transfer theory. And some relevant parameters such as binding sites, binding distance and intermolecular forces between the complex and BSA were also obtained by analyzing the fluorescence spectral data.

  15. Theoretical calculations, DNA interaction, topoisomerase I and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase studies of water soluble mixed-ligand nickel(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurumoorthy, Perumal; Mahendiran, Dharmasivam; Kalilur Rahiman, Aziz

    2016-03-25

    Eight water soluble mixed-ligand nickel(II) complexes of the type [NiL(1-4)(diimine)H2O]·(ClO4)2, (1-8) where L(1-4) = 2-((2-(piperazin-1-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-4-substituted phenols, and diimine = 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The uncoordinated perchlorate anions was ascertained form IR spectra of the complexes, and the absorption spectra reveal the octahedron geometry around nickel(II) ion with tridentate Schiff base ligand, diimine and a coordinated water molecule. Cyclic voltammograms of the complexes indicate the one-electron irreversible processes in the cathodic and anodic region. In vitro antioxidant activity proved the significant radical scavenging activity of the complexes against DPPH radical. The groove/electrostatic binding nature of complexes with CT-DNA (calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid) were affirmed by absorption, hydrodynamic and voltammetric titration experiments and docking analysis. All the complexes exhibit significant cleavage activity on plasmid DNA via hydrolytic and oxidatively, in which the oxidative mechanism involves hydroxyl radicals and supports the possibility of minor-groove binding. The complex 4 shows significant topoisomerase I (Topo-I) inhibitory activity. The molecular modeling analysis of complexes with phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) receptor indicate the hydrogen bonding with Met1039, Asp837 and Leu1027, and hydrophobic interactions with Ser488, Asn498, Asp500, Gln662, Lys668, Ile844, Ile847, Ile850, Val941, Leu942, Leu1020, Met1034, Leu1035, Thr1037, Met1039, Gln1041 and Ile1051 of subdomain IIA of BSA. The complexes show σ-π interaction between diimines and amino groups of Leu1030 and Arg839.

  16. Synthesis and structure of 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil and its Ni(II) complex: Topological insights and investigation for noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Diptanu; Roy, Subhadip; Purkayastha, Atanu; Bauzá, Antonio; Choudhury, Rupasree; Ganguly, Rakesh; Frontera, Antonio; Misra, Tarun Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The azo-derivative, 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil (HL) containing 6-aminouracil (a biomolecule) and sulfonamide functionality (commonly found in sulfa-drugs), and its Ni(II) complex, NiIIL2 were synthesized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the ligand (HL) consists of an E conformation about the azo-linkage with a nearly planar geometry and the complex possesses distorted square planar geometry. The H-bonded underlying networks of HL and NiIIL2 were topologically classified revealing distinct topological types, namely tts and hxl, respectively. Moreover, topology of molecular packings in HL and NiIIL2 has also been discussed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, at the M06-2X/def2TZVP level of theory, are employed to characterize a great variety of non-covalent interactions that explicitly show the importance of antiparallel stacking interactions established by π--π+ interactions and H-bonds in the self-assembled dimmers in HL and lp-π/C-H⋯π interactions in NiIIL2. The results of NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies evidence that the ligand exists in hydrazone-imine-keto (B) tautomeric form in solution. The ligand absorption bands consist of the overlapping bands of π→π* and n→π* transitions. The complex experiences electronic transitions that consist of basically ILCT in character with some sort of participation of the atomic d-orbitals of the nickel. The pKa value of the ligand is found to be 4.09.

  17. Analysis of Performance of Jet Engine from Characteristics of Components II : Interaction of Components as Determined from Engine Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Alpert, Sumner; Beede, William; Kovach, Karl

    1949-01-01

    In order to understand the operation and the interaction of jet-engine components during engine operation and to determine how component characteristics may be used to compute engine performance, a method to analyze and to estimate performance of such engines was devised and applied to the study of the characteristics of a research turbojet engine built for this investigation. An attempt was made to correlate turbine performance obtained from engine experiments with that obtained by the simpler procedure of separately calibrating the turbine with cold air as a driving fluid in order to investigate the applicability of component calibration. The system of analysis was also applied to prediction of the engine and component performance with assumed modifications of the burner and bearing characteristics, to prediction of component and engine operation during engine acceleration, and to estimates of the performance of the engine and the components when the exhaust gas was used to drive a power turbine.

  18. Predicting the solubility of sulfamethoxypyridazine in individual solvents. II: Relationship between solute-solvent interaction terms and partial solubility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A; Bustamante, P; Escalera, B; Sellés, E

    1989-08-01

    In the first paper in the series, an expanded system of parameters was devised to account for orientation and induction effects, and the term Wh was introduced to replace delta 1h delta 2h of the extended Hansen solubility approach. In the present report, a new term, Kh = Wh/delta 1h delta 2h is observed to take on values larger or smaller than unity depending on whether the hydrogen bonded solute-solvent interaction is larger or smaller than predicted by the term delta 1h delta 2h. The acidic delta a and basic delta b solubility parameters are used to represent two parameters, sigma and tau, suggested by Small in his study of proton donor-acceptor properties. The Small equation, including a heat of mixing term for hydrogen bonded species, is shown to be capable of semiquantitative evaluation. A partial molar heat delta H2h of hydrogen bonding is calculated using delta h and Wh terms; delta H2h is found to be correlated with the logarithm of the residual activity coefficient, In alpha R, a term representing strong solute-solvent interaction. The terms Wh, delta H2h, and In alpha 2R may be used to test the deviation from the geometric mean assumed in regular solution theory, and to replace the hydrogen bonding terms of the extended Hansen three-parameter model. The solubility of sulfamethoxypyridazine in 30 solvents is used to test the semiempirical solubility equations. The results are interpreted in terms of partial solubility parameters and the proton donor-acceptor properties of the solvents.

  19. Derivation of Pitzer Interaction Parameters for an Aqueous Species Pair of Sodium and Iron(II)-Citrate Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J. H.; Nemer, M.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground repository for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. The WIPP is located in the Permian Delaware Basin near Carlsbad, New Mexico, U.S.A. The TRU waste includes, but is not limited to, iron-based alloys and the complexing agent, citric acid. Iron is also present from the steel used in the waste containers. The objective of this analysis is to derive the Pitzer activity coefficients for the pair of Na+ and FeCit- complex to expand current WIPP thermodynamic database. An aqueous model for the dissolution of Fe(OH)2(s) in a Na3Cit solution was fitted to the experimentally measured solubility data. The aqueous model consists of several chemical reactions and related Pitzer interaction parameters. Specifically, Pitzer interaction parameters for the Na+ and FeCit- pair (β(0), β(1), and Cφ) plus the stability constant for species of FeCit- were fitted to the experimental data. Anoxic gloveboxes were used to keep the oxygen level low (<1 ppm) throughout the experiments due to redox sensitivity. EQ3NR, a computer program for geochemical aqueous speciation-solubility calculations, packaged in EQ3/6 v.8.0a, calculates the aqueous speciation and saturation index using an aqueous model addressed in EQ3/6's database. The saturation index indicates how far the system is from equilibrium with respect to the solid of interest. Thus, the smaller the sum of squared saturation indices that the aqueous model calculates for the given number of experiments, the more closely the model attributes equilibrium to each individual experiment with respect to the solid of interest. The calculation of aqueous speciation and saturation indices was repeated by adjusting stability constant of FeCit-, β(0), β(1), and Cφ in the database until the values are found that make the sum of squared saturation indices the smallest for the given number of experiments. Results will be presented at the time of

  20. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  1. Comparison of halogen bonding networks with Ru(ii) complexes and analysis of the influence of the XB interactions on their reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Marta E G; Egido, Irene; Hortelano, Carlos; López-López, María; Gómez-Sal, Pilar

    2017-07-20

    Coordination compounds of formula [Ru(Cl)2(CNR)4] are interesting building blocks for the preparation of halogen bonding supramolecular networks, since the chloride ligand is a good XB acceptor. When using I2 as the XB donor, an unexpected reaction on the ruthenium coordination sphere happens where the chloride ligands are substituted by iodides. The isolation of several intermediates with different substitution degrees and showing XB interactions in a solid state network evidenced the clear influence of the XB species in this unusual reaction process. The extension of the studies to bromine gave the analogous result, i.e. the substitution of the chloride ligands by bromides. Furthermore, changing the organic substituent in the isocyanide ligands from alkyl to aryl does not affect the outcome of the reaction; however the process is faster when the alkyl substituents are present. In the course of the study of these reactions we have isolated a whole range of XB-based networks were interactions such as ClI-I, BrBr-Br, II-I and IBr-Br are present, a systematic comparison of the XB structural features for the different networks isolated and the influence in their reactivity has been performed.

  2. The cation-π interaction between Lys53 and the flavin of fructosamine oxidase (FAOX-II) is critical for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, François; Fagan, Rebecca L; Zhang, Jianye; Nemet, Ina; Palfey, Bruce A; Monnier, Vincent M

    2011-09-20

    Fructosamine oxidases (FAOXs) are flavin-containing enzymes that catalyze the oxidative deglycation of low molecular weight fructosamines or Amadori products. The fructosamine substrate is oxidized by the flavin in the reductive half-reaction, and the reduced flavin is then oxidized by molecular oxygen in the oxidative half-reaction. The crystal structure of FAOX-II from Aspergillus fumigatus reveals a unique interaction between Lys53 and the isoalloxazine. The ammonium nitrogen of the lysine is in contact with and nearly centered over the aromatic ring of the flavin on the si-face. Here, we investigate the importance of this unique interaction on the reactions catalyzed by FAOX by studying both half-reactions of the wild-type and Lys53 mutant enzymes. The positive charge of Lys53 is critical for flavin reduction but plays very little role in the reaction with molecular oxygen. The conservative mutation of Lys53 to arginine had minor effects on catalysis. However, removing the charge by replacing Lys53 with methionine caused more than a million-fold decrease in flavin reduction, while only slowing the oxygen reaction by ∼30-fold. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. A new ternary copper(II) complex derived from 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole and glycylglycine: synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage, antioxidation and HSA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xia-Bing; Lin, Zi-Hua; Liu, Hai-Feng; Le, Xue-Yi

    2014-03-25

    A new ternary copper(II)-dipeptide complex [Cu(glygly)(HPB)(Cl)]⋅2H2O (glygly=glycylglycine anion, HPB=2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole) has been synthesized and characterized. The DNA interaction of the complex was studied by spectroscopic methods, viscosity, and electrophoresis measurements. The antioxidant activity was also investigated using the pyrogallol autoxidation assay. Besides, the interaction of the complex with human serum albumin (HSA) in vitro was examined by multispectroscopic techniques. The complex partially intercalated to CT-DNA with a high binding constant (Kb=7.28×10(5) M(-1)), and cleaved pBR322 DNA efficiently via an oxidative mechanism in the presence of Vc, with the HO· and O2(-) as the active species, and the SOD as a promoter. Furthermore, the complex shows a considerable SOD-like activity with the IC50 value of 3.8386 μM. The complex exhibits desired binding affinity to HSA, in which hydrogen bond or vander Waals force played a major role. The alterations of HSA secondary structure induced by the complex were confirmed by UV-visible, CD, synchronous fluorescence and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy.

  4. Lunar Outgassing, Transient Phenomena and The Return to The Moon, II: Predictions for Interactions between Outgassing and Regolith

    CERN Document Server

    Crotts, Arlin P S

    2007-01-01

    We consider the implications from Paper I on how gas leaking through the lunar surface might interact with the regolith, and in what respects this might affect or cause the appearance of optical Transient Lunar Phenomena (TLPs). We consider briefly a range of phenomena, but concentrate at the extremes of high and low gas flow rate, which might represent the more likely behaviors. Extremely fast i.e., explosive, expulsion of gas from the surface is investigated by examining the minimal amount of gas needed to displace a plug of regolith above a site of gaseous overpressure at the regolith's base. The area and timescale of this disturbance, it is consistent with observed TLPs. Furthermore there are several ways in which such an explosion might be expected to change the lunar surface appearance in a way consistent with many TLPs, including production of obscuration, brightening and color changes. At the slow end of the volatile flow range, gas seeping from the interior is retained below the surface for extensive...

  5. On the theory of ps and sub-ps laser pulse interaction with metals. II. Spatial temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttner, Bernd; Rohr, Gernot C.

    1998-04-01

    The interaction of short laser pulses with metals is described in terms of a new model involving a generalised nonlocal heat flow in time. The resulting system of coupled differential equations contains additional terms that originate in the thermal inertia of the electron subsystem. They are connected to the time derivative of both the laser intensity and the coupling of the electrons to the phonons. After briefly discussing the importance of the coefficient of heat exchange and of the different contributions to its main parts, the electron-phonon coupling and the average of the squared phonon frequencies, we present snap-shot-like calculations of the spatial temperature distribution along the z-axis for Al, Au, Pb and Nb for different intensities but fixed pulse duration τL=250 fs. In addition, the electron and phonon temperatures inside a thin Au film are studied in detail. Our results are compared to those arising from a standard two temperature model (TTM) and those of the conventional theory. While the traditional theory becomes invalid in most cases at least in the ps-range the differences between our approach and the TTM become the more pronounced the smaller the coefficient of heat exchange.

  6. DNA interaction studies of a platinum(II) complex containing L-histidine and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Nemati, Leila

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was developing coordination complexes that can be used as inorganic medicinal agents. The water soluble [Pt(phen)(His)]NO(3)·3H(2)O complex in which phen=1,10-phenantheroline and His=L-histidine was synthesized and characterized using physicochemical methods. Binding interaction of this complex with calf thymus (CT) DNA was investigated by emission, absorption, circular dichroism, and viscosity measurement techniques. Upon addition of CT-DNA, changes were observed in the characteristic ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) bands (hypochromism) of the complex. The complex binds to CT-DNA in an intercalative mode. The calculated binding constant, K(b), was 8 ± 0.2 × 10(4) M(-1). In addition, circular dichroism (CD) study showed that the phenanthroline ligand was inserted between the base pair stack of the double-helical structure of DNA. Also, the fluorescence spectral characteristics showed an increase in fluorescence intensity of the platinum complex in the presence of increasing amounts of DNA solution. The experimental results showed that the platinum complex binds to DNA via intercalative and hydrogen bonding mode.

  7. Cytotoxicity of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes with chloroquine and chelating ligands against breast and lung tumor cells: Interactions with DNA and BSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina-Vegas, Legna; Villarreal, Wilmer; Navarro, Maribel; de Oliveira, Clayton Rodrigues; Graminha, Angélica E; Maia, Pedro Ivo da S; Deflon, Victor M; Ferreira, Antonio G; Cominetti, Marcia Regina; Batista, Alzir A

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of nine π-arene piano-stool ruthenium (II) complexes with aromatic dinitrogen chelating ligands or containing chloroquine (CQ), are described in this study: [Ru(η(6)-C10H14)(phen)Cl]PF6 (1), [Ru(η(6)-C10H14)(dphphen)Cl]PF6 (2), [Ru(η(6)-C10H14)(bipy)Cl]PF6 (3), [Ru(η(6)-C10H14)(dmebipy)Cl]PF6 (4) and [Ru(η(6)-C10H14)(bdutbipy)Cl]PF6 (5), [Ru(η(6)-C10H14)(phen)CQ](PF6)2 (6), [Ru(η(6)-C10H14)(dphphen)CQ](PF6)2 (7), [Ru(η(6)-C10H14)(bipy)CQ](PF6)2 (8), [Ru(η(6)-C10H14)(dmebipy)CQ](PF6)2 (9): [1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dphphen), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (dmebipy), and 4,4'-di-t-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine (dbutbipy)]. The solid state structures of five ruthenium complexes (1-5) were determined by X-ray crystallography. Electrochemical experiments were performed by cyclic voltammetry to estimate the redox potential of the Ru(II)/Ru(III) couple in each case. Their interactions with DNA and BSA, and activity against four cell lines (L929, A549, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) were evaluated. Compounds 2, 6 through 9, interact with DNA which was comparable to the one observed for free chloroquine. The results of fluorescence titration revealed that these complexes strongly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA following a static quenching procedure. Binding constants (Kb) and the number of binding sites (n~1) were calculated using modified Stern-Volmer equations. The thermodynamic parameters ΔG at different temperatures were calculated and subsequently the values of ΔH and ΔS were also calculated, which revealed that hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions play a major role in the BSA-complex association. The MTT assay results indicated that complexes 2, 5 and 7 showed cytostatic effects at appreciably lower concentrations than those needed for cisplatin, chloroquine and doxorubicin.

  8. Mode-coupling approach to polymer diffusion in an unentangled melt. II. The effect of viscoelastic hydrodynamic interactions

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    Farago, J.; Meyer, H.; Baschnagel, J.; Semenov, A. N.

    2012-05-01

    A mode-coupling theory (MCT) version (called hMCT thereafter) of a recently presented theory [Farago, Meyer, and Semenov, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.178301 107, 178301 (2011)] is developed to describe the diffusional properties of a tagged polymer in a melt. The hMCT accounts for the effect of viscoelastic hydrodynamic interactions (VHIs), that is, a physical mechanism distinct from the density-based MCT (dMCT) described in the first paper of this series. The two versions of the MCT yield two different contributions to the asymptotic behavior of the center-of-mass velocity autocorrelation function (c.m. VAF). We show that in most cases the VHI mechanism is dominant; for long chains and prediffusive times it yields a negative tail ∝-N-1/2t-3/2 for the c.m. VAF. The case of non-momentum-conserving dynamics (Langevin or Monte Carlo) is discussed as well. It generally displays a distinctive behavior with two successive relaxation stages: first -N-1t-5/4 (as in the dMCT approach), then -N-1/2t-3/2. Both the amplitude and the duration of the first t-5/4 stage crucially depend on the Langevin friction parameter γ. All results are also relevant for the early time regime of entangled melts. These slow relaxations of the c.m. VAF, thus account for the anomalous subdiffusive regime of the c.m. mean square displacement widely observed in numerical and experimental works.

  9. Numerical analysis of seawater circulation in carbonate platforms: II. The dynamic interaction between geothermal and brine reflux circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G.D.; Whitaker, F.F.; Smart, P.L.; Sanford, W.E.

    2004-01-01

    Density-driven seawater circulation may occur in carbonate platforms due to geothermal heating and / or reflux of water of elevated salinity. In geothermal circulation lateral contrasts in temperature between seawater and platform groundwaters warmed by the geothermal heat flux result in upward convective flow, with colder seawater drawn into the platform at depth. With reflux circulation, platform-top waters concentrated by evaporation flow downward, displacing less dense underlying groundwaters. We have used a variable density groundwater flow model to examine the pattern, magnitude and interaction of these two different circulation mechanisms, for mesosaline platform-top waters (50???) and brines concentrated up to saturation with respect to gypsum (150???) and halite (246???). Geothermal circulation, most active around the platform margin, becomes restricted and eventually shut-off by reflux of brines from the platform interior towards the margin. The persistence of geothermal circulation is dependent on the rate of brine reflux, which is proportional to the concentration of platform-top brines and also critically dependent on the magnitude and distribution of permeability. Low permeability evaporites can severely restrict reflux whereas high permeability units in hydraulic continuity enhance brine transport. Reduction in permeability with depth and anisotropy of permeability (kv < < kh) focuses flow laterally in the shallow subsurface (<1 km), resulting in a horizontally elongated brine plume. Aquifer porosity and dispersivity are relatively minor controls on reflux. Platform brines can entrain surficial seawater when brine generating conditions cease but the platform-top remains submerged, a variant of reflux we term "latent reflux". Brines concentrated up to gypsum saturation have relatively long residence times of at least 100 times the duration of the reflux event. They thus represent a long-term control on post-reflux groundwater circulation, and

  10. Orbital Interaction and Electron Density Transfer in PdII([9]aneB2AL2 Complexes: Theoretical Approaches

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    Jong Keun Park

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The geometric structures of Pd-complexes {Pd([9]aneB2AL2 and Pd([9]aneBABL2 where A = P, S; B = N; L = PH3, P(CH33, Cl−}, their selective orbital interaction towards equatorial or axial (soft A…Pd coordination of macrocyclic [9]aneB2A tridentate to PdL2, and electron density transfer from the electron-rich trans L-ligand to the low-lying unfilled a1g(5s-orbital of PdL2 were investigated using B3P86/lanl2DZ for Pd and 6-311+G** for other atoms. The pentacoordinate endo-[Pd([9]aneB2A(L-donor2]2+ complex with an axial (soft A--Pd quasi-bond was optimized for stability. The fifth (soft A--Pd quasi-bond between the σ-donor of soft A and the partially unfilled a1g(5s-orbital of PdL2 was formed. The pentacoordinate endo-Pd([9]aneB2A(L-donor2]2+ complex has been found to be more stable than the corresponding tetracoordinate endo-Pd complexes. Except for the endo-Pd pentacoordinates, the tetracoordinate Pd([9]aneBABL2 complex with one equatorial (soft A-Pd bond is found to be more stable than the Pd([9]aneB2AL2 isomer without the equatorial (A-Pd bond. In particular, the geometric configuration of endo-[Pd([9]anePNP(L-donor2]2+ could not be optimized.

  11. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues of D1 protein interacting with phosphatidylglycerol affects the function of plastoquinone QB in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Kaichiro; Mizusawa, Naoki; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamada, Masato; Tomo, Tatsuya; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Masami; Kobayashi, Koichi; Wada, Hajime

    2015-12-01

    Recent X-ray crystallographic analysis of photosystem (PS) II at 1.9-Å resolution identified 20 lipid molecules in the complex, five of which are phosphatidylglycerol (PG). In this study, we mutagenized amino acid residues S232 and N234 of D1, which interact with two of the PG molecules (PG664 and PG694), by site-directed mutagenesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to investigate the role of the interaction in PSII. The serine and asparagine residues at positions 232 and 234 from the N-terminus were mutagenized to alanine and aspartic acid, respectively, and a mutant carrying both amino acid substitutions was also produced. Although the obtained mutants, S232A, N234D, and S232AN234D, exhibited normal growth, they showed decreased photosynthetic activities and slower electron transport from QA to QB than the control strain. Thermoluminescence analysis suggested that this slower electron transfer in the mutants was caused by more negative redox potential of QB, but not in those of QA and S2. In addition, the levels of extrinsic proteins, PsbV and PsbU, were decreased in PSII monomer purified from the S232AN234D mutant, while that of Psb28 was increased. In the S232AN234D mutant, the content of PG in PSII was slightly decreased, whereas that of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol was increased compared with the control strain. These results suggest that the interactions of S232 and N234 with PG664 and PG694 are important to maintain the function of QB and to stabilize the binding of extrinsic proteins to PSII.

  12. The impact of the C-terminal domain on the interaction of human DNA topoisomerase II α and β with DNA.

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    Kathryn L Gilroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type II DNA topoisomerases are essential, ubiquitous enzymes that act to relieve topological problems arising in DNA from normal cellular activity. Their mechanism of action involves the ATP-dependent transport of one DNA duplex through a transient break in a second DNA duplex; metal ions are essential for strand passage. Humans have two isoforms, topoisomerase IIα and topoisomerase IIβ, that have distinct roles in the cell. The C-terminal domain has been linked to isoform specific differences in activity and DNA interaction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the role of the C-terminal domain in the binding of human topoisomerase IIα and topoisomerase IIβ to DNA in fluorescence anisotropy assays using full length and C-terminally truncated enzymes. We find that the C-terminal domain of topoisomerase IIβ but not topoisomerase IIα affects the binding of the enzyme to the DNA. The presence of metal ions has no effect on DNA binding. Additionally, we have examined strand passage of the full length and truncated enzymes in the presence of a number of supporting metal ions and find that there is no difference in relative decatenation between isoforms. We find that calcium and manganese, in addition to magnesium, can support strand passage by the human topoisomerase II enzymes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The C-terminal domain of topoisomerase IIβ, but not that of topoisomerase IIα, alters the enzyme's K(D for DNA binding. This is consistent with previous data and may be related to the differential modes of action of the two isoforms in vivo. We also show strand passage with different supporting metal ions for human topoisomerase IIα or topoisomerase IIβ, either full length or C-terminally truncated. They all show the same preferences, whereby Mg > Ca > Mn.

  13. Synthesis of novel palladium(II) complexes with oxalic acid diamide derivatives and their interaction with nucleosides and proteins. Structural, solution, and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrkalić, Emina M; Jelić, Ratomir M; Klisurić, Olivera R; Matović, Zoran D

    2014-10-28

    Novel palladium complexes, KH[Pd(obap)]2·3H2O (3) with oxamido-N-aminopropyl-N'-benzoic acid and [Pd(apox)] (4) with N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethanediamide, were synthesized. Exhaustive synthetic, solution and structural studies of the two Pd(ii) complexes are reported. The binary and ternary systems of the Pd(ii) ion with H2apox or H3obap as primary ligands and nucleosides (Ado or Cyt) as secondary ligands, are investigated in order to better understand their equilibrium chemistry. The relative stabilities of the ternary complexes are determined and compared with those of the corresponding binary complexes in terms of their Δlog K values. The species distribution of all complexes in solution is evaluated. Fluorescence spectroscopy data shows that the fluorescence quenching of HSA is a result of the formation of the [PdL]-HSA complex. The structure of complex 3 is confirmed using X-ray crystallography. The results are compared to those obtained for palladium complexes of similar structures. Density functional theory (DFT) has been applied for modelling and energetic analysis purposes. The nature of the Pd-N(O) bond interaction is analyzed using NBO. We report here docking simulation experiments in order to predict the most probable mechanism of pro-drug-action. The next free binding energy order of the best scores from the [PdL]-DNA docking simulations, cis-[Pt(NH3)2(H2O)2](2+) > [Pd(obap)] > [Pd(mda)], has been observed in the case of DNA alteration. For the ER and cytosolic stress mechanisms the results of the docking simulations to the chaperons Grp78 and Hsc70 are promising for possible applications as potent protein inhibitors (Ki of [Pd(mda)]/GRP78 being ∼66 μM and Ki for [Pd(obap)]/HSC70 being 14.39 μM).

  14. Majors soil classes of the metropolitan region of Curitiba (PR, Brazil: II - interaction of Pb with mineral and organic constituents

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    Ana Christina Duarte Pires

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between heavy metals and soil constituents is one of the most important factors influencing the potential for ground water pollution. To study Pb behavior, samples of soils were incubated with a salt solution containing this metal. The experimental units consisted of plastic bags, partially opened with 0.1 dm³ of soil with three replications. After incubation, samples were subjected to sequential and selective extractions. Lead retention, measured by the maximum adsorption capacity of the soil, was relatively high with values ranging from 6,439 to 22,148 mg kg-1. The sequential and selective extractions showed that Pb adsorption was stable where the metal was found mainly in organic matter, Fe and Al oxides, and residual forms (specific adsorption. The capacity of the soils to retain Pb, thereby increasing the leaching potential of the metal, was in the sequence of: Histosol - Oxisol - Inceptisol.A interação entre os metais pesados e os constituintes orgânicos e minerais do solo é um dos fatores mais importantes para definir o potencial de contaminação das águas subterrâneas. Para estudar o comportamento do Pb em solos da região metropolitana de Curitiba, estado do Paraná, amostras das classes Organossolo, Latossolo e Cambissolo foram submetidas a análises físicas e químicas, e incubadas com soluções de sais desse metal. A dosagem utilizada correspondeu a 40% da Capacidade Máxima de Adsorção de Pb do solo (CMA. O ensaio foi conduzido na Universidade Federal do Paraná, em condições de casa de vegetação, no período de 29 de outubro a 29 de dezembro de 2003. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos ao acaso, com três repetições e as unidades experimentais corresponderam a sacos plásticos parcialmente abertos com 0,1 dm³ de solo. Após o período de incubação (60 dias, as amostras foram submetidas a extrações seqüenciais e seletivas, na seguinte ordem: 1 KCl 0,005 mol L-1; 2 BaCl2 0,1 mol L-1; 3 Na

  15. Interaction of a dinuclear fluorescent Cd(II) complex of calix[4]arene conjugate with phosphates and its applicability in cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasu Mummidivarapu, V V; Hinge, Vijaya Kumar; Rao, Chebrolu Pulla

    2015-01-21

    A triazole-linked hydroxyethylimino conjugate of calix[4]arene () and its cadmium complex have been synthesized and characterized, and their structures have been established. In the complex, both the Cd(2+) centers are bound by an N2O4 core, and one of it is a distorted octahedral, whereas the other is a trigonal anti-prism. The fluorescence intensity of the di-nuclear Cd(ii) complex is quenched only in the presence of phosphates and not with other anions studied owing to their binding affinities and the nature of the interaction of the phosphates with Cd(2+). These are evident even from their absorption spectra. Different phosphates exhibit changes in both their fluorescence as well as absorption spectra to varying extents, suggesting their differential interactions. Among the six phosphates, H2PO4(-) has higher fluorescence quenching even at low equivalents of this ion, whereas P2O7(4-) shows only 50% quenching even at 10 equivalents. The fluorescence quenching is considerable even at 20 ppb (0.2 μM) of H2PO4(-), whereas all other phosphates require a concentration of 50-580 ppb to exhibit the same effect on fluorescence spectra. Thus, the interaction of H2PO4(-) is more effective by ∼30 fold as compared to that of P2O7(4-). Fluorescence quenching by phosphate is due to the release of from its original cadmium complex via the formation of a ternary species followed by the capture of Cd(2+) by the phosphate, as delineated based on the combination of spectral techniques, such as absorption, emission, (1)H NMR and ESI MS. The relative interactive abilities of the six phosphates differ from each other. The removal of Cd(2+) is demonstrated to be reversible by the repeated addition of the phosphate followed by Cd(2+). The characteristics of the ternary species formed in each of these six phosphates have been computationally modeled using molecular mechanics. The computational study revealed that the coordination between cadmium and -CH2-CH2-OH breaks and new

  16. Structural and functional studies on the interaction of GspC and GspD in the type II secretion system.

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    Konstantin V Korotkov

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Type II secretion systems (T2SSs are critical for secretion of many proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. In the T2SS, the outer membrane secretin GspD forms a multimeric pore for translocation of secreted proteins. GspD and the inner membrane protein GspC interact with each other via periplasmic domains. Three different crystal structures of the homology region domain of GspC (GspC(HR in complex with either two or three domains of the N-terminal region of GspD from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli show that GspC(HR adopts an all-β topology. N-terminal β-strands of GspC and the N0 domain of GspD are major components of the interface between these inner and outer membrane proteins from the T2SS. The biological relevance of the observed GspC-GspD interface is shown by analysis of variant proteins in two-hybrid studies and by the effect of mutations in homologous genes on extracellular secretion and subcellular distribution of GspC in Vibrio cholerae. Substitutions of interface residues of GspD have a dramatic effect on the focal distribution of GspC in V. cholerae. These studies indicate that the GspC(HR-GspD(N0 interactions observed in the crystal structure are essential for T2SS function. Possible implications of our structures for the stoichiometry of the T2SS and exoprotein secretion are discussed.

  17. Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance studies of the interaction of methanol with the S2 state of the Mn4O5Ca cluster of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyala, Paul H; Stich, Troy A; Stull, Jamie A; Yu, Fangting; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Britt, R David

    2014-12-23

    The binding of the substrate analogue methanol to the catalytic Mn4CaO5 cluster of the water-oxidizing enzyme photosystem II is known to alter the electronic structure properties of the oxygen-evolving complex without retarding O2-evolution under steady-state illumination conditions. We report the binding mode of (13)C-labeled methanol determined using 9.4 GHz (X-band) hyperfine sublevel-correlation (HYSCORE) and 34 GHz (Q-band) electron spin-echo electron nuclear double resonance (ESE-ENDOR) spectroscopies. These results are compared to analogous experiments on a mixed-valence Mn(III)Mn(IV) complex (2-OH-3,5-Cl2-salpn)2Mn(III)Mn(IV) (salpn = N,N'-bis(3,5-dichlorosalicylidene)-1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane) in which methanol ligates to the Mn(III) ion ( Larson et al. (1992) J. Am. Chem. Soc. , 114 , 6263 ). In the mixed-valence Mn(III,IV) complex, the hyperfine coupling to the (13)C of the bound methanol (Aiso = 0.65 MHz, T = 1.25 MHz) is appreciably larger than that observed for (13)C methanol associated with the Mn4CaO5 cluster poised in the S2 state, where only a weak dipolar hyperfine interaction (Aiso = 0.05 MHz, T = 0.27 MHz) is observed. An evaluation of the (13)C hyperfine interaction using the X-ray structure coordinates of the Mn4CaO5 cluster indicates that methanol does not bind as a terminal ligand to any of the manganese ions in the oxygen-evolving complex. We favor methanol binding in place of a water ligand to the Ca(2+) in the Mn4CaO5 cluster or in place of one of the waters that form hydrogen bonds with the oxygen bridges of the cluster.

  18. Tripartite Motif-Containing Protein 22 Interacts with Class II Transactivator and Orchestrates Its Recruitment in Nuclear Bodies Containing TRIM19/PML and Cyclin T1

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    Greta Forlani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Among interferon (IFN inducible antiviral factors both tripartite motif-containing protein 22 (TRIM22 and class II transactivator (CIITA share the capacity of repressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 proviral transcription. TRIM22 is constitutively expressed in a subset of U937 cell clones poorly permissive to HIV-1 replication, whereas CIITA has been shown to inhibit virus multiplication in both T lymphocytic and myeloid cells, including poorly HIV-1 permissive U937 cells, by suppressing Tat-mediated transactivation of HIV-1 transcription. Therefore, we tested whether TRIM22 and CIITA could form a nuclear complex potentially endowed with HIV-1 repressive functions. Indeed, we observed that TRIM22, independent of its E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, interacts with CIITA and promotes its recruitment into nuclear bodies. Importantly, TRIM19/promyelocytic leukemia (PML protein, another repressor of HIV-1 transcription also acting before proviral integration, colocalize in these nuclear bodies upon TRIM22 expression induced by IFN-γ. Finally, tTRIM22 nuclear bodies also contained CyclinT1, a crucial elongation factor of HIV-1 primary transcripts. These findings show that TRIM22 nuclear bodies are a site of recruitment of factors crucial for the regulation of HIV-1 transcription and highlight the potential existence of a concerted action between TRIM22, CIITA, and TRIM19/PML to maintain a state of proviral latency, at least in myeloid cells.

  19. Kinetic investigation on the oxidation of tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) by oxone: the effect of BSA-SDS interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Harasit Kumar; Kundu, Arjama; Balti, Subrata; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2012-07-15

    The kinetic investigations of oxidation of tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) by oxone have been studied spectrophotometrically in phosphate buffer medium of pH 6.8, temperature 308 K, and ionic strength 0.25 mol L(-1). The reactions were also carried out in presence of globular transport protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) having isoelectric point 4.9, anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and their mixtures. The critical aggregation concentration (CAC) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) of SDS in presence of BSA have been determined using conductivity and kinetic measurement techniques. The secondary structure of BSA was examined by Circular Dichroism (CD) measurement at 308 K. The helix nature of BSA decreases with increase of SDS concentration. The effect of pH on rate in presence of BSA is opposite to its absence, and the effect of urea on rate in presence of BSA indicates the denaturation of BSA. The results depict that amphiphile SDS interacts with BSA and different molecular events, for example, specific binding, cooperative binding, protein unfolding, and micelle formation act. Activation parameters of the reaction in different environments have been determined.

  20. Interactions of pregabalin with gabapentin, levetiracetam, tiagabine and vigabatrin in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model: a type II isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Filip, Damian; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anticonvulsant effects of pregabalin in combination with four second-generation antiepileptic drugs (i.e., gabapentin, levetiracetam, tiagabine, and vigabatrin) in the mouse maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure model by using the type II isobolographic analysis. Tonic hind limb extension (seizure activity) was evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by a current (sine-wave, 25 mA, 500 V, 50 Hz, 0.2 s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. The combination of pregabalin with gabapentin at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 was supra-additive (synergistic) in terms of seizure suppression while the combinations at the fixed-ratios of 2:1 and 4:1 were additive in the mouse MES model. Similarly, the combination of pregabalin with tiagabine at the fixed-ratio of 25:1 was supra-additive, whereas the combinations at the fixed-ratios of 100:1 and 50:1 were additive in the mouse MES model. Pregabalin with levetiracetam and vigabatrin at the fixed-ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 4:1 were additive in this seizure model. The combinations of pregabalin with gabapentin (1:1) and pregabalin with tiagabine (25:1) appear to be favorable combinations exerting supra-additive interaction in suppressing MES-induced seizures. Pregabalin in combination with levetiracetam and vigabatrin appears to be neutral producing only additivity in the mouse MES model.

  1. A dynamic model of interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and catalytic subunits of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

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    Shirley Pepke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available During the acquisition of memories, influx of Ca2+ into the postsynaptic spine through the pores of activated N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors triggers processes that change the strength of excitatory synapses. The pattern of Ca2+influx during the first few seconds of activity is interpreted within the Ca2+-dependent signaling network such that synaptic strength is eventually either potentiated or depressed. Many of the critical signaling enzymes that control synaptic plasticity,including Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, are regulated by calmodulin, a small protein that can bindup to 4 Ca2+ ions. As a first step toward clarifying how the Ca2+-signaling network decides between potentiation or depression, we have created a kinetic model of the interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and CaMKII that represents our best understanding of the dynamics of these interactions under conditions that resemble those in a postsynaptic spine. We constrained parameters of the model from data in the literature, or from our own measurements, and then predicted time courses of activation and autophosphorylation of CaMKII under a variety of conditions. Simulations showed that species of calmodulin with fewer than four bound Ca2+ play a significant role in activation of CaMKII in the physiological regime,supporting the notion that processing of Ca2+ signals in a spine involves competition among target enzymes for binding to unsaturated species of CaM in an environment in which the concentration of Ca2+ is fluctuating rapidly. Indeed, we showed that dependence of activation on the frequency of Ca2+ transients arises from the kinetics of interaction of fluctuating Ca2+with calmodulin/CaMKII complexes. We used parameter sensitivity analysis to identify which parameters will be most beneficial to measure more carefully to improve the accuracy of predictions. This model provides a quantitative base from which to build more complex dynamic

  2. Efficient On-Off Ratiometric Fluorescence Probe for Cyanide Ion Based on Perturbation of the Interaction between Gold Nanoclusters and a Copper(II)-Phthalocyanine Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeifard, Zahra; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    2016-06-22

    A new ratiometric fluorescent sensor was developed for the sensitive and selective detection of cyanide ion (CN(-)) in aqueous media. The ratiometric sensing system is based on CN(-) modulated recovery of copper(II) phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) fluorescence signal at the expense of diminished fluorescence intensity of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Preliminary experiments revealed that the AuNCs and Cu(PcTs) possess a turn-off effect on each other, the interaction of which being verified through studying their interactions by principle component analysis (PCA) and multivariate cure resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods. In the presence of CN(-) anion, the AuNCs and Cu(PcTs) interaction was perturbed, so that the fluorescence of Cu (PcTs), already quenched by AuNCs, was found to be efficiently recovered, while the fluorescence intensity of AuNCs was quenched via the formation of a stable [Au(CN)2](-) species. The ratiometric variation of AuNCs and Cu(PcTs) fluorescence intensities leads to designing a highly sensitive probe for CN(-) ion detection. Under the optimal conditions, CN(-) anion was detected without needing any etching time, over the concentration range of 100 nM-220 μM, with a detection limit of 75 nM, which is much lower than the allowable level of CN(-) in water permitted by the World Health Organization (WHO). Moreover, the detection of CN(-) was developed based on the CN(-) effects on the blue and red florescent colors of Cu(PcTs) and AuNCs, respectively. The designed probe displays a continuous color change from red to blue by addition of CN(-), which can be clearly observed by the naked eye in the range of 7-350 μM, under UV lamp. The prepared AuNCs/Cu(PcTs) probe was successfully utilized for the selective and sensitive determination of CN(-) anion in two different types of natural water (Rodbal dam and rainwater) and also in blood serum as a biological sample.

  3. Mechanistic and conformational studies on the interaction of a platinum(II) complex containing an antiepileptic drug, levetiracetam, with bovine serum albumin by optical spectroscopic techniques in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hadidi, Saba

    2015-02-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with circular dichroism (CD) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy were employed to investigate the binding of a new platinum(II) complex containing an antiepileptic drug "Levetiracetam" to bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the physiological conditions. In the mechanism discussion, it was proved that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by Pt(II) complex is a result of the formation of Pt(II) complex-BSA complex. The thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS at different temperatures (283, 298, and 310 K) were calculated, and the negative value for ΔH and ΔS indicate that the hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions play major roles in Pt(II) complex-BSA association. Binding studies concerning the number of binding sites (n~1) and apparent binding constant K b were performed by fluorescence quenching method. The site marker competitive experiments indicated that the binding of Pt(II) complex to BSA primarily took place in site II. Based on the Förster's theory, the average binding distance between Pt(II) complex and BSA was obtained (r = 5.29 nm). Furthermore, UV-vis, CD, and synchronous fluorescence spectrum were used to investigate the structural change of BSA molecules with addition of Pt(II) complex. These results indicate that the binding of Pt(II) complex to BSA causes apparent change in the secondary structure of BSA and do affect the microenvironment around the tryptophan residue.

  4. Interactions of Zn(II) Ions with Humic Acids Isolated from Various Type of Soils. Effect of pH, Zn Concentrations and Humic Acids Chemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the analysis of the interaction between humic acids (HAs) from different soils and Zn(II) ions at wide concentration ranges and at two different pHs, 5 and 7, by using fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as potentiometric measurements. The presence of a few areas of HAs structures responsible for Zn(II) complexing was revealed. Complexation at α-sites (low humified structures of low-molecular weight and aromatic polycondensation) and β-sites (weakly humified structures) was stronger at pH 7 than 5. This trend was not observed for γ-sites (structures with linearly-condensed aromatic rings, unsaturated bonds and large molecular weight). The amount of metal complexed at pH5 and 7 by α and γ-structures increased with a decrease in humification and aromaticity of HAs, contrary to β-areas where complexation increased with increasing content of carboxylic groups. The stability of complexes was higher at pH 7 and was the highest for γ-structures. At pH 5, stability decreased with C/N increase for α-areas and -COOH content increase for β-sites; stability increased with humification decrease for γ-structures. The stability of complexes at α and β-areas at pH 7 decreased with a drop in HAs humification. FTIR spectra at pH 5 revealed that the most-humified HAs tended to cause bidentate bridging coordination, while in the case of the least-humified HAs, Zn caused bidentate bridging coordination at low Zn additions and bidentate chelation at the highest Zn concentrations. Low Zn doses at pH 7 caused formation of unidentate complexes while higher Zn doses caused bidentate bridging. Such processes were noticed for HAs characterized by high oxidation degree and high oxygen functional group content; where these were low, HAs displayed bidentate bridging or even bidentate chelation. To summarize, the above studies have showed significant impact of Zn concentration, pH and some properties of HAs on complexation reactions of humic

  5. The calcium-induced conformation and glycosylation of scavenger-rich cysteine repeat (SRCR) domains of glycoprotein 340 influence the high affinity interaction with antigen I/II homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2014-08-01

    Oral streptococci adhere to tooth-immobilized glycoprotein 340 (GP340) via the surface protein antigen I/II (AgI/II) and its homologs as the first step in pathogenesis. Studying this interaction using recombinant proteins, we observed that calcium increases the conformational stability of the scavenger-rich cysteine repeat (SRCRs) domains of GP340. Our results also show that AgI/II adheres specifically with nanomolar affinity to the calcium-induced SRCR conformation in an immobilized state and not in solution. This interaction is significantly dependent on the O-linked carbohydrates present on the SRCRs. This study also establishes that a single SRCR domain of GP340 contains the two surfaces to which the apical and C-terminal regions of AgI/II noncompetitively adhere. Compared with the single SRCR domain, the three tandem SRCR domains displayed a collective/cooperative increase in their bacterial adherence and aggregation. The previously described SRCRP2 peptide that was shown to aggregate several oral streptococci displayed limited aggregation and also nonspecific adherence compared to SRCR domains. Finally, we show distinct species-specific adherence/aggregation between Streptococcus mutans AgI/II and Streptococcus gordonii SspB in their interaction with the SRCRs. This study concludes that identification of the metal ion and carbohydrate adherence motifs on both SRCRs and AgI/II homologs could lead to the development of anti-adhesive inhibitors that could deter the adherence of pathogenic oral streptococci and thereby prevent the onset of infections.

  6. Design, characterization, teratogenicity testing, antibacterial, antifungal and DNA interaction of few high spin Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Lashin, Fakhr El-Din

    2013-07-01

    In this study, new Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid chelates derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized via elemental, thermogravimetric analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic, mass spectra and magnetic moment measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. Correlation of all spectroscopic data suggested that Schiff bases ligands exhibited tridentate with ONO sites coordinating to the metal ions via protonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N and carboxylate-O with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate via deprotonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N, carboxylate-O and N-imidazole ring ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their teratogenicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. Moreover, the interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometric and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. Furthermore, the free ligands and their complexes are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus flavus and Trichotheium rosium in order to assess their antimicrobial potential. The results show that the metal complexes are more reactive with respect to their corresponding Schiff base amino acid ligands.

  7. Non-covalent interactions in 2-methylimidazolium copper(II) complex (MeImH)2[Cu(pfbz)4]: Synthesis, characterization, single crystal X-ray structure and packing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raj Pal; Saini, Anju; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Jitendra; Sathishkumar, Ranganathan; Venugopalan, Paloth

    2017-01-01

    A new anionic copper(II) complex, (MeImH)2 [Cu(pfbz)4] (1) where, MeImH = 2-methylimidazolium and pfbz = pentafluorobenzoate has been isolated by reacting copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate, pentafluorobenzoic acid and 2-methylimidazole in ethanol: water mixture in 1:2:2 molar ratio. This complex 1 has been characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, spectroscopic techniques (UV-Vis, FT-IR) and conductance measurements. The complex salt crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system with space group C2/c. Single crystal X-ray structure determination revealed the presence of discrete ions: [Cu(pfbz)4]2- anion and two 2-methylimidazolium cation (C4H7N2)+. The crystal lattice is stabilized by strong hydrogen bonding and F⋯F interactions between cationic-anionic and the anionic-anionic moieties respectively, besides π-π interactions.

  8. Analysis of an unusual hetero-halogen bonded trimer using charge density analysis: A case of concerted type I Br· · · Br and type II Br· · · Cl interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MYSORE S PAVAN; TAYUR N GURU ROW

    2016-10-01

    The crystal structure of 4−bromo−2−chlorobenzoic acid generates an unusual triangular motif consisting of a hitherto uncharacterized Type I Br· · · Br contact along with two Type II Br· · · Cl interactions as edges of the triangle. The nature of such bonding is analyzed based on both experimental and theoretical chargedensity followed by topological analysis.

  9. Interaction of the tylosin-resistance methyltransferase RlmA II at its rRNA target differs from the orthologue RlmA I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, Stephen; Jakobsen, Lene; Yoshizawa, Satoko

    2008-01-01

    RlmA(II) methylates the N1-position of nucleotide G748 in hairpin 35 of 23 S rRNA. The resultant methyl group extends into the peptide channel of the 50 S ribosomal subunit and confers resistance to tylosin and other mycinosylated macrolide antibiotics. Methylation at G748 occurs in several groups...... of Gram-positive bacteria, including the tylosin-producer Streptomyces fradiae and the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Recombinant S. pneumoniae RlmA(II) was purified and shown to retain its activity and specificity in vitro when tested on unmethylated 23 S rRNA substrates. RlmA(II) makes multiple...

  10. Effect of RXR/PPAR interaction in angiotensin II-induced vascular inflammation and angiogenesis. Role of CXCL16/CXCR6 axis in angiotensin II or cigarette smoke-induced vascular inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Escudero Diaz, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Aumentos en los niveles circulantes de mediadores, incluyendo angiotensina II (Ang-II) y citoquinas, han sido detectados en enfermedades cardiovasculares y cardiometabólicas como la hipertensión, la obesidad y la diabetes, y parecen ejercer efectos negativos sobre la función endotelial (Granger et al., 2004; Marinou et al., 2010). Estos agentes inician una cascada inflamatoria de señalización que promueve la generación de especies reactivas del oxígeno, aumento en la superficie celular de la ...

  11. Magnetic Interactions in the Copper Complex (L-Aspartato)(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) Hydrate. An Exchange-Coupled Extended System with Two Dissimilar Copper Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondino, Carlos D.; Calvo, Rafael; Atria, Ana María; Spodine, Evgenia; Nascimento, Otaciro R.; Peña, Octavio

    1997-07-02

    We report EPR measurements in single-crystal samples at the microwave frequencies 9.8 and 34.3 GHz and magnetic susceptibility measurements in polycrystalline samples for the ternary complex of copper with aspartic acid and phenanthroline, (L-aspartato)(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) hydrate. The crystal lattice of this compound is composed of two dissimilar copper ions identified as Cu(A) and Cu(B), which are in two types of copper chains called A and B, respectively, running parallel to the b crystal axis. The copper ions in the A chains are connected by the aspartic acid molecule, and those in the B chains by a chemical path that involves a carboxylate bridge and a hydrogen bond. Both chains are held together by a complex network of hydrogen bonds and by hydrophobic interactions between aromatic amines. Magnetic susceptibility data indicate a Curie-Weiss behavior in the studied temperature range (2-300 K). The EPR spectra at 9.8 GHz display a single exchange collapsed resonance for any magnetic field orientation, in the so-called strong exchange regime. Those at 34.3 GHz are within the so-called weak exchange regime and display two resonances which belong to each type of copper ion chain. The decoupling of the spectra at 34.3 GHz using a theory based on Anderson's model for the case of two weakly exchange coupled spins S = (1)/(2) allows one to obtain the angular variation of the squares of the g-factor and the peak-to-peak line width of each resonance. This model also allows one to evaluate the exchange parameter |J(AB)/k| = 2.7(6) mK associated with the chemical path connecting dissimilar copper ions. The line width data obtained for each component of the spectra at 34.3 GHz are analyzed in terms of a model based on Kubo and Tomita's theory, to obtain the exchange parameters |J(A)/k| = 0.77(2) K and |J(B)/k| = 1.44(2) K associated with the chemical paths connecting the similar copper ions of types A and B, respectively.

  12. Coordination behavior and bio-potent aspects of Ni(II) with 2-aminobenzamide and some amino acid mixed ligands--Part II: Synthesis, spectral, morphological, pharmacological and DNA interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmaraja, Jeyaprakash; Subbaraj, Paramasivam; Esakkidurai, Thirugnanasamy; Shobana, Sutha

    2014-11-11

    A series of novel bioactive mixed ligand Ni(II) complexes (1a-1d) have been synthesised by using 2-aminobenzamide (2AB) and some bio-relevant amino acid ligands. The synthesised Ni(II) complexes were structurally characterized by various physico-chemical and spectral studies. Elemental analysis and molar conductance values suggest that 1:1:1 stoichiometry with non-electrolytic nature. Based on the spectral studies, both the ligands act as bidentate and they chelate with Ni(II) ion via amino-NH2 and amido-O and deprotonated carboxylato-O and amino-NH2 atoms respectively to form a stable six, five membered chelate rings with mononuclear octahedral geometry. Thermal studies show the presence of coordinated water and acetate molecules in the coordination. The powder X-ray diffractogram and SEM pictograph imply that all the complexes have fine crystalline peaks with homogeneous surface morphology. In vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant studies indicate the complexes are more active than free 2-aminobenzamide ligand. The Ni(II)-2AB-gly/phe complexes (1a and 1d) show significant oxidative cleavage and DNA binding activities. Moreover, the 3D molecular modeling, analysis of the complexes has also been studied.

  13. One-pot synthesis of an Mn(III)-Cu(II)-Mn(III) trinuclear heterometallic compound formed by Mn$\\cdots$S-Cu-S$\\cdots$Mn supramolecular interactions: Crystal structure of [{MnIII(salph)(H2O)}2{CuII(mnt)2}]$\\cdot$4DMF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vedichi Madhu; Samar K Das

    2006-11-01

    A one-pot synthesis, that includes CuCl2$\\cdot$2H2O, Na2mnt, H2salph and Mn(CH3COO)3$\\cdot$H2O, leads to the isolation of a trinuclear heterometallic compound [{MnIII(salph)(H2O)}2{CuII(mnt)2}]$\\cdot$4DMF (1) formed by Mn$\\cdots$S-Cu-S$\\cdots$Mn supramolecular interactions. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group 21/ with = 13.433(4), = 16.283(5), = 15.072(4) Å, = 107.785(4)°, = 2. In the crystal structure, the complex anion [CuII(mnt)2]2- bridges two [MnIII(salph)(H2O)]1+ cations through Mn$\\cdots$S contacts. The non-covalent hydrogen bonding and - interactions among the trinuclear [{MnIII(salph)(H2O)}2{CuII(mnt)2}] complexes lead to an extended chain-like arrangement of [MnIII(salph) (H2O)]1+ cations with [CuII(mnt)2]2- anions embedded in between these chains.

  14. A new family of [Cu(II)Ln(III)M(V)] heterotrimetallic complexes (Ln = La, Gd, Tb; M = Mo, W): model systems to probe exchange interactions and single-molecule magnet properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visinescu, Diana; Alexandru, Maria-Gabriela; Madalan, Augustin M; Jeon, Ie-Rang; Mathonière, Corine; Clérac, Rodolphe; Andruh, Marius

    2016-05-01

    Four isostructural trinuclear 3d-4f-4(5)d heterotrimetallic complexes, with the general formula [L(2)CuLn(H2O)5(μ-NC)M(CN)7], were obtained from the association of binuclear 3d-4f complexes and {M(V)(CN)8}(3-) metalloligands (M = Mo, Ln = La ; M = W, Ln = La ; M = Mo, Ln = Gd ; M = Mo; Ln = Tb , where H2L(2) = 1,2-ethanediylbis(2-iminomethylene-6-methoxy-phenol)). The metalloligand coordinates through a single-cyanido group at the apical position of the copper(ii) ion belonging to the {Cu(II)Ln(III)} binuclear complex. The analysis of the magnetic data for the La(iii) derivatives (compounds and ), in the 1.85-300 K temperature range, shows a weak ferromagnetic exchange interaction between Cu(II) and Mo(V)/W(V) ions across the cyanido bridge (JCuM/kB = 3.6(6) K; g = 2.23(5) for and JCuM/kB = 3.8(6) K, g = 2.21(5) for , with H = -2JCuMSCu·SM). These results were used to simulate the magnetic properties of compound , using the isotropic spin Hamiltonian H = -2JCuMoSCu·SMo - 2JCuGdSCu·SGd. The resulting magnetic interaction between Cu(II) and Gd(III) ions via the phenoxo-bridge was found to be weakly ferromagnetic (JCuGd/kB = +4.5(2) K with JCuMo/kB = +3.6(2) K, gGd = gCu = 2.00 and gMo = 1.98). The dc magnetic properties for compound also show a predominant ferromagnetic interaction, while the ac magnetic measurements indicate the presence of the slow relaxation of the magnetization below 3.5 K.

  15. Single crystal EPR study of the dinuclear Cu(II) complex [Cu(tda)(phen)](2)·H(2)tda (tda = thiodiacetate, phen = phenanthroline): influence of weak interdimeric magnetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Nicolás I; Perec, Mireille; González, Pablo J; Passeggi, Mario C G; Rizzi, Alberto C; Brondino, Carlos D

    2010-12-23

    We report powder and single crystal EPR measurements of [Cu(tda)(phen)](2)·H(2)tda (tda = thiodiacetate, phen = phenanthroline) at 9.7 GHz. This compound consists of centrosymmetric copper(II) ion dimers, weakly ferromagnetically exchange-coupled (J = +3.2 cm(-1)), in which the dimeric units are linked by hydrophobic chemical paths involving the phen molecules. EPR revealed that the triplet spectra are collapsed by interdimeric exchange interactions mediated by that chemical path. Analysis and simulation of the single crystal EPR spectra were performed using Anderson's exchange narrowing model, together with statistical arguments. This approach allowed us to interpret the spectra modulated by the interdimeric interactions in situations of weak, intermediate, and strong exchange. We evaluated an interdimeric exchange constant J' = 0.0070(3) cm(-1), indicating that hydrophobic paths can transmit weak exchange interactions between centers at relatively long distances of the order of ∼10 Å.

  16. The fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra study on the interactions of palladium (II)-Nootropic chelate with Congo red and their analytical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Jingdong; Liu, Shaopu; Peng, Huanjun; Pan, Ziyu; Bu, Lingli; Xiao, Huan; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2017-04-01

    A highly sensitive detection approach of resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra (RRS) is firstly applied to analyzing nootropic drugs including piracetam (PIR) and oxiracetam (OXI). In HCl-NaAc buffer solution (pH = 3.0), the OXI chelated with palladium (II) to form the chelate cation [Pd2·OXI]2 +, and then reacted with Congo red (CGR) by virtue of electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic force to form binary complex [Pd2·OXI]. CGR2, which could result in the great enhancement of RRS. The resonance Rayleigh scattering signal was recorded at λex = λem = 375 nm. This mixture complex not only has higher RRS, but also makes contribution to significant increase of fluorescence, and the same phenomena also were discovered in PIR. The enhanced RRS intensity is in proportion to the PIR and OXI concentration in the range of 0.03-3.0 μg mL- 1, and the detection limit (DL) of RRS method for PIR and OXI is 2.3 ng mL- 1 and 9.7 ng mL- 1. In addition, the DL of fluorescence method for PIR and OXI is 8.4 μg mL- 1 and 19.5 μg mL- 1. Obviously, the RRS is the highly sensitive method, and the recoveries of the two kinds of nootropic drugs were range from 100.4% to 101.8.0% with RSD (n = 5) from 1.1% to 3.1% by RRS method. This paper not only investigated the optimum conditions for detecting nootropics with using RRS method, but also focused on the reasons for enhancing RRS intensity and the reaction mechanism, which in order to firm and contract the resultant. Finally, The RRS method has been applied to detect nootropic drugs in human urine samples with satisfactory results. Fig. S2. The effect of ionic strength: Pd (II)-CGR system (curve a); Pd (II)-OXI-CGR system (curve b); Pd (II)-PIR- CGR system (curve c). Pd (II): 2.0 × 10- 4 mol L- 1; CGR: 1.0 × 10- 5 mol L- 1; OXI: 1.5 μg mL- 1; PIR: 2 μg mL- 1; NaCl: 1 mol L- 1. Fig. S3. The effect of time: Pd (II)-OXI-CGR system (curve a); Pd (II)-PIR-CGR system (curve b). Pd (II): 2.0 × 10- 4 mol L- 1; CGR: 1.0 × 10- 5 mol L- 1

  17. Krüppel-like factor (KLF) 5 mediates cyclin D1 expression and cell proliferation via interaction with c-Jun in Ang II-induced VSMCs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yu; Wen, Jin-kun; Dong, Li-Hua; Zheng, Bin; Han, Mei

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To elucidate how krüppel-like factor (KLF5) activates cyclin D1 expression in Ang II-induced vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) proliferation. Methods: An adenoviral vector containing the full-length cDNA of KLF5 and a recombinant plasmid expressing c-Jun were constructed. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to determine the effect of Ang II on cell growth. The luciferase assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation were used to detect the relationship between KLF5 and c-Jun in ...

  18. Quinoxaline-2-carboxamide as a carrier ligand in two new platinum(ii) compounds: Synthesis, crystal structure, cytotoxic activity and DNA interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marques Gallego, P.; Amparo Gamiz-Gonzalez, M.; Fortea-Pérez, F. R.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; Pevec, A.; Kozlevar, B.; Reedijk, J.

    2010-01-01

    The search for platinum compounds structurally different from cisplatin has led to two new platinum(II) compounds containing quinoxaline-2-carboxamide as a carrier ligand, i.e. cis-[Pt(qnxca)(MeCN)Cl2] (1) and the [Pt(qnxca−H)(dmso)Cl] (2). Both compounds have been synthesized and characterized usin

  19. Substitution of cysteine for a conserved alanine residue in the catalytic center of type II iodothyronine deiodinase alters interaction with reducing cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Theo); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHuman type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) catalyzes the activation of T(4) to T(3). The D2 enzyme, like the type I (D1) and type III (D3) deiodinases, contains a selenocysteine (SeC) residue (residue 133 in D2) in the highly conserved catalytic center. Remarkably, all

  20. DNA-interaction and in vitro antimicrobial studies of some mixed-ligand complexes of cobalt(II) with fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent ciprofloxacin and some neutral bidentate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M N; Chhasatia, M R; Gandhi, D S

    2009-05-15

    Six new mixed-ligand complexes of Co(II) with ciprofloxacin (Cip) and neutral bidentate ligands have been synthesized and characterized. Binding and cleavage of DNA with the complex were investigated using spectroscopic method, viscosity measurements and gel electrophoresis techniques. Antibacterial activity has been assayed against two Gram((-ve)) and three Gram((+ve)) microorganisms using the doubling dilution technique.

  1. Substitution of cysteine for a conserved alanine residue in the catalytic center of type II iodothyronine deiodinase alters interaction with reducing cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Ton); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHuman type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) catalyzes the activation of T(4) to T(3). The D2 enzyme, like the type I (D1) and type III (D3) deiodinases, contains a selenocysteine (SeC) residue (residue 133 in D2) in the highly conserved catalytic center. Remarkably, all

  2. Exploring the interaction of mercury(II) by N(2)S(2) and NS(3) anthracene-containing macrocyclic ligands: photophysical, analytical, and structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Abel; Pedras, Bruno; Lodeiro, Carlos; Escriche, Lluis; Casabó, Jaume; Capelo, José Luis; Covelo, Berta; Kivekäs, Raikko; Sillanpää, Reijo

    2007-09-17

    The complexation properties toward Hg(II) of six macrocyclic ligands, 3,11-dithia-7,17-diazabicyclo[11.3.1]heptadeca-1(17),13,15-triene (L1), 7-(9-anthracenylmethyl)-3,11-dithia-7,17-diazabicyclo[11.3.1]heptadeca-1(17),13,15-triene (L2), 7-(10-methyl-9-anthracenylmethyl)-3,11-dithia-7,17-diazabicyclo[11.3.1]heptadeca-1(17),13,15-triene (L3), 7,7'-[9,10-anthracenediylbis(methylene)]bis-3,11-dithia-7,17-diazabicyclo[11.3.1]heptadeca-1(17),13,15-triene (L4), 1,4,7-trithia-11-azacyclotetradecane (L5), and 11,-(anthracen-9-ylmethyl)-1,4,7-trithia-11-azacyclotetradecane (L6), were studied. The stoichiometries of the formed species were determined from absorption and fluorescence titrations. In these anthracene-containing macrocycles, a fluorescent quenching of the emission was found upon Hg(II) addition. The X-ray crystal structure of [HgCl2(L2)] x 1/2CH2Cl2 was determined. The asymmetric unit contains two independent [HgCl2(L2)] molecules and one dichloromethane molecule. Each Hg(II) ion is coordinated by the pyridine nitrogen, the two sulfur atoms of one L2 molecule, and two chloride ions. Analytical studies using solvent extraction separation of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions were performed to determine the Hg(II) extraction capability of ligands L1, L2, and L5.

  3. Quantum fields and poisson processes II: Interaction of boson-boson and boson-fermion fields with a cut-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, J.; Gaveau, B.; Rideau, G.

    1985-05-01

    Quantum field evolutions are written as expectation values with respect to Poisson processes in two simple models: interaction of two boson fields (with conservation of the number of particles in one field) and interaction of a boson with a fermion field. The introduction of a cut-off ensures that the expectation values are well-defined.

  4. Cu(II) complexes of monobasic bi- or tridentate (NO, NNO) azo dye ligands: Synthesis, characterization, and interaction with Cu-nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Mohamed; El-Sayed, Yusif S.; El-Baradie, Kamal; Fahmy, Rowaida M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of copper(II) azo complexes having the formula [CuL1-4(nH2O)]·OAc·xH2O where (n = 1-2) and (x = 0-1) have been synthesized using azo dyes containing the triazol and thiadiazole moieties. The azodyes and their metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic, mass, ESR spectra, magnetic moment measurements, and thermal analyses. IR spectra showed that the ligands having triazole moiety were coordinated with the copper(II) ion in a tridentate manner with ONN donor sites of the naphthyl OH, N-atoms of azo group, and triazole moiety while azodyes having thiadiazole moiety were coordinated with the copper(II) ion in a bidentate manner with ON donor sites of the naphthyl OH and the N-atom of the group. The thermodynamic activation parameters such as ΔE*, ΔH*, ΔS*, and ΔG* were calculated from the TG curves. Prepared spherical copper nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy and transition electron microscope (TEM). The spectral data showed the formation of surface complex between azo-dye ligands and colloidal copper nanoparticles through (sbnd OH) anchoring group. The stability constant of the prepared copper nanoparticles complexes is higher compared with the corresponding bulk ones due to the larger surface area of copper nanoparticles.

  5. Modeling interacting dynamic networks: II. Systematic study of the statistical properties of cross-links between two networks with preferred degrees

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wenjia; Zia, R K P

    2014-01-01

    In a recent work \\cite{LiuJoladSchZia13}, we introduced dynamic networks with preferred degrees and presented simulation and analytic studies of a single, homogeneous system as well as two interacting networks. Here, we extend these studies to a wider range of parameter space, in a more systematic fashion. Though the interaction we introduced seems simple and intuitive, it produced dramatically different behavior in the single- and two-network systems. Specifically, partitioning the single network into two identical sectors, we find the cross-link distribution to be a sharply peaked Gaussian. In stark contrast, we find a very broad and flat plateau in the case of two interacting identical networks. A sound understanding of this phenomenon remains elusive. Exploring more asymmetric interacting networks, we discover a kind of `universal behavior' for systems in which the `introverts' (nodes with smaller preferred degree) are far outnumbered. Remarkably, an approximation scheme for their degree distribution can ...

  6. Lattice cluster theory of associating polymers. II. Enthalpy and entropy of self-assembly and Flory-Huggins interaction parameter χ for solutions of telechelic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F; Douglas, Jack F

    2012-02-14

    The lattice cluster theory for solutions of telechelic polymer chains, developed in paper I, is applied to determine the enthalpy Δh(p) and entropy Δs(p) of self-assembly of linear telechelics and to evaluate the Flory-Huggins (FH) interaction parameter χ governing the phase behavior of these systems. Particular focus is placed on examining how these interaction variables depend on the composition of the solution, temperature, van der Waals and local "sticky" interaction energies, and the length of the individual telechelic chains. The FH interaction parameter χ is found to exhibit an entropy-enthalpy compensation effect between the "entropic" and "enthalpic" portions as either the composition or mass of the telechelic species is varied, providing unique theoretical insights into this commonly reported, yet, enigmatic phenomenon.

  7. Mass-radius relation of Newtonian self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates with short-range interactions: II. Numerical results

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanis, P H

    2011-01-01

    We develop the suggestion that dark matter could be a Bose-Einstein condensate. We determine the mass-radius relation of a Newtonian self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensate with short-range interactions described by the Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson system. We numerically solve the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium describing the balance between the gravitational attraction and the pressure due to quantum effects (Heisenberg's uncertainty principle) and short-range interactions (scattering). We connect the non-interacting limit to the Thomas-Fermi limit. We also consider the case of attractive self-interaction. We compare the exact mass-radius relation obtained numerically with the approximate analytical relation obtained with a Gaussian ansatz. An overall good agreement is found.

  8. Structure Effect of Some New Anticancer Pt(II) Complexes of Amino Acid Derivatives with Small Branched or Linear Hydrocarbon Chains on Their DNA Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantoury, Mahshid; Eslami Moghadam, Mahboube; Tarlani, Ali Akbar; Divsalar, Adeleh

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structure effect and identify the modes of binding of amino acid-Pt complexes to DNA molecule for cancer treatment. Hence, three novel water soluble platinum complexes, [Pt(phen)(R-gly)]NO3 (where phen is 1,10-phenanthroline, R-gly is methyl, amyl, and isopentyl-glycine), have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic methods, conductivity measurements, and chemical analysis. The anticancer activities of synthesized complexes were investigated against human breast cancer cell line of MDA-MB 231. The 50% cytotoxic concentration values were determined to be 42.5, 58, and 70 μm for methyl-, amyl-, and isopentyl-gly complexes, respectively. These complexes were interacted with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) via positive cooperative interaction. The modes of binding of the complexes to DNA were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism in combination with a molecular docking study. The result indicates that complexes with small or branched hydrocarbon chains can intercalate with DNA. This is while amyl complexes with linear chains interacted additionally via groove binding. The results of the negative value of Gibbs energy for binding of isopentyl-platinum to DNA and those of the molecular docking were coherent. Furthermore, the docking results demonstrated that hydrophobic interaction plays an important role in the complex-DNA interaction.

  9. Temperature-dependent interactions and disorder in the spin-transition compound [Fe(II)(L)2][ClO4]2.C7H8 through structural, calorimetric, magnetic, photomagnetic, and diffuse reflectance investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vibha; Mukherjee, Rabindranath; Linares, Jorge; Balde, Chérif; Desplanches, Cédric; Létard, Jean-François; Collet, Eric; Toupet, Loic; Castro, Miguel; Varret, François

    2008-09-01

    The title compound [Fe (II)(L) 2][ClO 4] 2.C 7H 8 (L = 2-[3-(2'-pyridyl)pyrazol-1-ylmethyl]pyridine) has been isolated while attempting to grow single crystals of the spin-transition (continuous-type) compound [Fe (II)(L) 2][ClO 4] 2, published earlier ( Dalton Trans. 2003, 3392-3397). Magnetic susceptibility measurements, as well as Mossbauer and calorimetric investigations on polycrystalline samples of [Fe(L) 2][ClO 4] 2.C 7H 8 revealed the occurrence of an abrupt HS ( (5) T 2) LS ( (1) A 1) transition with steep and narrow (2 K) hysteresis at approximately 232 K. The photomagnetic properties exhibit features typical for a broad distribution of activation energies, with relaxation curves in the shape of stretched exponentials. We performed a crystal structure determination of the compound at 120, 240, and 270 K. A noteworthy temperature-dependent behavior of the structural parameters was observed, in terms of disorder of both the anions and solvent molecules, leading to a strong thermal dependence of the strength and dimensionality of the interaction network. Additional data were obtained by diffuse reflectance measurements. We model and discuss the antagonistic effects of interactions and disorder by using a two-level cooperative mean-field approach which includes a distribution of barrier energies at the microscopic scale.

  10. Sulphate radical generation through interaction of peroxymonosulphate with Co(II) for in-line sample preparation aiming at spectrophotometric flow-based determination of phosphate and phosphite in fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, Carla C; Kamogawa, Marcos Y; Ferreira, José R; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2016-09-01

    An advanced oxidative process relying on the interaction of peroxymonosulphate and cobalt(II) was implemented for generating the sulphate radicals in flow analysis, in order to accomplish in-line sample preparation thus improving the spectrophotometric determination of phosphate and phosphite in liquid foliar fertilizers. To this end, a flow-batch system with a heated chamber was designed. The sample was handled twice, with and without the step of phosphite oxidation to phosphate, and the formed orthophosphate was quantified after interaction with the vanadate-molybdate reagent. Phosphite was determined as the difference in analytical signals corresponding to sample handling with and without the oxidation step. Influence of Co(II) on the peroxymonosulphate activation, reagent concentrations and added volumes, acidity, temperature and heating time were investigated like aiming at to improve analytical recovery and measurement repeatability, as well as the and system ruggedness. The 6.6-20.0mgL(-1) P2O5 standards were in-line prepared from a single stock solution. Detection limits were estimated as 0.8 and 0.1mgL(-1) for P2O5 and P-PO4. Twenty-four samples are were run per hour, and results are were in agreement with those obtained by the official procedure.

  11. A dinuclear end-on azide-bridged copper(II) compound with weak antiferromagnetic interaction - Synthesis, characterization, magnetism and X-ray structure of bis[(μ-azido-κN1)-(azido-κN1)(1,3-bis(benzimidazol-2-yl)-2-methylpropane)copper(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Albada, Gerard A.; Mutikainen, Ilpo; Roubeau, Olivier; Reedijk, Jan

    2013-03-01

    The centrosymmetric dinuclear compound of formula [Cu(μ-N3-κN1)(N3-κN1)(bbmp)]2 is reported. Synthesis, characterization, physical properties are determined in detail, together with its 3D structure. The dinuclear end-on azide-bridged copper(II) compound displays a weak antiferromagnetic interaction, despite the fact that the magnetic orbitals overlap. The Cu-Cu contact distance is 3.1867(8) Å, while the Cu-Nazide-Cu angle is 103.41(14)°. The IR spectra of the azido ligands are as expected for such coordinated azides.

  12. [C II] and {sup 12}CO(1-0) emission maps in HLSJ091828.6+514223: A strongly lensed interacting system at z = 5.24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawle, T. D.; Altieri, B. [ESAC, ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Egami, E.; Rex, M.; Clement, B. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bussmann, R. S.; Gurwell, M.; Fazio, G. G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ivison, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Boone, F. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Combes, F. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, CNRS, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Danielson, A. L. R.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Edge, A. C. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Richard, J. [CRAL, Université Lyon-1, 9 Av. Charles Andr, F-69561 St Genis Laval (France); Blain, A. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Dessauges-Zavadsky, M. [Observatoire de Genève, Université de Genève, 51 Ch. des Maillettes, 1290, Sauverny (Switzerland); Jones, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Kneib, J.-P., E-mail: tim.rawle@sciops.esa.int [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique EPFL, Observatoire de Sauverny, Versoix 1290 (Switzerland); and others

    2014-03-01

    We present Submillimeter Array [C II] 158 μm and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array {sup 12}CO(1-0) line emission maps for the bright, lensed, submillimeter source at z = 5.2430 behind A 773: HLSJ091828.6+514223 (HLS0918). We combine these measurements with previously reported line profiles, including multiple {sup 12}CO rotational transitions, [C I], water, and [N II], providing some of the best constraints on the properties of the interstellar medium in a galaxy at z > 5. HLS0918 has a total far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L {sub FIR(8–1000} {sub μm)} = (1.6 ± 0.1) × 10{sup 14} L {sub ☉} μ{sup –1}, where the total magnification μ{sub total} = 8.9 ± 1.9, via a new lens model from the [C II] and continuum maps. Despite a HyLIRG luminosity, the FIR continuum shape resembles that of a local LIRG. We simultaneously fit all of the observed spectral line profiles, finding four components that correspond cleanly to discrete spatial structures identified in the maps. The two most redshifted spectral components occupy the nucleus of a massive galaxy, with a source-plane separation <1 kpc. The reddest dominates the continuum map (demagnified L {sub FIR,} {sub component} = (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}) and excites strong water emission in both nuclear components via a powerful FIR radiation field from the intense star formation. A third star-forming component is most likely a region of a merging companion (ΔV ∼ 500 km s{sup –1}) exhibiting generally similar gas properties. The bluest component originates from a spatially distinct region and photodissociation region analysis suggests that it is lower density, cooler, and forming stars less vigorously than the other components. Strikingly, it has very strong [N II] emission, which may suggest an ionized, molecular outflow. This comprehensive view of gas properties and morphology in HLS0918 previews the science possible for a large sample of high-redshift galaxies once ALMA attains full sensitivity.

  13. Strongly luminescing ruthenium(II)/ruthenium(II) and ruthenium(II)/platinum(II) binuclear complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, R.; Baucom, D.A.; Rillema, D.P.

    1986-10-08

    Two strongly luminescing complexes, ruthenium(II)/ruthenium(II) homobinuclear complex and ruthenium(II)/platinum(II) heterobinuclear complex, have been prepared and characterized. The organic part of the complex is 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2' bipyridine dimer. The luminescence behavior of the homobinuclear and heterobinculear complexes was found to be comparable to that of Ru(bpy)/sub 3//sup 2 +/, although the luminescence maxima were shifted from 615 to 620 nm. These complexes exhibit good stability due to the bidentate chelating capability of the bridging ligand. These new complexes can provide the opportunity for detailed photophysical studies related to donor-acceptor interactions and to the possibility of two simultaneous single-electron transfer events. 17 references, 2 figures.

  14. Structure of AcMet-Gly and Its Interaction with Palladium(II)Tetraaqua Complex Studied by Electrospray Mass Spectrome try and Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN,Chen(金晨); ZHANG,Lin(张琳); HONG,Jin(洪瑾); YANG,Gao-Sheng(杨高升); ZHU,Long-Gen(朱龙根)

    2004-01-01

    The structure of dipepide AcMet-Gly was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. It possesses monoclinic, space group P21 (No. 4), with cell dimensions of a=0.8571(2) nm, b=0.5871(2) nm, c= 1.197(3) nm,β=99.290(10)°, V=0.5944(15) nm3, Z=2, .μ=2.74 cm-1. Mononuclear chelates, described as [Pd(X)(S,N,O-AcMet-Gly)] +, in which Pd(II) is coordinated by thioether, deprotonated amide nitrogen, carbonyl oxygen of methionine and X (AcMetGly or other ligands present in aqueous solution or in mobile phase solution), were detected 5 min after mixing AcMet-Gly with [Pd(H2O)4]2- at room temperature using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The geometry of [Pd(H2O)(S,N,O-AcMet-Gly)]+ is optimized at density functional B3LYP/LanL2DZ level. The fused five- and six-membered chelate is responsible for cleavage of Met-Gly bond. This is the first time to provide a direct evidence for Pd(II)-mediated cleavage of dipeptides via external solvent attack.

  15. Interactions of the "piano-stool" [ruthenium(II)(η(6) -arene)(quinolone)Cl](+) complexes with water; DFT computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zábojníková, Tereza; Cajzl, Radim; Kljun, Jakob; Chval, Zdeněk; Turel, Iztok; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2016-07-15

    Full optimizations of stationary points along the reaction coordinate for the hydration of several quinolone Ru(II) half-sandwich complexes were performed in water environment using the B3PW91/6-31+G(d)/PCM/UAKS method. The role of diffuse functions (especially on oxygen) was found crucial for correct geometries along the reaction coordinate. Single-point (SP) calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2pd)/DPCM/saled-UAKS level. In the first part, two possible reaction mechanisms-associative and dissociative were compared. It was found that the dissociative mechanism of the hydration process is kinetically slightly preferred. Another important conclusion concerns the reaction channels. It was found that substitution of chloride ligand (abbreviated in the text as dechlorination reaction) represents energetically and kinetically the most feasible pathway. In the second part the same hydration reaction was explored for reactivity comparison of the Ru(II)-complexes with several derivatives of nalidixic acid: cinoxacin, ofloxacin, and (thio)nalidixic acid. The hydration process is about four orders of magnitude faster in a basic solution compared to neutral/acidic environment with cinoxacin and nalidixic acid as the most reactive complexes in the former and latter environments, respectively. The explored hydration reaction is in all cases endergonic; nevertheless the endergonicity is substantially lower (by ∼6 kcal/mol) in basic environment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Intra- and supramolecular interactions in cis,mer-diaquatris(1H-imidazole-κN3(terephthalato-κOcobalt(II monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aouaouche Benkanoun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Co(C8H4O4(C3H4N23(H2O2]·H2O, the cisoid angles are in the range 85.59 (5–93.56 (5°, while two equal transoid angles deviate significantly from the ideal linear angle, the third being almost linear. One carboxylate group is almost coplanar [1.23 (13°] with the plane of its parent aromatic ring, although it has one O-atom donor involved in one coordination and one hydrogen bond as acceptor. The other carboxylate group does not coordinate and is rotated out of this plane with a torsional twist of 17.27 (20°. The coordination neutral entity, based on aqua ligands and two cyclic co-ligands seems, at first sight, monomeric. Strongly tight, via one intramolecular hydrogen bond between aqua and carboxylate O atoms, it brings out a quasi-planar six-membered ring around the CoII atom, turning the CoN3O3 coordination octahedron into a new building block. The rigidity of this feature associated with several hydrogen-bonded arrays yields an extended structure. In the resulting supramolecular packing, a binuclear hydrated CoII assembly, built up from triple strands driven by different heterosynthons, embodies the synergy of coordination, covalent and hydrogen bonds.

  17. Information technology in chemistry research and education: Part I. Ab initio studies on the hydrolysis of aromatic diazonium ions. Part II. Theoretical study and molecular modeling of non-covalent interactions. Part III. Applying information technology in chemistry education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengyu

    Part I of this dissertation studies the bonding in chemical reactions, while Part II studies the bonding related to inter- and intra-molecular interactions. Part III studies the application of IT technology in chemistry education. Part I of this dissertation (chapter 1 and chapter 2) focuses on the theoretical studies on the mechanism of the hydrolysis reactions of benzenediazonium ion and guaninediazonium ion. The major conclusion is that in hydrolysis reactions the "unimolecular mechanism" actually has to involve the reacting solvent molecule. Therefore, the unimolecular pathway can only serve as a conceptual model but will not happen in the reality. Chapter I concludes that the hydrolysis reaction of benzenediazonium ion takes the direct SN2Ar mechanism via a transition state but without going through a pre-coordination complex. Chapter 2 concludes that the formation of xanthine from the dediazoniation reaction of guaninediazonium ion in water takes the SN2Ar pathway without a transition state. And oxanine might come from an intermediate formed by the bimolecular deprotonation of the H atom on N3 of guaninediazonium ion synchronized with the pyrimidine ring opening reaction. Part II of this dissertation includes chapters 3, 4, and 5. Chapter 3 studies the quadrupole moment of benzene and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. We concluded that the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction is important in the arene-arene interactions. Our study shows the most stable structure of benzene dimer is the point-to-face T-shaped structure. Chapter 4 studies the intermolecular interactions that result in the disorder of the crystal of 4-Chloroacetophenone-(4-methoxyphenylethylidene). We analyzed all the nearest neighbor interactions within that crystal and found that the crystal structure is determined by its thermo-dynamical properties. Our calculation perfectly reproduced the percentage of parallel-alignment of the crystal. Part III of this dissertation is focused on the

  18. Modeling interacting dynamic networks: II. Systematic study of the statistical properties of cross-links between two networks with preferred degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjia; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2014-05-01

    In a recent work (Liu et al, 2013 J. Stat. Mech. P08001), we introduced dynamic networks with preferred degrees and presented simulation and analytic studies of a single, homogeneous system as well as two interacting networks. Here, we extend these studies to a wider range of parameter space, in a more systematic fashion. Though the interaction we introduced seems simple and intuitive, it produced dramatically different behavior in the single- and two-network systems. Specifically, partitioning the single network into two identical sectors, we find the cross-link distribution to be a sharply peaked Gaussian. In stark contrast, we find a very broad and flat plateau in the case of two interacting identical networks. A sound understanding of this phenomenon remains elusive. Exploring more asymmetric interacting networks, we discover a kind of ‘universal behavior’ for systems in which the ‘introverts’ (nodes with smaller preferred degree) are far outnumbered. Remarkably, an approximation scheme for their degree distribution can be formulated, leading to very successful predictions.

  19. Character of the hard tooth tissue-polymer bond. II. Study of the interaction of human tooth enamel and dentin with N-phenylglycine-glycidyl methacrylate adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexieva, C

    1979-09-01

    The interaction of powdered human tooth enamel and dentin with NPG-GMA was studied in alcoholic and alcoholic-aqueous solutions. The reaction produces ionized carboxylic groups capable of forming ionic bonds between the calcium ions in the tooth enamel or dentin and NPG-GMA.

  20. Large-scale parallel configuration interaction. II. Two- and four-component double-group general active space implementation with application to BiH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Fleig, Timo

    2010-01-01

    We present a parallel implementation of a large-scale relativistic double-group configuration interaction CIprogram. It is applicable with a large variety of two- and four-component Hamiltonians. The parallel algorithm is based on a distributed data model in combination with a static load balanci...

  1. Integrating statistical and ecophysiological analysis of genotype by environment interaction for grain filling of barley in Mediterranean areas. II. Grain growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voltas, J.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.; Araus, J.L.; Romagosa, I.

    1999-01-01

    In Mediterranean areas, grain growth of temperate cereals often progresses under the harmful influence of drought and high temperature. Genotypic responses are mediated by the specific occurrence of these constraints, thus causing genotype by environment (G × E) interaction. Field experiments were c

  2. The curve of ion exchange ratio(%)-pH of the interaction between suspended particles with Cd(II) in the Yellow River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The curve of ion exchange ratio(%)-pH of the interactionbetween suspended particles with Cd(II) in the Yellow River wasstudied. The effects of lysine on this curve have been alsoinvestigated. The results showed that (1) Cadmium in Cd(OH)+ formin the suspended particles exchanges with the cations.The exchangeratio of Cd2+ is nearly at its greatest value in the range of pH(8.0-8.5) in natural aquatic system; (2) Ion exchange ratiodecreases as the concentration of Cd2+ raises from 8.9×10-6 mol/L to 2x8.9 x 10-6mol/L; (3) At the lysine concentration of 6.8x10-6 mol/L, it can promote the ion exchange ratio; (4) Adsorption of thesuspended particles to cadmium is weaker in seawater and Jin ShaRiver than in the Yellow River.

  3. Antiproliferative effects of palladium(II) complexes of 5-nitrosopyrimidines and interactions with the proteolytic regulatory enzymes of the renin-angiotensin system in tumoral brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illán-Cabeza, Nuria A; García-García, Antonio R; Martínez-Martos, José M; Ramírez-Expósito, María J; Moreno-Carretero, Miguel N

    2013-09-01

    Seventeen new palladium(II) complexes of general formulaes PdCl2L, PdCl(LH-1)(solvent) and PdCl2(PPh3)2L containing pyrimidine ligands derived from 6-amino-5-nitrosouracil and violuric acid have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR ((1)H and (13)C) methods and, two of them, PdCl(DANUH-1)(CH3CN)]·½H2O and [PdCl(2MeOANUH-1)(CH3CN)] by X-ray single-crystal diffraction (DANU: 6-amino-1,3-dimethyl-5-nitrosouracil; 2MeOANU: 6-amino-2-methoxy-5-nitroso-3H-pyrimidin-4-one). The coordination environment around palladium is nearly square planar in the two compounds with different supramolecular arrangements. Crystallographic and spectral data are consistent with a bidentate coordination mode through N5 and O4 atoms when the ligands act in neutral form and N5 and N6 atoms in the monodeprotonated ones. The cytotoxicity of the complexes against human neuroblastoma (NB69) and human glioma (U373-MG) cell lines has been tested showing a considerable antiproliferative activity. Also, the study of the effects of palladium(II) complexes on the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) regulating proteolytic regulatory enzymes aminopeptidase A (APA), aminopeptidase N (APN) and insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) shows a strong dependence on the compound tested and the tumoral cell type, also affecting different catalytic routes; the compounds affect in a different way the activities of enzymes of the RAS system, changing their functional roles as initiators of cell proliferation in tumors as autocrine/paracrine mediators.

  4. The GISS global climate-middle atmosphere model. II - Model variability due to interactions between planetary waves, the mean circulation and gravity wave drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, D.; Suozzo, R.; Balachandran, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    The variability which arises in the GISS Global Climate-Middle Atmosphere Model on two time scales is reviewed: interannual standard deviations, derived from the five-year control run, and intraseasonal variability as exemplified by statospheric warnings. The model's extratropical variability for both mean fields and eddy statistics appears reasonable when compared with observations, while the tropical wind variability near the stratopause may be excessive possibly, due to inertial oscillations. Both wave 1 and wave 2 warmings develop, with connections to tropospheric forcing. Variability on both time scales results from a complex set of interactions among planetary waves, the mean circulation, and gravity wave drag. Specific examples of these interactions are presented, which imply that variability in gravity wave forcing and drag may be an important component of the variability of the middle atmosphere.

  5. [Application of hair analysis of selected psychoactive substances for medico-legal purposes. Part II. Cases of complex fatal poisonings: interactions of heroine - cocaine - amphetamines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Sebastian; Kłys, Małgorzata; Rzepecka-Woźniak, Ewa; Konopka, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    The study represents an attempt at employing segmental hair analysis in complex poisonings with xenobiotic mixtures of heroine - cocaine - amphetamines in the context of the cause of death as a consequence of complex interaction mechanisms which occurred prior to death. Two cases of complex poisonings: heroine - cocaine and heroine - cocaine - amphetamines were analyzed and documented with macro- and microscopic examinations and complex toxicological examinations, including the analysis of classic biological material, i.e. samples of selective blood, and alternative material, i.e. hair samples. Determinations of opioids, cocaine and its metabolite and amphetamines in the hair biological matrix were performed using high performance liquid chromatography--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS-MS). Segmental hair analysis of the investigated cases indicated a prolonged intake of similar psychoactive substances and a developed adaptation of the addicted to interaction mechanisms, which, however, led gradually to multiorgan anatomopathological changes, and in consequence to death.

  6. HLA Class I and II alleles, heterozygosity and HLA-KIR interactions are associated with rates of genital HSV shedding and lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaret, A; Dong, L; John, M; Mallal, S A; James, I; Warren, T; Gaudieri, S; Koelle, D M; Wald, A

    2016-12-01

    Variation at HLA and KIR loci is associated with the severity of viral infections. To assess associations of genital HSV-2 infection with human HLA and KIR genetic loci, we measured the frequencies of genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA detection and of genital lesions in HSV-2 seropositive persons. We followed 267 HSV-2 seropositive persons who collected daily genital swabs and recorded lesions for ⩾30 days. All persons were laboratory-documented as HIV-seronegative, and all were Caucasian by self-report. HSV detection rate and lesion frequency were compared by genotype using Poisson regression. Overall, HSV was detected on 19.1% of days and lesions on 11.6% of days. The presence of HLA-A*01 was directly associated with HSV detection frequency, whereas the presence of HLA-C*12 was inversely associated with HSV detection frequency. The presence of HLA-A*01 was directly associated with lesion rate, while HLA-A*26, -C*01 and -DQB1*0106 were associated with decreased lesions. We observed an interaction between the absence of both 2DS4del and HLA-Bw4 and higher lesion rate. Heterozygosity of HLA was also associated with reduced lesion frequency. Immune control of genital HSV infection relies on multiple interacting immunogenetic elements, including epistatic interactions between HLA and KIR.

  7. Syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties of three one-dimensional end-to-end azide/cyanate-bridged copper(II) compounds exhibiting ferromagnetic interaction: new type of solid state isomerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, Sujit; Sarkar, Sohini; Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria; Mohanta, Sasankasekhar

    2011-06-20

    The work in this paper presents the syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties of three end-to-end (EE) azide/cyanate-bridged copper(II) compounds [Cu(II)L(1)(μ(1,3)-NCO)](n)·2nH(2)O (1), [Cu(II)L(1)(μ(1,3)-N(3))](n)·2nH(2)O (2), and [Cu(II)L(2)(μ(1,3)-N(3))](n) (3), where the ligands used to achieve these species, HL(1) and HL(2), are the tridentate Schiff base ligands obtained from [1 + 1] condensations of salicylaldehyde with 4-(2-aminoethyl)-morpholine and 3-methoxy salicylaldehyde with 1-(2-aminoethyl)-piperidine, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 crystallize in the monoclinic P2(1)/c space group, while compound 3 crystallizes in the orthorhombic Pbca space group. The metal center in 1-3 is in all cases pentacoordinated. Three coordination positions of the metal center in 1, 2, or 3 are satisfied by the phenoxo oxygen atom, imine nitrogen atom, and morpholine (for 1 and 2) or piperidine (for 3) nitrogen atom of one deprotonated ligand, [L(1)](-) or [L(2)](-). The remaining two coordination positions are satisfied by two nitrogen atoms of two end-to-end bridging azide ligands for 2 and 3 and one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom of two end-to-end bridging cyanate ligands for 1. The coordination geometry of the metal ion is distorted square pyramidal in which one EE azide/cyanate occupies the apical position. Variable-temperature (2-300 K) magnetic susceptibilities of 1-3 have been measured under magnetic fields of 0.05 (from 2 to 30 K) and 1.0 T (from 30 to 300 K). The simulation reveals a ferromagnetic interaction in all three compounds with J values of +0.19 ± 0.01, +0.79 ± 0.01, and +1.25 ± 0.007 cm(-1) for 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Compound 1 is the sole example of a ferromagnetically coupled EE cyanate-bridged 1-D copper(II) system. In addition, a rare example of supramolecular isomerism and a nice example of magnetic isomerism have been observed and most interestingly a new type of solid state isomerism has emerged as a result of the comparison

  8. Kinetics of Formation of Cobalt(II)- and Nickel(II) Carbonic Anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Robert S.; Reardon, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the kinetic behavior associated with the interaction of metal ions with apocarbonic anhydrase, focusing on the formation of two metallocarbonic anhydrase--the biochemically active Co(II) and the inactive Ni(II)derivatives. (GA)

  9. Some new nano-structure zinc(II) coordination compounds of an imidazolidine Schiff base: Spectral, thermal, antimicrobial properties and DNA interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerozohori, Morteza; Musavi, Sayed Alireza; Naghiha, Asghar; Zohour, Mostafa Montazer

    2014-08-01

    Some novel nano-sized structure zinc complexes of a new Schiff base ligand entitled as (3-nitro-benzylidene)-{2-[2-(3-nitro-phenyl)-imidazolidine-1-yl]-ethyl}-amine(L) with general formula of ZnLX2 wherein X = Cl-, Br-, I-, SCN- and N3- have been synthesized under ultrasonic conditions. The ligand and its complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The resulting data from spectral investigation especially 1H and 13C NMR well confirmed formation of an imidazolidine ring in the ligand structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed nano-size structures with average particle sizes of 21.80-78.10 nm for the zinc(II) Schiff base complexes. The free Schiff base and its Zn(II) complexes have been screened in vitro both for antibacterial activity against some gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and also for antifungal activity. The metal complexes were found to be more active than the free Schiff base ligand. The results showed that ZnL(N3)2 is the most effective inhibitor against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aereuguinosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans while ZnLBr2 was found to be more effective against Bacillus subtillis than other compounds. Moreover, DNA cleavage potential of all compounds with plasmid DNA was investigated. The results showed that the ligand and ZnLCl2 complex cleave DNA more efficiently than others. In final, thermal analysis of ligand and its complexes revealed that they are decomposed via 2-3 thermal steps in the range of room temperature to 1000 °C. Furthermore some activation kinetic parameters such as A, E*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were calculated based on TG/DTA plots by use of coats - Redfern relation. Positive values of activation energy evaluated for the compounds confirmed the thermal stability of them. In addition to, the positive ΔH*, and ΔG* values suggested endothermic character for the thermal decomposition steps.

  10. Copper(II/I) complexes of 5-pyridin-2-yl-[1,3]dioxolo[4,5-g]isoquinoline: synthesis, crystal structure, antitumor activity and DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke-Bin; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Liu, Yan-Cheng; Wang, Meng; Wei, Jian-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Jian-Lian; Hu, Kun; Liang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Three new copper(II) complexes of 5-pyridin-2-yl-[1,3]dioxolo[4,5-g]isoquinoline (PYP), i.e. [Cu₂(PYP)₂Cl₄] (1), [Cu₄(PYP)₄(ClO₄)₂(H₂O)₂](ClO₄)₂·2H₂O (2), and [Cu₂(PYP)2Cl4]n (3), were synthesized and fully characterized. In comparison to free PYP, complexes 1-3 exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity against tested human tumor cell lines BEL-7404, SK-OV-3, A549, A375, MGC-803 and NCI-H460, with IC₅₀ values ranging from 0.31 to 30.76 μM. Complexes 1-3 exhibited lower cytotoxicity to HL-7702 than them to cancer cells. Complex 1 induced apoptotic death of BEL-7404, which involved mitochondria in the process. Caspase-3 activation assay indicated that 1 could be an efficient activator of caspase-3. DNA binding studies by UV-vis, DNA-melting, competitive binding, CD, viscosity measurement and agarose gel electrophoresis, revealed that intercalation might be the most likely binding mode of 1 with DNA.

  11. New water-soluble copper (II) complexes including 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline and L-tyrosine: synthesis, characterization, DNA interactions and cytotoxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnci, Duygu; Aydın, Rahmiye; Yılmaz, Dilek; Gençkal, Hasene Mutlu; Vatan, Özgür; Çinkılıç, Nilüfer; Zorlu, Yunus

    2015-02-05

    Two new water-soluble copper(II) complexes, [Cu(dmphen)2(NO3)]NO3 (1), [Cu(dmphen)(tyr)(H2O)]NO3·H2O (2) and the diquarternary salt of dmphen (dmphen = 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline and tyr = L-tyrosine), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The CT-DNA binding properties of these compounds have been investigated by absorption, emission spectroscopy and thermal denaturation measurements. The supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA cleavage activity of these compounds has been explored by agarose gel electrophoresis. The cytotoxicity of these compounds against MCF-7, Caco-2, A549 cancer cells and BEAS-2B healthy cells was also studied by the XTT method. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit significant cytotoxicity, with lower IC50 values than those of cisplatin.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of interaction of some bioactive ligands with cis-diaqua(cis-1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) in aqueous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Karmakar; S Ray; S Mallick; B K Bera; A Mandal; S Mondal; A K Ghosh

    2013-09-01

    The substitution reaction of cis-[Pt(cis-dach)(H2O)2]2+ (where `dach’ is cis-1,2-diaminocyclohexane) with 2-thiouracil (S, N), 1,2-cyclohexanedionedioxime (N, N) and acetylacetone (O, O) were studied in aqueous solution in 0.10 M NaClO4 under pseudo-first order conditions as a functions of concentration, pH and temperature using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The substitution reaction proceeds via rapid outer sphere association complex formation, followed by two slow consecutive steps. The first of these involves ligand-assisted deaquation, while second involves chelation as the second aqua ligand is displaced. The association equilibrium constant (KE) for the outer sphere complex formation has been evaluated together with rate constants for the two subsequent steps. The rate constants increase with increasing ligand concentration and the evaluated activation parameters for all reactions suggest an associative substitution mechanism for both the aqua ligand substitution processes. The product of the reaction has been characterized by IR, NMR and ESI-MS spectral analysis; which throws more light on the mechanistic behaviour of platinum(II) antitumour complexes.

  13. Fundamental insights into conformational stability and orbital interactions of antioxidant (+)-catechin species and complexation of (+)-catechin with zinc(II) and oxovanadium(IV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasarawan, Nuttawisit; Thipyapong, Khajadpai; Sirichai, Somsak; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    2013-09-01

    Conformational stability of (+)-catechin species in water has been examined with density functional theory, associated with the polarizable continuum model (PCM) of solvation. Factors such as electron delocalization, lone-pair electron donation and intramolecular hydrogen bonding substantially contribute to the conformational stabilization. Upon deprotonation, the HOMO and LUMO energies for (+)-catechin are both elevated; the energy gaps for the deprotonated species are narrower than the energy gap for the neutral species. The preferential deprotonation occurs at the C3'-, C5-, C7- and C4'-OH groups successively. The pKa value at 9.3 predicted for the most acidic OH group agrees well with previous experimental data; however the values are overestimated for the less acidic OH groups due to limitations of the PCM for charged solutes and/or complex nature of true deprotonation pathways. Formation of hydrogen radicals should be promoted at high pH values following the bond dissociation enthalpies. Complexation of (+)-catechin with either zinc(II) or oxovanadium(IV) is favored at the 1:1 metal-to-ligand (M:L) mole ratio, with the oxovanadium(IV) complex showing higher reaction preference. At M:L = 1:2, formation of two isomeric complexes are plausible for each type of metal ion. Effects of stoichiometry and isomerism on the computational spectral features of the possibly formed metal complexes have been described.

  14. Experimental and molecular modeling studies of the interaction of the polypyridyl Fe(II) and Fe(III) complexes with DNA and BSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnamfar, Mohammad Taghi; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Simpson, Jim; Darabi, Farivash; Shahpiri, Azar; Khayamian, Taghi; Ebrahimi, Malihe; Amiri Rudbari, Hadi; Salimi, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Two mononuclear iron complexes, [Fe(tppz)₂](PF₆)₂·H₂O (1) and Fe(tppz)Cl₃·2CHCl₃ (2) where tppz is (2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl)pyrazine), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis and IR) and single crystal X-ray structure analysis. The interaction of (1) as the nitrate salt ([Fe(tppz)₂](NO₃)₂) with calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy, competitive fluorescence titration, circular dichroism (CD), voltammetric techniques, viscosity measurement, and gel electrophoresis. Gel electrophoresis of DNA with [Fe(tppz)₂](NO₃)₂ demonstrated that the complex also has the ability to cleave supercoiled plasmid DNA. The results have indicated that the complex binds to CT-DNA by three binding modes, viz., electrostatic, groove and partial insertion of the pyridyl rings between the base stacks of double-stranded DNA. Molecular docking of [Fe(tppz)₂](NO₃)₂ with the DNA sequence d(ACCGACGTCGGT)₂ suggests the complex fits into the major groove. The water-insoluble complex (2) can catalyze the cleavage of BSA at 40 °C. There are no reports of the catalytic effect of polypyridyl metal complexes on the BSA cleavage. Molecular docking of (2) with BSA suggests that, when the chloro ligands in the axial positions are replaced by water molecules, the BSA can interact with the Fe(III) complex more easily.

  15. On the Origins of Disorganized Attachment and Internal Working Models: Paper II. An Empirical Microanalysis of 4-Month Mother-Infant Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Beatrice; Lachmann, Frank; Markese, Sara; Buck, Karen A; Bahrick, Lorraine E; Chen, Henian; Cohen, Patricia; Andrews, Howard; Feldstein, Stanley; Jaffe, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A microanalysis of 4-month mother-infant face-to-face communication predicted 12-month infant disorganized (vs. secure) attachment outcomes in an urban community sample. We documented a dyadic systems view of the roles of both partners, the roles of both self- and interactive contingency, and the importance of attention, orientation and touch, and as well as facial and vocal affect, in the co-construction of attachment disorganization. The analysis of different communication modalities identified striking intrapersonal and interpersonal intermodal discordance or conflict, in the context of intensely distressed infants, as the central feature of future disorganized dyads at 4 months. Lowered maternal contingent coordination, and failures of maternal affective correspondence, constituted maternal emotional withdrawal from distressed infants. This maternal withdrawal compromises infant interactive agency and emotional coherence. We characterize of the nature of emerging internal working models of future disorganized infants as follows: Future disorganized infants represent states of not being sensed and known by their mothers, particularly in moments of distress; they represent confusion about both their own and their mothers' basic emotional organization, and about their mothers' response to their distress. This internal working model sets a trajectory in development which may disturb the fundamental integration of the person. The remarkable specificity of our findings has the potential to lead to more finely-focused clinical interventions.

  16. Tuning of Supramolecular Architectures of l-Valine-Containing Dicyanoplatinum(II) 2,2'-Bipyridine Complexes by Metal-Metal, π-π Stacking, and Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Heidi Li-Ki; Po, Charlotte; He, Hexiang; Leung, Sammual Yu-Lut; Wong, Kam Sing; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2016-08-01

    A series of newly synthesized dicyanoplatinum(II) 2,2'-bipyridine complexes exhibits self-assembly properties in solution after the incorporation of the l-valine amino units appended with various hydrophobic motifs. These l-valine-derived substituents were found to have critical control over the aggregation behaviors of the complexes in the solution state. On one hand, one of the complexes was found to exhibit interesting circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) signals at low temperature due to the formation of chiral spherical aggregates in the temperature-dependent studies. On the other hand, systematic transformation from less uniform aggregates to well-defined fibrous and rod-like structures via Pt⋅⋅⋅Pt and π-π stacking interactions has also been observed in the mixed-solvent studies. These changes were monitored by UV/Vis absorption, emission, circular dichroism (CD), and CPL spectroscopies, and morphologies were studied by electron microscopy.

  17. Preferential Solvation of a Highly Medium Responsive Pentacyanoferrate(II) Complex in Binary Solvent Mixtures: Understanding the Role of Dielectric Enrichment and the Specificity of Solute-Solvent Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Raffaello

    2016-09-08

    In this work, the preferential solvation of an intensely solvatochromic ferrocyanide(II) dye involving a 4,4'-bipyridine-based ligand was examined in various binary solvent mixtures. Its solvatochromic behavior was rationalized in terms of specific and nonspecific solute-solvent interactions. An exceptional case of solvatochromic inversion was observed when going from alcohol/water to amide/water mixtures. These effects were quantified using Onsager's solvent polarity function. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the solvatochromism of the dye was determined using various solvatochromic parameters such as π* expressing the dipolarity/polarizability of solvents and α expressing the hydrogen-bond-donor acidity of solvents. This analysis was useful for the rationalization of the selective solvation phenomena occurring in the three types of alcohol/water and amide/water mixtures studied. Furthermore, two preferential solvation models were employed for the interpretation of the experimental spectral results in binary solvent mixtures, namely, the model of Suppan on dielectric enrichment [J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 1 1987, 83, 495-509] and the model of Bosch, Rosés, and co-workers [J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2, 1995, 8, 1607-1615]. The first model successfully predicted the charge transfer energies of the dye in formamide/water and N-methylformamide/water mixtures, but in the case of MeOH/water mixtures, the prediction was less accurate because of the significant contribution of specific solute-solvent interactions in that case. The second model gave more insights for both specific solute-solvent as well as solvent-solvent interactions in the cybotactic region. The role of dielectric enrichment and specific interactions was discussed based on the findings.

  18. Purified JC virus T antigen derived from insect cells preferentially interacts with binding site II of the viral core origin under replication conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollag, B; Mackeen, P C; Frisque, R J

    1996-04-01

    The human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) establishes persistent, asymptomatic infections in most individuals, but in severely immunocompromised hosts it may cause the fatal demyelinating brain disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. In cell culture JCV multiplies inefficiently and exhibits a narrow host range. This restricted behavior occurs, in part, at the level of DNA replication, which is regulated by JCV's multifunctional large tumor protein (TAg). To prepare purified JCV TAg (JCT) for biochemical analyses, the recombinant baculovirus B-JCT was generated by cotransfection of insect cells with wild-type baculovirus and the vector pVL-JCT(Int-) containing the JCT-coding sequence downstream of the efficient polyhedrin promoter. JCT expressed in infected cells was immunoaffinity purified using the anti-JCT monoclonal antibody PAb 2000. Characterization of the viral oncoprotein indicated that it exists in solution as a mixture of monomeric and oligomeric species. With the addition of ATP, the population of monomers decreased and that of hexamers and double hexamers increased. A DNA mobility shift assay indicated that origin binding occurred primarily with the double-hexamer form. A comparison of the specific DNA-binding activities of JCT and SV40 TAg (SVT) revealed that JCT generally exhibited greater affinity for binding site II relative to binding site I (B.S. I) of both viral origin regions, whereas SVT preferentially bound B.S. I. Furthermore, JCT bound nonviral DNA more efficiently than did SVT. These functional differences between the two TAgs may contribute to the reduced DNA replication potential of JCV in vitro, and to the virus' ability to establish persistent infections in vivo.

  19. Possible interaction of hippocampal nitric oxide and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II on reversal of spatial memory impairment induced by morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Kadivar, Mehdi; Naghdi, Nasser

    2015-03-15

    The opioid system plays an important role in learning and memory by modulation of different molecules in the brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of hippocampal nitric oxide and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) on the morphine-induced modulation of spatial memory consolidation in male rats. Spatial memory was assessed in Morris water maze task by a single training session of eight trials followed by a probe trial and visible test 24h later. Our data indicated that post-training administration of L-arginine, a nitric oxide precursor (6 and 9 µg/rat, intra-CA1) significantly decreased amnesia induced by morphine (10 mg/kg) in spatial memory consolidation. A reversal effect of L-arginine on morphine-induced amnesia prevented by KN-93 (N-[2-(N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylaminomethyl) phenyl]-N-[2-hydroxyethyl] methoxybenzenesulfnamide), CaMKII inhibitor, (10 nmol/0.5 µl/site). In addition, post-training injection of L-NAME, (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (10 and 15 µg/rat) or KN-93 (10 nmol/0.5 µl/site) with lower dose of morphine (2.5 mg/kg), which did not induce amnesia by itself, caused inhibition of memory consolidation. We also showed that co-administration of L-arginine (9 µg/rat) and morphine (10 mg/kg) significantly increased CaMKII activity in the rat hippocampus. On the other hand, administration of L-NAME (10 µg/rat) led to a decrease in the haippocampal activity of CaMKII in morphine-treated (2.5mg/kg) animals. These results indicate that acute single exposure to morphine can modulate consolidation of spatial memory, which may be mediated by a hippocampal nitrergic system and CaMKII activity.

  20. Interactions of the "piano-stool" [ruthenium(II) (eta6-arene)(en)CL]+ complexes with water and nucleobases; ab initio and DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futera, Zdenek; Klenko, Julia; Sponer, Judit E; Sponer, Jirí; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2009-09-01

    Piano stool ruthenium complexes of the composition [Ru(II)(eta6-arene)(en)Cl](+/2+) (en = ethylenediamine) represent an emerging class of cisplatin-analogue anticancer drug candidates. In this study, we use computational quantum chemistry to characterize the structure, stability and reactivity of these compounds. All these structures were optimized at DFT(B3LYP)/6-31G(d) level and their single point properties were determined by the MP2/6-31++G(2df,2pd) method. Thermodynamic parameters and rate constants were determined for the aquation process, as a replacement of the initial chloro ligand by water and subsequent exchange reaction of aqua ligand by nucleobases. The computations were carried out at several levels of DFT and ab initio theories (B3LYP, MP2 and CCSD) utilizing a range of bases sets (from 6-31G(d) to aug-cc-pVQZ). Excellent agreement with experimental results for aquation process was obtained at the CCSD level and reasonable match was achieved also with the B3LYP/6-31++G(2df,2pd) method. This level was used also for nucleobase-water exchange reaction where a smaller rate constant for guanine exchange was found in comparison with adenine. Although adenine follows a simple replacement mechanism, guanine complex passes by a two-step mechanism. At first, Ru-O6(G) adduct is formed, which is transformed through a chelate TS2 to the Ru-N7(G) final complex. In case of guanine, the exchange reaction is more favorable thermodynamically (releasing in total by about 8 kcal/mol) but according to our results, the rate constant for guanine substitution is slightly smaller than the analogous constant in adenine case when reaction course from local minimum is considered. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and spectroscopic investigation of new iron(III) and copper(II) complexes of a carboxylate rich ligand and their interaction with carbohydrates in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Christopher D; Arman, Hadi; Bawazir, Huda; Musie, Ghezai T

    2014-10-20

    New tetra-iron(III) (K4[1]·25H2O·(CH3)2CO and K3[2]·3H2O·(OH)) and di-copper(II) (Na3[3]·5H2O) complexes as carbohydrate binding models have been synthesized and fully characterized used several techniques including single crystal X-ray crystallography. Whereas K4[1]·25H2O·(CH3)2CO and Na3[3]·5H2O are completely water-soluble, K3[2]·3H2O·(OH) is less soluble in all common solvents including water. The binding of substrates, such as d-mannose, d-glucose, d-xylose, and xylitol with the water-soluble complexes in different reaction conditions were investigated. In aqueous alkaline media, complexes K4[1]·25H2O·(CH3)2CO and Na3[3]·5H2O showed coordination ability toward the applied substrates. Even in the presence of stoichiometric excess of the substrates, the complexes form only 1:1 (complex/substrate) molar ratio species in solution. Apparent binding constants, pKapp, values between the complexes and the substrates were determined and specific mode of substrate binding is proposed. The pKapp values showed that d-mannose coordinates strongest to K4[1]·25H2O·(CH3)2CO and Na3[3]·5H2O. Syntheses, characterizations and detailed substrate binding study using spectroscopic techniques and single crystal X-ray diffraction are reported.

  2. Harmonically-Interacting Step Approach to the Relaxation Process of Vicinal Surface. II. The Relaxation Process Induced by the Step-Edge Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takao

    1999-09-01

    The relaxation processes of vicinal surface induced by the diffusion of adatoms along the step edge are analyzed by the Ginzburg-Landau-Langevin equation based on the harmonically-interacting step (HIS) picture.By the equation, the time evolutions of the step deformation width and the step fluctuation width are analyzed.For the relaxation process induced by the infinite-length step-edge diffusion, these quantities show the “universal” scaling behaviors.However, both of the universality and the scaling behavior disappear for the finite-length diffusion.To verify the results quantitatively, we performed the Monte-Carlo calculations for the solid-on-solid step terrace-step-kink model.The results from the Monte-Carlo calculations agree with the analytic results from the HIS picture very well.

  3. A multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock method for excited electronic states. II. Coulomb interaction effects in single conjugated polymer chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, R. P.; Fisher, A. J.; Stella, L.; Horsfield, A. P.

    2011-06-01

    Conjugated polymers have attracted considerable attention in the last few decades due to their potential for optoelectronic applications. A key step that needs optimisation is charge carrier separation following photoexcitation. To understand better the dynamics of the exciton prior to charge separation, we have performed simulations of the formation and dynamics of localised excitations in single conjugated polymer strands. We use a nonadiabatic molecular dynamics method which allows for the coupled evolution of the nuclear degrees of freedom and of multiconfigurational electronic wavefunctions. We show the relaxation of electron-hole pairs to form excitons and oppositely charged polaron pairs and discuss the modifications to the relaxation process predicted by the inclusion of the Coulomb interaction between the carriers. The issue of charge photogeneration in conjugated polymers in dilute solution is also addressed.

  4. Can Co(II) or Cd(II) substitute for Zn(II) in zinc fingers?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Rabindra Reddy; M Radhika

    2001-02-01

    Zinc finger domains consist of sequences of amino acids containing cysteine and histidine residues tetrahedrally coordinated to a zinc ion. The role of zinc in a DNA binding finger was considered purely structural due to the absence of redox chemistry in zinc. However, whether other metals e.g. Co(II) or Cd(II) can substitute Zn(II) is not settled. For an answer the detailed interaction of Co(II) and Cd(II) with cysteine methylester and histidine methylester has been investigated as a model for the zinc core in zinc fingers. The study was extended to different temperatures to evaluate the thermodynamic parameters associated with these interactions. The results suggest that zinc has a unique role.

  5. Pb II

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    ISSN 1684–5315 ©2012 Academic Journals ... Exposure to Pb above permissible limit (50 ppb in water) .... taken and analyzed for residual metal concentration determination. ..... loss in Pb(II) sorption capacity up to five cycles of reuse of.

  6. Photophysical characterization of the interactions among tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) complexes ion-exchanged within zirconium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Angel A; Colón, Jorge L

    2010-08-16

    We studied the structures, luminescence, and self-quenching properties of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)) two-dimensional arrangements within the layers of zirconium phosphate (ZrP). The intercalation of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) was accomplished using a hydrated form of zirconium phosphate ZrP. Varying the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)/ZrP intercalation ratio, different Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)-exchanged ZrP loading levels were achieved. The ion exchange of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) within ZrP produces a red shift in the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) absorption band of the complex from 452 nm in aqueous solution to 460 nm in ZrP. Steady state luminescence spectra of the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)-exchanged ZrP materials show an increase in the luminescence intensity with an increase in the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) loading level until about 0.77 M, where subsequent increases in the loading level produce a decrease in the luminescence (self-quenching region). Time-resolved luminescence measurements are consistent with the steady state luminescence measurements. Analysis of the time domain luminescence measurements in loadings higher than 0.77 M leads to the determination of a collisional quenching rate constant of (1.67 +/- 0.05) x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). Stern-Volmer analysis of the luminescence quantum yield of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)-exchanged ZrP materials indicates that static quenching is also involved in the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) self-quenching mechanism. The quantum yield data behavior might be explained by a model that takes into account collisional quenching and the quasi-static Perrin mechanism. The calculation yields a quenching sphere of action of 14.8 A, which is slightly larger than the collisional radii of two Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) ions (12.2 A), as predicted by the model.

  7. Induction of apoptosis in leukemia cell lines by new copper(II) complexes containing naphthyl groups via interaction with death receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Lopes, Bruna F; Bull, Erika S; Azeredo, Nathália F B; Kanashiro, Milton M; Borges, Franz V; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Pires, Anderson B; Franco, Roberto W A; Almeida, João Carlos de A; Maciel, Leide L F; Resende, Jackson A L C; Schenk, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis, physico-chemical characterization and cytotoxicity of four new ligands and their respective copper(II) complexes toward two human leukemia cell lines (THP-1 and U937) are reported (i.e. [(HL1)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(HL1)]Cl2·H2O (1), [(H2L2)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(H2L2)]Cl2·5H2O (2), [(HL3)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(HL3)]Cl2·4H2O (3), [(H2L4)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(H2L4)]Cl2·6H2O (4)). Ligands HL1 and HL3 contain two pyridines, amine and alcohol moieties with a naphthyl pendant unit yielding a N3O coordination metal environment. Ligands H2L2 and H2L4 have pyridine, phenol, amine and alcohol groups with a naphthyl pendant unit providing a N2O2 coordination metal environment. These compounds are likely to be dinuclear in the solid state but form mononuclear species in solution. The complexes have an antiproliferative effect against both leukemia cell lines; complex (2) exhibits higher activity than cisplatin against U937 (8.20 vs 16.25μmoldm(-3)) and a comparable one against THP-1. These human neoplastic cells are also more susceptible than peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) toward the tested compounds. Using C57BL/6 mice an LD50 of 55mgkg(-1) was determined for complex (2), suggesting that this compound is almost four times less toxic than cisplatin (LD50=14.5mgkg(-1)). The mechanism of cell death promoted by ligand H2L2 and by complexes (2) and (4) was investigated by a range of techniques demonstrating that the apoptosis signal triggered at least by complex (2) starts from an extrinsic pathway involving the activation of caspases 4 and 8. This signal is amplified by mitochondria with the concomitant release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase 9.

  8. Container II

    OpenAIRE

    Baraklianou, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Container II, self-published artists book.\\ud The book was made on the occasion of the artists residency at the Banff Arts Centre, in Alberta Canada. \\ud \\ud Container II is a performative piece, it worked in conjunction with the photographic installation "Stage Set: Cool Tone" . (photographic floor installation, Reclaimed wood, frames, 130x145cm, 2016) \\ud The photographic installation was also part of the artists residency titled "New Materiality" at the Banff Arts Centre. \\ud \\ud Limited E...

  9. Characterizing plasma membrane H+-ATPase in two varieties of coffee leaf (Coffea arabica L.) and its interaction with an elicitor fraction from the orange rust fungus (H. vastatrix Berk and Br.) race II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osses, Luis R; Godoy, César A

    2006-04-01

    Early intercellular signaling in Coffea arabica L.-Hemileia vastatrix host-pathogen interaction was studied, using inside-out plasma membrane from two varieties of coffee leaf and a fungal fraction to determine the plant's biochemical responses. Microsomal pellets (100,000 x g) from the susceptible (Caturra) and resistant (Colombia) coffee leaf varieties were purified by partitioning in two-polymer DEX (6.3% w/w) and PEG (6.3% w/w) system aqueous phase. Fungal material was obtained from orange rust Hemileia vastatrix Berk and Br. race II urediospore germ tubes. Plasma membrane vesicles were preferentially localized to PEG phase, as indicated by its enzyme marker distribution. Both H(+)-ATPase activities displayed similar kinetic and biochemical characteristics, comparable to those described for P-type ATPases. Several enzymes may play pivotal roles in plants regarding early interaction with fungal elicitors. Studies of fungal fractions' effects on H(+)-ATPase and both varieties' proton pumping activities were thus carried out. Concentration as low as 0.1 Gluc eq. ml(-1) fungal fraction induced specific inhibition of H(+)-ATPase and the resistant variety's proton pumping activities. The present work describes characterizing the H(+)-ATPase plasma membrane from two Coffea arabica L. varieties (Caturra and Colombia) for the first time and the race specific inhibitory effect of a crude fungal fraction on both H(+)-ATPase and the resistant variety's proton pumping activities.

  10. Studies in interactive communication. II - The effects of four communication modes on the linguistic performance of teams during cooperative problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanis, A.; Parrish, R. N.; Ochsman, R. B.; Weeks, G. D.

    1977-01-01

    Two-man teams solved credible, 'real world' problems for which computer assistance has been or could be useful. Conversations were carried on in one of four modes of communication: typewriting, handwriting, voice, and natural unrestricted communication. Performance was assessed on three classes of dependent measures: time to solution, behavioral measures of activity, and linguistic measures. Significant differences among the communication modes were found in each of the three classes. This paper is concerned mainly with the results of the linguistic analyses. Linguistic performance was assessed with 182 measures, most of which turned out to be redundant and some of which were useless or meaningless. Those that remain show that although problems can be solved faster in the oral modes than in the hard-copy modes, the oral modes are characterized by many more messages, sentences, words, and unique words; much higher communication rates; but lower type-token ratios. Although a number of significant problem and job-role effects were found, there were relatively few significant interactions of modes with thsse variables. It appears, therefore, that the mode effects hold for both problems and for both job roles assigned to the subjects.

  11. A Systematic Search for Corotating Interaction Regions in Apparently Single Galactic Wolf-Rayet Stars. II. A Global View of the Wind Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Chené, André-Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This study is the second part of a survey searching for large-scale spectroscopic variability in apparently single Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. In a previous paper (Paper I), we described and characterized the spectroscopic variability level of 25 WR stars observable from the northern hemisphere and found 3 new candidates presenting large-scale wind variability, potentially originating from large-scale structures named Co-rotating Interaction Regions (CIRs). In this second paper, we discuss an additional 39 stars observable from the southern hemisphere. For each star in our sample, we obtained 4-5 high-resolution spectra with a signal-to-noise ratio of ~100 and determined its variability level using the approach described in Paper I. In total, 10 new stars are found to show large-scale spectral variability of which 7 present CIR-type changes (WR 8, WR 44, WR 55, WR 58, WR 61, WR 63, WR 100). Of the remaining stars, 20 were found to show small-amplitude changes and 9 were found to show no spectral variability as far...

  12. Isolation of monoclonal antibody from a Chinese hamster ovary supernatant. II: dynamics of the integrated separation on ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Wojciech; Muca, Renata; Woś, Sylwia; Piątkowski, Wojciech; Antos, Dorota

    2013-08-30

    Dynamics of the purification process of a CHO derived monoclonal antibody by ion exchange chromatography (IEC), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and their integration has been investigated. To quantify the adsorption behavior of the target protein (IgG1) and impurities contained in the supernatant, their elution course on IEC and HIC columns has been analyzed versus pH and/or the salt concentration in the mobile phase. A short-cut method has been proposed for mathematical modeling and determining underlying kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. The accuracy of the model predictions has been verified by comparing the simulated and experimental band profiles recorded in both chromatographic processes. After verification, the model was used to optimize operating conditions for the column loading and chromatographic elution in the integrated process IEC/HIC. Two alternative loading techniques based on the upstream and downstream feed dilution were taken into account in the optimization routine. In the first one the feed stream was diluted with the loading buffer prior to the column loading, while in the latter one the feed dilution was realized inside the column using the multiple-injection technique. It was shown that the downstream dilution allowed significant reduction of the contact time between the protein and the loading buffer.

  13. Investigating the origin of cyclical wind variability in hot massive stars - II. Hydrodynamical simulations of corotating interaction regions using realistic spot parameters for the O giant ξ Persei

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Uraz, A.; Owocki, S. P.; Wade, G. A.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Kee, N. D.

    2017-09-01

    OB stars exhibit various types of spectral variability historically associated with wind structures, including the apparently ubiquitous discrete absorption components (DACs). These features have been proposed to be caused either by magnetic fields or non-radial pulsations. In this second paper of this series, we revisit the canonical phenomenological hydrodynamical modelling used to explain the formation of DACs by taking into account modern observations and more realistic theoretical predictions. Using constraints on putative bright spots located on the surface of the O giant ξ Persei derived from high precision space-based broad-band optical photometry obtained with the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) space telescope, we generate 2D hydrodynamical simulations of corotating interaction regions in its wind. We then compute synthetic ultraviolet (UV) resonance line profiles using Sobolev Exact Integration and compare them with historical timeseries obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) to evaluate if the observed behaviour of ξ Persei's DACs is reproduced. Testing three different models of spot size and strength, we find that the classical pattern of variability can be successfully reproduced for two of them: the model with the smallest spots yields absorption features that are incompatible with observations. Furthermore, we test the effect of the radial dependence of ionization levels on line driving, but cannot conclusively assess the importance of this factor. In conclusion, this study self-consistently links optical photometry and UV spectroscopy, paving the way to a better understanding of cyclical wind variability in massive stars in the context of the bright spot paradigm.

  14. (5'-/sup 32/P)-8-azidoguanosine-3',5'-monophosphate. I. Synthesis and properties. II. Interaction with E. coli proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Under certain conditions of nutritional deprivation, microorganisms produce the magic spot nucleotides guanosine-3'-diphosphate-5'-triphosphate(pppGpp) and the tetraphosphate ppGpp. The latter is known to be a pleiotypic effector, i.e. it inhibits (and sometimes stimulates) many biological processes including transcription, translation, and metabolic pathways. It is unknown whether pppGpp, ppGp, pGpp, and pGp, other members of this family of guanosine-3',5'-phosphates, also have regulatory properties. To begin to investigate this question, a radioactive photoaffinity analog of pGp was prepared: (5'/sup 32/P)pN/sub 3/Gp. The interaction of this photoprobe with E. coli sonicates and a purified protein (RNA polymerase) was examined. At physiological salt concentrations two proteins (RNA polymerase) was examined. At physiological salt concentrations two proteins of 86,000 and 65,000 daltons (p86 and p65) were primarily photolabeled. Competition studies with guanosine and adenosine nucleotides indicated (5 /sup 32/P)pN/sub 3/Gp was labeling a ppGpp binding site on p86, and a pGp (or GMP) site on p65. ATP phosphorylation of p86 increased photoincorporation, while it decreased labeling of p65. The data also provide evidence of a different type of regulatory mechanism, i.e. phosphorylation modulates binding of an allosteric effector (ppGpp) to a protein(enzyme). Both ATP and GTP were found to phosphorylate the same proteins, although GTP was the preferred substrate in some cases.

  15. Synthetic, spectral and solution studies on imidazolate-bridged copper(II)-copper(II) and copper(II)-zinc(II) complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subodh Kumar; R N Patel; P V Khadikar; K B Pandeya

    2001-02-01

    Synthesis, spectral and solution studies on 2-ethyl imidazolate-bridged (2-EtIm) homo-binuclear copper(II)-copper(II) and hetero-binuclear copper(II)-zinc(II) homologue are described. Magnetic moment values of homo-binuclear complexes indicate that the imidazolate group can mediate antiferromagnetic interactions. Optical spectra of hetero-binuclear complex at varying H values suggest that the imidazolate-bridged complex is stable over the H-range 7 15-10 0.

  16. A new model for the three-dimensional folding of Escherichia coli 16 S ribosomal RNA. II. The RNA-protein interaction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, F; Brimacombe, R

    1997-08-29

    The map of the mass centres of the 21 proteins from the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal subunit, as determined by neutron scattering, was fitted to a cryoelectron microscopic (cryo-EM) model at a resolution of 20 A of 70 S ribosomes in the pre-translocational state, carrying tRNA molecules at the A and P sites. The fit to the 30 S moiety of the 70 S particles was accomplished with the help of the well-known distribution of the ribosomal proteins in the head, body and side lobe regions of the 30 S subunit, as determined by immuno electron microscopy (IEM). Most of the protein mass centres were found to lie close to the surface (or even outside) of the cryo-EM contour of the 30 S subunit, supporting the idea that the ribosomal proteins are arranged peripherally around the rRNA. The ribosomal protein distribution was then compared with the corresponding model for the 16 S rRNA, fitted to the same EM contour (described in an accompanying paper), in order to analyse the mutual compatibility of the arrangement of proteins and rRNA in terms of the available RNA-protein interaction data. The information taken into account included the hydroxyl radical and base foot-printing data from Noller's laboratory, and our own in situ cross-linking results. Proteins S1 and S14 were not considered, due to the lack of RNA-protein data. Among the 19 proteins analysed, 12 (namely S2, S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S15, S17 and S21) showed a fit to the rRNA model that varied from being excellent to at least acceptable. Of the remaining 7, S3 and S13 showed a rather poor fit, as did S18 (which is considered in combination with S6 in the foot-printing experiments). S16 was difficult to evaluate, as the foot-print data for this protein cover a large area of the rRNA. S19 and S20 showed a bad fit in terms of the neutron map, but their foot-print and cross-link sites were clustered into compact groups in the rRNA model in those regions of the 30 S subunit where these proteins have

  17. Gray matter reduction in the vermis and CRUS-II is associated with social and interaction deficits in low-functioning children with autistic spectrum disorders: a VBM-DARTEL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Daria; Annunziata, Silvia; Contarino, Valeria; Erbetta, Alessandra; Aquino, Domenico; Bulgheroni, Sara

    2013-10-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies have reported abnormalities in brain regions involved in functions that are commonly impaired in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, little is known about brain structure anomalies in low-functioning (LF) young children with ASD. A VBM analysis was carried out to assess brain regions involved in ASD LF children, and a multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between regional volume changes and autism symptom measures. Twenty-six LF ASD children (2-10 years) were compared with 21 controls. A VBM-Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration analysis using Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) was used to evaluate gray matter (GM) and white matter alterations, covaried with Intelligence Quotient, age, and total brain volume. The resulting altered regions were correlated with Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI)-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS)-Generic scores. GM bilateral reduction was noted in the cerebellum (Crus II and vermis) and in the hippocampi in ASD group. GM reduction was also detected in the inferior and superior frontal gyri, in the occipital medial and superior gyri, and in the inferior temporal gyrus of the left cerebral hemisphere. In the right hemisphere, GM reduction was found in the post-central cortex and in the occipital inferior gyrus. Multiple regression analysis showed a correlation between alterations in GM volume in the cerebellum (Crus II and vermis) and ADI-communication and ADOS-total (communication and interaction) scores. These findings seem to confirm that the cerebellum is involved in integrating and regulating emotional and cognitive functions which are impaired in ASD.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of some water soluble Zn(II) complexes with (E)-N-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)arylamines that regulate tumour cell death by interacting with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu Baul, Tushar S; Kundu, Sajal; Linden, Anthony; Raviprakash, Nune; Manna, Sunil K; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C

    2014-01-21

    The synthesis and spectroscopic properties of nine water soluble zinc(II) complexes of (E)-N-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)arylamines (L(n)) with the general formula [Zn(X)2(L(n))] (X = Cl(-), Br(-), I(-); (1-8)) and [Zn(μ-N3)(N3)(L(3))]2 (9) are reported. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and their spectroscopic properties were studied using UV-Visible, fluorescence, IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. The solid state structures of zinc(II) complexes 2-4 and 6-9 were established by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The majority of the structures are mononuclear with tetra-coordinate zinc centres (2-4, 6 and 7) except where L carries an additional donor atom capable of coordinating zinc (8), in which case the zinc atom has a distorted square pyramidal geometry. The centrosymmetric molecule of [Zn(μ-N3)(N3)(L(3))]2 (9) is binuclear with the zinc atoms in a trigonal bipyramidal coordination environment. In general, the dichlorozinc derivatives 1, 3-5 and 8 exhibited moderately elevated in vitro cytotoxic potency towards the human epithelial cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell line, with 4 as the best performer (IC50 value of 18 μM). Apoptosis-inducing activity, assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, showed that the zinc complexes interacted with DNA and thereby interfered the DNA binding of several transcription factors to its promoter sites, thus inhibiting gene transcription required for the biological activity of cells.

  19. TBscore II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Lemvik, Grethe; Abate, Ebba;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The TBscore, based on simple signs and symptoms, was introduced to predict unsuccessful outcome in tuberculosis patients on treatment. A recent inter-observer variation study showed profound variation in some variables. Further, some variables depend on a physician assessing...... them, making the score less applicable. The aim of the present study was to simplify the TBscore. Methods: Inter-observer variation assessment and exploratory factor analysis were combined to develop a simplified score, the TBscore II. To validate TBscore II we assessed the association between start...

  20. Antioxidant, DNA interaction, VEGFR2 kinase, topoisomerase I and in vitro cytotoxic activities of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes of tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and diimines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleel, A; Mahendiran, D; Veena, V; Sakthivel, N; Rahiman, A Kalilur

    2016-11-01

    A series of heteroleptic mononuclear copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L(1-3))(diimine)]ClO4 (1-6) containing three tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core ligands, ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(1)), ethyl 5-methyl-7-(4-diethylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(2)) or ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(3)), and two diimine coligands, 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral methods. The geometry of complexes have been determined with the help of electronic absorption and EPR splitting patterns, which suggest four coordinated square planar geometry around copper(II) ion. The lowering of HOMO-LUMO band gap value of complex 4 implies its higher biological activity compared to other complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that the complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed groove mode of binding, which was further supported by docking simulation. The complexes 3 and 4 strongly inhibit the topoisomerase I, and also strongly interact with VEGFR2 kinase receptor via π-π, σ-π and hydrogen bonding interaction. Gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave plasmid DNA in the absence of activators. In vitro cytotoxic activities of the complexes were examined on three cancerous cell lines such as human lung (A549), cervical (HeLa) and colon (HCT-15), and two normal cells such as human embryonic kidney (HEK) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The live cell and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells were observed with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining assay. All encouraging chemical and biological findings indicate that the complex 4 is a suitable candidate for drug target.

  1. Biochemical Analysis of Yeast Suppressor of Ty 4/5 (Spt4/5) Reveals the Importance of Nucleic Acid Interactions in the Prevention of RNA Polymerase II Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickard, J Brooks; Fu, Jianhua; Reese, Joseph C

    2016-05-06

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) undergoes structural changes during the transitions from initiation, elongation, and termination, which are aided by a collection of proteins called elongation factors. NusG/Spt5 is the only elongation factor conserved in all domains of life. Although much information exists about the interactions between NusG/Spt5 and RNA polymerase in prokaryotes, little is known about how the binding of eukaryotic Spt4/5 affects the biochemical activities of RNAPII. We characterized the activities of Spt4/5 and interrogated the structural features of Spt5 required for it to interact with elongation complexes, bind nucleic acids, and promote transcription elongation. The eukaryotic specific regions of Spt5 containing the Kyrpides, Ouzounis, Woese domains are involved in stabilizing the association with the RNAPII elongation complex, which also requires the presence of the nascent transcript. Interestingly, we identify a region within the conserved NusG N-terminal (NGN) domain of Spt5 that contacts the non-template strand of DNA both upstream of RNAPII and in the transcription bubble. Mutating charged residues in this region of Spt5 did not prevent Spt4/5 binding to elongation complexes, but abrogated the cross-linking of Spt5 to DNA and the anti-arrest properties of Spt4/5, thus suggesting that contact between Spt5 (NGN) and DNA is required for Spt4/5 to promote elongation. We propose that the mechanism of how Spt5/NGN promotes elongation is fundamentally conserved; however, the eukaryotic specific regions of the protein evolved so that it can serve as a platform for other elongation factors and maintain its association with RNAPII as it navigates genomes packaged into chromatin.

  2. Interaction studies between a 1,10-phenanthroline adduct of palladium(II) dithiocarbamate anti-tumor complex and calf thymus DNA. A synthesis spectral and in-vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Saeidifar, Maryam; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali. Akbar

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with a novel synthesized and characterized Palladium (II) complex with the formula of [Pd (Et-dtc) (phen)] NO 3 (where phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and Et-dtc is ethyldithiocarbamate) was extensively studied by various spectroscopic techniques. UV-vis studies imply that there is a set of 6 binding sites for the complex on DNA with positive cooperativity in the binding process. This complex unexpectedly denatures the DNA at very low concentration (˜9.8 μM). Gel filtration studies indicate that the binding of metal complex with DNA is strong enough not to readily break. Fluorescence studies show that the palladium complex intercalates in DNA through the planar 1,10-phenanthroline ligand presented in its structure. Several binding and thermodynamic parameters are also described. Furthermore, anti-tumor studies of this water soluble complex against human cell tumor lines (K562) have been done. It shows 50% cytotoxic concentration (Ic 50) value much lower than that of cisplatin.

  3. DFT study and crystal structure analysis of a new nano-structure five coordinated Hg(II) complex involving C-H⋯O, N⋯O and π⋯π interactions in a supra-molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerozohori, M; Musavi, S A; Masoudiasl, A; Hojjati, A; Assoud, A

    2015-08-05

    In this research, template synthesis and crystal structure of a new HgLI₂ complex are presented (L=N(1)-(4-nitrobenzylidene)-N(2)-(2-((E)-(4-nitrobenzylidene)amino)ethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine). The mercury complex crystallizes in the triclinic system with space group of P1¯. The crystal structure of the complex shows a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the mercury(II) center; including two I and an N atoms of Schiff base ligand in equatorial plane and two iminic N atoms in axial positions. Two five membered mercury containing rings [Hg(-N-C-C-N-)] are found in the structure. Some C-H⋯O, N⋯O and π⋯π intermolecular interactions causes a supra-molecular network in the solid-state. In addition to crystal structure analysis, density functional theory (DFT) study at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory has been also performed on the structure. Thereafter some theoretical structural and spectral data were compared with experimental results. Furthermore, total energy levels of HOMO and LUMO orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential, Mullikan atomic charges, thermodynamic and polarizability properties of the complex were calculated. Finally the mercury complex was prepared in nano-structure size confirmed by SEM and XRD analyses. The particles size of the titled complex was evaluated under 40 nm based on Sherrer's formula.

  4. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2016-02-18

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  5. Susceptibility and gene interaction study of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1 gene polymorphisms with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a multi-ethnic population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsul Mohd Zain

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1 has been reported to play a fibrogenic role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. In this study, five variants of the AGTR1 gene (rs3772622, rs3772627, rs3772630, rs3772633, and rs2276736 were examined for their association with susceptibility to NAFLD. Subjects made up of 144 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients and 198 controls were genotyped using TaqMan assays. The liver biopsy specimens were histologically graded and scored according to the method of Brunt. Single locus analysis in pooled subjects revealed no association between each of the five variants with susceptibility to NAFLD. In the Indian ethnic group, the rs2276736, rs3772630 and rs3772627 appear to be protective against NAFLD (p = 0.010, p = 0.016 and p = 0.026, respectively. Haplotype ACGCA is shown to be protective against NAFLD for the Indian ethnic subgroup (p = 0.03. Gene-gene interaction between the AGTR1 gene and the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3 gene, which we previously reported as associated with NAFLD in this sample, showed a strong interaction between AGTR1 (rs3772627, AGTRI (rs3772630 and PNPLA3 (rs738409 polymorphisms on NAFLD susceptibility (p = 0.007. Further analysis of the NAFLD patients revealed that the G allele of the AGTR1 rs3772622 is associated with increased fibrosis score (p = 0.003. This is the first study that replicates an association between AGTR1 polymorphism and NAFLD, with further details in histological features of NAFLD. There is lack of evidence to suggest an association between any of the five variants of the AGTR1 gene and NAFLD in the Malays and Chinese. In the Indians, the rs2276736, rs3772630 and rs3772627 appear to protect against NAFLD. We report novel findings of an association between the G allele of the rs3772622 with occurrence of fibrosis and of the gene-gene interaction between AGTR1gene and the much-studied PNPLA3 gene.

  6. Susceptibility and gene interaction study of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) gene polymorphisms with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a multi-ethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Mohamed, Zahurin; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Rampal, Sanjay; Basu, Roma Choudhury; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Salim, Agus; Mohamed, Rosmawati

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) has been reported to play a fibrogenic role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In this study, five variants of the AGTR1 gene (rs3772622, rs3772627, rs3772630, rs3772633, and rs2276736) were examined for their association with susceptibility to NAFLD. Subjects made up of 144 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients and 198 controls were genotyped using TaqMan assays. The liver biopsy specimens were histologically graded and scored according to the method of Brunt. Single locus analysis in pooled subjects revealed no association between each of the five variants with susceptibility to NAFLD. In the Indian ethnic group, the rs2276736, rs3772630 and rs3772627 appear to be protective against NAFLD (p = 0.010, p = 0.016 and p = 0.026, respectively). Haplotype ACGCA is shown to be protective against NAFLD for the Indian ethnic subgroup (p = 0.03). Gene-gene interaction between the AGTR1 gene and the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) gene, which we previously reported as associated with NAFLD in this sample, showed a strong interaction between AGTR1 (rs3772627), AGTRI (rs3772630) and PNPLA3 (rs738409) polymorphisms on NAFLD susceptibility (p = 0.007). Further analysis of the NAFLD patients revealed that the G allele of the AGTR1 rs3772622 is associated with increased fibrosis score (p = 0.003). This is the first study that replicates an association between AGTR1 polymorphism and NAFLD, with further details in histological features of NAFLD. There is lack of evidence to suggest an association between any of the five variants of the AGTR1 gene and NAFLD in the Malays and Chinese. In the Indians, the rs2276736, rs3772630 and rs3772627 appear to protect against NAFLD. We report novel findings of an association between the G allele of the rs3772622 with occurrence of fibrosis and of the gene-gene interaction between AGTR1gene and the much-studied PNPLA3 gene.

  7. Interactive Digital Image Processing Investigation. Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    Larrea tridentata (11) 0.7JGrass-Flourensia...11.3 Shrubland 58.2 Larrea tridentata (20) 9.6 Larrea tridentata -Grass (21) 4.6j Larrea tridentata -Grass-Parthenium incanum.(22)06 Larrea tridentata -Prosopis...glan- dulosa-Grass (23) 4.1 Larrea tridentata -Fourensia cernua-Grass (25) 2.4 Acacia constricta-Grass (30) 1.2 Acacia constricta-Latirrea

  8. Cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by metallo-intercalator ruthenium(II) complexes containing chloro-substituted phenylazopyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhukeaw, Tidarat; Temboot, Pornvichai; Hansongnern, Kanidtha; Ratanaphan, Adisorn

    2014-02-07

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the absence of expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Breast cancers with a BRCA1 mutation are also frequently triple-negative. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies and known specific molecular targets for this aggressive breast cancer subtype. To address this concern, we have explored the cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells, and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by the ruthenium(II) complexes containing the bidentate ligand, 5-chloro-2-(phenylazo)pyridine. Triple-negative MDA-MB-231, BRCA1-defective HCC1937 and BRCA1-competent MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were treated with ruthenium(II) complexes. The cytoxoxicity of ruthenium-induced breast cancer cells was evaluated by a real time cellular analyzer (RTCA). Cellular uptake of ruthenium complexes was determined by ICP-MS. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed using propidium iodide and Annexin V flow cytometry. The N-terminal BRCA1 RING protein was used for conformational and functional studies using circular dichroism and in vitro ubiquitination. HCC1937 cells were significantly more sensitive to the ruthenium complexes than the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. Treatment demonstrated a higher degree of cytotoxicity than cisplatin against all three cell lines. Most ruthenium atoms were retained in the nuclear compartment, particularly in HCC1937 cells, after 24 h of incubation, and produced a significant block at the G2/M phase. An increased induction of apoptotic cells as well as an upregulation of p53 mRNA was observed in all tested breast cancer cells. It was of interest that BRCA1 mRNA and replication of BRCA1-defective cells were downregulated. Changes in the conformation and binding constants of ruthenium-BRCA1 adducts were observed, causing inactivation of the RING heterodimer BRCA1/BARD1-mediated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity

  9. Felipe II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Restrepo Canal

    1962-04-01

    Full Text Available Como parte de la monumental Historia de España que bajo la prestante y acertadísima dirección de don Ramón Menéndez Pidal se comenzó a dar a la prensa desde 1954 por la Editorial Espasa Calpe S. A., aparecieron en 1958 dos tomos dedicados al reinado de Felipe II; aquella época en que el imperio español alcanzó su unidad peninsular juntamente con el dilatado poderío que le constituyó en la primera potencia de Europa.

  10. Active Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII Regulates NMDA Receptor Mediated Postischemic Long-Term Potentiation (i-LTP by Promoting the Interaction between CaMKII and NMDA Receptors in Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Active calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII has been reported to take a critical role in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP. Changes in CaMKII activity were detected in various ischemia models. It is tempting to know whether and how CaMKII takes a role in NMDA receptor (NMDAR-mediated postischemic long-term potentiation (NMDA i-LTP. Here, we monitored changes in NMDAR-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (NMDA fEPSPs at different time points following ischemia onset in vitro oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD ischemia model. We found that 10 min OGD treatment induced significant i-LTP in NMDA fEPSPs, whereas shorter (3 min or longer (25 min OGD treatment failed to induce prominent NMDA i-LTP. CaMKII activity or CaMKII autophosphorylation displays a similar bifurcated trend at different time points following onset of ischemia both in vitro OGD or in vivo photothrombotic lesion (PT models, suggesting a correlation of increased CaMKII activity or CaMKII autophosphorylation with NMDA i-LTP. Disturbing the association between CaMKII and GluN2B subunit of NMDARs with short cell-permeable peptides Tat-GluN2B reversed NMDA i-LTP induced by OGD treatment. The results provide support to a notion that increased interaction between NMDAR and CaMKII following ischemia-induced increased CaMKII activity and autophosphorylation is essential for induction of NMDA i-LTP.

  11. Synthesis,DNA/protein Interaction of a Copper(II)Complex with Schiff▬base Ligand%席夫碱铜配合物合成及与DNA/蛋白质作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅; 黄书娟; 叶诚; 黄珊珊

    2014-01-01

    A novel copper( II)complex was prepared by pyridine▬2▬aldehyde and N,N▬dimethylethylenediamine,and characterized by single▬crystal X▬ray diffraction,elemental analysis,and ESI▬MS• Single▬crystal analysis revealed that the complex shows a distorted pseudo▬square▬pyramidal geometry• The binding properties of the complex with calf thymus DNA( CT▬DNA)and HSA were investiga▬ted by UV▬visible( UV▬vis),uorescence and circular dichroism( CD)spectra• The complex binds signicantly to CT▬DNA by intercala▬tion modes,and the complex binding to protein HSA belongs to static quenching mechanism• The interaction between the complex and HSA involve hydrogen bonding and weak van der Waals•%利用2-吡啶甲醛、N,N▬二甲基乙二胺制备了一种新的席夫碱铜配合物,并通过X▬射线单晶衍射、元素分析和ESI▬MS对其结构进行分析•晶体结构分析表明,配合物呈现扭曲的四方锥构型•用紫外▬可见吸收光谱、荧光光谱和圆二色光谱研究了配合物与小牛胸腺DNA( CT▬DNA)和人血清白蛋白( HSA)的结合性质•结果表明:配合物以插入的方式与DNA相互作用,且配合物与HSA的相互作用为静态猝灭机制,分子间作用力为氢键和范德华力•

  12. DFT Simulation of Structural and Optical Properties of 9-Aminoacridine Half-Sandwich Ru(II), Rh(III), and Ir(III) Antitumoral Complexes and Their Interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José Pedro; Ruiz, José; Vicente, Consuelo; de Haro, Concepción; Bautista, Delia; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto

    2017-08-08

    In this work, we use DFT-based methods to simulate the chemical structures, optical properties, and interaction with DNA of a recently synthesized chelated C^N 9-aminoacridine arene Ru(II) anticancer agent and two new closely related Rh(III) and Ir(III) complexes using DFT-based methods. Four chemical models and a number of theoretical approaches, which representatively include the PBE0, B97D, ωB97X, ωB97X-D, M06, and M06-L density functionals and the LANL2DZ, def2-SVP, and def2-TZVP basis sets, are tested. The best overall accuracy/cost performance for the optimization process is reached at the ωB97X-D/def2-SVP and M06/def2-SVP levels of theory. Inclusion of explicit solvent molecules (CHCl3) further refines the geometry, while taking into account the crystal network gives no significant improvements of the computed bond distances and angles. The analysis of the excited states reveals that the M06 level matches better the experimental absorption spectra, compared to ωB97X-D. The use of the M06/def2-SVP approach is therefore a well-balanced method to study theoretically the bioactivity of this type of antitumoral complexes, so we couple this TD-DFT approach to molecular dynamics simulations in order to assess their reactivity with DNA. The reported results demonstrate that these drugs could be used to inject electrons into DNA, which might broaden their applications in photoactivated chemotherapy and as new materials for DNA-based electrochemical nanodevices.

  13. Structural alteration of hexagonal birnessite by aqueous Mn(II): Impacts on Ni(II) sorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkowitz, Joshua P.; Elzinga, Evert J.

    2017-09-01

    We studied the impacts of aqueous Mn(II) (1 mM) on the sorption of Ni(II) (200 μM) by hexagonal birnessite (0.1 g L- 1) at pH 6.5 and 7.5 with batch experiments and XRD, ATR-FTIR and Ni K-edge EXAFS analyses. In the absence of Mn(II)aq, sorbed Ni(II) was coordinated predominantly as triple corner-sharing complexes at layer vacancies at both pH values. Introduction of Mn(II)aq into Ni(II)-birnessite suspensions at pH 6.5 caused Ni(II) desorption and led to the formation of edge-sharing Ni(II) complexes. This was attributed to competitive displacement of Ni(II) from layer vacancies by either Mn(II) or by Mn(III) formed through interfacial Mn(II)-Mn(IV) comproportionation, and/or incorporation of Ni(II) into the birnessite lattice promoted by Mn(II)-catalyzed recrystallization of the sorbent. Similar to Mn(II)aq, the presence of HEPES or MES caused the formation of edge-sharing Ni(II) sorption complexes in Ni(II)-birnessite suspensions, which was attributed to partial reduction of the sorbent by the buffers. At pH 7.5, interaction with aqueous Mn(II) caused reductive transformation of birnessite into secondary feitknechtite that incorporated Ni(II), enhancing removal of Ni(II) from solution. These results demonstrate that reductive alteration of phyllomanganates may significantly affect the speciation and solubility of Ni(II) in anoxic and suboxic environments.

  14. DART II documentation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    The DART II is a remote, interactive, microprocessor-based data acquistion system suitable for use with air monitors. This volume of DART II documentation contains the following appendixes: adjustment and calibration procedures; mother board signature list; schematic diagrams; device specification sheets; ROM program listing; 6800 microprocessor instruction list, octal listing; and cable lists. (RWR)

  15. ALPS II technical overview and status report

    CERN Document Server

    Spector, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The Any Light Particle Search II (ALPS II) is an experiment that utilizes the concept of resonant enhancement to improve on the sensitivity of traditional light shining through a wall style experiments. These experiments attempt to detect photons passing through an opaque wall by converting to relativistic weakly interacting sub-eV particles and then reconverting back to photons. ALPS II at DESY in Hamburg, Germany will use dually resonant optical cavities before and after the wall to increase the probability of this interaction occurring. This paper gives a technical overview and status report of the experiment.

  16. The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore-forming proteins sticholysin I and II is modulated by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions as well as lipid composition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uris Ros; Lohans Pedrera; Daylín Díaz; Juan C De Karam; Tatiane P Sudbrack; Pedro A Valiente; Diana Martínez; Eduardo M Cilli; Fabiola Pazos; Rosangela Itri; Maria E Lanio; Shirley Schreier; Carlos Álvarez

    2011-12-01

    The sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus produces two pore-forming proteins, sticholysins I and II (St I and St II). Despite their high identity (93%), these toxins exhibit differences in hemolytic activity that can be related to those found in their N-terminal. To clarify the contribution of the N-terminal amino acid residues to the activity of the toxins, we synthesized peptides spanning residues 1–31 of St I (StI1-31) or 1–30 of St II (StII1-30) and demonstrated that StII1-30 promotes erythrocyte lysis to a higher extent than StI1-31. For a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the peptide activity, here we studied their binding to lipid monolayers and pemeabilizing activity in liposomes. For this, we examined the effect on peptide membranotropic activity of including phospatidic acid and cholesterol in a lipid mixture of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. The results suggest the importance of continuity of the 1–10 hydrophobic sequence in StII1-30 for displaying higher binding and activity, in spite of both peptides’ abilities to form pores in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, the different peptide membranotropic action is explained in terms of the differences in hydrophobic and electrostatic peptide properties as well as the enhancing role of membrane inhomogeneities.

  17. Mass spectrometry and potentiometry studies of Pb(II)-, Cd(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furia, Emilia; Aiello, Donatella; Di Donna, Leonardo; Mazzotti, Fabio; Tagarelli, Antonio; Thangavel, Hariprasad; Napoli, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni

    2014-01-21

    Cd(II)-, Pb(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes were investigated by potentiometric and different mass spectrometric (MS) methodologies. Laser desorption mass spectrometry has provided both the composition and structure of metal-cystine complexes according to the speciation models proposed on the basis of the potentiometric data. Detection of neutral complexes was achieved by protonation or electrochemical reduction during mass spectrometric experiments. The redox activity of metal-cystine complexes was confirmed by laser desorption and charge transfer matrix assisted laser assisted MS experiments, which allowed us to observe the formation of complexes with a reduction of cystine. The stoichiometry of Cd(II)-, Pb(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes was defined by observing the isotopic pattern of the investigated compound. The results suggest that interaction occurs through the carboxylate group of the ligand.

  18. Interacting Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard M.; Reining, Lucia; Ceperley, David M.

    2016-06-01

    Preface; Part I. Interacting Electrons: Beyond the Independent-Particle Picture: 1. The many electron problem: introduction; 2. Signatures of electron correlation; 3. Concepts and models for interacting electrons; Part II. Foundations of Theory for Many-Body Systems: 4. Mean fields and auxiliary systems; 5. Correlation functions; 6. Many-body wavefunctions; 7. Particles and quasi-particles; 8. Functionals in many-particle physics; Part III. Many-Body Green's Function Methods: 9. Many-body perturbation theory: expansion in the interaction; 10. Many-body perturbation theory via functional derivatives; 11. The RPA and the GW approximation for the self-energy; 12. GWA calculations in practice; 13. GWA calculations: illustrative results; 14. RPA and beyond: the Bethe-Salpeter equation; 15. Beyond the GW approximation; 16. Dynamical mean field theory; 17. Beyond the single-site approximation in DMFT; 18. Solvers for embedded systems; 19. Characteristic hamiltonians for solids with d and f states; 20. Examples of calculations for solids with d and f states; 21. Combining Green's functions approaches: an outlook; Part IV. Stochastic Methods: 22. Introduction to stochastic methods; 23. Variational Monte Carlo; 24. Projector quantum Monte Carlo; 25. Path integral Monte Carlo; 26. Concluding remarks; Part V. Appendices: A. Second quantization; B. Pictures; C. Green's functions: general properties; D. Matsubara formulation for Green's functions for T ̸= 0; E. Time-ordering, contours, and non-equilibrium; F. Hedin's equations in a basis; G. Unique solutions in Green's function theory; H. Properties of functionals; I. Auxiliary systems and constrained search; J. Derivation of the Luttinger theorem; K. Gutzwiller and Hubbard approaches; References; Index.

  19. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust

  20. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust