WorldWideScience

Sample records for pilot study risk

  1. Cardiometabolic Risk among African-American Women: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Susan J.; Oster, Robert A.; Floyd, Natalie A.; Ovalle, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the associations of the Homeostatic Model of Assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-ir), acanthosis nigricans, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) with two of the commonly used definitions of the metabolic syndrome (Adult Treatment Panel III {ATP III} and International Diabetes Federation {IDF}) among reproductive age healthy free living African-American women. Methods A pilot study with a cross-sectional design examined 33 African-American women aged 20 to 46 (mean 31.24, +/- 7.25), for the presence of metabolic syndrome determined by ATP III and IDF criteria, insulin resistance (HOMA-ir and/or acanthosis nigricans), degree of inflammation (hs-CRP) and presence of dysfibrinolysis (PAI-1). Results HOMA-ir identified insulin resistance in 27 (81.8%) of the women, whereas the presence of acanthosis nigricans indicated that 16 (48 %) of these women manifested insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome was found in 7 women (21.2 %) by ATP III or 9 (27.3 %) by IDF criteria. Bivariate correlations showed associations between HOMA-ir and waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), acanthosis nigricans, the ATP III and IDF definitions for metabolic syndrome. PAI-1 was significantly correlated with waist circumference, BMI, fasting glucose, HOMA-ir, and ATP III. Both HOMA-ir and PAI-1 were significantly and negatively correlated with HDL-C. hs-CRP was significantly correlated with BMI and 2-hour post glucose. Conclusion Both dysfibrinolysis (PAI-1 levels) and insulin resistance (HOMA-ir) when individually regressed on the ATP III definition of metabolic syndrome explained 32 % and 29% of the respective variance. The addition of HOMA-ir measurement may significantly improve early recognition of cardiometabolic risk among reproductive age African-American women who have not yet met the criteria for the ATP III or IDF definitions of the metabolic syndrome. Likewise, acanthosis nigricans is potentially a

  2. Cardiovascular risk score and cardiovascular events among airline pilots: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirawan, I Made Ady; Larsen, Peter D; Aldington, Sarah; Griffiths, Robin F; Ellis, Chris J

    2012-05-01

    A cardiovascular risk prediction score is routinely applied by aviation authorities worldwide. We examined the accuracy of the Framingham-based risk chart used by the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority in predicting cardiovascular events among airline pilots. A matched case-control design was applied to assess the association of 5-yr cardiovascular risk score and cardiovascular events in Oceania-based airline pilots. Cases were pilots with cardiovascular events as recorded on their medical records. Each case was age and gender matched with four controls that were randomly selected from the pilot population. To collect data before the events, 5-yr retrospective evaluations were conducted. Over a 16-yr study period we identified 15 cases of cardiovascular events, 9 (60%) of which were sudden clinical presentations and only 6 (40%) of which were detected using cardiovascular screening. There were 8 cases (53%) and 16 controls (27%) who had a 5-yr risk of > or = 10-15%. Almost half of the events (7/15) occurred in pilots whose highest 5-yr risk was in the 5-10% range. Cases were 3.91 times more likely to have highest 5-yr risk score of > or =10-15% than controls (OR = 3.91, 95% CI 1.04-16.35). The accuracy of the highest risk scores were moderate (AUC = 0.723, 95% CI 0.583-0.863). The cutoff point of 10% is valid, with a specificity of 0.73, but low sensitivity (0.53). Despite a valid and appropriate cutoff point, the tool had low sensitivity and was unable to predict almost half of the cardiovascular events.

  3. Short-Term Effects of Screening for Cardiovascular Risk in the Deaf Community: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited information on the risk of cardiovascular disease amongst the Deaf community. Given that the access of Deaf people to mainstream health promotion is likely to be hindered by language barriers, we were interested to assess the short-term impact of cardiovascular health promotion within this group. Using a pilot study we investigated changes in cardiovascular risk factors amongst Deaf people identified to be at high cardiovascular risk, who received standard health promotion by a medical team specializing in cardiovascular health promotion. The short-term impact of cardiovascular health promotion in this group did not reduce estimates of cardiovascular risk. The reasons for this are likely to relate to the design and delivery of health promotion to Deaf people, which deserves further study.

  4. Brief Intervention Within Primary Care for At-Risk Gambling: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlin, Christina; Nyberg, Fred; Jess, Kari

    2016-12-01

    Studies on interventions for at-risk gambling are scarce. This pilot study is the first step in a larger project aimed to develop methods to prevent more serious gambling problems. Drawing on experiences from the alcohol field, the brief intervention (BI) model was tested in a primary care setting. Primary care personnel was trained for 2 days. Patients were screened, and those with signs of problematic gambling were offered a return visit to discuss their gambling habits. Of the 537 screened, 34 (6.3 %) screened positive for problem gambling. Of those, 24 were at-risk gamblers whereof 19 agreed to participate. Six of those 19 took part in a 1-month follow-up. Important information for the planning of upcoming studies was collected from the pilot work. Given that the rate of at-risk gamblers was elevated in this setting we consider primary care a suitable arena for intervention. Staff training and support appeared essential, and questionnaires should be selected that are clear and well-presented so staff feel secure and comfortable with them. The BI model was found to be most suitable for patients already known to the caregiver. The number of participants who were willing to take part in the follow-up was low. To ensure power in future studies, a much larger number of screened patients is evidently necessary.

  5. Association between Echinococcus granulosus infection and cancer risk - a pilot study in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomopoulou, Katerina; Yu, Herbert; Wang, Zhanwei; Vasiliou, Stella K; Brinc, Davor; Christofi, Georgios; Theodorou, Marilena; Pavlou, Pavlos; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Demetriou, Christiana A; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2016-12-01

    Infections from microorganisms and parasites have been connected with either increased or decreased cancer risk. The objective of this study was to investigate whether infection by Echinococcus granulosus is associated with cancer risk. We assembled a pilot retrospective cohort of patients who were diagnosed as being infected by E. granulosus in Cyprus between 1930 and 2011. Age/gender-matched non-infected family members and neighbors were selected as references. Medical history was ascertained from each study subject through in-person interview. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to assess the association of being infected by E. granulosus with cancer risk. Individuals with prior infection by E. granulosus (n=249) were more likely to have cancer compared to those without infection (n=753), 11.65% vs. 8.37% (p=0.0492). Survival analysis also showed that subjects with prior infection had a higher risk for developing cancer. The hazards ratio (HR) was 1.595, [95% confidence interval (CI) between 1.008 and 2.525]. The risk ratio did not change significantly (HR=1.536; 95% CI: 0.965-2.445) after adjusting for gender, year of birth, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and family history of cancer. Our study suggests that infection by E. granulosus may increase cancer risk. If this observation can be confirmed independently, further investigation of the mechanisms underlying the association is warranted.

  6. Breast cancer and personal environmental risk factors in Marin County - Pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, C.A.; Farren, G.; Baltzell, K.; Chew, T.; Clarkson, C.; Fleshman, R.; Leary, C.; Mizroch, M.; Orenstein, F.; Russell, M.L.; Souders-Mason, V.; Wrensch, M.

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, they used a community-based research approach. In the collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process.

  7. Radiation effects-prevalence of contributory risk factors a pilot study in Visakhapthnam steel plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshman rao, K. V.

    2004-07-01

    Integrated Steel Plants contribute significant air pollution, water pollution and solid waste generation. Diverse occupational health hazards present is steel industry pose ill effects to the industrial workers. Occupational health services and research center (OHS and RC) of this plant established in the year 1992 to protect the health and well-being of all the employees working in different occupations. the primary role OHS and RC is to conduct periodical medical examinations, monitoring of the working environments, suggest the suitable personal protective equipment to the workers, evaluate risk factors, work practices, risk management and industrial toxicological studies. Dissemination of information related to occupational health and safety to the working population through regular educational sessions at the workplaces as at training and development center (T and DC) is also part of our services. The proneness for effects of exposure to ionizing radiation is enhanced by various factors related to the family history of chronic diseases, nutritional status of the individuals, the lifestyle factors apart from psycho-social factors like illiteracy, ignorance, negligence and inadequate utilization of personal protective equipment (PPE) at workplace. To evaluate the prevalence of such contributory risk factors, a pilot study has been conducted in Visakhapatnam Steel Plant. The data is obtained through routine periodical medical examination of workers at the Occupational Health Services Center through standard format. The study revealed statistically high prevalence of the risk factors and indicated the necessity of intensifying primary prevention methods in addition to environmental control and usage of PPE. (Author)

  8. [Risk epidemiology and child protection statistics in early childhood – a pilot study in southern Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurn, Leonore; Besier, Tanja; Ziegenhain, Ute; Jud, Andreas; Kindler, Heinz; Fischer, Dieter; Fegert, Jörg M; Künster, Anne Katrin

    2017-07-01

    In contrast to many other countries in Europe, Germany lacks sufficient empirical data on the incidence/prevalence of child maltreatment and its risk factors. This pilot study generated systematic data on the prevalence of child abuse and neglect and its risk factors in Germany. Using a newly developed questionnaire (ESM1 and ESM2) on child abuse and neglect as well as indicators for risk factors, we conducted a survey on 35 child daycare centers in a county in southern Germany, the goal being to generate reliable data. The questionnaire and the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was completed by daycare professionals for every child between 4 and under 7 years who was attending the participating daycare center (1,122 children). Child maltreatment was reported in 13.2 % of the cases, and risk factors for future child maltreatment were detected in 38.4 % cases. This study demonstrates that systematic data collection concerning child protection is feasible in child daycare centers. In the future, we recommend that local child protection networks be modified on the basis of reliable empirical data.

  9. Potential Risk Estimation Drowning Index for Children (PREDIC): a pilot study from Matlab, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borse, N N; Hyder, A A; Bishai, D; Baker, T; Arifeen, S E

    2011-11-01

    Childhood drowning is a major public health problem that has been neglected in many low- and middle-income countries. In Matlab, rural Bangladesh, more than 40% of child deaths aged 1-4 years are due to drowning. The main objective of this paper was to develop and evaluate a childhood drowning risk prediction index. A literature review was carried out to document risk factors identified for childhood drowning in Bangladesh. The Newacheck model for special health care needs for children was adapted and applied to construct a childhood drowning risk index called "Potential Risk Estimation Drowning Index for Children" (PREDIC). Finally, the proposed PREDIC Index was applied to childhood drowning deaths and compared with the comparison group from children living in Matlab, Bangladesh. This pilot study used t-tests and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve to analyze the results. The PREDIC index was applied to 302 drowning deaths and 624 children 0-4 years old living in Matlab. The results of t-test indicate that the drowned children had a statistically (t=-8.58, p=0.0001) significant higher mean PREDIC score (6.01) than those in comparison group (5.26). Drowning cases had a PREDIC score of 6 or more for 68% of the children however, the comparison group had 43% of the children with score of 6 or more which was statistically significant (t=-7.36, p<0.001). The area under the curve for the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve was 0.662. Index score construction was scientifically plausible; and the index is relatively complete, fairly accurate, and practical. The risk index can help identify and target high risk children with drowning prevention programs. PREDIC index needs to be further tested for its accuracy, feasibility and effectiveness in drowning risk reduction in Bangladesh and other countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tsunami Risk in the NE Atlantic: Pilot Study for Algarve Portugal and Applications for future TWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omira, R.; Baptista, M. A.; Catita, C.; Carrilho, F.; Matias, L.

    2012-04-01

    Tsunami risk assessment is an essential component of any Tsunami Early Warning System due to its significant contribution to the disaster reduction by providing valuable information that serve as basis for mitigation preparedness and strategies. Generally, risk assessment combines the outputs of the hazard and the vulnerability assessment for considered exposed elements. In the NE Atlantic region, the tsunami hazard is relatively well established through compilation of tsunami historical events, evaluation of tsunamigenic sources and impact computations for site-specific coastal areas. While, tsunami vulnerability remains poorly investigated in spite of some few studies that focused on limited coastal areas of the Gulf of Cadiz region. This work seeks to present a pilot study for tsunami risk assessment that covers about 170 km of coasts of Algarve region, south of Portugal. This area of high coastal occupation and touristic activities was strongly impacted by the 1755 tsunami event as reported in various historical documents. An approach based upon a combination of tsunami hazard and vulnerability is developed in order to take into account the dynamic aspect of tsunami risk in the region that depends on the variation of hazard and vulnerability of exposed elements from a coastal point to other. Hazard study is based upon the consideration of most credible earthquake scenarios and the derivation of hazard maps through hydrodynamic modeling of inundation and tsunami arrival time. The vulnerability assessment is performed by: i) the analysis of the occupation and the population density, ii) derivation of evacuation maps and safe shelters, and iii) the analysis of population response and evacuation times. Different risk levels ranging from "low" to "high" are assigned to the coats of the studied area. Variation of human tsunami risk between the high and low touristic seasons is also considered in this study and aims to produce different tsunami risk-related scenarios

  11. Telmisartan to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk in Older HIV-Infected Adults: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-infected persons are at increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but traditional CVD therapies are understudied in this population. Telmisartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker and PPAR-γ agonist that improves endothelial function and cardiovascular mortality in HIV-uninfected populations. We assessed the effects of telmisartan on endothelial function in older HIV-infected persons at risk for CVD in a small pilot study. Methods HIV-infected individuals ≥50 years old on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) with ≥1 traditional CVD risk factor received open label telmisartan 80 mg daily for six weeks. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) measured endothelial function. The primary endpoint was six-week change in maximum relative FMD. Results Seventeen participants enrolled; 16 completed all evaluations (88% men, 65% non-White, median age 60 years, CD4+ T lymphocyte count 625 cells/mm3). ART included 71% PI, 29% NNRTI, 29% integrase inhibitor, 65% tenofovir and 29% abacavir. CVD risk factor prevalence included 76% hyperlipidemia, 65% hypertension, 18% smoking and 12% diabetes mellitus. After six weeks, statistically significant blood pressure changes were observed (systolic −16.0 mmHg, diastolic −6.0 mmHg) without significant changes in FMD. In subset analyses, FMD increased more among abacavir-treated, PI-treated and non-smoking participants. Conclusions No significant FMD changes were observed after six weeks of telmisartan therapy; however, abacavir- and PI-treated participants and non-smokers showed greater FMD increases. Additional studies are needed to explore the effects of telmisartan on endothelial function among HIV-infected individuals with traditional CVD and/or ART-specific risk factors. PMID:26360501

  12. Perceived risk vs. intention to adopt e-commerce - a pilot study of potential moderators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricea Elena Bertea

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available E-commerce continues to develop as an important channel for consumer purchases. This explains the growing interest in determining the most important variables which affect online consumer behavior, especially perceived risk as a well-known behavioral deterrent. Previous studies have proved a negative influence of perceived risk on the intention to adopt e-commerce. However, depending on the type of product and the population investigated, results were often contradictory and this relationship was found to be stronger, weaker or even inconclusive. This led us to conclude that, besides direct influence factors, there could be moderating effects for the analyzed relationship. Moderators are qualitative or quantitative variables which modify a relationship, and affect the direction and/or strength of that relationship between an independent and a dependant variable. The purpose of our research was to investigate potential moderator variables which could change the relationship between perceived risk and the intention to buy online. We used three observable variables – gender, experience in using the Internet and experience with online shopping – and three latent, psychological variables – fear of uncertainty, trust in e-commerce and materialism. The research consisted of a survey conducted on a sample of 481 business students, followed by a Structural Equation Modeling approach. Although no moderation effect was proved, partly due to the homogeneity of the investigated pilot population, fear of uncertainty and trust in e-commerce were found to be antecedents of perceived risk in e-commerce, making perceived risk a mediator between these two variables and the intention to buy online.

  13. Organisational change, job strain and increased risk of stroke? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Jennie; Ekberg, Kerstin; Nordlund, Anders; Eklund, Jörgen

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to explore whether organisational change and work-related stress, as measured by the Job Content Questionnaire, were associated with first-ever stroke among working people aged 30-65. In a case-control study a total of 65 consecutive cases, aged 30-65 years of age, with first-ever stroke were recruited from four hospitals in Sweden during 2000-2002. During the same period, 103 random population controls in the same age interval were recruited. Data on job-related stress and traditional medical risk factors were collected by a questionnaire. In the multivariate analyses, organisational change (OR 3.38) increased the likelihood of stroke, while experiencing an active job (OR 0.37) decreased the likelihood of stroke. Regarding risk factors outside work, age (OR 1.11), low physical activity (OR 5.21), low education (OR 2.48) and family history of stroke (OR 2.59) were associated with increased likelihood of stroke. This study suggests an association between organisational change, work-related stress and stroke. The likelihood of stroke was lower for people in active job situations.

  14. Risk propensity in commercial and military pilots.

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    Sicard, Bruno; Taillemite, Jean Pierre; Jouve, Elisabeth; Blin, Olivier

    2003-08-01

    Flight safety is dependent on the quality of the decision-making process, which is closely related to risk taking. The purpose of this descriptive study was to evaluate risk propensity among commercial and military pilots. Since commercial and military flights are conducted in different environments with different safety policies, our hypothesis was that risk propensity levels observed in these different settings will not be the same. We tested 96 French pilots, 63 who were flying commercial aircraft (mean age 43 yr) and 33 serving in military aviation (mean age 33 yr), with the Evaluation of Risk (EVAR) visual analog scale, designed to rate risk proneness, and the Barrat impulsiveness scale. EVAR is composed of 24 items distributed among 5 factors: "self-control," "danger-seeking," "energy," "impulsiveness," and "invincibility." We observed significantly higher scores in all EVAR factors except "impulsiveness" in military pilots compared with commercial pilots. This different risk profile was corroborated by Barrat scores and was not explained by the significant age difference. The observed difference in risk propensity cannot be explained by this descriptive study. A prospective evaluation of risk proneness beginning with the selection process and continuing through training and military and commercial flying is necessary to assess how a risk proneness profile is determined.

  15. Bisphenol a exposure in Mexico City and risk of prematurity: a pilot nested case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercado-García Adriana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presence of Bisphenol A (BPA has been documented worldwide in a variety of human biological samples. There is growing evidence that low level BPA exposure may impact placental tissue development and thyroid function in humans. The aim of this present pilot study was to determine urinary concentrations of BPA during the last trimester of pregnancy among a small subset of women in Mexico City, Mexico and relate these concentrations to risk of delivering prematurely. Methods A nested case-control subset of 60 participants in the Early Life Exposure in Mexico to ENvironmental Toxicants (ELEMENT study in Mexico City, Mexico were selected based on delivering less than or equal to 37 weeks of gestation and greater than 37 weeks of gestation. Third trimester archived spot urine samples were analyzed by online solid phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry. Results BPA was detected in 80.0% (N = 48 of the urine samples; total concentrations ranged from th week (n = 12, the odds ratio for specific-gravity adjusted BPA was larger and statistically significant (p Conclusions This is the first study to document measurable levels of BPA in the urine of a population of Mexican women. This study also provides preliminary evidence, based on a single spot urine sample collected during the third trimester, that pregnant women who delivered less than or equal to 37 weeks of gestation and prematurely (

  16. Cardiovascular investigations of airline pilots with excessive cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirawan, I Made Ady; Aldington, Sarah; Griffiths, Robin F; Ellis, Chris J; Larsen, Peter D

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the prevalence of airline pilots who have an excessive cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk score according to the New Zealand Guideline Group (NZGG) Framingham-based Risk Chart and describes their cardiovascular risk assessment and investigations. A cross-sectional study was performed among 856 pilots employed in an Oceania based airline. Pilots with elevated CVD risk that had been previously evaluated at various times over the previous 19 yr were reviewed retrospectively from the airline's medical records, and the subsequent cardiovascular investigations were then described. There were 30 (3.5%) pilots who were found to have 5-yr CVD risk score of 10-15% or higher. Of the 29 pilots who had complete cardiac investigations data, 26 pilots underwent exercise electrocardiography (ECG), 2 pilots progressed directly to coronary angiograms and 1 pilot with abnormal echocardiogram was not examined further. Of the 26 pilots, 7 had positive or borderline exercise tests, all of whom subsequently had angiograms. One patient with a negative exercise test also had a coronary angiogram. Of the 9 patients who had coronary angiograms as a consequence of screening, 5 had significant disease that required treatment and 4 had either trivial disease or normal coronary arteries. The current approach to investigate excessive cardiovascular risk in pilots relies heavily on exercise electrocardiograms as a diagnostic test, and may not be optimal either to detect disease or to protect pilots from unnecessary invasive procedures. A more comprehensive and accurate cardiac investigation algorithm to assess excessive CVD risk in pilots is required.

  17. Next-generation personalised medicine for high-risk paediatric cancer patients - The INFORM pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worst, Barbara C; van Tilburg, Cornelis M; Balasubramanian, Gnana Prakash; Fiesel, Petra; Witt, Ruth; Freitag, Angelika; Boudalil, Miream; Previti, Christopher; Wolf, Stephan; Schmidt, Sabine; Chotewutmontri, Sasithorn; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Schick, Matthias; Schlesner, Matthias; Hutter, Barbara; Taylor, Lenka; Borst, Tobias; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, Claus R; Milde, Till; Pfaff, Elke; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Stackelberg, Arend; Meisel, Roland; Borkhardt, Arndt; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Dirksen, Uta; Jürgens, Heribert; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, Andre O; Westermann, Frank; Fischer, Matthias; Burkhardt, Birgit; Wößmann, Wilhelm; Nathrath, Michaela; Bielack, Stefan S; Frühwald, Michael C; Fulda, Simone; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koscielniak, Ewa; Schwab, Matthias; Tremmel, Roman; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Schulte, Johannes H; Brors, Benedikt; von Deimling, Andreas; Lichter, Peter; Eggert, Angelika; Capper, David; Pfister, Stefan M; Jones, David T W; Witt, Olaf

    2016-09-01

    The 'Individualized Therapy for Relapsed Malignancies in Childhood' (INFORM) precision medicine study is a nationwide German program for children with high-risk relapsed/refractory malignancies, which aims to identify therapeutic targets on an individualised basis. In a pilot phase, reported here, we developed the logistical and analytical pipelines necessary for rapid and comprehensive molecular profiling in a clinical setting. Fifty-seven patients from 20 centers were prospectively recruited. Malignancies investigated included sarcomas (n = 25), brain tumours (n = 23), and others (n = 9). Whole-exome, low-coverage whole-genome, and RNA sequencing were complemented with methylation and expression microarray analyses. Alterations were assessed for potential targetability according to a customised prioritisation algorithm and subsequently discussed in an interdisciplinary molecular tumour board. Next-generation sequencing data were generated for 52 patients, with the full analysis possible in 46 of 52. Turnaround time from sample receipt until first report averaged 28 d. Twenty-six patients (50%) harbored a potentially druggable alteration with a prioritisation score of 'intermediate' or higher (level 4 of 7). Common targets included receptor tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and cell cycle control. Ten patients received a targeted therapy based on these findings, with responses observed in some previously treatment-refractory tumours. Comparative primary relapse analysis revealed substantial tumour evolution as well as one case of unsuspected secondary malignancy, highlighting the importance of re-biopsy at relapse. This study demonstrates the feasibility of comprehensive, real-time molecular profiling for high-risk paediatric cancer patients. This extended proof-of-concept, with examples of treatment consequences, expands upon previous personalised oncology endeavors

  18. Pilot Study of Physiologic Partograph Use Among Low-Risk, Nulliparous Women With Spontaneous Labor Onset.

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    Neal, Jeremy L; Lowe, Nancy K; Nacht, Amy S; Koschoreck, Kate; Anderson, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Neal and Lowe developed a physiologic partograph to give clinicians an evidence-based, uniform approach to assessing active labor progress and diagnosing dystocia in high-resource settings. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the feasibility of implementing the Neal and Lowe partograph for in-hospital labor assessment. A descriptive study of low-risk, nulliparous women with spontaneous labor onset was performed at an academic medical center. Eight certified nurse-midwives from a single practice used the Neal and Lowe partograph for the assessment of labor progress. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize characteristics, interventions, and outcomes for women with partograph-assessed labors. Labors assessed by nurse-midwives (n = 83) or obstetricians (n = 75) using their usual assessment strategies were also described for the year prior to partograph introduction to contextualize partograph-assessed labor findings. Inferential statistical tests were not performed. Thirty-one of 34 (91.2%) partographs were used correctly. Seventy-one percent (n = 22) of these women progressed to complete dilatation within expected physiologic time frames while the remaining women (n = 9) experienced labor dystocia. Similar proportions of women in the partograph and usual labor assessment groups received oxytocin during labor. The cesarean rate was lower in the partograph group than in the usual care groups. No cesareans were performed for dystocia in active labor for women whose labors were assessed via partograph. Implementation of the Neal and Lowe partograph for in-hospital labor assessment is feasible. Incorrect plotting and/or interpretation of the partograph may be further minimized by providing clinicians opportunities for ongoing partograph training after implementation or through partograph software development. The Neal and Lowe partograph may assist clinicians in safely and significantly decreasing primary cesarean births performed for active labor dystocia in

  19. Factors related to health outcomes and health risk behaviors of adolescents with lead exposure. A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study was an approach to determine the health outcomes (nutritional status, cognitive status, mental health and educational status), and the presence of health risk behaviors (aggressive behavior/ delinquency, hazardous/harmful drinking, substance use/abuse and tobacco use) of adolescents who have been exposed all their lives to lead. Besides, we could identify individual, familial and social factors, such as lead exposure, that were related to them. The sample included 40 adolesce...

  20. Can genetic risk information for age-related macular degeneration influence motivation to stop smoking? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, C A; Stinge, A; King, E A; Sothirachagan, S; Osmond, C; Lotery, A J

    2012-01-01

    Smoking can increase the risk of macular degeneration and this is more than additive if a person also has a genetic risk. The purpose of this study was to examine whether knowledge of genetic risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) could influence motivation to quit smoking. A questionnaire-based study of hypothetical case scenarios given to 49 smokers without AMD. Participants were randomly allocated to a generic risk, high genetic risk, or low genetic risk of developing AMD scenario. Forty-seven percent knew of the link between smoking and eye disease. In all, 76%, 67%, and 46% for the high risk, generic, and low risk groups, respectively, would rethink quitting (P for trend = 0.082). In all, 67%, 40%, and 38.5%, respectively, would be likely, very likely, or would definitely quit in the following month (P for trend = 0.023). Few participants (smoking session with no difference across groups. In all, 75.5% of participants would consider taking a genetic test for AMD. In this pilot study, a trend was seen for the group given high genetic risk information to be more likely to quit than the generic or low genetic risk groups. Participants were willing to take a genetic test but further work is needed to address the cost benefits of routine genetic testing for risk of AMD. More generic risk information should be given to the public, and health warnings on cigarette packets that 'smoking causes blindness' is a good way to achieve this.

  1. Using Faculty Learning Communities to Link FYE and High-Risk Core Courses: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Mo; Campbell, Kendra; Lowery-Hart, Russell D.; Mallard, Jessica; Andersen, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Can success rates in a gateway course be improved by linking it to a college success course? This article describes the results of a pilot study that linked a first-year biology course that had a high drop-out and failure rate to a college success course that included study skills. The proposal to link courses came from the work of a faculty…

  2. Risk Management and Disaster Recovery in Public Libraries in South Australia: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Diane L.; Evans, Nina; Kaeding, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports the findings of a study of risk management in public libraries. The focus of the research was to determine whether the libraries had a risk management and disaster plan for major disasters. Method: A qualitative study was done to investigate risk management and disaster recovery in public libraries in South…

  3. Developing rural community health risk assessments for climate change: a Tasmanian pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Erica J; Turner, Paul; Meinke, Holger; Holbrook, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the development and pilot implementation of an approach to support local community decision-makers to plan health adaptation responses to climate change. The approach involves health and wellbeing risk assessment supported through the use of an electronic tool. While climate change is a major foreseeable public health threat, the extent to which health services are prepared for, or able to adequately respond to, climate change impact-related risks remains unclear. Building health decision-support mechanisms in order to involve and empower local stakeholders to help create the basis for agreement on these adaptive actions is an important first step. The primary research question was 'What can be learned from pilot implementation of a community health and well-being risk assessment (CHWRA) information technology-based tool designed to support understanding of, and decision-making on, local community challenges and opportunities associated with health risks posed by climate change? The article examines the complexity of climate change science to adaptation translational processes, with reference to existing research literature on community development. This is done in the context of addressing human health risks for rural and remote communities in Tasmania, Australia. This process is further examined through the pilot implementation of an electronic tool designed to support the translation of physically based climate change impact information into community-level assessments of health risks and adaptation priorities. The procedural and technical nature of the CHWRA tool is described, and the implications of the data gathered from stakeholder workshops held at three rural Tasmanian local government sites are considered and discussed. Bushfire, depression and waterborne diseases were identified by community stakeholders as being potentially 'catastrophic' health effects 'likely' to 'almost certain' to occur at one or more Tasmanian rural sites

  4. Diabetes telemonitoring reduces the risk of hypoglycaemia during Ramadan: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J Y; Lee, S W H; Nasir, N H; How, S; Tan, C S S; Wong, C P

    2015-12-01

    This pilot study evaluated the short-term benefits of a telemonitoring-supplemented focused diabetic education compared with education alone in participants with Type 2 diabetes who were fasting during Ramadan. In this pilot mixed-method study, we identified 37 participants and randomly allocated them to either a telemonitoring group (n = 18) or a group receiving Ramadan-focused pre-education only (usual care; n = 19). The telemonitoring group received goal-setting and personalized feedback. The telemonitoring group was less likely to experience hypoglycaemia than the usual care group (odds ratio: 0.1273; 95% confidence interval: 0.0267-0.6059). No significant differences were noted in glycaemic control at the end of study. Participants viewed telemedicine as a more convenient alternative although technological barriers remain a concern. The results of this study reinforce the need for monitoring as well as educational initiatives for Muslims with diabetes who fast during Ramadan. Telemonitoring offers an attractive option requiring further research. (Clinical Trial Registry No. NCT02189135). © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  5. The Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Psychoeducational Approach to Improve Financial Competence in At-Risk Youth: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee White

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a growing number of initiatives have been aimed at increasing financial literacy among youth in America. However, these efforts have tended to target mainstream populations, and failing to adequately address the backgrounds, learning, and psychological needs of at-risk youth. This study piloted a curriculum on money management that presented a basic set of financial skills via story situations and characters that are meaningful to at-risk youth using a dynamic interactive multimedia online delivery to heighten youths’ interest to learn. The approach also helped at-risk youth gain insight into their money beliefs and psychological barriers to success, integrating change theory and techniques designed to enhance their motivation to change. Eighty-eight Job Corps participants were randomly assigned to treatment and control conditions. Results showed that the interactive multimedia curriculum produced significant gains in youth’s financial knowledge and confidence in money management skills.

  6. An intervention to improve care and reduce costs for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostrowski Shannon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A small percentage of high-risk patients accounts for a large proportion of Medicaid spending in the United States, which has become an urgent policy issue. Our objective was to pilot a novel patient-centered intervention for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions to determine its potential to improve care and reduce costs. Methods Community and hospital-based care management and coordination intervention with pre-post analysis of health care utilization. We enrolled Medicaid fee-for-service patients aged 18-64 who were admitted to an urban public hospital and identified as being at high risk for hospital readmission by a validated predictive algorithm. Enrolled patients were evaluated using qualitative and quantitative interview techniques to identify needs such as transportation to/advocacy during medical appointments, mental health/substance use treatment, and home visits. A community housing partner initiated housing applications in-hospital for homeless patients. Care managers facilitated appropriate discharge plans then worked closely with patients in the community using a harm reduction approach. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled; all were male, 18/19 were substance users, and 17/19 were homeless. Patients had a total of 64 inpatient admissions in the 12 months before the intervention, versus 40 in the following 12 months, a 37.5% reduction. Most patients (73.3% had fewer inpatient admissions in the year after the intervention compared to the prior year. Overall ED visits also decreased after study enrollment, while outpatient clinic visits increased. Yearly study hospital Medicaid reimbursements fell an average of $16,383 per patient. Conclusions A pilot intervention for high-cost patients shows promising results for health services usage. We are currently expanding our model to serve more patients at additional hospitals to see if the pilot's success can be replicated. Trial registration

  7. A Pilot Study on Developing a Standardized and Sensitive School Violence Risk Assessment with Manual Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzman, Drew H; Ni, Yizhao; Griffey, Marcus; Patel, Bianca; Warren, Ashaki; Latessa, Edward; Sorter, Michael

    2016-08-16

    School violence has increased over the past decade and innovative, sensitive, and standardized approaches to assess school violence risk are needed. In our current feasibility study, we initialized a standardized, sensitive, and rapid school violence risk approach with manual annotation. Manual annotation is the process of analyzing a student's transcribed interview to extract relevant information (e.g., key words) to school violence risk levels that are associated with students' behaviors, attitudes, feelings, use of technology (social media and video games), and other activities. In this feasibility study, we first implemented school violence risk assessments to evaluate risk levels by interviewing the student and parent separately at the school or the hospital to complete our novel school safety scales. We completed 25 risk assessments, resulting in 25 transcribed interviews of 12-18 year olds from 15 schools in Ohio and Kentucky. We then analyzed structured professional judgments, language, and patterns associated with school violence risk levels by using manual annotation and statistical methodology. To analyze the student interviews, we initiated the development of an annotation guideline to extract key information that is associated with students' behaviors, attitudes, feelings, use of technology and other activities. Statistical analysis was applied to associate the significant categories with students' risk levels to identify key factors which will help with developing action steps to reduce risk. In a future study, we plan to recruit more subjects in order to fully develop the manual annotation which will result in a more standardized and sensitive approach to school violence assessments.

  8. Identifying patient preferences for communicating risk estimates: A descriptive pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor Annette M

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients increasingly seek more active involvement in health care decisions, but little is known about how to communicate complex risk information to patients. The objective of this study was to elicit patient preferences for the presentation and framing of complex risk information. Method To accomplish this, eight focus group discussions and 15 one-on-one interviews were conducted, where women were presented with risk data in a variety of different graphical formats, metrics, and time horizons. Risk data were based on a hypothetical woman's risk for coronary heart disease, hip fracture, and breast cancer, with and without hormone replacement therapy. Participants' preferences were assessed using likert scales, ranking, and abstractions of focus group discussions. Results Forty peri- and postmenopausal women were recruited through hospital fliers (n = 25 and a community health fair (n = 15. Mean age was 51 years, 50% were non-Caucasian, and all had completed high school. Bar graphs were preferred by 83% of participants over line graphs, thermometer graphs, 100 representative faces, and survival curves. Lifetime risk estimates were preferred over 10 or 20-year horizons, and absolute risks were preferred over relative risks and number needed to treat. Conclusion Although there are many different formats for presenting and framing risk information, simple bar charts depicting absolute lifetime risk were rated and ranked highest overall for patient preferences for format.

  9. A clinic-based youth development program to reduce sexual risk behaviors among adolescent girls: prime time pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieving, Renee E; Bernat, Debra H; Resnick, Michael D; Oliphant, Jennifer; Pettingell, Sandra; Plowman, Shari; Skay, Carol

    2012-07-01

    Multifaceted, sustained efforts are needed to reduce early pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases among high-risk adolescents. An important area for research is testing youth development interventions offered through clinic settings, where access to high-risk adolescents is plentiful and few efforts have rigorously evaluated a dual approach of building protective factors while addressing risk. This article presents findings from a pilot study of Prime Time, a clinic-based youth development intervention to reduce sexual risk behaviors among girls at risk for early pregnancy. Girls aged 13 to 17 years meeting specified risk criteria were assigned to Prime Time treatment groups. The Prime Time intervention included a combination of case management services and peer leadership groups. Participants completed self-report surveys at baseline, 12 and 18 months following enrollment. At 12 months, the intervention group reported significantly fewer sexual partners than the control group. At 18 months, the intervention group reported significantly more consistent condom use with trends toward more consistent hormonal and dual method use. Dose-response analyses suggested that relatively high levels of exposure to a youth development intervention were needed to change contraceptive use behaviors among adolescents at risk for early pregnancy. Given promising findings, further testing of the Prime Time intervention is warranted.

  10. Laboratory tests to identify patients at risk of early major adverse events: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M; Bebee, B; Bailey, J; Robbins, R; Hart, G K; Bellomo, R

    2014-10-01

    To test whether commonly measured laboratory variables can identify surgical patients at risk of major adverse events (death, unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) admission or rapid response team (RRT) activation). We conducted a prospective observational study in a surgical ward of a university-affiliated hospital in a cohort of 834 surgical patients admitted for >24 h. We applied a previously validated multivariable model-derived risk assessment to each combined set of common laboratory tests to identify patients at risk. We compared the clinical course of such patients with that of control patients from the same ward who had blood tests but were identified as low risk. We studied 7955 batches and 73,428 individual tests in 834 patients (males 55%; average age 65.8 ± 17.6 years). Among these patients, 66 (7.9%) were identified as 'high risk'. High-risk patients were older (75.9 vs 61.8 years of age; P identify surgical ward patients at risk of early major adverse events. Further studies are needed to assess whether such identification system can be used to trigger interventions that help improve patient outcomes. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. Risk factors for fatigue among airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Alwin; Boot, Cécile R L; Hlobil, Hynek; Smid, Tjabe; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine risk factors for fatigue among airline pilots, taking into account person-, work-, health-, sleep-, and lifestyle-related characteristics. The study population consisted of 502 pilots who participated in the MORE Energy study. Included risk factors were either measured through an online questionnaire or provided by the company. The outcome of this study, fatigue, was assessed using the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS), and was defined as scoring more than 76 points on this questionnaire. The association of the risk factors with fatigue was determined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Of the participating pilots, 29.5 % scored more than 76 points on the CIS and were classified as being fatigued. The fully adjusted regression model showed that person-, work-, health-, and lifestyle-related characteristics were associated with fatigue. Pilots who were aged 31 to 40 (OR 3.36, 95 % CI 1.32-8.53) or 41 to 50 (OR 4.19, 95 % CI 1.40-12.47), an evening type (OR 2.40, 95 % CI 1.38-4.16), scored higher on work-life balance disturbance (OR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.10-1.36), scored higher on need for recovery (OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.01-1.04), scored lower on general health perception (OR 0.31, 95 % CI 0.20-0.47), were less physically active (OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.89), and had a moderate alcohol consumption (OR 3.88, 95 % CI 1.21-12.43), were at higher risk for fatigue. Higher age, being an evening type, disturbance of the work-life balance, more need for recovery, a lower perceived health, less physical activity, and moderate alcohol consumption were shown to be risk factors for fatigue. Further longitudinal research is needed to elucidate the direction of the associations found and to evaluate the effects of possible countermeasures in airline pilots.

  12. THE IMPACT OF SEVERITY OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK ASSESSMENT USING FRAMINGHAM RISK SCORE - A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is the most common micro vascular complications of diabetes, estimated to affect approximately 100 million people worldwide, while cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death in individuals with type II diabetes. There is limited Indian data reporting the association of Diabetic retinopathy and its severity with CVD. AIM : To study the relation between the severity of DR and risk of CVD in cen tral Indian subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS : The subjects consisted of 50 patients with Diabetes mellitus type II having varying grades of diabetic retinopathy attending eye OPD of a tertiary care hospital in central India. 10 year risk of developing CVD was estimated using the Framingham Risk Score. RESULTS : The number of subjects with an increased risk of developing CVD increased with advancing age (28.57% in 40 - 49 years to 61 .53% in > 60 years age group. The risk of CVD was slightly more in males (55. 55% compared to females (43.47%. Out of the 30 patients having sight threatening diabetic retinopathy, 13 had low risk of developing CVD while 17 had high risk of developing CVD. The prevalence of sight threatening retinopathy was more in the high risk group (56.67% when compared to the low - risk group (40%. DISCUSSION : We found that more subjects having high risk of developing CVD had sight - threatening DR compared to those having low risk. CONCLUSION : Diabetic retinopathy may contribute to CVD risk in Indian population too. A careful cardiovascular assessment and follow - up may be required in individuals with diabetic retinopathy, using a larger sample size

  13. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Baxter, S.L.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Rowe, M.D.; Sun, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Anspaugh, L.; Layton, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Two important environmental problems at the USDOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) facility in Fernald, Ohio were studied in this human health risk assessment. The problems studied were radon emissions from the K-65 waste silos, and offsite contamination of ground water with uranium. Waste from the processing of pitchblende ore is stored in the K-65 silos at the FEMP. Radium-226 in the waste decays to radon gas which escapes to the outside atmosphere. The concern is for an increase in lung cancer risk for nearby residents associated with radon exposure. Monitoring data and a gaussian plume transport model were used to develop a source term and predict exposure and risk to fenceline residents, residents within 1 and 5 miles of the silos, and residents of Hamilton and Cincinnati, Ohio. Two release scenarios were studied: the routine release of radon from the silos and an accidental loss of one silo dome integrity. Exposure parameters and risk factors were described as distributions. Risks associated with natural background radon concentrations were also estimated.

  14. Atherosclerotic risk and social jetlag in rotating shift-workers : First evidence from a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Duboutay, Françoise; Haubruge, Damien; Kerkhofs, Myriam; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Skene, Debra J

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify atherosclerotic risk using pulse wave velocity (PWV) in steel workers employed in different shift-work rotations, and to elucidate its relationship to social jetlag and shift schedule details. PARTICIPANTS: Male workers in a steel factory (n=77, 32 fa

  15. Atherosclerotic risk and social jetlag in rotating shift-workers : first evidence from a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Duboutay, Françoise; Haubruge, Damien; Kerkhofs, Myriam; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Skene, Debra J

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify atherosclerotic risk using pulse wave velocity (PWV) in steel workers employed in different shift-work rotations, and to elucidate its relationship to social jetlag and shift schedule details. PARTICIPANTS: Male workers in a steel factory (n=77, 32 fa

  16. Atherosclerotic risk and social jetlag in rotating shift-workers : First evidence from a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Duboutay, Françoise; Haubruge, Damien; Kerkhofs, Myriam; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Skene, Debra J

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify atherosclerotic risk using pulse wave velocity (PWV) in steel workers employed in different shift-work rotations, and to elucidate its relationship to social jetlag and shift schedule details. PARTICIPANTS: Male workers in a steel factory (n=77, 32

  17. Job level risk assessment using task level strain index scores: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkaus, Phillip; Bloswick, Donald S; Sesek, Richard; Mann, Clay; Bernard, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores 2 methods of modifying the Strain Index (SI) to assess the ergonomic risk of multi-task jobs. Twenty-eight automotive jobs (15 cases and 13 controls) were studied. The first method is based on the maximum task SI score, and the second method is modeled on the NIOSH Composite Lifting Index (CLI) algorithm, named cumulative assessment of risk to the distal upper extremity (CARD). Significant odds ratios of 11 (CI 1.7-69) and 24 (CI 2.4-240) were obtained using the modified maximum task and CARD, respectively. This indicates that modification of the SI may be useful in determining the risk of distal upper extremity injury associated with a multi-task job.

  18. Periodontal pocket as a potential reservoir of high risk human papilloma virus: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath Mundoor Dayakar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Human papilloma viruses (HPVs are small DNA viruses that have been identified in periodontal pocket as well as gingival sulcus. High risk HPVs are also associated with a subset of head and neck carcinomas. HPV detection in periodontium has previously involved DNA detection. This study attempts to: (a Detect the presence or absence of high risk HPV in marginal periodontiun by identifying E6/E7 messenger RNA (mRNA in cells from samples obtained by periodontal pocket scraping. (b Detect the percentage of HPV E6/E7 mRNA in cells of pocket scrapings, which is responsible for producing oncoproteins E6 and E7. Materials and Methods: Pocket scrapings from the periodontal pockets of eight subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis were taken the detection of presence or absence of E6, E7 mRNA was performed using in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. Results: HPV E6/E7 mRNA was detected in four of the eight samples. Conclusion: Presence of high risk human papillomaviruses in periodontal pockets patients of diagnosed with chronic periodontitis, not suffering from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the present day could link periodontitis to HPV related squamous cell carcinoma. Prevalence studies are needed detecting the presence of HPV in marginal periodontium as well as prospective studies of HPV positive periodontitis patients are required to explore this possible link.

  19. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  20. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I. [ed.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center; Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Hamilton, L.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,24O}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual {sup 239}Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,24O}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10{sup {minus}6}, 6 x 10{sup {minus}5}, and 5 x 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  1. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I. (ed.)

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of [sup 239,24O]Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual [sup 239]Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with [sup 239,24O]Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10[sup [minus]6], 6 x 10[sup [minus]5], and 5 x 10[sup [minus]4], respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  2. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I. (ed.)

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of [sup 239,24O]Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual [sup 239]Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with [sup 239,24O]Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10[sup [minus]6], 6 x 10[sup [minus]5], and 5 x 10[sup [minus]4], respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  3. Impact of adalimumab treatment on cardiovascular risk biomarkers in psoriasis: Results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkalpakiotis, Spyridon; Arenbergerova, Monika; Gkalpakioti, Petra; Potockova, Jana; Arenberger, Petr; Kraml, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic systemic immune-mediated inflammatory dermatosis associated with several comorbidities. Psoriasis patients are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD), namely, coronary heart disease, stroke or peripheral vascular disease, and psoriasis seems to be an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Antipsoriatic systemic therapy, especially anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, seems to exert a beneficial effect on these comorbidities. The purpose of this study was: (i) to measure the level of cardiovascular serum markers in psoriasis patients in comparison with healthy volunteers; and (ii) to compare the serum level of the same markers in patients before and 3 months after adalimumab therapy. We investigated six biomarkers connected to CVD: C-reactive protein (measured high sensitively, hsCRP), oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL), oxLDL/β-glycoprotein I complex (oxLDL/β2GPI), vascular endothelial adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin and interleukin (IL)-22. These biomarkers were measured in 21 patients with moderate/severe psoriasis before and after treatment with adalimumab and in healthy volunteers. hsCRP (P psoriasis patients but the difference did not reach statistical significance. A decrease of E-selectin (P psoriasis but also decreases serum cardiovascular biomarkers. E-selectin and IL-22 could serve for monitoring of the efficacy of antipsoriatic systemic therapy on cardiovascular risk. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  4. Clinical outcomes and risk factors for perforation in gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection: A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Tomita, Toshihiko; Toyoshima, Fumihiko; Sakurai, Jun; Kondo, Takashi; Asano, Haruki; Yamasaki, Takahisa; Okugawa, Takuya; Ikehara, Hisatomo; Oshima, Tadayuki; Fukui, Hirokazu; Miwa, Hiroto

    2013-06-16

    To evaluate clinical outcomes and risk factors for endoscopic perforation during endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in a prospective study. We investigated the clinical outcomes and risk factors for the development of perforation in 98 consecutive gastric neoplasms undergoing ESD regarding. Demographic and clinical parameters including patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors, clinical parameters, and duration of hospital stay were analyzed for risk factors for perforation. In subgroup analysis, we also compared the clinical outcomes between perforation and "silent" free air without endoscopically visible perforation detected only by computed tomography. Perforation was identified in 8.2% of patients. All patients were managed conservatively by the administration of antibiotics. The mean procedure time was significantly longer in patients with endoscopic perforation than in those without. According to the receiver-operating characteristic analysis, the resulting cutoff value of the procedure time for perforation was 115 min (87.5% sensitivity, 56.7% specificity). Prolonged procedure time (≥ 115 min) was associated with an increased risk of perforation (odds ratio 9.15; 95%CI: 1.08-77.54; P = 0.04). Following ESD, body temperature and C-reactive protein level were significantly higher in patients with perforation than in those without (P = 0.02), whereas there was no difference between these patient groups on the starting day of oral intake or of hospitalization. In subgroup analysis, the post-ESD clinical course was not different between endoscopic perforation and silent free air. Only prolonged procedure time (≥ 115 min) was significantly associated with perforation. The clinical outcomes of perforation are favorable and are comparable to those of patients with or without silent free air.

  5. High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV screening and detection in healthy patient saliva samples: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Robert C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human papillomaviruses (HPV are a large family of non-enveloped DNA viruses, mainly associated with cervical cancers. Recent epidemiologic evidence has suggested that HPV may be an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal cancers. Evidence now suggests HPV may modulate the malignancy process in some tobacco- and alcohol-induced oropharynx tumors, but might also be the primary oncogenic factor for inducing carcinogenesis among some non-smokers. More evidence, however, is needed regarding oral HPV prevalence among healthy adults to estimate risk. The goal of this study was to perform an HPV screening of normal healthy adults to assess oral HPV prevalence. Methods Healthy adult patients at a US dental school were selected to participate in this pilot study. DNA was isolated from saliva samples and screened for high-risk HPV strains HPV16 and HPV18 and further processed using qPCR for quantification and to confirm analytical sensitivity and specificity. Results Chi-square analysis revealed the patient sample was representative of the general clinic population with respect to gender, race and age (p Conclusions The successful recruitment and screening of healthy adult patients revealed HPV16, but not HPV18, was present in a small subset. These results provide new information about oral HPV status, which may help to contextualize results from other studies that demonstrate oral cancer rates have risen in the US among both females and minorities and in some geographic areas that are not solely explained by rates of tobacco and alcohol use. The results of this study may be of significant value to further our understanding of oral health and disease risk, as well as to help design future studies exploring the role of other factors that influence oral HPV exposure, as well as the short- and long-term consequences of oral HPV infection.

  6. Utilization of 3-Month Yoga Program for Adults at High Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeongra Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Various modes of physical activity, combined with dieting, have been widely recommended to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Among these, yoga holds promise for reducing risk factors for type 2 diabetes by promoting weight loss, improving glucose levels and reducing blood pressure and lipid levels. This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility of implementing a 12-week yoga program among adults at high risk for type 2 diabetes. Twenty-three adults (19 Whites and 4 non-Whites were randomly assigned to the yoga intervention group or the educational group. The yoga group participated in a 3-month yoga intervention with sessions twice per week and the educational group received general health educational materials every 2 weeks. All participants completed questionnaires and had blood tests at baseline and at the end of 3 months. Effect sizes were reported to summarize the efficacy of the intervention. All participants assigned to the yoga intervention completed the yoga program without complication and expressed high satisfaction with the program (99.2%. Their yoga session attendance ranged from 58.3 to 100%. Compared with the education group, the yoga group experienced improvements in weight, blood pressure, insulin, triglycerides and exercise self-efficacy indicated by small to large effect sizes. This preliminary study indicates that a yoga program would be a possible risk reduction option for adults at high risk for type 2 diabetes. In addition, yoga holds promise as an approach to reducing cardiometabolic risk factors and increasing exercise self-efficacy for this group.

  7. The direction of shift-work rotation impacts metabolic risk independent of chronotype and social jetlag--an exploratory pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Duboutay, Françoise; Haubruge, Damien; Hampton, Shelagh; Darling, Andrea L; Berry, Jacqueline L; Kerkhofs, Myriam; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Skene, Debra J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to explore the risk of metabolic abnormalities in steel workers employed in different shift-work rotations. Male workers in a steel factory [16 employed in a fast clockwise rotation (CW), 18 in slow counterclockwise rotation (CC), 9 day workers (DW); mean age 43.3 ± S

  8. Falls prevention advice and visual feedback to those at risk of falling: study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that functional strength and balance exercises can reduce the risk of falling in older people if they are done on a regular basis. However, the repetitive nature of these exercises; combined with the inherent lack of feedback of progress may discourage seniors from exercising in the home, thereby rendering such an intervention ineffective. This study hypothesizes that the use of visual feedback and multimodal games will be more effective in encouraging adherence to home rehabilitation than standard care; thereby promoting independence and improving the quality of life in older adults at risk of falling. Methods A pllel-group pilot randomized controlled trial with 3 groups of participants will be conducted in the home for 12 weeks. Participants will include older adults who have been identified as at risk of falling (n = 48), over the age of 65, living in the community, and suitable for a home exercise intervention. The primary outcome is adherence to exercise. Secondary outcomes include: variability in stride length, stride time and double support time (DST); walking speed; Timed up and go test (TUG); Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I); CONFbal scale; Romberg’s test; and quality of life measures (SF-12 and EuroQol EQ-5D). Qualitative assessments on personal experiences with rehabilitation tools will be done before and after the trial. Discussion This study will investigate the use of visual feedback and engaging multimodal activities to address the problem of non-compliance to home exercises for falls rehabilitation. One of the unique qualities of this study is the adaptation of special participatory design methods through which the end users (fallers) will be involved in the design of the proposed rehabilitation tools at various stages of the design process. Trial registration ISRCTN79967470 PMID:23510162

  9. HIV/STI risk among male Mexican immigrants in Dallas, Texas: findings from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kate S; Eggleston, Elizabeth; Diaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Garcia, Sandra G

    2010-12-01

    Rates of HIV and STIs are higher among Latinos than the general U.S. population. A number of factors place Latino immigrants at particularly high risk. 128 male Mexican immigrants in Dallas, Texas completed personal interviews. We measured the prevalence of HIV/STI risk factors and identified sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics associated with higher risk. 9% of the total sample had 3 or more sexual partners in the past year. 5% had sex with a commercial sex worker (CSW). 11% had sex with another man. 11% had a previous STI diagnosis. Risk behaviors and STI history were more prevalent among men who had used illegal drugs or frequently consumed alcohol (18% of the sample) than among others. The overall prevalence of HIV/STI risk factors in this population was moderate. However, men who drank alcohol frequently and used illegal drugs were more likely than others to report engaging in behaviors that put them at risk for acquiring HIV/STI.

  10. Prevalence and risk factors for Sick Building Syndrome among Italian correctional officers: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chirico

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the past two decades, numerous studies on indoor air and the Sick Building Syndrome (SBS have been conducted, mostly in office environments. However, there is little knowledge about SBS in police officers. This study was aimed to fill this gap. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in 2016 at the Triveneto Penitentiary Center, Northern Italy. Chi-square was used to test the difference of prevalence between office workers (OWs and correctional officers (COs of personal characteristics, cases of SBS, and general and mucocutaneous symptoms associated with SBS. A binary logistic regression was used to identify among individual, environmental, and psychosocial characteristics, factors associated with correctional officers’ Sick Building Syndrome. Results: Chi-squared analyses revealed that there were statistically significant differences in the estimated prevalence of SBS general symptoms (χ2 (1 = 12.22, P < .05, SBS mucocutaneous symptoms (χ2 (1 = 9.04, P < .05, and cases of SBS (χ2 (1 = 4.39, P <.05 between COs and OWs. COs reported that their health had been affected by the passive smoking (β = 2.34, P < .05 and unpleasant odour (β = 2.51, P < .05 as environmental risk factors; work-family conflict (β = 2.14, P < .05, psychological and physical isolation (β = 2.07, P < .05, and negative public image (β = 2.06, P < .05 as psychosocial risk factors. Finally, atopy (β = 2.02, P < .05 and to be current smoker (β = 2.02, P < .05 were statistically significant behavioral predictors of SBS among correctional officers. Discussion: Our survey showed that symptoms compatible with the sick building syndrome are common in correctional officers and that psychosocial work climate and exposure to passive smoking could have a strong influence on the prevalence of both general and mucocutaneous symptoms associated with SBS. A health policy for passive tobacco smoking within prisons, and for work-related stress

  11. COG risk informed in-service inspection (RI-ISI) pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaie-Manesh, M. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); O' Regan, P. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Chesworth, S. [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., San Francisco, California (United States)

    2011-07-01

    In 2009, CNSC prepared 'Guidelines for Risk-Informed In-service Inspection for Piping,' that provided guidance for licensees to develop a RI-ISI program as an alternate to the current CSA N285.4 and augmented programs for piping inspection. In response, a COG project was initiated to develop a best-fit methodology for the CANDU design and evaluate plant risk levels between current and RI-ISI inspection programs. EPRI RI-ISI was used as a starting point for methodology development. The effectiveness of current piping inspection programs in managing risk-significant locations was evaluated, and potential risk reductions associated with relocating or adding inspections were investigated.

  12. Little change of modifiable risk factors 1 year after stroke: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units.......Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units....

  13. Little change of modifiable risk factors 1 year after stroke: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units.......Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units....

  14. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M; Ingul, Charlotte B

    2016-06-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), 10.4 %), p heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key pointsLow volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetesThe weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes.However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for exercise volumes or longer intervention period.

  15. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Revdal, Siri M. Hollekim-Strand, Charlotte B. Ingul

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10 or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min-1·kg-1, 10.4 %, p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min-1·kg-1 (4.6 %, p = 0.03, respectively. Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04 and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02. Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated.

  16. A pilot study of sampling subcutaneous adipose tissue to examine biomarkers of cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Kristin L.; Makar, Karen W.; Kratz, Mario; Foster-Schubert, Karen E.; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2009-01-01

    Examination of adipose tissue biology may provide important insight into mechanistic links for the observed association between higher body fat and risk of several types of cancer, in particular colorectal and breast cancer. We tested two different methods of obtaining adipose tissue from healthy individuals.

  17. Risk factors for hidradenitis suppurativa: a pilot study Fatores de risco para hidradenite supurativa: um estudo piloto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Vilaverde Schmitt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease whose etiology is not fully understood. We conducted a pilot case-control study matched by sex and age with other dermatological patients to analyze possible risk factors associated with this disease. We included 15 cases and 45 controls, 67% were women. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis identified significant association with smoking, higher body mass index and family history. The use of hormonal contraceptives was less frequent in women with hidradenitis.A hidradenite supurativa é uma doença inflamatória crônica debilitante de etiologia parcialmente compreendida. Realizamos um estudo piloto tipo caso-controle pareado por sexo e idade com outros pacientes dermatológicos para analisar prováveis fatores de risco associados a esta doença. Incluímos 15 casos e 45 controles, sendo 67% mulheres. Análise bivariada e multivariada por regressão logística identificou associação significativa com tabagismo, índice de massa corporal mais elevado e história familiar. O uso de contraceptivos hormonais foi menos frequente nas portadoras de hidradenite.

  18. DO UNIVERSITY STUDENTS HAVE HIGH CARDIOVASCULAR RISK? A PILOT STUDY FROM UNIVERSITI MALAYSIA SARAWAK (UNIMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAMARUDIN K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A health screening was done in UNIMAS in August 2008 for 237 undergraduate students. Body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC and blood pressure (BP were measured for all subjects. Total cholesterol and glucose levels were checked for those who fulfilled the screening criteria. The proportion of participants with cardiovascular (CVD risk factors was high. The strategies for health promotion should not only be targeted to the older community but also to the younger community.

  19. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  20. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  1. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  2. A Pilot Cross-Sectional Study of Postpartum Wrist Pain in an Urban Chinese Population: Its Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Regina W S; Tam, Wing-Hung; Chan, Dicken C C; Yip, Benjamin H K; Tam, Lucia W Y; Chow, Lyan L Y; Chung, Vincent C H; Chung, Roger Y; Wong, Samuel Y S

    2017-07-01

    Wrist pain after childbirth is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Little is known about the prevalence of this musculoskeletal disorder which is important to overall maternal health. To examine the prevalence of and risk factors for de novo wrist pain in women after childbirth. A pilot cross-sectional survey. A telephone interview was conducted 2 months after childbirth among women who delivered at a tertiary hospital in Hong Kong. The prevalence of de novo wrist pain was recorded; its severity was rated using the numerical rating scale and Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) with pain and functional subscale scores. In total, 259 women aged 32.8 ± 4.0 years participated; 149 women (57.5%) developed wrist pain after childbirth and 125 (84%) had persistent wrist pain 2 months postpartum. The majority had moderate (43.5%) to severe (21%) wrist pain. Bilateral involvement was common (56.8%), with most of the pain (59.3%) located on the radial side of the wrist. Primiparity was associated with wrist pain development (odds ratio 2.62, 95% confidence interval 1.33 - 5.16, P = 0.01); pain intensity was negatively correlated with the baby's birth weight (beta = -1.059, P = 0.013). Mean PRWE pain and function scores were 22.8 ± 10.3 and 15.6 ± 10.7, respectively. Cross-sectional survey is prone to volunteer bias, though recent literature indicates that the bias may not substantially affect the internal validity of the study. Wrist pain is prevalent after childbirth; future studies may consider looking into its exact pathology, long-term consequences, and overall effect on maternal health. Wrist pain, DeQuervain disease, postpartum, childbirth, mothers, prevalence, cross sectional study, survey.

  3. The waste isolation pilot plant transuranic waste repository: A case study in radioactive waste disposal safety and risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Leif G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) deep geological defense-generated transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) repository in the United States was certified on the 13 of May 1998 and opened on the 26 of March 1999. Two sets of safety/performance assessment calculations supporting the certification of the WIPP TRUW repository show that the maximum annual individual committed effective dose will be 32 times lower than the regulatory limit and that the cumulative amount of radionuclide releases will be at least 10 times, more likely at least 20 times, lower than the regulatory limits. Yet, perceptions remain among the public that the WIPP TRUW repository imposes an unacceptable risk.

  4. Preoperative systemic etoposide/ifosfamide/doxorubicin chemotherapy combined with regional hyperthermia in high-risk sarcoma: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issels, R D; Bosse, D; Abdel-Rahman, S; Starck, M; Panzer, M; Jauch, K W; Stiegler, H; Berger, H; Sauer, H; Peter, K

    1993-01-01

    From November 1990 to September 1991, 23 adults with high-risk, nonmetastatic sarcomas (20 soft-tissue sarcomas and 3 chondrosarcomas) were entered in a pilot protocol (RHT-91) involving regional hyperthermia combined with systemic chemotherapy followed by surgery. Of these patients, 12 had undergone previous surgery and/or radiation, 5 had received previous multidrug chemotherapy, and 6 were previously untreated. A tumor size of > 8 cm and/or an extracompartmental tumor location (11 patients) or local recurrence (12 patients) were defined as high-risk factors in addition to tumor grading (21 patients had grade 2 or 3 sarcomas). Regional hyperthermia was produced by an electromagnetic deep-regional-heating device. For systemic chemotherapy, all patients received etoposide/ifosfamide/doxorubicin (EIA) and mesna, with regional hyperthermia being given only on days 1 and 4 in repeated EIA/regional hyperthermia cycles every 3 weeks. Tumor temperatures (range, 40 degrees-44 degrees C) were measured by invasive thermometry in all patients during each regional hyperthermia treatment. A total of 181 regional hyperthermia treatments were applied within the pelvic region (11 patients) or extremities (12 patients) bearing relatively large tumors (mean volume, 848 cm3). By the cutoff date for this analysis (October 15, 1991), 13 patients had undergone surgery after receiving 2-6 (mean, 3.8) cycles of EIA chemotherapy combined with regional hyperthermia; all tumors except one were resected without disfiguration. In 22 evaluable patients (minimum, 2 EIA plus regional hyperthermia cycles), the clinical response rate was 27%, with 6 patients showing partial responses (PRs). In addition, a pathologic response to preoperative thermochemotherapy was evaluable in 13 patients, with 4 responders (31%) having > 50% histologic necrosis. In all, 3 of the responders (1 PR and 2 patients with > 50% histologic necrosis) relapsed within 3 months of surgical resection. The other 7 responding

  5. Efficacy of high intensity exercise on disease activity and cardiovascular risk in active axial spondyloarthritis: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje Halvorsen Sveaas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical therapy is recommended for the management of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA and flexibility exercises have traditionally been the main focus. Cardiovascular (CV diseases are considered as a major health concern in axSpA and there is strong evidence that endurance and strength exercise protects against CV diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of high intensity endurance and strength exercise on disease activity and CV health in patients with active axSpA. METHODS: In a single blinded randomized controlled pilot study the exercise group (EG performed 12 weeks of endurance and strength exercise while the control group (CG received treatment as usual. The primary outcome was the Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS Disease Activity Score (ASDAS. Secondary outcomes included patient reported disease activity (Bath AS Disease Activity Index [BASDAI], physical function (Bath AS Functional Index [BASFI], and CV risk factors measured by arterial stiffness (Augmentation Index [Alx] and Pulse Wave Velocity [PWV], cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2 peak and body composition. ANCOVA on the post intervention values with baseline values as covariates was used to assess group differences, and Mann Whitney U-test was used for outcomes with skewed residuals. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients were included and 24 (EG, n = 10, CG, n = 14 completed the study. A mean treatment effect of -0.7 (95%CI: -1.4, 0.1 was seen in ASDAS score. Treatment effects were also observed in secondary outcomes (mean group difference [95%CI]: BASDAI: -2.0 (-3.6, -0.4, BASFI: -1.4 (-2.6, -0.3, arterial stiffness (estimated median group differences [95% CI]: AIx (%: -5.3 (-11.0, -0.5, and for PVW (m/s: -0.3 (-0.7, 0.0, VO2 peak (ml/kg/min (mean group difference [95%CI]: 3.7 (2.1, 5.2 and trunk fat (%: -1.8 (-3.0, -0.6. No adverse events occurred. CONCLUSION: High intensity exercise improved disease activity and reduced CV risk factors in

  6. Efficacy of high intensity exercise on disease activity and cardiovascular risk in active axial spondyloarthritis: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveaas, Silje Halvorsen; Berg, Inger Jorid; Provan, Sella Aarrestad; Semb, Anne Grete; Hagen, Kåre Birger; Vøllestad, Nina; Fongen, Camilla; Olsen, Inge C; Michelsen, Annika; Ueland, Thor; Aukrust, Pål; Kvien, Tore K; Dagfinrud, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Physical therapy is recommended for the management of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and flexibility exercises have traditionally been the main focus. Cardiovascular (CV) diseases are considered as a major health concern in axSpA and there is strong evidence that endurance and strength exercise protects against CV diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of high intensity endurance and strength exercise on disease activity and CV health in patients with active axSpA. In a single blinded randomized controlled pilot study the exercise group (EG) performed 12 weeks of endurance and strength exercise while the control group (CG) received treatment as usual. The primary outcome was the Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) Disease Activity Score (ASDAS). Secondary outcomes included patient reported disease activity (Bath AS Disease Activity Index [BASDAI]), physical function (Bath AS Functional Index [BASFI]), and CV risk factors measured by arterial stiffness (Augmentation Index [Alx]) and Pulse Wave Velocity [PWV]), cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2 peak) and body composition. ANCOVA on the post intervention values with baseline values as covariates was used to assess group differences, and Mann Whitney U-test was used for outcomes with skewed residuals. Twenty-eight patients were included and 24 (EG, n = 10, CG, n = 14) completed the study. A mean treatment effect of -0.7 (95%CI: -1.4, 0.1) was seen in ASDAS score. Treatment effects were also observed in secondary outcomes (mean group difference [95%CI]): BASDAI: -2.0 (-3.6, -0.4), BASFI: -1.4 (-2.6, -0.3), arterial stiffness (estimated median group differences [95% CI]): AIx (%): -5.3 (-11.0, -0.5), and for PVW (m/s): -0.3 (-0.7, 0.0), VO2 peak (ml/kg/min) (mean group difference [95%CI]: 3.7 (2.1, 5.2) and trunk fat (%): -1.8 (-3.0, -0.6). No adverse events occurred. High intensity exercise improved disease activity and reduced CV risk factors in patients with active axSpA. These

  7. Multicenter pilot study: safety of automated chest percussion in patients at risk for intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, DaiWai M; Bader, Mary Kay; Dennis, Christina; Mahanes, Dea; Riemen, Kristina

    2010-06-01

    In the critical care setting, the focus of care during the first few weeks following acute brain injury is prevention of secondary brain injury by optimizing cerebral perfusion. Ensuring adequate oxygenation and perfusion of cerebral tissues requires attention to all of the body systems. Chest percussion therapy (CPT) promotes pulmonary hygiene and optimizes gas exchange by opening the alveoli. However, many patients with brain injury have intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, and conventional wisdom supports limiting activities such as CPT that may stimulate the patient and increase ICP. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of CPT on ICP. Thirty participants were enrolled over a 6-month period. Data were collected at 1-minute intervals for 1 hour. Each patient was randomized to receive automated CPT (using specialty beds) for 10 minutes, starting at 10, 20, 30, or 40 minutes into the hour. There were no differences in mean ICP values before, during, or after CPT. This study provides evidence that it is safe to perform CPT in patients with ICP monitoring in situ.

  8. Pharmacogenetic polymorphism as an independent risk factor for frequent hospitalizations in older adults with polypharmacy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finkelstein J

    2016-10-01

    pharmacogenetic polymorphism frequency between cases and controls was statistically significant (p<0.05. In 50% of cases, more than one major pharmacogenetic polymorphism was found. The frequency of CYP2C19 rapid metabolizer, CYP3A4/5 poor metabolizer, VKORC1 low sensitivity, and CYP2D6 rapid metabolizer status in cases was 67%, 33%, 33%, and 17%, respectively, which significantly exceeded respective prevalence in general population. The mean number of major gene–drug interactions found in cases was 2.8±2.2, whereas no major drug–gene interactions were identified in controls. The difference in the number of major drug–gene interactions between cases and controls was statistically significant (p<0.05. The pilot data supported the hypothesis that pharmacogenetic polymorphism may represent an independent risk factor for frequent hospitalizations in older adults with polypharmacy. Due to small sample size, the results of this proof-of-concept study cannot be conclusive. Further work on the utility of pharmacogenetic testing for optimization of medication regimens in this vulnerable group of older adults is warranted. Keywords: urgent care utilization, risk factors, personalized medicine, elderly, case–control study

  9. Family context of mental health risk in Tsunami-exposed adolescents: findings from a pilot study in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickrama, K A S; Kaspar, Violet

    2007-02-01

    Using survey data from 325 Tsunami-exposed adolescents and mothers from two villages in southern Sri Lanka, this pilot study investigated influences of Tsunami exposure and subsequent psychosocial losses on adolescent depressive and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Findings generally support the study hypotheses: disaster exposure (for example experiences of property destruction and deaths of close others) contributes to depressive and PTSD symptoms in adolescents. Findings also show that psychosocial losses associated with Tsunami exposure, such as prolonged displacement, social losses, family losses, and mental health impairment among mothers, contribute to depressive and PTSD symptoms in adolescents. Results suggest that the influence of Tsunami exposure on adolescent mental health operates partially through Tsunami-related psychosocial losses. As expected, positive mother-child relationships provide a compensatory influence on both depressive and PTSD symptoms of adolescents. In addition, high levels of depressive symptoms among mothers increases the detrimental influence of other Tsunami-related psychosocial losses on adolescent mental health. These preliminary findings suggest ways to improve ongoing recovery and reconstruction programs and assist in formulating new programs for families exposed to both the Tsunami and other natural disasters. More importantly, findings from this pilot study emphasize the urgent need for larger systematic studies focusing on mental health following disaster exposure.

  10. The wild rat as sentinel animal in the environmental risk assessment of asbestos pollution: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardizzone, Michele; Vizio, Carlotta; Bozzetta, Elena; Pezzolato, Marzia; Meistro, Serena; Dondo, Alessandro; Giorgi, Ilaria; Seghesio, Angelo; Mirabelli, Dario; Capella, Silvana; Vigliaturo, Ruggero; Belluso, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Asbestos has been banned in many countries, including Italy. However, sources of exposure may still exist, due to asbestos in-situ or past disposal of asbestos-containing waste. In an urban area with past high environmental exposure, like Casale Monferrato, the lung fiber burden in sentinel animals may be useful to identify such sources. A pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility of its determination in wild rats, a suitable sentinel species never used before for environmental lung asbestos fiber burden studies. Within the framework of pest control campaigns, 11 adult animals from 3 sites in the urban area of Casale Monferrato and 3 control rats from a different, unexposed town were captured. Further, 3 positive and 3 negative control lung samples were obtained from laboratories involved in breeding programs and conducting experimental studies on rats. Tissue fiber concentration was measured by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry. Asbestos (chrysotile and crocidolite) was identified in the lungs from rats from Casale Monferrato, but not in control rats and in negative control lung samples. Asbestos grunerite at high concentration was found in positive control lung samples. Measurement of the lung fiber burden in wild rats has proved feasible: it was possible not only to detect, but also to characterize asbestos fibers both qualitatively and quantitatively. The pilot study provides the rationale for using wild rats as sentinels of the soil contamination level in Casale Monferrato, to identify areas with the possible presence of previously unrecognized asbestos sources.

  11. Pilot study of antibodies against varicella zoster virus and human immunodeficiency virus in relation to the risk of developing stroke, nested within a rural cohort in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiki, Gershim; Stockdale, Lisa; Kasamba, Ivan; Vudriko, Tobias; Tumwekwase, Grace; Johnston, Tom; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kamali, Anatoli; Seeley, Janet; Newton, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The risk of stroke rises after episodes of herpes zoster and chickenpox, which are caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV). We conducted a pilot case-control study of stroke, nested within a long-standing cohort in Uganda (the General Population Cohort), to examine antibodies against VZV prior to diagnosis. We used stored sera to examine the evolution of IgG and IgM antibodies against VZV among 31 clinically confirmed cases of stroke and 132 matched controls. For each participant, three samples of sera were identified: one each, taken at or near the time of (pseudo)diagnosis, between 5 and 10 years prior to diagnosis and at 15 years prior to diagnosis. All participants had detectable antibodies against VZV, but there were no significant differences between cases and controls in the 15 years prior to diagnosis. As a secondary finding, 16% (5/31) of cases and 6% (8/132) of controls had HIV (OR 3.0; 95% CI 0.8-10.1; P = 0.06). This is the first prospective study to examine a biological measure of exposure to VZV prior to diagnosis of stroke and although we identified no significant association, in this small pilot, with limited characterisation of cases, we cannot exclude the possibility that the virus is causal for a subset. The impact of HIV on risk of stroke has not been well characterised and warrants further study. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Paraguayan Education Study: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia

    A qualitative pilot study, guided by an ecological framework, illustrates the complexities involved in studying the unique linguistic situation in Paraguay between Spanish and the indigenous language of Guarani, and its relationship with education. The pilot study interviewing eight kindergarten children. Seventy five children have been…

  13. Disseminating Childhood Home Injury Risk Reduction Information in Pakistan: Results from a Community-Based Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan A. Hyder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most childhood unintentional injuries occur in the home; however, very little home injury prevention information is tailored to developing countries. Utilizing our previously developed information dissemination tools and a hazard assessment checklist tailored to a low-income neighborhood in Pakistan, we pilot tested and compared the effectiveness of two dissemination tools. Methods: Two low-income neighborhoods were mapped, identifying families with a child aged between 12 and 59 months. In June and July 2010, all enrolled households underwent a home hazard assessment at the same time hazard reduction education was being given using an in-home tutorial or a pamphlet. A follow up assessment was conducted 4–5 months later. Results: 503 households were enrolled; 256 received a tutorial and 247 a pamphlet. The two groups differed significantly (p < 0.01 in level of maternal education and relationship of the child to the primary caregiver. However, when controlling for these variables, those receiving an in-home tutorial had a higher odds of hazard reduction than the pamphlet group for uncovered vats of water (OR 2.14, 95% CI: 1.28, 3.58, an open fire within reach of the child (OR 3.55, 95% CI: 1.80, 7.00, and inappropriately labeled cooking fuel containers (OR 1.86, 95% CI: 1.07, 3.25. Conclusions: This pilot project demonstrates the potential utility of using home-visit tutorials to decrease home hazards in a low-income neighborhood in Pakistan. A longer-term randomized study is needed to assess actual effectiveness of the use of allied health workers for home-based injury education and whether this results in decreased home injuries.

  14. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in commercial airline pilots: a cohort study of 2630 pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, S; Venemans-Jellema, A; Cannegieter, S C; van Haften, M; Middeldorp, S; Büller, H R; Rosendaal, F R

    2014-08-01

    Airline pilots may be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) because air travel has recently been established as a risk factor for VTE. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of VTE in a cohort of Dutch airline pilots. Airline pilots who had been active members of the Dutch aviation society (VNV) were questioned for the occurrence of VTE, presence of risk factors for VTE and number of flight hours per year and rank. Incidence rates among pilots were compared with those of the general Dutch population and with a population of frequently flying employees of multinational organizations. A total of 2630 male pilots were followed-up for a total of 20420 person-years (py). Six venous thromboses were reported, yielding an incidence rate of 0.3 per 1000 py. The standardized morbidity ratio, comparing these pilots with the general Dutch population adjusted for age, was 0.8. Compared with the international employee cohort, the standardized morbidity ratio was 0.7 when all employees were included and 0.6 when only the frequently travelling employees were included. The incidence rate did not increase with number of flight hours per year and did not clearly vary by rank. We conclude that the risk of VTE is not increased amongst airline pilots. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. Placental Growth Factor Levels in Populations with High Versus Low Risk for Cardiovascular Disease and Stressful Physiological Environments such as Microgravity: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Mehta, Satish K.; Schlegel, Todd. T.; Russomano, Thais; Pierson, Duane L.; Mann, Vivek; Mansoor, Elvedina; Olamigoke, Loretta; Okoro, Elvis

    2017-02-01

    This pilot study compared placental growth factor (PIGF) levels in populations with high versus low risk for cardiovascular disease. Previous experiments from our laboratory (Sundaresan et al. 2005, 2009) revealed that the angiogenic factor PIGF was up regulated in modeled microgravity conditions in human lymphocytes leading to possible atherogenesis and pathogenesis in microgravity. Since the findings came from microgravity analog experiments, there is a strong link to its usefulness in the microgravity field as a biomarker. It is important to understand, that these findings came from both studies on expression levels of this cardiovascular marker in human lymphocytes in microgravity ( in vitro microgravity analog), and a follow up gene expression study in hind limb suspended mice ( in vivo microgravity analog). The relevance is enhanced because in life on earth, PIGF is an inflammatory biomarker for cardiovascular disease. Studies on the levels of PIGF would help to reduce the risk and prevention of heart failures in astronauts. If we can use this marker to predict and reduce the risk of cardiac events in astronauts and pilots, it would significantly help aerospace medicine operations. The investigations here confirmed that in a cardiovascular stressed population such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, PIGF could be overexpressed. We desired to re-evaluate this marker in patients with cardiovascular disease in our own study. PIGF is a marker of inflammation and a predictor of short-term and long-term adverse outcome in ACS. In addition, elevated PIGF levels may be associated with increased risk for CAD.PIGF levels were determined in thirty-one patients undergoing cardiovascular catheterization for reasons other than ACS and in thirty-three low-risk asymptomatic subjects. Additional data on traditional cardiovascular risk factors for both populations were also compiled and compared. We found that PIGF levels were

  16. "Assessment of endometrial cancer risk factors in a pilot study at Vali-e-Asr unit, Imam Khomeini hospital "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Ghaemmaghamei F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to identify endometrial Cancer risk factors. In a case series study on 1989-1996 , we assessed endometrial cancer in 52 patients whose age range was 32-80 years, with 73% over fifty years. Obesity was seen in 68% at time of cancer detection , and 69% were in the postmenopausal age, with a history of late menopause in 21%. As a matter of parity 13% were nulliparous, and 52% were grandmultiparous. There was a history of hypertension in 37% and ovarian tumors and polyeystic ovaian disease in 2%. The most common symptom in our patients was vaginal bleeding and the most frequent histology was endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Endometrial cancer was most common in the sirth decade of age. The two most common risk factors in this population were obesity and hypertension. The next important risk factor was late menopause.

  17. Adult functioning of mothers with traumatic brain injury at high risk of child abuse: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet-Ruissen, Cora; McKinlay, Audrey; Taylor, Annabel

    2014-01-01

    There is little information regarding the impact that traumatic brain injury (TBI) has on the functioning of mothers at risk of child abuse. This study evaluated adult functioning (e.g. child abuse, substance use, criminal convictions, and mental health problems) of mothers, at high risk for child abuse, who also had a history of TBI compared with those without TBI. It was hypothesised that mothers with a history of TBI would engage in higher rates of dysfunctional behaviour compared to those with no history of TBI. Participants were 206 women engaged in a child abuse prevention programme for mothers who are highly socially disadvantaged, and at high risk for child abuse. Using historical data collected as part of the referral, and self report intake process, this study compared child abuse, mental health problems (depression, anxiety, substance use) and rates of criminal offending for mothers with a history of TBI versus those with no history of TBI. Mothers with TBI were no more likely than those without TBI to have engaged in child abuse. However, mothers with a history of TBI were significantly more likely to have one or more mental health problems, engage in substance use and have a history of criminal offending. Parents with TBI who have been identified as high risk for engaging in child abuse have increased risk for mental health problems and criminal offending. These issues need to be considered when designing parenting programmes in order for intervention strategies to be effective.

  18. High-risk human papillomavirus in HIV-infected women undergoing cervical cancer screening in Lilongwe, Malawi: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Deepa; Njala, Joseph; Stocker, Penny; Schooley, Alan; Flores, Martiniano; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Pfaff, Colin; Jansen, Perry; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Hoffman, Risa M

    2015-05-01

    Rates of abnormal visual inspection with acetic acid and prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes have not been well characterized in HIV-infected women in Malawi. We performed a prospective cohort study of visual inspection with acetic acid (N = 440) in HIV-infected women aged 25--59 years, with a nested study of HPV subtypes in first 300 women enrolled. Of 440 women screened, 9.5% (N = 42) had abnormal visual inspection with acetic acid with 69.0% (N = 29) having advanced disease not amenable to cryotherapy. Of 294 women with HPV results, 39% (N = 114) of women were positive for high-risk HPV infection. Only lower CD4 count (287 cells/mm(3) versus 339 cells/mm(3), p = 0.03) and high-risk HPV (66.7% versus 35.6%, p < 0.01) were associated with abnormal visual inspection with acetic acid. The most common high-risk HPV subtypes in women with abnormal visual inspection with acetic acid were 35 (33.3%), 16 (26.7%), and 58 (23.3%). Low CD4 cell count was associated with abnormal visual inspection with acetic acid and raises the importance of early antiretroviral therapy and expanded availability of visual inspection with acetic acid. HPV vaccines targeting additional non-16/18 high-risk HPV subtypes may have greater protective advantages in countries such as Malawi.

  19. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is an independent risk factor for lower resilience in adolescents: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angélica Regalla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is associated with impaired daily functioning in a wide range of domains. Resilience, the ability to overcome and recover from challenges, has been scarcely investigated in ADHD and could potentially provide novel strategies for treatment. However, since ADHD is often comorbid with other clinical conditions, it is necessary to better understand if it impairs resilience levels when controlled for other variables. This pilot study is the first to investigate the correlation between quantitative measures of resilience and ADHD using strict diagnostic criteria by controlling this correlation for comorbid conditions.Methods:Twelve adolescents diagnosed with ADHD via semi-structured interview using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV were compared to 12 adolescents exhibiting typical development, regarding resilience, in an analysis controlled for anxiety and depression levels, socioeconomic status, and intelligence quotient (IQ.Results: The ADHD group was less resilient than the control group (p < 0.01. Importantly, resilience in the ADHD group was not correlated with depression or anxiety, age, intelligence level, and socioeconomic status.Conclusions:ADHD seems to be associated with lower resilience, which cannot be explained by depression, anxiety, intelligence level, age, or socioeconomic status.

  20. Development and Evaluation of an Online Fall-Risk Questionnaire for Nonfrail Community-Dwelling Elderly Persons: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seraina Obrist

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Falls are frequent in older adults and may have serious consequences but awareness of fall-risk is often low. A questionnaire might raise awareness of fall-risk; therefore we set out to construct and test such a questionnaire. Methods. Fall-risk factors and their odds ratios were extracted from meta-analyses and a questionnaire was devised to cover these risk factors. A formula to estimate the probability of future falls was set up using the extracted odds ratios. The understandability of the questionnaire and discrimination and calibration of the prediction formula were tested in a cohort study with a six-month follow-up. Community-dwelling persons over 60 years were recruited by an e-mail snowball-sampling method. Results and Discussion. We included 134 persons. Response rates for the monthly fall-related follow-up varied between the months and ranged from low 38% to high 90%. The proportion of present risk factors was low. Twenty-five participants reported falls. Discrimination was moderate (AUC: 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.81. The understandability, with the exception of five questions, was good. The wording of the questions needs to be improved and measures to increase the monthly response rates are needed before test-retest reliability and final predictive value can be assessed.

  1. Mobile Phone-Based Lifestyle Intervention for Reducing Overall Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Guangzhou, China: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiting; Chen, Songting; Zhang, Guanrong; Lin, Aihua

    2015-12-17

    With the rapid and widespread adoption of mobile devices, mobile phones offer an opportunity to deliver cardiovascular disease (CVD) interventions. This study evaluated the efficacy of a mobile phone-based lifestyle intervention aimed at reducing the overall CVD risk at a health management center in Guangzhou, China. We recruited 589 workers from eight work units. Based on a group-randomized design, work units were randomly assigned either to receive the mobile phone-based lifestyle interventions or usual care. The reduction in 10-year CVD risk at 1-year follow-up for the intervention group was not statistically significant (-1.05%, p = 0.096). However, the mean risk increased significantly by 1.77% (p = 0.047) for the control group. The difference of the changes between treatment arms in CVD risk was -2.83% (p = 0.001). In addition, there were statistically significant changes for the intervention group relative to the controls, from baseline to year 1, in systolic blood pressure (-5.55 vs. 6.89 mmHg; p fasting plasma glucose (-0.31 vs. 0.02 mmol/L; p < 0.001), BMI (-0.57 vs. 0.29 kg/m²; p < 0.001), and waist hip ratio (-0.02 vs. 0.01; p < 0.001). Mobile phone-based intervention may therefore be a potential solution for reducing CVD risk in China.

  2. Raising awareness of carrier testing for hereditary haemoglobinopathies in high-risk ethnic groups in the Netherlands: a pilot study among the general public and primary care providers

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    Cornel Martina C

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands no formal recommendations exist concerning preconceptional or antenatal testing for carriership of hereditary haemoglobinopathies. Those at highest risk may be unaware of the possibility of carrier screening. While universal newborn screening has recently been introduced, neither preconceptional nor antenatal carrier testing is routinely offered by health care services to the general public. A municipal health service and a foundation for public information on medical genetics undertook a pilot project with the aim of increasing knowledge and encouraging informed choice. Two groups were targeted: members of the public from ethnic groups at increased risk, and primary health care providers. This study examines the effectiveness of culturally specific 'infotainment' to inform high-risk ethnic groups about their increased risk for haemoglobinopathies. In addition, the study explores attitudes and intentions of primary care providers towards haemoglobinopathy carrier testing of their patients from high-risk ethnic groups. Methods Informational sessions tailored to the public or professionals were organised in Amsterdam, and evaluated for their effect. Psychological parameters were measured using structured questionnaires based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Results The pre-test/post-test questionnaire showed that members of the public gained understanding of inheritance and carriership of haemoglobinopathies from the "infotainment" session (p Conclusion The "infotainment" programme may have a positive effect on people from high-risk groups, but informed general practitioners and midwives were reluctant to facilitate their patients' getting tested. Additional initiatives are needed to motivate primary care providers to facilitate haemoglobinopathy carrier testing for their patients from high-risk backgrounds.

  3. Using Video Conferencing to Deliver a Brief Motivational Intervention for Alcohol and Sex Risk to Emergency Department Patients: A Proof-of-Concept Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celio, Mark A; Mastroleo, Nadine R; DiGuiseppi, Graham; Barnett, Nancy P; Colby, Suzanne M; Kahler, Christopher W; Operario, Don; Suffoletto, Brian; Monti, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Brief motivational intervention (MI) is an efficacious approach to reduce heavy drinking and associated sexual risk behavior among Emergency Department (ED) patients, but the intensity of demands placed on ED staff makes the implementation of in-person MIs logistically challenging. This proof-of-concept pilot study examined the acceptability and logistic feasibility of using video-conferencing technology to deliver an MI targeting heavy drinking and risky sexual behavior to patients in an ED setting. Rigorous screening procedures were employed to ensure that the pilot sample represents the target portion of ED patients who would benefit from this multi-target MI. Mixed qualitative and quantitative data from a sample of seven ED patients (57% Female; Mage = 35 years) who received MI by video conference consistently demonstrated high levels of satisfaction, engagement, and acceptability. The observed completion rate supports logistic feasibility, and patient feedback identified methods to improve the experience by using high-definition hardware, ensuring stronger network connectivity, and effectively communicating information regarding protection of privacy. Post-intervention patient ratings and independent ratings of the audio-recorded sessions (using the Motivational Interviewing Skills Coding system) were very high, suggesting that intervention fidelity and MI adherence was not compromised by delivery modality. Collectively, these data suggest video conferencing is a viable technology that can be employed to implement brief evidence-based MIs in ED settings.

  4. Oncologist use of the Adjuvant! model for risk communication: a pilot study examining patient knowledge of 10-year prognosis

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    Hutton David W

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to collect preliminary data on newly diagnosed breast cancer patient knowledge of prognosis before and after oncology visits. Many oncologists use a validated prognostic software model, Adjuvant!, to estimate 10-year recurrence and mortality outcomes for breast cancer local and adjuvant therapy. Some oncologists are printing Adjuvant! screens to use as visual aids during consultations. No study has reported how such use of Adjuvant! printouts affects patient knowledge of prognosis. We hypothesized that Adjuvant! printouts would be associated with significant changes in the proportion of patients with accurate understanding of local therapy prognosis. Methods We recruited a convenience sample of 20 patients seen by 2 senior oncologists using Adjuvant! printouts of recurrence and mortality screens in our academic medical center. We asked patients for their estimates of local therapy recurrence and mortality risks and counted the number of patients whose estimates were within ± 5% of Adjuvant! before and after the oncology visit, testing whether pre/post changes were significant using McNemar's two-sided test at a significance level of 5%. Results Two patients (10% accurately estimated local therapy recurrence and mortality risks before the oncology visit, while seven out of twenty (35% were accurate afterwards (p = 0.125. Conclusion A majority of patients in our sample were inaccurate in estimating their local therapy recurrence and mortality risks, even after being shown printouts summarizing these risks during their oncology visits. Larger studies are needed to replicate or repudiate these preliminary findings, and test alternative methods of presenting risk estimates. Meanwhile, oncologists should be wary of relying exclusively on Adjuvant! printouts to communicate local therapy recurrence and mortality estimates to patients, as they may leave a majority of patients misinformed.

  5. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
.

  6. Short-Term Effectiveness of a Lifestyle Intervention Program for Reducing Selected Chronic Disease Risk Factors in Individuals Living in Rural Appalachia: A Pilot Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Drozek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most Western chronic diseases are closely tied to lifestyle behaviors, and many are preventable. Despite the well-distributed knowledge of these detrimental behaviors, effective efforts in disease prevention have been lacking. Many of these chronic diseases are related to obesity and type 2 diabetes, which have doubled in incidence during the last 35 years. The Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP is a community-based, comprehensive lifestyle modification approach to health that has shown success in addressing this problem. This pilot study demonstrates the effectiveness of CHIP in an underserved, rural, and vulnerable Appalachian population. Two hundred fourteen participants in CHIP collectively demonstrated significant reductions in body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and fasting blood levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and glucose. If these results can be repeated in other at-risk populations, CHIP has the potential to help reduce the burden of preventable and treatable chronic diseases efficiently and cost-effectively.

  7. Mobile Phone-Based Lifestyle Intervention for Reducing Overall Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Guangzhou, China: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiting Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid and widespread adoption of mobile devices, mobile phones offer an opportunity to deliver cardiovascular disease (CVD interventions. This study evaluated the efficacy of a mobile phone-based lifestyle intervention aimed at reducing the overall CVD risk at a health management center in Guangzhou, China. We recruited 589 workers from eight work units. Based on a group-randomized design, work units were randomly assigned either to receive the mobile phone-based lifestyle interventions or usual care. The reduction in 10-year CVD risk at 1-year follow-up for the intervention group was not statistically significant (–1.05%, p = 0.096. However, the mean risk increased significantly by 1.77% (p = 0.047 for the control group. The difference of the changes between treatment arms in CVD risk was –2.83% (p = 0.001. In addition, there were statistically significant changes for the intervention group relative to the controls, from baseline to year 1, in systolic blood pressure (–5.55 vs. 6.89 mmHg; p < 0.001, diastolic blood pressure (–6.61 vs. 5.62 mmHg; p < 0.001, total cholesterol (–0.36 vs. –0.10 mmol/L; p = 0.005, fasting plasma glucose (–0.31 vs. 0.02 mmol/L; p < 0.001, BMI (–0.57 vs. 0.29 kg/m2; p < 0.001, and waist hip ratio (–0.02 vs. 0.01; p < 0.001. Mobile phone-based intervention may therefore be a potential solution for reducing CVD risk in China.

  8. Pilot Study: Association of Traditional and Genetic Risk Factors and New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Following Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkera, H.A.; Hanson, R.L.; Raza, S.M.; DiStefano, J.K.; Millis, M.P.; Heilman, R.L.; Mulligan, D.C.; Reddy, K.S.; Mazur, M.J.; Hamawi, K.; Moss, A.A.; Mekeel, K.L.; Cerhan, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction New-onset diabetes mellitus, which occurs after kidney transplant and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), shares common risk factors and antecedents in impaired insulin secretion and action. Several genetic polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with T2DM. We hypothesized that transplant recipients who carry risk alleles for T2DM are “tipped over” to develop diabetes mellitus in the posttransplant milieu. Methods We investigated the association of genetic and traditional risk factors present before transplantation and the development of new-onset diabetes mellitus after kidney transplantation (NODAT). Markers in 8 known T2DM-linked genes were genotyped using either the iPLEX assay or allelic discrimination (AD)-PCR in the study cohort testing for association with NODAT. We used univariate and multivariate logistic regression models for the association of pretransplant nongenetic and genetic variables with the development of NODAT. Results The study cohort included 91 kidney transplant recipients with at least 1 year posttransplant follow-up, including 22 who developed NODAT. We observed that increased age, family history of T2DM, pretransplant obesity, and triglyceridemia were associated with NODAT development. In addition, we observed positive trends, although statistically not significant, for association between T2DM-associated genes and NODAT. Conclusions These findings demonstrated an increased NODAT risk among patient with a positive family history for T2DM, which, in conjunction with the observed positive predictive trends of known T2DM-associated genetic polymorphisms with NODAT, was suggestive of a genetic predisposition to NODAT. PMID:20005362

  9. Inflammatory lung disease a potential risk factor for onset of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: results from a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmers, Sevim Barbasso; Jiang, Xia; Pettersson, David; Wikman, Anna-Lis; Axelman, Pia; Lundberg, Åsa; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Alfredsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between inflammatory lung disease and the risk of developing idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Methods A population-based case–control study was conducted. Adult myositis cases, identified from the Swedish inpatient registry (diagnosed between 1995 and 1997), and randomly selected controls matched to cases on the date of birth, gender and residency, were asked to fill out a questionnaire with questions on lifestyle, environmental exposures and health. Eventually, 100 cases and 402 controls responded to the questionnaire and were included in the analyses. Exposure was defined as self-reported preceding inflammatory lung diseases (pneumonia, tuberculosis or sarcoidosis). The association between the exposure and risk of developing myositis was evaluated by calculating OR together with 95% CIs in logistic regressions. Results 42 (42%) cases and 112 (28%) controls reported preceding inflammatory lung disease. Median duration between inflammatory lung disease and first symptom of myositis was 30 years. We observed a significant association between self-reported history of lung disease at study inclusion and diagnosis of myositis (crude OR=1.8 (1.1 to 2.9); smoking adjusted OR=1.9 (1.2 to 3.1)). We further identified a modestly increased, yet non-significant, association between preceding inflammatory lung disease (prior to index year) and diagnosis of myositis (smoking adjusted OR=1.6 (0.9 to 2.8)). The association was more pronounced among the cases of myositis with concurrent interstitial lung disease (OR=3.8 (1.0 to 14.5)). Conclusions Patients with preceding inflammatory lung disease tend to have an increased risk of developing myositis compared to those without. The effect was more pronounced among patients with myositis with concurrent interstitial lung disease. Thus inflammatory lung disease may constitute a risk factor for myositis.

  10. A Pilot study of the Sharing Risk Information Tool (ShaRIT for Families with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kardashian Ani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals who carry deleterious BRCA mutations face significantly elevated risks of breast, ovarian, and other cancers. These individuals are also responsible for informing relatives of their increased risk for carrying the family BRCA mutation. Few interventions have been developed to facilitate this family communication process. Methods We developed the Sharing Risk Information Tool (ShaRIT, a personalized educational intervention, to support BRCA carriers as they discuss BRCA positive results and their implications with relatives. We conducted a pilot study of 19 BRCA carriers identified through the University of California San Francisco Cancer Risk Program. Our study had two aims: 1 to assess the feasibility and acceptability of ShaRIT, and 2 describe characteristics associated with increased family communication and BRCA testing. Participants in our study were divided into two groups: those who had not received ShaRIT as part of their genetic counseling protocol (control group, n = 10 and those who received ShaRIT (n = 9. Results All 9 women who received ShaRIT reported that it was a useful resource. Characteristics associated with increased sharing and testing included: female gender, degree of relationship, and frequency of communication. Increased pedigree knowledge showed a trend toward higher rates of sharing. Conclusions Both participants and genetic counselors considered ShaRIT a well-received, comprehensive tool for disseminating individual risk information and clinical care guidelines to Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome families. Because of this, ShaRIT has been incorporated as standard of care at our institution. In the future we hope to evaluate the effects of ShaRIT on family communication and family testing in larger populations of BRCA positive families.

  11. Yoga for Risk Reduction of Metabolic Syndrome: Patient-Reported Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J. Sohl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle change is recommended as treatment for adults at risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS, although adoption of new behavioral patterns is limited. In addition, most existing lifestyle interventions do not address psychological stress or quality of life, both of which impact the burden of MetS. Yoga, a form of physical activity that incorporates psychological components (e.g., maintaining attention, relaxation, is a promising intervention for improving the burden of MetS. This randomized controlled trial assessed the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a 12-week yoga program coupled with an evidence-based health education program (HED compared to HED alone. A secondary, exploratory aim examined perceived stress, quality of life, and related psychological outcomes (mindfulness, perceived health competence, and mood. Sixty-seven adults at risk for MetS enrolled (mean age [SD]: 58 [10] years; 50% male; 79% non-Hispanic White. Preliminary results revealed significantly larger improvements in two quality of life domains (role-physical and general health perceptions in the HED plus yoga group versus HED alone (ps<0.05. This is the first study that implemented lifestyle education along with yoga to evaluate the potential unique effects of yoga on participants at risk for MetS. A larger clinical trial is warranted to further investigate these promising patient-reported outcomes.

  12. Patient-specific assessment of left ventricular thrombogenesis risk after acute myocardial infarction: a pilot clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, L.; Khan, A.; Del Alamo, J. C.; Martinez-Legazpi, P.; Pérez Del Villar, C.; Benito, Y.; Yotti, R.; Barrio, A.; Delgado-Montero, A.; Gonzalez-Mansilla, A.; Fernandez-Avilés, F.; Bermejo, J.

    2016-11-01

    Left ventricular thrombosis (LVT) is a major complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In these patients, the benefits of chronic anticoagulation therapy need to be balanced with its pro-hemorrhagic effects. Blood stasis in the cardiac chambers, a risk factor for LVT, is not addressed in current clinical practice. We recently developed a method to quantitatively assess the blood residence time (RT) inside the left ventricle (LV) based on 2D color-Doppler velocimetry (echo-CDV). Using time-resolved blood velocity fields acquired non-invasively, we integrate a modified advection equation to map intraventricular stasis regions. Here, we present how this tool can be used to estimate the risk of LVT in patients with AMI. 73 patients with a first anterior-AMI were studied by echo-CDV and RT analysis within 72h from admission and at a 5-month follow-up. Patients who eventually develop LVT showed early abnormalities of intraventricular RT: the apical region with RT>2s was significantly larger, had a higher RT and a longer wall contact length. Thus, quantitative analysis of intraventricular flow based on echocardiography may provide subclinical markers of LV thrombosis risk to guide clinical decision making.

  13. Addressing intravaginal practices in women with HIV and at-risk for HIV infection, a mixed methods pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, Maria L; Rodriguez, Violeta J; Fischl, Margaret A; Jones, Deborah L; Weiss, Stephen M

    2017-01-01

    Intravaginal practices (IVPs), include intravaginal cleansing (cleansing the inside of the vagina) or intravaginal insertion of products for hygiene, health or sexuality reasons. IVPs are associated with adverse female health outcomes, development of bacterial vaginosis, HIV acquisition and transmission. A mixed methods approach was used in this study to examine the prevalence of IVP, assess reasons for engagement, and perceptions of IVP among a sample of minority (African-American and Hispanic) women infected, or at-risk, for HIV in Miami, USA, a city with increasing numbers of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV. Three focus groups (total n=20) and quantitative assessments (n=72) were conducted with women infected or uninfected with HIV. In the qualitative assessments, most women reported engaging in both intravaginal cleansing and intravaginal insertion, and stated the main motivation for IVP was hygiene. The quantitative assessments confirmed that cleansing with water alone, soap with water or using commercial douches was common, as well as intravaginal insertion using a cloth or a rag in both HIV-infected and uninfected women. Women with HIV infection reported less use of water and water and soap for IVPs, and reported learning about the potential harm of IVP from their HIV health care providers. Despite their health risks, IVP appeared common in both HIV-infected and at-risk minority women, and interventions to decrease IVP could have important health implications among populations with high rates of IVP, STIs and HIV. PMID:28280394

  14. Cognitive impairment and the associated risk factors among the elderly in the Shanghai urban area: a pilot study from China

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    Zhuang Jun-Peng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Our study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cognitive impairment(CI and the associated risk factors among elderly people in Shanghai urban area, China. Methods A population-based survey was conducted among people aged 55 years or older in urban areas of Shanghai. Face-to-face interviews were carried out to collect information including demographic characteristics, medical history, and medication use, etc. The validated Chinese version of the Mini-Mental State Examination(MMSE was used to screen subjects with CI, and the criteria of CI were adjusted for education levels. Results A total of 3,176 home-living residents (≥55 years old were included in the study. Among them, 266 people (102 men and 164 women were identified as cognition impaired, with a prevalence of 8.38% (266/3,176, 95% CI: (8.26, 8.49 for both genders, 9.21% (102/1,107,95% CI: (9.18, 9.33 for men and 7.93% (164/2,069, 95% CI: (7.80, 8.09 for women, respectively. Furthermore, we found that several significant risk factors, including social factors(education, number of children, marriage status, and family structure, physiological factors (age, blood glucose level, and obesity, factors on living styles(physical exercise, diet & chronic diseases, and genetic factor(ApoE, associated with CI onset. Conclusions This study confirms the high prevalence of CI among the elderly population in the Shanghai urban in China, similar to previous epidemiologic studies in Western countries. The putative risk factors associated with CI merit further investigated.

  15. Effect of a plant sterol, fish oil and B vitamin combination on cardiovascular risk factors in hypercholesterolemic children and adolescents: a pilot study

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    Garaiova Iveta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors can predict clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis in adulthood. In this pilot study with hypercholesterolemic children and adolescents, we investigated the effects of a combination of plant sterols, fish oil and B vitamins on the levels of four independent risk factors for CVD; LDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerols, C-reactive protein and homocysteine. Methods Twenty five participants (mean age 16 y, BMI 23 kg/m2 received daily for a period of 16 weeks an emulsified preparation comprising plant sterols esters (1300 mg, fish oil (providing 1000 mg eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and vitamins B12 (50 μg, B6 (2.5 mg, folic acid (800 μg and coenzyme Q10 (3 mg. Atherogenic and inflammatory risk factors, plasma lipophilic vitamins, provitamins and fatty acids were measured at baseline, week 8 and 16. Results The serum total cholesterol, LDL- cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol, subfractions LDL-2, IDL-1, IDL-2 and plasma homocysteine levels were significantly reduced at the end of the intervention period (pp Conclusions Daily intake of a combination of plant sterols, fish oil and B vitamins may modulate the lipid profile of hypercholesterolemic children and adolescents. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89549017

  16. A WebGIS service for managing, sharing and communicating information on mountain risks: a pilot study at the Barcelonnette Basin (South French Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, Simone; Skupinski, Grzegorz; Kappes, Melanie; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Puissant, Anne

    2010-05-01

    Integrative analysis, assessment and management of mountain hazards and risks require (1) the intense cooperation among scientists, local practitioners and stakeholders, (2) the compilation of multi-source GIS database on both the sources of the dangers and their impacts, and (3) the communication of scientific results which is still a challenge. Within the European project Mountain Risks and the French-research initiative OMIV (Multi-disciplinary Observatory on Slope Instabilities; http://eost.u-strasbg.fr/omiv), several approaches are under development aiming at a coherent communication of scientific results to the population in order to inform about hazards and risks and support practical risk management measures. A simple and user-friendly approach with a visual-web-based interface is proposed, able (1) to incorporate geographical information on past events and on controlling factors, (2) to include administrative boundaries and official risk regulation maps, and(3) to integrate all modeling results obtained in the study area (already performed or in progress). The possibility to share information by means of web services offers a double utility: firstly it is a way to decrease the gap between scientific community's results and stakeholders' practical needs (simple interface, easy-to-use buttons in a generally user-friendly approach). Secondly the wide collection of diverse information (records of historical events, conditioning and triggering factors, information on elements at risk and their vulnerability, modeling results) in combination with the possibility of comparison among the data offers a great support in the decision-making process. As first case study, the Barcelonnette Basin (South French Alps) has been chosen for the pilot development of the interface. The objective is to organize, manage and share a wide range of information and calibrate a correct web-service solution. Several steps are planned to achieve this goal: the creation of a

  17. Pilots' perception of risks and hazards in general aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, D

    1990-07-01

    A sample of licensed pilots completed the Aeronautical Risk Judgment Questionnaire (ARJQ) which was developed to obtain data on pilots' perceptions of their abilities, willingness to take risks, hazard awareness, and judgments of the risks of general aviation. A subset of these subjects was tested on a computerised test of flight decision-making involving a proposed VFR flight in marginal weather conditions. Results from the ARJQ indicate relatively low levels of risk and hazard awareness combined with a generally optimistic self-appraisal of abilities by this sample of general aviation pilots. Younger subjects (under 30) were found to rate the likelihood of being involved in an accident more highly than did older pilots. Experienced pilots obtained higher scores on a measure of "personal invulnerability" from factors commonly associated with accidents. This does not appear to be due simply to overconfidence in their abilities, since it was the younger and less experienced pilots who held the most unrealistically optimistic appraisals of their ability. Pilots who proceeded with the computerised flight rate themselves as having a greater willingness to take risks, and were likely to be younger and have higher total hours than those who rejected the flight. They were also found to have significantly higher scores on the measure of "personal invulnerability." The results are discussed in relation to previous epidemiological findings and possible safety prevention strategies.

  18. Metabolic syndrome in Internal Medicine patients: the pilot NIMEC study (National Internal Medicine Equivalent/Complex C-V-@Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nardi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Metabolic Syndrome (MetS, currently defined as slight differences in the criteria of diagnosis – depending on which authority is quoted [i.e.: NCEP-ATP III (National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III; WHO (World Health Organization; IDF (International Diabetes Federation; AACE (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists], designates a cluster of metabolic risk factors that come together in a single individual, leading to cardiovascular disease. MetS is quite common, approximately 20-30% of the population in industrialized countries being affected. However, most of epidemiological data regarding MetS are derived from populations consisting mostly of middle-aged and younger subjects. AIM OF THE STUDY To assess the prevalence of the MetS in Internal Medicine wards and to determine its related comorbidities, including other clinical forms of atherosclerotic disease such as CHD risk equivalents. METHODS Our study was performed in patients admitted in Internal Medicine wards and selected as a randomization list in 12 Emilia Romagna-Marche FADOI centers. 1.316 patients were registered. According to explicit inclusion/exclusion criteria, we studied overall 902 participants (50.6% men, mean of age: 71-73 years. RESULTS According to NCEP-ATP III and IDF criteria the prevalence of MetS was 45.3% (IC 95%: 41.6-49.1 and 38.6% (IC 95%: 34.9-42.3, respectively. Patients with MetS presented a higher significant rate of ALT increase, syncope, atrial fibrillation, COPD, unstable angina, chronic kidney disease, cancer, valvular heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and carotid plaques. A strong association between IDF-MetS and congestive heart failure was observed, suggesting a role of central obesity as an independent risk factor in the elderly. DISCUSSION World-wide populations are becoming older. Aging and MetS are two conditions that represent an important part of health-care spending. Trunkal fatness increases in

  19. Blood concentrations and risk assessment of persistent organochlorine compounds in newborn boys in Turkey. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulutaş, Onur Kenan; Çok, İsmet; Darendeliler, Feyza; Aydin, Banu; Çoban, Asuman; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2015-12-01

    Even early life in utero cannot provide a safe place for newborns. The first acquaintance with chemicals takes place in utero and/or with mother's milk after delivery. Besides legislations and bans to persistent organic pollutants (POPs), these chemicals are still affecting the general population especially the children as they are one of the populations most susceptible to chemicals, and also the health problems may arise in the future. Our objective is to collect the first data in newborns in Turkey to determine baseline levels of POPs in the general population and estimate the potential cancer risk related to exposure. Twenty-nine organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 18 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in blood samples of newborn boys (0-1 month old) who were born in İstanbul, Turkey, in 2010-2012 were evaluated with high-resolution gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS). Results for analyzed chlorinated compounds are as follows: hexachlorocyclohexane (ΣHCH) 1828 ± 3650 pg/g lipid, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (ΣDDT) 10,000 ± 15,398 pg/g lipid, and ΣPCB 1068 ± 1823 pg/g lipid. 4,4'-DDT, 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4'-DDE), hexachlorobenzene, and PCB 138 and 153 are the major contaminants. New POPs as lindane 61 ± 268 pg/g lipid, pentachlorobenzene 13 ± 74 pg/g lipid, and endosulfan 29 ± 106 pg/g lipid are also detected in blood. Estimated total risk for lifetime PCB exposure is less than 1 × 10(-5), an acceptable risk. Blood concentration levels will be important base data in the assessment of health concerns of newborns as well as for studies about how endocrine disruptors affect humans.

  20. A comparison of metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors in Filipino women and Filipino American women: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancheta, Irma B; Battie, Cynthia A; Tuason, Teresa; Ancheta, Christine V

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in women of Filipino ethnicity. The objective of our work was to determine if metabolic syndrome (MetS), a modifiable CVD risk factor, differs in women as a function of country of residency and to determine if, CVD prevention strategies need to differ for these groups of Filipino women. Data were collected in community-based health screenings for this cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS were recruited at places of worship in southeast United States (n=60) and Central Visayas, Philippines (n=56). Prevalence of MetS and its component factors as defined by the International Diabetes Federation criteria. The prevalence of MetS in Filipino women (FW) and Filipino American women (FAW) groups was similar (52% vs 55%, P=.08) although the prevalence of elevated waist circumference was greater for FAW (78% vs 59%, P=.03). Conversely, the percentage of FW women with risk-associated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels was higher than the FAW group (84% vs 42%, P<.001). Other MetS component factors (blood pressure, glucose and triglycerides) did not significantly differ between groups. Similar high rates of MetS were observed in Filipino women regardless of the country of residency although the FAW tended to have higher rates of central obesity while the FW tended to have higher rates of risk-associated HDL levels. Further research should examine the cause of these differences in order to develop better cardiovascular screening and intervention strategies.

  1. Transfer Readiness Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; And Others

    The California Community Colleges (CCC) has implemented a prototype model for determining student transfer readiness as a primary means of assessing community college transfer effectiveness. This report provides definitions of transfer readiness and guidelines for colleges participating in the CCC transfer readiness study. First, a memorandum from…

  2. Development of a school-based program for adolescents at-risk for depression in India: results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Meghna; Manjula, M; Vijay Sagar, K John

    2014-08-01

    A majority of adolescents in India, who are at risk for depression, do not receive treatment or receive it when the psychopathology has become entrenched and chronic. The present pilot study was an endeavor to assess the felt needs of adolescents vis-à-vis the difficulties and stressors experienced by them. For this purpose, 300 students across three schools were screened using standardized measures. Another objective of the study was to develop and test a school-based Coping Skills Program to address adolescents at-risk for depression. Schools were sequentially assigned to intervention or control conditions; students of index (n=13) and control (n=6) groups were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and 3 months follow-up. At post-intervention for the index group, all outcomes measures except coping skills-including depressive symptoms, negative cognitions, academic stress, and social problem-solving-showed change in the expected direction, this difference assuming significance at follow-up. The program was rated positively by students using anonymous feedback and there was low to nil perceived stigmatization. Results are discussed in the context of need for such intervention programs in India, and future scope of research involving larger samples.

  3. A high-fiber, low-fat diet improves periodontal disease markers in high-risk subjects: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Keiko; Ishikado, Atsushi; Morino, Katsutaro; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Ugi, Satoshi; Kajiwara, Sadae; Kurihara, Mika; Iwakawa, Hiromi; Nakao, Keiko; Uesaki, Syoko; Shigeta, Yasutami; Imanaka, Hiromichi; Yoshizaki, Takeshi; Sekine, Osamu; Makino, Taketoshi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; King, George L; Kashiwagi, Atsunori

    2014-06-01

    Periodontal disease is related to aging, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, and systemic inflammation. However, there remains limited evidence about causality from intervention studies. An effective diet for prevention of periodontal disease has not been well established. The current study was an intervention study examining the effects of a high-fiber, low-fat diet on periodontal disease markers in high-risk subjects. Forty-seven volunteers were interviewed for recruitment into the study. Twenty-one volunteers with a body mass index of at least 25.0 kg/m(2) or with impaired glucose tolerance were enrolled in the study. After a 2- to 3-week run-in period, subjects were provided with a test meal consisting of high fiber and low fat (30 kcal/kg of ideal body weight) 3 times a day for 8 weeks and followed by a regular diet for 24 weeks. Four hundred twenty-five teeth from 17 subjects were analyzed. Periodontal disease markers assessed as probing depth (2.28 vs 2.21 vs 2.13 mm; P diet for 8 weeks effectively improved periodontal disease markers as well as metabolic profiles, at least in part, by effects other than the reduction of total energy intake.

  4. OS013. Reduction of preeclampsia related complications with with theNO-donor penterythriltetranitrat (petn) in risk pregnancies - Aprospective randomized double-blind placebo pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, T; Fitzgerald, J; Lehmann, T; Schneider, U; Kähler, C; Schleussner, E

    2012-07-01

    NO-donors reduce the impedance in uteroplacental vessels. Consequently Lees et al. pilot study demonstrated that transdermal nitroglycerin positively influences pregnancy outcome within a high-risk collective. Furthermore the NO-donor pentaerythriltetranitrate additionally expresses cell stabilizing effects in endothelial cells. Hypothesizing an effect on endothelial health and uterine perfusion in pregnancies presented with pathological uterine perfusion at 20weeks of gestation we performed a randomized, prospective, and placebo-controlled, double-blind study implemented with the aim to investigate whether the oral NO-donor Pentalong(®) (PETN) is suitable as a prophylactic drug in abnormal placentation. We included 111 pregnancies presenting with abnormal placental perfusion (bilateral notch or mean RI>0.7) between the 19th and 24thweek of gestation (w.o.g.). Further risk factors (high-risk group: history of HELLP/preeclampsia/IUGR/IUFD/placental abruption, type I diabetes mellitus, hypertension, thrombosis/thrombophilia) were identified in 78 study participants. Fifty-four women received PETN 57 received placebo. Doppler velocimetry measurements of uteroplacental and fetal vessels and fetal growth scans were monitored biweekly with primary endpoints being the occurrence of preeclampsia, IUGR and/or premature birth. Within the first week of intake, PETN improved uteroplacental perfusion significantly in comparison to placebo (mean PI 1.26±0.36 vs. 1.49±0.44; pPETN study group by reducing the frequency of IUGR (4 vs. 10), diagnosis of preeclampsia before 32 w.o.g. (3 vs. 7) and premature birth before 32 w.o.g. (1 vs. 6). Furthermore 4 fetal losses occurred in the study group all in the placebo group. NO-donors constitute an interesting option in the prophylaxis of adverse pregnancy outcome related to abnormal placentation. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A pilot study of omalizumab to facilitate rapid oral desensitization in high-risk peanut-allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lynda C; Rachid, Rima; LeBovidge, Jennifer; Blood, Emily; Mittal, Mudita; Umetsu, Dale T

    2013-12-01

    Peanut allergy is a major public health problem that affects 1% of the population and has no effective therapy. To examine the safety and efficacy of oral desensitization in peanut-allergic children in combination with a brief course of anti-IgE mAb (omalizumab [Xolair]). We performed oral peanut desensitization in peanut-allergic children at high risk for developing significant peanut-induced allergic reactions. Omalizumab was administered before and during oral peanut desensitization. We enrolled 13 children (median age, 10 years), with a median peanut-specific IgE level of 229 kU(A)/L and a median total serum IgE level of 621 kU/L, who failed an initial double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge at peanut flour doses of 100 mg or less. After pretreatment with omalizumab, all 13 subjects tolerated the initial 11 desensitization doses given on the first day, including the maximum dose of 500 mg peanut flour (cumulative dose, 992 mg, equivalent to >2 peanuts), requiring minimal or no rescue therapy. Twelve subjects then reached the maximum maintenance dose of 4000 mg peanut flour per day in a median time of 8 weeks, at which point omalizumab was discontinued. All 12 subjects continued on 4000 mg peanut flour per day and subsequently tolerated a challenge with 8000 mg peanut flour (equivalent to about 20 peanuts), or 160 to 400 times the dose tolerated before desensitization. During the study, 6 of the 13 subjects experienced mild or no allergic reactions, 5 subjects had grade 2 reactions, and 2 subjects had grade 3 reactions, all of which responded rapidly to treatment. Among children with high-risk peanut allergy, treatment with omalizumab may facilitate rapid oral desensitization and qualitatively improve the desensitization process. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A pilot study of omalizumab to facilitate rapid oral desensitization in high-risk peanut allergic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lynda C.; Rachid, Rima; LeBovidge, Jennifer; Blood, Emily; Mittal, Mudita; Umetsu, Dale T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Peanut allergy is a major public health problem that affects 1% of the population and has no effective therapy. Objective To examine the safety and efficacy of oraldesensitization in peanut allergic children in combination with a brief course of anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (omalizumab, Xolair). Methods We performed oral peanut desensitization in peanut allergic children at high risk for developing significant peanut-induced allergic reactions. Omalizumab was administered prior to and during oral peanut desensitization. Results We enrolled 13 children (median age, 10 years), with a median peanut-specific IgE of 229 kUA/L and a median total serum IgE of 621 kU/L, who failed an initial double-blind placebo controlled food challenge at doses 100 mg peanut flour. After pre-treatment with omalizumab, all subjects tolerated the initial 11 desensitization doses given on the first day, including the maximum dose of 500 mg peanut flour (cumulative dose, 992 mg, equivalent to >2 peanuts), requiring minimal or no rescue therapy. 12 subjects then reached the maximum maintenance dose of 4,000 mg peanut flour/day in a median time of 8 weeks, at which point omalizumab was discontinued. All 12 subjects continued on 4,000 mg peanut flour/day and subsequently tolerated a challenge with 8,000 mg peanut flour (equivalent to about 20 peanuts), or 160 to 400 times the dose tolerated before desensitization. During the study, 6 of the 13 subjects experienced mild or no allergic reactions; 6 subjects had Grade 2, and 2 subjects Grade 3 reactions, all of which responded rapidly to treatment. Conclusions Among children with high-risk peanut allergy, treatment with omalizumab may facilitate rapid oral desensitization, and qualitativelyimprove the desensitization process. PMID:24176117

  7. Do teas rich in antioxidants reduce the physicochemical and peroxidative risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in humans? Pilot studies with Rooibos herbal tea and Japanese green tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, A; Mokoena, M; Durbach, I; Lazarus, J; de Jager, S; Ackermann, H; Breytenbach, I; Okada, A; Usami, M; Hirose, Y; Ando, R; Yasui, T; Kohri, K

    2016-08-01

    Several experimental and animal studies have demonstrated that substances rich in antioxidants can reduce the physicochemical and peroxidative risk factors for calcium oxalate (CaOx) renal stone formation in urine and blood. However, there are very few such investigations in humans. In the present pilot study, two varieties of tea, a green one from Japan (JGT) and a herbal one from South Africa (Rooibos) (RT), both rich in antioxidants, were administered to a group of CaOx stone formers (SF) (n = 8) for 30 days. Both teas were analysed for polyphenols by high-performance liquid chromatography and for minerals by plasma atomic and optical emission spectroscopy. 24 h urines (baseline and day 30) were analysed for lithogenic factors. CaOx metastable limits and crystal nucleation and growth kinetics were also determined in each urine sample. Deposited crystals were inspected by scanning electron microscopy. Blood samples were collected (baseline and day 30). Biomarkers of oxidative stress including plasma and urinary thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) were also determined. Urinary physicochemical risk factors were also investigated after ingestion of RT for 30 days in two control groups (CG1 and CG2), the latter one of which consisted of habitual JGT drinkers. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon signed rank tests and Mann-Whitney tests for paired and independent measurements, respectively. Several flavonoids and catechins were quantified in RT and JGT, respectively, confirming that both teas are rich sources of antioxidants. Mineral content was found to be far below dietary reference intakes. There were no significant changes in any of the urinary physicochemical or peroxidative risk factors in the control groups or in SF, except for the supersaturation (SS) of brushite (Bru) which decreased in the latter group after ingestion of JGT. Crystal morphology showed a tendency to change from

  8. A study of airline pilot morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Adrian J; Larsen, Peter D; Griffiths, Robin F; Aldington, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    It has long been believed that airline pilots are healthier than the general population. There are a number of reasons why this should be the case. However, there is very little evidence to support this belief as fact. This study investigates the health of the pilot population of an Oceanic based airline compared to the health of the general population. Pilots who conducted their medical certificate renewal at the airline's medical unit between 1 November 2009 and 31 October 2010 were included. A medical questionnaire was completed by each pilot at the time of their medical certificate renewal. Data from the questionnaire was entered into a database as well as the pilot's BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, and blood glucose level. The comparison population was the population who completed the New Zealand Health Survey (NZHS) between 2006-2007. Demographic, lifestyle characteristics, and health status data from the pilots was compared to the NZHS using a Chi-squared test. Included in the study were 595 pilots. With respect to most medical conditions, pilots had a lower prevalence when compared to the general population. Pilots had a higher prevalence of kidney disease (3.3% vs 0.6%) and melanoma skin cancer (19 per 1000 vs 0.4 per 1000). This study suggests that pilots in New Zealand are healthier than the general population with respect to most medical conditions. The two medical conditions that were identified as being overrepresented in pilots may be the result of the occupational environment.

  9. Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Patients with “Male Depression” Syndrome, Hopelessness, and Suicide Risk: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Angeletti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives and Methods. This was an observational study of the efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP in a sample of 35 (30 women and 5 men patients with moderate-to-severe “male depression” (Gotland Scale for Male Depression (GSMD ≥ 13 comorbid with unipolar mood disorder (dysthymia and major depression or anxiety disorder. Outcome measures were GSMD and BHS (Beck Hopelessness Scale score changes from baseline. Results. Patients had a strong response to STPP on the GSMD (estimated mean score change (± SE=−9.08 ± 2.74;P<0.01; partial eta squared  =0.50, but not on the BHS (estimated mean score change (± SE=−0.92 ± 1.55;P=0.57; partial eta squared  =0.03. BHS score changes were significantly associated with GSMD score changes (Pearson's r=0.56; P<0.001, even when controlling for the severity of hopelessness at the baseline (partial r=0.62; P<0.001. Conclusions. STPP proved to be effective in patients suffering from “male depression” although hopelessness was only marginally reduced by this treatment which points to the need to better understand how STPP can be involved in the reduction of suicide risk.

  10. CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc versus CHADS(2) for stroke risk assessment in low-risk patients with atrial fibrillation: a pilot study from a single center of the NCDR-PINNACLE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyaskulkaew, Chatchawan; Singh, Tejwant; Szpunar, Susan; Saravolatz, Louis; Rosman, Howard

    2014-05-01

    The CHADS(2) score is widely used to assess the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Patients with score of 0 and 1 are considered 'low risk' and are often treated with aspirin. In a Danish Study, the CHA(2)DS(2)--VASc score was shown to identify low and high-risk subgroups among patients with CHADS(2) score of 0 and 1, with annual risk ranging from 0.84 to 8.18%. This study seeks to assess whether using CHA(2)DS(2)--VASc score will identify high-risk subset of patients with low CHADS(2) scores in an American population. This pilot study examined data from our cardiology fellowship ambulatory clinics from January 2009 to May 2012 using the NCDR-PINNACLE registry. Each cardiology fellow entered patients' data using on-line software developed by the American College of Cardiology. Among 2,048 patients followed at our clinics, 478 had AF. Of those, 161 patients had CHADS(2) score of 0 (44 patients) or 1 (117 patients). Calculating the CHA(2)DS(2)--VASc score in these patients, 12 (7.4%) had score of 0, 50 (31.1%) had score of 1, 66(41%) had score of 2, 31 (19.3%) had score of 3 and 2 (1.2%) had score of 4. Using original CHADS(2) recommendation, warfarin would not be strongly recommended in any of these patients. Utilizing the CHA(2)DS(2)--VASc score, 61.5% of the 161 patients would have a score of 2 or more signifying increased risk where anticoagulation may be indicated. Compared to CHADS(2), CHA(2)DS(2)--VASc may more precisely predict the risk of stroke and anticoagulation strategy in low-risk patients with non-valvular AF.

  11. Nutritional status, glycemic control and its associated risk factors among a sample of type 2 diabetic individuals, a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayyeh Firouzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in Malaysia, with most patients poorly controlled. Hence, this study aimed to determine nutritional and metabolic status as well as blood pressure of Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and identify associated risk factors for poor glycemic control. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 type 2 diabetic patients were recruited and completed a questionnaire covering socio-demographic status, 3-day diet records, and physical activity. Anthropometry and glycemic control parameters, lipid profile and blood pressure were also measured. Results: Subjects were on average 56.7±9.9 years old with a mean duration of diabetes of 6.5 ± 5.0 years. The mean hemoglobin A1c of the subjects was 7.6% ± 1.4%, with only 20.2% achieving the target goal of <6.5% with no significant differences between genders. The mean body mass index was 26.9 ± 4.7 kg/m 2 , with 86.5% either were overweight or obese. Only 10.6% of the subjects exercised daily. The proportions of macronutrients relative to total energy intake were consistent with the recommendations of most diabetes associations. The adjusted odds of having poor glycemic control were 3.235 (1.043-10.397 (P < 0.05 higher among those who had high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels below the normal range. Those taking one or two types of oral anti-diabetic drugs had 19.9 (2.959-87.391 (P < 0.01 and 14.3 (2.647-77.500 (P < 0.01 higher odds of poor glycemic control respectively compared to those who were being treated by diet alone. Conclusion: Poor glycemic control was prevalent among Malaysian diabetic patients, and this could be associated with low levels of HDL and being treated with oral anti-diabetes agents.

  12. Clara Cell Protein Expression in Mechanically Ventilated Term and Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome and at Risk of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guzmán-Bárcenas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study was to determine Clara cell protein (CC16 concentration in bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL fluid from full-term and preterm (<37 weeks’ gestational age neonates requiring respiratory support, having symptoms of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, and at risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD. We hypothesized that CC16 may be predictive of BPD diagnosis regardless of gestational age. BAL fluid CC16 was measured by ELISA at birth and at day 7 of life. Both groups that developed BPD showed significantly decreased BAL fluid CC16 levels compared to those infants that did not develop the disease. CC16 positively correlated with diagnosis of BPD and negatively with the severity of the disease. These results suggest that BAL fluid CC16 levels may have a diagnostic value at day 7 for BPD in both term and preterm infants. This study demonstrates the potential utility of BAL fluid CC16 levels as a biomarker for BPD in term infants.

  13. 90% Compliance Pilot Studies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    In early 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced an opportunity for states to participate in energy code compliance evaluation pilot studies. DOE worked with five Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations (REEOs, formerly referred to as Energy Efficiency Partnerships, or EEPs) to fund pilot studies covering nine states. This report details conclusions stated in individual state reports, as well as conclusions drawn by DOE based on their oversight of the pilot studies, and based on discussions held with the REEOs and representatives from the pilot study states and their contractors.

  14. The direction of shift-work rotation impacts metabolic risk independent of chronotype and social jetlag--an exploratory pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Duboutay, Françoise; Haubruge, Damien; Hampton, Shelagh; Darling, Andrea L; Berry, Jacqueline L; Kerkhofs, Myriam; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Skene, Debra J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to explore the risk of metabolic abnormalities in steel workers employed in different shift-work rotations. Male workers in a steel factory [16 employed in a fast clockwise rotation (CW), 18 in slow counterclockwise rotation (CC), 9 day workers (DW); mean age 43.3 ± SD 6.8 years] with at least 5 years experience in their current work schedule participated. All workers provided fasting blood samples between 06:00 and 08:00 h for plasma glucose, insulin, apo-lipoproteins A and B (ApoA, ApoB), high- and low-density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL), total cholesterol (tCH), triglycerides (TG), minimally oxidized (mox) LDL, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). HOMA index (homeostatic model assessment) was calculated to evaluate insulin resistance, beta cell function and risk of diabetes. Information on demographics, health, stimulants, sleep, social and work life, chronotype (phase of entrainment) and social jetlag (difference between mid-sleep on workdays and free days) as a surrogate for circadian disruption was collected by questionnaire. Neither chronotype nor social jetlag was associated with any of the metabolic risk blood markers. There were no significant differences in 25(OH)D, ApoA, ApoB, CRP, HDL, IL-8, insulin, LDL, mox-LDL, mox-LDL/ApoB ratio, tCH and TG levels between the three work groups. Although we did observe absolute differences in some of these markers, the small sample size of our study population might prevent these differences being statistically significant. Fasting glucose and HOMA index were significantly lower in CW compared to DW and CC, indicating lower metabolic risk. Reasons for the lower fasting glucose and HOMA index in CW workers remains to be clarified. Future studies of workers in different shift rotations are warranted to understand better the differential effects of shift-work on individual workers and their health indices.

  15. Can a community pharmacy sleep assessment tool aid the identification of patients at risk of sleep disorders in the community: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashyap KC

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Krishneeta C Kashyap,1 Lisa M Nissen,1 Simon S Smith,2 James A Douglas,3 Greg J Kyle41School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland, Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia; 2Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia; 3The Prince Charles Hospital, Chermside, Queensland, Australia; 4School of Pharmacy, University of Canberra, Bruce, Canberra, AustraliaBackground: When experiencing sleep problems for the first time, consumers may often approach community pharmacists for advice as they are easily accessible health care professionals in the community. In Australian community pharmacies there are no specific tools available for use by pharmacists to assist with the assessment and handling of consumers with sleep enquiries.Objective: To assess the feasibility of improving the detection of sleep disorders within the community through the pilot of a newly developed Community Pharmacy Sleep Assessment Tool (COP-SAT.Method: The COP-SAT was designed to incorporate elements from a number of existing, standardized, and validated clinical screening measures. The COP-SAT was trialed in four Australian community pharmacies over a 4-week period.Key findings: A total of 241 community pharmacy consumers were assessed using the COP-SAT. A total of 74 (30.7% were assessed as being at risk of insomnia, 26 (10.7% were at risk of daytime sleepiness, 19 (7.9% were at risk of obstructive sleep apnea, and 121 (50.2% were regular snorers. A total of 116 (48.1% participants indicated that they consume caffeine before bedtime, of which 55 (47% had associated symptoms of sleep onset insomnia. Moreover, 85 (35% consumed alcohol before bedtime, of which 50 (58% experienced fragmented sleep, 50 (58% were regular snorers, and nine (10.6% had apnea symptoms. The COP-SAT was feasible in the community pharmacy setting. The prevalence of sleep disorders in the sampled population was high, but generally

  16. Brief report do university students have high cardiovascular risk? A pilot study from universiti malaysia sarawak (unimas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Py; Ong, Ta; Muna, S; Syed Alwi, Sar; Kamarudin, K

    2010-01-01

    A health screening was done in UNIMAS in August 2008 for 237 undergraduate students. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure (BP) were measured for all subjects. Total cholesterol and glucose levels were checked for those who fulfilled the screening criteria. The proportion of participants with cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors was high. The strategies for health promotion should not only be targeted to the older community but also to the younger community.

  17. Brief Report Do University Students Have High Cardiovascular Risk? A Pilot Study from Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (Unimas)

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, PY; Ong, TA; Muna, S; Syed Alwi, SAR; Kamarudin, K

    2010-01-01

    A health screening was done in UNIMAS in August 2008 for 237 undergraduate students. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure (BP) were measured for all subjects. Total cholesterol and glucose levels were checked for those who fulfilled the screening criteria. The proportion of participants with cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors was high. The strategies for health promotion should not only be targeted to the older community but also to the younger community.

  18. Variation in HNF1B and Obesity May Influence Prostate Cancer Risk in African American Men: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganna Chornokur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prostate cancer (PCa racial disparity is multifactorial, involving biological, sociocultural, and lifestyle determinants. We investigated the association between selected potentially functional polymorphisms (SNPs and prostate cancer (PCa risk in Black (AAM and White (EAM men. We further explored if these associations varied by the body mass index (BMI and height. Methods. Age-matched DNA samples from 259 AAM and 269 EAM were genotyped for 10 candidate SNPs in 7 genes using the TaqMan allelic differentiation analysis. The dominant, recessive, and additive age-adjusted unconditional logistic regression models were fitted. Results. Three SNPs showed statistically significant associations with PCa risk: in AAM, HNF1B rs7501939 (OR=2.42, P=0.0046 and rs4430796 (OR=0.57, P=0.0383; in EAM, CTBP2 rs4962416 (OR=1.52, P=0.0384. In addition, high BMI in AAM (OR=1.06, P=0.022 and height in EAM (OR=0.92, P=0.0434 showed significant associations. Interestingly, HNF1B rs7501939 was associated with PCa exclusively in obese AAM (OR=2.14, P=0.0103. Conclusion. Our results suggest that variation in the HNF1B may influence PCa risk in obese AAM.

  19. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  20. T Wave Alternans in high arrhythmic risk patients: Analysis in time and frequency domains: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunt Anthony C

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T wave alternans (TA is a repolarisation phenomenon manifesting as a microvolt beat to beat change in the amplitude of the T wave and ST segment. TA has been shown to be a predictor of arrhythmic risk in unselected myocardial infarction populations. TA has not been used to differentiate risk within the ischaemic cardiomyopathy population. Methods The subjects investigated comprised, Group 1: 7 stable patients with remote (>20 months extensive myocardial scarring and no arrhythmic events (NYHA 3 and 4. Group2: 9 post infarction patients with malignant arrhythmia and implantable defibrillator. During breath holding, 20 continuous QRST complexes from each patients X, Y and Z leads were digitally recorded. Time domain, resultant absolute difference vectors (ATA, were calculated for alternate resultant T wave sequences. Group differences between the magnitude and temporal distribution of mean ATAs and their spectral and cross-spectral analysis were compared. Results Group 1 v Group 2 mean ATAs were 10.7 (7.17 v 11.7 (8.48 respectively, not significant. Each group had a homogenous temporal distribution of ATAs. Both group's largest mean ATA frequency components were between 0 to 25 Hz, the largest ATA component being at the DC frequency. Cross spectral analysis showed no significant differences in group ATA frequency content. Conclusion The frequency content and microvolt magnitude of T wave alternans was not significantly different in these two groups. The specificity of T wave alternans for differentiating arrhythmic risk in post infarction scarring and heart failure needs investigation.

  1. mHealth to promote pregnancy and interconception health among African-American women at risk for adverse birth outcomes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jennifer; Miller, Lindsey; Isbell, Sheila; Shields, Tekesia; Worthy, Natasha; Dunlop, Anne Lang

    2015-01-01

    The use of mobile phone applications (mHealth) to provide health education and behavioral prompts is 1 of the 12 common mHealth functions identified by the World Health Organization as innovations to strengthen health systems. Among low-income pregnant and parenting women, health education is widely recognized as a way to improve maternal and infant health outcomes, but the efficacy of written health education materials to change knowledge and behavior for this population is questionable. mHealth prompts, in contrast, is a promising alternative. A team of researchers in medicine/epidemiology, anthropology/midwifery, computer science/sensors, and community-based case management created and pilot tested a mHealth application (mHealth app) for African-American women at high risk for adverse birth outcomes. We tested the acceptability and feasibility of the interactive application among women during the reproductive stages of early and late pregnancy, postpartum, and interconception. Interview data from 14 women in the various reproductive stages revealed that most women found the mHealth messages helpful. Also, 62 Ob-Gyn physicians and nurses and 19 Family Medicine residents provided feedback. Women's responses to specific messages trended down over time. Women in the postpartum phase had the highest response rate to particular text messages, followed by those in the pregnancy phase. Responses dropped off dramatically during the interconception period. About 21% of women lost their phones. Unexpected findings were that all participants already had smartphones, women wanted messages about depression, and clinicians wanted the app to link to case management for individualized medical care. Logistical challenges to app management were limitations but are useful for consideration before scale-up. This study corroborates findings in the health literacy literature that women most at risk for adverse birth outcomes need additional face-to-face support with m

  2. Is thyroid gland an organ at risk in breast cancer patients treated with locoregional radiotherapy? Results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunio, Mutahir Ali; Al Asiri, Mushabbab; Bayoumi, Yasser; Stanciu, Laura G; Al Johani, Naji; Al Saeed, Eyad Fawzi

    2015-01-01

    Aim was to evaluate the dose distribution within the thyroid gland its association with hypothyroidism in breast cancer (BC) patients receiving supraclavicular (SC) radiation therapy (RT). Consecutive 40 BC patients with baseline normal thyroid function tests (TFTs), were randomized into two groups: (a) Adjuvant chest wall/breast with SC-RT (20 patients) and (b) control group (adjuvant chest wall/breast RT only); 20 patients. The thyroid gland was contoured for each patient. Each patient's dose volume histogram (DVH), mean thyroid volume, the volume percentages of the thyroid absorbing respectively 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 Gy (V5, V10, V20, V30, V40, and V50), and Dmean (average dose in whole volume of thyroid) were then estimated. TFTs were performed at the time of the last follow-up and compared. Mean thyroid volume of cohort was 19.6 cm(3) (4.02-93.52) and Dmean of thyroid gland in SC-RT and control group was 25.8 Gy (16.4-52.2) and 5.6 Gy (0.7-12.8), respectively. Median values of V5, V10, V20, V30, V40, and V50 were 54%, 51%, 42.8%, 30.8%, 27.8%, and 7.64%, respectively, in SC-RT as compared to control group (V5;4.9%, V10;2.4%, V20;1.75%, V301%, V40;0%, and V50;0%, respectively) with P thyroid function whereas four patients (10%) had hypothyroidism; 3/20 (15%) patients in SC-RT and 1/20 (5%) in control group with P thyroid volume (P = 0.03). The risk of hypothyroidism in BC patients after SC-RT depends on the thyroid gland volume and V30 >50% and the risk can be minimized by thyroid gland shielding during RT.

  3. Triple Therapy with Scopolamine, Ondansetron and Dexamethasone for Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Moderate to High Risk Patients Undergoing Craniotomy Under General Anesthesia: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Daniel Bergese

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative nausea and vomiting is one of the most common complaints from patients and clinicians after a surgical procedure. According to the current Society of Ambulatory Anesthesia Consensus Guidelines, the general incidence of vomiting and nausea is around 30% and 50% respectively; and up to 80% in high risk patients. In previous studies, the reported incidence of PONV at 24 hours after craniotomy was 43%-70%. The transdermal scopolamine delivery system contains a 1.5 mg drug reservoir, which is designed to deliver a continuous slow release of scopolamine through intact skin during the first 72 hours of patch application. Therefore, we designed this single arm, non-randomized, pilot study to assess the efficacy and safety of triple therapy with scopolamine, ondansetron and dexamethasone to prevent PONV.Materials and methods: In the preoperative area, subjects received an active TDS 1.5 mg that was applied to a hairless patch of skin in the mastoid area approximately 2 hours prior to the operation. Immediately after anesthesia induction, all patients received a single 4 mg dose of ondansetron IV and a single 10 mg dose of dexamethasone IV. Patients that experienced nausea and/or vomiting received ondansetron 4 mg IV as the initial rescue medication. Results: A total of 36 subjects were analyzed. The overall incidence of PONV during the first 24 hours after neurological surgery was 33% (n=12. The incidence of nausea and emesis during the first 24 hours after surgery was recorded as 33% (n=12 and 16% (n=6 respectively. Conclusion: Our data also showed that this triple therapy regimen may be an efficient alternative regimen for PONV prophylaxis in patients undergoing neurological surgery with general anesthesia. Further studies using regimens affecting different receptor pathways should be performed to better prove the efficacy in preventing PONV or delayed PONV.

  4. Is thyroid gland an organ at risk in breast cancer patients treated with locoregional radiotherapy? Results of a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutahir Ali Tunio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aim was to evaluate the dose distribution within the thyroid gland its association with hypothyroidism in breast cancer (BC patients receiving supraclavicular (SC radiation therapy (RT. Materials and Methods: Consecutive 40 BC patients with baseline normal thyroid function tests (TFTs, were randomized into two groups: (a Adjuvant chest wall/breast with SC-RT (20 patients and (b control group (adjuvant chest wall/breast RT only; 20 patients. The thyroid gland was contoured for each patient. Each patient′s dose volume histogram (DVH, mean thyroid volume, the volume percentages of the thyroid absorbing respectively 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 Gy (V5, V10, V20, V30, V40, and V50, and D mean (average dose in whole volume of thyroid were then estimated. TFTs were performed at the time of the last follow-up and compared. Results: Mean thyroid volume of cohort was 19.6 cm 3 (4.02-93.52 and D mean of thyroid gland in SC-RT and control group was 25.8 Gy (16.4-52.2 and 5.6 Gy (0.7-12.8, respectively. Median values of V5, V10, V20, V30, V40, and V50 were 54%, 51%, 42.8%, 30.8%, 27.8%, and 7.64%, respectively, in SC-RT as compared to control group (V5;4.9%, V10;2.4%, V20;1.75%, V301%, V40;0%, and V50;0%, respectively with P 50% and the risk can be minimized by thyroid gland shielding during RT.

  5. Pilot study of feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of asthma risk with paracetamol versus ibuprofen use in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Judith; Hunt, Anna; McDouall, Alice; Waqanivavalagi, Steve; Braithwaite, Irene; Weatherall, Mark; Stanley, Thorsten; Beasley, Richard; Mitchell, Edwin A; Dalziel, Stuart R

    2016-10-14

    To undertake a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of paracetamol versus ibuprofen use during infancy to determine if paracetamol is associated with an increased risk of developing asthma, the preferred method of recruitment needs to be determined. We assessed three different recruitment domains to determine the likely enrolment rates of newborn infants into a three-year or six-year RCT of paracetamol versus ibuprofen and the development of asthma symptoms. The proposed RCT would require 1,806 participants. A questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of Auckland and Wellington based parents/guardians within three different recruitment domains: antenatal classes, postnatal wards and six-week well-child visits at primary healthcare centres. Over a twelve-week period 19/586 (3.2%), 196/861 (22.8%), and 0/110 (0%) questionnaires were completed by parents/guardians of newborn infants in antenatal, postnatal and primary healthcare domains. In the postnatal recruitment domain, the likelihood of newborn infants being enrolled in the proposed RCT was rated 'very likely', 'likely' and 'neutral' by 15 (8%, CI 4-12%), 65 (33%, CI 26-40%) and 64 (33%, CI 25-39%) of respondents for a RCT of three years duration; and by 5 (3%, CI 1-5%), 37 (19%, CI 14-25%) and 59 (30%, CI 24-36%) of respondents respectively for a RCT of six years duration. Postnatal wards are expected to be the most successful recruitment domain for the proposed RCT, likely a reflection of the face-to-face direct recruitment by researchers. It appears feasible to recruit into the proposed RCT using three large New Zealand tertiary hospitals.

  6. The Use of Message Framing to Promote Sexual Risk Reduction in Young Adolescents: A Pilot Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenga, Deepa R.; Hieftje, Kimberly D.; Fiellin, Lynn E.; Edelman, E. Jennifer; Rosenthal, Marjorie S.; Duncan, Lindsay R.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have explored the application of message framing to promote health behaviors in adolescents. In this exploratory study, we examined young adolescents' selection of gain- versus loss-framed images and messages when designing an HIV-prevention intervention to promote delayed sexual initiation. Twenty-six adolescents (aged 10-14 years)…

  7. Liverpool Telecare Pilot: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Barnes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Telecare services use information and communications technology (ICT to support the provision of care to people in their own homes. This paper describes a pilot telecare service employed by Liverpool (UK City Council to support a sample of their frail and elderly social services users. The pilot has been running for over two years and has been deployed for 21 individuals in Liverpool. In this paper we present the pilot system and provide real example cases which help to illustrate the benefits of such a system.

  8. A Common Genetic Variant Risk Score is Associated with Drug-Induced QT Prolongation and Torsade de Pointes Risk: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, David G; Vicente, Jose; Johannesen, Lars; Blinova, Ksenia; Mason, Jay W; Weeke, Peter; Behr, Elijah R; Roden, Dan M; Woosley, Raymond; Kosova, Gulum; Rosenberg, Michael A; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2017-02-17

    Background -Drug-induced QT interval prolongation, a risk factor for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, is a potential side effect of many marketed and withdrawn medications. The contribution of common genetic variants previously associated with baseline QT interval to drug-induced QT prolongation and arrhythmias is not known. Methods -We tested the hypothesis that a weighted combination of common genetic variants contributing to QT interval at baseline, identified through genome-wide association studies, can predict individual response to multiple QT-prolonging drugs. Genetic analysis of 22 subjects was performed in a secondary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial of 3 QT-prolonging drugs with 15 time-matched QT and plasma drug concentration measurements. Subjects received single doses of dofetilide, quinidine, ranolazine and placebo. The outcome was the correlation between a genetic QT score comprising 61 common genetic variants and the slope of an individual subject's drug-induced increase in heart rate corrected QT (QTc) vs. drug concentration. Results -The genetic QT score was correlated with drug-induced QTc prolongation. Among white subjects, genetic QT score explained 30% of the variability in response to dofetilide (r = 0.55 [95% CI, 0.09-0.81], P = 0.02), 23% in response to quinidine (r = 0.48 [95% CI, -0.03 to 0.79], P = 0.06) and 27% in response to ranolazine (r = 0.52 [95% CI, 0.05 to 0.80], P = 0.03). Furthermore, the genetic QT score was a significant predictor of drug-induced torsade de pointes in an independent sample of 216 cases compared to 771 controls (r(2) = 12%, P = 1x10(-7)). Conclusions -We demonstrate that a genetic QT score comprising 61 common genetic variants explains a significant proportion of the variability in drug-induced QT prolongation and is a significant predictor of drug-induced torsade de pointes. These findings highlight an opportunity for recent genetic discoveries to improve

  9. Efficacy of High Intensity Exercise on Disease Activity and Cardiovascular Risk in Active Axial Spondyloarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Silje Halvorsen Sveaas; Inger Jorid Berg; Sella Aarrestad Provan; Anne Grete Semb; Kåre Birger Hagen; Nina Vøllestad; Camilla Fongen; Inge C Olsen; Annika Michelsen; Thor Ueland; Pål Aukrust; Kvien, Tore K; Hanne Dagfinrud

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical therapy is recommended for the management of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and flexibility exercises have traditionally been the main focus. Cardiovascular (CV) diseases are considered as a major health concern in axSpA and there is strong evidence that endurance and strength exercise protects against CV diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of high intensity endurance and strength exercise on disease activity and CV health in patien...

  10. A pilot study (SWOG S0429 of weekly cetuximab and chest radiotherapy for poor-risk stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhchyau eChen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with poor performance status (PS or co-morbidities are often not candidates for standard chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT due to poor tolerance to treatments. A pilot study for poor-risk stage III NSCLC patients was conducted combining cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, with chest radiation (RT. Methods: Stage III NSCLC patients with Zubrod PS 2, or Zubrod PS 0-1 with poor pulmonary function and co-morbidities prohibiting chemoRT were eligible. A loading dose of cetuximab (400 mg/m2 was delivered week one, followed by weekly cetuximab (250 mg/m2/RT to 64.5 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions, and maintenance weekly cetuximab (250 mg/m2 for two years or until disease progression. H-score for EGFR protein expression was conducted in available tumors.Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled. Twenty two were assessed for outcome and toxicity. Median survival was 14 months and median progression-free survival was 8 months. The response rate was 47% and disease control rate was 74%. Toxicity assessment revealed 22.7% overall ≥ Grade 3 non-hematologic toxicities. Grade 3 esophagitis was observed in one patient (5%. The skin reactions were mostly Grade 1 or 2 except two of 22 (9% had Grade 3 acne and 1/22 (5% had Grade 3 radiation skin burn. Grade 3-4 hypomagnesemia was seen in 4 (18% patients. One patient (5% had elevated cardiac troponin and pulmonary emboli. H-score did not reveal prognostic significance. An initially planned second cohort of the study did not commence due to slow accrual, which would have added weekly docetaxel to cetuximab/RT after completion of the first cohort of patients. Conclusions: Concurrent weekly cetuximab/chest RT followed by maintenance cetuximab for poor-risk stage III NSCLC was well tolerated. Further studies with larger sample sizes will be useful to establish the optimal therapeutic ratio of this regimen.

  11. Ballet and stress. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, G; Casale, T; Rosati, M V; Melcarne, R; Sinibaldi, F; Capozzella, A; Di Giorgio, V; Giubilati, R; Sacco, C; Tomei, F; Sancini, A

    2015-01-01

    Work-related stress is a complex problem requiring a work environment-based assessment. Artists like dancers represent a category of atypical workers potentially at high risk for work-related stress. Aim of our pilot study is to evaluate organizational stress in a population of professional dancers, using the HSE Indicator Tool for Work Related Stress. We administered the Italian version of the HSE Indicator Tool to 38 ballet dancers, males and females. The questionnaire evaluates 7 key organizational dimensions: demand, control, managers' support, peer support, relationships, role and change. The standards required-ideal conditions are achieved in none of the above-mentioned dimensions. Change is the only dimension for which results fall between the 20th and the 50th percentile, while for other dimensions results fall below the 20th percentile suggesting the need for immediate corrective action. In male dancers an acceptable situation is highlighted for the dimension "change" compared to female dancers. In both sexes there is a high frequency of subjects complaining of verbal abuse, bullying and harassment. Despite the small sample size, our pilot study highlights the presence of heightened levels of organizational stress. Preventive measures targeted towards improving communication between managers and dancers and aimed at team building should be implemented.

  12. A pilot exercise on comparative risk assessment in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebrian, M.E.; Albores, A.; Sierra, A. [and others

    1996-12-31

    Concern in the Mexican government and academic institutions about human health problems derived from exposure to environmental contaminants has been increasing. This interest prompted us to perform a pilot study to identify and rank potentially problematic environmental situations. We were given access to files from the Instituto Nacional de Ecologia. We screened about 2,500 documents and selected about 200 reports for further analysis. We adapted methodologies developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1993) and ATSDR (1992) to analyze environmental data. San Luis Potosi City and Region Lagunera were the areas posing greater risks. We chose San Luis Potosi City to perform a more detailed study, since here a smelting complex is located within an urban zone. The high levels of As, Pb, and Cd in environmental media resulted in a higher body burden in exposed children than children living 7 km away. Multiple regression analysis suggested that alterations in sensorial nerve transmission were mainly related to As in urine (AsU), whereas those in motor nerves were mainly related to Pb in blood (PbB). No apparent relationships associated with CdU were found. Slower auditory nerve conduction was associated with both AsU and PbB. These findings suggest that exposed children are also at high risk of suffering other adverse health effects. This exercise illustrates the need to perform studies aimed at identifying and ranking environmental contamination problems in industrializing countries. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Total flying hours and risk of high systolic blood pressure in the civilian pilot in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdi Afian

    2016-07-01

    medical examinations in the Civil Aviation Medical Center  on 18 to 29 May 2015. Several data among other, others, were on demographic and job characteristics, clinical, exercise habits, eating habits, and history of the disease. High systolic blood pressure defined as systolic blood pressure  140 mmHg or more. Results: Of the 690 pilots who conduct periodic health examinations, 428 male pilots willing to participate this study. Age and history of hypertension is the dominant risk factor associated with high systolic blood pressure. When compared with the pilot age 19-39 years, 40-65 years old had 15.1-fold greater risk of high systolic blood pressure [odds ratio (adjusted ORa= 15.12; p= 0.001]. Pilot with a history of hypertension compared to those without a history of having high systolic blood pressure risk 93.2 times larger (ORa= 93.21; p= 0.001. Conclusion: Age of 40-65 years and had history of hypertension increased the riskj of systolic blood pressure among civilian pilot in Indonesia. Key words: systolic blood pressure, total flight hours, civilian pilot, Indonesia

  14. Total flying hours and risk of high systolic blood pressure in the civilian pilot in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdi Afian

    2016-07-01

    medical examinations in the Civil Aviation Medical Center  on 18 to 29 May 2015. Several data among other, others, were on demographic and job characteristics, clinical, exercise habits, eating habits, and history of the disease. High systolic blood pressure defined as systolic blood pressure  140 mmHg or more. Results: Of the 690 pilots who conduct periodic health examinations, 428 male pilots willing to participate this study. Age and history of hypertension is the dominant risk factor associated with high systolic blood pressure. When compared with the pilot age 19-39 years, 40-65 years old had 15.1-fold greater risk of high systolic blood pressure [odds ratio (adjusted ORa= 15.12; p= 0.001]. Pilot with a history of hypertension compared to those without a history of having high systolic blood pressure risk 93.2 times larger (ORa= 93.21; p= 0.001. Conclusion: Age of 40-65 years and had history of hypertension increased the riskj of systolic blood pressure among civilian pilot in Indonesia. Key words: systolic blood pressure, total flight hours, civilian pilot, Indonesia

  15. The psychological profile of pilots of passenger planes: Analysis of temperamental traits, aggression and risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Makarowski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the years it has been assumed, that the greater the number of pilot flight hours, the better the development of problem-solving skills among pilots. Research suggests, however, that the problem is more complex than that. Not only one’s experience is of importance – temperament, aggression and risk may also affect the decision-making process under stressful conditions. Material and Methods: We examined 97 male pilots of passenger planes, who had flew ATRs, Boeings, Airbuses, Embraers, and Saabs. The comparative group was made up of 127 graduates of technical studies (not connected with aviation. In our study, we used the following methods: the PTS (Pavlovian Temperament Survey Temperament Questionnaire by Strelau, the Aggression Questionnaire by Buss and Perry, and the Stimulating-Instrumental Risk Inventory (SIRI by Zaleśkiewicz. Results: Following the analyses we could categorize the pilots into 3 distinct groups: group 1 – strong type of nervous system with a tendency to avoid risk; group 2 – strong type of nervous system with a tendency to take risks; group 3 – the relatively weakest type of nervous system with a tendency toward aggressive behavior. Conclusions: Members of each group were analyzed to assess how they function in a task situation, i.e., whilst piloting a passenger plane. The study showed that individuals with high need for stimulation may – consciously or not – seek situations of excessive or unnecessary risks, and this is done in order to reach the right level of stimulation. A constellation of the following variables: temperament, risk, and aggression could be – we argue – useful in psychological examinations, and should be taken into account in training procedures for pilots. Med Pr 2017;68(5:639–651

  16. BIMOMASS GASIFICATION PILOT PLANT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a gasification pilot program using two biomass feedstocks: bagasse pellets and wood chips. he object of the program was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its suitability as a fuel for gas-turbine-based power generation cycles. he f...

  17. Case management for at-risk elderly patients in the English integrated care pilots: observational study of staff and patient experience and secondary care utilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Roland

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2009, the English Department of Health appointed 16 integrated care pilots which aimed to provide better integrated care. We report the quantitative results from a multi-method evaluation of six of the demonstration projects which used risk profiling tools to identify older people at risk of emergency hospital admission, combined with intensive case management for people identified as at risk. The interventions focused mainly on delivery system redesign and improved clinical information systems, two key elements of Wagner's Chronic Care Model.Methods: Questionnaires to staff and patients. Difference-in-differences analysis of secondary care utilisation using data on 3,646 patients and 17,311 matched controls, and changes in overall secondary care utilisation.Results: Most staff thought that care for their patients had improved. More patients reported having a care plan but they found it significantly harder to see a doctor or nurse of their choice and felt less involved in decisions about their care. Case management interventions were associated with a 9% increase in emergency admissions. We found some evidence of imbalance between cases and controls which could have biased this estimate, but simulations of the possible effect of unobserved confounders showed that it was very unlikely that the sites achieved their goal of reducing emergency admissions. However, we found significant reductions of 21% and 22% in elective admissions and outpatient attendance in the six months following an intervention, and overall inpatient and outpatient costs were significantly reduced by 9% during this period. Area level analyses of whole practice populations suggested that overall outpatient attendances were significantly reduced by 5% two years after the start of the case management schemes.Conclusion: Case management may result in improvements in some aspects of care and has the potential to reduce secondary care costs. However, to improve

  18. Case management for at-risk elderly patients in the English integrated care pilots: observational study of staff and patient experience and secondary care utilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Roland

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2009, the English Department of Health appointed 16 integrated care pilots which aimed to provide better integrated care. We report the quantitative results from a multi-method evaluation of six of the demonstration projects which used risk profiling tools to identify older people at risk of emergency hospital admission, combined with intensive case management for people identified as at risk. The interventions focused mainly on delivery system redesign and improved clinical information systems, two key elements of Wagner's Chronic Care Model. Methods: Questionnaires to staff and patients. Difference-in-differences analysis of secondary care utilisation using data on 3,646 patients and 17,311 matched controls, and changes in overall secondary care utilisation. Results: Most staff thought that care for their patients had improved. More patients reported having a care plan but they found it significantly harder to see a doctor or nurse of their choice and felt less involved in decisions about their care. Case management interventions were associated with a 9% increase in emergency admissions. We found some evidence of imbalance between cases and controls which could have biased this estimate, but simulations of the possible effect of unobserved confounders showed that it was very unlikely that the sites achieved their goal of reducing emergency admissions. However, we found significant reductions of 21% and 22% in elective admissions and outpatient attendance in the six months following an intervention, and overall inpatient and outpatient costs were significantly reduced by 9% during this period. Area level analyses of whole practice populations suggested that overall outpatient attendances were significantly reduced by 5% two years after the start of the case management schemes. Conclusion: Case management may result in improvements in some aspects of care and has the potential to reduce secondary care costs. However, to improve

  19. Association between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma Pro12Ala variant and haplotype and pancreatic cancer in a high-risk cohort of smokers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesinmeyer, Megan Dann; Stanford, Janet L; Brentnall, Teresa A; Mandelson, Margaret T; Farin, Federico M; Srinouanprachanh, Sengkeo; Afsharinejad, Zahra; Goodman, Gary E; Barnett, Matt J; Austin, Melissa A

    2009-08-01

    The Pro12Ala variant in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) gene has been associated with diabetes and several cancers. This pilot study tested for the association between Pro12Ala and pancreatic cancer risk in a high-risk sample of smokers. A nested case-control study was conducted in 83 incident cases of pancreatic cancer and 166 matched controls originally recruited into a cohort chemoprevention study of lung cancer. Associations between Pro12Ala and pancreatic cancer risk were measured using conditional logistic regression. Carriers of the G allele (Ala) of the Pro12Ala variant had a borderline increased relative risk of pancreatic cancer compared with homozygous carriers of the C allele (Pro), with an odds ratio of 1.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96-3.33; P=0.06). Among subjects randomized to high-dose vitamin A, the odds ratio was 2.80 (95% CI, 1.16-6.74; P=0.02) versus 1.20 (95% CI, 0.45-3.23; P=0.71) in the placebo group. A haplotype including Pro12Ala was also significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk in all subjects and in subjects randomized to vitamin A. This analysis presents the first evidence that PPARG may be associated with pancreatic cancer risk, and this candidate gene should be investigated in future, larger studies.

  20. The ENIQ pilot study: current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaitre, P.; Eriksen, B.; Crutzen, S. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands); Hansch, M. [Preussische Elektrizitaets-AG (Preussenelektra), Hannover (Germany); Whittle, J. [AEA Technology, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-01

    A pilot study is currently being carried out by ENIQ (European Network for Inspection Qualification) in order to explore the issues involved in inspection qualification applied along the general principles of the European methodology. The components selected for the pilot study are austenitic pipe to pipe and pipe to elbows welds typical of those in BWR recirculation loops. A range of defect parameters has been defined. A suitable inspection procedure designed to find the designated defects will be applied to geometrically representative test pieces. The procedure/equipment will be qualified through open trials and technical justification. The personnel qualification will be done in a blind way. Once all features of the inspection system will have been qualified an in-service inspection will be simulated in order to test the feasibility of the qualification approach followed. In this paper the current status of this pilot study is discussed. (orig.)

  1. The atrial fibrillation ablation pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analyse...... tachycardia, and 4 patients died (1 haemorrhagic stroke, 1 ventricular fibrillation in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, 1 cancer, and 1 of unknown cause). CONCLUSION: The AFib Ablation Pilot Study provided crucial information on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of catheter ablation of AFib...

  2. Total working period and other risk factors related to eating protein foods habits among civil pilots in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Imelda Hutabarat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Latar belakang: Kebiasaan makan protein yang berlebihan dapat menyebabkan penyakit ginjal dan hati serta meningkatkan risiko penyakit kardiovaskular yang dapat menyebabkan terjadinya inkapasitasi pada pilot. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengidentifikasi faktor sosiodemografi dan faktor lainnya terhadap kebiasaan makan protein berlebih pada pilot sipil di Indonesia. Metode: Penelitian potong lintang menggunakan data sekunder Survei kebiasaan makan, minum dan latihan fisik pada pilot  sipil di Indonesia 2016. Data yang dikumpulkan adalah karakteristik demografi, kebiasaan latihan fisik, pengetahuan, indeks massa tubuh dan karakteristik penerbangan. Analisis regresi cox dipakai untuk menganalisis faktor-faktor dominan yang berhubungan dengan kebiasaan makan protein berlebih. Hasil: Di antara 528 pilot yang berusia 19-64 tahun, 194 (36.74% pilot memiliki kebiasaan makan protein berlebih. Lama masa kerja dan indeks massa tubuh menjadi faktor risiko dominan yang berkaitan dengan kebiasaan makan protein berlebih pada pilot. Jika dibandingkan dengan pilot dengan lama masa kerja 1 – 9 tahun, pilot dengan masa kerja 10 – 40 tahun berisiko 35% lebih kecil memiliki kebiasaan makan protein berlebih (RRa = 0.65 ; 95% CI 0.49 – 0.87. Jika dibandingkan dengan pilot dengan indeks massa tubuh normal, pilot yang overweight berisiko 34% lebih  kecil  memiliki kebiasaan makan protein berlebih (RRa = 0.66 ; 95% CI 0.47 – 0.93. Kesimpulan: Masa kerja yang lebih panjang dan overweight merupakan faktor protektif terhadap risiko kebiasaan makan protein berlebih Kata kunci: kebiasaan makan protein, lama masa kerja, indeks massa tubuh, pilot sipil Indonesia       ABSTRACT Background: Excessive protein eating habits may cause kidney and liver disease and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease leading to incapacitation of the pilot. The purpose of this study was to identify sociodemographic and other factors on protein eating habits among civilian

  3. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  4. A pilot study into measurements of markers of atherosclerosis in periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leivadaros, E; van der Velden, U; Bizzarro, S; ten Heggeler, JMAG; Gerdes, VEA; Hoek, FJ; Nagy, TOM; Scholma, J; Bakker, SJL; Gans, ROB; ten Cate, H; Loos, BG

    Background: Periodontitis may be a possible risk factor for atherosclerosis. The current pilot study explored arterial wall thickness and other variables associated with atherosclerosis in healthy subjects with and without periodontitis. Methods: Patients with moderate (N = 34) and severe

  5. PILOT STUDY OF TARGETING ELEVATED BLOOD-LEVEL LEVELS IN CHILDREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    THIS PILOT STUDY SEEKS TO DEVELOP STATISTICAL MODELS TO PREDICT RISK OF CHILDHOOD LEAD POISONING WITHIN SPECIFIED GEOGRAPHIC AREAS BASED ON A COMBINATION OF DEMOGRAPHIC, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND PROGRAMMATIC INFORMATION SOURCES.

  6. High beverage sugar as well as high animal protein intake at infancy may increase overweight risk at 8 years: a prospective longitudinal pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, J.M. Peter; Kool, M. Laura; Baar, M. van Nicolien; Zee, C. van der Saskia

    2011-01-01

    Background: Combined effects of early exposure to beverage sugar and animal protein and later life overweight risk have not been studied. Methods: A prospective longitudinal study was initiated in 2001 with 226 infants between 4 and 13 months of age. Dietary intake was assessed with a 2 day food rec

  7. Cytogenetics of jaw cysts - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Esther; Brennan, Peter A; Bodner, Lipa

    2012-07-01

    The pathogenesis of cysts that arise in the jaws is still not certain, and the underlying mechanisms of epithelial proliferation are not fully understood. Cysts of the jaw may involve a reactive, inflammatory, or neoplastic process. Cytogenetics, the study of the number and structure of chromosomes, has provided valuable information about the diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted treatment in many cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytogenetics can also provide information about the possible aetiology or neoplastic potential of a lesion, though to our knowledge no studies of this technique have been used for cysts in the jaws. In this pilot study we used cytogenetics in a series of 10 cysts (3 radicular, 4 dentigerous, 2 of the nasopalatine duct, and 1 dermoid). In all cases we found normal karyotypes. Further work and larger numbers are needed for a definitive study, but we can hypothesise from this pilot study that these cysts do not have cytogenetic aberrations and so have no neoplastic potential.

  8. High level of work stressors increase the risk of mental-emotional disturbances among airline pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah S. Widyahening

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Civilian airline pilots have one of the most stressful occupations. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of work stressors and other factors on mental-emotional disturbances among airline pilots. A cross-sectional study was done by interviewing selected pilots of an airline using appropriate questionnaires, during their routine medical examination from May to July 1999 in Jakarta. Five aspects of work stressor were assessed: working conditions, physical conditions of working environment, career development, organization and interpersonal relationship. Mental-emotional disturbances were determined by using the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL 90 questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using relative risk by Cox regression with constant time. From 128 subjects interviewed, 109 could be analyzed. Most of the subjects were married (73.4% and college graduates (91.7%. The number of captains and first officers were almost equal. The prevalence of mental-emotional disturbances was 39.4%. Mental-emotional disturbances were significantly related to work stressors and moderately related to household tension (P = 0.184. Compared to pilots with low levels of work stressors, those with high or very high levels of work stressors had a risk of 4.6 times of mental-emotional disturbances [adjusted relative risk (RRa = 4.64; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.01 – 19.65]. Adequate guides to cope work stressors and household tension which related to mental-emotional disturbance is recommended. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:117-21Keywords: mental-emotional disturbance, work stressors, household tension, airline pilots

  9. Exposure to psychosocial risks at work in prisons: does contact with inmates matter? A pilot study among prison workers in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaddar, Ali; Ronda, Elena; Nolasco, Andreu; Álvares, Nahum; Mateo, Inmaculada

    2011-04-01

    Research has lately increased its focus on work conditions as predictors of stress among prison workers but only few studies have focused on how the exposure of workers to psychosocial risks vary according to their occupational groups and their contact with inmates. Work psychosocial risks (demands, control and social support) were assessed using the Spanish version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire among 164 Spanish prison workers (43 per cent of those surveyed). Regression analysis was used to explore how psychosocial hazards and their combinations (outcome variables) vary according to occupational groups. Results suggest that psychosocial risks were highest among guards that have more contact with inmates. Implications of the findings for policy making and practice application are discussed.

  10. Risk based methods for optimised operation of power stations - a pilot study; Riskbaserade metoder foer optimerad drift av kraftvaermeverk - en foerstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnars, Jens; Gustavsson, Fredrik [Det Norske Veritas AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-03-01

    Methods for risk based planning and management of maintenance and operation of mechanical components in power stations have been studied. Risk based methods may be utilised for analysis of the risk level with reference to both safety and economy of the plant. The methods can be an important tool for planning and optimisation of the annual investment in different types of maintenance actions, with the purpose of improving long term profitability. The risk based planning can include: selection of components, inspection intervals, coverage, planning of time for replacement/repair of components, and selection of operation conditions. The first part of the report is a general survey and description of risk based methods for analyse of mechanical components. Some problems specific to power stations are discussed. Application of quantitative RBI is illustrated for the water system in steam boiler number 5 at Aabyverket. The possibilities to decrease inspection costs or increase availability also for power stations is obvious, and is expected to result in competitive advantages. The use and understanding of quantitative reliability methods are a necessary and essential part of any RBI assessment.

  11. Level of information about gynaecological prevention in teenagers at risk from social exclusion, referred by family court rulings to juvenile attendance centres – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Bobiński

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective. The objective of the study was to present preliminary results of a pilot study concerning the level of knowledge of gynaecological prevention, conducted in teenagers referred by court rulings to a juvenile attendance centre. Materials and method. The instrument was an anonymous survey questionnaire completed by participants in health prevention classes in late 2010 and early 2011. The studied group consisted of teenagers aged 15–17 years (mean age: 15.72 years, median = 16 years, SD = 0.679 who were under probation officers’ supervision in the Zamość region of south-eastern Poland. The sample size was 101 persons – 51 boys (50.50%, 50 girls (49.5%. Results. According to the respondents, the most important reasons for seeing a gynaecologist were: menstrual disorders (70.30%, suspicion of pregnancy (63.37% and pain or burning sensations while urinating (58.42%. The following were regarded as prevalent cancers in women: cancers of the breast (99.01%, cervix (89.1%, and ovaries (62.38%. Over 92% of subjects stated that it was possible to protect oneself from cervical cancer, but only 41.5% of respondents indicated the correct definition of the term ‘cytology’. Statistical analysis focused on differences between genders. A higher self-assessment of mental health was shown in boys. Conclusions. Teenagers of similar background may find it more difficult to gain access to knowledge about health prophylaxis, including gynaecological prevention. Efforts should be intensified in order to ‘equalize health opportunities’ through appropriate preparation of teaching curricula (including health education and philosophy of medicine.

  12. Personalized prevention approach with use of a web-based cardiovascular risk assessment with tailored lifestyle follow-up in primary care practice--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brekel-Dijkstra, Karolien; Rengers, Antonia H; Niessen, Maurice A J; de Wit, Niek J; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this prospective implementation study is to evaluate feasibility of a personalized prevention approach with use of a web-based health risk assessment for cardiovascular diseases combined with tailored lifestyle feedback and interventions in the community setting. A random sample of 800 inhabitants of Leidsche Rijn (a newly built residential area in the city of Utrecht) between 45 and 70 years old was invited by their general practitioner to participate in this study and sent a web-based health risk assessment containing a questionnaire, covering socio-demographic variables, family and personal medical history, lifestyle behaviour and psychological variables. The system generates an individual cardiovascular risk based on prognostic modelling. In the case of increased risk further biometric and laboratory evaluation is advised. All participants received tailored web-based feedback with an electronic referral to available medical, psychological and lifestyle interventions in the neighbourhood, or online interventions, and a follow-up questionnaire after six months. The participation rate was 29% (230/800) of which 39% (89/230) were at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and were advised to perform biometric measures, of which 36% (32/89) actually did. Of these respondents 25% (8/32) had increased blood pressure (≥140/90), 56% (18/32) increased total cholesterol (>6.0 mmol/l).One-third of the participants started changing their lifestyle, 20% indicated planning to do this later; 32% (41/129) increased their physical activity and 28% (36/129) were eating healthier. Seventy-nine per cent of the responders stated their participation was 'meaningful'. The personalized prevention approach offers a system for integrated risk profiling and individualized health management that was well received in general practice. The client-centred approach, which was embedded in a local community setting, using a web-based health risk assessment with tailored feedback

  13. Oxidative stress and nephrolithiasis: a comparative pilot study evaluating the effect of pomegranate extract on stone risk factors and elevated oxidative stress levels of recurrent stone formers and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Chad R; Henning, Jonathan R; Newton, Mark R; Aviram, Michael; Bridget Zimmerman, M

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have linked oxidative stress and nephrolithiasis. Animal studies have demonstrated that pomegranate juice may play a role in preventing stone formation. We examined differences between recurrent stone formers (RSFs) and non-stone formers (NSFs) regarding oxidative stress and the effect of pomegranate administration on risk factors for nephrolithiasis. RSFs were recruited prospectively and matched to a group of NSFs. Subjects submitted urine and blood samples prior to and after receiving pomegranate polyphenol extract (1,000 mg) for 90 days. Serum and urine samples were analyzed for stone risk and oxidative stress. Thirty subjects completed the study. RSFs had significantly higher levels of oxidative stress at baseline as measured by urinary 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (p 0.99), or by highly sensitive C-reactive protein (p > 0.99). Following pomegranate supplementation, there was a 10 % increase in PON1 activity in RSFs (p = 0.007), which correlated with a trend toward decreasing values of supersaturation of calcium oxalate (SSCaOx; p = 0.05). RSFs have markedly higher levels of oxidative stress than NSFs. While the ability to prevent stone formation through supplementation cannot be determined in this pilot study, supplementation with pomegranate extract does not increase the risk of stones and may confer some benefit in lowering SSCaOX in those patients with increased PON-1 levels following supplementation, confirming findings of previous animal models.

  14. A pilot study of a family focused, psychosocial intervention with war-exposed youth at risk of attack and abduction in north-eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Paul; Branham, Lindsay; Shannon, Ciarán; Betancourt, Theresa S; Dempster, Martin; McMullen, John

    2014-07-01

    Rural communities in the Haut-Uele Province of northern Democratic Republic of Congo live in constant danger of attack and/or abduction by units of the Lord's Resistance Army operating in the region. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate a community-participative psychosocial intervention involving life skills and relaxation training and Mobile Cinema screenings with this war-affected population living under current threat. 159 war-affected children and young people (aged 7-18) from the villages of Kiliwa and Li-May in north-eastern DR Congo took part in this study. In total, 22% of participants had been abduction previously while 73% had a family member abducted. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress reactions, internalising problems, conduct problems and pro-social behaviour were assessed by blinded interviewers at pre- and post-intervention and at 3-month follow-up. Participants were randomised (with an accompanying caregiver) to 8 sessions of a group-based, community-participative, psychosocial intervention (n=79) carried out by supervised local, lay facilitators or a wait-list control group (n=80). Average seminar attendance rates were high: 88% for participants and 84% for caregivers. Drop-out was low: 97% of participants were assessed at post-intervention and 88% at 3 month follow-up. At post-test, participants reported significantly fewer symptoms of post-traumatic stress reactions compared to controls (Cohen's d=0.40). At 3 month follow up, large improvements in internalising symptoms and moderate improvements in pro-social scores were reported, with caregivers noting a moderate to large decline in conduct problems among the young people. Trial Registration clinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT01542398.

  15. Calcium scores in the risk assessment of an asymptomatic population: implications for airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirawan, I Made Ady; Wu, Rodney; Abernethy, Malcolm; Aldington, Sarah; Larsen, Peter D

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated whether coronary artery calcium score (CACS) improved cardiovascular disease risk prediction when compared to the New Zealand Cardiovascular Risk Charts (NZ-CRC), and describes the potential utilization of CACS in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment of pilots. A cross-sectional study was performed among asymptomatic patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography at Pacific Radiology Wellington, New Zealand, between August 2007 and July 2012 and had their CACS and CVD risk score calculated. Receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analyses were used to measure the accuracy of the NZ-CRC and CACS. Reclassification analyses were performed to examine the net reclassification improvement (NRI) of CACS when compared to NZ-CRC. Over a 5-yr study period, 237 male asymptomatic patients with ages ranging from 30 to 69 yr with a mean (SD) of 53.24 (8.18) yr, were included. The area under the ROC curves (AUC) (95% CI) for CACS and NZ-CRC were 0.88 (0.83-0.93) and 0.66 (0.59-0.73), respectively. The NRI (95% CI) of the calcium scores was 0.39 (0.17-0.62). CACS should be assessed in pilots with 5-yr CVD risk scores of 5-10% and 10-15%. CACS has a better accuracy than the NZ-CRC and reclassified a considerable proportion of asymptomatic patients into correct cardiovascular risk categories. An approach on how the CACS should be employed in the cardiovascular risk assessment of airline pilots is noted in this paper.

  16. Breakthrough Listen on MWA Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S.; Siemion, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Tremblay, S.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a pilot study, using the Voltage Capture System, for Breakthrough Listen on the MWA. Breakthrough Listen (BL) is a major new project that aims to dramatically improve the coverage of parameter space in the search for intelligent life beyond Earth. BL has already deployed hardware and software to the Green Bank Telescope, and will bring a similar program with the Parkes Telescope online in the second half of 2016. The low frequency sky is however currently very poorly explored. The superb capabilities of the MWA (large field of view, low frequency of operation, and location in a very radio quiet site) provide a unique opportunity for a pilot study to obtain voltage data for a SETI (Search For Extraterrestrial Intelligence) study of the Galactic Plane. We propose commensal observations, piggybacking on the proposed pulsar search of Tremblay et al. Using existing VCS software, combined with the pipeline developed for Breakthrough Listen at GBT and Parkes, we will perform a blind search for candidate signals from extraterrestrial intelligence. Although the chances of a detection are not large, particularly for a pilot study such as that proposed here, the Breakthrough Listen team plan to perform extensive testing and analysis on the data obtained which should be useful for other users of the MWA VCS. We will make the secondary SETI data products and associated documentation available as a resource to the community via the Breakthrough Listen online archive.

  17. Periodontal disease as a risk factor in pre-term low birth weight - An assessment of gynecologists′ knowledge: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Rekha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pre-term low birth weight (PLBW is a condition having tremendous financial impact on health care systems as well as the affected families. Studies suggest that 18.2% of all PLBW cases may be attributable to periodontal disease. Objectives: To assess gynecologists′ knowledge of periodontal disease as a risk factor in PLBW and their knowledge with regard to the oral manifestations of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted on gynecologists in the city of Mangalore. The respondents were divided into four groups - those practicing only in medical colleges, those having only a private practice, those practicing in both medical colleges and in private practice, and post-graduate students of gynecology in the medical colleges in the city. Statistical Analysis Used: The Chi-square test for proportions was used to test the differences between the groups. Results: Out of a total of 142 gynecologists, 93 participated in the survey. Group II respondents were omitted from the statistical analysis as the response rate was only 18.8%. Periodontal disease was considered to be a risk factor in PLBW by 52 (59.8% respondents while 13 (14.9% stated that it was not a risk factor at all. Sixty-seven (77% respondents stated that bleeding/enlargement of the gingivae was a sign of periodontal infection. Conclusions: Respondents′ knowledge was high regarding the oral manifestations of periodontal disease but was low regarding periodontal disease as a risk factor in PLBW.

  18. Hazing in the Military: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    different. It is important not to assume they are the same in policy or treatment. A policy covering hazing may enable workplace bullying to go unnoticed...while an education program to reduce workplace bullying will not likely transfer to decrease hazing. HAZING IN THE MILITARY: A PILOT STUDY 3...however, it is also found in the adult workplace . Bullying behaviors, like hazing, may be psychological or physical in nature, vary in severity, and

  19. Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Suzanna M; Turgeon, D Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Ruffin, Mack T; Wright, Benjamin D; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0 g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0 g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P = 0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P = 0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P = 0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk.

  20. Prophylactic resorbable synthetic mesh to prevent wound dehiscence and incisional hernia in high high-risk laparotomy. A pilot study of using TIGR Matrix mesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald eSöderbäck

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWound dehiscence and incisional hernia are potentially serious complications following abdominal surgery, especially if performed through a midline incision. Although prophylactic reinforcement with on-lay mesh has been shown to reduce this risk, a permanent mesh carries the risk of seroma formation, infection and persistent pain. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of a resorbable on-lay mesh to reinforce the midline suturein patients with high risk for wound dehiscence or incisional hernia.MethodSixteen patients with three or more risk factors for wound dehiscence or incisional hernia were included. A TIGR® Matrix mesh, composed of a mixture of 40% copolymer fibres of polyglycolide, polylactide, and polytrimethylene carbonate and 60% copolymer fibres of polylactide, and polytrimethylene carbonate, was placed on the aponeurosis with an overlap of 5 on either side, and fixated with continuous monofilament polydioxanone suture. All postoperative complications were registered at clinical follow-up. ResultsMean follow-up was nine months. One patient developed a seroma that needed drainage and antibiotic treatment. One patient had a wound infection that needed antibiotic treatment. There was no complication requiring a reoperation. No wound dehiscence or incisional hernia was seen.ConclusionOn-lay placement of TIGR® Matrix is safe, and may provide a feasible way of reinforcing the suture line in patients with high risk for postoperative wound dehiscence or incisional hernia. Larger samples are required, however, if one is to draw any conclusion regarding the safety and effectiveness of this technique,.

  1. Helicopter pilot back pain: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, D F; Reading, T E

    1984-02-01

    Because of the high prevalence of back pain experienced by U.S. Army helicopter pilots, a study was conducted to ascertain the feasibility of reproducing these symptoms in the laboratory. A mock-up of a UH-1H seat and control configuration was mounted to a multi-axis vibration simulator (MAVS). Eleven subjects were tested on the apparatus for two 120-min periods. During one period, the MAVS was programmed to reproduce vibrations recorded from a UH-1H in cruise flight. The subjects received no vibration during the other test period. All subjects reported back pain which they described as identical to the pain they experience during flight, during one or more of their test periods. There was no statistical difference between the vibration and nonvibration test conditions (p greater than 0.05) in terms of time of onset of pain or intensity of pain as measured by a visual analog scale. It appears the vibration at the frequencies and amplitudes tested plays little or no role in the etiology of the back symptoms reported by these pilots. It is proposed that the primary etiological factor for these symptoms is the poor posture pilots are obliged to assume for extended periods while operating helicopters.

  2. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the nation's estuaries have been environmentally stressed since the turn of the 20th century and will continue to be impacted in the future. Tampa Bay, one the Gulf of Mexico's largest estuaries, exemplifies the threats that our estuaries face (EPA Report 2001, Tampa Bay Estuary Program-Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (TBEP-CCMP)). More than 2 million people live in the Tampa Bay watershed, and the population constitutes to grow. Demand for freshwater resources, conversion of undeveloped areas to resident and industrial uses, increases in storm-water runoff, and increased air pollution from urban and industrial sources are some of the known human activities that impact Tampa Bay. Beginning on 2001, additional anthropogenic modifications began in Tampa Bat including construction of an underwater gas pipeline and a desalinization plant, expansion of existing ports, and increased freshwater withdrawal from three major tributaries to the bay. In January of 2001, the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) and its partners identifies a critical need for participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in providing multidisciplinary expertise and a regional-scale, integrated science approach to address complex scientific research issue and critical scientific information gaps that are necessary for continued restoration and preservation of Tampa Bay. Tampa Bay stakeholders identified several critical science gaps for which USGS expertise was needed (Yates et al. 2001). These critical science gaps fall under four topical categories (or system components): 1) water and sediment quality, 2) hydrodynamics, 3) geology and geomorphology, and 4) ecosystem structure and function. Scientists and resource managers participating in Tampa Bay studies recognize that it is no longer sufficient to simply examine each of these estuarine system components individually, Rather, the interrelation among system components must be understood to develop conceptual and

  3. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson Anita; Pålsson Gunvor; Branell Ulla-Carin; Ahrén Bo; Granfeldt Yvonne; Jönsson Tommy; Söderström Margareta; Lindeberg Staffan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age') diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin. Methods In a randomized cross-over study, 13 patients with type 2 diabetes, 3 women and 10 men, were instructed to eat a Paleolithic diet based on lean meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs and nuts; and a Diabetes diet designed in accorda...

  4. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson Anita; Pålsson Gunvor; Branell Ulla-Carin; Ahrén Bo; Granfeldt Yvonne; Jönsson Tommy; Söderström Margareta; Lindeberg Staffan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age') diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin. Methods In a randomized cross-over study, 13 patients with type 2 diabetes, 3 women and 10 men, were instructed to eat a Paleolithic diet based on lean meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs and nuts; and a Diabetes diet designed in accorda...

  5. Pilot study of aprepitant for prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis in high risk patients: a phase II randomized, double-blind placebo controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Tilak; Liddle, Rodger A.; Branch, M. Stanley; Jowell, Paul; Obando, Jorge; Poleski, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Animal studies have demonstrated a role for substance P binding to neurokinin-1 receptor in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Our aim was to assess the efficacy of a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (aprepitant) at preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis in high risk patients. Methods Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial at a single academic medical center. Patients at high risk for post-ERCP pancreatitis received either placebo or oral aprepitant administered 4 hours prior to ERCP, 80 mg 24 hours after the first dose, and then 80 mg 24 hours after the second dose. Fisher's exact test was used to compare incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis in the two groups. Results 34 patients received aprepitant and 39 patients received placebo. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Incidence of acute pancreatitis was 7 in the aprepitant group and 7 in the placebo group. Hospitalization within 7 days post-procedure for abdominal pain that did not meet criteria for acute pancreatitis occurred in 6 and 9 patients in the aprepitant and placebo groups respectively (p=0.77). Conclusions Aprepitant did not lower incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis in this preliminary human study. Larger studies potentially using the recently available intravenous formulation are necessary to conclusively clarify the efficacy of aprepitant in this setting. PMID:22964958

  6. Efficacy of Poly-Gamma-Glutamic Acid in Women with High-Risk Human Papillomavirus-Positive Vaginal Intraepithelial Neoplasia: an Observational Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Yu-Jin; Min, Kyung-Jin; Hong, Jin-Hwa; Lee, Jae-Kwan

    2015-07-01

    Poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a natural polymer that is synthesized by Bacillus species and has been reported to have antitumor activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of γ-PGA on the treatment of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN). A retrospective observational study on γ-PGA therapy for biopsy-proven VAIN was conducted. The efficacy was assessed by evaluating the results of Pap cytology and the viral load of high-risk HPV at three time points: at enrollment, and at the first and second post-treatment visits. Of 17 patients treated with γ-PGA, only 12 patients who had a high-risk HPV infection were included in the analysis. Histology was VAIN1 in seven patients, VAIN2 in two patients, and VAIN3 in three patients. γ-PGA was administered for newly diagnosed VAIN in five (41.7%) patients and persistent VAIN in seven (58.3%) patients for the mean time of 4.5 months. At the first and second post-treatment visits, cytological regression was observed in five (41.7%) and six (50%) patients, respectively. Regarding the HPV load, the overall response rate was 66.7%, and the mean level was 670.6 ± 292.5 RLU at the first follow-up, which was lower than the initial viral load of 1,494.8 ± 434.5 RLU (p = 0.084). At the second follow-up, the overall response rate was 58.3%, and the mean viral load level was 924.2 ± 493.7 RLU. γ-PGA may be helpful for the cytological regression and reduction of viral load in patients with high-risk HPV-positive VAIN, suggesting that γ-PGA is a promising treatment option for primary or persistent VAIN.

  7. The relationship of music preferences and the selected risk-taking and autodestructive behaviour among teenage girls subject to inpatient stay due to mental condition – pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Krajewska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available During adolescence, related to the crisis of identity, attempts to separate from the family and rebellion against the reality result in the youth to be particularly susceptible to the impact of peers. Identification with the group is most often based on common interests, one of which being music. The aim of the pilot study was to assess the relationship of autodestructive and  antisocial behaviour and  music preferences of  girls subject to  inpatient stay due to  mental problems. Material and methods: Own questionnaire was used concerning music preferences, consisting of the following genres: metal, rock, pop, jazz, hip-hop, reggae, film music, sung poetry, electronic music. The studied group comprised of 26 girls diagnosed with mood disorders, neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders, eating disorders and behavioural and emotional disorders according to ICD-10. Exclusion criteria were the remaining diagnostic categories, especially active psychotic process and mental retardation as well as lack of understanding of the questionnaire questions or not being familiar with basic types of music. Among the patients aged 13–18 subject to inpatient stay at the Department of Adolescent Psychiatry in Łódź in the period 2013–2014 and consented to the study, the incidence of attempted suicide, inflicting self-harm, alcohol abuse, taking psychoactive substances and the presence of antisocial disorders were assessed. Questionnaire verification was carried out in a group of 30 people tested with a test–retest method with a two-week break; reliability was obtained: 0.89–1. Analysis was carried out with the use of Statistica 9.1 programme. Results: Among the teenage girls subject to inpatient stay, music preferences were not related in a statistically significant manner (p > 0.05 with a greater incidence of attempted suicide, inflicting self-harm, alcohol abuse and contact with psychoactive

  8. The effect of total flight hours and others dominant factors on the risk of distress in civilian pilots in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliana Yuliana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Distres pada pilot dapat mengurangi tingkat kewaspadaan dan mengganggu prosespengambilan keputusan. Tujuan penelitian ini mengidentifikasi pengaruh jam terbang total dan faktordominan lainnya terhadap risiko distres di antara pilot sipil di Indonesia.Metode: Studi potong lintang dengan sampling purposif pada tanggal 1-14 Mei 2013 terhadap pilot yangsedang melakukan pemeriksaan medik (medex di Balai Kesehatan Penerbangan, Jakarta. Pilot mengisilangsung dan tanpa nama data demografi dan pekerjaan, kuesioner strategi koping dan stresor di rumah.Pengukuran distres menggunakan Self Reporting Questionnaire-20 (SRQ-20 dengan titik potong 5/6,self rating dan anonymous. Risiko distres dianalisis menggunakan risiko relatif (RR dengan regresi Coxdengan waktu konstan.Hasil: Dari 209 pilot didapatkan 13,4% berisiko distres. Pilot dengan jam terbang total 6000-12999 jamdibandingkan dengan 59-5999 jam berisiko distres hampir 5,8 kali lipat [risiko relatif suaian (RRa =5,83; P = 0,000], sedangkan jam terbang total 13000-29000 berisiko meningkatkan distres lebih dari8 kali lipat (RRa = 8,42; P = 0,000. Selanjutnya, pertengkaran di keluarga 2,5 kali lipat mempertinggirisiko distres (RRa = 2,47; P = 0,006, sedangkan penggunaan koping beragama mengurangi distressebanyak 51% (RRa = 0,49; CI = 0,97-1,06; P = 0,051.Kesimpulan: Jam terbang total 6000 jam atau lebih dan pertengkaran di keluarga mempertinggi risikodistres, sedangkan penggunaan koping agama menurunkan distres pada pilot sipil di Indonesia. (HealthScience Journal of Indonesia 2015;6:17-22Kata kunci: pilot sipil, distres, jam terbang total, koping agama AbstractBackground: Distress can reduce awareness and interfere with decision making. The aim of this study isto identify the effect of total flight hours on the risk of distress among civilian pilots in Indonesia.Method: This cross sectional study with purposive sampling was conducted on May 1-14, 2013 amongcivilian pilots undergoing

  9. Breast Stimulation in Low-Risk Primigravidas at Term: Does It Aid in Spontaneous Onset of Labour and Vaginal Delivery? A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanchali Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The aim of the study was to elicit the safety and efficacy of breast stimulation as an intervention to prevent postdatism and as an aid in spontaneous onset of labour. Methods. Primigravidas with cephalic presentation, without any high-risk factor, were recruited between 36 to 38 weeks of gestation. 200 patients were recruited and randomized into two groups (n = 100. Breast stimulation was advised to one group but not to the other group. Bishop’s scoring was done at 38 weeks and repeated at 39 weeks of gestation. Maternal and fetal outcomes were compared in two groups. Result. Bishop’s score changed from 3.12 (±1.01 to 3.9 (±1.08 in control group and from 3.02 (±0.82 to 6.08 (±1.29 in breast stimulation group after one week (P value < 0.0001. The period of gestation at delivery was 39.5 (±2.3 weeks in control group and 39.2 (±2.8 weeks in intervention group (P value: 0.044. There were increased chances of vaginal delivery in intervention group (P value: 0.046. Duration of labor, hyperstimulation, presence of meconium stained liquor, postpartum hemorrhage, and neonatal outcomes were similar in both groups. Conclusion. Breast stimulation in low-risk primigravidas helps in cervical ripening and increases chances of vaginal delivery.

  10. Progresses on studies of the factors relevant to risk perception for pilots%飞行人员风险认知心理影响因素研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庆峰; 宋华淼

    2012-01-01

    目的 综述与飞行人员风险认知及其心理影响因素相关的心理学研究概况.资料来源与选择 该领域的综述、研究报告、标准资料和论著. 资料引用 公开发表的相关文献38篇. 资料综合 从风险认知概念、特点出发,结合飞行职业特点,提出开展飞行人员风险认知研究的必要性和主要应该关注的问题,从航空危险态度、飞行安全控制点和心理应激等与飞行风险认知关系密切的3个方面论述了飞行风险认知研究的进展情况,并进行了研究展望. 结论 飞行人员风险认知是研究飞行安全行为的重要方法之一,与之相关的心理测量方法和工具不断发展,在飞行安全教育、心理训练领域取得了一定成果,是未来该领域的发展方向.%Objective To summarize the progresses in the studies of risk perception and the relevant psychological affecting factors for pilots in resent years.Literature resource and selection Published reviews,standards,study reports and monographs in this field.Literature quotation Thirty-eight published papers were cited.Literature synthesis The necessity of risk perception study and concerned issues were summarized in conducting with the concept and characters of risk perception,as well as its specialty in aviation.Such topics as ① studies on hazardous attitude in aviation,② studies on aviation safety locus of control,and ③ the relationship between psychological stressors and risk perception were mentioned and prospected in the paper.Conclusion Risk perception is one of the most important means of studying flight safety.The developed psychometric methods and tools have being effectively exerted in safety education and psychological training,and those will direct the studies and practice of risk perception in future.

  11. The Risk of Melanoma in Airline Pilots and Cabin Crew A Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlorenzo, Martina; Wehner, Mackenzie R.; Linos, Eleni; Kornak, John; Kainz, Wolfgang; Posch, Christian; Vujic, Igor; Johnston, Katia; Gho, Deborah; Monico, Gabriela; McGrath, James T.; EE; Osella-Abate, Simona; Quaglino, Pietro; Cleaver, James E.; Ortiz-Urda, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Importance Airline pilots and cabin crew are occupationally exposed to higher levels of cosmic and UV radiation than the general population, but their risk of developing melanoma is not yet established. Objective To assess the risk of melanoma in pilots and airline crew. Data Sources PubMed (1966 to October 30, 2013), Web of Science (1898 to January 27, 2014), and Scopus (1823 to January 27, 2014). Study Selection All studies were included that reported a standardized incidence ratio (SIR), standardized mortality ratio (SMR), or data on expected and observed cases of melanoma or death caused by melanoma that could be used to calculate an SIR or SMR in any flight-based occupation. Data Extraction and Synthesis Primary random-effect meta-analyses were used to summarize SIR and SMR for melanoma in any flight-based occupation. Heterogeneity was assessed using the χ2 test and I2 statistic. To assess the potential bias of small studies, we used funnel plots, the Begg rank correlation test, and the Egger weighted linear regression test. Main Outcomes and Measures Summary SIR and SMR of melanoma in pilots and cabin crew. Results Of the 3527 citations retrieved, 19 studies were included, with more than 266 431 participants. The overall summary SIR of participants in any flight-based occupation was 2.21 (95% CI, 1.76-2.77; P < .001; 14 records). The summary SIR for pilots was 2.22 (95% CI, 1.67-2.93; P = .001; 12 records). The summary SIR for cabin crew was 2.09 (95% CI, 1.67-2.62; P = .45; 2 records). The overall summary SMR of participants in any flight-based occupation was 1.42 (95% CI, 0.89-2.26; P = .002; 6 records). The summary SMR for pilots was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.27-2.63, P = .33; 4 records). The summary SMR for cabin crew was 0.90 (95% CI, 0.80-1.01; P = .97; 2 records). Conclusions and Relevance Pilots and cabin crew have approximately twice the incidence of melanoma compared with the general population. Further research on mechanisms and optimal occupational

  12. Where’s Your Phone? A Survey of Where Women Aged 15-40 Carry Their Smartphone and Related Risk Perception: A Survey and Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones are now owned by most young adults in many countries. Installed applications regularly update while the phone is in standby. If it is kept near the body, this can lead to considerably higher exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation than occurred without internet access. Very little is known about current smartphone carrying habits of young women. This survey used an online questionnaire to ask about smartphone location under several circumstances to inform the power calculation for a women’s health study. They were also asked about risk perceptions. Data was analysed using Pearson chi square. Three age categories were made: 15–20, 21–30, 31–40. Smartphones were generally kept on standby (96% by day, 83% at night). Of all participants, in the last week the most common locations of the phone when not in use or during passive use was off-body (86%), in the hand (58%), a skirt/trouser pocket (57%), or against the breast (15%). Pocket and near-the-breast storage were significant by age (χ215.04, p = 0.001 and χ210.96, p = 0.04, respectively), both positively influenced by the youngest group. The same influence lay in the association between holding the phone (χ211.082, p = 0.004) and pocket-storage (χ219.971, prelated to health problems while 16% did not. There was no relationship between thinking RF-EMR exposure causes health problems in general and carrying the phone against the upper or lower body (p = 0.69 and p = 0.212, respectively). However, calls with the phone against the head were positively related to perception of health risk (χ2 6.695, p = 0.035). Our findings can be used in the power calculation for a case-control study. PMID:28060844

  13. The risk of melanoma in airline pilots and cabin crew: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlorenzo, Martina; Wehner, Mackenzie R; Linos, Eleni; Kornak, John; Kainz, Wolfgang; Posch, Christian; Vujic, Igor; Johnston, Katia; Gho, Deborah; Monico, Gabriela; McGrath, James T; Osella-Abate, Simona; Quaglino, Pietro; Cleaver, James E; Ortiz-Urda, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Airline pilots and cabin crew are occupationally exposed to higher levels of cosmic and UV radiation than the general population, but their risk of developing melanoma is not yet established. To assess the risk of melanoma in pilots and airline crew. PubMed (1966 to October 30, 2013), Web of Science (1898 to January 27, 2014), and Scopus (1823 to January 27, 2014). All studies were included that reported a standardized incidence ratio (SIR), standardized mortality ratio (SMR), or data on expected and observed cases of melanoma or death caused by melanoma that could be used to calculate an SIR or SMR in any flight-based occupation. Primary random-effect meta-analyses were used to summarize SIR and SMR for melanoma in any flight-based occupation. Heterogeneity was assessed using the χ2 test and I2 statistic. To assess the potential bias of small studies, we used funnel plots, the Begg rank correlation test, and the Egger weighted linear regression test. Summary SIR and SMR of melanoma in pilots and cabin crew. Of the 3527 citations retrieved, 19 studies were included, with more than 266 431 participants. The overall summary SIR of participants in any flight-based occupation was 2.21 (95% CI, 1.76-2.77; P < .001; 14 records). The summary SIR for pilots was 2.22 (95% CI, 1.67-2.93; P = .001; 12 records). The summary SIR for cabin crew was 2.09 (95% CI, 1.67-2.62; P = .45; 2 records). The overall summary SMR of participants in any flight-based occupation was 1.42 (95% CI, 0.89-2.26; P = .002; 6 records). The summary SMR for pilots was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.27-2.63, P = .33; 4 records). The summary SMR for cabin crew was 0.90 (95% CI, 0.80-1.01; P = .97; 2 records). Pilots and cabin crew have approximately twice the incidence of melanoma compared with the general population. Further research on mechanisms and optimal occupational protection is needed.

  14. Pilot study of a program delivered within the regular service system in Germany: effect of a short-term attachment-based intervention on maternal sensitivity in mothers at risk for child abuse and neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillhofer, Melanie; Spangler, Gottfried; Bovenschen, Ina; Kuenster, Anne K; Gabler, Sandra; Fallon, Barbara; Fegert, Joerg M; Ziegenhain, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This pilot study examined the effectiveness of a short-term attachment-based intervention, the Ulm Model, in a German population at risk for child abuse and neglect. The intervention used home visits and video feedback to promote maternal sensitivity, and was implemented by trained staff within the health care and youth welfare systems. Mothers in the control group (n=33) received standard services only, while those in the intervention group (n=63) additionally the Ulm Model intervention. The outcomes measured were maternal sensitivity, as assessed by the CARE-Index at pre-intervention, after the last session, and at about 6 and 12 months of age; and infant socio-emotional development, as assessed by the ET6-6 development test at about 6 and 12 months of age. The moderating effects on treatment outcomes of two variables were examined: risk for child abuse (moderate vs. high) and type of maternal attachment representation (secure vs. insecure). Among participants at moderate risk for child abuse, no differences were found between the intervention group and control group in either maternal sensitivity or infant development. Among those considered high risk, mothers in the intervention group showed a significant increase in maternal sensitivity from pre- to post-intervention; however, no group differences were seen at follow-up. There were some indications that infants of mothers in the intervention group showed better emotional development. The variable of maternal attachment representation was not a significant moderator for the intervention effect, but post hoc analysis indicated that the mean sensitivity of secure mothers was significant higher at the 6-month follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The analysis of family risk factors associated with the occurrence of suicidal attempts among girls aged 12–16 years old. A pilot study

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    Aleksandra Rutkowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The analysis of family risk factors associated with the occurrence of suicidal attempts and self-mutilation in girls aged 12–16 years old. Material and method: The participants of this study consisted of 34 girls aged 12–16 years old, hospitalized in the Department of Paediatrics of the Medical University (Klinika Pediatrii UM in Lublin due to suicidal attempts. Fifty-five percent of the participants came from complete families, 20% were brought up by mothers only, 20% declared their parents to be divorced. The majority of the girls (76% were hospitalized due to medication overdose, 8% due to medication overdose and vein cutting, and 5% due to medication and alcohol overdose. The participants were presented with a complementary metric survey, and guided interviews were carried out with them. Results: A positive relationship between the number of self-mutilation acts and the number of suicidal attempts has been shown. The greatest number of suicidal attempts has been observed in the group of girls whose parents were divorced. Such a relationship has not been observed in the case of self-mutilation acts. A positive correlation has been observed between the feeling of isolation and the number of self-mutilation acts and suicidal attempts. The increase in the number of family rows was indicative of the increase in the number of self-mutilation acts. The feeling of being rejected by the family was positively related to the number of suicidal attempts. Conclusions: Adolescent girls with a tendency towards suicidal behaviours are simultaneously prone to self-destructive behaviours. Parental relationships affect the girls’ functioning, with the risk of suicidal attempts being higher in the group of girls whose parents are divorced. The risk of suicidal attempts and self-mutilation acts increases with the feeling of isolation in teenage girls.

  16. Development and pilot of an internationally standardized measure of cardiovascular risk management in European primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szecsenyi Joachim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care can play an important role in providing cardiovascular risk management in patients with established Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD, patients with a known high risk of developing CVD, and potentially for individuals with a low risk of developing CVD, but who have unhealthy lifestyles. To describe and compare cardiovascular risk management, internationally valid quality indicators and standardized measures are needed. As part of a large project in 9 European countries (EPA-Cardio, we have developed and tested a set of standardized measures, linked to previously developed quality indicators. Methods A structured stepwise procedure was followed to develop measures. First, the research team allocated 106 validated quality indicators to one of the three target populations (established CVD, at high risk, at low risk and to different data-collection methods (data abstraction from the medical records, a patient survey, an interview with lead practice GP/a practice survey. Secondly, we selected a number of other validated measures to enrich the assessment. A pilot study was performed to test the feasibility. Finally, we revised the measures based on the findings. Results The EPA-Cardio measures consisted of abstraction forms from the medical-records data of established Coronary Heart Disease (CHD-patients - and high-risk groups, a patient questionnaire for each of the 3 groups, an interview questionnaire for the lead GP and a questionnaire for practice teams. The measures were feasible and accepted by general practices from different countries. Conclusions An internationally standardized measure of cardiovascular risk management, linked to validated quality indicators and tested for feasibility in general practice, is now available. Careful development and pilot testing of the measures are crucial in international studies of quality of healthcare.

  17. FDG-PET-CT for staging of high-risk breast cancer patients reduces the number of further examinations: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Jos; Houben, Ruud; Ruysscher, Dirk de; Lambin, Philippe (MAASTRO Clinic, Postbus 1345, 6202 NA Maastricht (Netherlands)), E-mail: jos.jager@maastro.nl; Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Keymeulen, Kristien (Maastricht Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands)); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. (Maastricht Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)); Hupperets, Pierre (Maastricht Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Medical Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands)); Kroonenburgh, Marinus van (Maastricht Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands))

    2010-02-15

    Aim. To determine the additional value of FDG-PET-CT as compared to conventional staging (CS) in high-risk breast cancer patients. Patients and methods. Thirty-one high-risk breast cancer patients, 14 of whom had recurrent breast cancer, were included in this study, which took place between June 2005 and March 2008. None of the patients had clinical signs of distant metastases. FDG-PET-CT scanning was added to CS, which consisted of a chest x-ray, liver ultrasonography or CT, and bone scintigraphy. Median follow-up was 17 months (6-41 months). FDG-PET-CT was considered to have additional value to CS if it led to a change in treatment plan or if it made additional examinations to confirm or deny findings on CS unnecessary. Results. FDG-PET-CT was considered to have additional value to CS in 13 patients (42% [95% CI: 23-61]). In five patients (16% [95% CI: 1-31]), FDG-PET-CT led to a change in treatment plan by identifying nodal metastases in the internal mammary chain (IMC; N = 3) or in the mediastinum (N = 2). In nine patients (29% [95% CI: 11-47]), FDG-PET-CT would have prevented the need for additional examinations; in seven of these nine patients, distant metastases were suggested in bone or liver on CS, but these did not show FDG uptake. Conclusions. FDG-PET-CT was found to have additional value to CS in 42% of the patients. To optimize cost-effectiveness, the main challenge now is to improve the selection of patients in whom FDG-PET-CT has additional value to CS

  18. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Tommy; Granfeldt, Yvonne; Ahrén, Bo; Branell, Ulla-Carin; Pålsson, Gunvor; Hansson, Anita; Söderström, Margareta; Lindeberg, Staffan

    2009-07-16

    Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age') diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin. In a randomized cross-over study, 13 patients with type 2 diabetes, 3 women and 10 men, were instructed to eat a Paleolithic diet based on lean meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs and nuts; and a Diabetes diet designed in accordance with dietary guidelines during two consecutive 3-month periods. Outcome variables included changes in weight, waist circumference, serum lipids, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), and areas under the curve for plasma glucose and plasma insulin in the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Dietary intake was evaluated by use of 4-day weighed food records. Study participants had on average a diabetes duration of 9 years, a mean HbA1c of 6,6% units by Mono-S standard and were usually treated with metformin alone (3 subjects) or metformin in combination with a sulfonylurea (3 subjects) or a thiazolidinedione (3 subjects). Mean average dose of metformin was 1031 mg per day. Compared to the diabetes diet, the Paleolithic diet resulted in lower mean values of HbA1c (-0.4% units, p = 0.01), triacylglycerol (-0.4 mmol/L, p = 0.003), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg, p = 0.03), weight (-3 kg, p = 0.01), BMI (-1 kg/m2, p = 0.04) and waist circumference (-4 cm, p = 0.02), and higher mean values of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+0.08 mmol/L, p = 0.03). The Paleolithic diet was mainly lower in cereals and dairy products, and higher in fruits, vegetables, meat and eggs, as compared with the Diabetes diet. Further, the Paleolithic diet was lower in total energy, energy density, carbohydrate, dietary glycemic load, saturated fatty acids and calcium, and higher in unsaturated fatty acids, dietary cholesterol and several vitamins. Dietary GI was slightly lower in the Paleolithic diet

  19. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson Anita

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age' diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin. Methods In a randomized cross-over study, 13 patients with type 2 diabetes, 3 women and 10 men, were instructed to eat a Paleolithic diet based on lean meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs and nuts; and a Diabetes diet designed in accordance with dietary guidelines during two consecutive 3-month periods. Outcome variables included changes in weight, waist circumference, serum lipids, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c, and areas under the curve for plasma glucose and plasma insulin in the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Dietary intake was evaluated by use of 4-day weighed food records. Results Study participants had on average a diabetes duration of 9 years, a mean HbA1c of 6,6% units by Mono-S standard and were usually treated with metformin alone (3 subjects or metformin in combination with a sulfonylurea (3 subjects or a thiazolidinedione (3 subjects. Mean average dose of metformin was 1031 mg per day. Compared to the diabetes diet, the Paleolithic diet resulted in lower mean values of HbA1c (-0.4% units, p = 0.01, triacylglycerol (-0.4 mmol/L, p = 0.003, diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg, p = 0.03, weight (-3 kg, p = 0.01, BMI (-1 kg/m2, p = 0.04 and waist circumference (-4 cm, p = 0.02, and higher mean values of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+0.08 mmol/L, p = 0.03. The Paleolithic diet was mainly lower in cereals and dairy products, and higher in fruits, vegetables, meat and eggs, as compared with the Diabetes diet. Further, the Paleolithic diet was lower in total energy, energy density, carbohydrate, dietary glycemic load, saturated fatty acids and calcium, and higher in unsaturated fatty acids, dietary cholesterol and several vitamins. Dietary GI

  20. Human biomonitoring pilot study DEMOCOPHES in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwedler, Gerda; Seiwert, Margarete; Fiddicke, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    on a European Scale) and DEMOCOPHES (Demonstration of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale) were formed, comprising 35 partners from 27 European countries. In COPHES a research scheme and guidelines were developed to exemplarily measure in a pilot study mercury in hair......Human biomonitoring (HBM) is an effective tool to assess human exposure to environmental pollutants, but comparable HBM data in Europe are lacking. In order to expedite harmonization of HBM studies on a European scale, the twin projects COPHES (Consortium to Perform Human Biomonitoring......, cadmium, cotinine and several phthalate metabolites in urine of 6–11 year old children and their mothers in an urban and a rural region. Seventeen European countries simultaneously conducted this cross-sectional DEMOCOPHES feasibility study. The German study population was taken in the city of Bochum...

  1. Bimatoprost/timolol fixed combination versus latanoprost in treatment-naïve glaucoma patients at high risk of progression: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutierrez-Diaz E

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Esperanza Gutierrez-Diaz,1 Jose Silva Cotta,2 Francisco J Muñoz-Negrete,3 Consuelo Gutierrez-Ortiz,4 Robert J Morgan-Warren,5 John Maltman5 On behalf of the GIFT study group1Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Doce de Octubre, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital de São João, Porto, Portugal; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, IRYCIS, Universidad Alcalá, Madrid, Spain; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario Príncipe de Asturias, Madrid, Spain; 5Medical Affairs, Allergan Holdings Ltd, Marlow, UKObjective: To compare a fixed combination of 0.03% bimatoprost and 0.5% timolol (BTFC with latanoprost monotherapy (LM in treatment-naïve patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG and risk factors for glaucomatous progression.Methods: Patients were enrolled at 15 sites in Spain and Portugal, and were randomized 1:1 to BTFC or LM. Patients instilled one drop of medication once per day at 8 pm for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in intraocular pressure (IOP at 12 weeks.Results: Of 81 patients enrolled, 43 were randomized to BTFC and 38 to LM. Mean (SD change in IOP from baseline to 12 weeks was significantly greater for BTFC than for LM: -13.5 mmHg (4.48 versus -11.4 mmHg (3.19, respectively (P=0.003. Similarly, at 12 weeks, significantly more BTFC patients than LM patients had IOP reductions of ≥40% (74.4% versus 47.4%, P=0.015 or ≥50% (46.5% versus 15.8%, P=0.003. Adverse events were more frequent with BTFC than with LM (33 versus 13 events, but most were mild in severity. The only serious adverse event (colon cancer was adjudged unrelated to the study medication.Conclusion: BTFC was effective and well tolerated in treatment-naïve patients with OAG at high risk of progression.Keywords: open-angle, fixed combinations

  2. Where's Your Phone? A Survey of Where Women Aged 15-40 Carry Their Smartphone and Related Risk Perception: A Survey and Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmayne, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones are now owned by most young adults in many countries. Installed applications regularly update while the phone is in standby. If it is kept near the body, this can lead to considerably higher exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation than occurred without internet access. Very little is known about current smartphone carrying habits of young women. This survey used an online questionnaire to ask about smartphone location under several circumstances to inform the power calculation for a women's health study. They were also asked about risk perceptions. Data was analysed using Pearson chi square. Three age categories were made: 15-20, 21-30, 31-40. Smartphones were generally kept on standby (96% by day, 83% at night). Of all participants, in the last week the most common locations of the phone when not in use or during passive use was off-body (86%), in the hand (58%), a skirt/trouser pocket (57%), or against the breast (15%). Pocket and near-the-breast storage were significant by age (χ215.04, p = 0.001 and χ210.96, p = 0.04, respectively), both positively influenced by the youngest group. The same influence lay in the association between holding the phone (χ211.082, p = 0.004) and pocket-storage (χ219.971, pphone against the head. More than half kept the phone 20-50 cms from their head at night (53%), while 13% kept it closer than 20 cms. Many (36%) thought RF-EMR exposure was related to health problems while 16% did not. There was no relationship between thinking RF-EMR exposure causes health problems in general and carrying the phone against the upper or lower body (p = 0.69 and p = 0.212, respectively). However, calls with the phone against the head were positively related to perception of health risk (χ2 6.695, p = 0.035). Our findings can be used in the power calculation for a case-control study.

  3. Pilot age and geographic region of commuter and air taxi crashes: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebok, George W; Qiang, Yandong; Baker, Susan P; Li, Guohua

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies of major airline and general aviation crashes have identified a host of risk factors. We examined risk factors related to crashes involving commuter air carrier and air taxi flights. A matched case-control design was applied to assess the association of pilot age, total flight time, and geographic region with commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes (14 CFR Part 135) from 1983-2002 in the United States. A total of 2033 commuter air carrier or air taxi crashes from the National Transportation Safety Board aviation crash database were identified as eligible cases. Controls were randomly selected incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) aviation incident database coded under Part 135 operation. Relative to controls, commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes were less likely to occur in pilots under 30 yr of age (adjusted odds ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.54-0.88) after adjusting for geographic region and total flight time. With adjustment for pilot age and total flight time, the commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes with pilot error were nearly 13 times as likely to be in Alaska as their matched controls (adjusted odds ratio 12.84, 95% confidence interval 5.24-31.45). These results suggest that pilot age may be associated with risk of crash involvement in Part 135 operations. The excess crash risk in Alaska with or without pilot error underscores the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety.

  4. Acceleration risk in student fighter pilots: preliminary analysis of a management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvagno, Samuel M; Massa, Thomas V; Price, Scott C

    2004-12-01

    Despite advances in G-protection, F-16 student pilots continue to demonstrate G-performance inadequacies. The G-Risk Indicator Management (GRIM) Program was introduced at Luke Air Force Base in 2000 to facilitate early detection of G-related problems and to aid in the establishment of tailored ground training programs designed to enhance a student's performance under G. Assessment of anthropomorphic data, previous G-performance, anaerobic fitness, and centrifuge qualification scores comprise the initial assessment in the GRIM Program. Observations from these assessments are used to qualitatively determine the level of risk for the student. In the absence of any historical controls, no conclusions could be drawn with regards to the overall efficiency of the GRIM program. Significant differences were found between groups for anaerobic test scores, centrifuge scores, and gradebook comments. The results from this non-experimental study suggest the need for future studies to better determine the validity of G-risk indicators.

  5. The fragile patient management in the territory: results of a pilot study of monitoring of individuals over 65 at risk in summer 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Nati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In his daily activities a general practitioner wonders about a patient’s probability to see his state of health altered due to external factors that could influence it. Surely some risk factors , both modifiable and not modifiable , can interact with external factors to increase the incidence of diseases or ailments that compels one person to go under medical care, to the emergency room or in serious cases to hospitalization and / or exitus . The summer period , and in particular the risk of heat wave in big cities , as reported in the literature , is an additional risk factor for the development of difficult health situations.

  6. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jönsson, Tommy; Granfeldt, Yvonne; Ahrén, Bo; Branell, Ulla-Carin; Pålsson, Gunvor; Hansson, Anita; Söderström, Margareta; Lindeberg, Staffan

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age') diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin...

  7. Raising awareness of carrier testing for hereditary haemoglobinopathies in high-risk ethnic groups in the Netherlands: a pilot study among the general public and primary care providers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinreich, S.S.; Lange-de Klerk, E.S.M. de; Rijmen, F.; Cornel, M.C.; Kinderen, M. de; Plass, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands no formal recommendations exist concerning preconceptional or antenatal testing for carriership of hereditary haemoglobinopathies. Those at highest risk may be unaware of the possibility of carrier screening. While universal newborn screening has recently been introduc

  8. Association of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene G894T polymorphism with the risk of diabetic nephropathy in Qassim region, Saudi Arabia—A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackawy, Amal Mohammed Husein; Khan, Amjad Ali; Badawy, Mohammed El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a chronic microangiopathic complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM).Vascular endothelial dysfunction resulting from impaired nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in the vascular endothelial cells has been suggested as playing an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (E-NOS) gene G894T polymorphism has been reported to be associated with endothelial dysfunction leading to DN. Our objective was to evaluate the association of G894T polymorphism of eNOS gene with the risk of DN among type 2 diabetic Saudi patients. Methods One hundred and twenty subjects were included in this study. They were divided into three groups. Group I, 40 controls. Group II, 40 type 2 diabetic patients without nephropathy. Group III, 40 type2 diabetic patients with nephropathy. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) G894Tpolymorphism was detected by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP). Plasma nitric oxide (NO) levels were estimated. Results E-NOS genotype frequency showed non-significant differences among the all studied groups (p > 0.05). Both diabetic groups had significantly higher plasma nitrate levels than in controls with a significant increase in group III than in group II patients (all p diabetic Saudi patients. The higher plasma levels of nitrates as a marker of oxidative stress in diabetic patients with nephropathy suggest the possible role of oxidative stress but not e-NOS gene SNP in pathogenesis of the DN. PMID:25606424

  9. Flight hours, habit of eating sweet foods and the risk of hyperglycemia in civilian pilots in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golda Naomi Sinambela

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Hiperglikemi antara lain dapat menyebabkan komplikasi penyakit kardiovaskular yang dapat mengganggu kinerja seorang pilot sipil dalam keselamatan penerbangan. Tujuan penelitian ini ialah mengidentifikasi beberapa faktor yang berperan terhadap risiko hiperglikemi.Metode: Subjek penelitian pada penelitian potong lintang ini dipilih secara purposif di antara pilot sipil lakilaki yang melakukan pemeriksaan kesehatan berkala di Balai Kesehatan Penerbangan (Balhatpen Jakarta pada 28 Mei - 9 Juni 2013. Data demografi, kebiasaan, dan pekerjaan diperoleh dengan wawancara. Data kadar glukosa darah puasa (GDP berasal dari laboratorium Balhatpen. Hiperglikemi jika kadar GDP 100-125 mg/dl, dan GDP normal adalah 70-99 mg/dl. Hasil:Selama 10 hari pengumpulan data terdapat 612 pilot sipil, 225 orang menjadi subjek penelitian, dan 31,2% di antaranya dengan hiperglikemi. Pada penelitian ini ditemukan 2 faktor dominan yaitu rerata jam terbang per tahun dan kebiasaan makan makanan manis yang mempertinggi risiko hiperglikemi. Pilot dengan rerata 1051-1130 jam terbang per tahun dibandingkan dengan 25 sampai 1050 jam per tahun berisiko 85% lebih tinggi hiperglikemia [risiko relatif suaian (RRa = 1,85; P = 0,003]. Pilot sipil dengan kebiasaan makan makanan manis setiap hari dibandingkan dengan 0-4 kali/minggu berisiko 2 kali lipat hiperglikemia (RRa = 2,09; P = 0,002 Kesimpulan: Pilot sipil yang dengan rerata 1051-1130 jam terbang per tahun atau mempunyai kebiasaan makan makanan manis setiap hari mempunyai risiko lebih tinggi mengalami hiperglikemia. (Health Science Indones 2014;1:-Kata kunci: hiperglikemi, jam terbang, kebiasaan makan, pilot sipil, IndonesiaAbstractBackground:Hyperglycemia can lead to long-term complications such as cardiovascular disease that might interfere the performance of civilian pilot. This study aimed to identify the factors that contribute to the risk of hyperglycemia.Methods:The subjects of this cross-sectional study

  10. Risk assessment of pesticide usage by farmers in Commewijne, Suriname, South America: a pilot study for the Alkmaar and Tamanredjo regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabali, Shirley; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2015-03-01

    Limited scientific work is available on pesticide use and exposure in Suriname. Therefore, research was conducted to assess the application, safety practices (use of personal protective equipment (PPEs)), and potential risk of pesticide use by means of a face-to-face questionnaire and determination of the international estimated short-term intake (IESTI)). The amount of pesticide used was compared with the label and the in the European Union (EU) authorized dose. The majority of the farmers was male between 41 and 60 years and followed a primary education only. Less than 5 % of farmers used non-authorized pesticides. Results showed that most farmers (58 up to 100 %) apply a dose, which is within 0-100 % of the regulated dose (label and EU). Good results were obtained for the use of most PPEs. Statistical analysis did not reveal a significant difference between the different age classes, the different levels of education, and the use of PPEs. Pesticide residue analysis of four major crops showed that 22 % of the samples contained pesticides (13 % imidacloprid and 9 % chlorothalonil). The results for imidacloprid were higher than their respective maximum residue levels (MRLs) and were used for calculation of the IESTI. The highest observed IESTI value was 74.5 % of the EU acute reference dose (ARfD), giving rise to concern about pesticide usage. In Suriname, educational programs, good agricultural practices (GAP) training, sustainable agricultural practices, food monitoring studies, and legislative control mechanisms are urgently needed to protect farmer's health and the environment and to ensure food safety.

  11. Pharmacogenetics of Ketamine-Induced Emergence Phenomena: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroke, Edwin N; Crawford, Sybil L; Dungan, Jennifer R

    Up to 55% of patients who are administered ketamine experience an emergence phenomena (EP) that closely mimics schizophrenia and increases their risk of injury; however, to date, no studies have investigated genetic association of ketamine-induced EP in healthy patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the feasibility and sample sizes required to explore the relationship between CYP2B6*6 and GRIN2B single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ketamine-induced EP. This cross-sectional, pharmacogenetic candidate, gene pilot study recruited 75 patients having minor elective outpatient surgeries. EP was measured with the Clinician Administered Dissociative State Scale. Genetic association of CYP2B6*6 and GRIN2B (rs1019385 and rs1806191) single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ketamine-induced EP occurrence and severity were tested using logistic and linear regression. Forty-seven patients (63%) received ketamine and were genotyped, and 40% of them experienced EP. Occurrence and severity of EP were not associated with CYP2B6*6 or GRIN2B (p > .10). Exploratory analysis of nongenotype models containing age, ketamine dose, duration of anesthesia, and time from ketamine administration to assessment for EP significantly predicted EP occurrence (p = .001) and severity (p = .007). This pilot study demonstrates feasibility for implementing a pharmacogenetic study in a clinical setting, and we estimate that between 380 and 570 cases will be needed to adequately power future genetic association studies. Younger age, higher dose, and longer duration of anesthesia significantly predicted EP occurrence and severity among our pilot sample. Although the small sample size limited our ability to demonstrate significant genotype differences, we generated effect sizes, sample size estimates, and nongenetic covariates information in order to support future pharmacogenetic study design for evaluating this adverse event.

  12. Location Independent Professional Project: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, J.A.; Long, J.P.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-02-01

    This pilot study project explored the problem of providing access to the nomadic worker who desires to connect a computer through network access points at a number of different locations within the SNL/NM campus as well as outside the campus. The design and prototype development gathered knowledge that may allow a design to be developed that could be extended to a larger number of SNL/NM network drop boxes. The focus was to provide a capability for a worker to access the SNL IRN from a network drop box (e.g. in a conference room) as easily as when accessing the computer network from the office normally used by the worker. Additional study was done on new methods to authenticate the off campus worker, and protect and control access to data.

  13. A pilot evaluation of a social media literacy intervention to reduce risk factors for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Siân A; Wertheim, Eleanor H; Masters, Jennifer; Paxton, Susan J

    2017-07-01

    This pilot study investigated the effectiveness of a social media literacy intervention for adolescent girls on risk factors for eating disorders. A quasi-experimental pre- to post-test design comparing intervention and control conditions was used. Participants were 101 adolescent girls (Mage  = 13.13, SD = 0.33) who were allocated to receive three social media literacy intervention lessons (n = 64) or to receive classes as usual (n = 37). Self-report assessments of eating disorder risk factors were completed one week prior to, and one week following the intervention. Significant group by time interaction effects revealed improvements in the intervention condition relative to the control condition for body image (body esteem-weight; d = .19), disordered eating (dietary restraint; d = .26) and media literacy (realism scepticism; d = .32). The outcomes of this pilot study suggest that social media literacy is a potentially useful approach for prevention of risk for eating disorders in adolescent girls in the current social media environment of heightened vulnerability. Replication of this research with larger, randomized controlled trials, and longer follow-up is needed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Arsenic exposure and calpain-10 polymorphisms impair the function of pancreatic beta-cells in humans: a pilot study of risk factors for T2DM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Díaz-Villaseñor

    Full Text Available The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is increasing worldwide and diverse environmental and genetic risk factors are well recognized. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the calpain-10 gene (CAPN-10, which encodes a protein involved in the secretion and action of insulin, and chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs through drinking water have been independently associated with an increase in the risk for T2DM. In the present work we evaluated if CAPN-10 SNPs and iAs exposure jointly contribute to the outcome of T2DM. Insulin secretion (beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity were evaluated indirectly through validated indexes (HOMA2 in subjects with and without T2DM who have been exposed to a gradient of iAs in their drinking water in northern Mexico. The results were analyzed taking into account the presence of the risk factor SNPs SNP-43 and -44 in CAPN-10. Subjects with T2DM had significantly lower beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity. An inverse association was found between beta-cell function and iAs exposure, the association being more pronounced in subjects with T2DM. Subjects without T2DM who were carriers of the at-risk genotype SNP-43 or -44, also had significantly lower beta-cell function. The association of SNP-43 with beta-cell function was dependent on iAs exposure, age, gender and BMI, whereas the association with SNP-44 was independent of all of these factors. Chronic exposure to iAs seems to be a risk factor for T2DM in humans through the reduction of beta-cell function, with an enhanced effect seen in the presence of the at-risk genotype of SNP-43 in CAPN-10. Carriers of CAPN-10 SNP-44 have also shown reduced beta-cell function.

  15. Arsenic Exposure and Calpain-10 Polymorphisms Impair the Function of Pancreatic Beta-Cells in Humans: A Pilot Study of Risk Factors for T2DM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Cruz, Laura; Cebrián, Arturo; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U.; Hiriart, Marcia; García-Vargas, Gonzálo; Bassol, Susana; Sordo, Monserrat; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Klimecki, Walter T.; López-Carillo, Lizbeth; Cebrián, Mariano E.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing worldwide and diverse environmental and genetic risk factors are well recognized. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the calpain-10 gene (CAPN-10), which encodes a protein involved in the secretion and action of insulin, and chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water have been independently associated with an increase in the risk for T2DM. In the present work we evaluated if CAPN-10 SNPs and iAs exposure jointly contribute to the outcome of T2DM. Insulin secretion (beta-cell function) and insulin sensitivity were evaluated indirectly through validated indexes (HOMA2) in subjects with and without T2DM who have been exposed to a gradient of iAs in their drinking water in northern Mexico. The results were analyzed taking into account the presence of the risk factor SNPs SNP-43 and -44 in CAPN-10. Subjects with T2DM had significantly lower beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity. An inverse association was found between beta-cell function and iAs exposure, the association being more pronounced in subjects with T2DM. Subjects without T2DM who were carriers of the at-risk genotype SNP-43 or -44, also had significantly lower beta-cell function. The association of SNP-43 with beta-cell function was dependent on iAs exposure, age, gender and BMI, whereas the association with SNP-44 was independent of all of these factors. Chronic exposure to iAs seems to be a risk factor for T2DM in humans through the reduction of beta-cell function, with an enhanced effect seen in the presence of the at-risk genotype of SNP-43 in CAPN-10. Carriers of CAPN-10 SNP-44 have also shown reduced beta-cell function. PMID:23349674

  16. Effects of exercise and nutrition on postural balance and risk of falling in elderly people with decreased bone mineral density : randomized controlled trial pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanenburg, Jaap; de Bruin, Eling Douwe; Stauffacher, Marguerite; Mulder, Theo; Uebelhart, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of calcium/vitamin D supplements with a combination of calcium/vitamin D supplements and exercise/protein on risk of failing and postural balance. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Setting: University hospital physiotherapy department. Subjects: Twenty-four independ

  17. Effects of exercise and nutrition on postural balance and risk of falling in elderly people with decreased bone mineral density : randomized controlled trial pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanenburg, Jaap; de Bruin, Eling Douwe; Stauffacher, Marguerite; Mulder, Theo; Uebelhart, Daniel

    Objective: To compare the effect of calcium/vitamin D supplements with a combination of calcium/vitamin D supplements and exercise/protein on risk of failing and postural balance. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Setting: University hospital physiotherapy department. Subjects: Twenty-four

  18. A computer decision aid for medical prevention: a pilot qualitative study of the Personalized Estimate of Risks (EsPeR system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunino Sylvain

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many preventable diseases such as ischemic heart diseases and breast cancer prevail at a large scale in the general population. Computerized decision support systems are one of the solutions for improving the quality of prevention strategies. Methods The system called EsPeR (Personalised Estimate of Risks combines calculation of several risks with computerisation of guidelines (cardiovascular prevention, screening for breast cancer, colorectal cancer, uterine cervix cancer, and prostate cancer, diagnosis of depression and suicide risk. We present a qualitative evaluation of its ergonomics, as well as it's understanding and acceptance by a group of general practitioners. We organised four focus groups each including 6–11 general practitioners. Physicians worked on several structured clinical scenari os with the help of EsPeR, and three senior investigators leaded structured discussion sessions. Results The initial sessions identified several ergonomic flaws of the system that were easily corrected. Both clinical scenarios and discussion sessions identified several problems related to the insufficient comprehension (expression of risks, definition of familial history of disease, and difficulty for the physicians to accept some of the recommendations. Conclusion Educational, socio-professional and organisational components (i.e. time constraints for training and use of the EsPeR system during consultation as well as acceptance of evidence-based decision-making should be taken into account before launching computerised decision support systems, or their application in randomised trials.

  19. The Pilot Staffing Conundrum: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-2. School of Logistics and Acquisition Management, Air Force Institute of Technology (AU), Wright Patterson AFB, OH, June...Kafer, John H. Relationship of Airline Pilot Demand and Air Force Pilot Retention. Graduate Research Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-11. School of Logistics

  20. [Pilot study on compulsory vaccination coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandolfo, M E; Lauria, L; Medda, E; Bucciarelli, M; Andreozzi, S; Salinetti, S; Sitzia, G; Bernacchia, R

    1999-01-01

    The disappearance of diphtheria and poliomyelitis is the best evidence of the efficacy of the vaccination strategies adopted in Italy. The active offer of the prophylaxis, reinforced by law, has characterised the operational aspects of the strategy. The active surveillance system is the main tool to take under control the effectiveness of health services responsible for vaccination. This system could be more easily implemented if the health services will be given a specific software aiming to handle and evaluate vaccination registers. The present pilot study, performed in the regions Marche and Sardegna, is an example of active surveillance and it is based on the ARVA software produced by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità. The results show a good level of coverage (> 95%) within the second year of life. Unsatisfactory results were obtained on the timing of vaccinations, as recommended by the vaccination schedule, mostly for the third doses.

  1. Risk factors for suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence in HIV-infected adolescents in Gaborone, Botswana: a pilot cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndiaye M

    2013-09-01

    (HIV viral load <400 copies/mL. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of ART non-adherence. Results: The overall median (interquartile range ART adherence was 99% (96.5–100 (N = 82. Seventy-six percent of adolescents had excellent pill count ART adherence levels and 94% achieved virologic suppression. Male adolescents made up 65% of the non-adherent group (P = 0.02. Those who displayed suboptimal ART adherence were more likely to report having ever missed ART doses due to failure to pick up medication at the pharmacy (30.0% versus 9.7%, P = 0.03. In the multivariate logistic regression model, male sex (odds ratio [OR] 3.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13–9.54; P = 0.03 was the only factor which was independently associated with suboptimal ART adherence. Conclusions: A high proportion of HIV-infected adolescents studied had excellent ART adherence and virologic suppression, with male adolescents at higher risk of suboptimal adherence than females. Further research to investigate how gender relates to suboptimal adherence may aid in the design of targeted intervention strategies. Keywords: HIV/AIDS, ART adherence, adolescents, barriers, Botswana

  2. Methods and tools to support real time risk-based flood forecasting - a UK pilot application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Emma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flood managers have traditionally used probabilistic models to assess potential flood risk for strategic planning and non-operational applications. Computational restrictions on data volumes and simulation times have meant that information on the risk of flooding has not been available for operational flood forecasting purposes. In practice, however, the operational flood manager has probabilistic questions to answer, which are not completely supported by the outputs of traditional, deterministic flood forecasting systems. In a collaborative approach, HR Wallingford and Deltares have developed methods, tools and techniques to extend existing flood forecasting systems with elements of strategic flood risk analysis, including probabilistic failure analysis, two dimensional flood spreading simulation and the analysis of flood impacts and consequences. This paper presents the results of the application of these new operational flood risk management tools to a pilot catchment in the UK. It discusses the problems of performing probabilistic flood risk assessment in real time and how these have been addressed in this study. It also describes the challenges of the communication of risk to operational flood managers and to the general public, and how these new methods and tools can provide risk-based supporting evidence to assist with this process.

  3. 75 FR 80827 - Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ...; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs; Notice To Extend Expiration Date...) Sec. 400.210 entitled ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs... ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs.'' Previous extensions...

  4. Development of a Burn Escharotomy Assessment Tool: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur, Rebecca; Holmes, James H; Johnson, James E; Molnar, Joseph A; Carter, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injuries can require escharotomies which are urgent, infrequent, and relatively high-risk procedures necessary to preserve limb perfusion and sometimes ventilation. The American Burn Association Advanced Burn Life Support© course educates surgeons and emergency providers about escharotomy incisions but lacks a biomimetic trainer to demonstrate, practice, or provide assessment. The goal was to build an affordable biomimetic trainer with discrete points of failure and pilot a validation study. Fellowship-trained burn and plastic surgeons worked with special effect artists and anatomists to develop a biomimetic trainer with three discrete points of failure: median or ulnar nerve injury, fasciotomy, and failure to check distal pulse. Participants were divided between experienced and inexperienced, survey pre- and post-procedure on a biomimetic model while being timed. The trainer total cost per participant was less than $35. Eighteen participants were involved in the study. The inexperienced (0-1 prior escharotomies performed) had significantly more violations at the discrete points of failure relative to more experienced participants (P = .036). Face validity was assessed with 100% of participants agreement that the model appeared similar to real life and was valuable in their training. Given the advancements in biomimetic models and the need to train surgeons in how to perform infrequent, emergent surgical procedures, an escharotomy trainer is needed today. The authors developed an affordable model with a successful pilot study demonstrating discrimination between experienced and inexperienced surgeons. Additional research is needed to increase the reliability and assessment metrics.

  5. A pilot study of intensity modulated radiation therapy with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in the treatment of intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, Eric K; Slack, Rebecca S; Hanscom, Heather N; Lei, Sue; Suy, Simeng; Park, Hyeon U; Kim, Joy S; Sherer, Benjamin A; Collins, Brian T; Satinsky, Andrew N; Harter, K William; Batipps, Gerald P; Constantinople, Nicholas L; Dejter, Stephen W; Maxted, William C; Regan, James B; Pahira, John J; McGeagh, Kevin G; Jha, Reena C; Dawson, Nancy A; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2010-10-01

    Clinical data suggest that large radiation fractions are biologically superior to smaller fraction sizes in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The CyberKnife is an appealing delivery system for hypofractionated radiosurgery due to its ability to deliver highly conformal radiation and to track and adjust for prostate motion in real-time. We report our early experience using the CyberKnife to deliver a hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Twenty-four patients were treated with hypofractionated SBRT and supplemental external radiation therapy plus or minus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Patients were treated with SBRT to a dose of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Quality of life data were collected with American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaires before and after treatment. PSA responses were monitored; acute urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v3. All 24 patients completed the planned treatment with an average follow-up of 9.3 months. For patients who did not receive ADT, the median pre-treatment PSA was 10.6 ng/ml and decreased in all patients to a median of 1.5 ng/ml by 6 months post-treatment. Acute effects associated with treatment included Grade 2 urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity but no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or greater toxicity. AUA and EPIC scores returned to baseline by six months post-treatment. Hypofractionated SBRT combined with IMRT offers radiobiological benefits of a large fraction boost for dose escalation and is a well tolerated treatment option for men with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Early results are encouraging with biochemical response and acceptable toxicity. These data provide a basis for the design of a phase II clinical

  6. Study of occupational stress among railway engine pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traffic volume and speed is going to be increased in Indian Railways successively, leading to higher stress in staff connected with train operations. The jobs of railway engine pilots come under the category of high-strain jobs, necessitating a need to conduct multicentric study to unfold the factors associated with occupational stress and organizational strategies. Materials and Methods: Present study covered 185 railway engine pilots and office clerks working in various railway zones by incidental method. Occupational Stress Index (OSI test developed by Srivastva and Singh, questionnaire of specific stressors constructed by authors and laboratory test battery for psychological screening of high-speed train pilots were used as tools. Results: Means of OSI and all the 12 occupational stressors of railway engine pilots were found significantly higher to that of office clerks. Means of OSI and occupational stressors of goods train pilots were significantly higher in comparison to high-speed train pilots and passenger train pilots. Study revealed positive correlation of speed perception and complex reaction time tests and negative correlation of other constituent tests of laboratory test battery to OSI test. Highest subgroup of stressor observedwas role overload followed by role conflict. Conclusions: These findings provide a prima facie evidence of higher occupational stress among railway engine pilots because of identified specific stressors prevalent in their job and explore the possible intervention strategies for its reduction. Significant correlation is noticed between OSI and laboratory test results, indicating its relevant utility in preliminary psychological screening.

  7. Study of occupational stress among railway engine pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Devesh; Singh, Jai Vir; Kharwar, Poonam S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traffic volume and speed is going to be increased in Indian Railways successively, leading to higher stress in staff connected with train operations. The jobs of railway engine pilots come under the category of high-strain jobs, necessitating a need to conduct multicentric study to unfold the factors associated with occupational stress and organizational strategies. Materials and Methods: Present study covered 185 railway engine pilots and office clerks working in various railway zones by incidental method. Occupational Stress Index (OSI) test developed by Srivastva and Singh, questionnaire of specific stressors constructed by authors and laboratory test battery for psychological screening of high-speed train pilots were used as tools. Results: Means of OSI and all the 12 occupational stressors of railway engine pilots were found significantly higher to that of office clerks. Means of OSI and occupational stressors of goods train pilots were significantly higher in comparison to high-speed train pilots and passenger train pilots. Study revealed positive correlation of speed perception and complex reaction time tests and negative correlation of other constituent tests of laboratory test battery to OSI test. Highest subgroup of stressor observedwas role overload followed by role conflict. Conclusions: These findings provide a prima facie evidence of higher occupational stress among railway engine pilots because of identified specific stressors prevalent in their job and explore the possible intervention strategies for its reduction. Significant correlation is noticed between OSI and laboratory test results, indicating its relevant utility in preliminary psychological screening. PMID:21808497

  8. A Pilot Study of the Effects of Atomoxetine on Driving Performance in Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Russell A.; Anderson, Deborah L.; Kruesi, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Objective: There is a high risk of vehicular crashes, traffic citations, and poorer driving performance in adults with ADHD. This pilot study examines the value of a new nonstimulant (atomoxetine) for improving the driving performance of adults with ADHD. Method: Atomoxetine (1.2 mg/kg daily for 3 weeks) and a placebo are studied on 18 adults with…

  9. Hearing Aids: Expectations and Satisfaction of People with an Intellectual Disability, a Descriptive Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwese-Jongejeugd, A.; Verschuure, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In spite of an increased risk of hearing impairment in persons with an intellectual disability (ID), rehabilitation with hearing aids often fails. We performed a descriptive pilot study with the following study questions: (1) Do comparable elements as in the general population contribute to expectations of and satisfaction with hearing…

  10. Hearing Aids: Expectations and Satisfaction of People with an Intellectual Disability, a Descriptive Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwese-Jongejeugd, A.; Verschuure, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In spite of an increased risk of hearing impairment in persons with an intellectual disability (ID), rehabilitation with hearing aids often fails. We performed a descriptive pilot study with the following study questions: (1) Do comparable elements as in the general population contribute to expectations of and satisfaction with hearing…

  11. High intensity interior aircraft noise increases the risk of high diastolic blood pressure in Indonesian Air Force pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarma Siagian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the effects of aircraft noise, resting pulse rate, and other factors on the risk of high diastolic blood pressure (DBP in Indonesian Air Force pilots.Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted using data extracted from annual medical check-ups indoctrination aerophysiologic training records at the Saryanto Aviation and Aerospace Health Institute (LAKESPRA in Jakarta from January 2003 – September 2008. For analysis of DBP: the case group with DBP ≥ 90 mmHg were compared with contral group with DBP < 79 mmHG. One case matched to 12 controls.Results: Out of 567 pilots, 544 (95.9% had complete medical records. For this analysis there were 40 cases of high DBP and 480 controls for DBP. Pilots exposed to aircraft noise 90-95 dB rather than 70-80 dB had a 2.7-fold increase for high DBP [adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 2.70; 95% confi dence interval (CI = 1.05-6.97]. Pilots with resting pulse rates of ≥ 81/minute rather than ≤ 80/minute had a 2.7-fold increase for high DBP (ORa = 2.66; 95% CI = 1.26-5.61. In terms of total fl ight hours, pilots who had 1401-11125 hours rather than 147-1400 hours had a 3.2-fold increase for high DBP (ORa = 3.18; 95% CI = 1.01-10.03.Conclusion: High interior aircraft noise, high total flight hours,  and high resting pulse rate, increased risk for high DBP. Self assessment of resting pulse rate can be used to control the risk of high DBP. (Med J Indones 2009; 276: 276-82Keywords: diastolic blood pressure, aircraft noise, resting pulse rate, military pilots

  12. Vascular quality of care pilot study: how admission to a vascular surgery service affects evidence-based pharmacologic risk factor modification in patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steenhof N

    2014-06-01

    prescriptions were largely responsible for improved guideline adherence with antiplatelets and statins, most of the apparent improvement in ACE inhibitor and ARB use was the result of identifying an acceptable reason for not having them prescribed. Conclusion: This hypothesis generating pilot study supports the findings of others that there is suboptimal prescription of pharmacologic risk reduction therapies in the PAD population. Admission to a vascular service increases these rates. Nevertheless, some patients are still not receiving evidence-based treatment at discharge even after consideration of acceptable reasons. Strategies are needed to improve PAD guideline adherence in both the community at large and the vascular surgery service. Keywords: guideline adherence, vascular protection, risk reduction

  13. The effects of risk perception and flight experience on airline pilots' locus of control with regard to safety operation behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xuqun; Ji, Ming; Han, Haiyan

    2013-08-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to integrate two research traditions, social cognition approach and individual state approach, and to understand the relationships between locus of control (LOC), risk perception, flight time, and safety operation behavior (SOB) among Chinese airline pilots. The study sample consisted of 193 commercial airline pilots from China Southern Airlines Ltd. The results showed that internal locus of control directly affected pilot safety operation behavior. Risk perception seemed to mediate the relationship between locus of control and safety operation behaviors, and total flight time moderated internal locus of control. Thus, locus of control primarily influences safety operation behavior indirectly by affecting risk perception. The total effect of internal locus of control on safety behaviors is larger than that of external locus of control. Furthermore, the safety benefit of flight experience is more pronounced among pilots with high internal loci of control in the early and middle flight building stages. Practical implications for aviation safety and directions for future research are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

    2003-09-20

    A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

  15. Pilot plant study for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.S. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-02-01

    Most of domestic alcohol fermentation factory adopt batch process of which productivity is lower than continuous fermentation process. They have made great effort to increase productivity by means of partial unit process automatization and process improvement with their accumulated experience but there is technical limitation in productivity of batch fermentation process. To produce and supply fuel alcohol, economic aspects must be considered first of all. Therefore, development of continuous fermentation process, of which productivity is high, is prerequisite to produce and use fuel alcohol but only a few foreign company possess continuous fermentation technic and use it in practical industrial scale fermentation. We constructed pilot plant (5 Stage CSTR 1 kl 99.5 v/v% ethanol/Day scale) to study some aspects stated below and our ultimate aims are production of industrial scale fuel alcohol and construction of the plant by ourselves. Some study concerned with energy saving separation and contamination control technic were entrusted to KAIST, A-ju university and KIST respectively. (author) 67 refs., 100 figs., 58 tabs.

  16. Climatotherapy in Japan: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Hitomi; Kusaka, Yukinori; Hirai, Takayoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko; Schuh, Angela

    2017-08-01

    Twenty-nine urban inhabitants participated in a half-day climatotherapy programme at the moderate mountain area and lowland area in the northwest part of the main island of Japan. The current study was aimed to investigate physically and mentally the objective and subjective influence of our short programme, which was a prospective pilot study of single intervention. Blood pressure was significantly descended during terrain cure at the uphill mountain path and returned after fresh-air rest cure, while there was no significant change throughout the programme at lowland flat path. Heart rate was significantly ascended and descended at both area, and more clearly changed at the mountain path. Profile of Mood Status brief form Japanese version administered before and after our half-day programme. Age adjusted T score of negative subscales, `tension-anxiety', `depression', `anger-hostility', `fatigue' and `confusion' were significantly lower after climatotherapy at both sites. Whereas, there was no significant change concerning `vigour' score. This short-version climatotherapy programme has been designed for people without enough time for long stay at health resort. It turned out our half-day climatotherapy programme contribute to mood status improvement. In addition, repeated practice of our short-version programme including endurance exercise with cool body shell using uphill path can be expected that blood pressure will go toward the normal range and heart rate will decrease both in usual time and during exercise. Therefore, health benefits can be expected of this climatotherapy programme.

  17. Polymorphism of genes associated with increased cardiovascular risk and cognitive function in patients with chronic heart failure and in healthy persons: the pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana V. Martynovich

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the relationship between polymorphic variants of APOC3 (rs2854117, PON1 (rs854560, rs662, AGT (rs4762, rs699 and AGTR1 (rs5186 genes with the results of cognitive tests in patients with chronic heart failure (СHF of ischemic genesis and healthy persons. The general group included 50 patients with CHF of II-IV functional classes, the control group - 50 healthy volunteers. Cognitive functions were estimated by 5th and 7th subtests of Wexler and Burdon's test. There was revealed statistically significant correlation between the polymorphism of APOC3, PON1, AGT, AGTR1 genes and the results of cognitive tests in patients with CHF and healthy persons. These data suggest that the polymorphism of the studied genes may be important in the genetic susceptibility to the formation and progression of cognitive disorders.

  18. FTO Gene Associates and Interacts with Obesity Risk, Physical Activity, Energy Intake, and Time Spent Sitting: Pilot Study in a Nigerian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolaji Fatai Oyeyemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO gene influences obesity but studies have shown that environmental/lifestyle variables like physical activity (PA, time spent sitting (TSS, and energy intake might mediate the effect. However, this is poorly understood in Nigeria due to scarce studies. We demystified association and interaction between FTO rs9939609, obesity, PA, TSS, and energy intake in Nigeria. FTO gene variant was genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism and gene sequencing analysis in 103 people with obesity and 98 controls. Anthropometrics and environmental variables were measured using standard procedures. Significant associations were found between FTO rs9939609 with obesity and environmental/lifestyle variables before and after adjusting for age. Carriers of allele A have significantly higher odds of being overweight/obese using BMI [0.191 (0.102–0.361, p<0.001] but this was attenuated by PA (p[interaction]=0.029; odds of being overweight reduced from 0.625 (0.181–2.159 to 0.082 (0.009–0.736 for low and high PA, respectively. Mediation analysis of total indirect effect also confirmed this by showing a simultaneous mediating role of total PA, energy intake, and TSS in the relationship between FTO and BMI (unstandardized-coefficient = 1.68; 95% CI: 1.26–2.22. This study shows a relationship between FTO and obesity phenotype and environmental/lifestyle factors might be an important modulator/mediator in the association.

  19. Blood Pressure Deviations From Optimal Mean Arterial Pressure During Cardiac Surgery Measured With a Novel Monitor of Cerebral Blood Flow and Risk for Perioperative Delirium: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Daijiro; Max, Laura; Laflam, Andrew; Brown, Charles; Neufeld, Karin J; Adachi, Hideo; Sciortino, Christopher; Conte, John V; Cameron, Duke E; Hogue, Charles W; Mandal, Kaushik

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether excursions of blood pressure from the optimal mean arterial pressure during and after cardiac surgery are associated with postoperative delirium identified using a structured examination. Prospective, observational study. University hospital. The study included 110 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients were monitored using ultrasound-tagged near-infrared spectroscopy to assess optimal mean arterial pressure by cerebral blood flow autoregulation monitoring during cardiopulmonary bypass and the first 3 hours in the intensive care unit. The patients were tested preoperatively and on postoperative days 1 to 3 with the Confusion Assessment Method or Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit, the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98, and the Mini Mental State Examination. Summative presence of delirium on postoperative days 1 through 3, as defined by the consensus panel following Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-TR criteria, was the primary outcome. Delirium occurred in 47 (42.7%) patients. There were no differences in blood pressure excursions above and below optimal mean arterial pressure between patients with and without summative presence of delirium. Secondary analysis showed blood pressure excursions above the optimal mean arterial pressure to be higher in patients with delirium (mean±SD, 33.2±26.51 mmHgxh v 23.4±16.13 mmHgxh; p = 0.031) and positively correlated with the Delirium Rating Scale score on postoperative day 2 (r = 0.27, p = 0.011). Summative presence of delirium was not associated with perioperative blood pressure excursions; but on secondary exploratory analysis, excursions above the optimal mean arterial pressure were associated with the incidence and severity of delirium on postoperative day 2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Pilot Study Applying Social Cognitive Theory to Predict HPV Vaccination Intentions of Unvaccinated College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Hannah Priest; Knowlden, Adam P.; Sharma, Manoj; Franzidis, Alexia

    2016-01-01

    Although college-aged women are at high risk for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, many college women remain unvaccinated against HPV. Testing health behavior theory can assist sexuality educators in identifying behavioral antecedents to promote behavior change within an intervention. The purpose of this pilot study was to utilize social…

  1. Contribution of plantar pressure to the prevention and quantification of the muscle-skeletal injury risk in hiking trails--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Ronaldo; Monteiro, Marco; Moreira, Helena; Maia, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Hiking trails have been growing in popularity in the health and well-being promotion. Consequently, the foot became an object of study in order to understand the discomfort and pain in the lower limb. The aims of the work were: 1) to detect tendencies for behaviour of maximum values of plantar pressure (MaxP) during the walk on different slopes, 2) to contribute to the methodology of the difficulty level of hiking trails. Equations show strong tendencies (R2 > 0.8) of behaviour of MaxP in the lateral zones of the heel, 4th and 5th metatarsus as well as in the plantar zone of the hallux. The analysis of the difficulty level of the hiking trails branches deserves a separate presentation, including the technical difficulty analysis (with a compulsory emphasis on the biomechanics) and information on the caloric consumption and on the slopes of each branch.

  2. LAM Pilot Study with Imatinib Mesylate (LAMP-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0132 TITLE: LAM Pilot Study with Imatinib Mesylate ( LAMP -1) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Charlie...AND SUBTITLE LAM Pilot Study with Imatinib Mesylate ( LAMP -1) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0132 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The LAMP -1 study is

  3. Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Scottish Youth: A Pilot Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Buchan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Approximately 70% of the total ethnic minority population of Scotland is of South Asian ancestry, although relatively little is known about their cardiovascular risk profile. Determining the risk profiles of Scottish youth of South Asian ancestry may inform the creation of interventions to reduce risk and improve the quality of life in this population. Approach: The purpose of this pilot investigation was to examine the Cardiovascular Disease (CVD risk profiles of Scottish youth of South Asian ancestry. A sample of 48 South Asian adolescents (26 females, 22 males, 16±2 years of age resident in the city of Glasgow participated in this study. Stature, mass, waist circumference, physical activity, blood pressure, diet and 10 metabolic markers of CVD risk were recorded. Results: Boys had a significantly (p≤0. 01 greater body mass, stature and were more physically active than girls. The boys also had significantly (p≤0. 05 higher fasting levels of glucose, LDL and C-Reactive Protein (CRP and recorded lower levels of HDL than girls. High fat diets, low physical activity, elevated CRP, glucose and insulin levels and low HDL levels were the risk factors most often identified as being as non-desirable. About 88% of the cohort had between 2 and 6 CVD risk factors while 40% of boys and 20% of girls presented with 5 or more risk factors. Conclusion/Recommendations: Results suggest that preventive measures, including increased physical activity and dietary management may be warranted for the youth of South Asian ancestry."

  4. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study. ... of microbes that cause infections are helpful to determine proper antibiotic therapy. ... including extended spectrum beta lactamase producing strains of Proteus ...

  5. 1999 ANNUAL REPORT NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This annual report present the proceedings of the second annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Belfast, UK in March 1999. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the research arena of clean products, clean processes, and pollution prevention tools.

  6. Application of a pilot control banding tool for risk level assessment and control of nanoparticle exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, S Y; Zalk, D M; Swuste, P

    2008-03-03

    Control Banding (CB) strategies offer simplified solutions for controlling worker exposures to constituents that are found in the workplace in the absence of firm toxicological and exposure data. These strategies may be particularly useful in nanotechnology applications, considering the overwhelming level of uncertainty over what nanomaterials and nanotechnologies present as potential work-related health risks, what about these materials might lead to adverse toxicological activity, how risk related to these might be assessed, and how to manage these issues in the absence of this information. This study introduces a pilot CB tool or 'CB Nanotool' that was developed specifically for characterizing the health aspects of working with engineered nanoparticles and determining the level of risk and associated controls for five ongoing nanotechnology-related operations being conducted at two Department of Energy (DOE) research laboratories. Based on the application of the CB Nanotool, four of the five operations evaluated in this study were found to have implemented controls consistent with what was recommended by the CB Nanotool, with one operation even exceeding the required controls for that activity. The one remaining operation was determined to require an upgrade in controls. By developing this dynamic CB Nanotool within the realm of the scientific information available, this application of CB appears to be a useful approach for assessing the risk of nanomaterial operations, providing recommendations for appropriate engineering controls, and facilitating the allocation of resources to the activities that most need them.

  7. Occupational health and metabolic risk factors: A pilot intervention for transport workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L. Naug

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Heavy vehicle transport workers have a high risk of obesity and obesity-related disorders including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Sedentary nature of their work makes a healthy work and lifestyle balance difficult to achieve. Educational interventions that promote behavioral changes have been shown to be effective in various group settings. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of metabolic risk factors among a population of urban bus drivers; to deliver a 3-month educational intervention specifically tailored for the workplace environment of transport workers; and to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention through quantitative measurements and qualitative feedback. Material and Methods: Thirty-three bus drivers from depots in south Queensland were recruited for the study. Baseline metabolic data were collected through anthropometric measurements, blood collection and diet/lifestyle questionnaires. Metabolic risk factors that were analyzed included: waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, blood triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. Three interactive seminars were delivered over a 3-month period. At the end of the period, data collection was repeated. Results: At the commencement of the study, 35% of the participants exhibited ≥ 3 of the metabolic risk factors that characterize metabolic syndrome. This is higher than the reported prevalence in the general Australian population (22.1%. A total 21 of the 33 participants remained committed to the intervention and provided pre and post intervention data. Of these, 28% (N = 6 showed a decrease in one or more of the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. There was a significant increase in the average HDL-C after the intervention. Qualitative feedback indicated that the workers benefited from the program, especially regarding their awareness of the risks associated with their profession. Conclusions: This pilot

  8. PILOT STUDY: CCQM-P32 pilot study. Anion calibration solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michael; Wüthrich, Jürg

    2003-01-01

    In the CCQM-P32 pilot study two gravimetrically prepared anion calibration solutions of chloride and phosphate each of about 1 g/kg mass fraction were investigated. The comparison was an activity of the Inorganic Analysis Working Group of CCQM in 2002 and was piloted by the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA). The following institutes participated in this study (in alphabetical order): BAM (Germany), CENAM (Mexico), EMPA (Switzerland), GUM (Poland), KRISS (South Korea), LNE (France), NIST (United States of America), NMIJ (Japan), NRCCRM (China), PTB (Germany), SMU (Slovakia). For the chloride calibration solution 11 participants provided 16 results by the following analytical techniques: coulometry (7), titrimetry (5) and ion chromatography (4). The phosphate amount content was determined by 9 NMIs and 11 results were reported. Phosphate ion chromatography was the most applied technique (4), followed by titrimetry (2), ICP-OES (2), gravimetry (1) and ion-exchange coulometry (1). All results were found within a range of +/-0.5% with respect to the gravimetric value. The variability (RSD) of the results is 0.13% for chloride and 0.26% for phosphate. The reported results of all participants are also graphically displayed in this report. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM Working Group on Inorganic Analysis, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  9. Adjuvant simultaneous radiochemotherapy following radical hysterectomy for patients with cervical cancers in high-risk situation. Results of a pilot study; Adjuvante simultane Radiochemotherapie nach operiertem Uteruszervixkarzinom in der High-Risk-Situation. Ergebnisse einer Pilotuntersuchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haensgen, G.; Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Dunst, J. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Strauss, H. [Klinik fuer Gynaekologie der Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle/Wittenberg (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    Background: The most important factors for prognosis of cervical cancers are age and histological criteria such as the tumor size, the involvement of lymph nodes, lympho-vascular space involvement as well as microvessel involvement and poor tumor differentiation (grading 3). Here we present the results of concomitant chemo-radiation at high-risk situation of patients with cervical cancer after surgery. Patients and Methods: The study comprised 34 patients with median age of 40 years (26-63 years) after Wertheim surgical technique for cervical cancer at the FIGO Stages IB (n = 19) and IIB (n = 15). All patients were treated between November 1995 and June 1999 by a schedule of concomitant chemoradiation. The indication for this treatment was given by the positive histological proof of lymph node metastasis, microvessel or lympho-vascular space involvement as well as a G3 grading. The chemo-therapy was given in week 1 and 5 (day 1-5 and day 29-33). The dosage of cisplatin was 20 mg/m{sup 2}/d on every day and 5-FU was given as a 120-h infusion with 600 mg/m{sup 2}/d. The external beam radiotherapy was applied to the pelvis with 1.8 Gy per fraction up to 50.4-54 Gy. In two patients the paraaortal region was irradiated too because of the involvement of these lymph nodes. Results: The median observation time was 48 months (3-68 months). 30 patients are alive (88%) in complete response. Four patients died. The mean survival was 61 {+-} 3 months. We have seen only slight acute toxicities of grade 1 and 2. Three patients suffered from a grade 3 diarrhea and three patients developed a grade 3 leukopenia. In seven patients we found a secondary lymphedema as a late toxicity. Conclusion: The concomitant chemoradiation containing cisplatin in high-risk situation for cervical cancer after surgery improves the outcome and survival in these patients. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Entscheidend fuer die Prognose nach operiertem Uteruszervixkarzinom sind neben dem Alter

  10. Pilot Evaluation Study of the Life Skills Program REBOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Jungaberle

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study is pilot evaluation of the life skills program REBOUND in a school context focusing on substance use, risk perception, and knowledge about psychoactive substances ( n IG + CG = 723 students in five schools and 46 classes, Mage = 14.8, range 14-18 for the total sample and in the subgroups gender, age, and school type. Main goal of the study is collecting evidence for program optimization. A controlled study was carried out with repeated measurement before and after the intervention (4-6 months. Multilevel analyses, ANCOVA, and logistic regression analyses were applied to measure the effects. Overall, significantly lower incidence rates of drunkenness (odds ratio [OR] = .55; p = .033, improved knowledge about psychoactive substances (p = .006, lower personal (p = .013 and general tobacco risk perception among users (p = .002, and lower general tobacco (p = .018 and cannabis (p = .000 risk perception in non-users were found in the total intervention group. In subgroups, significantly lower rates for the incidence of drunkenness can be shown for males (p = .008 and for younger participants (p = .004. Students at academic high school (German Gymnasium showed a decrease in 30-day prevalence for alcohol (p = .017 and cannabis (p = .014, and they improved in their knowledge about psychoactive substances (p = .000. In vocational high school classes (German Realschule, there was an increase in the relative alcohol risk perception of the students (p = .019. REBOUND contributes to a controlled use of alcohol and increases knowledge about psychoactive substances. REBOUND has various effects on the examined subgroups age, gender, and school type: Males, younger students, and students in academic high school benefitted more from the course regarding consumption-related criteria. We suggest a program optimization specific to school form and age, inclusion of a tobacco intervention, and the use of more gender-segregated interventions.

  11. Acupressure for smoking cessation – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moody Russell C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco smoking is a serious risk to health: several therapies are available to assist those who wish to stop. Smokers who approach publicly funded stop-smoking clinics in the UK are currently offered nicotine replacement therapy (NRT or bupropion, and group behaviour therapy, for which there is evidence of effectiveness. Acupuncture and acupressure are also used to help smokers, though a systematic review of the evidence of their effectiveness was inconclusive. The aim of this pilot project was to determine the feasibility of a study to test acupressure as an adjunct to one anti-smoking treatment currently offered, and to inform the design of the study. Methods An open randomised controlled pilot study was conducted within the six week group programme offered by the Smoking Advice Service in Plymouth, UK. All participants received the usual treatment with NRT and group behavioural therapy, and were randomised into three groups: group A with two auricular acupressure beads, group B with one bead, and group C with no additional therapy. Participants were taught to press the beads when they experienced cravings. Beads were worn in one ear for four weeks, being replaced as necessary. The main outcome measures assessed in the pilot were success at quitting (expired CO ≤ 9 ppm, the dose of NRT used, and the rating of withdrawal symptoms using the Mood and Symptoms Scale. Results From 49 smokers attending four clinics, 24 volunteered to participate, 19 attended at least once after quitting, and seven remained to the final week. Participants who dropped out reported significantly fewer previous quit attempts, but no other significant differences. Participants reported stimulating the beads as expected during the initial days after quitting, but most soon reduced the frequency of stimulation. The discomfort caused by the beads was minor, and there were no significant side effects. There were technical problems with adhesiveness of

  12. Ecological study of sleep disruption in PTSD: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica; Katherine Shear, M; Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J

    2006-07-01

    Laboratory-based sleep studies have yielded inconsistent results regarding the presence and nature of objective sleep anomalies in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This pilot study aimed at assessing sleep in adult crime victims with PTSD by using in-home polysomnography. Compared to healthy archival subjects, PTSD subjects showed longer sleep latency, reduced total sleep time, and increased duration of nocturnal awakening. Quantitative electroencephalography (EEG) measures of delta and beta activity also differed in PTSD and healthy subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that ambulatory methods can capture objective signs of sleep disruption, and corroborate subjective complaints of disrupted sleep in PTSD.

  13. Pilot Study of Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking Among US Muslim College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Abu-Ras, Wahiba; Ahmed, Sameera

    2015-10-01

    Waterpipe smoking is common among the young in Muslim-majority countries despite recent Islamic rulings on tobacco. US Muslim college students, especially immigrants, may be at high risk for smoking, but information is lacking. In this pilot study, respondent-driven sampling was used to sample 156 Muslim college students. Waterpipe smoking was common (44.3%). Leading motivations to smoke were social and perceived low tobacco harm. Independent risk factors among the Muslim students were perception that friends and other students smoked, and ever drank alcohol. Personal belief that waterpipe smoking is prohibited in Islam was not significant. This pilot suggests that Muslim students are at high risk for waterpipe smoking and more definitive studies are needed.

  14. Problematic internet usage in US college students: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myaing Mon T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet addiction among US college students remains a concern, but robust estimates of its prevalence are lacking. Methods We conducted a pilot survey of 307 college students at two US universities. Participants completed the Internet Addiction Test (IAT as well as the Patient Health Questionnaire. Both are validated measures of problematic Internet usage and depression, respectively. We assessed the association between problematic Internet usage and moderate to severe depression using a modified Poisson regression approach. In addition, we examined the associations between individual items in the IAT and depression. Results A total of 224 eligible respondents completed the survey (73% response rate. Overall, 4% of students scored in the occasionally problematic or addicted range on the IAT, and 12% had moderate to severe depression. Endorsement of individual problematic usage items ranged from 1% to 70%. In the regression analysis, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with several individual items. Relative risk could not be estimated for three of the twenty items because of small cell sizes. Of the remaining 17 items, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with 13 of them, and three others had P values less than 0.10. There was also a significant association between problematic Internet usage overall and moderate to severe depression (relative risk 24.07, 95% confidence interval 3.95 to 146.69; P = 0.001. Conclusion The prevalence of problematic Internet usage among US college students is a cause for concern, and potentially requires intervention and treatment amongst the most vulnerable groups. The prevalence reported in this study is lower than that which has been reported in other studies, however the at-risk population is very high and preventative measures are also recommended.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardio-Cerebrovascular Risk Disparities Between Pilots and Aircraft Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong-Bo; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Suk-Ho; Lee, Se-Ho; Park, Won-Ju

    2017-09-01

    In the Republic of Korea Air Force, the health of pilots is strictly supervised, but there is comparatively not enough interest in aircraft mechanics' health. Among mechanics, who are heavily involved in military aircraft maintenance, the occurrence of sudden cardio-cerebrovascular diseases (CCVDs) is a possible risk factor during the maintenance process, which should be performed perfectly. We performed health examinations on 2123 male aircraft pilots and 1271 aircraft mechanics over 30 yr of age and determined the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS), an important risk factor for CCVDs. The prevalence of MetS in the aircraft mechanics (21.3%) was significantly higher than in the pilots (12.6%), and the gap in prevalence tended to grow as age increased. Among aircraft mechanics in their 30s and 40s, the prevalence of MetS was lower than in the general population. However, the prevalence of MetS among aircraft mechanics in their 50s (36.0%) was similar to that in the general population (35.7%). Systematic health management is needed for aircraft mechanics for aviation safety and for the maintenance of military strength via the prevention of CCVDs.Kim M-B, Kim H-J, Kim S-H, Lee S-H, Lee S-H, Park W-J. Metabolic syndrome and cardio-cerebrovascular risk disparities between pilots and aircraft mechanics. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(9):866-870.

  16. Microcirculation and atherothrombotic parameters in prolactinoma patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuwer, Anne Q; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M; Battjes, Suzanne; van Zijderveld, Rogier; Stuijver, Danka J F; Bisschop, Peter H; Twickler, Marcel Th B; Meijers, Joost C M; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Stroes, Erik S

    2012-12-01

    Atherothrombosis is a multifactorial process, governed by an interaction between the vessel wall, hemodynamic factors and systemic atherothrombotic risk factors. Recent in vitro, human ex vivo and animal studies have implicated the hormone prolactin as an atherothrombotic mediator. To address this issue, we evaluated the anatomy and function of various microvascular beds as well as plasma atherothrombosis markers in patients with elevated prolactin levels. In this pilot study, involving 10 prolactinoma patients and 10 control subjects, sidestream dark field (SDF) imaging revealed a marked perturbation of the sublingual microcirculation in prolactinoma patients compared to control subjects, as attested to by significant changes in microvascular flow index (2.74 ± 0.12 vs. 2.91 ± 0.05, respectively; P = 0.0006), in heterogeneity index (0.28 [IQR 0.18-0.31] vs. 0.09 [IQR 0.08-0.17], respectively; P = 0.002) and lower proportion of perfused vessels (90 ± 4.0% vs. 95 ± 3.0%, respectively; P = 0.016). In the retina, fluorescein angiography (FAG) confirmed these data, since prolactinoma patients more often have dilatated perifoveal capillaries. In plasma, prolactinoma patients displayed several pro-atherogenic disturbances, including a higher endogenous thrombin potential and prothrombin levels as well as decreased HDL-cholesterol levels. Prolactinoma patients are characterized by microvascular dysfunction as well as plasma markers indicating a pro-atherothrombotic state. Further studies are required to assess if prolactin is causally involved in atherothrombotic disease.

  17. First Breath prenatal smoking cessation pilot study: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehn, Lisette; Lokker, Nicole; Matitz, Debra; Christiansen, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Despite the many dangers associated with smoking during pregnancy, it remains a salient public health problem for Wisconsin women. The First Breath pilot program was developed in an attempt to reduce rates of smoking during pregnancy among low-income women. Preliminary results suggest that the First Breath counseling-based approach is effective, with a quit rate of 43.8% among First Breath enrollees at 1 month postpartum. Women receiving First Breath cessation counseling also had higher quit rates at every measurement period versus women in a comparison group who were receiving whatever cessation care was available in their county in the absence of First Breath. The First Breath pilot study has demonstrated success in helping pregnant women quit smoking and in creating a model for integration of cessation services into prenatal health care service provision. It is through this success that First Breath is expanding beyond the pilot study stage to a statewide program in 2003.

  18. Managing Ethical Problems in Qualitative Research Involving Vulnerable Populations, Using a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalina van Wijk RN, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the researcher's study was to examine the meaning that intimate partners of female rape victims attached to their lived experiences after the rape. The conduct of qualitative research concerning non-offending partners of female rape victims, however, often involves multifaceted ethical and practical challenges, which can be managed through the use of pilot studies. The pilot study described in this report had three objectives. The first was to pretest and refine the proposed method for locating, accessing, and recruiting intimate partners of female rape victims, within the first two weeks after the rape, for participation in a six-month longitudinal study. The second objective was to identify and prevent all possible risk factors in the proposed recruitment and data collection methods that could harm the participants' safety during the main study. The third objective was to determine the feasibility of the main study, in terms of the limited financial and human resources available. The pilot phase was valuable in identifying ethical and methodological problems during the recruitment of participants and collection of data. It allowed for methodological adjustments prior to the main study and confirmed the feasibility of the overall research design. A pilot, pretesting phase is therefore seen as an essential component of a qualitative study involving a vulnerable population.

  19. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  20. Self moving patients to the operation theatre - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvarfordh, Anna Pernilla; Rovsing, Marie Louise; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate patients' satisfaction with walking to the operation theatre instead of being driven in a bed or wheel chair, and to identify the need for information. In total, 75 patients (aged 15-83 years) participated in the study. A questionnaire...

  1. Attitudes Toward Guarani and Spanish: A Pilot Study in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Nancy C.

    This study analyzes the language attitudes of the Paraguayan people toward their two languages, Guarani and Spanish. To study the bilingual situation in the South American country, a pilot survey was carried out in the capital city addressing the major topics of language attitudes, language usage, and language varieties. The goals of the survey…

  2. CHASE assessment of the North Sea – a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, N.; Andersen, Jesper; Høgåsen, T.

    In this pilot study, hazardous substances in the North Sea were assessed and classified using the HELCOM Chemical Substances Status Assessment Tool (CHASE). The study was based on monitoring by Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Together, 1350...

  3. Rare variants in ischemic stroke: an exome pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Cole

    Full Text Available The genetic architecture of ischemic stroke is complex and is likely to include rare or low frequency variants with high penetrance and large effect sizes. Such variants are likely to provide important insights into disease pathogenesis compared to common variants with small effect sizes. Because a significant portion of human functional variation may derive from the protein-coding portion of genes we undertook a pilot study to identify variation across the human exome (i.e., the coding exons across the entire human genome in 10 ischemic stroke cases. Our efforts focused on evaluating the feasibility and identifying the difficulties in this type of research as it applies to ischemic stroke. The cases included 8 African-Americans and 2 Caucasians selected on the basis of similar stroke subtypes and by implementing a case selection algorithm that emphasized the genetic contribution of stroke risk. Following construction of paired-end sequencing libraries, all predicted human exons in each sample were captured and sequenced. Sequencing generated an average of 25.5 million read pairs (75 bp×2 and 3.8 Gbp per sample. After passing quality filters, screening the exomes against dbSNP demonstrated an average of 2839 novel SNPs among African-Americans and 1105 among Caucasians. In an aggregate analysis, 48 genes were identified to have at least one rare variant across all stroke cases. One gene, CSN3, identified by screening our prior GWAS results in conjunction with our exome results, was found to contain an interesting coding polymorphism as well as containing excess rare variation as compared with the other genes evaluated. In conclusion, while rare coding variants may predispose to the risk of ischemic stroke, this fact has yet to be definitively proven. Our study demonstrates the complexities of such research and highlights that while exome data can be obtained, the optimal analytical methods have yet to be determined.

  4. 78 FR 23941 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational... the Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Applications pilot program to May 8... ``Investigational Device Exemptions (IDE) for Early Feasibility Medical Device Clinical Studies, Including...

  5. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) & cervical intraepithelial neoplasia - A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Neerja Bhatla; Kriti Puri; Elizabeth Joseph; Alka Kriplani; Venkateswaran K. Iyer; Sreenivas, V

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the necessary cause of cervical cancer and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is considered a potential cofactor in the development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The objective of this pilot study was to determine the association of CT infection with HPV, other risk factors for cervical cancer, and CIN in symptomatic women. Methods: A total of 600 consecutively selected women aged 30-74 yr with persistent vaginal discharge, inter...

  6. Childhood maltreatment and amygdala connectivity in methamphetamine dependence: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Andy C.; Kohno, Milky; Hellemann, Gerhard; London, Edythe D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Childhood maltreatment, a well-known risk factor for the development of substance abuse disorders, is associated with functional and structural abnormalities in the adult brain, particularly in the limbic system. However, almost no research has examined the relationship between childhood maltreatment and brain function in individuals with drug abuse disorders. Methods We conducted a pilot study of the relationship between childhood maltreatment (evaluated with the Childhood Traum...

  7. Prevalence and Correlates of Video and Internet Gaming Addiction among Hong Kong Adolescents: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chong-Wen Wang; Chan, Cecilia L. W.; Kwok-Kei Mak; Sai-Yin Ho; Wong, Paul W. C.; Ho, Rainbow T. H.

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the patterns of video and internet gaming habits and the prevalence and correlates of gaming addiction in Hong Kong adolescents. A total of 503 students were recruited from two secondary schools. Addictive behaviors of video and internet gaming were assessed using the Game Addiction Scale. Risk factors for gaming addiction were examined using logistical regression. An overwhelming majority of the subjects (94%) reported using video or internet games, with one in ...

  8. Development of the gagging problem assessment : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvell, G. F. E. C. van Linden; Ter Pelkwijk, B. J.; Stegenga, B.

    An accepted management strategy for gagging problems appears not to exist. A reliable and valid instrument is needed to develop an evidence based treatment for this clinical problem. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a newly developed measurement tool for

  9. Tai Chi for People with Visual Impairments: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszko, Tanya A.; Ramsey, Vincent K.; Blasch, Bruce B.

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the physical and psychological outcomes of a tai chi exercise program for eight adults with visual impairments. It found that after eight weeks of orientation and mobility training and tai chi practice, the participants' single leg-stance time and total knee flexion work and power improved, as did their frequency of,…

  10. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  11. Consumer Understanding of Nutrition Marketing Terms: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroldson, Amber; Yen, Chih-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the validity of a questionnaire developed to assess adult consumer understanding of nutrition marketing terms and the resulting impact on consumer behavior. Participants (n = 40) completed an electronic questionnaire. Efforts to establish validity and reliability suggest that the questionnaire is a…

  12. Development of the gagging problem assessment : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvell, G. F. E. C. van Linden; Ter Pelkwijk, B. J.; Stegenga, B.

    2008-01-01

    An accepted management strategy for gagging problems appears not to exist. A reliable and valid instrument is needed to develop an evidence based treatment for this clinical problem. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a newly developed measurement tool for de

  13. Physical activity in Georgia state parks: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln R. Larson; Jason W. Whiting; Gary T. Green

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the role of Georgia State Parks in the promotion of physical activity among different racial/ethnic and age groups. Data were collected at three state parks in north Georgia during the summer of 2009 using two research methods: behavior observations (N=2281) and intercept surveys (N=473).

  14. Mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GYGAX, MARINE JEQUIER; SCHNEIDER, PATRICK; NEWMAN, CHRISTOPHER JOHN

    2011-01-01

    ...‐paretic arm, is used in the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke in adults. We tested the effectiveness and feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia by performing a pilot crossover study in ten participants (aged 6–14y...

  15. Elderly Homosexual Women and Men: Report on a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnigerode, Fred A.; Adelman, Marcy R.

    1978-01-01

    A pilot study is described in which four- to five-hour tape-recorded interviews were conducted with 11 homosexual women and men, 60-77 years of age. Areas examined included: physical change and physical health; work, retirement and leisure time; social behavior; psychological functioning; sexual behavior; and personal perspectives on the life…

  16. Assessing the Flipped Classroom in Operations Management: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The author delved into the results of a flipped classroom pilot conducted for an operations management course module. It assessed students' perception of a flipped learning environment after making them experience it in real time. The classroom environment was construed using a case research approach and students' perceptions were studied using…

  17. Emission studies from a CO2 capture pilot plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, E.F. da; Kolderup, H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Hjarbo, K.W.; Huizinga, A.; Khakharia, P.M.; Tuinman, I.L.; Mejdell, T.; Zahlsen, K.; Vernstad, K.; Hyldbakk, A.; Holten, T.; Kvamsdal, H.M.; Os, P.J. van; Einbu, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of emissions from a pilot-plant for CO2 capture at Maasvlakte (in the Netherlands). Three contributions to emissions were identified and analyzed: Gas phase emission, aerosols (also referred to as mist or fog) and droplets of entrained solvents. For the emission campaig

  18. Teaching Speech Communication with a Foreign Accent: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Ming; Chung, Jensen

    A pilot study examined problems encountered by foreign instructors teaching in American colleges. Fourteen Chinese-born instructors teaching in Speech Communication answered a questionnaire containing 12 open-ended questions. Recurring themes were coded from the answers, and then organized into three categories: cultural differences; linguistic…

  19. Consumer Understanding of Nutrition Marketing Terms: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroldson, Amber; Yen, Chih-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the validity of a questionnaire developed to assess adult consumer understanding of nutrition marketing terms and the resulting impact on consumer behavior. Participants (n = 40) completed an electronic questionnaire. Efforts to establish validity and reliability suggest that the questionnaire is a…

  20. Skin and Plasma Autofluorescence During Hemodialysis : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, Reindert; Arsov, Stefan; Ramsauer, Bernd; Koetsier, Marten; Sundvall, Nils; Engels, Gerwin E.; Sikole, Aleksandar; Lundberg, Lennart; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) is related to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and is one of the strongest prognostic markers of mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether changes in skin AF appear after a single HD session an

  1. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  2. Effects of aquajogging in obese adults: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PhD Ad Vingerhoets; PhD Rinie Geenen; MD E.J.M. Wouters; PhD Ronette Kolotkin; MSc Annemieke van Nunen

    2009-01-01

    Aim and method: To examine in obese people the potential effectiveness of a six-week, two times weekly aquajogging program on body composition, fitness, health-related quality of life and exercise beliefs. Fifteen otherwise healthy obese persons participated in a pilot study. Results: Total fat mass

  3. Pasadena City College SIGI Project Research Design. Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, John J.; Tulley, John E.

    A pilot study evaluation of SIGI (System of Interactive Guidance and Information) at Pasadena City College in 1974-75 tested the effectiveness of an experimental research design for an expanded field test of the system the following year. (SIGI is a computer based career guidance program designed by Educational Testing Service to assist community…

  4. Facial recognition and laser surface scan: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Kristoffersen, Agnethe May

    2009-01-01

    Surface scanning of the face of a suspect is presented as a way to better match the facial features with those of a perpetrator from CCTV footage. We performed a simple pilot study where we obtained facial surface scans of volunteers and then in blind trials tried to match these scans with 2D...

  5. A novel assessment of adolescent mobility: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Tom; Duncan, Scott; Chaix, Basile

    2015-01-01

    . The recent development of VERITAS - a web-based application nested within a computer-assisted personal interview - allows researchers to assess daily mobility, travel to regular destinations, and perceived neighbourhood boundaries using interactive mapping technology. The aims of this pilot study were to (1...

  6. A pilot study to delimit tsetse target populations in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Chikowore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse (Glossina sensu stricto are cyclical vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses, that are presently targeted by the Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC coordinated by the African Union. In order to achieve effective control of tsetse, there is need to produce elaborate plans to guide intervention programmes. A model intended to aid in the planning of intervention programmes and assist a fuller understanding of tsetse distribution was applied, in a pilot study in the Masoka area, Mid-Zambezi valley in Zimbabwe, and targeting two savannah species, Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina pallidipes.The field study was conducted between March and December 2015 in 105 sites following a standardized grid sampling frame. Presence data were used to study habitat suitability of both species based on climatic and environmental data derived from MODIS and SPOT 5 satellite images. Factors influencing distribution were studied using an Ecological Niche Factor Analysis (ENFA whilst habitat suitability was predicted using a Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt model at a spatial resolution of 250 m. Area Under the Curve (AUC, an indicator of model performance, was 0.89 for G. m. morsitans and 0.96 for G. pallidipes. We then used the predicted suitable areas to calculate the probability that flies were really absent from the grid cells where they were not captured during the study based on a probability model using a risk threshold of 0.05. Apart from grid cells where G. m. morsitans and G. pallidipes were captured, there was a high probability of presence in an additional 128 km2 and 144 km2 respectively.The modelling process promised to be useful in optimizing the outputs of presence/absence surveys, allowing the definition of tsetse infested areas with improved accuracy. The methodology proposed here can be extended to all the tsetse infested parts of Zimbabwe and may also be useful for other PATTEC national initiatives in other

  7. A pilot with computer-assisted psychosocial risk –assessment for refugees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Refugees experience multiple health and social needs. This requires an integrated approach to care in the countries of resettlement, including Canada. Perhaps, interactive eHealth tools could build bridges between medical and social care in a timely manner. The authors developed and piloted a multi-risk Computer-assisted Psychosocial Risk Assessment (CaPRA tool for Afghan refugees visiting a community health center. The iPad based CaPRA survey was completed by the patients in their own language before seeing the medical practitioner. The computer then generated individualized feedback for the patient and provider with suggestions about available services. Methods A pilot randomized trial was conducted with adult Afghan refugees who could read Dari/Farsi or English language. Consenting patients were randomly assigned to the CaPRA (intervention or usual care (control group. All patients completed a paper-pencil exit survey. The primary outcome was patient intention to see a psychosocial counselor. The secondary outcomes were patient acceptance of the tool and visit satisfaction. Results Out of 199 approached patients, 64 were eligible and 50 consented and one withdrew (CaPRA = 25; usual care = 24. On average, participants were 37.6 years of age and had lived 3.4 years in Canada. Seventy-two percent of participants in CaPRA group had intention to visit a psychosocial counselor, compared to 46 % in usual care group [X2 (1=3.47, p = 0.06]. On a 5-point scale, CaPRA group participants agreed with the benefits of the tool (mean = 4 and were ‘unsure’ about possible barriers to interact with the clinicians (mean = 2.8 or to privacy of information (mean = 2.8 in CaPRA mediated visits. On a 5-point scale, the two groups were alike in patient satisfaction (mean = 4.3. Conclusion The studied eHealth tool offers a promising model to integrate medical and social care to address the health and settlement

  8. The number of sectors and other risk factors related to fatigue among shorthaul commercial pilots in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inne Yuliawati

    2016-03-01

     AbstractBackground: Fatigue could impair cognitive function in pilots which may lead to accidents in short-haul flight. Theaim of this study was to identify the risk factors related to fatigue among short-haul commercial pilots in Indonesia.Methods: A cross-sectional study with purposive sampling was conducted among Boeing 737 seriestyped-rating pilots taking medical examination at the Civil Aviation Medical Center, Jakarta from May5-26, 2014. Fatigue was measured with Self-Reporting Questionnaire, Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. Datawere collected using anonymous self-reporting questionnaire on demographics, workload, sleep restriction(Epworth Sleepiness Scale-ESS, personal factors, and managerial support. Linear regression was used toidentify dominant risk factors related to fatigue.Results: During data collection, 785 pilots were taking medical examination, 382 pilots were willing toparticipate, and 239 pilots met the criteria. The FSS mean was 4.66 ± 1.202. The number of sectors in 24hours, flight times of unplanned flights in 30 days, and sleep restriction were dominant factors of fatigue.Each additional sector increased FSS by 0.371 points [regression coefficient (β = 0.371; P = 0.000].Furthermore, each additional ESS, increased FSS by 0.043 points (β = 0.043; P = 0.008, while eachadditional unplanned flights increased FSS by 0.033 points (β = 0.033; P = 0.000.Conclusions: Additional number of sectors in 24 hours, additional unplanned flight times within 30 days,and sleep restriction increased the risk of fatigue among short-haul commercial pilots in Indonesia. (HealthScience Journal of Indonesia 2015;6:69-75Keyword: Fatigue, number of sectors, pilots, Indonesia

  9. The number of sectors and other risk factors related to fatigue among shorthaul commercial pilots in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inne Yuliawati

    2016-03-01

     AbstractBackground: Fatigue could impair cognitive function in pilots which may lead to accidents in short-haul flight. Theaim of this study was to identify the risk factors related to fatigue among short-haul commercial pilots in Indonesia.Methods: A cross-sectional study with purposive sampling was conducted among Boeing 737 seriestyped-rating pilots taking medical examination at the Civil Aviation Medical Center, Jakarta from May5-26, 2014. Fatigue was measured with Self-Reporting Questionnaire, Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. Datawere collected using anonymous self-reporting questionnaire on demographics, workload, sleep restriction(Epworth Sleepiness Scale-ESS, personal factors, and managerial support. Linear regression was used toidentify dominant risk factors related to fatigue.Results: During data collection, 785 pilots were taking medical examination, 382 pilots were willing toparticipate, and 239 pilots met the criteria. The FSS mean was 4.66 ± 1.202. The number of sectors in 24hours, flight times of unplanned flights in 30 days, and sleep restriction were dominant factors of fatigue.Each additional sector increased FSS by 0.371 points [regression coefficient (β = 0.371; P = 0.000].Furthermore, each additional ESS, increased FSS by 0.043 points (β = 0.043; P = 0.008, while eachadditional unplanned flights increased FSS by 0.033 points (β = 0.033; P = 0.000.Conclusions: Additional number of sectors in 24 hours, additional unplanned flight times within 30 days,and sleep restriction increased the risk of fatigue among short-haul commercial pilots in Indonesia. (HealthScience Journal of Indonesia 2015;6:69-75Keyword: Fatigue, number of sectors, pilots, Indonesia

  10. Effects of Nitric Oxide on Carotid Intima Media Thickness: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edwin

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Preventive treatment of high-risk asymptomatic individuals depends on accurate prediction of a person's risk to develop a cardiovascular event. Currently, cardiovascular risk prediction in asymptomatic individuals is based on the level of cardiovascular risk factors incorporated in scoring equations. Improvement in cardiovascular risk prediction is needed because atherosclerosis underlies the occurrence of cardiovascular events, develops over decades, and has a prolonged asymptomatic phase during which it is possible to modify the course of the disease. The carotid intima media thickness test (CIMT) is a measure used to diagnose the extent of carotid atherosclerotic vascular disease. The test measures the thickness of the inner 2 layers of the carotid artery-the intima and media-and alerts physicians to any thickening when patients are still asymptomatic. Early detection may indicate the need for a more aggressive approach to managing the risk factors associated with heart disease and stroke. The role of nitric oxide (NO) in maintaining the integrity of the cardiovascular system is well established. Utilizing a dietary supplement that restores NO production, the author conducted a pilot study involving 10 patients with stable plague. Six months of treatment with the NO lozenge resulted in a statistically significant 10.9% reduction in CIMT. This pilot study suggests this approach may be a safe and effective strategy for patients with early stages of atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  11. A Study of the Characteristics of Human-Pilot Control Response to Simulated Aircraft Lateral Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Donald C

    1954-01-01

    Report presents the results of studies made in an attempt to provide information on the control operations of the human pilot. These studies included an investigation of the ability of pilots to control simulated unstable yawing oscillations, a study of the basic characteristics of human-pilot control response, and a study to determine whether and to what extent pilot control response can be represented in an analytical form.

  12. Screening Preschool Children for Visual Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Adhikari, BOptom

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ocular and/or vision defects are one of the most common reasons for the referral of young children to the hospital. Vision disorders are the fourth most common disability of children and the leading cause of handicapping conditions in childhood. In preschool-age children, amblyopia and amblyogenic risk factors, such as strabismus and significant refractive errors, are the most prevalent and important visual disorders. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the prevalence of visual disorders in preschool children in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.Methods: Four hundred and eighty-four children attending eight preschools in Kathmandu Valley underwent detailed optometric examination. Visual acuity was assessed with either Sheridan Gardiner or Kay Picture chart monocularly. Binocularity was assessed with cover test and prism bar neutralisation. Refraction was carried out in all children. In most instances this was done without the use of a cycloplegic agent. Stereopsis was assessed with the Lang stereo test. Anterior and posterior segment abnormalities were assessed by using a pen light, hand-held slit lamp, and direct ophthalmoscope.Results: Refractive error was the most common visual disorder. Considering our criteria of refractive error for myopia ≥ 0.50 D, hyperopia ≥ 1.50 D, astigmatism ≥ 1.00 D, and anisometropia ≥ 1.00 D, the overall prevalence of refractive error in our study was 31.82%. The overall prevalence of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism was 24.17%, 2.48%, and 5.17%, respectively. Anisometropia was present in 1.65% of the participants, and 2%, 1.4%, and 0.2% had strabismus, amblyopia, and nystagmus, respectively.Conclusion: The relatively high prevalence of refractive error in our studied population needs more attention. The results suggest that there is a need for a large-scale community-based preschool screening program in Nepal so that affected children can be identified early and appropriate treatment can be

  13. Co-morbidity obese children in family practice in The Netherlands : the results of a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langens, F.; Dapper, T.; Nuboer, R.; Weel, C. van; Binsbergen, J.J. van

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the prevalence of co-morbidity in obese children. Particular emphasis was on cardiovascular risk. METHOD: In this retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study the data of 155 obese children, who visited a paediatric obesity outdoor clinic,

  14. Efficacy of internet and group-administered cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in adolescents: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, E.J.; Oort, F.J.; Bögels, S.M.; Meijer, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that adolescents are at risk for insomnia, but are reluctant to seek help. Treatment of insomnia has been extensively examined in adults, but studies with adolescents are sparse. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess feasibility and efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy

  15. Indonesian EFL Students’ Perspective on Writing Process: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Imelda Hermilinda Abas; Noor Hashima Abd. Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at understanding the EFL Indonesian students’ perspective on the writing process. The pilot study involved two male Indonesian postgraduate students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. The Indonesian students were selected based on the following criteria: (1) had enough knowledge in English writing, indicated by the completion of Academic Writing and Research Methodology courses taken in UUM; (2) had written an unpublished thesis during their undergraduate studies in Indonesia a...

  16. 77 FR 74668 - Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs; Notice To Extend Expiration Date AGENCY: Food and Drug... ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs'' to December 31, 2014. FOR... (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs.'' Previous extensions of the expiration date...

  17. Decision-making program for rural adolescents with asthma: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Hyekyun; Hollen, Patricia J; Belyea, Michael J; Sutherland, Melissa A

    2008-12-01

    Although a high prevalence of substance use and its adverse effects on the course of the disease have been reported in adolescents with asthma, no studies have attempted to ameliorate the risk through adequate interventions. This pilot study evaluates and supports the feasibility and the effectiveness of a decision-making program in improving decision-making quality and reducing risk motivation over a 6-month study period. Differential effectiveness of the intervention was observed by race and gender. Although the improvement of decision-making quality was observed only in Whites, changes in risk motivation were detected only in non-Whites and girls. No significant reduction in actual substance use behavior was found. The intervention was favorably received by participants. An approach enhancing decision-making quality can be effective in addressing the risk of substance use in adolescent with asthma by altering motivations.

  18. Structural differences in gray matter between glider pilots and non-pilots. A voxel based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosif eAhamed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full body rotations. In the present study we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry (VBM. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction and oculomotor control.

  19. Transient ischaemic attack and stroke risk: pilot of a primary care electronic decision support tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranta A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs indicate high risk for stroke and rapid management reduces stroke burden. Rapid specialist access to initiate timely management is often challenging to achieve. AIM: To assess the feasibility of implementing a TIA/Stroke electronic decision support (EDS tool intended to aid general practitioners (GPs in the timely management of TIAs. METHODS: An eight-week pilot provided access to the TIA/Stroke EDS to selected GPs in the MidCentral district, with subsequent patient record review and a post-pilot user satisfaction survey. RESULTS: Eleven patients from eight practices were entered into the tool and when EDS-rendered advice was followed, diagnosis was accurate and management was in accordance with New Zealand TIA guidelines. No adverse outcomes resulted and user feedback was positive. DISCUSSION: Results indicate that wider implementation of the TIA/Stroke EDS tool is feasible.

  20. A remotely piloted aircraft system in major incident management: concept and pilot, feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsen, Håkon B

    2015-06-10

    Major incidents are complex, dynamic and bewildering task environments characterised by simultaneous, rapidly changing events, uncertainty and ill-structured problems. Efficient management, communication, decision-making and allocation of scarce medical resources at the chaotic scene of a major incident is challenging and often relies on sparse information and data. Communication and information sharing is primarily voice-to-voice through phone or radio on specified radio frequencies. Visual cues are abundant and difficult to communicate between teams and team members that are not co-located. The aim was to assess the concept and feasibility of using a remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) system to support remote sensing in simulated major incident exercises. We carried out an experimental, pilot feasibility study. A custom-made, remotely controlled, multirotor unmanned aerial vehicle with vertical take-off and landing was equipped with digital colour- and thermal imaging cameras, a laser beam, a mechanical gripper arm and an avalanche transceiver. We collected data in five simulated exercises: 1) mass casualty traffic accident, 2) mountain rescue, 3) avalanche with buried victims, 4) fisherman through thin ice and 5) search for casualties in the dark. The unmanned aerial vehicle was remotely controlled, with high precision, in close proximity to air space obstacles at very low levels without compromising work on the ground. Payload capacity and tolerance to wind and turbulence were limited. Aerial video, shot from different altitudes, and remote aerial avalanche beacon search were streamed wirelessly in real time to a monitor at a ground base. Electromagnetic interference disturbed signal reception in the ground monitor. A small remotely piloted aircraft can be used as an effective tool carrier, although limited by its payload capacity, wind speed and flight endurance. Remote sensing using already existing remotely piloted aircraft technology in pre

  1. A yoga intervention for type 2 diabetes risk reduction: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is a major health problem in many countries including India. Yoga may be an effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategy in India, particularly given its cultural familiarity. Methods This was a parallel, randomized controlled pilot study to collect feasibility and preliminary efficacy data on yoga for diabetes risk factors among people at high risk of diabetes. Primary outcomes included: changes in BMI, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, blood pressure, and cholesterol. We also looked at measures of psychological well-being including changes in depression, anxiety, positive and negative affect and perceived stress. Forty-one participants with elevated fasting blood glucose in Bangalore, India were randomized to either yoga (n = 21) or a walking control (n = 20). Participants were asked to either attend yoga classes or complete monitored walking 3–6 days per week for eight weeks. Randomization and allocation was performed using computer-generated random numbers and group assignments delivered in sealed, opaque envelopes generated by off-site study staff. Data were analyzed based on intention to treat. Results This study was feasible in terms of recruitment, retention and adherence. In addition, yoga participants had significantly greater reductions in weight, waist circumference and BMI versus control (weight −0.8 ± 2.1 vs. 1.4 ± 3.6, p = 0.02; waist circumference −4.2 ± 4.8 vs. 0.7 ± 4.2, p yoga intervention and walking control over the course of the study. Conclusion Among Indians with elevated fasting blood glucose, we found that participation in an 8-week yoga intervention was feasible and resulted in greater weight loss and reduction in waist circumference when compared to a walking control. Yoga offers a promising lifestyle intervention for decreasing weight-related type 2 diabetes risk factors and potentially increasing

  2. Hijama (wet cupping) for female infertility treatment: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Abduljabbar; Anhar Gazzaz; Samiha Mourad; Ayman Oraif

    2016-01-01

    Background: To assess the effectiveness of wet cupping (Hijama) as a treatment of female factor infertility. The primary outcome measured was pregnancy rates after Hijama. The secondary outcome measured was the effect on the reproductive hormonal profile before and after Hijama. Methods: A pilot clinical study was conducted for the use of Hijama as treatment for female infertility at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from September 2013 to May 2015. Inclusion criteria included: patients w...

  3. A Pilot Study on EFL Reading Teaching through Linguistic Landscape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The public displays of languages have been described as “linguistic landscape”. Nowadays, most globalized cities have worked hard at creating English-friendly environments by including bilingual signs to facilitate communication. The domain of linguistic landscape, therefore, has drawn the interests of English educators. This paper serves as a pilot study to exploit every possibility in the linguistic landscape as EFL teaching material, and optimize pedagogic activities in reading classes by adopting this linguistic resource.

  4. Pilot study of smoking, alcohol and drug abuse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, A; Perry, C; Killen, J; Slinkard, L A; Maccoby, N

    1980-07-01

    A longitudinal pilot study gathered data on the onset and prevention of smoking, alcohol, and drug abuse among 526 students from two junior-high-schools in California. Over two school years, students who were trained to resist social pressures toward tobacco, alcohol, and drug use began smoking at less than one-half the rate of those who did not receive special training. Frequent alcohol and marijuana use was also less prevalent among the students who received such training.

  5. eHealth Familias Unidas: Pilot Study of an Internet Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Family Intervention to Reduce Drug Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Hispanic Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannine Estrada

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Internet adaptation of an evidenced-based intervention for Hispanic families, eHealth Familias Unidas, and explores whether an Internet-based format is feasible and acceptable to Hispanic families. Core intervention components from the evidence-based intervention, Familias Unidas, were transposed into a video format and edited for content. Additionally, interactive exercises and a soap opera series were incorporated to reinforce intervention content and optimize participant engagement and retention. To understand the feasibility and acceptability of eHealth Familias Unidas, we conducted a pilot study and examined findings from: (1 session completion rates for both e-parent group sessions and family sessions (n = 23 families; and (2 qualitative data collected from Hispanic parents (n = 29 that received the eHealth intervention. Engagement and attendance in the intervention showed that 83% of families engaged in the intervention and that there was an overall session completion rate of 78%. Qualitative interviews were conducted mid and post intervention with a combined total of 29 participants. A general inductive approach was used to derive themes from the collected data. Overall, parents expressed positive feedback in regards to the intervention and stated that there were multiple lessons learned from participating in eHealth Familias Unidas. Findings indicate that an Internet-based family intervention is not only feasible and acceptable for Hispanic families, but also offers a viable option to ameliorate barriers to participation and implementation of preventive interventions.

  6. eHealth Familias Unidas: Pilot Study of an Internet Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Family Intervention to Reduce Drug Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Hispanic Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Yannine; Molleda, Lourdes; Murray, Ashley; Drumhiller, Kathryn; Tapia, Maria; Sardinas, Krystal; Rosen, Alexa; Pantin, Hilda; Perrino, Tatiana; Sutton, Madeline; Cano, Miguel Ángel; Dorcius, Daphney; Wendorf Muhamad, Jessica; Prado, Guillermo

    2017-03-04

    This paper describes the Internet adaptation of an evidenced-based intervention for Hispanic families, eHealth Familias Unidas, and explores whether an Internet-based format is feasible and acceptable to Hispanic families. Core intervention components from the evidence-based intervention, Familias Unidas, were transposed into a video format and edited for content. Additionally, interactive exercises and a soap opera series were incorporated to reinforce intervention content and optimize participant engagement and retention. To understand the feasibility and acceptability of eHealth Familias Unidas, we conducted a pilot study and examined findings from: (1) session completion rates for both e-parent group sessions and family sessions (n = 23 families); and (2) qualitative data collected from Hispanic parents (n = 29) that received the eHealth intervention. Engagement and attendance in the intervention showed that 83% of families engaged in the intervention and that there was an overall session completion rate of 78%. Qualitative interviews were conducted mid and post intervention with a combined total of 29 participants. A general inductive approach was used to derive themes from the collected data. Overall, parents expressed positive feedback in regards to the intervention and stated that there were multiple lessons learned from participating in eHealth Familias Unidas. Findings indicate that an Internet-based family intervention is not only feasible and acceptable for Hispanic families, but also offers a viable option to ameliorate barriers to participation and implementation of preventive interventions.

  7. CE: Defining and Understanding Pilot and Other Feasibility Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Nancy S; Rosenbloom, Deborah A

    2017-03-01

    : Nurses are becoming increasingly involved in conducting clinical research in which feasibility studies are often the first steps. Understanding why and how these studies are conducted may encourage clinical nurses to engage with researchers and take advantage of opportunities to participate in advancing nursing science. This article provides an overview of feasibility studies, including pilot studies, and explains the type of preliminary data they seek to provide in order to make larger, future studies more efficient and successful. By way of example, the authors discuss a feasibility study they conducted that illustrates the key components and necessary steps involved in such work.

  8. GenousTM endothelial progenitor cell capturing stent vs. the Taxus Liberte stent in patients with de novo coronary lesions with a high-risk of coronary restenosis: a randomized, single-centre, pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.M. Beijk; M. Klomp; N.J.W. Verouden; N. van Geloven; K.T. Koch; J.P.S. Henriques; J. Baan; M.M. Vis; E. Scheunhage; J.J. Piek; J.G.P. Tijssen; R.J. de Winter

    2010-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Genous(TM) endothelial progenitor cell capturing stent vs. the Taxus Liberté paclitaxel-eluting stent in patients with de novo coronary lesions with a high-risk of coronary restenosis. Methods and results We randomly assigned 193 patients with lesio

  9. The prediction of the in-hospital mortality of acutely ill medical patients by electrocardiogram (ECG) dispersion mapping compared with established risk factors and predictive scores--a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, John

    2011-08-01

    ECG dispersion mapping (ECG-DM) is a novel technique that analyzes low amplitude ECG oscillations and reports them as the myocardial micro-alternation index (MMI). This study compared the ability of ECG-DM to predict in-hospital mortality with traditional risk factors such as age, vital signs and co-morbid diagnoses, as well as three predictive scores: the Simple Clinical Score (SCS)--based on clinical and ECG findings, and two Medical Admission Risk System scores--one based on vital signs and laboratory data (MARS), and one only on laboratory data (LD).

  10. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, William B. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States); Francisco, Paul W. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States); Merrin, Zachary [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  11. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial Using Prophylactic Dressings to Minimize Sacral Pressure Injuries in High-Risk Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rachel; Huxley, Leisa; Juttner, Melanie; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Scott, Justin; Aitken, Leanne M

    2016-02-12

    This pilot randomized controlled trial examined the effect of prophylactic dressings to minimize sacral pressure injuries (PIs) in high-risk hospitalized patients and assessed feasibility criteria to inform a larger study. Eighty patients were recruited at admission points (the emergency department and surgical care unit) or directly from participating wards in the general medical-surgical setting following the assessment of high risk of sacral PI. Participants were randomized into either the routine care or routine care and silicone foam border dressing group. Outcome assessment comprised digital photographs of each participant's sacrum every 72 hr for evaluation by a blind-to-intervention assessor. Sixty-seven participants had at least one sacral photograph taken and assessed by a blind-to-intervention assessor. Three participants were assessed as having a Stage I PI. Although the use of photography was effective, feasibility criteria identified challenges related to bias, blinding, weight assessment, preparation of nursing staff, and sample size estimation.

  12. Motivation in the Classroom: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Deanna E.

    Purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the validity of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as it applies to young children; (2) determine developmental shifts in expressed motivational needs; (3) gather information concerning the worries and fears of young children, particularly those of low socioeconomic status; and (4) gather data regarding…

  13. Educational Optimism among Parents: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räty, Hannu; Kasanen, Kati

    2016-01-01

    This study explored parents' (N = 351) educational optimism in terms of their trust in the possibilities of school to develop children's intelligence. It was found that educational optimism could be depicted as a bipolar factor with optimism and pessimism on the opposing ends of the same dimension. Optimistic parents indicated more satisfaction…

  14. Pilot study of a multimodal intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, Mary Ellen; Hovgaard, Doris; Boesen, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Substantial physical and functional deconditioning and diminished psychological wellbeing are all potential adverse effects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and benefits (physical and functional capacity) of a 4-6 w...

  15. Piloting a Savings-Led Microfinance Intervention with Women Engaging in Sex Work in Mongolia: Further Innovation for HIV Risk Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Laura Cordisco; Witte, Susan S; Aira, Toivgoo; Altantsetseg, Batsukh; Riedel, Marion

    2011-12-30

    This paper describes a pilot study testing the feasibility of an innovative savings-led microfinance intervention in increasing the economic empowerment and reducing the sexual risk behavior of women engaging in sex work in Mongolia. Women's economic vulnerability may increase their risk for HIV by compromising their ability to negotiate safer sex with partners and heightening the likelihood they will exchange sex for survival. Microfinance has been considered a potentially powerful structural HIV prevention strategy with women conducting sex work, as diversification of income sources may increase women's capacity to negotiate safer transactional sex. With 50% of all reported female HIV cases in Mongolia detected among women engaging in sex work, direct prevention intervention with women conducting sex work represents an opportunity to prevent a potentially rapid increase in HIV infection in urban Mongolia. The piloted intervention consisted of a matched savings program in which matched savings could be used for business development or vocational education, combined with financial literacy and business development training for women engaging in sex work. Results of the pilot demonstrate participants' increased confidence in their ability to manage finances, greater hope for pursuing vocational goals, moderate knowledge gains regarding financial literacy, and an initial transition from sex work to alternative income generation for five out of nine participants. The pilot findings highlight the potential for such an intervention and the need for a clinical trial testing the efficacy of savings-led microfinance programs in reducing HIV risk for women engaging in sex work in Mongolia.

  16. Individualized toxicity-titrated 6-mercaptopurine increments during high-dose methotrexate consolidation treatment of lower risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. A Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Thomas L; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Lausen, Birgitte;

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and toxicity of individualized toxicity-titrated 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) dose increments during post-remission treatment with High-dose methotrexate (HDM) (5000 mg/m(2), ×3) in 38 patients with Childhood (ALL). Patients were increased in steps of 25 mg 6MP/m(2...... the remaining patients (P = 0·03). This study shows individualized toxicity-titrated 6MP dosing during consolidation is feasible without increased risk of toxicity....

  17. Practitioner evaluation of a novel online integrated oral health and risk assessment tool: a practice pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, M; Chapple, E; Matthews, R; Chapple, I L C

    2013-08-01

    To report the development and evaluation of an evidence-based, online, patient assessment tool, capable of measuring oral health status, future disease risk and capitation fee guidance. An online integrated oral health and risk assessment tool called DEPPA was developed, incorporating 1) PreViser(™) risk scores for periodontal disease, caries, non-carious tooth surface loss and oral cancer, 2) revised versions of Denplan Excel's Oral Health Score and 3) capitation fee guidance score. DEPPA was piloted by 25 dentists who provided quantitative and qualitative feedback. Six hundred and forty assessments were performed. There was strong agreement on the need for such a tool, that it constituted a comprehensive assessment and supported good patient communication. The validity of the system was perceived as sound and the revised capitation fee guidance broadly welcomed. While some deemed the caries risk scoring algorithm to be too sensitive, the 30% high/very high risk rating is consistent with current rates of active caries in UK adults. A viable online oral health and risk-assessment tool has been developed (DEPPA) that will allow dental teams to measure oral health status, future disease risk and receive ongoing guidance on capitation fee setting. The indications are that DEPPA could be a valuable audit, care planning and patient communication tool.

  18. Pilot study of a multimodal intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, Mary Ellen; Hovgaard, Doris; Boesen, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Substantial physical and functional deconditioning and diminished psychological wellbeing are all potential adverse effects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and benefits (physical and functional capacity) of a 4......-6 week supervised and structured mixed-type exercise, progressive relaxation and psychoeducation programme in patients undergoing allo-HSCT. Nineteen patients were randomized to an intervention or a conventional care group (CC) and were tested for physical and functional capacity before admission...

  19. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  20. Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, William B. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Francisco, Paul W. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Merrin, Zachary [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofits conducted a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation and living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois, area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements. Blower door and zone pressure diagnostics were conducted at each house. The treatments consisted of using air-sealing foams at the underside of the floor that separated the living space from the foundation and providing duct sealing on the ductwork that is situated in the foundation area. The hypothesis was that air sealing the floor system that separated the foundation from the living space should better isolate the living space from the foundation; this isolation should lead to less radon entering the living space from the foundation. If the hypothesis had been proven, retrofit energy-efficiency programs may have chosen to adopt these isolation methods for enhanced radon protection to the living space.

  1. Treadmill Desks at LANL - Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, Samara Kia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-28

    It is well established that sedentariness is the largest, preventable contributor to premature death, eclipsing smoking in recent years. One approach to reduce sedentariness is by using a treadmill desk to perform office work while walking at a low speed.We found an increased interest level when the treadmill desks were first introduced to LANL, but after a few months interest appeared to drop. It is possible that treadmill desk use was occurring, but subjects did not record their use. The treadmill desks will not be readily available for purchase by employees due to the study outcome. Additionally, conclusive changes in body measurements could not be performed due to lack of follow up by 58% of the participants.

  2. Reducing false-positive biopsies: a pilot study to reduce benign biopsy rates for BI-RADS 4A/B assessments through testing risk stratification and new thresholds for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Chris I; O'Donoghue, Cristina; Moore, Dan; Goss, Adeline; Kim, Danny; Kim, June-Ho; Elias, Sjoerd G; Fridland, Julia; Esserman, Laura J

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate Breast Imaging Reporting and Data Systems (BI-RADS) 4A/B subcategory risk estimates for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive cancer (IC), determining whether changing the proposed cutoffs to a higher biopsy threshold could safely increase cancer-to-biopsy yields while minimizing false-positive biopsies. A prospective clinical trial was performed to evaluate BI-RADS 4 lesions from women seen in clinic between January 2006 and March 2007. An experienced radiologist prospectively estimated a percent risk-estimate for DCIS and IC. Truth was determined by histopathology or 4-year follow-up negative for malignancy. Risk estimates were used to generate receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Biopsy rates, cancer-to-biopsy yields, and type of malignancies missed were then calculated across postulated risk thresholds. A total of 124 breast lesions were evaluated from 213 women. An experienced radiologist gave highly accurate risk estimates for IC, DCIS alone, or the combination with an area under ROC curve of 0.91 (95 % CI 0.84-0.99) (p biopsies avoided; cancer-to-biopsy yields of 36, 47, and 46 %; and associated chance of missing an IC of 0, 1, and 2 %, respectively. Expert radiologists estimate risk of IC and DCIS with a high degree of accuracy. Increasing the cut off point for recommending biopsy, substituting with a short-term follow-up protocol with biopsy if any change, may safely reduce the number of false-positive biopsies.

  3. SERDP munition disposal source characterization pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R.C.; Couch, R.G.; Fried, L.E. [and others

    1995-09-01

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) is supporting studies to develop and implement technologies for the safe, efficient, and environmentally sound disposal of obsolete munitions and propellants which are stored at various locations across the country. One proposed disposal technique is the open-air burning or detonation (OB/OD) of this material. Although OB/OD is viewed as an efficient and cost-effective method for reducing the inventory of unwanted munitions and propellants, questions regarding its safety and environmental impacts must be addressed. Since very large amounts of munitions and propellants must be consumed inexpensively in relatively short time periods and with the very restrictive Federal and State regulations on environmental issues, it is clear that traditional OB/OD procedures will not be acceptable and that it is necessary to develop modified or advanced OB/OD technology. The effectiveness and environmental impact of the OB/OD technology must be verified by experimental data and with validated numerical models for acceptance by Federal and State regulators. Specifically, technology must be developed and tested that minimizes toxic bum and detonation products the noise (peak pressure) and destructive effect (impulse) of the explosive blast generation and travel distance of shrapnel, and entrainment of dust. Three explosion attenuation scenarios are analyzed: Contained water, aqueous foams, and wet sand.

  4. Social dysfunction in bipolar disorder: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Rocca, Cristiana Castanho; de Macedo-Soares, Marcia Britto; Gorenstein, Clarice; Tamada, Renata Sayuri; Issler, Cilly Kluger; Dias, Rodrigo Silva; Schwartzmann, Angela Maria; Lafer, Beny

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the social skills of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder. A group of 25 outpatients with bipolar disorder type I were evaluated in comparison with a group of 31 healthy volunteers who were matched in terms of level of education, age, sex and intelligence. Both groups were assessed using a self-report questionnaire, the Brazilian Inventario de Habilidades Sociais (IHS, Social Skills Inventory). Two Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale subtests (Picture Arrangement and Comprehension) were also used in order to assess subject ability to analyse social situations and to make judgements, respectively. Patients with bipolar disorder had lower IHS scores for the domains that assessed conversational skills/social self-confidence and social openness to new people/situations. Patients with anxiety disorders had high scores for the domain that assessed self-confidence in the expression of positive emotions. No differences were found between patients and controls in performance on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Picture Arrangement and Comprehension subtests. Euthymic patients with bipolar disorder present inhibited and overattentive behaviour in relation to other people and their environment. This behaviour might have a negative impact on their level of social functioning and quality of life.

  5. Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Souto Valente

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Telemedicine can be defined as the use of electronic media for transmission of information and medical data from one site to another. The objective of this study is to demonstrate an experience of telemedicine in plastic surgery. Methods. 32 plastic surgeons received a link with password for real-time streaming of a surgery. At the end of the procedure, the surgeons attending the procedure by the Internet answered five questions. The results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. 27 plastic surgeons attended the online procedure in real-time. 96.3% considered the access to the website as good or excellent and 3.7% considered it bad. 14.8% reported that the transmission was bad and 85.2% considered the quality of transmission as good or excellent. 96.3% classified the live broadcasting as a good or excellent learning experience and 3.7% considered it a bad experience. 92.6% reported feeling able to perform this surgery after watching the demo and 7.4% did not feel able. 100% of participants said they would like to participate in other surgical demonstrations over the Internet. Conclusion. We conclude that the use of telemedicine can provide more access to education and medical research, for plastic surgeons looking for medical education from distant regions.

  6. Individual traffic-related air pollution and new onset adult asthma:A GIS-based pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysbeck Hansen, Carl; Jensen, Steen Solvang; Baelum, Jesper

    The background for the project is that traffic-related air pollution may provoke the onset of asthma. The objective of this pilot study is to investigate the relation between asthma and wheeze debut and individually estimated exposure to traffic-related air pollutants with a validated exposure...... demonstrated. A tendency towards higher levels of nitrogen oxides exposure during the year prior to debut was seen in wheeze cases. Substantial problems in determining time of onset were encountered. This pilot study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using AirGIS to study correlations between...... individual traffic-related air pollution exposure and new onset asthma and wheeze. It is recommended that the analytic methods developed in this pilot study are used in a larger prospective cohort to investigate individual traffic-related air pollutants as a risk factor for the development of new asthma...

  7. Early Childhood Development and Obesity Risk-Factors in a Multi-Ethnic, Low-Income Community: Feasibility of The "Five Hundred under Five" Social Determinants of Health Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearst, Mary O.; Martin, Lauren; Rafdal, Brooke H.; Robinson, Ronel; McConnell, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: First, to describe a community-academic partnership that piloted a parent and home-based programme focused on the intersection of health and education from a social determinants foundation and determine the feasibility and acceptability of such work. Second, to examine trends and co-occurrence of social and environmental context,…

  8. Early Childhood Development and Obesity Risk-Factors in a Multi-Ethnic, Low-Income Community: Feasibility of The "Five Hundred under Five" Social Determinants of Health Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearst, Mary O.; Martin, Lauren; Rafdal, Brooke H.; Robinson, Ronel; McConnell, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: First, to describe a community-academic partnership that piloted a parent and home-based programme focused on the intersection of health and education from a social determinants foundation and determine the feasibility and acceptability of such work. Second, to examine trends and co-occurrence of social and environmental context,…

  9. Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

    2009-12-01

    The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow

  10. Functional Improvement in Older Adults after a Falls Prevention Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Fen J. Chang Ph.D., OTR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Falls are a costly, disabling, and life-threatening risk in the elderly. Improvements in physical function, balance, lower extremity strength, and health-related quality of life are hypothesized to help mitigate fall risk. In this pilot study, six women and men with an average age of 81 years participated in a 6-week exercise andeducation program created to reduce risk of falls. Evaluations were made at baseline and at 6 weeks on four tests: the Functional Status Questionnaire, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS, the Six-minute Walk Test, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life–BREF 26-question test. Scores indicated significant improvement in functional physical status (activities of daily living, balance, distance walked in 6 min, and quality of life in the physical health domain. The size of this study limits the generalizability of its findings, but its evidence warrants undertaking a larger trial.

  11. Future Jet Technologies. Part B. F-35 Future Risks v. JS-Education of Pilots & Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2011-09-01

    Design of “Next-Generation” airframes based on supermarket-jet-engine-components is nowadays passé. A novel integration methodology [Gal-Or, “Editorial-Review, Part A”, 2011, Gal-Or, “Vectored Propulsion, Supermaneuverability and Robot Aircraft”, Springer Verlag, Gal-Or, Int'l. J. of Thermal and Fluid Sciences 7: 1-6, 1998, “Introduction”, 2011] is nowadays in. For advanced fighter aircraft it begins with JS-based powerplant, which takes up to three times longer to mature vis-à-vis the airframe, unless “committee's design” enforces a dormant catastrophe. Jet Steering (JS) or Thrust Vectoring Flight Control, is a classified, integrated engine-airframe technology aimed at maximizing post-stall-maneuverability, flight safety, efficiency and flight envelopes of manned and unmanned air vehicles, especially in the “impossible-to-fly”, post-stall flight domains where the 100+ years old, stall-spin-limited, Conventional Flight Control fails. Worldwide success in adopting the post-stall, JS-revolution, opens a new era in aviation, with unprecedented design variables identified here for a critical review of F-35 future risks v. future fleets of jet-steered, pilotless vehicles, like the X-47B/C. From the educational point of view, it is also instructive to comprehend the causes of long, intensive opposition to adopt post-stall, JS ideas. A review of such debates may also curb a future opposition to adopt more advanced, JS-based technologies, tests, strategies, tactics and missions within the evolving air, marine and land applications of JS. Most important, re-education of pilots and engineers requires adding post-stall, JS-based studies to curriculum & R&D.

  12. Increased neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio in delirium: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egberts A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Angelique Egberts, Francesco US Mattace-Raso Section of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Aim: Delirium is a common and severe complication among older hospitalized patients. The pathophysiology is poorly understood, but it has been suggested that inflammation and oxidative stress may play a role. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate levels of the neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR – a marker of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress – in patients with and without delirium. Methods: This pilot study was performed within a retrospective chart review study that included acutely ill patients, 65 years and older, who were admitted to the ward of geriatrics of the Erasmus University Medical Center. All patients in whom the differential white blood cell (WBC counts as well as the C-reactive protein (CRP level were determined within 24 h after admission were included in the present study. Differences in NLR between patients with and without delirium were investigated using univariate analysis of variance, with adjustments for age, sex, comorbidities, CRP level, and total WBC count. Results: Eighty-six patients were included. Thirteen patients were diagnosed with delirium. In adjusted models, higher mean NLR values were found in patients with, than in those without, delirium (9.10 vs 5.18, P=0.003. Conclusion: In this pilot study, we found increased NLR levels in patients with delirium. This finding might suggest that an inadequate response of the immune system and oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of delirium. Further studies are needed to confirm the association between NLR and delirium. Keywords: delirium, pathology, biomarkers, leukocytes, immune system, brain 

  13. Dissonance-Based Prevention of Eating Disorder Risk Factors in Middle School Girls: Results from Two Pilot Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Paul; Auslander, Beth A.; Shaw, Heather; Raineri, Kate M.; Gau, Jeff M.; Stice, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although several eating disorder prevention programs reduce eating disorder risk factors and symptoms for female high school and college students, few efficacious prevention programs exist for female middle school students, despite the fact that body image and eating disturbances often emerge then. Two pilot trials evaluated a new dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program for middle school girls with body image concerns. Methods Female middle school students with body dissatisfaction from two sites (Study 1: N = 81, M age = 12.1, SD = 0.9; Study 2: N = 52, M age = 12.5, SD = 0.8) were randomized to a dissonance intervention (MS Body Project) or educational brochure control; Study 2 included a 3-month follow-up. Results Intervention participants showed significant posttest reductions in only one of six variables with both Studies 1 and 2 (i.e., pressure to be thin and negative affect, respectively), though posttest effect sizes suggested medium reductions in eating disorder risk factors and symptoms (Study 1 M d = 0.40; Study 2 M d = 0.65); reductions at 3-month follow-up in Study 2 were not evident (M d = 0.19). Conclusions Results suggest that this new middle school version of the Body Project is producing medium magnitude reductions in eating disorder risk factors at posttest but that effects are showing limited persistence. Continued refinement and evaluation of this intervention appears warranted to develop more effective prevention programs for this age group. PMID:24590419

  14. PACAP38 dose-response pilot study in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollesen, Anne Luise Haulund; Guo, Song; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravenous infusion of 10 pmol/kg/min pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP38) induces migraine-like attacks in migraine patients without aura (MO). Here, we conducted a pilot study and investigated if lower doses of PACAP38 exert similar migraine......-inducing abilities. METHODS: We randomly allocated six MO patients to receive intravenous infusion of 4, 6, and 8 pmol/kg/min of PACAP38 over 20 minutes in a double-blind, three-way cross-over study. Headache and migraine characteristics were recorded during hospital (0-2 hours) and post-hospital (2-13 hours) phases...

  15. Chiropractic manipulation in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoline Michael R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS remains the most common deforming orthopedic condition in children. Increasingly, both adults and children are seeking complementary and alternative therapy, including chiropractic treatment, for a wide variety of health concerns. The scientific evidence supporting the use chiropractic intervention is inadequate. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot study and explore issues of safety, patient recruitment and compliance, treatment standardization, sham treatment refinement, inter-professional cooperation, quality assurance, and outcome measure selection. Methods Six patients participated in this 6-month study, 5 of whom were female. One female was braced. The mean age of these patients was 14 years, and the mean Cobb angle was 22.2 degrees. The study design was a randomized controlled clinical trial with two independent and blinded observers. Three patients were treated by standard medical care (observation or brace treatment, two were treated with standard medical care plus chiropractic manipulation, and one was treated with standard medical care plus sham manipulation. The primary outcome measure was Cobb, and the psychosocial measure was Scoliosis Quality of Life Index. Results Orthopedic surgeons and chiropractors were easily recruited and worked cooperatively throughout the trial. Patient recruitment and compliance was good. Chiropractic treatments were safely employed, and research protocols were successful. Conclusion Overall, our pilot study showed the viability for a larger randomized trial. This pilot confirms the strength of existing protocols with amendments for use in a full randomized controlled trial. Trial registration This trial has been assigned an international standard randomized controlled trial number by Current Controlled Trials, Ltd. http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/. The number is ISRCTN41221647.

  16. Pilot Study on Harmonisation of Reactor Safety in WENRA Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    Most of the objectives, set for the Pilot Study, were met. It can be concluded that the methodology was adequate for its purpose. National requirements on selected safety issues have been systematically compared and the major gaps and differences have been identified. Convenient overviews have been provided of differences and similarities between the countries. Furthermore, the conclusions are based on a safety justification and are detailed enough to provide input to a further more detailed analysis on the national level. It was not possible, however, to provide fully verified conclusions about the implementation of the reference levels in the different countries. This has to do with the following constraints on the study: In line with the Terms of Reference, the comparison of formal requirements did not address the more detailed use of criteria and methods to verify compliance. The same requirement could be enforced differently in different regulatory systems, and hence lead to different implementation. The Pilot Study also assessed the implementation, but it was not possible to do this in sufficient detail to identify such differences. The implementation was assessed on the basis of current knowledge of the respective regulatory body, but it was not possible to provide the panels with evidence of the implementation. For these reasons, conclusions about implemented safety provisions in the different countries should be drawn with precaution. The introduction of the panel assessments greatly improved the quality and consistency of the comparison assessments. Uncertainties in the assessments are mainly connected with lack of time to make a detailed analysis in some cases. The reliability of the assessments seems to be sufficient for the objectives of the Pilot Study. The introduction of the IAEA safety standards in the study proved to be helpful and provided confidence in the scope and strictness of the reference levels. This Pilot Study has contributed to

  17. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students), Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowicz, Karolina; Rewiuk, Krzysztof; Halicka, Monika; Kalwak, Weronika; Rybak, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students), targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males) participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward. PMID:28164113

  18. Excessive adiposity and sedentary lifestyles are prevalent in cancer patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Almeida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer aetiology is multifactorial; risk factors comprise obesity, central adiposity, physical inactivity and excessive/deficient intake of foods and/or nutrients with pro-carcinogenic/protective effects. We aim to analyze the pattern of nutritional status, food intake and physical activity in a cohort of cancer patients. This pilot cross-sectional study was conducted in 64 outpatients referred for Radiotherapy. Nutritional parameters evaluated: BMI, waist circumference, body composition by tetrapolar bioimpedance (Xitron®. Usual food intake was collected with a short food frequency questionnaire and physical activity was assessed with Jacksons' questionnaire. Overweight/obesity and excessive body fat mass prevalence was of 53% and 61%, respectively. Central obesity, which indicates moderate/high cardio-metabolic risk, was found in 78% of patients. Food frequency analysis showed a poor intake in vegetables and a high intake in meat and carbohydrates. Physical inactivity was prevalent. This pilot study in cancer patients, showed a high prevalence of overweight/obesity, excessive fat mass and central obesity, simultaneously with sedentary lifestyles and an inadequate diet, poor in protective foods and excessive in deleterious ones. Thus, these patients exhibit a high risk pattern for cancer development and for a poorer prognosis. The implementation of measures to promote balanced and protective diets and to encourage physical activity practice is urgently needed.

  19. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students, Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Gorski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students, targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy < 24 hours, surgical hospitalization, isolation due to infectious disease, and discharge to other medical wards. Every day trained volunteers delivered a multicomponent standardized intervention targeted at risk factors of in-hospital complications to the intervention group. The control group, selected using a retrospective individual matching strategy (1 : 1 ratio, regarding age, gender, and time of hospitalization, received standard care. Outcome Measures. Hospitalization time, deaths, falls, delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward.

  20. Total flight hours, irritated and burning eye and risk of mild myopia in civilian pilots in Indonesia

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    Pritha Maya Savitri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang: Miopia merupakan kelainan refraksi yang sering terjadi di antara penerbang. Penelitianini bertujuan mengidentifikasi beberapa faktor risiko dominan terhadap miopia ringan pada penerbang sipildi Indonesia.Metode: Subyek adalah penerbang sipil pria berusia 21-45 tahun yang dipilih secara purposif di antara yangsedang melaksanakan pemeriksaan kesehatan berkala di Balai Kesehatan Penerbangan Jakarta. Data tajampenglihatan dan gula darah didapatkan dari rekam medik. Miopia ringan adalah subyek dengan penurunantajam penglihatan dengan koreksi lensa -0,25 sampai dengan -0,30. Analisis data dengan regresi Coxmenggunakan Stata 10.Hasil: Persentase miopia ringan dalam penelitian ini sebesar 36%. Faktor risiko dominan terhadap myopiaringan adalah jam terbang total, riwayat orang tua myopia, dan gejala iritasi dan gatal mata. Subyekdengan dibandingkan dengan yang kurang dari 1000 jam terbang 28% lebih tinggi berisiko myopia ringan[risiko relatif suaian (RRa = 1,28; 95% interval kepercayaan (CI =1,00-1,64; P = 0,047]. Subyek dengandibandingkan ttanpa riwayat orang tua myopia 32% lebih tinggi berisiko myopia ringan (RRa = 5,32; 95%CI = 3,75-7,55; P = 0,000. Sedangkan subyek dengan dibandingkan tanpa gejala iritasi mata 48% lebihbesar berisiko miopia ringan RRa = 1,48; 95% CI = 1,19-1,85; P = 0,001. Subyek dengan dibandingkantanpa gejala iritasi mata 46% lebih berisiko miopia ringan (RRa = 0,46; 95% CI = 0,26-0,83; P = 0,009.Kesimpulan: Jam terbang total lebih dari 1000 jam, riwayat orang tua miopia, iritasi mata merupakanfaktor risiko dominan terhadap miopia ringan pada penerbang sipil di Indonesia. (Health Science Journalof Indonesia 2016;7:49-53Kata kunci: miopia ringan, penerbang sipil, jam terbang, Indonesia Background: Spatial orientation is the main problem to pilots that determined by visual, vestibuler andpropioseptif. This study aims to identify several dominant risk factors related to mild myopia in civilianpilots in Indonesia

  1. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting.

  2. ENabling Reduction of Low-grade Inflammation in SEniors Pilot Study: Concept, Rationale, and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manini, Todd M; Anton, Stephen D; Beavers, Daniel P; Cauley, Jane A; Espeland, Mark A; Fielding, Roger A; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Lewis, Kristina H; Liu, Christine; McDermott, Mary M; Miller, Michael E; Tracy, Russell P; Walston, Jeremy D; Radziszewska, Barbara; Lu, Jane; Stowe, Cindy; Wu, Samuel; Newman, Anne B; Ambrosius, Walter T; Pahor, Marco

    2017-09-01

    To test two interventions to reduce interleukin (IL)-6 levels, an indicator of low-grade chronic inflammation and an independent risk factor for impaired mobility and slow walking speed in older adults. The ENabling Reduction of low-Grade Inflammation in SEniors (ENRGISE) Pilot Study was a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized pilot trial of two interventions to reduce IL-6 levels. Five university-based research centers. Target enrollment was 300 men and women aged 70 and older with an average plasma IL-6 level between 2.5 and 30 pg/mL measured twice at least 1 week apart. Participants had low to moderate physical function, defined as self-reported difficulty walking one-quarter of a mile or climbing a flight of stairs and usual walk speed of less than 1 m/s on a 4-m usual-pace walk. Participants were randomized to losartan, omega-3 fish oil (ω-3), combined losartan and ω-3, or placebo. Randomization was stratified depending on eligibility for each group. A titration schedule was implemented to reach a dose that was safe and effective for IL-6 reduction. Maximal doses were 100 mg/d for losartan and 2.8 g/d for ω-3. IL-6, walking speed over 400 m, physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery), other inflammatory markers, safety, tolerability, frailty domains, and maximal leg strength were measured. Results from the ENRGISE Pilot Study will provide recruitment yields, feasibility, medication tolerance and adherence, and preliminary data to help justify a sample size for a more definitive randomized trial. The ENRGISE Pilot Study will inform a larger subsequent trial that is expected to have important clinical and public health implications for the growing population of older adults with low-grade chronic inflammation and mobility limitations. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and low-density lipoprotein heterogeneity as a risk factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease with triglyceride metabolic disorder: a pilot cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Kiyoshi; Tani, Shigemasa; Atsumi, Wataru; Yagi, Tsukasa; Kawauchi, Kenji; Matsumoto, Naoya; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2017-11-01

    We hypothesized that an increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) might reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size in conjunction with triglyceride (TG) metabolism disorder, resulting in an increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). This study was carried out as a hospital-based cross-sectional study in 537 consecutive outpatients (mean age: 64 years; men: 71%) with one or more risk factors for ASCVD from April 2014 to October 2014 at the Cardiovascular Center of Nihon University Surugadai Hospital. The estimated LDL-particle size was measured as relative LDL migration using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the LipoPhor system.The plasma PAI-1 level, including the tissue PA/PAI-1 complex and the active and latent forms of PAI-1, was determined using a latex photometric immunoassay method. A multivariate regression analysis after adjustments for ASCVD risk factors showed that an elevated PAI-1 level was an independent predictor of smaller-sized LDL-particle in both the overall patients population (β=0.209, P<0.0001) and a subset of patients with a serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level lower than 100 mg/dl (β=0.276, P<0.0001). Furthermore, an increased BMI and TG-rich lipoprotein related markers [TG, remnant-like particle cholesterol, apolipoprotein (apo) B, apo C-II, and apo C-III] were found to be independent variables associated with an increased PAI-1 level in multivariate regression models. A statistical analysis of data from nondiabetic patients with well-controlled serum LDL-C levels yielded similar findings. Furthermore, in the 310 patients followed up for at least 6 months, a multiple-logistic regression analysis after adjustments for ASCVD risk factors identified the percent changes of the plasma PAI-1 level in the third tertile compared with those in the first tertile as being independently predictive of decreased LDL-particle size [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 2.11 (1

  4. Indonesian EFL Students’ Perspective on Writing Process: A Pilot Study

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    Imelda Hermilinda Abas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at understanding the EFL Indonesian students’ perspective on the writing process. The pilot study involved two male Indonesian postgraduate students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. The Indonesian students were selected based on the following criteria: (1 had enough knowledge in English writing, indicated by the completion of Academic Writing and Research Methodology courses taken in UUM; (2 had written an unpublished thesis during their undergraduate studies in Indonesia and they are writing their master or doctoral thesis in English; (3 used English extensively in writing their assignments, and in daily activities. Pseudonyms were used to refer to the participants as Sukarno and Suharto. The data were collected through in-depth interviews with the participants. The interview sessions took approximately 15-20 minutes for each participant and were videotaped and audiotaped. Semi-structured interview with 15 questions and probes were used. The results showed that the two participants had positive feelings and attitudes towards writing in English. Although they had a hard time in English writing during their undergraduate in Indonesia, they become fond of writing in English in their postgraduate time due to the exposure to English extensively. In composing, they used brainstorming, drafting, pausing, revising and editing in a recursive manner. Keywords: in-depth interview, pilot study, writing process, English as a Foreign Language (EFL

  5. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? - A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ashish; Dhull, Kanika Singh; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-05-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (pdenture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures.

  6. Pharmacovigilance in veterinary medicine in Chile: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iragüen, D; Urcelay, S; San Martín, B

    2011-04-01

    Iragüen, D., Urcelay, S., San Martín, B. Pharmacovigilance in veterinary medicine in Chile: a pilot study. J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap.34, 108-115. In Chile, there is no present government policy to survey and analyse adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the field of veterinary medicine. The intent of this study is to assess, for the first time, ADR frequency in treated animals. To this purpose, a 6-month period pilot study based on WHO recommendations was conducted to monitor ADRs in cats and dogs for frequently used drugs and common labelled signs. Of a total of 149 detected ADRs, 29 (6 in cats and 23 in dogs) were notified by means of ADR report forms, while the rest was identified after reviewing patient clinical records, thus evidencing strong under-reporting problems. More than 70% of ADRs were related to antimicrobials, vaccines and tranquilizers. In dogs, there was a significant effect on ADRs' presentation when acepromazine, amoxicillin, carprofen, ivermectin, sextuple vaccine (polyvalent vaccine that confers immunity against canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, Leptospira canicola, L. icterohemmoragiae, canine adenovirus type 2 and canine parainfluenza virus) and phytomenadione (subcutaneous injection) were administered. In the case of cats, a significant influence on ADRs was detected when acepromazine, amoxicillin or vitamin K was administered. Present results suggest the need for a pharmacovigilance programme in veterinary medicine for timely ADR-presenting drug detection and drug safety improvement.

  7. Psycho-education programme for temporomandibular disorders: a pilot study

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    El Maaytah Mohammed

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs are by far the most predominant condition affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, however many patients have mild self-limiting symptoms and should not be referred for specialist care. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a simple, cost-effective management programme for TMDs using CD-ROM. 41 patients (age 18–70 participated in this study, patients were divided into three groups: the 1st group were involved in an attention placebo CD-ROM (contain anatomical information about the temporomandibular system, the 2nd group received information on CD-ROM designed to increase their control and self efficacy, while the 3rd group received the same programme of the 2nd group added to it an introduction to self-relaxing techniques followed by audio tape of progressive muscle relaxation exercises. Each of the groups was asked to complete a number of questionnaires on the day of initial consultation and six weeks afterwards. Results The two experimental groups (2nd & 3rd were equally effective in reducing pain, disability and distress, and both were more effective than the attention placebo group (1st, however the experimental groups appeared to have improved at follow-up relative to the placebo-group in terms of disability, pain and depressed mood. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of the design. A full, randomized, controlled trial is required to confirm the efficacy of the interventions developed here.

  8. Homeopathic Secretin in autism: a clinical pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, T W

    2001-04-01

    Autism is a condition characterised by impairments of social communication, social interaction and social imagination. The exact aetiology of autism is unknown but some autistic features have been explained by the 'opioid excess theory' in which excess brain peptide levels have a morphine-like activity. Reduction of peptide levels by administration of the duodenal enzyme Secretin has been found to improve social and language skills in autistic patients. Homeopathic Secretin has been said to produce similar effects. A pilot study was undertaken to study these effects by administration of Secretin to a group of autistic patients. Weekly assessment for 12 weeks was performed by the patients' care workers. Statistical analysis of the mean pre-treatment results compared with the mean treatment results suggested a worsening in the autistic symptoms during treatment. Discussion with the care workers revealed changes and some improvements that were not recordable on the scoring system. Further research into Secretin treatment of autism using a more detailed and customized scoring system would be justified. Following this pilot study a randomised controlled trial of Secretin vs placebo would be appropriate.

  9. Total flight hours, irritated and burning eye and risk of mild myopia in civilian pilots in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritha Maya Savitri

    2016-07-01

      in civilian aviator and other populatian. This study aims to identify risk factors that affect the incidence of mild myopia in  civilian pilot in Indonesia. Methods: This study using cross-sectional method with purposive sampling. Subjects answered the questionaire.  Subject of this study are 21-45 years old male civilian aviators which performs scheduled medical check up at Civil Aviatian Medical Centre at May 5 – 21, 2014. The researcher using the medical record to get data about visual acuity. Cox regression analyses using Stata 9. Mild myopia in this study is defect distant visual acuity with corrected lens power -0.25 s/d -0.30. Results: The percentage of mild myopia in this study was 36%. Subjects with a total of 1000 hours of flying hours or more had a 28% higher risk of experiencing mild myopia [relative risk (RRa = 1.28; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.00 to 1.64; P = 0.047]. A history of parental myopia will increase the risk of mild myopia 5 times (RRa = 5.32, P = 0.000. Subjects with symptoms of difficulty focus has 48% higher risk of experiencing mild myopia (RRa = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.19 to 1.85, P = 0.001. Subjects with symptoms such as eye irritation, gritty, burning has a 54% lower risk of experiencing mild myopia (RRa = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.26-0.83, P = 0.009. Conclusions: Total flight time, parental myopia, visual fatigue; difficulty in focusing and foggy letters are influenced risk factors for mild myopia in civilian aviator in Indonesia. Key words: mild myopia, civilian aviator, total flight time, Indonesia.

  10. Endoscopic procedure with a modified Reiki intervention: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Rosalinda S; Stuart-Shor, Eileen M; Russo, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined the use of Reiki prior to colonoscopy to reduce anxiety and minimize intraprocedure medications compared with usual care. A prospective, nonblinded, partially randomized patient preference design was employed using 21 subjects undergoing colonoscopy for the first time. Symptoms of anxiety and pain were assessed using a Likert-type scale. Between-group differences were assessed using chi-square analyses and analysis of variance. There were no differences between the control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 11) groups on age (mean = 58 years, SD = 8.5) and gender (53% women). The experimental group had higher anxiety (4.5 vs. 2.6, p = .03) and pain (0.8 vs. 0.2, p = .42) scores prior to colonoscopy. The Reiki intervention reduced mean heart rate (-9 beats/minute), systolic blood pressure (-10 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg), and respirations (-3 breaths/minute). There were no between-group differences on intraprocedure medication use or postprocedure physiologic measures. Although the experimental group patients had more symptoms, they did not require additional pain medication during the procedure, suggesting that (1) anxious people may benefit from an adjunctive therapy; (2) anxiety and pain are decreased by Reiki therapy for patients undergoing colonoscopy, and (3) additional intraprocedure pain medication may not be needed for colonoscopy patients receiving Reiki therapy. This pilot study provided important insights in preparation for a rigorous, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  11. [Dental caries and early childhood development: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, F Loreto; Sanz, B Javier; Mejía, L Gloria

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between dental caries and early childhood development in 3-year-olds from Talca, Chile. A pilot study with a convenience sample of 3-year-olds from Talca (n = 39) who attend public healthcare centers. Child development was measured by the Psychomotor Development Index (PDI), a screening tool used nationally among pre-school children to assess language development, fine motor skills and coordination areas. Dental caries prevalence was evaluated by decayed, missing, filled teeth (DFMT) and decayed, missing, filled tooth surfaces (DFMS) ceo-d and ceo-s indexes. The children were divided into two groups according to the PDIscore: those with a score of 40 or more were considered developmentally normal (n = 32), and those with a score below 40 were considered as having impaired development (n = 7). The severity of caries (DMFT) was negatively correlated with PDI (r = -0.82), and children with the lowest TEPSI score had the highest DFMT values. The average DMFT in children with normal development was 1.31, and 3.57 for those with impaired development. This pilot study indicates that the severity of dental caries is correlated with early childhood development. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  12. Patient satisfaction with colonoscopy: A literature review and pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Lucas; Arthurs, Erin; Sewitch, Maida J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend that colonoscopic colorectal cancer screening be undertaken every 10 years after the age of 50 years. However, because the procedure does not meet criteria that promote screening uptake, patient satisfaction with colonoscopy may encourage repeat screening. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature and conduct a pilot study of patient satisfaction with the colonoscopy experience. METHODS: All cohort studies from January 1997 to August 2008 in the MEDLINE database that measured either patient satisfaction with colonoscopy, patient willingness to return for colonoscopy under the same conditions or patient preference for colonoscopy compared with other large bowel procedures were identified. The search was supplemented by journal citation lists in the retrieved articles. RESULTS: Of the 29 studies identified, 15 met the inclusion criteria. Consistently, the vast majority of patients (approximately 95%) were very satisfied with their colonoscopy experience. Patient satisfaction was similar for screening and nonscreening colonoscopy. Patient willingness to return for the procedure ranged from 73% to 100%. Of the five studies that examined modality preference, three studies reported the majority of patients preferred colonography to colonoscopy and two studies reported the reverse. Our pilot study findings mirrored those of other studies that were conducted in the United States. The major limitation of the included studies was that patients who were most dissatisfied may have gone elsewhere to have their colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients were very satisfied with colonoscopy. The majority were willing to return for repeat testing under the same conditions, and colonoscopy was not preferred over other modalities. However, studies were limited by methodological shortcomings. PMID:19319384

  13. First clinical pilot study with intravascular polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Martin; Karanasos, Antonios; Ren, Jian; Lippok, Norman; Shishkov, Milen; Daemen, Joost; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Diletti, Roberto; Valgimigli, Marco; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; de Jaegere, Peter; Zijlstra, Felix; van Soest, Gijs; Nadkarni, Seemantini; Regar, Evelyn; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-02-01

    Polarization sensitive (PS) OCT measures the polarization states of the light backscattered by tissue and provides measures of tissue birefringence and depolarization in addition to the structural OCT signal. Ex vivo studies have demonstrated that birefringence is increased in tissue rich in collagen and with elevated smooth muscle cell content. Preliminary data further suggests that depolarization can identify regions of macrophage infiltration, lipid, and irregularly arranged collagen fibers. These are important aspects of the mechanical integrity and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. To evaluate the potential of PS-OCT in the clinical setting, we combined our custom PS-OCT system with commercially available OCT catheters (Fastview, Terumo Corporation) and performed a pilot study in 30 patients, scheduled to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on the grounds of stable or unstable angina. A total of 82 pullbacks in 39 vessels were performed, either in the native coronary arteries or post procedure. Comparing consecutive pullbacks of the same coronary artery, we found excellent agreement between the polarization features in the repeat pullbacks, validating the repeatability and robustness of PS-OCT in the clinical in vivo setting. In addition we observed that the birefringence and depolarization features vary significantly across lesions with identical structural OCT appearance, suggesting morphological subtypes. This first human pilot study proved the feasibility and robustness of intravascular PS-OCT. PS-OCT achieves improved tissue characterization and may help in identifying high-risk plaques, with the potential to ultimately improve risk stratification and help guiding PCI.

  14. Parental Grief and Marital Issues Aftermath: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Atikah Mohamed Hussin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The death of a child is difficult to the bereaved parents. Literature had associated the loss with marriage disruption. The issues on that the difficulties to communicate, gender-related coping mechanisms and sexual need were discussed as reasons for bereaved parents to have conflict in their relationship. However there is limited knowledge about this issue. A pilot study has been conducted among six bereaved parents. The bereaved parents were Malaysian Muslim bereaved parents. They were interviewed individually to explore the challenges or conflicts that they had experienced after the death of their child. This study revealed that there were situations which bereaved parents described as having difficulties in their relationship. However, this study also revealed that the mutual understanding and respect to each other are the most of important components for bereaved parents to maintain their relationship post-loss. This study suggested the importance of suggesting couple counselling to bereaved parents after the death of their child.

  15. Cervical Spine Motion During Extrication: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafer, Jeffrey S

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal immobilization is one of the most commonly performed pre-hospital procedures. Little research has been done on the movement of the neck during immobilization and extrication. In this study we used a sophisticated infrared six-camera motion-capture system (Motion Analysis Corporation, Santa Rosa, CA, to study the motion of the neck and head during extrication. A mock automobile was constructed to scale, and volunteer patients, with infrared markers on bony prominences, were extricated by experienced paramedics. We found in this pilot study that allowing an individual to exit the car under his own volition with cervical collar in place may result in the least amount of motion of the cervical spine. Further research should be conducted to verify these findings. In addition, this system could be utilized to study a variety of methods of extrication from automobile accidents. [WestJEM. 2009;10:74-78.

  16. Flight simulation using a Brain-Computer Interface: A pilot, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryger, Michael; Wester, Brock; Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Rich, Matthew; John, Brendan; Beaty, James; McLoughlin, Michael; Boninger, Michael; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C

    2017-01-01

    As Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems advance for uses such as robotic arm control it is postulated that the control paradigms could apply to other scenarios, such as control of video games, wheelchair movement or even flight. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether our BCI system, which involves decoding the signals of two 96-microelectrode arrays implanted into the motor cortex of a subject, could also be used to control an aircraft in a flight simulator environment. The study involved six sessions in which various parameters were modified in order to achieve the best flight control, including plane type, view, control paradigm, gains, and limits. Successful flight was determined qualitatively by evaluating the subject's ability to perform requested maneuvers, maintain flight paths, and avoid control losses such as dives, spins and crashes. By the end of the study, it was found that the subject could successfully control an aircraft. The subject could use both the jet and propeller plane with different views, adopting an intuitive control paradigm. From the subject's perspective, this was one of the most exciting and entertaining experiments she had performed in two years of research. In conclusion, this study provides a proof-of-concept that traditional motor cortex signals combined with a decoding paradigm can be used to control systems besides a robotic arm for which the decoder was developed. Aside from possible functional benefits, it also shows the potential for a new recreational activity for individuals with disabilities who are able to master BCI control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimization of the cumulative risk assessment of pesticides and biocides using computational techniques: Pilot project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Reffstrup, Trine Klein; Petersen, Annette

    This pilot project is intended as the first step in developing a computational strategy to assist in refining methods for higher tier cumulative and aggregate risk assessment of exposure to mixture of pesticides and biocides. For this purpose, physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models were...... developed for two compounds, tebuconazole and prochloraz, and a binary mixture of these compounds in two species, rat and human. PBTK models can be used to estimate the concentration levels (internal doses) of toxic substances and their metabolites in blood and tissue, by a collection of differential...... the models. Exposure scenarios were constructed based on findings of pesticide residues in food of ordinary consumers, and assessment of dermal exposure of professional workers. PBTK simulations were carried using these scenarios....

  18. Pilot Study of a Patient-Centered Radiology Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, J Shannon; Furtado, Vanessa F; Keller, Lisa A; Lotti, Judith Borsody; Saltalamacchia, Catherine A; Lennes, Inga T; Salazar, Gloria M

    2017-02-01

    The Radiology Process Model (RPM) was previously described in terms of its conceptual basis and proposed survey items. The current study describes the first pilot application of the RPM in the field and the results of initial psychometric analysis. We used an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot RPM survey in 100 patients having outpatient interventional radiology procedures. The 24 survey items had 4 or 5 levels of severity. We assessed for missing data, items that patients found confusing, any suggestions by patients for additional items and clarity of items from patient feedback. Factor analysis was performed and internal consistency measured. Construct validity was assessed by correlation of patient responses to the items as a summated scale with a visual analog scale (VAS) they completed indicating their interventional radiology experience. The visual analog scale and the RPM summated scale were strongly correlated (r = 0.7). Factor analysis showed four factors: interactions with facility and doctors/staff, time-sensitive aspects, pain, and anxiety. The items showed high internal consistency (alpha: 0.86) as a group and approximately 0.7 to 0.9 by the factors. Analysis shows that two items could be deleted (cost and communication between radiologist and referrers). Revision of two items and potential addition of others are discussed. The RPM shows initial evidence of psychometric validity and internal consistency reliability. Minor changes are anticipated before wider use. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Using singing to nurture children's hearing? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Graham F; Saunders, Jo; Edwards, Sian; Palmer, Zoe; Himonides, Evangelos; Knight, Julian; Mahon, Merle; Griffin, Susanna; Vickers, Deborah A

    2015-09-01

    This article reports a pilot study of the potential benefits of a sustained programme of singing activities on the musical behaviours and hearing acuity of young children with hearing impairment (HI). Twenty-nine children (n=12 HI and n=17 NH) aged between 5 and 7 years from an inner-city primary school in London participated, following appropriate ethical approval. The predominantly classroom-based programme was designed by colleagues from the UCL Institute of Education and UCL Ear Institute in collaboration with a multi-arts charity Creative Futures and delivered by an experienced early years music specialist weekly across two school terms. There was a particular emphasis on building a repertoire of simple songs with actions and allied vocal exploration. Musical learning was also supported by activities that drew on visual imagery for sound and that included simple notation and physical gesture. An overall impact assessment of the pilot programme embraced pre- and post-intervention measures of pitch discrimination, speech perception in noise and singing competency. Subsequent statistical data analyses suggest that the programme had a positive impact on participant children's singing range, particularly (but not only) for HI children with hearing aids, and also in their singing skills. HI children's pitch perception also improved measurably over time. Findings imply that all children, including those with HI, can benefit from regular and sustained access to age-appropriate musical activities.

  20. Connecting Primary Health Care: A Comprehensive Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Maghsoudloo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The collection of data within the primary health care facilities in Iran is essentially paper-based. It is focused on family’s health, monitoring of non-infectious and infectious diseases. Clearly due to the paper-based nature of the tasks, timely decision making at most can be difficult if not impossible. As part of an on-going electronic health record implementation project at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, for the first time in the region, based on a comprehensive pilot project, four urban healthcare facilities are connected to their headquarters and beyond, covering all aspects of primary health care, for the last four years. Without delving into the technical aspects of its software engineering processes, the progress of the implementation is reported, selection of summarized data is presented, and experience gained thus far are discussed. Four years passed and if time is any important reason to go by, then it is safe to accept that the software architecture and electronic health record structural model implemented are robust and yet extensible. Aims and duration of a pilot study should be clearly defined prior to start and managed till its completion. Resistance to change and particularly to information technology, apart from its technical aspects, is also based on human factors.

  1. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls.

  2. 77 FR 13343 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational... for early feasibility study IDE applications. FDA is also announcing that the duration of the pilot... ``Investigational Device Exemptions (IDE) for Early Feasibility Medical Device Clinical Studies, Including...

  3. A pilot study examining the effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training and continuous low to moderate intensity training on quality of life, functional capacity and cardiovascular risk factors in cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie Toohey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training and continuous low to moderate intensity training on quality of life, functional capacity and cardiovascular disease risk factors in cancer survivors. Methods Cancer survivors within 24 months post-diagnosis were randomly assigned into the low-volume high-intensity interval training group (n = 8 or the continuous low to moderate intensity training group (n = 8 group for 36 sessions (12 weeks of supervised exercise. The low-volume high-intensity interval training (LVHIIT group performed 7 × 30 s intervals (≥85% maximal heart rate and the continuous low to moderate intensity training (CLMIT group performed continuous aerobic training for 20 min (≤55% maximal heart rate on a stationary bike or treadmill. Results Significant improvements (time were observed for 13 of the 23 dependent variables (ES 0.05–0.61, p ≤ 0.05. An interaction effect was observed for six minute walk test (18.53% [32.43–4.63] ES 0.50, p ≤ 0.01 with the LVHIIT group demonstrating greater improvements. Conclusion These preliminary findings suggest that both interventions can induce improvements in quality of life, functional capacity and selected cardiovascular disease risk factors. The LVHIIT program was well tolerated by the participants and our results suggest that LVHIIT is the preferred modality to improve fitness (6MWT; it remains to be seen which intervention elicits the most clinically relevant outcomes for patients. A larger sample size with a control group is required to confirm the significance of these findings.

  4. Canine heartworm disease: a review and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, K C

    1987-01-01

    Canine heartworm disease is a mosquito vectored illness resulting from parasitization by the filariid worm Dirofilaria immitis. While presenting some danger to humans, the filariid has its greatest impact on the canine population. In recent years the disease has become established throughout much of the United States, perhaps as the result of diffusion from a suspected hearth in the southeastern coastal plain. While its distribution is known in general terms, much research remains to be done to assess the pattern of distribution as well as the impact of D. immitis on canine populations and their human owners for many locales. The present study provides a review of the literature on the parasite; on its distribution, particularly in the United States; and on the ecology of canine heartworm disease. A pilot study is presented which emphasizes the problems encountered in establishing a data base for observations on the disease at the local level.

  5. [Management of psychiatric inpatients with advanced cancer: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhondali, Wadih; Ledoux, Mathilde; Sahraoui, Fatma; Marotta, Juliette; Sanchez, Vincent; Filbet, Marilène

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of cancer is not well established and probably underestimated in long-stay psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric patients do not have the same access for cancer screening and care. Therapeutic decision-making is a real ethical problem. In this context, access to medical care should be provided by the establishment of guidelines and/or recommendations for this specific population. The aim of our study was to assess how cancer was managed among long term psychiatric inpatients. For this pilot study, we used a mixed methodology: a quantitative part with a retrospective chart review of cancer patients in a psychiatric institution and a qualitative part based on semi-structured interviews with psychiatrists with discourse analysis. Delay in cancer diagnosis can be explained by communication and behavior disorders, inadequate screening, and additional tests often refused by patients. Compliance and ethical issues (i.e. obtaining informed consent) are many pitfalls to optimal cancer care that should be explored in further research.

  6. A mentored cooperative group pilot study: atrophic vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Joanne L; Jarvis, Chandler; Bartholomew, Deborah; Yee, Lisa

    2014-02-01

    To review nursing research initiatives from two cooperative groups and outline a pilot study performed by a junior nurse researcher mentored by cooperative group nurse researchers and institutional physicians. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus, World Wide Web. Nursing research can be initiated and led by nurses in the cooperative group setting. The team approach model of research includes several disciplines to examine multiple facets of the same problem, or of multiple problems that a cancer patient may face. This new model will enable a greater number of nurse researchers to investigate symptom management, survivorship, and quality-of-life issues. Nurse researchers should be included in every cooperative group study to investigate nurse-sensitive outcomes and issues related to symptom management, survivorship, and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CHASE assessment of the North Sea – a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, N.; Andersen, Jesper; Høgåsen, T.;

    In this pilot study, hazardous substances in the North Sea were assessed and classified using the HELCOM Chemical Substances Status Assessment Tool (CHASE). The study was based on monitoring by Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Together, 1350...... assessment and classification of “hazardous substances status”. This can be in particular advantageous for use in remedial action plan and, in particular, for the sciencebased evaluation of whether the North Sea is undisturbed by hazardous substances....... locations (1155 for sediment and 195 for biota) were used resulting in 966 matrices sampled in the open-sea and 506 in coastal areas. CHASE is a multi-metric indicator-based tool developed for the HELCOM integrated thematic assessment of hazardous substances in the Baltic Sea. CHASE produces an integrated...

  8. Prevalence and correlates of video and internet gaming addiction among Hong Kong adolescents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong-Wen; Chan, Cecilia L W; Mak, Kwok-Kei; Ho, Sai-Yin; Wong, Paul W C; Ho, Rainbow T H

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the patterns of video and internet gaming habits and the prevalence and correlates of gaming addiction in Hong Kong adolescents. A total of 503 students were recruited from two secondary schools. Addictive behaviors of video and internet gaming were assessed using the Game Addiction Scale. Risk factors for gaming addiction were examined using logistical regression. An overwhelming majority of the subjects (94%) reported using video or internet games, with one in six (15.6%) identified as having a gaming addiction. The risk for gaming addiction was significantly higher among boys, those with poor academic performance, and those who preferred multiplayer online games. Gaming addiction was significantly associated with the average time spent gaming per week, frequency of spending money on gaming, period of spending money on gaming, perceived family disharmony, and having more close friends. These results suggest that effective educational and preventative programs or strategies are needed.

  9. Prevalence and Correlates of Video and Internet Gaming Addiction among Hong Kong Adolescents: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Wen Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This pilot study investigated the patterns of video and internet gaming habits and the prevalence and correlates of gaming addiction in Hong Kong adolescents. A total of 503 students were recruited from two secondary schools. Addictive behaviors of video and internet gaming were assessed using the Game Addiction Scale. Risk factors for gaming addiction were examined using logistical regression. An overwhelming majority of the subjects (94% reported using video or internet games, with one in six (15.6% identified as having a gaming addiction. The risk for gaming addiction was significantly higher among boys, those with poor academic performance, and those who preferred multiplayer online games. Gaming addiction was significantly associated with the average time spent gaming per week, frequency of spending money on gaming, period of spending money on gaming, perceived family disharmony, and having more close friends. These results suggest that effective educational and preventative programs or strategies are needed.

  10. Tai Chi for older nurses: a workplace wellness pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Mary Val; Wu, Ge; Shaner-McRae, Hollie; Rambur, Betty; McIntosh, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of a Tai Chi workplace wellness program as a cost effective way of improving physical and mental health, reducing work related stress, and improving work productivity among older nurses in a hospital setting Design A randomized control trial of two groups (control and Tai Chi group). A randomized control trial of two groups (control and Tai Chi group). Northeastern academic medical center. A convenience sample of eleven female nurses (mean age 54.4 years). The Tai Chi group (n = 6) was asked to attend Tai Chi classes once a week offered at their worksite and to practice on their own for 10 minutes each day at least 4 days per week for 15 weeks. Controls (n = 5) received no intervention. SF-36 Health Survey, Nursing Stress Scale (NSS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Sit-and-Reach test, Functional Reach test, the Work Limitations Questionnaire, workplace injury and unscheduled time off. The two study groups were compared descriptively and changes across time in the intervention versus control were compared. The Tai Chi group took no unscheduled time-off hours, whereas, the control group was absent 49 hours during the study period. There was also a 3% increase in work productivity and significant improvement in functional reach (p=0.03) compared to the control group. Other outcomes were not statistically significant. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of Tai Chi with older female workers as a cost effective wellness option in the workplace; thus encouraging replication with a larger sample. Methodological implications were also addressed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A pilot study on peritraumatic dissociation and coping styles as risk factors for posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression in parents after their child's unexpected admission to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Bob F

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To study the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, anxiety and depression in parents three months after pediatric intensive care treatment of their child and examine if peritraumatic dissocation and coping styles are related to these mental health problems. Methods This is a prospective cohort study and included parents of children unexpectedly admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU from January 2006 to March 2007. At three months follow-up parents completed PTSD (n = 115, anxiety and depression (n = 128 questionnaires. Immediately after discharge, parents completed peritraumatic dissocation and coping questionnaires. Linear regression models with generalized estimating equations examined risk factors for mental health problems. Results Over 10% of the parents were likely to meet criteria for PTSD and almost one quarter for subclinical PTSD. Respectively 15% to 23% of the parents reported clinically significant levels of depression and anxiety. Peritraumatic dissocation was most strongly associated with PTSD, anxiety as well as depression. Avoidance coping was primarily associated with PTSD. Conclusion A significant number of parents have mental health problems three months after unexpected PICU treatment of their child. Improving detection and raise awareness of mental health problems is important to minimize the negative effect of these problems on parents' well-being.

  12. A Positive Psychology Intervention in a Hindu Community: The Pilot Study of the Hero Lab Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Siddhi; Qureshi, Adil; Galiatsatos, Panagis

    2016-12-01

    India has high rates of mental health issues among its youth and low-income communities experience a disproportionate amount of depression and suicide. Positive psychology, the act of promoting well-being, could be used as a tool to promote wellness and help improve the mental health of youth living in slum areas of India. A pilot positively psychology program, "The Hero Lab", was conducted in a migratory slum in Worli, Mumbai, with trained Hindu community leaders implementing the interventions toward at-risk Hindu youth. The curriculum's impact showed statistical improvement (p < 0.001) in happiness (General Happiness Scale from 11.24 ± 1.56 to 19.08 ± 3.32), grit (Grit Survey from 2.23 ± 0.34 to 3.24 ± 0.67), empathy (Toronto Empathy Questionnaire from 24.92 ± 3.27 to 41.96 ± 8.41), and gratitude (Gratitude Survey from 16.88 ± 3.47 to 27.98 ± 6.59). While a pilot study, the Hero Lab curriculum demonstrates that positive psychology interventions may be an important tool in improving mental health in at-risk children.

  13. Effects of a recreational physical activity and healthy habits orientation program, using an illustrated diary, on the cardiovascular risk profile of overweight and obese schoolchildren: a pilot study in a public school in Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Militão AG

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Angeliete Garcez Militão,1,2 Margô Gomes de Oliveira Karnikowski,3 Fernanda Rodrigues da Silva,4 Elba Sancho Garcez Militão,3 Raiane Maiara dos Santos Pereira,5 Carmen Silvia Grubert Campbell,2,5 1Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rondonia, Brazil; 2Post-Graduate Program in Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brazil; 3University of Brasilia, Brazil; 4Laboratory of Physical Evaluation and Training, 5Laboratory of Physical Education and Health Studies, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brazil Introduction: Educative strategies need to be adopted to encourage the consumption of healthy foods and to promote physical activity in childhood and adolescence. The effects of recreational physical activity and a health-habit orientation program using an illustrated diary on the cardiovascular risk profile of overweight and obese children was investigated. Methods: The weight and height of 314 schoolchildren aged between 9 and 11 years old, in a public school in Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil, were recorded. According to the body mass index (BMI classification proposed by the World Health Organization, 84 were overweight or obese for their age and sex. Of these children, 34 (40% participated in the study. Students were divided into two groups matched for sex, age, BMI, percent body fat (%BF: the intervention group (IG, n = 17 and the control group (CG, n = 17. The IG underwent a program of 10 weeks of exercise with recreational activities and health-habit orientation using an illustrated diary of habits, while no such interventions were used with the CG during the study period. Before and after the intervention, the children's weight, height, BMI, %BF, waist circumference (WC, maximum oxygen intake (VO2max, total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoprotein (HDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL, triglycerides, glucose, eating habits, and physical activity level (PAL were assessed. In analyzing the data, we used

  14. Social media in adolescent health literacy education: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Carrie Kw; Bridges, Susan M; Srinivasan, Divya Parthasarathy; Cheng, Brenda Ss

    2015-03-09

    While health literacy has gained notice on a global stage, the initial focus on seeking associations with medical conditions may have overlooked its impact across generations. Adolescent health literacy, specifically in dentistry, is an underexplored area despite the significance of this formative stage on an individual's approach to healthy lifestyles and behaviors. The aim is to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of three major social media outlets - Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube - in supporting adolescents' oral health literacy (OHL) education. A random sample of 22 adolescents (aged 14-16 years) from an English-medium international school in Hong Kong provided informed consent. Sociodemographic information, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience were collected via a questionnaire. A pre- and post-test of OHL (REALD-30) was administered by two trained, calibrated examiners. Following pre-test, participants were randomly assigned to one of three social media outlets: Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube. Participants received alerts posted daily for 5 consecutive days requiring online accessing of modified and original OHL education materials. One-way ANOVA ( analysis of variance) was used to compare the mean difference between the pre- and the post-test results among the three social media. No associations were found between the social media allocated and participants' sociodemographics, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience. Of the three social media, significant differences in literacy assessment scores were evident for participants who received oral health education messages via Facebook (P=.02) and YouTube (P=.005). Based on the results of the pilot study, Facebook and YouTube may be more efficient media outlets for OHL promotion and education among adolescent school children when compared to Twitter. Further analyses with a larger study group is warranted.

  15. Why undertake a pilot in a qualitative PhD study? Lessons learned to promote success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Jane; Archibong, Uduak; Walton, Sean

    2017-01-23

    Background Pilot studies can play an important role in qualitative studies. Methodological and practical issues can be shaped and refined by undertaking pilots. Personal development and researchers' competence are enhanced and lessons learned can inform the development and quality of the main study. However, pilot studies are rarely published, despite their potential to improve knowledge and understanding of the research. Aim To present the main lessons learned from undertaking a pilot in a qualitative PhD study. Discussion This paper draws together lessons learned when undertaking a pilot as part of a qualitative research project. Important methodological and practical issues identified during the pilot study are discussed including access, recruitment, data collection and the personal development of the researcher. The resulting changes to the final study are also highlighted. Conclusion Sharing experiences of and lessons learned in a pilot study enhances personal development, improves researchers' confidence and competence, and contributes to the understanding of research. Implications for practice Pilots can be used effectively in qualitative studies to refine the final design, and provide the researcher with practical experience to enhance confidence and competence.

  16. Fighter Pilot Ejection Study as an Educational Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Garry; Jovanoski, Zlatko

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we apply the well-known equations of projectile motion to the case of a fighter pilot ejecting from an aircraft, the aim being to establish under what conditions there is danger of impact with the rear vertical stabilizer. The drag force on the pilot after ejection is assumed to vary as the velocity squared and the aircraft motion…

  17. Flight hours of unplanned flight and other risk factors affecting exercise habit among commercial pilots in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citra Ariani

    2017-07-01

    as preventing incapacitation events caused by low back pain, fatigue, dan cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to find out the description of physical exercise habit among commercial pilot in Indonesia and its affecting factors. Method: This study was conducted with cross sectional design using secondary data from Healthy Lifestyle Survey of Commercial Pilot in Indonesia Year 2016. In this study, data of pilots with CPL and ATPL was analysed. Physical exercise habit was defined appropriately with American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM recommendation. Data taken were demographic data, job factors, satisfaction of life, body mass index, and waist circumference. Cox regression analysis was used to analyse dominant factors which affect physical exercise habit. Results: Among 644 pilots’ data, there were 332 data met the criteria in this study. Proportion of commercial pilots who had appropriate exercise habit was 44%. Dominant factor which affecting exercise habit was age. Compared to pilots aged 20 to 29 years old, pilots aged 50 to 65 years old had 40% less likely to have exercise habit (adjusted relative aisk (RRa 0.60; 95% Confidence Interval (CI 0.38 – 0.94; P 0.026. Moreover, flight hours of unplanned flight and overweight were likely to affect physical exercise habit (consecutively aRR 0.58; 95%CI 0.30 – 1.13; P = 0.112 and aRR 0,79; IK95% 0,62 – 1,02; P 0,072. Conclusion: Age group, flight hours of unplanned flight and overweight were likely to affect exercise habit among commercial pilots in Indonesia. Key words: physical exercise, flight hours, commercial pilot, Indonesia.

  18. Entrepreneurial behavior among employees. Pilot study: Employees from Bucharest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionuţ Constantin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many objective or subjective factors influence the decision to open a business. The most important factors are: the existence of an adequate opportunity or a market, perception that starting a business could be difficult because of bureaucracy, financial barriers or the need to acquire new skills, a lack of money, etc. Also, entrepreneurial behavior is generally influenced by socio-economic status of the family of origin [1]. Thus, children from wealthy families have the “competitive advantage” to receive an education appropriate for managing a business and of course have the necessary financial resources and its start [2]. However, abilities of every individual can “correct’’ these benefits are completely eliminated/reduced exogenous barriers [3]. In this article I will present the results of a pilot study conducted in 2014 at Bucharest employees to observe their entrepreneurial behavior.

  19. Development of a Korean family attitude scale: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heeyoung; Schepp, Karen G; Jung, Young-Mi

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop and pilot test a Korean version of the Family Attitude Scale (FAS). We developed the Korean FAS using the translation/back-translation method. Two English monolinguals assessed its translation validity by comparing the original with a back-translated English version. Translation equivalence of the FAS and the refined Korean FAS was evaluated in a convenience sample of 56 bilingual Korean college students. The internal consistency of the Korean FAS and the FAS was 0.96 and 0.76, respectively. Mean scores on the two versions did not differ (t = -0.14, p = 0.89). The test-retest correlation coefficient was 0.37 (p < .001). Although the Korean FAS needs further refinement and psychometric testing, it was translated to reflect the original version and was a reliable instrument for the Korean population.

  20. Early caries detection: comparison of two procedures. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Guerra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Caries is one of the most common chronic diseases and the main cause of tooth loss. Early detection provides a better evaluation of the disease and improves the chances to succeed of prevention strategies. This pilot study aims to compare the effectiveness of ICDAS-II system (International Caries Detection and Assessment System and the fluorescence terminal (Proof of VistaCam iX intraoral camera, in the early diagnosis and assessment of caries in permanent teeth. Results shows a fair correlation between ICDAS II and VistaCam iX Proof; intraoral camera proved to be a useful support to the ICDAS II visual / tactile monitoring of carious lesions in occlusal surfaces.

  1. Familial paraphilia: a pilot study with the construction of genograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labelle, Alain; Bourget, Dominique; Bradford, John M W; Alda, Martin; Tessier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Biological factors are likely predisposing and modulating elements in sexually deviant behavior. The observation that paraphilic behavior tends to cluster in some families is intriguing and potentially raises questions as to whether shared genetic factors may play a role in the transmission of paraphilia. This pilot study introduces five families in which we found presence of paraphilia over generations. We constructed genograms on the basis of a standardized family history. Results document the aggregation of sexual deviations within the sample of families and support a clinical/phenomenological heterogeneity of sexual deviation. The concept of paraphilia in relation to phenotypic expressions and the likelihood of a spectrum of related disorders must be clarified before conclusions can be reached as to family aggregation of paraphilia based on biological factors.

  2. Impact of nutrition messages on children's food choice: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Katie; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2006-03-01

    This pilot study tested the influence of nutrition message framing on snack choice among kindergarteners. Three classrooms were randomly assigned to watch one of the following 60s videos: (a) a gain-framed nutrition message (i.e. the positive benefits of eating apples) (n=14); (b) a loss-framed message (i.e. the negative consequences of not eating apples) (n=18); or (c) a control scene (children playing a game) (n=18). Following this, the children were offered a choice between animal crackers and an apple for their snack. Among the children who saw one of the nutrition message videos, 56% chose apples rather than animal crackers; in the control condition only 33% chose apples. This difference was statistically significant (chi2=7.56, p<0.01). These results suggest that videos containing nutritional messages may have a positive influence on children's short-term food choices.

  3. Land use mapping in Erie County, Pennsylvania: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); May, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of mapping land use in the Great Lakes Basin area utilizing ERTS-1 data. Small streams were clearly defined by the presence of trees along their length in predominantly agricultural country. Field patterns were easily differentiated from forested areas; dairy and beef farms were differentiated from other farmlands, but no attempt was made to identify crops. Large railroad lines and major highway systems were identified. The city of Erie and several smaller towns were identified, as well as residential areas between these towns, and docks along the shoreline in Erie. Marshes, forests, and beaches within Presque Isle State Park were correctly identified, using the DCLUS program. Bay water was differentiated from lake water, with a small amount of misclassification.

  4. Pilot-scale study of biomass reduction in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qunhui; Ai, Hengyu; Li, Xuesong; Liu, Haitao; Xie, Weimin

    2007-05-01

    Pilot-scale experiments were continuously carried out for more than 9 months to study the excess biomass reduction effect using a biophase-separation bioreactor, which was designed based on food-chain theory. By separating the biophase in the wastewater treatment system, bacteria, protozoa, and metazoa could be separated from each other and dominated in different microbial communities. After degrading organic matter, bacteria were consumed by protozoa or metazoa in the following process in such a reactor. Thus, both chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biomass were reduced. During the process of treating restaurant wastewater, the excess biomass yield in this biophase-separation technique varied from 0.13 to 0.22 kg/kg COD removed, 50% lower than that from the reference system. Apart from low biomass production, this biophase-separation technique can simultaneously achieve a high COD removal efficiency and improve settleability of biosolids at a hydraulic retention time of 6 to 13 hours.

  5. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Junichi; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Seki, Noriko; Hongo, Atsushi; Mizutani, Yasushi; Miyagi, Yasunari; Yoshinouchi, Mitsuo; Kudo, Takafumi [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-03-01

    Recently, attempts have made to use radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy in various solid tumors including cervical cancer. Twenty-four patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were treated with concurrent Carboplatin (16-24 mg/m{sup 2}/day) or Nedaplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/week) and conventional radiotherapy. Of 13 evaluable patients, there were nine complete responders and four partial responders. There was no renal damage or grade 4 hematological toxicity. Gastrointestinal adverse reactions were mild. One patient had grade 3 dermatologic toxicity after delayed radiation therapy. This pilot study suggests that daily Carboplatin or weekly Nedaplatin administered with standard radiation therapy is safe, well-tolerated, and thus may be useful as a radiation sensitizer in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. (author)

  6. A Pilot Study of Mindfulness Meditation for Pediatric Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn C. Waelde

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in psychological interventions for pediatric chronic pain, there has been little research examining mindfulness meditation for these conditions. This study presents data from a pilot clinical trial of a six-week manualized mindfulness meditation intervention offered to 20 adolescents aged 13–17 years. Measures of pain intensity, functional disability, depression and parent worry about their child’s pain were obtained at baseline and post-treatment. Results indicated no significant changes in pain or depression, however functional disability and frequency of pain functioning complaints improved with small effect sizes. Parents’ worry about child’s pain significantly decreased with a large effect size. Participants rated intervention components positively and most teens suggested that the number of sessions be increased. Three case examples illustrate mindfulness meditation effects and precautions. Mindfulness meditation shows promise as a feasible and acceptable intervention for youth with chronic pain. Future research should optimize intervention components and determine treatment efficacy.

  7. 77 FR 12312 - Electronic Submission of Nonclinical Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Electronic Submission of Nonclinical Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... participate in a pilot evaluation program to test the electronic submission of nonclinical study data using...

  8. Interactive Voice Response for Relapse Prevention Following Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Alcohol Use Disorders: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Gail L.; Skelly, Joan M.; Gary J Badger; Magdalena R. Naylor; HELZER, JOHN E.

    2012-01-01

    Relapse after alcoholism treatment is high. Alcohol Therapeutic Interactive Voice Response (ATIVR) is an automated telephone program for posttreatment self-monitoring, skills practice, and feedback. This pilot study examined feasibility of ATIVR. Participants (n = 21; 57% male) had access to ATIVR for 90 days following outpatient group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to make daily reports of mood, confidence in sobriety, urges to use substances, and actual use. Reports of relapse or risk w...

  9. Effects of music therapy in the treatment of children with delayed speech development - results of a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Linden Ulrike; Groß Wibke; Ostermann Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Language development is one of the most significant processes of early childhood development. Children with delayed speech development are more at risk of acquiring other cognitive, social-emotional, and school-related problems. Music therapy appears to facilitate speech development in children, even within a short period of time. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the effects of music therapy in children with delayed speech development. Methods A total of 18 childr...

  10. A Pilot Study on Measuring Customer’s Satisfaction Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vide Boltez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RQ: Determine the level of customer satisfaction of a company’s products and services to obtain information on needed improvements.Purpose: The purpose of measuring customer’s satisfaction level is to obtain information directly from the final buyer that bought our product. The next step is to analyze the information obtained and to take the results into consideration to improve the working process in production and in other departments of the company.Method: The method used for the pilot study to measure customer satisfaction was a short questionnaire that was given to 10 customers of our product and 10 completed questionnaires were obtained.Results: The results showed the level of satisfaction of final buyers of roof tiles and roofs that the company has achieved through their products and services. The results facilitate the production, logistics, purchasing and sales department to obtain information on positive satisfaction levels and areas that need change. At the same time, the final buyer was identified (i.e., name, surname, address, and so forth, which up until now had not been.Organization: The organization will save time and money in the future, because it will continuously measure customer satisfaction to improve production and other departments in the organization towards creating satisfied customers.Society: Final buyers of roofs are, and will be, more satisfied with their decisions, because the organization carries out after-sales satisfaction levels.Originality: The research was original, because up to this date the organization has not conducted research in such a manner.Limitations: The pilot study used 10 completed questionnaires that represent a very small sample to make any generalizations.

  11. Tryptophan degradation in women with breast cancer: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schubert Christine M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered tryptophan metabolism and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity are linked to cancer development and progression. In addition, these biological factors have been associated with the development and severity of neuropsychiatric syndromes, including major depressive disorder. However, this biological mechanism associated with both poor disease outcomes and adverse neuropsychiatric symptoms has received little attention in women with breast cancer. Therefore, a pilot study was undertaken to compare levels of tryptophan and other proteins involved in tryptophan degradation in women with breast cancer to women without cancer, and secondarily, to examine levels in women with breast caner over the course of chemotherapy. Findings Blood samples were collected from women with a recent diagnosis of breast cancer (n = 33 before their first cycle of chemotherapy and after their last cycle of chemotherapy. The comparison group (n = 24 provided a blood sample prior to breast biopsy. Plasma concentrations of tryptophan, kynurenine, and tyrosine were determined. The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (KYN/TRP was used to estimate indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. On average, the women with breast cancer had lower levels of tryptophan, elevated levels of kynurenine and tyrosine and an increased KYN/TRP ratio compared to women without breast cancer. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the KYN/TRP ratio (p = 0.036, which remained elevated in women with breast cancer throughout the treatment trajectory. Conclusions The findings of this pilot study suggest that increased tryptophan degradation may occur in women with early-stage breast cancer. Given the multifactorial consequences of increased tryptophan degradation in cancer outcomes and neuropsychiatric symptom manifestation, this biological mechanism deserves broader attention in women with breast cancer.

  12. Pilot study of manual sugarcane harvesting using biomechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementson, C L; Hansen, A C

    2008-07-01

    In many countries, sugar cane harvesting is a very labor-intensive activity in which workers usually become fatigued after manually cutting the cane for a few hours. They need frequent pauses for rest, and they experience sustained injuries from excessive stress on the joints and muscles of the body. The cutting tool and motion involved directly influence the stresses created. A cutting tool that has not been designed by taking into consideration occupational biomechanics can lead to unnecessary strains in the body's muscle system, resulting in injuries. The purpose of this research was to carry out a pilot study of the impact of two common manual sugarcane cutting tools and the cutting posture they induce on the body with the aid of biomechanics. The machete and the cutlass from South Africa and Guyana, respectively, were examined to determine the cutting forces. Using static strength prediction modeling, the body stress levels at the point of cut in the cutting motion were determined. The cutting postures of three subjects were contrasted, their extreme postures were identified, and suggestions were made to improve the ergonomics of the cutting activity. The results of this pilot study showed that the cutlass required less cutting force than the machete because of the slicing cut provided by the curved blade edge of the cutlass. However, the biomechanical analysis indicated that the bent blade of the machete required less flexion of the back and therefore was likely to cause less back fatigue and injury. An improved design of the sugarcane manual harvesting tool should incorporate the bend of the machete to reduce flexion and a curved cutting edge that provides a slicing cut.

  13. Influence of Cultural, Organizational, and Automation Capability on Human Automation Trust: A Case Study of Auto-GCAS Experimental Test Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltai, Kolina; Ho, Nhut; Masequesmay, Gina; Niedober, David; Skoog, Mark; Cacanindin, Artemio; Johnson, Walter; Lyons, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses a case study that examined the influence of cultural, organizational and automation capability upon human trust in, and reliance on, automation. In particular, this paper focuses on the design and application of an extended case study methodology, and on the foundational lessons revealed by it. Experimental test pilots involved in the research and development of the US Air Force's newly developed Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System served as the context for this examination. An eclectic, multi-pronged approach was designed to conduct this case study, and proved effective in addressing the challenges associated with the case's politically sensitive and military environment. Key results indicate that the system design was in alignment with pilot culture and organizational mission, indicating the potential for appropriate trust development in operational pilots. These include the low-vulnerability/ high risk nature of the pilot profession, automation transparency and suspicion, system reputation, and the setup of and communications among organizations involved in the system development.

  14. Health of children born through artificial oocyte activation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemeh, Mohammad R; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad H

    2015-03-01

    Artificial oocyte activation (AOA) has shown to improve fertility in severe male infertility following intracytoplasmic sperm insemination (ICSI). However, the effect of AOA on the health status of children has not been studied. This pilot historical cohort study aims to evaluate physical and mental health of 79 and 89 children from 275 and 406 couples undergoing ICSI-AOA using ionomycin and conventional ICSI, respectively. The outcomes assessed were clinical pregnancy, abortion, type of delivery, and health of children (major birth defect, mental and behavior status). No significant differences were observed between the ICSI-AOA and the ICSI groups for these parameters, and the rate of major birth defects were not significantly different between the 2 groups. In this study, AOA has not imposed a greater risk on physical and mental health of children born through AOA, but for such a solid conclusion, further trails with higher number of cases are required and conclusions drawn are limited to this study.

  15. Medication coaching program for patients with minor stroke or TIA: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sides Elizabeth G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients who are hospitalized with a first or recurrent stroke often are discharged with new medications or adjustment to the doses of pre-admission medications, which can be confusing and pose safety issues if misunderstood. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of medication coaching via telephone after discharge in patients with stroke. Methods Two-arm pilot study of a medication coaching program with 30 patients (20 intervention, 10 control. Consecutive patients admitted with stroke or TIA with at least 2 medications changed between admission and discharge were included. The medication coach contacted intervention arm patients post-discharge via phone call to discuss risk factors, review medications and triage patients’ questions to a stroke nurse and/or pharmacist. Intervention and control participants were contacted at 3 months for outcomes. The main outcomes were feasibility (appropriateness of script, ability to reach participants, and provide requested information and participant evaluation of medication coaching. Results The median lengths of the coaching and follow-up calls with requested answers to these questions were 27 minutes and 12 minutes, respectively, and participant evaluations of the coaching were positive. The intervention participants were more likely to have seen their primary care provider than were control participants by 3 months post discharge. Conclusions This medication coaching study executed early after discharge demonstrated feasibility of coaching and educating stroke patients with a trained coach. Results from our small pilot showed a possible trend towards improved appointment-keeping with primary care providers in those who received coaching.

  16. The impact of individualised cardiovascular disease (CVD risk estimates and lifestyle advice on physical activity in individuals at high risk of CVD: a pilot 2 × 2 factorial understanding risk trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin Simon J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently much interest in encouraging individuals to increase physical activity in order to reduce CVD risk. This study has been designed to determine if personalised CVD risk appreciation can increase physical activity in adults at high risk of CVD. Methods/Design In a 2 × 2 factorial design participants are allocated at random to a personalised 10-year CVD risk estimate or numerical CVD risk factor values (systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol and fasting glucose and, simultaneously, to receive a brief lifestyle advice intervention targeting physical activity, diet and smoking cessation or not. We aim to recruit 200 participants from Oxfordshire primary care practices. Eligibility criteria include adults age 40–70 years, estimated 10-year CVD risk ≥20%, ability to read and write English, no known CVD and no physical disability or other condition reducing the ability to walk. Primary outcome is physical activity measured by ActiGraph accelerometer with biochemical, anthropometrical and psychological measures as additional outcomes. Primary analysis is between group physical activity differences at one month powered to detect a difference of 30,000 total counts per day of physical activity between the groups. Additional analyses will seek to further elucidate the relationship between the provision of risk information, and intention to change behaviour and to determine the impact of both interventions on clinical and anthropometrical measures including fasting and 2 hour plasma glucose, fructosamine, serum cotinine, plasma vitamin C, body fat percentage and blood pressure. Discussion This is a pilot trial seeking to demonstrate in a real world setting, proof of principal that provision of personalised risk information can contribute to behaviour changes aimed at reducing CVD risk. This study will increase our understanding of the links between the provision of risk information and behaviour change and if

  17. Including health economic analysis in pilot studies: lessons learned from a cost-utility analysis within the PROSPECTIV pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richéal M. Burns

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available PurposeTo assess feasibility and health economic benefits and costs as part of a pilot study for a nurse-led, psychoeducational intervention (NPLI for prostate cancer in order to understand the potential for cost effectiveness as well as contribute to the design of a larger scale trial.MethodsMen with stable prostate cancer post-treatment were recruited from two cancer centres in the UK. Eighty-three men were randomised to the NLPI plus usual care or usual care alone (UCA (42 NLPI and 41 UCA; the NLPI plus usual care was delivered in the primary-care setting (the intervention and included an initial face-to-face consultation with a trained nurse, with follow-up tailored to individual needs. The study afforded the opportunity to undertake a short-term within pilot analysis. The primary outcome measure for the economic evaluation was quality of life, as measured by the EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D (EQ-5D-5L instrument. Costs (£2014 assessed included health-service resource use, out-of-pocket expenses and losses from inability to undertake usual activities.ResultsTotal and incremental costs varied across the different scenarios assessed, with mean cost differences ranging from £173 to £346; incremental effect, as measured by the change in utility scores over the duration of follow-up, exhibited wide confidence intervals highlighting inconclusive effectiveness (95% CI: -0.0226; 0.0438. The cost per patient of delivery of the intervention would be reduced if rolled out to a larger patient cohort.ConclusionsThe NLPI is potentially cost saving depending on the scale of delivery; however, the results presented are not considered generalisable.

  18. Cervical spine degeneration in fighter pilots and controls: a 5-yr follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrén-Mallmin, M; Linder, J

    2001-05-01

    At 5 yr after MRI of the cervical spine, for evaluation concerning degenerative lesions, follow-up MRI was performed on asymptomatic experienced military high performance aircraft pilots (mean age 47 yr; mean accumulated flying time 3,100 h) and on age-matched controls without military flying experience. Young military high performance aircraft pilots (mean age 28 yr, mean accumulated flying time 915 h) were also re-examined. Compared with baseline MRI 5 yr earlier, there was significant increase in disk protrusions in all groups, in osteophytes in controls, and in foraminal stenoses in experienced pilots, and a significant reduction in disk signal intensity in young pilots. The difference between experienced pilots and controls was markedly reduced compared with that at baseline MRI. Thus, military high performance aircraft pilots seem to be at increased risk of premature development of degenerative lesions of the same type as are seen in an aging population. With increasing age the difference between pilots and controls diminishes.

  19. The benefits of hypopharyngeal packing in nasal surgery: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fennessy, B G

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypopharyngeal packs are used in nasal surgery to reduce the risk of aspiration and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Side effects associated with their use range from throat pain to retained packs postoperatively. AIM: To evaluate, as a pilot study, postoperative nausea\\/vomiting and throat pain scores for patients undergoing nasal surgery in whom a wet or dry hypopharyngeal pack was placed compared with patients who received no packing. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind prospective trial in a general ENT unit. RESULTS: The study failed to show a statistically significant difference between the three groups in terms of their postoperative nausea\\/vomiting and throat pain scores at 2 and 6 h postoperatively. This is the first study in which dry packs have been compared with wet and absent packs. CONCLUSION: Based on our findings, the authors recommend against placing hypopharyngeal packs for the purpose of preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting.

  20. Concentraciones de DDT/DDE y riesgo de hipospadias: un estudio piloto de casos y controles DDT/DDE concentrations and risk of hypospadias: a case-control pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Flores-Luévano

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar la asociación entre los niveles séricos maternos de DDT/DDE y el riesgo de hipospadias. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio de casos y controles, efectuado en la Ciudad de México durante el periodo 1997-1999, con 41 casos de hipospadias y 28 controles. La informacion obtenida por cuestionario y las muestras sanguíneas fueron evaluadas mediante modelos multivariados de regresión logística. RESULTADOS: Las concentraciones materna de DDT y DDE no mostraron asociación con el riesgo de hipospadias (RM 1.13; IC 95% 0.24-5.29 y RM 0.48; IC 95% 0.15-1.60, respectivamente. Los predictores encontrados fueron hijos de madres con mayor edad (RM 8.69; IC 95% 1.69-44.9, y la actividad laboral durante el embarazo (RM, 4.68; IC 95% 1.15-18.9. CONCLUSIONES: Dado que se cuenta con escasa información sobre los efectos endocrinos a diferentes concentraciones de DDT/DDE en humanos, la dosis pudiera ser un factor determinante sobre el tipo de efecto.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between maternal serum DDT/DDE levels and risk of hypospadias. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case-control study in Mexico City was conducted during 1997-1999 among 41 subjects with hypospadias and 28 controls. Blood samples were obtained from study subjects. Information was obtained using a standardized questionnaire. Data were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models. RESULTS: Maternal DDT and DDE levels showed no association with hypospadias (OR 1.13; 95% CI 0.24-5.29 and OR=0.48; 95% CI 0.15-1.60, respectively. Associated factors were older age of mothers (OR 8.69; 95% CI 1.69-44.9, and working during pregnancy (OR 4.68; 95% CI 1.15-18.9. CONCLUSIONS: Information about the endocrine effects of different levels of DDT/DDE in human subjects is scarce; dosage may be a determinant factor of the type of effect.

  1. New technologies for offshore wildlife risk studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Caleb

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Two research initiatives by Pandion Systems, funded by the US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE), are addressing the enormous challenges of conducting offshore wind-wildlife risk/impact studies by providing new wildlife sensing technologies that surmount some of the limitations of previous techniques. Both initiatives rest on the shoulders of pioneering European studies and experience. One entails the development of a remote-operating acoustic/thermographic detector. This device, designed with input from the Danish National Environmental Research Institute (NERI) and Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology (CLO), will provide species-specific occurrence data, as well as flight altitude estimation, for vocalizing flying wildlife that flies within a detection beam that corresponds roughly to the rotor swept zone of a single, commercial marine wind turbine. While the detection beam is small and limitations exist for silently flying animals, this device will be capable of providing information on bats and on federally-listed bird species that has been difficult or impossible to achieve with other methods. A preliminary version of this device was developed in 2009-2010 in a BOEMRE-funded pilot study, and a sea-worthy device is currently being developed, scheduled for initial deployment on the US Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (AOCS) in summer, 2011. A second initiative is targeted at developing a high-definition aerial survey protocol capable of providing a safe, cost-effective, reproducible snapshot of bird, marine mammal, and sea turtle distribution on the entire AOCS. This research, being conducted with a team of technologists and biologists including scientists from the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), entails conducting a series of pilot experiments in spring, 2011 with a variety of different aircraft, cameras, flight altitudes, and image resolutions, to determine optimum protocols for the large-scale surveys. Both of

  2. Development and pilot study of an essential set of indicators for general surgery services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Aledo, Victor; Angel-Garcia, Daniel; Martinez-Nicolas, Ismael; Rebasa Cladera, Pere; Cabezali Sanchez, Roger; Pereira García, Luis Francisco

    2016-11-01

    At present there is a lack of appropriate quality measures for benchmarking in general surgery units of Spanish National Health System. The aim of this study is to present the selection, development and pilot-testing of an initial set of surgical quality indicators for this purpose. A modified Delphi was performed with experts from the Spanish Surgeons Association in order to prioritize previously selected indicators. Then, a pilot study was carried out in a public hospital encompassing qualitative analysis of feasibility for prioritized indicators and an additional qualitative and quantitative three-rater reliability assessment for medical record-based indicators. Observed inter-rater agreement, prevalence adjusted and bias adjusted kappa and non-adjusted kappa were performed, using a systematic random sample (n=30) for each of these indicators. Twelve out of 13 proposed indicators were feasible: 5 medical record-based indicators and 7 indicators based on administrative databases. From medical record-based indicators, 3 were reliable (observed agreement >95%, adjusted kappa index >0.6 or non-adjusted kappa index >0.6 for composites and its components) and 2 needed further refinement. Currently, medical record-based indicators could be used for comparison purposes, whilst further research must be done for validation and risk-adjustment of outcome indicators from administrative databases. Compliance results in the adequacy of informed consent, diagnosis-to-treatment delay in colorectal cancer, and antibiotic prophylaxis show room for improvement in the pilot-tested hospital. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. A pilot study of coronary angioplasty in outpatients.

    OpenAIRE

    Laarman, G.J.; Kiemeneij, F.; van der Wieken, L R; Tijssen, J.G.; Suwarganda, J S; Slagboom, T.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Is it safe to discharge patients from hospital on the same day as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)? The hypothesis tested was that careful pre and post angioplasty selection of patients can identify a group that is at very low risk of postprocedural complications and that these patients may be discharged on the day of the procedure. METHODS--63 patients undergoing limited risk coronary angioplasty of 72 lesions were studied. So that patients would be able to w...

  4. Inappropriate bottle use: an early risk for overweight? Literature review and pilot data for a bottle-weaning trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuck, Karen A; Huang, Vincent; Fletcher, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Identifying early risk factors for childhood obesity is critical, as weight in infancy and early childhood tracks to later periods. Continued bottle use - primarily from excess milk intake - is emerging as a potential risk factor for early childhood overweight. Over three fourths of US infants drink from bottles beyond the recommended weaning age of 12 months, and two thirds of UK infants use a bottle at 18 months. This paper is divided into three parts. Part 1 reviews the literature on beverage intake, weight and bottle use in young children. Part II describes pilot data on milk bottle use and weight in 12-60-month-olds, collected prior to a randomized controlled (RCT) trial of a bottle-weaning intervention. Median daily milk bottle consumption at 12 months was 5.0 (interquartile range = 3-6). Among 12-36-month-olds, current users were significantly more likely to be >95th% weight-for-height (19% vs. 0%, P 85% weight-for-height (27% vs. 11%, P flip chart. An observational study nested within the RCT will describe dietary changes during this period of feeding transitions.

  5. Implementation of a Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Program among School-Aged Children: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavon Young

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to test students’ knowledge of cardiovascular disease information and to determine if a carefully structured training program administered to high school students would increase their knowledge about cardiovascular disease and risk factors that are preventable. A pilot study was conducted during which fifty high school students from nine counties in the State of Mississippi were measured for their knowledge of hypertension both at baseline and after the completion of an intervention training activity. There were significant gains in knowledge between the pre-test and the post-test that the students completed. The gains in knowledge indicate that elimination of risk factors is possible if all health care and school-based prevention programs are implemented to positively impact changes in eating and physical activity behaviors. Students’ involvement in such activities could translate into significant changes in risk factors at these ages and throughout their lifetime. It is widely accepted that these behavioral changes, if sustained into adulthood, could have the potential to influence cardiovascular risk reduction.

  6. Working on asymmetry in Parkinson's disease: randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Ricciardi, Diego; Lena, Francesco; Plotnik, Meir; Petracca, Martina; Barricella, Simona; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Modugno, Nicola; Bernabei, Roberto; Fasano, Alfonso

    2015-08-01

    Posture, gait and balance problems are very disabling symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). An increased stride-to-stri de variability, reduction of automaticity and asymmetry of lower limbs function characterize parkinsonian gait. These features predispose to freezing of gait (FOG), which often leads to falls. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the modulation of asymmetry through physiotherapy might improve gait and reduce FOG, thus preventing falls. Twenty-eight PD patients entered a double-blind pilot feasibility controlled study and were evaluated at baseline and after 3 months of a rehabilitative program (performed twice a week) by means of the motor part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III), Gait and Falls Questionnaire, Tinetti balance and gait scale, Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), European Quality of Life questionnaire. Patients were randomly assigned to three treatment arms: (1) worst side improvement; (2) best side improvement; (3) standard therapy. All study arms showed a significant improvement of the Tinetti and SPPB scores. BSI led to a greater improvement than ST in terms of UPDRS-III (p = 0.01); Tinetti total score (p = 0.05) and Tinetti gait subscore (p = 0.01). Our study confirms the efficacy of physical therapy in the treatment of PD and, more importantly, suggests that specific intervention tailored on individual feature (e.g., asymmetry of motor condition) might be even more effective than standard rehabilitative programs.

  7. Individual traffic-related air pollution and new onset adult asthma:A GIS-based pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysbeck Hansen, Carl; Jensen, Steen Solvang; Baelum, Jesper

    individual traffic-related air pollution exposure and new onset asthma and wheeze. It is recommended that the analytic methods developed in this pilot study are used in a larger prospective cohort to investigate individual traffic-related air pollutants as a risk factor for the development of new asthma......The background for the project is that traffic-related air pollution may provoke the onset of asthma. The objective of this pilot study is to investigate the relation between asthma and wheeze debut and individually estimated exposure to traffic-related air pollutants with a validated exposure...... successfully identified for all study participants (N=33). Using AirGIS traffic-related air pollutant levels from both urban background and street level were estimated for the 10 year study period on an hourly basis. Individual levels of air pollutants in the years preceding debut of asthma or wheeze were...

  8. A pilot study of children's exposure to CCA-treated wood from playground equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalat, S L; Solo-Gabriele, H M; Fleming, L E; Buckley, B T; Black, K; Jimenez, M; Shibata, T; Durbin, M; Graygo, J; Stephan, W; Van De Bogart, G

    2006-08-15

    Arsenic from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood, widely used in playgrounds and other outdoor equipment, can persist as surface residues on wood. This raises concerns about possible health risks associated with children playing on CCA-treated playgrounds. In a Pilot Study, 11 children (13-71 months) in homes with and without CCA-treated playgrounds were evaluated with post-exposure hand rinses and urine for total arsenic. Samples of wood, soil, and mulch, as well as synthetic wipes, were sampled for total arsenic. In non-CCA-treated playgrounds vs. CCA-treated playgrounds, respectively, wood arsenic was soil arsenic was playground was 0.4 mg/kg vs. two CCA-treated playgrounds of 0.6 and 69 mg/kg. The arsenic removed using a synthetic wipe at non-CCA-treated playgrounds was playgrounds was playgrounds. Mean urinary total arsenic levels were 13.6 pg/ml (range 7.2-23.1 pg/ml) for all children evaluated, but there was no association between access to CCA-playgrounds and urinary arsenic levels. Arsenic speciation was not performed. This preliminary Pilot Study of CCA-treated wood playgrounds observed dislodgeable arsenic on 11 children's hands after brief periods of play exposure. Future efforts should increase the number of children and the play exposure periods, and incorporate speciation in order to discriminate between various sources of arsenic.

  9. The Hong Kong vision study: a pilot assessment of visual impairment in adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Newkirk, M R

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Hong Kong Adult Vision Pilot Study is a population based study of the distribution and determinants of eye disease in a random sample of the Chinese population age 40 and over. The present pilot study identifies the extent and causes of visual loss using methods developed in the United States and Australia. The pilot study uses the prevalence data to estimate the sample size necessary to predict the size of an effect a larger study may detect and the confidence with which that ef...

  10. Postmarketing studies: benefits and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, F B; Caro, J J

    1999-01-01

    To consider the benefits and risks of large postmarketing outcomes studies, as demonstrated by studies of the statin drugs. Literature review. The risks were that the statin studies had a strong coat-tail effect. Each new study was beneficial to all statins as well as the one studied. Economic analyses based on the results of the postmarketing studies concluded that the drugs were not cost-effective. Long-term postmarketing studies were slow to be put into perspective and did not immediately influence other researchers or clinicians. During that time, the sponsoring companies shouldered opportunity costs as well as the actual costs of the studies. The risk that one drug company would use another company's results instead of investing in their own research did not materialize. The benefits were that the studies definitively showed that the drugs and the lowering of lipids were safe and efficacious. The studies also expanded the indications for the drugs, generated goodwill in the medical and research communities for the sponsors, allowed sponsors to include specific claims in their advertisements, generated follow-up studies, spawned economic analyses that sparked interest in the medical and lay press, and had a major impact on clinicians' use of the drug. The risks and benefits of postmarketing studies may depend on the company's time perspective. In the short term, the risks may outweigh the benefits. Only companies that have a longer perspective may find it beneficial to undertake large postmarketing studies.

  11. Plant substrate as a vehicle for trituration: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Mariani Verginelli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Lactose and hydroalcoholic solutions are not the proper substances to study the High Dilution (HD effects using plant models. Plant substrate can not be considered an inert vehicle, but it is not harmful to plants. Aim: In this pilot study we verify the possibility to use plant substrate as a trituration vehicle to prepare substances to be used in plants. Methods: We used a partially dried commercial plant substrate (12% humidity as the vehicle to prepare a set of trituration, having NaCl as the initial active substance. Triturations were performed using a ball mill, with a mass dilution rate of 1:18 (set A and 1:100 (set B, up to the 7th trituration, that is, each set contained 8 groups: A0 to A7 and B0 to B7. For each group, the triturated substrate was mixed with a fresh one in a mass ratio of 1:1. After homogenization, 18 seeds of radish (Raphanus sativus were sown in plastic trays (31 ml cell, for each group and kept in a green house exposed to natural thermal and light variations. After 4 weeks we determine the germination rate and number of mature cotyledon. Then 5 plants from each group were selected at random to determine the following parameters: averaged leaf area, length, fresh and dry mass and pigments amount (chlorophyll a and b, carotenes. Results: Groups A0 and B0 (higher saline concentration showed those typical effects of saline stress: lower germination ratio, immature cotyledons, smaller and shorter leaves, higher water content and less pigments. All the others groups showed similar results, for all parameters, except pigments amount. The chlorophyll to carotene ratio (CCr showed an unexpected but interesting behavior (figure 1.Both sets showed an initial CCr growing (as expected due the saline ratio decrease, but followed by an unexpected decrement. Set B (the higher mass dilution rate, 1:100 showed a slower change, compared to set A. When we sort the results in order of saline amount we observe two peaks (figure

  12. The provision of mental health services on Long Island college campuses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lorraine B

    2007-01-01

    College students, often away from home for the first time, are at risk for mental health disorders that can affect academic performance and quality of life. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the provision of mental health services to students attending colleges on Long Island, NY and to explore information about the policies developed in regards to disclosing mental health information to a student's family in the event of crisis. A descriptive questionnaire was developed for the purpose of this study. Qualified professionals are providing mental health services to students on Long Island college campuses but few policies exist to enhance communication in the event of crisis. Nurses employed in college health centers can work with students and families towards health-promoting behaviors and to proactively plan for the management of health information in the event of a mental health crisis.

  13. Do chiropractic college faculty understand informed consent: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hondras Maria A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to survey full-time faculty at a single chiropractic college concerning their knowledge of Institutional Review Board (IRB policies in their institution as they pertain to educational research. Methods All full-time faculty were invited to participate in an anonymous survey. Four scenarios involving educational research were described and respondents were asked to select from three possible courses of action for each. In addition, respondents were queried about their knowledge of IRB policies, how they learned of these policies and about their years of service and departmental assignments. Results The response rate was 55%. In no scenario did the level of correct answers by all respondents score higher than 41% and in most, the scores were closer to just under 1 in 3. Sixty-five percent of respondents indicated they were unsure whether Palmer had any policies in place at all, while 4% felt that no such policies were in place. Just over one-quarter (27% were correct in noting that students can decline consent, while more than half (54% did not know whether there were any procedures governing student consent. Conclusion Palmer faculty have only modest understanding about institutional policies regarding the IRB and human subject research, especially pertaining to educational research. The institution needs to develop methods to provide knowledge and training to faculty. The results from this pilot study will be instrumental in developing better protocols for a study designed to survey the entire chiropractic academic community.

  14. A pilot study on mindfulness based stress reduction for smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Timothy B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mindfulness means paying attention in the present moment, non-judgmentally, without commentary or decision-making. We report results of a pilot study designed to test the feasibility of using Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR (with minor modifications as a smoking intervention. Methods MBSR instructors provided instructions in mindfulness in eight weekly group sessions. Subjects attempted smoking cessation during week seven without pharmacotherapy. Smoking abstinence was tested six weeks after the smoking quit day with carbon monoxide breath test and 7-day smoking calendars. Questionnaires were administered to evaluate changes in stress and affective distress. Results 18 subjects enrolled in the intervention with an average smoking history of 19.9 cigarettes per day for 26.4 years. At the 6-week post-quit visit, 10 of 18 subjects (56% achieved biologically confirmed 7-day point-prevalent smoking abstinence. Compliance with meditation was positively associated with smoking abstinence and decreases in stress and affective distress. Discussions and conclusion The results of this study suggest that mindfulness training may show promise for smoking cessation and warrants additional study in a larger comparative trial.

  15. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students), Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Stanislaw; Piotrowicz, Karolina; Rewiuk, Krzysztof; Halicka, Monika; Kalwak, Weronika; Rybak, Paulina; Grodzicki, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students), targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy internal medicine ward.

  16. An exercise program to prevent falls in institutionalized elderly with cognitive deficits: a crossover pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSure, Ariell R; Peterson, Karen; Gianan, Faith V; Pang, Lorrin

    2013-11-01

    Falls are the leading cause of injury among older adults in the United States, with the institutionalized elderly at elevated risk for injury and death. Physical weakness and mental frailty, prevalent in institutionalized elderly, are major risk factors for falls. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a program that addresses both the physical and mental aspects of exercise to reduce falls in institutionalized elderly. Twenty-seven volunteer subjects residing in an assisted living facility participated in the 24 week randomized crossover study. After demographic, fall history, and mental status examinations, subjects were randomly assigned first to ten weeks of either an exercise class or a control group, followed by a four week "washout period" of no activity, then cross assigned to ten weeks as either a control group or exercise class, respectively. Falls as well as mental status changes were monitored during the study. After adjusting for differences in baseline risk between the control and treatment groups, and for potential residual effects of the treatment during the crossover phase, a statistically significant (P = .025) reduction in falls was found during treatment compared to the control periods. No change in mental status was seen. This small, pilot study shows that exercise programs, which emphasize mental strengthening as well as physical fitness, have the potential to reduce falls among mentally impaired, institutionalized seniors.

  17. Effects of a multidisciplinary group rehabilitation programme on participation of the visually impaired elderly : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alma, Manna A.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Melis-Dankers, Bart J. M.; Post, Marcel W. M.; Suurmeijer, Theo P. B. M.; van der Mei, Sijrike F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To pilot test the newly developed multidisciplinary group rehabilitation programme Visually Impaired elderly Persons Participating (VIPP). Method: A single group pretest-posttest design pilot study included 29 visually impaired persons (>= 55 years). The intervention (20 weekly meetings) co

  18. Plantar focal idiopathic hyperhidrosis and botulinum toxin: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanati, Anna; Bernardini, Maria Luisa; Gesuita, Rosaria; Offidani, Annamaria

    2007-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective treatment for idiopatic focal axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis, but very few data are reported in the literature on its effect on plantar idiopatic hyperhidrosis. The current study was undertaken to investigate the impact of BTX-A administration on sweat production and quality of life in patients suffering from plantar hyperhidrosis. Ten patients with idiopathic, recalcitrant plantar hyperhidrosis were included in a pilot study and underwent intradermal injections with 100 MU of BTX-A in the plantar skin, bilaterally. All the patients were followed for 16 weeks after treatment with objective (Minor's test) and subjective (DLQI test) evaluation. Patients experienced an improvement of symptoms with a significant decrease of Minor's test and DLQI levels for 12 weeks. No significant side effects occurred in any treated patient. BTX-A seems to be a promising treatment for plantar hyperhidrosis. However, clinical trials on larger patient series are needed in order to evaluate its safety and effectiveness for this application.

  19. Patterns of federal Internet offenders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ann W; Carretta, Carrie M; Burgess, Allen G

    2012-09-01

    Internet-facilitated sexual offending is receiving increased forensic and clinical attention. Two issues confront this field. First, studies are equivocal as to whether (or not) the possession of Internet pornography can escalate to contact sexual offenses against a child, and second, federal judges have been questioning the length of sentences for users only of child pornography. The findings of this pilot study of 101 federal Internet offenders revealed over half of the men at the time of arrest were employed, educated, were in (or had been in) a relationship, had children, and did not have a prior criminal offense, suggesting a changing profile of a convicted sex offender. Forensic and psychiatric nurses who evaluate users of child pornography contraband need to be knowledgeable of Internet file transfer technology and the various types of contraband viewed specifically for the age of the preferred child, extreme acts to the child (e.g., bondage, S&M), and whether the user prefers images of adults with children or images of children only.

  20. Patterns of Sweet Taste Liking: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Miller, Jason; Arcori, Leann; Lumeng, Julie C.; Han-Markey, Theresa; Herman, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Two distinct patterns of sweet taste liking have been described: one showing a peak liking response in the mid-range of sucrose concentrations and the other showing a monotonic liking response at progressively higher sucrose concentrations. Classification of these patterns has been somewhat arbitrary. In this report, we analyzed patterns of sweet taste liking in a pilot study with 26 adults including 14 women and 12 men, 32.6 ± 14.5 years of age with body mass index 26.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 (mean ± SD). Sweet taste liking was measured for 10 levels of sucrose solutions (0.035 M to 1.346 M). Participants rated their liking of each solution using a visual analog scale with 0 indicating strongly disliking and 100 strongly liking. The cluster analysis demonstrated two distinct groups: 13 liked relatively low sucrose concentrations and liked high sucrose concentrations less, and 13 liked high sucrose concentrations greatly. If we use the 0.598 M sucrose solution alone and a cutoff liking score of 50, we can distinguish the two clusters with high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%). If validated in additional studies, this simple tool may help us to better understand eating behaviors and the impact of sweet taste liking on nutrition-related disorders. PMID:26404363

  1. Patterns of Sweet Taste Liking: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Asao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Two distinct patterns of sweet taste liking have been described: one showing a peak liking response in the mid-range of sucrose concentrations and the other showing a monotonic liking response at progressively higher sucrose concentrations. Classification of these patterns has been somewhat arbitrary. In this report, we analyzed patterns of sweet taste liking in a pilot study with 26 adults including 14 women and 12 men, 32.6 ± 14.5 years of age with body mass index 26.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 (mean ± SD. Sweet taste liking was measured for 10 levels of sucrose solutions (0.035 M to 1.346 M. Participants rated their liking of each solution using a visual analog scale with 0 indicating strongly disliking and 100 strongly liking. The cluster analysis demonstrated two distinct groups: 13 liked relatively low sucrose concentrations and liked high sucrose concentrations less, and 13 liked high sucrose concentrations greatly. If we use the 0.598 M sucrose solution alone and a cutoff liking score of 50, we can distinguish the two clusters with high sensitivity (100% and specificity (100%. If validated in additional studies, this simple tool may help us to better understand eating behaviors and the impact of sweet taste liking on nutrition-related disorders.

  2. Enhancing treatment effectiveness through social modelling: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faasse, Kate; Perera, Anna; Loveys, Kate; Grey, Andrew; Petrie, Keith J

    2017-05-01

    Medical treatments take place in social contexts; however, little research has investigated how social modelling might influence treatment outcomes. This experimental pilot study investigated social modelling of treatment effectiveness and placebo treatment outcomes. Fifty-nine participants took part in the study, ostensibly examining the use of beta-blockers (actually placebos) for examination anxiety. Participants were randomly assigned to observe a female confederate report positive treatment effects (reduced heart rate, relaxed, calm) or feeling no different. Heart rate, anxiety and blood pressure were assessed, as were symptoms and attributed side effects. Heart rate decreased significantly more in the social modelling compared to control condition, p = .027 (d = .63), and there were trends towards effects in the same direction for both anxiety, p = .097 (d = .46), and systolic blood pressure, p = .077 (d = .51). Significant pre-post placebo differences in heart rate, anxiety and diastolic blood pressure were found in the social modelling group, ps  .28 (ds = .09-.59). Social observation of medication effectiveness enhanced placebo effectiveness in heart rate, and showed a trend towards enhancing treatment effectiveness in both anxiety and systolic blood pressure. Social modelling may have utility in enhancing the effectiveness of many active medical treatments.

  3. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S; Vilhelmsen, Jeanet R; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2017-02-20

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient's self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists' and occupational therapists' evaluation of the patients' achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals. The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals, and found it worth the time spent using it. However, no clear advantage in relation to their quality of life (WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score) was reported.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  4. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Ester H; Draaisma, Jos M; den Hamer, Sabien; Loeffen, Jan L

    2015-01-01

    Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often report having little opportunity to perform in the role of team leader during residency. In order to gain more insight into leadership skills and behaviors, we classified leadership styles of pediatric residents during simulated emergencies. We conducted a prospective quantitative study to investigate leadership styles used by pediatric residents during simulated emergencies with clinical deterioration of a child at a pediatric ward. Using videotaped scenarios of 48 simulated critical events among 12 residents, we were able to classify verbal and nonverbal communication into different leadership styles according to the situational leadership theory. The coaching style (mean 54.5%, SD 7.8) is the most frequently applied by residents, followed by the directing style (mean 35.6%, SD 4.1). This pattern conforms to the task- and role-related requirements in our scenarios and it also conforms to the concept of situational leadership. We did not find any significant differences in leadership style according to the postgraduate year or scenario content. The model used in this pilot study helps us to gain a better understanding of the development of effective leadership behavior and supports the applicability of situational leadership theory in training leadership skills during residency.

  5. Effect of caffeine on the vocal folds: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S; Wood, G; Rubin, J S; O'Flynn, P E; Ratcliffe, P

    1999-04-01

    Caffeine is considered to be a dehydrating agent with detrimental effects on the quality of voice of persons ingesting it. This has led medical personnel dealing with voice disorders, especially in the case of professional voice users, to give advice against the use of caffeine. Yet this is an anecdotal truth as an extensive Medline literature search did not reveal any scientific evidence of caffeine being proven to have adverse effects on the vocal folds. We, therefore, initiated this pilot study to ascertain the connection between caffeine and voice quality on a laboratory basis. Two hundred and fifty mg of caffeine were provided to eight volunteers in tablet form, and blood levels along with laryngograph readings were recorded to document the changes produced. Analysing the irregularities of frequencies in a) free speech b) a reading passage and c) singing 'Happy Birthday', substantial changes were seen to authenticate the fact that caffeine does produce alterations in voice quality but these alterations have considerable intra-subject variability. A full study with wider parameters is to be performed on this subject as we consider it to be of importance in the management of voice disorders.

  6. Impact of healing touch on pediatric oncology outpatients: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Fletcher, Nancy B; Hamilton, Craig A; McLean, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    Healing Touch (HT) is a biofield therapy used to enhance well-being. We conducted a pilot study to assess its effects in pediatric oncology patients. We enrolled patients in the continuation or consolidation phase of therapy. Patients or their parent completed simple visual analogue scales (VASs; 0-10) for relaxation, vitality, overall well-being, stress, anxiety, and depression before and after a 20-minute period of rest and a standardized HT treatment. Patients' heart rates were monitored and later analyzed for heart rate variability (HRV) characteristics. Of the nine patients, all completed VASs and six had usable HRV data. The average age was 9 years. VAS scores for stress decreased significantly more for HT treatment than for rest (HT: 4.4-1.7; rest: 2.3-2.3; p = .03). The HRV characteristic of total power was significantly lower during HT than for rest (HT 599 +/- 221; rest: 857 +/- 155; p = .048), and sympathetic activity was somewhat but not significantly lower (HT: 312 +/- 158; rest: 555 +/- 193; p = .06). HT is associated with lowered stress and changes in HRV. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of these effects in larger samples and to explore the impact on additional clinically relevant measures.

  7. Photoacoustic analysis of thyroid cancer in vivo: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Min-Hee; Jo, Kwanhoon; Ha, Jeonghoon; Kim, Yongmin; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Chulhong

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers. About 3-8% of the people in the United States have thyroid nodules, and 5-15% of these nodules are malignant. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a standard procedure to diagnose malignity of nodules. However, about 10-20% of FNABs produce indeterminable results, which leads to repeat biopsies and unnecessary surgical operations. We have explored photoacoustic (PA) imaging as a new method to identify cancerous nodules. In a pilot study to test its feasibility, we recruited patients with thyroid nodules (currently 36 cases with 21 malignant and 15 benign nodules), acquired in vivo PA and ultrasound (US) images of the nodules in real time using a recently-developed clinical PA/US imaging system, and analyzed the acquired data offline. The preliminary results show that malignant and benign nodules could be differentiated by utilizing their PA amplitudes at different excitation wavelengths. This is the first in vivo PA analysis of thyroid nodules. Although a larger-scale study is needed for statistical significance, the preliminary results show the good potential of PA imaging as a non-invasive tool for triaging thyroid cancer.

  8. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Ester H; Draaisma, Jos M; den Hamer, Sabien; Loeffen, Jan L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often report having little opportunity to perform in the role of team leader during residency. In order to gain more insight into leadership skills and behaviors, we classified leadership styles of pediatric residents during simulated emergencies. Methods We conducted a prospective quantitative study to investigate leadership styles used by pediatric residents during simulated emergencies with clinical deterioration of a child at a pediatric ward. Using videotaped scenarios of 48 simulated critical events among 12 residents, we were able to classify verbal and nonverbal communication into different leadership styles according to the situational leadership theory. Results The coaching style (mean 54.5%, SD 7.8) is the most frequently applied by residents, followed by the directing style (mean 35.6%, SD 4.1). This pattern conforms to the task- and role-related requirements in our scenarios and it also conforms to the concept of situational leadership. We did not find any significant differences in leadership style according to the postgraduate year or scenario content. Conclusion The model used in this pilot study helps us to gain a better understanding of the development of effective leadership behavior and supports the applicability of situational leadership theory in training leadership skills during residency. PMID:25610010

  9. [Telerehabilitation to treat stress urinary incontinence. Pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión Pérez, Francisca; Rodríguez Moreno, María Sofía; Carnerero Córdoba, Lidia; Romero Garrido, Marina C; Quintana Tirado, Laura; García Montes, Inmaculada

    2015-05-21

    We aimed to test a new telerehabilitation device for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in order to make an initial assessment of its effectiveness. Randomized, controlled pilot study. experimental group (10 patients): pelvic floor muscle training, device training and home treatment with it; control group (9 patients): conventional rehabilitation treatment. Outcome measures (baseline and 3 months) overall and specific quality of life: International Consultation Incontinence Questionnaire and King's Health Questionnaire, bladder diary, perineometry, satisfaction with the program and degree of compliance. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. There was no statistically significant difference for any outcome measures between groups at the end of the follow-up. The change in perineometry values at baseline and after the intervention was significant in the experimental group (23.06 to 32.00, P=.011). No group in this study had any serious adverse effects. The tested device is safe and well accepted. Although there is some evidence of its efficacy in the rehabilitation treatment of SUI, larger trials are needed to appropriately evaluate the potential advantages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Moving mammogram-reluctant women to screening: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, Mary E; Luckmann, Roger; White, Mary Jo; Rosal, Milagros C; LaPelle, Nancy; Cranos, Caroline

    2009-06-01

    Effective interventions are needed for women long overdue for screening mammography. The purpose of this study is to pilot test an intervention for motivating overdue women to receive a mammogram. Subjects aged 45-79 without a mammogram in > or =27 months and enrolled in study practices were identified from claims data. The intervention included a mailed, educational booklet, computer-assisted barrier-specific tailored counseling and motivational interviewing, and facilitated, short-interval mammography scheduling. Of 127 eligible women, 45 (35.4%) agreed to counseling and data collection. Most were > or =3 years overdue. Twenty-six (57.8%) of the counseled women got a mammogram within 12 months. Thirty-one (72.1%) of 43 counseled women moved > or =1 stage closer to screening, based on a modified Precaution Adoption Process Model. It is feasible to reach and counsel women who are long overdue for a mammogram and to advance their stage of adoption. The intervention should be formally evaluated in a prospective trial comparing it to control or to proven interventions.

  11. Mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gygax, Marine Jequier; Schneider, Patrick; Newman, Christopher John

    2011-05-01

    Mirror therapy, which provides the visual illusion of a functional paretic limb by using the mirror reflection of the non-paretic arm, is used in the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke in adults. We tested the effectiveness and feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia by performing a pilot crossover study in ten participants (aged 6-14 y; five males, five females; Manual Ability Classification System levels: one at level I, two at level II, four at level III, three at level IV) randomly assigned to 15 minutes of daily bimanual training with and without a mirror for 3 weeks. Assessments of maximal grasp and pinch strengths, and upper limb function measured by the Shriner's Hospital Upper Extremity Evaluation were performed at weeks 0 (baseline), 3, 6 (intervention), and 9 (wash-out). Testing of grasp strength behind the mirror improved performance by 15% (p=0.004). Training with the mirror significantly improved grasp strength (with mirror +20.4%, p=0.033; without +5.9%, p>0.1) and upper limb dynamic position (with mirror +4.6%, p=0.044; without +1.2%, p>0.1), while training without a mirror significantly improved pinch strength (with mirror +6.9%, p>0.1; without +21.9%, p=0.026). This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia and that it may improve strength and dynamic function of the paretic arm.

  12. The In Vivo Adherence Intervention For at Risk Adolescents With Asthma: Report of a Randomized Pilot Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Seid, Michael; D'Amico, Elizabeth J.; Varni, James W; Munafo, Jennifer K.; Britto, Maria T.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Drotar, Dennis; King, Eileen C.; Darbie, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Objective Low-income and minority adolescents are at high risk for poor asthma outcomes, due in part to adherence. We tested acceptability, feasibility, and effect sizes of an adherence intervention for low socioeconomic status (SES) minority youth with moderate- and severe-persistent asthma. Design and Methods Single-site randomized pilot trial: intervention (n = 12; asthma education, motivational interviewing, problem-solving skills training, 1 month cell-phone with tailored text messaging)...

  13. Using Social Media While Waiting in Pain: A Clinical 12-Week Longitudinal Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merolli, Mark; Gray, Kathleen; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Mantopoulos, Steven; Hogg, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim was to conduct a longitudinal pilot study to understand what aspects of research design are key to the success of running a larger-scale study of social media use in the clinical management of chronic pain...

  14. Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (AIDJEX) Second Pilot Study, March - May 1972: A Documentary Film

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project described in this documentary was a pilot study conducted in 1972 in preparation for the AIDJEX main experiment of 1975 to 1976. The study included a...

  15. Active video gaming in patients with renal transplant: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dorothy Wei Yun; Sills, Laura L; MacDonald, Sara B; Maianski, Ziv; Alwayn, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Patients with renal transplant are at higher risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population. Physical activity has been shown to reduce the risk of CVD mortality in these patients. Unfortunately, barriers such as the harsh Canadian climate prevent patients from engaging in and harvesting the health benefits of physical activity. This pilot study explored active video gaming (AVG) as a way for patients with renal transplant to obtain physical activity and examined its effect on their functional status and quality of life (QOL). We recruited nine patients for an 8-week prospective pilot study. All patients received a Microsoft Xbox 360™ video gaming console, a Microsoft Kinect™ sensor, and the video game Your Shape Fitness Evolved 2012. Assessment of each participant before and after the intervention included blood pressure measures, a 6-minute walk test, and the Godin Leisure Time Questionnaire (GLTQ). We analyzed all nine patients at the end of the 8-week study period, and found no changes in blood pressure or GLTQ scores. However, there was a significant increase in the 6-minute walk distance (P = 0.022), which represented a consistent increase for most patients (correlation = 0.977). In addition, participants over the age of 45 years (n = 4) were more likely to use the AVG system (P = 0.042). AVG has the potential to improve the functional status in patients with renal transplant. Further research is required to corroborate the full health benefits of AVG in this patient population.

  16. Substance use and dietary practices among students attending alternative high schools: results from a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannan Peter J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use and poor dietary practices are prevalent among adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine frequency of substance use and associations between cigarette, alcohol and marijuana use and selected dietary practices, such as sugar-sweetened beverages, high-fat foods, fruits and vegetables, and frequency of fast food restaurant use among alternative high school students. Associations between multi-substance use and the same dietary practices were also examined. Methods A convenience sample of adolescents (n = 145; 61% minority, 52% male attending six alternative high schools in the St Paul/Minneapolis metropolitan area completed baseline surveys. Students were participants in the Team COOL (Controlling Overweight and Obesity for Life pilot study, a group randomized obesity prevention pilot trial. Mixed model multivariate analyses procedures were used to assess associations of interest. Results Daily cigarette smoking was reported by 36% of students. Cigarette smoking was positively associated with consumption of regular soda (p = 0.019, high-fat foods (p = 0.037, and fast food restaurant use (p = 0.002. Alcohol (p = 0.005 and marijuana use (p = 0.035 were positively associated with high-fat food intake. With increasing numbers of substances, a positive trend was observed in high-fat food intake (p = 0.0003. There were no significant associations between substance use and fruit and vegetable intake. Conclusions Alternative high school students who use individual substances as well as multiple substances may be at high risk of unhealthful dietary practices. Comprehensive health interventions in alternative high schools have the potential of reducing health-compromising behaviors that are prevalent among this group of students. This study adds to the limited research examining substance use and diet among at-risk youth. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01315743

  17. Virtual reality experiments linking social environment and psychosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Wim; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Dorrestijn, Emily; van der Gaag, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Initial studies with healthy subjects and individuals with high risk for psychosis have suggested that virtual reality (VR) environments may be used to investigate social and psychological mechanisms of psychosis. One small study reported that VR can safely be used in individuals with current persecutory delusions. The present pilot study investigated the feasibility and potential negative side effects of exposure to different virtual social risk environments in patients with first episode psychosis and in healthy controls. Seventeen patients with first episode psychosis (FEP) and 24 healthy control subjects (HC) participated in four virtual experiments during which they walked for 3.5-4 minutes in a virtual café, looking for avatars with digits on their clothing. The level of paranoid thoughts, as well as psychological, physiological, and behavioral correlates of paranoid thoughts, were measured in different virtual social risk environments, manipulating two factors: population density and ethnicity of avatars. FEP and HC frequently had paranoid thoughts about avatars. Paranoia in the real world correlated strongly with paranoid thoughts about avatars in virtual environments (Spearman's ρ=0.67 and 0.54 in FEP and HC respectively, pvirtual environments with avatars of other ethnicity than in the own ethnicity condition. These results suggest that VR is an acceptable and sufficiently realistic method to use in patients with first episode psychosis. VR research may help to increase our understanding of the social and psychological mechanisms of psychosis and to develop new treatment applications.

  18. Visual consequences of electronic reader use: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maducdoc, Marlon M; Haider, Asghar; Nalbandian, Angèle; Youm, Julie H; Morgan, Payam V; Crow, Robert W

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing prevalence of electronic readers (e-readers) for vocational and professional uses, it is important to discover if there are visual consequences in the use of these products. There are no studies in the literature quantifying the incidence or severity of eyestrain, nor are there clinical characteristics that may predispose to these symptoms with e-reader use. The primary objective of this pilot study was to assess the degree of eyestrain associated with e-reader use compared to traditional paper format. The secondary outcomes of this study were to assess the rate of eyestrain associated with e-reader use and identify any clinical characteristics that may be associated with the development of eyestrain. Forty-four students were randomly assigned to study (e-reader iPAD) and control (print) groups. Participant posture, luminosity of the room, and reading distance from reading device were measured during a 1-h session for both groups. At the end of the session, questionnaires were administered to determine symptoms. Significantly higher rates of eyestrain (p = 0.008) and irritation (p = 0.011) were found among the iPAD study group as compared to the print 'control' group. The study group was also 4.9 times more likely to report severe eyestrain (95 % CI [1.4, 16.9]). No clinical characteristics predisposing to eyestrain could be identified. These findings conclude that reading on e-readers may induce increased levels of irritation and eyestrain. Predisposing factors, etiology, and potential remedial interventions remain to be determined.

  19. Two-year follow-up of the Genous™ endothelial progenitor cell capturing stent versus the Taxus Liberté stent in patients with de novo coronary artery lesions with a high-risk of restenosis: a randomized, single-center, pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.M. Beijk; M. Klomp; N. van Geloven; K.T. Koch; J.P.S. Henriques; J. Baan; M.M. Vis; J.G.P. Tijssen; J.J. Piek; R.J. de Winter

    2011-01-01

    In the prospective randomized TRIAS pilot study, the bio-engineered Genous™ endothelial progenitor cell capturing stent was compared with the Taxus Liberté™ SR paclitaxel-eluting stent. At 1 yr, a statistically nonsignificant difference in the rates of target vessel failure (cardiac death, myocardia

  20. Pilot study of the application of Tellus airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data for radon mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Green, B M R; Larmour, R

    2008-10-01

    The scope for using Tellus Project airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and soil geochemical data to predict the probability of houses in Northern Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is evaluated, in a pilot study in the southeast of the province, by comparing these data statistically with in-house radon measurements. There is generally good agreement between radon maps modelled from the airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data using multivariate linear regression analysis and conventional radon maps which depend solely on geological and indoor radon data. The radon maps based on the Tellus Project data identify some additional areas where the radon risk appears to be relatively high compared with the conventional radon maps. One of the ways of validating radon maps modelled on the Tellus Project data will be to carry out additional indoor measurements in these areas.

  1. Prolonged Grief in Palliative Family Caregivers: A Pilot Study in a Portuguese Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Alexandra; Delalibera, Mayra; Barbosa, António; Lawlor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Caregivers are particularly vulnerable to experience intense levels of distress following the loss. The aim of this prospective pilot study is to determine the incidence of prolonged grief disorder symptoms among caregivers. A total of 73 bereaved families responded to the Prolonged Grief Disorder Evaluation Instrument (PG-13) at 6 and 12 months following their loss. The incidence of prolonged grief disorder at the first assessment was 28.8%, and it decreased to 15.1% at the second assessment. The prevalence of prolonged grief disorder declined significantly over time (p = .041). In the second evaluation, six bereaved individuals continued to meet criteria for a diagnosis of prolonged grief disorder, 15 remitted, and 4 new (incident) cases emerged. The important differences in values that occur after 12 months suggest time is important in distinguishing between those at risk for persistent distress and those whose grief symptomatology will decrease with time.

  2. Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Using Telemedicine Tools: Pilot Study in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eszes, Dóra J.; Szabó, Dóra J.; Russell, Greg; Kirby, Phil; Paulik, Edit; Nagymajtényi, László

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a sight-threatening complication of diabetes. Telemedicine tools can prevent blindness. We aimed to investigate the patients' satisfaction when using such tools (fundus camera examination) and the effect of demographic and socioeconomic factors on participation in screening. Methods. Pilot study involving fundus camera screening and self-administered questionnaire on participants' experience during fundus examination (comfort, reliability, and future interest in participation), as well as demographic and socioeconomic factors was performed on 89 patients with known diabetes in Csongrád County, a southeastern region of Hungary. Results. Thirty percent of the patients had never participated in any ophthalmological screening, while 25.7% had DR of some grade based upon a standard fundus camera examination and UK-based DR grading protocol (Spectra™ software). Large majority of the patients were satisfied with the screening and found it reliable and acceptable to undertake examination under pupil dilation; 67.3% were willing to undergo nonmydriatic fundus camera examination again. There was a statistically significant relationship between economic activity, education and marital status, and future interest in participation. Discussion. Participants found digital retinal screening to be reliable and satisfactory. Telemedicine can be a strong tool, supporting eye care professionals and allowing for faster and more comfortable DR screening. PMID:28078306

  3. GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, Margaret; Marentette, Christina; Bujosa, Robert; Taylor, Jessica; Lewis, Preston

    2016-01-01

    During the spring of 2016, from April 4 - May 27, sixteen GLOBE schools participated in the GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study. Thirteen teachers from these schools had previously participated in the NASA LEARN program (Long-term Experience in Authentic Research with NASA) where they were GLOBE trained in Atmosphere protocols, and engaged in 1-3 years of research under the mentorship of NASA scientists. Each school was loaned two aerosol instruments for the Campaign duration, either 2 GLOBE sun photometers, 2 Calitoo sun photometers, or 1 of each. This allowed for students to make measurements side-by-side and in the case of the Calitoos, to compare AOT results immediately with each other for better consistency in data collection. Additionally, as part of the Field Campaign evaluation, multiple instruments allow for an assessment of the ease of use of each instrument for grade level of students, whether in middle school or high school. Before the Campaign, all GLOBE and Calitoo instruments were 'checked out' against an AERONET, then checked again upon return after the Campaign. By examining all data, before, during and after the Campaign, this gives an indication of instrument performance and proficiency obtained by the students. Support was provided to each teacher and their students at the level requested, via email, phone or video conferencing.

  4. Conceptualizing and Validating Marital Quality in Beijing: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiping; Xu, Xiaohe; Tsang, Sandra K M

    2013-08-01

    Since the inception of the economic reform, marital relationship in urban China has undergone dramatic transformations. Though the burgeoning body of scholarly research has demonstrated that marital quality has increasingly become an important aspect of family life among married persons in urban China, both the conceptualization and measurement of marital quality remain underdeveloped. The purpose of this pilot study is to develop and validate a comprehensive and culturally appropriate marital quality scale, namely the Chinese Marital Quality Scale (CMQS). Results from the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) conducted on a sample of 387 married persons from Beijing indicate that the CMQS can be conceptualized as a two-factorial and multidimensional construct, encompassing marital happiness, marital interaction, marital disagreement, marital problem, and marital instability. Additional statistical analyses also indicate that the CMQS has exhibited satisfactory reliability and concurrent validity. It is thus concluded that the CMQS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure marital quality in contemporary Beijing and possibly in other Chinese cities.

  5. Lucid dreaming treatment for nightmares: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoormaker, Victor I; van den Bout, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of the cognitive-restructuring technique 'lucid dreaming treatment' (LDT) on chronic nightmares. Becoming lucid (realizing that one is dreaming) during a nightmare allows one to alter the nightmare storyline during the nightmare itself. After having filled out a sleep and a posttraumatic stress disorder questionnaire, 23 nightmare sufferers were randomly divided into 3 groups; 8 participants received one 2-hour individual LDT session, 8 participants received one 2-hour group LDT session, and 7 participants were placed on the waiting list. LDT consisted of exposure, mastery, and lucidity exercises. Participants filled out the same questionnaires 12 weeks after the intervention (follow-up). At follow-up the nightmare frequency of both treatment groups had decreased. There were no significant changes in sleep quality and posttraumatic stress disorder symptom severity. Lucidity was not necessary for a reduction in nightmare frequency. LDT seems effective in reducing nightmare frequency, although the primary therapeutic component (i.e. exposure, mastery, or lucidity) remains unclear.

  6. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience.

  7. Perceived harmfulness of substance use: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Harm ratings of substances help in understanding the perception toward substance use and formulating policies. Evidence of such harm ratings by substance users and their caregivers provides a clearer perspective of those who experience and observe such harm closely. Materials and Methods: Substance users and their caregivers were recruited from the Drug De-addiction and Treatment Centre of PGIMER, Chandigarh. Sociodemographic details of the subjects were noted. The subjects were then asked to rate a list of psychoactive preparations according to the harms they thought the preparation caused. The list of substances was developed taking into consideration substance commonly encountered in the geographical area. The harm ratings were transformed on a scale of 0-100. Results: All subjects were males and majority of them were educated above 10 th standard, were not employed and belonged to urban background. Most of them had taken psychoactive substances in their lifetimes but were currently abstinent. Most of the subjects endorsed intravenous drugs as the most harmful, followed by heroin. Beer and chewable tobacco considered the least harmful substances. Greater degree of education was associated with lower harm rankings for heroin, cannabis, dextropropoxyphene, and raw opium; while urban residence was associated with greater harm ratings for cannabis and raw opium. Differences in the harms were perceived for different preparations of the same active compound for alcohol and nicotine. Conclusion: Harm ratings of substances can be a useful guide while formulating policies and allocating resources. Need for further research extending this pilot study is emphasized.

  8. A Problem Solving Intervention for hospice caregivers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Washington, Karla; Fruehling, Lynne Thomas; Haggarty-Robbins, Donna; Doorenbos, Ardith; Wechkin, Hope; Berry, Donna

    2010-08-01

    The Problem Solving Intervention (PSI) is a structured, cognitive-behavioral intervention that provides people with problem-solving coping skills to help them face major negative life events and daily challenges. PSI has been applied to numerous settings but remains largely unexplored in the hospice setting. The aim of this pilot study was to demonstrate the feasibility of PSI targeting informal caregivers of hospice patients. We enrolled hospice caregivers who were receiving outpatient services from two hospice agencies. The intervention included three visits by a research team member. The agenda for each visit was informed by the problem-solving theoretical framework and was customized based on the most pressing problems identified by the caregivers. We enrolled 29 caregivers. Patient's pain was the most frequently identified problem. On average, caregivers reported a higher quality of life and lower level of anxiety postintervention than at baseline. An examination of the caregiver reaction assessment showed an increase of positive esteem average and a decrease of the average value of lack of family support, impact on finances, impact on schedules, and on health. After completing the intervention, caregivers reported lower levels of anxiety, improved problem solving skills, and a reduced negative impact of caregiving. Furthermore, caregivers reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention, perceiving it as a platform to articulate their challenges and develop a plan to address them. Findings demonstrate the value of problem solving as a psycho-educational intervention in the hospice setting and call for further research in this area.

  9. Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Using Telemedicine Tools: Pilot Study in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dóra J. Eszes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a sight-threatening complication of diabetes. Telemedicine tools can prevent blindness. We aimed to investigate the patients’ satisfaction when using such tools (fundus camera examination and the effect of demographic and socioeconomic factors on participation in screening. Methods. Pilot study involving fundus camera screening and self-administered questionnaire on participants’ experience during fundus examination (comfort, reliability, and future interest in participation, as well as demographic and socioeconomic factors was performed on 89 patients with known diabetes in Csongrád County, a southeastern region of Hungary. Results. Thirty percent of the patients had never participated in any ophthalmological screening, while 25.7% had DR of some grade based upon a standard fundus camera examination and UK-based DR grading protocol (Spectra™ software. Large majority of the patients were satisfied with the screening and found it reliable and acceptable to undertake examination under pupil dilation; 67.3% were willing to undergo nonmydriatic fundus camera examination again. There was a statistically significant relationship between economic activity, education and marital status, and future interest in participation. Discussion. Participants found digital retinal screening to be reliable and satisfactory. Telemedicine can be a strong tool, supporting eye care professionals and allowing for faster and more comfortable DR screening.

  10. SoCIAL - training cognition in schizophrenia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Davide; Mucci, Armida; Piegari, Giuseppe; D'Alise, Valentina; Mazza, Annapaola; Galderisi, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of a new social cognition (SC) remediation intervention, the Social Cognition Individualized Activities Lab (SoCIAL), for subjects with schizophrenia. The training includes a module for emotion recognition and one for theory of mind. A comparison with a validated cognitive remediation intervention, the Social Skills And Neurocognitive Individualized Training (SSANIT), was conducted to verify the efficacy of the SoCIAL in improving SC. Ten stabilized patients with schizophrenia accepted to participate. Five patients were randomized to SoCIAL and five to SSANIT. The SoCIAL intervention includes individual sessions of neurocognitive individualized training (NIT) and group sessions of SC training. SSANIT includes individual sessions of NIT and group sessions of social skills individualized training. The interventions were matched for the overall treatment duration (20 weeks) and for the frequency of the sessions (two times a week, one for SoCIAL or social skills individualized training and one for NIT, with a duration of 80 minutes for each session). Results showed a significant treatment effect (effect size: Cohen's d 0.32) on the primary outcome; in fact, only the SoCIAL intervention improved theory of mind. Patients receiving the SoCIAL intervention also showed an improvement of avolition. These preliminary findings support further development of the SoCIAL and suggest that cognitive remediation should include an SC module.

  11. Psychiatry Residents' Use of Educational Websites: A Pilot Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torous, John; Franzan, Jamie; O'Connor, Ryan; Mathew, Ian; Keshavan, Matcheri; Kitts, Robert; Boland, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatry residents have numerous online educational resources readily available to them although currently there are no data regarding residents' use and perception of such websites. A survey was offered to 62 residents from all four years of training as well as recent graduates of a single psychiatry residency training program. Residents reported utilizing online resources on average 68 % of the time, in comparison to 32 % on average for printed materials. Residents reported UpToDate, PubMed, and Wikipedia as the most visited websites and ranked each highly but for different purposes. Thirty-five percent of residents felt that insufficient faculty guidance was a barrier to use of these educational websites. Pilot data indicate psychiatry residents use online resources daily for their education in various settings. Resident perceptions of individual website's trustworthiness, ease of use, and sources of clinical decision-making and personal learning suggest potential opportunities for educators to better understand the current use of these resources in residency training. Reported barriers including lack of faculty guidance suggest opportunities for academic psychiatry. Further study is necessary at multiple sites before such results may be generalized.

  12. Microwave Imaging of Human Forearms: Pilot Study and Image Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Gilmore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a pilot study using a microwave tomography system in which we image the forearms of 5 adult male and female volunteers between the ages of 30 and 48. Microwave scattering data were collected at 0.8 to 1.2 GHz with 24 transmitting and receiving antennas located in a matching fluid of deionized water and table salt. Inversion of the microwave data was performed with a balanced version of the multiplicative-regularized contrast source inversion algorithm formulated using the finite-element method (FEM-CSI. T1-weighted MRI images of each volunteer’s forearm were also collected in the same plane as the microwave scattering experiment. Initial “blind” imaging results from the utilized inversion algorithm show that the image quality is dependent on the thickness of the arm’s peripheral adipose tissue layer; thicker layers of adipose tissue lead to poorer overall image quality. Due to the exible nature of the FEM-CSI algorithm used, prior information can be readily incorporated into the microwave imaging inversion process. We show that by introducing prior information into the FEM-CSI algorithm the internal anatomical features of all the arms are resolved, significantly improving the images. The prior information was estimated manually from the blind inversions using an ad hoc procedure.

  13. Gene Expression Correlation for Cancer Diagnosis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbing Ling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor prognosis for late-stage, high-grade, and recurrent cancers has been motivating cancer researchers to search for more efficient biomarkers to identify the onset of cancer. Recent advances in constructing and dynamically analyzing biomolecular networks for different types of cancer have provided a promising novel strategy to detect tumorigenesis and metastasis. The observation of different biomolecular networks associated with normal and cancerous states led us to hypothesize that correlations for gene expressions could serve as valid indicators of early cancer development. In this pilot study, we tested our hypothesis by examining whether the mRNA expressions of three randomly selected cancer-related genes PIK3C3, PIM3, and PTEN were correlated during cancer progression and the correlation coefficients could be used for cancer diagnosis. Strong correlations (0.68≤r≤1.0 were observed between PIK3C3 and PIM3 in breast cancer, between PIK3C3 and PTEN in breast and ovary cancers, and between PIM3 and PTEN in breast, kidney, liver, and thyroid cancers during disease progression, implicating that the correlations for cancer network gene expressions could serve as a supplement to current clinical biomarkers, such as cancer antigens, for early cancer diagnosis.

  14. Intraoperative music application in children and adolescents - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, P K; Spielmann, N; Buehrer, S; Schmidt, A R; Weiss, M; Schmitz, A

    2017-09-01

    Hospitalization, surgery and anaesthesia may lead to new-onset maladaptive behaviour, emotional distress and trauma. This pilot study aims to investigate the influence of intraoperatively applied music on post-operative behaviour in children and adolescents. Children with an ASA physical state classification of I or II, aged from 4 to 16 years and scheduled for elective circumcision or inguinal hernia repair under combined general and caudal anaesthesia were included. The children were randomized into two groups. They wore headphones during surgery, and were either exposed to music or not. All involved staff were blinded. Post-operative behaviour was documented by parents on day 7, 14 and 28 after surgery, using a questionnaire adapted from the "Post Hospitalization Behavioural Questionnaire" (PHBQ). Overall occurrence of at least one item indicating maladaptive behaviour was the primary outcome. Data are presented as median (interquartile range). In total, 135 children aged 6.6 (5.3-8.5) years, weighing 22 (19-29) kg, were included, with 112 completed questionnaires returned. Overall occurrence of at least one maladaptive item was lower in the music group, with a significantly lower incidence on day 7 (51% vs. 77% in controls; P < 0.01). Intraoperative music application in children undergoing minor surgical procedures may reduce the incidence of post-operative maladaptive behaviour within the first week. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Skin and plasma autofluorescence during hemodialysis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graaff, Reindert; Arsov, Stefan; Ramsauer, Bernd; Koetsier, Marten; Sundvall, Nils; Engels, Gerwin E; Sikole, Aleksandar; Lundberg, Lennart; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) is related to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and is one of the strongest prognostic markers of mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether changes in skin AF appear after a single HD session and if they might be related to changes in plasma AF. Skin and plasma AF were measured before and after HD in 35 patients on maintenance HD therapy (nine women and 26 men, median age 68 years, range 33-83). Median dialysis time was 4 h (range 3-5.5). Skin AF was measured noninvasively with an AGE Reader, and plasma AF was measured before and after HD at 460 nm after excitation at 370 nm. The HD patients had on average a 65% higher skin AF value than age-matched healthy persons (P < 0.001). Plasma AF was reduced by 14% (P < 0.001), whereas skin AF was not changed after a single HD treatment. No significant influence of the reduced plasma AF on skin AF levels was found. This suggests that the measurement of skin AF can be performed during the whole dialysis period and is not directly influenced by the changes in plasma AF during HD.

  16. Evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Laura; Bruce, Natalie; Suh, Kathryn N; Roth, Virginia

    2014-07-01

    Environmental auditing is an important tool to ensure consistent and effective cleaning. Our pilot study compared an alcohol-based fluorescent marking product and an adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence product for use in an environmental auditing program to determine which product was more practical and acceptable to users. Both products were tested on 15 preselected high touch objects in randomly selected patient rooms, following regular daily cleaning. A room was considered a "pass" if ≥80% of surfaces were adequately cleaned as defined by manufacturers' guidelines. A qualitative survey assessed user preference and operational considerations. Using fluorescent marking, 9 of 37 patient rooms evaluated (24%) were considered a "pass" after daily cleaning. Using adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence, 21 of 37 patient rooms passed (57%). There was great variability in results between different high touch objects. Eighty percent of users preferred the alcohol-based fluorescent marking product because it provided an effective visual aid to coach staff on proper cleaning techniques and allowed simple and consistent application. Environmental auditing using translucent, alcohol-based fluorescent marking best met the requirements of our organization. Our results reinforce the importance of involving a multidisciplinary team in evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sociomoral Reasoning in Adults with ADHD: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate E. Thomason

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is frequently linked with antisocial behaviour, yet less is known about its relationship with sociomoral reasoning, and the possible mediating effect of intelligence. A pilot study was designed to investigate the relationship between antisocial personality traits, intelligence and sociomoral reasoning in adults with ADHD. Twenty two adults with ADHD and 21 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and IQ completed a battery of measures including the National Adult Reading Test, Gough Socialisation Scale and Sociomoral Reflection Measure-Short Form. There was no difference between the groups and levels of sociomoral reasoning, despite the ADHD group reporting greater antisocial personality traits. Sociomoral reasoning was positively correlated with intelligence. Results from a hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that both antisocial traits and IQ were significant predictors of sociomoral reasoning, with IQ proving the most powerful predictor. Whilst antisocial personality traits may explain some of the variance in levels of sociomoral reasoning, a diagnosis of ADHD does not appear to hinder the development of mature moral reasoning. Intellectual functioning appears to facilitate the development of sociomoral reasoning. A further analysis showed that both ADHD and low sociomoral reasoning were significant predictors of antisocial traits. The current findings have important treatment implications.

  18. Adjustable recessions in horizontal comitant strabismus: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the surgical outcome of adjustable with the conventional recession in patients with horizontal comitant strabismus. Patients and Methods: A prospective comparative nonrandomized interventional pilot study was performed on patients with horizontal comitant strabismus. Fifty-four patients (27 in each group were allocated into 2 groups to undergo either adjustable suture (AS recession or non-AS (NAS recession along with conventional resection. The patients were followed up for 6 months. A successful outcome was defined as deviation ±10 prism diopters at 6 months. The results were statistically analyzed by Chi-square test, Fisher′s exact test, and Student′s t-test. Results: A successful outcome was found in 24 (88.8% patients in AS and 17 (62.9% in NAS group (P = 0.02. The postoperative adjustment was done in 13 (48.1% patients in AS group. There was one complication (tenon′s cyst in AS group. Conclusion: AS recession may be considered in all cooperative patients undergoing strabismus surgery for comitant deviations.

  19. NEREDA Pilot Studies 2003 - 2010; NEREDA Pilotonderzoeken 2003 - 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkhof, D.; De Bruin, B.; Kerstholt, M.; Kraan, R.; Miska, V.; Peeters, T.; Van der Roest, H.; Verschoor, J. [DHV, Amersfoort (Netherlands); De Kreuk, M.; Van Loosdrecht, M. [Technische Universiteit Delft TUD, Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Since the nineties of last century research has been conducted on the development of the aerobic granular sludge technology for wastewater treatment. A first STOWA pilot research project was executed at Ede, Netherlands. In 2005 a technological breakthrough was accomplished and was the starting sign for a broader national development program (NNOP). Next to STOWA, Delft University of Delft and DHV, six Waterboards are involved within this development program. Main goal of the NNOP is to develop a new competitive biological wastewater treatment technology (Nereda). After the Ede project additional pilot research projects were conducted at four locations in the Netherlands. Within these pilot research projects the following aspects were investigated: granulation on different wastewater types; stability of granular sludge; optimization of nitrogen and phosphate removal, especially during winter time; control of effluent suspended solids concentration; and obtain technological design parameters for full scale WWTPs (waste water treatment plants) [Dutch] In dit rapport staan de resultaten beschreven van de tussen 2003 en 2010 uitgevoerde pilots met de aeroob-korrelslibtechnologie Nereda. Dit is een nieuwe zuiveringstechnologie waarbij het reinigende actief slib geen vlokken maar korrels vormt. Hierdoor bezinkt het slib sneller en makkelijker. De technologie wordt gekenmerkt door hoge zuiveringsrendementen, weinig ruimtebeslag (voor bezinking) en relatief lage energiekosten. De resultaten van de pilots zijn dermate goed, dat drie van de vijf deelnemende waterschappen hebben besloten om 1 van hun rwzi's (rioolwaterzuiveringsinstallaties) aan te passen op basis van de Nereda-technologie.

  20. Feasibility of Pilates exercise to decrease falls risk: a pilot randomized controlled trial in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna L; Talevski, Jason; Bohensky, Megan A; Brand, Caroline A; Cameron, Peter A; Morello, Renata T

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of Pilates exercise in older people to decrease falls risk and inform a larger trial. Pilot Randomized controlled trial. Community physiotherapy clinic. A total of 53 community-dwelling people aged ⩾60 years (mean age, 69.3 years; age range, 61-84). A 60-minute Pilates class incorporating best practice guidelines for exercise to prevent falls, performed twice weekly for 12 weeks. All participants received a letter to their general practitioner with falls risk information, fall and fracture prevention education and home exercises. Indicators of feasibility included: acceptability (recruitment, retention, intervention adherence and participant experience survey); safety (adverse events); and potential effectiveness (fall, fall injury and injurious fall rates; standing balance; lower limb strength; and flexibility) measured at 12 and 24 weeks. Recruitment was achievable but control group drop-outs were high (23%). Of the 20 participants who completed the intervention, 19 (95%) attended ⩾75% of the classes and reported classes were enjoyable and would recommend them to others. The rate of fall injuries at 24 weeks was 42% lower and injurious fall rates 64% lower in the Pilates group, however, was not statistically significant (P = 0.347 and P = 0.136). Standing balance, lower-limb strength and flexibility improved in the Pilates group relative to the control group (P Pilates in older people would be feasible and is warranted given the acceptability and potential positive effects of Pilates on fall injuries and fall risk factors. The protocol for this study is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN1262000224820). © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Lancaster, Gillian A; Campbell, Michael J; Thabane, Lehana; Hopewell, Sally; Coleman, Claire L; Bond, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms 'pilot' and 'feasibility' in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms 'feasibility' or 'pilot' as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term 'feasibility' in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention.

  2. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M Eldridge

    Full Text Available We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms 'pilot' and 'feasibility' in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms 'feasibility' or 'pilot' as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term 'feasibility' in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention.

  3. Learning the 'SMART' way... results from a pilot study evaluating an interprofessional acute care study day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of patients requiring critical care are now being managed outside of critical care facilities. There is evidence that staff looking after these patients lack the necessary knowledge and skills to care for them safely, and that effective pre-registration education can play a significant role in addressing these shortfalls in nurses' knowledge and skills. A team from Sheffield Hallam University, in collaboration with the University of Sheffield, developed a pilot one day interprofessional acute illness programme which was called SMART® (Student Management of Acute illness - Recognition and Treatment). To evaluate the pilot programme, 16 student doctors and 72 student nurses were recruited. A pre- and post-course questionnaire based on the Featherstone et al. (2005) evaluation of ALERT was used to ascertain the students' general level of knowledge of the deteriorating patient, their experiences of and confidence in caring for an acutely unwell patient, and their level of comfort with interprofessional working. The results from the pilot study indicate that the students' levels of knowledge, their levels of confidence and their comfort with interprofessional working all rose after undertaking the programme. The pilot study has a number of implications for the future teaching and learning of acute care clinical skills, within a theoretically based curriculum.

  4. Smoking close to others and butt littering at bus stops: pilot observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Wilson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transportation settings such as bus stops and train station platforms are increasingly the target for new smokefree legislation. Relevant issues include secondhand smoke exposure, nuisance, litter, fire risks and the normalization of smoking. We therefore aimed to pilot study aspects of smoking behavior and butt disposal at bus stops.Methods. Systematic observation of smoking and butt disposal by smokers at bus stops. The selection of 11 sites was a mix of convenience and purposeful (bus stops on main routes in two New Zealand cities.Results. During 27 h of observation, a total of 112 lit cigarettes were observed being smoked. Smoking occurred in the presence of: just adults (46%, both young people and adults (44%, just young people (6% and alone (5%. An average of 6.3 adults and 3.8 young people were present at the bus stops while smoking occurred, at average minimum distances of 1.7 and 2.2 m respectively. In bus stops that included an enclosed shelter, 33% of the cigarettes were smoked inside the shelter with others present. Littering was the major form of cigarette disposal with 84% of cigarettes smoked being littered (95% CI; 77%–90%. Also, 4% of disposals were into vegetation, which may pose a fire risk.Conclusions. This pilot study is limited by its small size and various methodological aspects but it appears to be a first attempt to provide observational evidence around smoking at bus stops. The issues described could be considered by policy makers who are investigating national smokefree laws or by-laws covering transportation settings.

  5. Smoking close to others and butt littering at bus stops: pilot observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nick; Oliver, Jane; Thomson, George

    2014-01-01

    Background. Transportation settings such as bus stops and train station platforms are increasingly the target for new smokefree legislation. Relevant issues include secondhand smoke exposure, nuisance, litter, fire risks and the normalization of smoking. We therefore aimed to pilot study aspects of smoking behavior and butt disposal at bus stops. Methods. Systematic observation of smoking and butt disposal by smokers at bus stops. The selection of 11 sites was a mix of convenience and purposeful (bus stops on main routes) in two New Zealand cities. Results. During 27 h of observation, a total of 112 lit cigarettes were observed being smoked. Smoking occurred in the presence of: just adults (46%), both young people and adults (44%), just young people (6%) and alone (5%). An average of 6.3 adults and 3.8 young people were present at the bus stops while smoking occurred, at average minimum distances of 1.7 and 2.2 m respectively. In bus stops that included an enclosed shelter, 33% of the cigarettes were smoked inside the shelter with others present. Littering was the major form of cigarette disposal with 84% of cigarettes smoked being littered (95% CI; 77%-90%). Also, 4% of disposals were into vegetation, which may pose a fire risk. Conclusions. This pilot study is limited by its small size and various methodological aspects but it appears to be a first attempt to provide observational evidence around smoking at bus stops. The issues described could be considered by policy makers who are investigating national smokefree laws or by-laws covering transportation settings.

  6. Menstrual phase effects on smoking cessation: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Matthew J; Saladin, Michael E; Leinbach, Ashley S; Larowe, Steven D; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2008-03-01

    A growing body of research suggests that nicotine withdrawal and cigarette craving may vary across the menstrual cycle and that the luteal phase of the cycle may be associated with increases in each. This potential relationship suggests that careful timing of quit attempts during the menstrual cycle may improve initial success at abstinence, although there are no direct tests of this approach yet published. Our objectives were to preliminarily test the effect of timing of quit attempts for smoking cessation relative to menstrual cycle and to identify methodological procedures that could guide subsequent, larger clinical trials. In this pilot study, we randomized female smokers aged 18-40 who were not currently using hormonal contraception to quit smoking during either the follicular (n = 25) or luteal phase (n = 19) of their menstrual cycle. Participants were provided with two sessions of smoking cessation counseling (90 minutes total). All participants were provided with a transdermal nicotine patch contingent on maintenance of abstinence throughout the course of the 6-week study. Among participants who initiated treatment, received the patch, and made a quit attempt (n = 35), carbon monoxide-verified repeated point prevalence abstinence 2 weeks after the target quit date was higher in the follicular than the luteal group (32% vs. 19%, respectively; OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 0.4-9.8). Within the overall study population, this difference was slightly lower (24% vs. 16%; OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 0.4-7.8). Timing quit attempts based on menstrual phase is feasible. Insights gained from this study and the recommendations made herein may inform future research on this important clinical question.

  7. Free online otolaryngology educational modules: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina; Bryson, Paul C; Sykes, Kevin J; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-04-01

    Otolaryngology residents need concise, easily accessible modules to expand educational opportunities between surgical cases. These modules should be inexpensive to create and improve learning outcomes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether otolaryngology residents at multiple institutions used online video modules to supplement their studying for the Otolaryngology Training Exam, whether the modules had any effect on their Otolaryngology Training Examination Scores, and to obtain survey feedback about the modules. This randomized trial was conducted in 3 academic departments of otolaryngology in the United States among 37 residents enrolled in 3 otolaryngology residency programs. Residents were randomized into 2 groups, one with access to the educational modules and the other with no access. Otolaryngology training examination scores were obtained from the year prior to the intervention (2012) and the year following module access (2013). Residents with access to the modules were also surveyed to assess use and obtain feedback about the modules. Otolaryngology training examination scores improved significantly from 2012 to 2013 among both residents who had access to the modules and those who did not in the sections of head and neck, laryngology, and sleep medicine. However, scores in the sections of pediatric otolaryngology (8% increase, P = .03), otology (7% increase, P = .02), and facial plastic surgery (10% increase, P = .02) improved from 2012 to 2013 only among residents with access to the modules. All respondents rated the videos as very helpful, with a rating of 4 of 5 on a Likert scale. Online otolaryngology educational modules are an inexpensive way to expand resident learning opportunities. Despite the lack of quantifiable improvement in otolaryngology training examination scores in this study, use of online modules sends a message to otolaryngology residents that their education is a priority; self-study outside the hospital

  8. Comparison of organochlorine chemical body burdens of female breast cancer cases with cancer free women in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil--Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, C.A.; Petreas, M.X.; Caleffi, M.; Barbosa, F.S.; Goth-Goldstein, R.

    1999-12-01

    This pilot study collected preliminary data to examine known and suspected breast cancer risk factors among women living in rural and urban areas in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil by questionnaire. In addition, the body burden levels of a panel of organochlorines was measured in a small clinic-based prospective sample.

  9. A Pilot Study Assessing the Feasibility of a Facial Emotion Training Paradigm for School-Age Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Ponsaran, Nicole M.; Evans-Smith, Bernadette; Johnson, Jason K.; McKown, Clark

    2014-01-01

    Many children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) demonstrate facial emotion recognition and expression impairments. These impairments may contribute to social disability and may put children with ASDs at risk for developing further mental health problems. In this pilot study, we examined the use of a coach- and computer-assisted facial emotion…

  10. Scatter Plot Analysis of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness and Severe Disruptive Behavior in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Anneke P. H. M.; Didden, Robert; Bouts, Lex; Smits, Marcel G.; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are at risk for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and disruptive behavior. This pilot study explores temporal characteristics of EDS and severe disruptive behavior across time of day and day of week in seven individuals with PWS (aged between 33 and 49 years) of whom five were matched to controls.…

  11. Stay Well and Healthy! Pilot Study Findings from an In-Home Preventive Healthcare Programme for Persons Ageing with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Harriet Udin; Hahn, Joan Earle

    2005-01-01

    Background:While disparities in the health status for persons ageing with intellectual and developmental disabilities have been well documented, interventions that address individual risks in physical, emotional, social and environmental health among this population are lacking. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of two in-home…

  12. EFFECT OF DANCE EXERCISE ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Song

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group. The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD-K. Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048, word list delayed recall (p = 0.038, word list recognition (p = 0.007, and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037. However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome.

  13. Association among interleukin-6 gene polymorphisms, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and chronic periodontitis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, Loganathan; Vijayshree Priyadharshini, Jayaseelan; Sivapathasundharam, Balasundaram

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (-174 G>C) in the interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene with chronic periodontitis (CP) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in south Indian population. Genomic DNA was obtained from the white blood cells of 30 patients with T2DM, 30 patients with CP, 30 patients with T2DM with CP, and 30 controls. DNA was amplified using polymerase chain reaction with specific primers flanking the locus -174 of the IL-6 gene and further genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The genotype distribution and allele frequencies between the study groups were determined using χ(2) -test. The relative risk was estimated with a 95% confidence interval. The CP group (26.7%) displayed a greater percentage of GC genotype (P = 0.026) when compared to the control group (3.3%). A statistically-significant difference in the allele frequencies was found between the control and CP group with the C-allele frequency being greater (0.13) in the CP group than normal controls (0.02). The GC genotype was found to be the risk genotype and the C allele was found to be the risk allele for the development of CP. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment: the Seaside, Oregon Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, F. I.; Geist, E. L.; Synolakis, C.; Titov, V. V.

    2004-12-01

    A pilot study of Seaside, Oregon is underway, to develop methodologies for probabilistic tsunami hazard assessments that can be incorporated into Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) developed by FEMA's National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Current NFIP guidelines for tsunami hazard assessment rely on the science, technology and methodologies developed in the 1970s; although generally regarded as groundbreaking and state-of-the-art for its time, this approach is now superseded by modern methods that reflect substantial advances in tsunami research achieved in the last two decades. In particular, post-1990 technical advances include: improvements in tsunami source specification; improved tsunami inundation models; better computational grids by virtue of improved bathymetric and topographic databases; a larger database of long-term paleoseismic and paleotsunami records and short-term, historical earthquake and tsunami records that can be exploited to develop improved probabilistic methodologies; better understanding of earthquake recurrence and probability models. The NOAA-led U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP), in partnership with FEMA, USGS, NSF and Emergency Management and Geotechnical agencies of the five Pacific States, incorporates these advances into site-specific tsunami hazard assessments for coastal communities in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington. NTHMP hazard assessment efforts currently focus on developing deterministic, "credible worst-case" scenarios that provide valuable guidance for hazard mitigation and emergency management. The NFIP focus, on the other hand, is on actuarial needs that require probabilistic hazard assessments such as those that characterize 100- and 500-year flooding events. There are clearly overlaps in NFIP and NTHMP objectives. NTHMP worst-case scenario assessments that include an estimated probability of occurrence could benefit the NFIP; NFIP probabilistic assessments of 100- and 500-yr

  15. Study of the CMS Phase 1 Pixel Pilot Blade Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The silicon pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracking system. It was replaced in March 2017 with an upgraded one, called the Phase 1 upgrade detector. During Long Shutdown 1, a third disk was inserted into the present forward pixel detector with eight prototype blades constructed using a new digital read-out chip architecture and a prototype readout chain. Testing the performance of these pilot modules enabled us to gain experience with the Phase 1 upgrade modules. In this document, the data reconstruction with the pilot system is presented. The hit finding efficiency and residual of these new modules is also shown, and how these observables were used to adjust the timing of the pilot blades.

  16. Elder abuse and dementia--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, C; Mortimer, A

    1995-01-01

    An anonymous postal questionnaire was distributed to 200 members of a voluntary organisation providing information and support for the carers of dementia sufferers. Carers were asked about the possible occurrence of verbal, physical abuse and neglect. Those carers who admitted to any form of abuse were compared with those who did not and risk factors in both carers and patients were analysed to determine risk factors for abuse. Fifty-five per cent of carers admitted to some form of abuse with verbal abuse being the most common form. Verbal abuse was associated with a poor premorbid relationship and social isolation of the carer and was found to be a risk factor for physical abuse. Those carers who had high GHQ scores and who had been caring for longer were more likely to physically abuse the person they cared for. This study supports the hypothesis that various categories of abuse have different correlates.

  17. Extending decision making competence to special populations: a pilot study of persons on the autism spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Irwin P; Gaeth, Gary J; Foley-Nicpon, Megan; Yegorova, Vitaliya; Cederberg, Charles; Yan, Haoyang

    2015-01-01

    The area of decision making has much to offer in our effort to understand special populations. This pilot study is an example of just such a project, where we illustrate how traditional decision making tools and tasks can be used to uncover strengths and weaknesses within a growing population of young adults with autism. In this pilot project we extended accounts of autistic behavior such as those derived from "theory of mind" to predict key components of decision making in high-functioning young adults on the autism spectrum. A battery of tests was administered to 15 high-functioning college students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), focusing on decision making competence (DMC) and other aspects of decision making related to known deficits associated with autism. Data from this group were compared to data from unselected college students receiving the same measures. First, as a test of a key social deficit associated with autism, the target group scored much lower on the Empathy Quotient scale. Traditional elements of decision making competency such as Numeracy and application of decision rules were comparable across groups. However, there were differences in thinking style, with the ASD group showing lesser ability and engagement in intuitive thinking, and they showed lower levels of risk taking. For comparisons within the ASD group, autobiographical reports concerning individual lifestyles and outcomes were used to derive a scale of Social Functioning. The lowest scoring individuals showed the lowest levels of intuitive thinking, the lowest perceived levels of others' endorsement of socially undesirable behaviors, and the lowest ability to discriminate between "good" and "bad" risks. Results are discussed in terms of interventions that might aid high-functioning young adults with ASD in their everyday decision making.

  18. Accumulation of contaminants from urban rainfall runoff in blue crabs: A pilot study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of using caged blue crabs Callinectes sapidus to monitor accumulation of contaminants in urban...

  19. A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pilot Study of Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) investigated the aggregate exposures of 257 preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to pollutants commonly detected in their everyday environments. ...

  20. Psychological Impact of Life as Refugees: A Pilot Study on a Syrian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychological Impact of Life as Refugees: A Pilot Study on a Syrian Camp .... was then pretested by pharmacy students (n = 10) and ... These factors included type of shelter; period spent in .... counselors, along with a training mental program.

  1. Dry deposition of sulphur on the Mpumalanga highveld: a pilot study using the inferential method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zunckel, M

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available A pilot study which uses the inferential method to estimate dry deposition of sulphur on the central Mpumalanga highveld is discussed in this paper. Ambient concentrations of sulphur dioxide, particulates and micro-meteorological measurements from 2...

  2. Practical Implications of Metacognitively Oriented Psychotherapy in Psychosis : Findings From a Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; van Donkersgoed, Rozanne J. M.; Aleman, Andre; van der Gaag, Mark; Wunderink, Lex; Arends, Johan; Lysaker, Paul H.; Pijnenborg, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    In preparation for a multicenter randomized controlled trial, a pilot study was conducted investigating the feasibility and acceptance of a shortened version (12 vs. 40 sessions) of an individual metacognitive psychotherapy (Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy [MERIT]). Twelve participants

  3. Breeding Biology of White-faced Ibis in Northwest Nevada Pilot Study Report 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Between June 1 and September 15, 1994, a pilot study was conducted for the purpose of testing and developing techniques necessary in understanding the breeding...

  4. ShopTrip Pilot Study : The Preference-Conscious Choice Modelled and Observed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barratt, Daniel; Selsøe-Sørensen, Henrik; Qvistgaard, Francoise

    The goal of the current pilot study was to construct and test a new kind of setup for observing the consumer’s purchasing behaviour, with a particular focus on fairness and misleadingness issues as opposed to marketing and sales. The setup described represents a compromise between ecological...... validity and experimental control in at least two ways: the way the consumer’s behaviour is monitored and the way the consumer’s behaviour is brought about. The first part of the pilot study involved a simulation of an ‘e-shopping environment’ which had the advantage of creating a relatively realistic...... of the pilot study, the participants were presented with actual products and instructed to assume the role of ‘health detectives’ in order to enhance the degree of preference consciousness even further. In the third and final part of the pilot study, the participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire...

  5. Photogrammetric Documentation of Regions of Interest at Autopsy—A Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, Liselott Kristina; Larsen, Peter Kastmand; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this pilot study, the authors tested whether photogrammetry can replace or supplement physical measurements made during autopsies and, based on such measurements, whether virtual computer models may be applicable in forensic reconstructions. Photogrammetric and physical measurements of markers...

  6. Observation of Autoregulation Indices During Ventricular CSF Drainage After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, Marcel J. H.; de Jong, Sytse F.; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Regtien, Joost; Depreitere, Bart; Czosnyka, Marek; Smielewski, Peter; Elting, Jan Willem J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autoregulation is increasingly recognized as a factor that requires evaluation when managing poor grade aneurysmal subarachno pilot study, we investigated whether intraventricular intracranial pressure (ICP) derived when

  7. Feasibility of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Nispen Ruth MA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demographic ageing will lead to increasing pressure on visual rehabilitation services, which need to be efficiently organised in the near future. The Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI was developed to assess the rehabilitation needs of visually impaired persons. This pilot study tests the feasibility of the D-AI using a computer-assisted telephone interview. Methods In addition to the regular intake, the first version of the D-AI was assessed in 20 patients. Subsequently, patients and intake assessors were asked to fill in an evaluation form. Based on these evaluations, a new version of the D-AI was developed. Results Mean administration time of the D-AI was 88.8 (± 41.0 minutes. Overall, patients and assessors were positive about the D-AI assessment. However, professionals and 60% of the patients found the administration time to be too long. All included items were considered relevant and only minor adjustments were recommended. Conclusion The systematic character of the revised D-AI will prevent topics from being overlooked and indicate which needs have the highest priority from a patient-centred perspective. Moreover, ongoing assessment of the D-AI will enhance evaluation of the rehabilitation process. To decrease administration time, in the revised D-AI only the top priority goals will be fully assessed. Using the D-AI, a rehabilitation plan based on individual needs can be developed for each patient. Moreover, it enables better evaluation of the effects of rehabilitation. A larger validation study is planned.

  8. The Incidence and Temporal Patterning of Insomnia: a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Michael; Phillips, Cindy; Gehrman, Philip R.; Pigeon, Wilfred; Matteson, Sara; Jungquist, Carla

    2014-01-01

    To date very little research has been conducted on night-to-night variability in the incidence of insomnia. Unclear from prior research is whether subjects with Primary Insomnia (PI) exhibit good sleep (or better than average sleep) on some interval basis. In the present study, pilot data are provided on 1) the frequency with which “good sleep” occurs in subjects with PI and 2) whether these events occur in a non-random manner. 10 PI subjects participated in this “naturalistic” study. All subjects completed daily sleep diaries for a minimum of 20 days. None of the subjects received treatment for their insomnia during the monitoring period. The night-tonight data were evaluated by typing each night’s sleep as “Good” or “Bad” and then by determining the number of bad nights that occurred prior to a good night for each subject. Good and bad nights were typed in two ways: 1. using a ≥ 85% cutoff and 2. using a better than the individual’s mean sleep efficiency (idiographic cutoff). Subjects exhibited good sleep on between 29% (> 85% criteria) and 55% (idiographic criteria) of the nights evaluated. The temporal patterning analysis (based on a idiographic cutoff) revealed that better than average sleep most frequently occurred (> 89% of instances) following one to three night’s of poor sleep. These data suggests that insomnia severity may be mediated/moderated by sleep homeostasis and that the homeostat, or input to the homeostat, may be abnormal in patients with Primary Insomnia. PMID:19912510

  9. Endometrial Histology of Depomedroxyprogesterone Acetate Users: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To obtain pilot data on the endometrial histology of Depomedroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera, DMPA users experiencing breakthrough bleeding (BTB versus users with amenorrhea. To compare the endometrial histology of patients who used DMPA continuously for 3–12 months versus those who used it for 13 months or more. Methods. Cross-sectional study. Endometrial biopsy was obtained from all consenting patients who used DMPA for at least 3 months. Patients were divided into those with BTB in the last 3 months versus those with amenorrhea for at least 3 months. Histology results and duration of therapy were compared. Results. The proportion of women with chronic endometritis, uterine polyps, atrophic, proliferative, or progesterone-dominant endometrium did not differ between those DMPA users with BTB versus those with amenorrhea. Duration of therapy did not correlate with symptoms of BTB or endometrial histology. Chronic endometritis was the most common histologic finding (10/40, 25% and occurred more often in women experiencing BTB (35% versus 15% (RR 1.62 CI 0.91–2.87. Moreover, 45% of women with BTB had received DMPA for more than 12 months. Conclusions. BTB was more common than previously reported in women using DMPA for more than 12 months. Chronic endometritis, which may indicate an underlying infectious or intracavitary anatomic etiology, has not been previously reported as a frequent finding in DMPA users, and may be related to ethnic or other sociodemographic characteristics of our patient population. Further study to elucidate the etiology of chronic endometritis in these patients is warranted.

  10. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coolen EH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ester H Coolen,1 Jos M Draaisma,2 Sabien den Hamer,3 Jan L Loeffen2 1Department of Pediatric Surgery, Amalia Children’s Hospital, Radboud University Medical Center, 2Department of Pediatrics, Amalia Children’s Hospital, Radboud University Medical Center, 3Department of Communication Science, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Purpose: Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often report having little opportunity to perform in the role of team leader during residency. In order to gain more insight into leadership skills and behaviors, we classified leadership styles of pediatric residents during simulated emergencies. Methods: We conducted a prospective quantitative study to investigate leadership styles used by pediatric residents during simulated emergencies with clinical deterioration of a child at a pediatric ward. Using videotaped scenarios of 48 simulated critical events among 12 residents, we were able to classify verbal and nonverbal communication into different leadership styles according to the situational leadership theory. Results: The coaching style (mean 54.5%, SD 7.8 is the most frequently applied by residents, followed by the directing style (mean 35.6%, SD 4.1. This pattern conforms to the task- and role-related requirements in our scenarios and it also conforms to the concept of situational leadership. We did not find any significant differences in leadership style according to the postgraduate year or scenario content. Conclusion: The model used in this pilot study helps us to gain a better understanding of the development of effective leadership behavior and supports the applicability of situational leadership theory in training leadership skills during residency. Keywords

  11. Interactive home telehealth and burns: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Sean; Gomez, Jason; Meller, Benjamin; Schneider, Jeffery C; Cheney, Meredith; Nejad, Shamim; Schulz, John; Goverman, Jeremy

    2017-06-19

    The objective of this study is to review our experience incorporating Interactive Home Telehealth (IHT) visits into follow-up burn care. A retrospective review of all burn patients participating in IHT encounters over the course of 15 months was performed. Connections were established through secure video conferencing and call-routing software. Patients connected with a personal computer or tablet and providers connected with a desktop computer with a high-definition web camera. In some cases, high-definition digital images were emailed to the provider prior to the virtual consultation. For each patient, the following was collected: (1) patient and injury demographics (diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical management), (2) total number of encounters, (3) service for each encounter (burn, psychiatry, and rehabilitation), (4) length of visit, including travel distance and time saved and, (5) complications, including re-admissions and connectivity issues. 52 virtual encounters were performed with 31 patients during the first year of the pilot project from March 2015 to June 2016. Mean age of the participant was 44 years (range 18-83 years). Mean total burn surface area of the participant was 12% (range 1-80%). Average roundtrip travel distance saved was 188 miles (range 4-822 miles). Average round trip travel time saved was 201min (range 20-564min). There were no unplanned re-admissions and no complications. Five connectivity issues were reported, none of which prevented completion of the visit. Interactive Home Telehealth is a safe and feasible modality for delivering follow-up care to burn patients. Burn care providers benefit from the potential to improve outpatient clinic utilization. Patients benefit from improved access to multiple members of their specialized burn care team, as well as cost-reductions for patient travel expenses. Future studies are needed to ensure patient and provider satisfaction and to further validate the significance, cost-effectiveness and

  12. Effect of Piroxicam on ART Outcome: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Sohrabvand

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most important factors affecting success rates in assisted reproductive techniques (ART besides the number of oocytes retrieved and high quality embryos derived from them is the technical aspects of embryo transfer. It seems that pretreatement with uterine relaxants can be helpful in preventing unpleasant cramps which can have an adverse effect on ART outcome. In this respect, some drugs such as prostaglandin inhibitors or sedatives have been evaluated but not confirmed yet remain controversial. This study was performed in order to assess the effect of administrating Piroxicam prior to embryo transfer on pregnancy rates in ART cycles. Materials and Methods: This pilot study was performed from August 2010 through December 2011 on 50 infertile women in ART cycles. Recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH with a long gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH analogue protocol were used for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. The subjects were randomly allocated into two groups of 25 patients after obtaining written consent. Group A received a 10 mg Piroxicam capsule 30 minutes before embryo transfer and group B was the control group with no treatment. Data were analyzed by Chi-square and analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: Pregnancy rate was 34% (n=17 totally, with 32% (n=8 in group A and 36% (n=9 in group B (p=0.75. Uterine cramps were experienced by 4 women (16% in group B, while none were reported by women in group A (p=0.037. Conclusion: It seems that Piroxicam administration 30 minutes prior to embryo transfer cannot increase pregnancy rates, but can prevent or reduce uterine cramps after the procedure.

  13. Computerized assessment of pain drawing area: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wenngren

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Wenngren, Britt-Marie StålnackeDepartment of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, SwedenAim: To investigate if pain area in patients with chronic pain could be measured by a computerized assessment on previously marked pain drawings on paper figures and to analyze the further application of the method.Methods: Seventy-two patients (54 women and 18 men who were admitted to Umeå University Hospital during 2003 for assessment of chronic pain answered a set of questionnaires (pain intensity on the visual analog scale [VAS], disability on the Disability Rating Index [DRI], life satisfaction on the LiSat-11 and filled in pain drawings on paper figures of the human body. The pain drawings were later analyzed by using computerized assessment.Results: Women marked a greater pain area than men, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.433. No significant difference was shown for the previous seven days between men and women on the VAS (p = 0.914, DRI (p = 0.493, or LiSat-11 (p = 0.124. A statistically significant correlation was found between pain area and VAS for the previous seven days (r = 0.250; p = 0.046. Pain area was statistically significantly correlated to the DRI (r = 0.336; p = 0.014 and close to negatively correlated to the LiSat-11 (r = -0.687; p = 0.057.Conclusion: This pilot study shows that pain drawing area could be measured by a computerized assessment of pain drawings. The method points to the possibility of relating pain area with other instruments. In the present