WorldWideScience

Sample records for pilot site profile

  1. Agricultural Pilot's Audiological Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foltz, Lucas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The agricultural airplane pilot are daily exposed to intense noises, being susceptible to the noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL and its auditory and extra auditory effects. Objective: To analyze the audiological profile of this population, verifying the work's influence on its hearing. Method: It was realized a retrospective, individual, observational, and cross-sectional study through the data obtained by means of a questionnaire and audiometric thresholds of 41 agricultural pilots. To the statistical analysis were utilized the chi-square, Spearman, and Wilcoxon tests with significance level of 5%. Results: It was verified that 95,1% of the pilots use PPE ( personal protective equipment during flight and 58,5% have contact with pesticides. More than half of individuals referred to feel auditory and extra auditory symptoms, being the buzz the more frequent (29,1%. It has the occurrence of 29,3% of NIHL suggestive hearing loss and 68,3% of normality, taking this presence of unilateral notch in 24,4% and bilateral notch in 31,7%. It was found correlation statistically significant in the associations between time of service and the average of the acute frequencies in the right ear (p=0038, and in the left ear (p=0,010. It has a statistical tendency in the association between audiometric configuration and contact with pesticides (p=0,088. Conclusion: The hearing loss prevalence in this study was showed high. More than half of the sample has normal audiometric thresholds with notch configuration. Such data lead to the conclusion that the agricultural pilots, even with PPE use, they still suffer with the damages caused by noise, needing best proposals of hearing loss prevention.

  2. Report of reprocessing of reflection seismic profile X-5 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, Eddy County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John J.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic reflection profile X-5 exhibits a 7,700 ft long anomalous zone of poor quality to nonexistent reflections between shotpoints 100 and 170, compared to the high-quality, flat-lying, coherent reflections on either side. Results from drill holes in the area suggest 'layer cake' geology with no detectable abnormalities such as faults present. In an attempt to determine whether the anomalous zone of the seismic profile is an artifact or actually indicates a geologic condition, the data were extensively reprocessed using state-of-the-art processing techniques and the following conclusions were made: 1. The field-recorded data in the anomalous zone are of poor quality due to surface conditions and recording parameters used. 2. Reprocessing shows reflectors throughout the anomalous zone at all levels. However, it cannot prove that the reflectors are continuous throughout the anomalous zone. 3. Significant improvement in data quality may be achieved if the line is reshot using carefully determined recording parameters.

  3. Hanford Site Ecological Quality Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilyard, Gordon R.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Tzemos, Spyridon

    2002-02-17

    This report reviews the ecological quality profile methodology and results for the Hanford Site. It covers critical ecological assets and terrestrial resources, those in Columbia River corridor and those threatened and engdangered, as well as hazards and risks to terrestrial resources. The features of a base habitat value profile are explained, as are hazard and ecological quality profiles.

  4. State Cancer Profiles Web site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Cancer Profiles (SCP) web site provides statistics to help guide and prioritize cancer control activities at the state and local levels. SCP is a...

  5. Audiometric profile of civilian pilots according to noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Taiana Pacheco; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Schütz, Gabriel Eduardo; Mello, Márcia Gomide da Silva; Câmara, Volney de Magalhães

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the audiometric profile of civilian pilots according to the noise exposure level. METHODS This observational cross-sectional study evaluated 3,130 male civilian pilots aged between 17 and 59 years. These pilots were subjected to audiometric examinations for obtaining or revalidating the functional capacity certificate in 2011. The degree of hearing loss was classified as normal, suspected noise-induced hearing loss, and no suspected hearing loss with other associated complications. Pure-tone air-conduction audiometry was performed using supra-aural headphones and acoustic stimulus of the pure-tone type, containing tone thresholds of frequencies between 250 Hz and 6,000 Hz. The independent variables were professional categories, length of service, hours of flight, and right or left ear. The dependent variable was pilots with suspected noise-induced hearing loss. The noise exposure level was considered low/medium or high, and the latter involved periods > 5,000 flight hours and > 10 years of flight service. RESULTS A total of 29.3% pilots had suspected noise-induced hearing loss, which was bilateral in 12.8% and predominant in the left ear (23.7%). The number of pilots with suspected hearing loss increased as the noise exposure level increased. CONCLUSIONS Hearing loss in civilian pilots may be associated with noise exposure during the period of service and hours of flight. PMID:25372170

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

  7. Determination of the Mixing Layer Height Over two Sites, Using Pilot Balloons During the MILAGRO Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohrnschimmel, H.; Alonso, A. L.; Ángeles, F.; Sosa, G.; Varela, J.; Cárdenas, B.

    2007-12-01

    Among the mechanisms that affect air quality there is a variety of meteorological processes. An important process in this context are the changes in the mixing layer height during a day and over the year. The mixing layer height is the portion of the atmosphere close to the surface layer where air pollutants get diluted, without leaving this layer. Therefore, it is important to describe the variations in the height of the mixing layer, i.e. the vertical dilution of air pollution, since this is a process mitigating naturally the impact of emissions. There exist different methods to obtain information on the mixing layer height, among them radio soundings, the application of vertical wind profilers, and launching pilot balloons. In this study, pilot balloons have been used simultaneously over two sites of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO campaign in March 2006. The objective was to determine the vertical wind profiles and derive information on the mixing layer height. Daily, four pilot balloons were launched, at 9:00, 12:00, 15:00, and 18:00 hours, over Tenango del Aire (a rural area in the Southeast of Mexico City), and over Ciudad Universitaria, in the Southern metropolitan area. At some occasions, night time measurements have been carried out at 21:00 and 24:00. A variability of the diurnal evolution of the mixing layer was observed along March, which could be related to surface temperature. The diurnal evolution showed a sudden growth of the mixing layer between 9:00 and 12:00 hours. Data intercomparisons were carried out for pilot balloons versus radio soundings during a few days at a third site, Tula, in the North of Mexico City. Both intercomparisons showed that pilot balloons are an effective method to obtain information about the development of the mixing layer.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CY 2000 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC; Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc.

    2001-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office and Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2000 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2000 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protect ion Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2000. The format of this report follows guidance offered in a June 1, 2001 memo from DOE's Office of Policy and Guidance with the subject ''Guidance for the preparation of Department of Energy (DOE) Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2000.'' WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2000, no

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 1999 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Roy B.; Adams, Amy; Martin, Don; Morris, Randall C.; Reynolds, Timothy D.; Warren, Ronald W.

    2000-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)Carlsbad Area Office and the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 1999 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 1999 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during calendar year 1999. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 1999, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment. Radionuclide concentrations in the environment surrounding WIPP were not statistically higher in 1999 than in 1998.

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions, Inc.

    2002-09-20

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2001 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above Orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2001. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2001, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment.

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2003-09-17

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2002 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 2002 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, and Guidance for the Preparation of DOE Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2002 (DOE Memorandum EH-41: Natoli:6-1336, April 4, 2003). These Orders and the guidance document require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  12. Sealing concepts for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, C.L.; Gulick, C.W.; Lambert, S.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility is proposed for development in the southeast portion of the State of New Mexico. The proposed horizon is in bedded salt located approximately 2150 ft below the surface. The purpose of the WIPP is to provide an R&D facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from defense activities of the United States. As such, it will include a disposal demonstration for transuranic (TRU) wastes and an experimental area to address issues associated with disposal of defense high level wastes (DHLW) in bedded salt. All DHLW used in the experiments are planned for retrieval at the termination of testing; the TRU waste can be permanently disposed of at the site after the pilot phase is complete. This report addresses only the Plugging and Sealing program, which will result in an adequate and acceptable technology for final sealing and decommissioning of the facility at the WIPP site. The actual plugging operations are intended to be conducted on a commercial industrial basis through contracts issued by the DOE. This report is one in a series that is based on a technical program of modeling, laboratory materials testing and field demonstration which will provide a defensible basis for the actual plugging operations to be conducted by the DOE for final closure of the facility.

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson [Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), NM (United States); Basabilvazo, George T. [Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2016 (ASER) is to provide the information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP facility. DOE Order 231.1B; DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability; and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1B, which requires DOE facilities to submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer.

  14. Waset Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-09-26

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data that: (a) Characterize site environmental management performance; (b) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (d) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP site. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. This order requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) (No. NM4890139088-TSDF [treatment, storage, and disposal facility]) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  15. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year. (3) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (4) Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Permit) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Enviromental Report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Enviromnetal Services

    2009-09-21

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2008 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to characterize site environmental management performance; summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant facility programs and efforts; and describe how compliance and environmental improvement is accomplished through the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) Number NM4890139088-TSDF (treatment, storage, and disposal facility) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WIPP mission is to safely dispose of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated by the production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. In 2008, 5,265 cubic meters (m3) of TRU waste were disposed of at the WIPP facility, including 5,216 m3 of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and 49 m3 of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. From the first

  17. Restoring of offshore wind farm sites. Lillgrund Pilot Project; Aaterstaellande av havsbaserad vindkraft. Lillgrund Pilot Projekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumle Wikander, Jhenny (Vattenfall Vindkraft AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    This report focuses on the legal aspects of decommissioning and restoring of offshore wind farm sites, as part of an extensive report on the Lillgrund Offshore Wind Farm Pilot Project. For this analysis, all permit conditions of the granted permits for the offshore wind parks in Sweden have been collected and studied. According to the Swedish Environmental code 'the validity of a permit, approval or exemption may be made subject to the requirement that the person who intends to pursue the activity must furnish a security for the costs of after-treatment and any other restoration measures that may be necessary as a result. The state, municipalities, county councils and associations of municipalities shall not be required to furnish a security. If there is cause to assume that the security furnished is no longer sufficient, the authority which is considering the application for a permit, approval or exemption may require an additional security to be furnished'. The permits show that different types of securities are being used, with bank warranties and securities being the most common. Securities are either fixed and furnished prior to start of construction or start of operations, or they are obtained gradually over the life of the project. Among the twelve permits studied, a gradual tendency to use a combination of the two alternatives can bee seen. The conditions governing when an offshore wind farm is to be discontinued and which parts need to be partly or fully removed from the site are obviously of future importance. The issue has been addressed to different degrees in the permits, some to a clear legal extent, while others are more general. The Lillgrund Offshore Wind Farm was secured for 60 million SEK. The extent to which the park is to be decommissioned and the site to be restored is decided by the county administrative board once production is terminated

  18. A Pilot Sampling Design for Estimating Outdoor Recreation Site Visits on the National Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley J. Zarnoch; S.M. Kocis; H. Ken Cordell; D.B.K. English

    2002-01-01

    A pilot sampling design is described for estimating site visits to National Forest System lands. The three-stage sampling design consisted of national forest ranger districts, site days within ranger districts, and last-exiting recreation visitors within site days. Stratification was used at both the primary and secondary stages. Ranger districts were stratified based...

  19. THE QUALITY OF THE WEB SITES FROM THE IIRC PILOT PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionelia-Alexandra FELDIOREANU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the quality of the Web sites content of the companies from the IIRC Pilot Programme in 2013 and how corporations use their Web sites to emphasize the environmental responsibility. We try to determine the quality of the web sites of by the organizations included in the IIRC Pilot Programme in 2013 and their ability to support the access to environmental elements. In the first part, the paper tries to review the existing literature regarding the quality of the Web sites especially regarding their attitude towards presentations of the informations through their Web page. And in the second part we present our result.

  20. THE QUALITY OF THE WEB SITES FROM THE IIRC PILOT PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionelia-Alexandra FELDIOREANU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the quality of the Web sites content of the companies from the IIRC Pilot Programme in 2013 and how corporations use their Web sites to emphasize the environmental responsibility. We try to determine the quality of the web sites of by the organizations included in the IIRC Pilot Programme in 2013 and their ability to support the access to environmental elements. In the first part, the paper tries to review the existing literature regarding the quality of the Web sites especially regarding their attitude towards presentations of the informations through their Web page. And in the second part we present our result.

  1. Thirty Meter Telescope Site Testing VI: Turbulence Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Els, S G; Schoeck, M; Riddle, R; Skidmore, W; Seguel, J; Bustos, E; Walker, D

    2009-01-01

    The results on the vertical distribution of optical turbulence above the five mountains which were investigated by the site testing for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) are reported. On San Pedro Martir in Mexico, the 13 North site on Mauna Kea and three mountains in northern Chile Cerro Tolar, Cerro Armazones and Cerro Tolonchar, MASS-DIMM turbulence profilers have been operated over at least two years. Acoustic turbulence profilers - SODARs - were also operated at these sites. The obtained turbulence profiles indicate that at all sites the lowest 200m are the main source of the total seeing observed, with the Chilean sites showing a weaker ground layer than the other two sites. The two northern hemisphere sites have weaker turbulence at altitudes above 500m, with 13N showing the weakest 16km turbulence, being responsible for the large isoplanatic angle at this site. The influence of the jetstream and wind speeds close to the ground on the clear sky turbulence strength throughout the atmosphere are discussed...

  2. Personality profiles and stress-coping strategies of Slovenian military pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Meško

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a pilot also depends on the pilot's personality profile and their stresscoping style. In our study we aimed to analyze, by means of the Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ and the Coping Responses Inventory (CRI, the personality profiles, stress-coping strategies and the relationship between them among Slovenian military pilots. The study involved 120 respondents: 30 of whom were military pilots in the experimental group, while the other 90 were in the control groups. The control groups included sport pilots, the general population and soldiers with no involvement in aviation. The members of the control group were selected with regard to the characteristics of the experimental group members, so that both groups were equivalent in terms of relevant factors (e.g. gender, age, health state, level of education etc, thus participating in a study of equivalent pairs. A statistical analysis identified statistically significant differences between the groups in the following BFQ dimensions: energy, conscientiousness and emotional stability; in the dimensions of CRI 'cognitive avoidance' (cognitive effort to avoid realistic consideration of a problem; and 'emotional discharge or emptying' (behavioural attempts to alleviate tension by venting negative emotions. Results revealed that certain personality characteristics were differentially and significantly related to specific stress coping strategies adopted by military pilots.

  3. Assessment of CO2 storage performance of the Enhanced Coalbed Methane pilot site in Kaniow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, F. van; Winthaegen, P.; Pagnier, H.; Krzystolik, P.; Jura, B.; Skiba, J.; Wageningen, N. van

    2009-01-01

    A pilot site for CO2 storage in coal seams was set-up in Poland, as has been reported on previous GHGT conferences. This site consisted of one injection and one production well. About 760 ton of CO2 has been injected into the reservoir from August 2004 to June 2005. Breakthrough of the injected CO2

  4. Assessment of CO2 storage performance of the Enhanced Coalbed Methane pilot site in Kaniow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, F. van; Winthaegen, P.; Pagnier, H.; Krzystolik, P.; Jura, B.; Skiba, J.; Wageningen, N. van

    2009-01-01

    A pilot site for CO2 storage in coal seams was set-up in Poland, as has been reported on previous GHGT conferences. This site consisted of one injection and one production well. About 760 ton of CO2 has been injected into the reservoir from August 2004 to June 2005. Breakthrough of the injected CO2

  5. Hanford site as it relates to an alternative site for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: an environmental description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecht, K.R. (ed.)

    1978-12-01

    The use of basalt at Hanford as an alternative for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) would require that the present Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) at Hanford be expanded to incorporate the planned WIPP functions, namely the permanent storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes. This report discusses: program costs, demography, ecology, climatology, physiography, hydrology, geology, seismology, and historical and archeological sites. (DLC)

  6. MEASURING QUALITY-OF-LIFE WITH THE SICKNESS IMPACT PROFILE - A PILOT-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HULSEBOS, RG; BELTMAN, FW; MIRANDA, DD; SPANGENBERG, JFA

    1991-01-01

    A pilot-study was done to investigate the applicability of the sickness impact profile (SIP) in ex-ICU patients. For this study 221 consecutively admitted patients were reviewed retrospectively after excluding children, deceased patients and readmissions. SIP was assessed in these patients by either

  7. Pilot demonstration for containment using in situ soil mixing techniques at a chemical disposal superfund site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarlinski, S.J.; Kingham, N.W.; Semenak, R. [Kiber Environmental Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Kiber Environmental Services, Inc. (Kiber), under contract to McLaren-Hart Corporation and the site PRP group, performed technical oversight and on-site sampling and analyses at the confidential site located in Texas. The site consists of 15,000 cubic meters (20,000 cubic yards) of contaminated materials that were to be solidified on-site. The contaminants included heavy metals, PAHs, oil and grease, and volatile organics. Groundwater is less than 1 meter from the surface. Kiber was retained after several unsuccessful efforts to find on-site containment methods that effectively solidified the waste pits while achieving the performance goals. The PRP group then contracted with Kiber to perform the treatability and pilot oversight studies. The full-scale pilot demonstration was performed by Geo-Con. Pilot-scale treatment was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of in situ solidification treatment at achieving the site specific performance criteria, including an unconfined compressive strength of greater than 170 kPa (25 psi) and a permeability of less than 1x10{sup -6} cm/sec. Technical oversight and on-site sampling and analysis were provided to evaluate pilot-scale application of the selected technology and verify treatment effectiveness. The project was divided into several subtasks. First, laboratory treatability testing was conducted to verify that performance specifications were achievable using the proposed reagent formulations. Next, a pilot demonstration was performed by Geo-Con using a Manotowoc 4000 crane equipped with a 1.5-meter diameter auger to evaluate shallow soil mixing. The final task included a comparative study between the performance of test specimens collected using wet sampling techniques versus in situ post-treatment coring.

  8. Matching profiles of masked perpetrators: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Bojesen, Sophie; Kuhlman, Michael Bilde

    2010-01-01

    indicate the possible matches, and perhaps even the best match, which may be helpful in police investigations, but it would not carry enough weight to be used as evidence per se. This study only focused on the profile. Future studies will use surface laser scans to analyse congruence between masked...

  9. Pilot unit testing of scale inhibitors at geopressured energy well sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouche, R.J.; Matson, M.L.; Matson, J.V.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L. (eds.)

    1981-01-01

    The skid-mounted pilot unit is a smaller version of the main surface equipment used at geothermal geopressured well sites. It will be used to monitor the effectiveness of scale and corrosion inhibitors for the preventing of scaling and corrosion in the main surface equipment. The pilot unit will model the main surface equipment with respect to pressure, flow velocities, and scale inhibitor injection. The pilot unit will also operate under other conditions for optimization determination. Scaling tendencies will be monitored by specially shaped mild steel coupons placed at critical locations throughout the pilot unit. The coupons will be checked at regular intervals, and analysis will include visual, weight and EDAX-SEM analysis. Various scale inhibitors will be tested over a large range of dosage levels in order to screen inhibitors and their effectiveness for water with particular quality parameters.

  10. Effect of Root Coverage on Oral Health Impact Profile (G49: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Hansmeier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this prospective longitudinal clinical pilot study was the evaluation of the effect on the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP and patient-centered results of the envelope technique for Connective Tissue Graft (CTG. Methods. Sixteen patients (11 females 24 to 71 years of age (42.6±11.1 received CTG that had been harvested from the palate and grafted using the envelope technique. Prior to and 3 months after surgery, all patients were examined clinically, completed the OHIP-G49 questionnaire, and were asked to judge the results of surgery. Results. Mean baseline recession depth of 2.5±0.8 mm was reduced by 1.2±0.9 mm (<.001. Root coverage amounted to 48±39%. In 5 of 16 defects complete root coverage was achieved. Pain at the donor site was more pronounced than at recipient site regarding prevalence (8/6; =.007, intensity (2.1±2.3/1.1±1.9 [visual analogue scale]; =.016, and duration (1.4±2.3/0.8±1.4 days; =.042. Baseline OHIP (15.7±12.1 was decreased by 3.6±8.5 three months after surgery (=.139. Thirteen patients (81% would undergo CTG surgery for similar reasons again. Conclusions. Root coverage using CTG according to the envelope technique provided improvement of OHIP as early as 3 months after surgery. Over all, patients were reasonably satisfied with the surgical technique and its results.

  11. Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations.

  12. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site gravity survey and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrows, L.J.; Fett, J.D.

    1983-04-01

    A portion of the WIPP site has been extensively surveyed with high-precision gravity. The main survey (in T22S, R31E) covered a rectangular area 2 by 4-1/3 mi encompassing all of WIPP site Zone II and part of the disturbed zone to the north of the site. Stations were at 293-ft intervals along 13 north-south lines 880 ft apart. The data are considered accurate to within a few hundredths of a milligal. Long-wavelength gravity anomalies correlate well with seismic time structures on horizons below the Castile Formation. Both the gravity anomalies and the seismic time structures are interpreted as resulting from related density and velocity variations within the Ochoan Series. Shorter wavelength negative gravity anomalies are interpreted as resulting from bulk density alteration in the vicinity of karst conduits. The WIPP gravity survey was unable to resolve low-amplitude, long-wavelength anomalies that should result from the geologic structures within the disturbed zone. It did indicate the degree and character of karst development within the surveyed area.

  13. Estimation of Wave Conditions at Svåheia SSG Pilot Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Margheritini, Lucia; Stratigaki, V.;

    The purpose of the project described in the present report is to estimate the local wave conditions at the proposed location for a SSG pilot at the Svåheia site in the south western part of Norway. Focus is put on estimating the everyday conditions to enable an evaluation of the power production...... potential for the SSG pilot at the proposed location. The work in the project has been performed in three parts: 1. Establishing the offshore wave conditions and bathymetry of the area. 2. Transformation of offshore waves to near shore, through numerical wave modeling. 3. Evaluation of the transformed...

  14. Estimation of Wave Conditions at Svåheia SSG Pilot Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Margheritini, Lucia; Stratigaki, V.

    The purpose of the project described in the present report is to estimate the local wave conditions at the proposed location for a SSG pilot at the Svåheia site in the south western part of Norway. Focus is put on estimating the everyday conditions to enable an evaluation of the power production...... potential for the SSG pilot at the proposed location. The work in the project has been performed in three parts: 1. Establishing the offshore wave conditions and bathymetry of the area. 2. Transformation of offshore waves to near shore, through numerical wave modeling. 3. Evaluation of the transformed...... (local) wave conditions and its implications....

  15. Protein profile study of breast cancer tissues using HPLC-LIF: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Suraj; Sujatha; Kumar, K. Kalyan; Kurien, Jacob; Krishnanand, B. R.; Mahato, K. K.; George, Sajan D.; Kartha, V. B.; C, Santhosh

    2007-02-01

    Proteomics based techniques are rapidly emerging as alternative techniques to conventional histo-pathological methods for detection and diagnosis of cancers. Tumor markers are of considerable importance in the study of various cancers. A study of various changes in the protein profile associated with breast cancer will facilitate a better understanding of the various dynamic changes associated with the disease. In our study we have used High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with highly sensitive Laser Induced Fluorescence for recording the protein profiles of breast tissue homogenates. The protein profiles were recorded from pathologically certified normal as well as malignant breast tissue samples. The recorded protein profiles were studied by using Principal Component Analysis. Good discrimination of normal, benign and malignant samples was achieved in this pilot study.

  16. Biopsy site selfies--a quality improvement pilot study to assist with correct surgical site identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Lee, Erica H; Nehal, Kishwer S

    2015-04-01

    Determining the biopsy site location of a skin cancer before treatment is often challenging. To study the implementation and effectiveness of biopsy site selfies as a quality improvement measure for correct surgical site identification. In the first phase, the ability of dermatologic surgeon and patient to definitively identify the biopsy site and whether photography was needed to ensure site agreement were recorded. In the second phase, patients were requested to take biopsy site selfies, and after implementation, similar data were collected including whether a biopsy site selfie was helpful for definitive site identification. In the first phase, the physician and patient were unable to identify the biopsy site 17.6% (49/278) and 25.5% (71/278) of cases, respectively. A photograph was needed in 22.7% of cases (63/278). After implementation of biopsy site selfies, the physician and patient were unable to identify the biopsy site 17.4% (23/132) and 15.2% (20/132) of cases, respectively. Biopsy site selfies were available for 64.1% of cases for which no internal image was available and critical for site identification in 21.4% of these cases. Biopsy site selfies has proven to be helpful for correct surgical site identification by both the physician and the patient and may also provide further reassurance and confidence for patients.

  17. The wind speed profile at offshore wind farm sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B.; Larsen, S. E.; Højstrup, J.; Barthelmie, R.

    2003-04-01

    The first large offshore wind farms are in the planning phase in several countries in Europe. Their economic viability depends on the favourable wind conditions compared to sites on land. The higher energy yield has to compensate the additional installation and maintenance cost. For project planning and siting a reliable prediction of the wind resource is therefore crucial. For turbine design the wind shear of the marine surface layer is an important design parameter, especially since the growing rotor diameter makes turbines more vulnerable for spatial wind speed variations. Compared to land surfaces the roughness of water is very low. It is commonly described either as a constant (as in the wind resource estimation program WAsP) or by means of the Charnock approach, relating sea surface roughness and friction velocity. While this relation works well for the open oceans it has been found inappropriate for coastal areas where waves are not fully developed. Information about the wave field is needed to model the sea surface roughness more accurately (see e.g. Johnson et al. (1998)). The atmospheric stability differs greatly between land and water areas. It is more important offshore compared to land sites due to the low surface roughness of water. The main influence of the atmospheric stability is on the vertical momentum transport, which is reflected in the vertical wind speed profile. It is usually described with Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. However, other effects not described by this approach might also play an important role: For offshore flow the flow regime at coastal sites is affected by the land-sea discontinuity (Højstrup, 1999). An internal boundary layer develops at the coastline and an inhomogeneous flow field might develop in the coastal zone, especially in stable stratification (see e.g. (Smedman et al. (1997)) Recent data from the measurement at Rødsand, 10 km off the Danish coast in the Baltic Sea, include simultaneous wind and wave data from

  18. A pilot study of an interactive web site in the workplace for reducing alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matano, Robert A; Koopman, Cheryl; Wanat, Stanley F; Winzelberg, Andrew J; Whitsell, Shelly D; Westrup, Darrah; Futa, Kristine; Clayton, Justin B; Mussman, Lisa; Taylor, C Barr

    2007-01-01

    An interactive web-site-based intervention for reducing alcohol consumption was pilot tested. Participants were 145 employees of a work site in the Silicon Valley region of California, categorized as low or moderate risk for alcohol problems. All participants were given access to a web site that provided feedback on their levels of stress and use of coping strategies. Participants randomized to the full individualized feedback condition also received individualized feedback about their risk for alcohol-related problems. Some evidence was found for greater alcohol reduction among participants who received full individualized feedback, although due to difficulties in recruiting participants, the sample size was inadequate for evaluating treatment effects on drinking. The results provide preliminary support for using an interactive web site to provide individualized feedback for persons at risk for alcohol problems. However, the low participation rate (2.7%) suggests that such an intervention must address the challenges of recruiting employees through their work site.

  19. Serum metabolomic profiles from patients with acute kidney injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinchun; Shannon, Melissa; Ando, Yosuke; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Khan, Nasim A; Portilla, Didier; Beger, Richard D

    2012-04-15

    Low sensitivity of current clinical markers (serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN)) in early stages of the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) limits their utility. Rapid LC/MS-based metabolic profiling of serum demonstrated in a pilot study that metabolomics could provide novel indicators of AKI. Metabolic profiles of serum samples from seventeen hospitalized patients with newly diagnosed AKI were compared with the profiles of serum from age-matched subjects with normal kidney function. Increases in acylcarnitines and amino acids (methionine, homocysteine, pyroglutamate, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and phenylalanine) and a reduction in serum levels of arginine and several lysophosphatidyl cholines were observed in patients with AKI compared to healthy subjects. Increases in homocysteine, ADMA and pyroglutamate have been recognized as biomarkers of cardiovascular and renal disease, and acylcarnitines represent biomarkers of defective fatty acid oxidation. The results of this pilot study demonstrate the utility of metabolomics in the discovery of novel serum biomarkers that can facilitate the diagnosis and determine prognosis of AKI in hospitalized patients.

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014. Emended

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year (CY); Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE environmental sustainability goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

  1. The physical therapy profile questionnaire (PTPQ: development, validation and pilot testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimmer-Somers Karen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Country by country similarities and differences in physical therapy practice exists. Therefore, before updates in practice can be provided, such as trainings in evidence-based practice, it is necessary to identify the profile and nature of practice in a given country or setting. Following a search of the international literature, no appropriate tool was identified to collect and establish data to create the profile of physical therapy practice in the Philippines. We therefore developed, validated and pilot tested a survey instrument which would comprehensively describe the practice of physical therapy in the Philippines Findings We used a mixed methods design to answer our study aims. A focus group interview was conducted among a group of physical therapists to establish the content and contexts of items to be included in the survey instrument. Findings were amalgamated with the information from the literature on developing survey instruments/questionnaires. A survey instrument was drafted and named as the Physical Therapy Profile Questionnaire (PTPQ. The PTPQ was then validated and pilot tested to a different group of physical therapists. The final version consisted of five separate parts namely (A General information and demographics, (B Practice Profile, (C Treatment Preferences, (D Bases for clinical work and (E Bases for educational/research work. At present the PTPQ is relevant to the Philippines and could be used by any country which has a similar nature of practice with the Philippines. Conclusion The Physical Therapy Practice Questionnaire (PTPQ was shown to have good face and content validity among the Filipino physical therapists and their context of practice. It has also been found to be useful, easy to administer tool and in a format appealing to respondents. The PTPQ is expected to assist comprehensive data collection to create a profile of physical therapy practice in the Philippines.

  2. Public outreach supports the entire life-cycle of the Ketzin pilot site, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Sonja; Kollersberger, Tanja; Möller, Fabian; Liebscher, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Interdisciplinary research at the Ketzin pilot site in Germany contributes to the understanding of the geological CO2 storage since 2004. In addition to the research activities, public outreach has been a key element through the entire life-cycle of the project including site assessment, characterization, development as well as operation (2008-2013) and post-closure. From the very beginning of the project, the research activities were accompanied by an open dialogue with the general public including locals and interested people from all over Germany and the world. The visitor centre at the Ketzin site is run by GFZ and the most important contact point to inform about first-hand experiences from the project. Up to now, about 3,000 visitors came to the Ketzin site for guided tours and the annual open house days. In addition, project status and progress are disseminated in brochures and on the public website www.co2ketzin.de. The Ketzin project is also presented in short films, e.g. on monitoring, drilling and well closure. As the post-closure and pre-transfer phase started after the cease of CO2 injection in August 2013 and the injection facility was dismantled in December 2013, we were looking for a tool to further inform about the previous operation and site infrastructure. A virtual tour was set up for the Ketzin site which is accessible via the website. This tour includes several videos which virtually guide you on site and provide information on the (former) facilities. Public acceptance is a key issue for the Ketzin project as it is for any other CO2 storage project. For example, an open communication with the local residents helped to conduct large-scale seismic campaigns without severe restrictions. The experience from the Ketzin pilot site shows that honest communication and a diverse dissemination program is able to overcome critical public perception even for highly debated technologies.

  3. Studies and research concerning BNFP pilot-scale pulsed columns: column profile and holdup studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermak, A. F.

    1980-11-01

    Experimental studies were conducted on pilot-scaled pulsed columns for the purpose of obtaining data for verification of contactor computer programs. This work is in support of safeguards programs related to determination of near real-time inventories in pulsed columns. Holdup tests were performed resulting in the derivation of an empirical equation for estimation of the dispersed phase holdup in a column. Uranium solvent extraction mass-transfer tests were conducted in which all four process cycles were simulated under coprocessing flowsheet conditions. Extensive data were obtained during these tests on uranium profiles and inventories within the columns. Transient profile data were also determined between selected runs under the tested operating conditions. No concentration peaks could be observed during the transient period. Based on the extensive inventory data taken, empirical equations were developed for relating uranium inventory in a column to the test parameters. These equations were found useful for predicting and estimating the column inventory under the known run conditions.

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This is the 1989 Site Environmental Report (SER) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP is a government owned and contractor-operated facility. The WIPP project is operated by Westinghouse Electric Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of the WIPP is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by the defense activities of the US Government. This report provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at the WIPP during calendar year 1989. The WIPP facility will not receive waste until all concerns affecting opening the WIPP are addressed to the satisfaction of the Secretary of Energy. Therefore, this report describes the status of the preoperational activities of the Radiological Environmental Surveillance (RES) program, which are outlined in the Radiological Baseline Program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WTSD-TME-057). 72 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

  5. Stratigraphic Profiles for Selected Hanford Site Seismometer Stations and Other Locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V.

    2014-02-01

    Stratigraphic profiles were constructed for eight selected Hanford Site seismometer stations, five Hanford Site facility reference locations, and seven regional three-component broadband seismometer stations. These profiles provide interpretations of the subsurface layers to support estimation of ground motions from past earthquakes, and the prediction of ground motions from future earthquakes. In most cases these profiles terminated at the top of the Wanapum Basalt, but at selected sites profiles were extended down to the top of the crystalline basement. The composite one-dimensional stratigraphic profiles were based primarily on previous interpretations from nearby boreholes, and in many cases the nearest deep borehole is located kilometers away.

  6. Pilot-scale demonstration of surfactant-enhanced PCE solubilization at the Bachman Road site. 1. Site characterization and test design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriola, Linda M; Drummond, Chad D; Hahn, Ernest J; Hayes, Kim F; Kibbey, Tohren C G; Lemke, Lawrence D; Pennell, Kurt D; Petrovskis, Erik A; Ramsburg, C Andrew; Rathfelder, Klaus M

    2005-03-15

    A pilot-scale demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) was conducted to recover dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tetrachloroethene (PCE) from a sandy glacial outwash aquifer underlying a former dry cleaning facility at the Bachman Road site in Oscoda, MI. Part one of this two-part paper describes site characterization efforts and a comprehensive approach to SEAR test design, effectively integrating laboratory and modeling studies. Aquifer coring and drive point sampling suggested the presence of PCE-DNAPL in a zone beneath an occupied building. A narrow PCE plume emanating from the vicinity of this building discharges into Lake Huron. The shallow unconfined aquifer, characterized by relatively homogeneous fine-medium sand deposits, an underlying clay layer, and the absence of significant PCE transformation products, was judged suitable for the demonstration of SEAR. Tween 80 was selected for application based upon its favorable solubilization performance in batch and two-dimensional sand tank treatability studies, biodegradation potential, and regulatory acceptance. Three-dimensional flow and transport models were employed to develop a robust design for surfactant delivery and recovery. Physical and fiscal constraints led to an unusual hydraulic design, in which surfactant was flushed across the regional groundwater gradient, facilitating the delivery of concentrations of Tween 80 exceeding 1% (wt) throughout the treatment zone. The potential influence of small-scale heterogeneity on PCE-DNAPL distribution and SEAR performance was assessed through numerical simulations incorporating geostatistical permeability fields based upon available core data. For the examined conditions simulated PCE recoveries ranged from 94to 99%. The effluent treatment system design consisted of low-profile air strippers coupled with carbon adsorption to trap off-gas PCE and discharge of treated aqueous effluent to a local wastewater treatment plant. The

  7. Temperature Profiles and Hydrologic Implications from the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Gillespie

    2005-03-01

    In this investigation, 145 previously recorded temperature logs from 63 boreholes on or near the NTS were examined. Thirteen of these temperature logs were determined to be suitable for the determination of heat flow values. Additionally, 36 new temperature profiles were obtained in the field, either to validate existing temperature profiles, or to provide additional temperature profiles for heat flow determination. Of these, 23 boreholes were found to have temperature profiles suitable for the determination of additional heat flow values from one or more intervals within the boreholes. Comparison of the previously existing and relogged temperature profiles, in general, displayed excellent correlations, and demonstrated the usefulness and reliability of existing temperature profiles from the NTS. Heat flow values for intervals contained within the 36 boreholes from which values could be determined ranged from a low of 8.0 mW m-2 to a high of 181.6 mW m-2. Vertical variations in heat flow values, within individual boreholes, were readily explained by the advection of heat by groundwater flow. Horizontal consistencies and variations in heat flow values between various boreholes were dependent upon the geologic setting of the borehole, and the effect of vertical fluid movement. Temperature profiles are extremely easy and inexpensive to obtain. Considerable hydrologic information can be determined from the examination of a single temperature profile; however, if sufficient spatially distributed heat flow values are obtained, a heat transport model of the NTS could be used to reduce the uncertainty of nonisothermal hydrologic models.

  8. Pilot CCS project in Indonesia "Gundih CCS project": Geological and geophysical surveys for site selection and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Toru; Kitamura, Keigo; Onishi, Kyosuke; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Rachmat Sule, Mohammad; Kadir, Wawan Gunawan A.; Widarto, Djedi S.; Sebayang, Rio I.; Prasetyo, Agung; Priyono, Awali; Widianto, Eko; Sapiie, Benyamin

    2013-04-01

    A pilot CCS project in Indonesia will be implemented in Gundih area, Central Java Province. The Gundih area is a gas field, and gas is ready to be produced by Pertamina EP. The CO2 content within the produced gas is more than 20% in the Gundih field, so that CO2 injection near the gas production well could be effective way to avoid abundant CO2 emission. Before implementing CO2 injection, the reservoir for CO2 injection must be characterized carefully by conducting subsurface characterization and evaluation, in order to make sure that the reservoir is suitable for CCS. Here we report preliminary results of site surveys for the determination of CO2 injection site in the Gundih area. Subsurface structures imaged on seismic reflection profiles indicate that the Ngrayong formation is one of the candidates for CO2 injection. The lithology of the Ngrayong formation is sandstone, and the depth of the formation is ~1 km in the Gundih area. Since we could not find large-scale structural closure (i.e., anticline) for the Ngrayong formation, we need to consider residual trapping. To reveal hydrological properties (e.g., permeability) of the Ngrayong formation, we obtained rock samples from the outcrop of the Ngrayong formation. Using the laboratory-derived hydrological properties and subsurface structures extracted from seismic data (e.g., geometry of the Ngrayong formation), we will apply reservoir simulation in order to determine CO2 injection site. To design the geophysical monitoring survey (e.g., receiver and source position in time-lapse seismic survey), furthermore, we conduct simulation study for the constructed geological model and estimate elastic and electric responses associated with CO2 injection.

  9. A pilot and field investigation on mobility of PCDDs/PCDFs in landfill site with municipal solid waste incineration residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osako, Masahiro; Kim, Yong-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hoon

    2002-09-01

    A field investigation by boring was carried out in a landfill site primarily with municipal solid waste incineration residue. From the collected core samples, vertical profiles of homologous content of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) in the landfill layer were traced and the behavior of PCDDs/PCDFs was examined. In addition, a pilot-scale study was conducted on the PCDDs/PCDFs leached from incineration fly ash and the treated one using large landfill simulation columns (lysimeters) and the leaching behavior of PCDDs/PCDFs was examined. As a result, it was found that the coexistence of dissolved coloring constituents (DCCs), which might be composed of constituents like dissolved humic matters having strong affinity for hydrophobic organic pollutants, could enhance the leachability of PCDDs/PCDFs, thus contributing to the vertical movement and leaching behavior of PCDDs/PCDFs in the landfill layers of the incineration residue. Moreover, it is highly probable that DCCs derive from the unburned carbon in the bottom ash mixed and buried with the fly ash containing a high content of PCDDs/PCDFs.

  10. Hydraulic Testing of Salado Formation Evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, Richard L.; Domski, Paul S.; Roberts, Randall M.

    1999-07-01

    This report presents interpretations of hydraulic tests conducted in bedded evaporates of the Salado Formation from May 1992 through May 1995 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP is a US Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic wastes from the nation's defense programs. The WIPP disposal horizon is located in the lower portion of the Permian Salado Formation. The hydraulic tests discussed in this report were performed in the WIPP underground facility by INTERA inc. (now Duke Engineering and Services, Inc.), Austin, Texas, following the Field Operations Plan and Addendum prepared by Saulnier (1988, 1991 ) under the technical direction of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) monitors a comprehensive set of parameters in order to detect any potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future quantitative environmental impact evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, soil, and biotics are measured for background radiation. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include meteorological, air quality, soil properties, and the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the site with emphasis on the salt storage pile, whereas baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in a preoperational state, no waste has been received; therefore, certain elements required by Order DOE 5400.1 are not presented in this report. 15 figs. 19 tabs.

  12. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report, for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 General Environmental Protection Program, requires DOE facilities, that conduct environmental protection programs, to annually prepare a Site Environmental Report (SER). The purpose of the SER is to provide an abstract of environmental assessments conducted in order to characterize site environmental management performance, to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit. The content of this SER is not restricted to a synopsis of the required data, in addition, information pertaining to new and continued monitoring and compliance activities during the 1995 calendar year are also included. Data contained in this report are derived from those monitoring programs directed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP). The EMP provides inclusive guidelines implemented to detect potential impacts to the environment and to establish baseline measurements for future environmental evaluations. Surface water, groundwater. air, soil, and biotic matrices are monitored for an array of radiological and nonradiological factors. The baseline radiological surveillance program encompasses a broader geographic area that includes nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Most elements of nonradiological assessments are conducted within the geographic vicinity of the WIPP site.

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE facility that conducts significant environmental protection programs to prepare an Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER). The purpose of the ASER is to summarize environmental data in order to characterize site environmental management performance, to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts. This ASER not only documents the required data, it also documents new and continued monitoring and compliance activities during the 1994 calendar year. Data contained in this report are derived from those monitoring programs directed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) (DOE/WIPP 94-024). The EMP defines a comprehensive set of parameters that must be monitored to detect potential impacts to the environment and to establish baseline measurements for future environmental evaluations. Surface water, groundwater, air, soil, and biotics are monitored for radiological and nonradiological activity levels. The baseline radiological surveillance program covers the broader geographic area that encompasses nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Nonradiological studies focus on the area immediately surrounding the WIPP site.

  14. Ecological baseline studies at the site of the Barstow 10 MWe pilot solar thermal power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, F.B. (ed.)

    1979-11-01

    Baseline ecological measurements and observations were made in 1978 and 1979 at the site of the Barstow pilot 10 MWe solar thermal power system. The station will be constructed on Southern California Edison's Coolwater property. The climate of the area is typical of the Mojave Desert, with high summer temperatures (monthly means of up to 31/sup 0/C), and low rainfall (annual mean of 94 mm). About 66% of the rain falls in winter and spring. About 75% of winds are from the west-southwest to northwest, and mean monthly wind velocities during spring and summer are around 15 to 20 km hr/sup -1/. Surface soils of the site are sandy, but soils below 3 m are generally well graded sand with some silt and gravel. Some of the soils are highly saline, to an extent precluding plant growth. All soils are alkaline, with pH values as high as 9. Over 130 species of plants have been identified on the site, 18 of which are non-native. Estimated aggregate densities of annual plants range from around 600 to almost 9000 m/sup -2/, depending on sampling locale. Aggregate densities of perennials (including herbaceous species) range from as low as 0.2 to 4.4 m/sup -2/. Creosotebush supports a varied assemblage of sap-feeding and defoliating insects, principally homopterans and orthopterans. Other shrubs are populated with hemipterans, mealybugs, thrips, phytophagous beetles and moth larvae. Common ground-dwelling species are ants, tenebrionid beetles, weevils, various orthopterans, and predatory arachnids. Some 300 different kinds of arthropods were distinguished in samples from the site. The most commonly trapped rodents were kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami, D. deserti), pocket mice (Perognathus formosus) and ground squirrels (Spermophilus tereticaudus). Over 60 kinds of birds were observed around the site, many associated with evaporating ponds adjoining the Coolwater Generating Station.

  15. Surface and Subsurface Characterization of a Carbon Sequestration Pilot Site: San Juan Basin, NM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henthorn, B. (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV); Wilson, T.H.; Wells, A.W.

    2007-04-01

    Successful sequestration of CO2 requires that the majority of injected CO2 remain underground for hundreds to thousands of years. Evaluation of site integrity is important in the design and implementation stages of the sequestration effort. This study presents some of the background evaluation undertaken of a Fruitland coal pilot sequestration site located in the San Juan basin. The study includes comparison of fracture traces measured in the field and in high resolution QuickBird satellite imagery, along with multi-frequency terrain conductivity surveys and subsurface maps of the surrounding area. Prominent fracture systems are exposed along the edges of mesas formed in the nearly flat-lying Eocene age San Jose Formation. Fracture trend varies considerably, however, rose diagrams reveal two prominent fracture sets: one trending ~N30E and the other ~N45W. Analysis of the QuickBird image reveals similar variability along with two prominent sets: one trending N35E and another smaller set trending N50W. Previous studies in the area suggest that the face cleat orientation and direction of preferential flow during CO2 injection will follow this NE trend. The site lies in the "High Rate Fairway" near a structural low in the Fruitland Formation. Subsurface maps will help determine whether smaller scale folds and faults similar to those observed to the northwest in the Cedar Hill area exist. If present, they may exert additional control on CO2 flow patterns and serve as potential avenues for CO2 escape. The study will help National Energy Technology Laboratory scientists position tracer and soil monitors at the site.

  16. Verification of geomechanical integrity and prediction of long-term mineral trapping for the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, Thomas; De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Static and dynamic numerical modelling generally accompany the entire CO2 storage site life cycle. Thereto, it is required to match the employed models with field observations on a regular basis in order to predict future site behaviour. We investigated the coupled processes at the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site [1] using a model coupling concept focusing on the temporal relevance of processes involved (hydraulic, chemical and mechanical) at given time-scales (site operation, abandonment and long-term stabilization). For that purpose, long-term dynamic multi-phase flow simulations [2], [3] established the basis for all simulations discussed in the following. Hereby, pressure changes resulting in geomechanical effects are largest during site operation, whereas geochemical reactions are governed by slow kinetics resulting in a long-term stabilization. To account for mechanical integrity, which may be mainly affected during site operation, we incorporated a regional-scale coupled hydro-mechanical model. Our simulation results show maximum ground surface displacements of about 4 mm, whereas shear and tensile failure are not observed. Consequently, the CO2 storage operation at the Ketzin pilot site does not compromise reservoir, caprock and fault integrity. Chemical processes responsible for mineral trapping are expected to mainly occur during long-term stabilization at the Ketzin pilot site [4]. Hence, our previous assessment [3] was extended by integrating two long-term mineral trapping scenarios. Thereby, mineral trapping contributes to the trapping mechanisms with 11.7 % after 16,000 years of simulation in our conservative and with 30.9 % in our maximum reactivity scenarios. Dynamic flow simulations indicate that only 0.2 % of the CO2 injected (about 67,270 t CO2 in total) is in gaseous state, but structurally trapped after 16,000 years. Depending on the studied long-term scenario, CO2 dissolution is the dominating trapping mechanism with 68.9 % and 88

  17. Profiles of social networking sites users in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Efthymios; Alarcón del Amo, Maria del Carmen; Lorenzo Romero, Carlota

    2010-01-01

    Online social networking has become a reality and integral part of the daily personal, social and business life. The extraordinary increase of the user numbers of Social Networking Sites (SNS) and the rampant creation of online communities presents businesses with many challenges and opportunities.

  18. Profiles of social networking sites users in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Efthymios; Alarcón del Amo, Maria del Carmen; Lorenzo Romero, Carlota

    2010-01-01

    Online social networking has become a reality and integral part of the daily personal, social and business life. The extraordinary increase of the user numbers of Social Networking Sites (SNS) and the rampant creation of online communities presents businesses with many challenges and opportunities.

  19. Geohydrology of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, Los Medanos area, southeastern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Jerry W.

    1983-01-01

    Geohydrologic data have been collected in the Los Medanos area at the U.S. Department of Energy 's proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico since 1975 as part of an intensive study evaluating the feasibility of storing defense-associated nuclear wastes within the bedded salt of the Salado Formation of Permian age. Drilling and hydrologic testing have identified three principal water-producing zones above the salt, including the Rustler-Salado Formational contact and the Culebra and Magenta Dolomite Members of the Permian Rustler Formation. Below the bedded salt there is another water-bearing zone, the channel sandstones of the Bell Canyon formation of the Permian Delaware Mountain Group. Most data collected from 33 hydrologic test holes indicate that the water-bearing zones are characterized by low transmissivities and contain slightly saline to briny water. Data collected from drill-stem tests in the Bell Canyon Formation indicate the channel sandstones have hydraulic conductivities ranging from 0.02 to 0.36 feet per day grade vertically and laterally into siltstones and shales of very low permeability. The Rustler Formation contains the principal water-producing zones identified at the WIPP site. The Rustler-Salado formational contact has the least transmissivity, ranging from 0.00003 to 0.003 feet squared per day. The Culebra Dolomite is the most productive unit at the WIPP site with transmissivities ranging from 0.001 to 73 feet squared per day; the greater values result from fracturing in the dolomite created by dissolution of underlying halite. Minute vertical permeabilities prevent movement of water between hydrologic units. (USGS)

  20. Profiles of social networking sites users in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinides, Efthymios; Alarcón del Amo, Maria del Carmen; Lorenzo Romero, Carlota

    2010-01-01

    Online social networking has become a reality and integral part of the daily personal, social and business life. The extraordinary increase of the user numbers of Social Networking Sites (SNS) and the rampant creation of online communities presents businesses with many challenges and opportunities. From the commercial perspective, the SNS are an interesting and promising field: online social networks are important sources of market intelligence and also offer interesting options for co-operat...

  1. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant annual site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) defined a comprehensive set of parameters which are monitored to detect potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future environmental evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, air, soil, and biotics are monitored for radioactivity levels. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include air, water quality, soil properties, meteorological measurements and determination of the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the WIPP site with emphasis on the salt storage pile. The baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in its preoperational phase (i.e., no waste has been received) certain operational requirements of DOE Orders 5400.1, 5400.5, and the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T) are not relevant. Therefore, this report does not discuss items such as radionuclide emissions and effluents and subsequent doses to the public.

  2. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING DATA FROM THE AREA 5 PILOT WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-09-01

    Three exploratory boreholes were drilled and completed to the uppermost alluvial aquifer in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in 1992. The boreholes and associated investigations were part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level, mixed, and high-specific-activity waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize the hydrogeology of the thick vadose zone and to help define the water quality and hydraulic properties of the uppermost aquifer. Wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are located in a triangular array near the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners, respectively, of the approximately 2.6-square-kilometer Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to give reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization, and to help define the nearly horizontal water table. Two of the wells, UE5PW-1 and UE5PW-2, penetrated only unconsolidated alluvial materials. The third well, located closer to the margin of the basin, penetrated both alluvium and underlying ash-flow and bedded tuff units. The watertable was encountered at the elevation of approximately 734 meters. The results of laboratory testing of core and drill cuttings samples indicate that the mineralogical, material, and hydrologic properties of the alluvium are very similar within and between boreholes. Additional tests on the same core and drill cuttings samples indicate that hydrologic conditions within the alluvium are also similar between pilot wells. Both core and drill cuttings samples are dry (less than 10 percent water content by weight) throughout the entire unsaturated section of alluvium, and water content increases slightly with depth in each borehole. Water potential measurements on core samples show a large positive potential gradient (water tends to move upward, rather than downward) to a depth of approximately 30

  3. MIIT:8 Nonferrous Metals Enterprises Listed as Pilot Sites for Brand Cultivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>MIIT released "Notice on Deepening Pilot Work of Industrial Enterprises for Brand Cultivation"(hereinafter referred to as "Notice"). According to the notice,the Technology Department of MIIT,on the basis of the requirements of "Notice on Implementing Pilot Work

  4. Caustic Recycling Pilot Unit to Separate Sodium from LLW at Hanford Site - 12279

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendleton, Justin; Bhavaraju, Sai; Priday, George; Desai, Aditya; Duffey, Kean; Balagopal, Shekar [Ceramatec Inc., Salt Lake City, UT 84119 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Advanced Remediation Technologies initiative, a scheme was developed to combine Continuous Sludge Leaching (CSL), Near-Tank Cesium Removal (NTCR), and Caustic Recycling Unit (CRU) using Ceramatec technology, into a single system known as the Pilot Near-Tank Treatment System (PNTTS). The Cesium (Cs) decontaminated effluent from the NTCR process will be sent to the caustic recycle process for recovery of the caustic which will be reused in another cycle of caustic leaching in the CSL process. Such an integrated mobile technology demonstration will give DOE the option to insert this process for sodium management at various sites in Hanford, and will minimize the addition of further sodium into the waste tanks. This allows for recycling of the caustic used to remove aluminum during sludge washing as a pretreatment step in the vitrification of radioactive waste which will decrease the Low Level Waste (LLW) volume by as much as 39%. The CRU pilot process was designed to recycle sodium in the form of pure sodium hydroxide. The basis for the design of the 1/4 scale pilot caustic recycling unit was to demonstrate the efficient operation of a larger scale system to recycle caustic from the NTCR effluent stream from the Parsons process. The CRU was designed to process 0.28 liter/minute of NTCR effluent, and generate 10 M concentration of 'usable' sodium hydroxide. The proposed process operates at 40 deg. C to provide additional aluminum solubility and then recover the sodium hydroxide to the point where the aluminum is saturated at 40 deg. C. A system was developed to safely separate and vent the gases generated during operation of the CRU with the production of 10 M sodium hydroxide. Caustic was produced at a rate between 1.9 to 9.3 kg/hr. The CRU was located inside an ISO container to allow for moving of the unit close to tank locations to process the LLW stream. Actual tests were conducted with the NTCR effluent

  5. Social comparison 2.0: examining the effects of online profiles on social-networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haferkamp, Nina; Krämer, Nicole C

    2011-05-01

    Through their features--such as profile photographs or the personal vita--online profiles on social-networking sites offer a perfect basis for social comparison processes. By looking at the profile photograph, the user gains an impression of a person's physical attractiveness, and the user's vita shows which career path the person is pursuing. Against the background of Festinger's Social Comparison Theory, the focus of this research is on the effects of online profiles on their recipients. Therefore, qualitative interviews (N = 12) and two online experiments were conducted in which virtual online profiles of either physically attractive or unattractive persons (N = 93) and profiles of users with either high or low occupational attainment (N = 103) were presented to the participants. Although qualitative interviews did not initially give reason to expect online profiles to constitute a basis for comparison processes, results of the experiments proved otherwise. The first study indicates that recipients have a more negative body image after looking at beautiful users than persons who were shown the less attractive profile pictures. Male participants of the second study, who were confronted with profiles of successful males, showed a higher perceived discrepancy between their current career status and an ideal vita than male participants who looked at profiles of less successful persons.

  6. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

    2000-08-01

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

  7. Pilot-scale ISCO treatment of a MtBE contaminated site using a Fenton-like process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Ivan; Verginelli, Iason; Massetti, Felicia; Piscitelli, Daniela; Gavasci, Renato; Baciocchi, Renato

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports about a pilot-scale feasibility study of In-Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) application based on the use of stabilized hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by naturally occurring iron minerals (Fenton-like process) to a site formerly used for fuel storage and contaminated by MtBE. The stratigraphy of the site consists of a 2-3 meter backfill layer followed by a 3-4 meter low permeability layer, that confines the main aquifer, affected by a widespread MtBE groundwater contamination with concentrations up to 4000 μg/L, also with the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons. The design of the pilot-scale treatment was based on the integration of the results obtained from experimental and numerical modeling accounting for the technological and regulatory constraints existing in the site to be remediated. In particular, lab-scale batch tests allowed the selection of the most suitable operating conditions. Then, this information was implemented in a numerical software that allowed to define the injection and monitoring layout and to predict the propagation of hydrogen peroxide in groundwater. The pilot-scale field results confirmed the effective propagation of hydrogen peroxide in nearly all the target area (around 75 m(2) using 3 injection wells). As far as the MtBE removal is concerned, the ISCO application allowed us to meet the clean-up goals in an area of 60 m(2). Besides, the concentration of TBA, i.e. a potential by-product of MtBE oxidation, was actually reduced after the ISCO treatment. The results of the pilot-scale test suggest that ISCO may be a suitable option for the remediation of the groundwater plume contaminated by MtBE, providing the background data for the design and cost-estimate of the full-scale treatment.

  8. Modeling atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles and fluxes above sloping terrain at a boreal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Aalto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 fluxes and concentrations were simulated in the planetary boundary layer above subarctic hilly terrain using a three dimensional model. The model solves the transport equations in the local scale and includes a vegetation sub-model. A WMO/GAW background concentration measurement site and an ecosystem flux measurement site are located inside the modeled region at a hilltop and above a mixed boreal forest, respectively. According to model results, the concentration measurement at the hill site was representative for continental background. However, this was not the case for the whole model domain. Concentration at few meters above active vegetation represented mainly local variation. Local variation became inseparable from the regional signal at about 60-100 m above ground. Flow over hills changed profiles of environmental variables and height of inversion layer, however CO2 profiles were more affected by upwind land use than topography. The hill site was above boundary layer during night and inside boundary layer during daytime. The CO2 input from model lateral boundaries dominated in both cases. Daily variation in the CO2 assimilation rate was clearly seen in the CO2 profiles. Concentration difference between the hill site and the forest site was about 5ppm during afternoon according to both model and measurements. The average modeled flux to the whole model region was about 40% of measured and modeled local flux at the forest site.

  9. RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERRARE,R.A.

    2000-01-09

    We have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. This Raman lidar system is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols (Goldsmith et al., 1998). These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. We have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) (Feltz et al., 1998; Turner et al., 1999). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

  10. Raman lidar profiling of water vapor and aerosols over the ARM SGP Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrare, R.A.

    2000-01-09

    The authors have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. The Raman lidar sytem is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols. These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. The authors have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

  11. The psychological profile of pilots of passenger planes: Analysis of temperamental traits, aggression and risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Makarowski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the years it has been assumed, that the greater the number of pilot flight hours, the better the development of problem-solving skills among pilots. Research suggests, however, that the problem is more complex than that. Not only one’s experience is of importance – temperament, aggression and risk may also affect the decision-making process under stressful conditions. Material and Methods: We examined 97 male pilots of passenger planes, who had flew ATRs, Boeings, Airbuses, Embraers, and Saabs. The comparative group was made up of 127 graduates of technical studies (not connected with aviation. In our study, we used the following methods: the PTS (Pavlovian Temperament Survey Temperament Questionnaire by Strelau, the Aggression Questionnaire by Buss and Perry, and the Stimulating-Instrumental Risk Inventory (SIRI by Zaleśkiewicz. Results: Following the analyses we could categorize the pilots into 3 distinct groups: group 1 – strong type of nervous system with a tendency to avoid risk; group 2 – strong type of nervous system with a tendency to take risks; group 3 – the relatively weakest type of nervous system with a tendency toward aggressive behavior. Conclusions: Members of each group were analyzed to assess how they function in a task situation, i.e., whilst piloting a passenger plane. The study showed that individuals with high need for stimulation may – consciously or not – seek situations of excessive or unnecessary risks, and this is done in order to reach the right level of stimulation. A constellation of the following variables: temperament, risk, and aggression could be – we argue – useful in psychological examinations, and should be taken into account in training procedures for pilots. Med Pr 2017;68(5:639–651

  12. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  13. Meteorological data quarterly report WIPP site: Eddy County, New Mexico, Summer Quarter, May--June 1976. [Radioactive waste isolation pilot plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matejka, D. Q.

    1977-08-01

    The U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) is evaluating a site in southeastern New Mexico for its suitability as a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The purpose of the WIPP is to demonstrate the technical and operational principles of a permanent repository in bedded salt for low-level and intermediate-level transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by ERDA in national defense programs. High-level waste and waste from commercial sources are excluded from the mission; however, there will be experiments in the WIPP with limited quantities of high-level waste. Meteorological data obtained during May through July 1976 are presented in tabular form.

  14. Monitoring Concept for CO2 Storage at the Pilot Site Ketzin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipki, Mario; Liebscher, Axel; Lüth, Stefan; Ivanova, Alexandra; Möller, Fabian; Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia; Rippe, Dennis; Zimmer, Martin; Szizybalski, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Between 2008 and 2013, the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ has injected more than 67 kt of CO2 at the Pilot Site in Ketzin, 25 km west of Berlin. The CO2 was stored in porous sandstones of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation at a depth of 630 to 650 m. In more than a decade, GFZ has developed and tested an extraordinary multi-monitoring concept for onshore CO2 storages which mainly comprises the following methods: Time-lapse 3D seismic surveying is the most commonly used method for imaging and monitoring a CO2-plume in the deep underground before, during and after the injection phase. Such campaigns require high logistical and financial efforts and can be realised only to a limited extent. At Ketzin, for instance, 3D-seismic repeat surveys were acquired using several thousand surface acquisition points and lasting over two or three months. Alternative approaches include permanently buried seismic receivers. Geoelectric measurements in Ketzin are mainly applied by using a permanent downhole electrode installation (Vertical Electrical Resistivity Array = VERA) which has been implemented in three wells behind the well casings. Measurements between 590 m to 735 m are constantly carried out covering the vertical thickness of the entire CO2 storage horizon. Valuable results were achieved by a combination of inhole, crosshole and surface downhole measurements which has been carried out with appropriate acquisition geometries. For focused areas around monitoring wells, geoelectric methods may support and supplement information from seismic surveys. Borehole monitoring of pressure and temperature are generally indispensable for every underground gas storage type. In Ketzin, a remote monitoring system for all wells has been installed that constantly provides the operators with values for date, time, downhole and wellhead pressure, depth, and temperature. Moreover, all wellheads are checked weekly during onsite inspections. Samples for chemical analysis are

  15. A pilot study to profile the lower limb musculoskeletal health in children with obesity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, Grace

    2012-01-01

    : Evidence suggests a negative effect of obesity on musculoskeletal health in children. A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the presence of musculoskeletal impairments in children with obesity and to explore the relationships among body mass index, physical activity, and musculoskeletal measures.

  16. Seismic reflection data report: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hern, J.L.; Powers, D.W.; Barrows, L.J.

    1978-12-01

    Volume II contains uninterpreted processed lines and shotpoint maps from three seismic reflection surveys conducted from 1976 through 1978 by Sandia Laboratories to support investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Data interpretations will be the subject of subsequent reports. (LK)

  17. Communication Profiles of Psychiatric Residents and Attending Physicians in Medication-Management Appointments: A Quantitative Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Enrico G.; Pincus, Harold A.; Wieland, Melissa; Roter, Debra; Larson, Susan; Houck, Patricia; Reynolds, Charles F.; Cruz, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors quantitatively examined differences in psychiatric residents' and attending physicians' communication profiles and voice tones. Methods: Audiotaped recordings of 49 resident-patient and 35 attending-patient medication-management appointments at four ambulatory sites were analyzed with the Roter Interaction Analysis System…

  18. Continuous Water Vapor Profiles for the Fixed Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Troyan, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2006-01-09

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program defined a specific metric for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2006 to complete a continuous time series of the vertical profile of water vapor for selected 30-day periods from each of the fixed ARM sites. In order to accomplish this metric, a new technique devised to incorporate radiosonde data, microwave radiometer data and analysis information from numerical weather forecast models has been developed. The product of this analysis, referred to as the merged sounding value-added product, includes vertical profiles of atmospheric water vapor concentration and several other important thermodynamic state variables at 1-minute time intervals and 266 vertical levels.

  19. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L. [and others

    1998-08-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report.

  20. Core analyses for selected samples from the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, V.A.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Two groups of core samples from the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were analyzed to provide estimates of hydrologic parameters for use in flow-and-transport modeling. Whole-core and core-plug samples were analyzed by helium porosimetry, resaturation and porosimetry, mercury-intrusion porosimetry, electrical-resistivity techniques, and gas-permeability methods. 33 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Core analyses for selected samples from the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, V.A.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Two groups of core samples from the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were analyzed to provide estimates of hydrologic parameters for use in flow-and-transport modeling. Whole-core and core-plug samples were analyzed by helium porosimetry, resaturation and porosimetry, mercury-intrusion porosimetry, electrical-resistivity techniques, and gas-permeability methods. 33 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Maximum-likelihood model averaging to profile clustering of site types across discrete linear sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A major analytical challenge in computational biology is the detection and description of clusters of specified site types, such as polymorphic or substituted sites within DNA or protein sequences. Progress has been stymied by a lack of suitable methods to detect clusters and to estimate the extent of clustering in discrete linear sequences, particularly when there is no a priori specification of cluster size or cluster count. Here we derive and demonstrate a maximum likelihood method of hierarchical clustering. Our method incorporates a tripartite divide-and-conquer strategy that models sequence heterogeneity, delineates clusters, and yields a profile of the level of clustering associated with each site. The clustering model may be evaluated via model selection using the Akaike Information Criterion, the corrected Akaike Information Criterion, and the Bayesian Information Criterion. Furthermore, model averaging using weighted model likelihoods may be applied to incorporate model uncertainty into the profile of heterogeneity across sites. We evaluated our method by examining its performance on a number of simulated datasets as well as on empirical polymorphism data from diverse natural alleles of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene. Our method yielded greater power for the detection of clustered sites across a breadth of parameter ranges, and achieved better accuracy and precision of estimation of clusters, than did the existing empirical cumulative distribution function statistics.

  3. Maximum-likelihood model averaging to profile clustering of site types across discrete linear sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A major analytical challenge in computational biology is the detection and description of clusters of specified site types, such as polymorphic or substituted sites within DNA or protein sequences. Progress has been stymied by a lack of suitable methods to detect clusters and to estimate the extent of clustering in discrete linear sequences, particularly when there is no a priori specification of cluster size or cluster count. Here we derive and demonstrate a maximum likelihood method of hierarchical clustering. Our method incorporates a tripartite divide-and-conquer strategy that models sequence heterogeneity, delineates clusters, and yields a profile of the level of clustering associated with each site. The clustering model may be evaluated via model selection using the Akaike Information Criterion, the corrected Akaike Information Criterion, and the Bayesian Information Criterion. Furthermore, model averaging using weighted model likelihoods may be applied to incorporate model uncertainty into the profile of heterogeneity across sites. We evaluated our method by examining its performance on a number of simulated datasets as well as on empirical polymorphism data from diverse natural alleles of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene. Our method yielded greater power for the detection of clustered sites across a breadth of parameter ranges, and achieved better accuracy and precision of estimation of clusters, than did the existing empirical cumulative distribution function statistics.

  4. Evaluation of the commonest site, demographic profile and most effective therapy in scabies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sudip

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was planned to find out commonest sites of scabies in Indian patients. Attempt was made to study the demographic profile i.e., the common age groups, affection of family members, friends or sexual partners, type of skin lesions, history of previous affection of scabies, coassociation with STDs, and to find out the most effective treatment of scabies. Our study showed that genitalia and finger webs were the most common sites and papular lesions were by far the commonest lesion in scabies. Oral lvermectin remained the most effective drug closely followed by topical 5% permethrin cream.

  5. Evaluation of the commonest site, demographic profile and most effective therapy in scabies

    OpenAIRE

    Das Sudip; Chatterjee Tapas; Banerji G; Biswas Indranil

    2006-01-01

    The study was planned to find out commonest sites of scabies in Indian patients. Attempt was made to study the demographic profile i.e., the common age groups, affection of family members, friends or sexual partners, type of skin lesions, history of previous affection of scabies, coassociation with STDs, and to find out the most effective treatment of scabies. Our study showed that genitalia and finger webs were the most common sites and papular lesions were by far the commonest lesion in sca...

  6. Australian seafood compositional profiles: A pilot study. Vitamin D and mercury content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, David; Greenfield, Heather; Cunningham, Judy; Kiermeier, Andreas; McLeod, Catherine

    2016-02-15

    Given the scarcity of comprehensive nutritional data for Australia's >400 commercially produced seafood species a pilot study was undertaken to collect and analyse 22 species of wild and aquaculture seafood in order to develop a model for future comprehensive surveys. The species analysed were: Atlantic salmon, Australian sardine, prawn (six species), barramundi, abalone (three species), blue sprat, burrowing blackfish, gummy shark, oyster (four species), ocean trout and yellowtail kingfish. The analyses undertaken in this pilot study were: moisture, protein, total fat, cholesterol, fatty acids, vitamin C, vitamins A and D, and 21 mineral elements (including total mercury and methyl mercury). The data reported here are for vitamin D and mercury only. Comprehensive data have already been published elsewhere. Issues identified that should be addressed prior to undertaking a more extensive and representative study of the remaining major edible commercial Australian seafood species include: choice of samples and nutrients for analysis, facilities for sample handling and storage, data management and scrutiny, and laboratory quality control.

  7. Microbial profile comparisons of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in periodontitis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Sembler-Møller, Maria Lynn; Grande, Maria Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to compare microbial profiles of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in patients with periodontitis. We tested the hypotheses that saliva can be an alternative to pooled subgingival samples, when screening for presence of periopathogens....... DESIGN: Site specific subgingival plaque samples (n = 54), pooled subgingival plaque samples (n = 18) and stimulated saliva samples (n = 18) were collected from 18 patients with generalized chronic periodontitis. Subgingival and salivary microbiotas were characterized by means of HOMINGS (Human Oral...... to an AUC of 0.76 (sensitivity: 0.56, specificity: 0.94) in pooled subgingival samples. CONCLUSIONS: Site-specific presence of periodontal pathogens was detected with comparable accuracy in stimulated saliva samples and pooled subgingival plaque samples. Consequently, saliva may be a reasonable surrogate...

  8. DNA methylation profiling of the human major histocompatibility complex: a pilot study for the human epigenome project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardhman K Rakyan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human Epigenome Project aims to identify, catalogue, and interpret genome-wide DNA methylation phenomena. Occurring naturally on cytosine bases at cytosine-guanine dinucleotides, DNA methylation is intimately involved in diverse biological processes and the aetiology of many diseases. Differentially methylated cytosines give rise to distinct profiles, thought to be specific for gene activity, tissue type, and disease state. The identification of such methylation variable positions will significantly improve our understanding of genome biology and our ability to diagnose disease. Here, we report the results of the pilot study for the Human Epigenome Project entailing the methylation analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex. This study involved the development of an integrated pipeline for high-throughput methylation analysis using bisulphite DNA sequencing, discovery of methylation variable positions, epigenotyping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, and development of an integrated public database available at http://www.epigenome.org. Our analysis of DNA methylation levels within the major histocompatibility complex, including regulatory exonic and intronic regions associated with 90 genes in multiple tissues and individuals, reveals a bimodal distribution of methylation profiles (i.e., the vast majority of the analysed regions were either hypo- or hypermethylated, tissue specificity, inter-individual variation, and correlation with independent gene expression data.

  9. Measuring the Quality of Inclusive Practices: Findings from the Inclusive Classroom Profile Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukakou, Elena P.; Winton, Pam J.; West, Tracey A.; Sideris, John H.; Rucker, Lia M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of the Inclusive Classroom Profile (ICP), an observation measure designed to assess the quality of classroom practices in inclusive preschool programs. The measure was field tested in 51 inclusive classrooms. Results confirmed and extended previous research findings, providing…

  10. Atmospheric Profile Retrieval with AIRS Data and Validation at the ARM CART Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The physical retrieval algorithm of atmospheric temperature and moisture distribution from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) radiances is presented. The retrieval algorithm is applied to AIRS clear-sky radiance measurements. The algorithm employs a statistical retrieval followed by a subsequent nonlinear physical retrieval. The regression coefficients for the statistical retrieval are derived from a dataset of global radiosonde observations (RAOBs) comprising atmospheric temperature, moisture, and ozone profiles. Evaluation of the retrieved profiles is performed by a comparison with RAOBs from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud And Radiation Testbed (CART) in Oklahoma,U. S. A.. Comparisons show that the physically-based AIRS retrievals agree with the RAOBs from the ARM CART site with a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 1 K on average for temperature profiles above 850 hPa, and approximately 10% on average for relative humidity profiles. With its improved spectral resolution, AIRS depicts more detailed structure than the current Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) sounder when comparing AIRS sounding retrievals with the operational GOES sounding products.

  11. Identification of Protein Pupylation Sites Using Bi-Profile Bayes Feature Extraction and Ensemble Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pupylation, one of the most important posttranslational modifications of proteins, typically takes place when prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup is attached to specific lysine residues on a target protein. Identification of pupylation substrates and their corresponding sites will facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanism of pupylation. Comparing with the labor-intensive and time-consuming experiment approaches, computational prediction of pupylation sites is much desirable for their convenience and fast speed. In this study, a new bioinformatics tool named EnsemblePup was developed that used an ensemble of support vector machine classifiers to predict pupylation sites. The highlight of EnsemblePup was to utilize the Bi-profile Bayes feature extraction as the encoding scheme. The performance of EnsemblePup was measured with a sensitivity of 79.49%, a specificity of 82.35%, an accuracy of 85.43%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.617 using the 5-fold cross validation on the training dataset. When compared with other existing methods on a benchmark dataset, the EnsemblePup provided better predictive performance, with a sensitivity of 80.00%, a specificity of 83.33%, an accuracy of 82.00%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.629. The experimental results suggested that EnsemblePup presented here might be useful to identify and annotate potential pupylation sites in proteins of interest. A web server for predicting pupylation sites was developed.

  12. Environmental assessment for the reuse of TNX as a multi-purpose pilot plant campus at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental and safety impacts of DOE planning to allow asset reuse of the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The proposed action would include providing for a location for the Centers of Excellence at or adjacent to SRS and entering into a cooperative agreement with a non-profit management and operations (management firm) contractor to operate and market the TNX facilities and equipment. The area (formerly TNX) would be called a Multi-Purpose Pilot Plant Campus (MPPC) and would be used: (1) as location for technology research, development, demonstration, and commercial operations; (2) to establish partnerships with industry to develop applied technologies for commercialization; and (3) serve as administrative headquarters for Centers of Excellence in the program areas of soil remediation, radioecology, groundwater contamination, and municipal solid waste minimization.

  13. New stable isotope results for reservoir and above zone monitoring in CCS from the Ketzin pilot site, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Martin; van Geldern, Robert; Myrttinen, Anssi; Veith, Becker; Zimmer, Martin; Barth, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    With rising atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, CCS technologies are a feasible option to diminish consequences of uncontrolled anthropogenic CO2 emissions and related climate change. However, application of CCS technologies requires appropriate and routine monitoring tools in order to ensure a safe and effective CO2 injection. Stable isotope techniques have proven as a useful geochemical monitoring tool at several CCS pilot projects worldwide. They can provide important information about gas - water - rock interactions, mass balances and CO2 migration in the reservoir and may serve as a tool to detect CO2 leakage in the subsurface and surface. Since the beginning of injection in 2008 at the Ketzin pilot site in Germany, more than 450 samples of fluids and gases have been analysed for their carbon and oxygen isotopic composition. Analytical advancements were achieved by modifying a conventional isotope ratio mass-spectrometer with a He dilution system. This allowed analyses of a larger number of CO2 gas samples from the injection well and observation wells. With this, a high-resolution monitoring program was established over a time period of one year. Results revealed that two isotopical distinct kinds of CO2 are injected at the Ketzin pilot site. The most commonly injected CO2 is so-called 'technical' CO2 with an average carbon isotopic value of about -31 ‰. Sporadically, natural source CO2 with an average δ13C value of -3 ‰ was injected. The injection of natural source CO2 generated a distinct isotope signal at the injection well that can be used as an ideal tracer. CO2 isotope values analysed at the observation wells indicate a highly dispersive migration of the supercritical CO2 that results in mixing of the two kinds of CO2 within the reservoir. Above-reservoir monitoring includes the first overlying aquifer above the cap rock. An observation well within this zone comprises an U-tube sampling device that allows frequent sampling of unaltered brine

  14. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.B.; Woodruff, L.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Cannon, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.; Kilburn, J.E.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset of 73 of these samples was analyzed for a suite of 19 organochlorine pesticides by gas chromatography. Only three of these samples had detectable pesticide concentrations. A separate sample of A-horizon soil was collected for microbial characterization by phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA), soil enzyme assays, and determination of selected human and agricultural pathogens. Collection, preservation and analysis of samples for both organic compounds and microbial characterization add a great degree of complication to the sampling and preservation protocols and a significant increase to the cost for a continental-scale survey. Both these issues must be considered carefully prior to adopting these parameters as part of the soil geochemical survey of North America.

  15. Full Life Cycle Research at the Ketzin Pilot Site, Germany - From Safe and Successful CO2 Injection Operation to Post-Injection Monitoring and Site Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    The Ketzin pilot site near Berlin, Germany, was initiated in 2004 as the first European onshore storage project for research and development on geological CO2 storage. The operational CO2 injection period started in June 2008 and ended in August 2013 when the site entered the post-injection closure period. During these five years, a total amount of 67 kt of CO2 was safely injected into a saline aquifer (Upper Triassic sandstone) at a depth of 630 m - 650 m. In fall 2013, the first observation well was partially plugged in the reservoir section; full abandonment of this well finished in 2015 after roughly 2 years of well closure monitoring. Abandonment of the remaining 4 wells will be finished by 2017 and hand-over of liability to the competent authority is planned for end of 2017. The CO2 injected was mainly of food grade quality (purity > 99.9%). In addition, 1.5 kt of CO2 from the pilot capture facility "Schwarze Pumpe" (oxyfuel power plant CO2 with purity > 99.7%) was injected in 2011. The injection period terminated with a CO2-N2 co-injection experiment of 650 t of a 95% CO2/5% N2 mixture in summer 2013 to study the effects of impurities in the CO2 stream on the injection operation. During regular operation, the CO2 was pre-heated on-site to 40 - 45°C prior to injection to ensure a single-phase injection process and avoid any phase transition or transient states within the injection facility or the reservoir. Between March and July 2013, just prior to the CO2-N2 co-injection experiment, the injection temperature was stepwise decreased down to 10°C within a "cold-injection" experiment to study the effects of two-phase injection conditions. During injection operation, the combination of different geochemical and geophysical monitoring methods enabled detection and mapping of the spatial and temporal in-reservoir behaviour of the injected CO2 even for small quantities. After the cessation of CO2 injection, post-injection monitoring continued and two additional

  16. Pedestrian and motorists' actions at pedestrian hybrid beacon sites: findings from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulugurtha, Srinivas S; Self, Debbie R

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on an analysis of pedestrian and motorists' actions at sites with pedestrian hybrid beacons and assesses their effectiveness in improving the safety of pedestrians. Descriptive and statistical analyses (one-tail two-sample T-test and two-proportion Z-test) were conducted using field data collected during morning and evening peak hours at three study sites in the city of Charlotte, NC, before and after the installation of pedestrian hybrid beacons. Further, an analysis was conducted to assess the change in pedestrian and motorists' actions over time (before the installation; 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the installation). Results showed an increase in average traffic speed at one of the pedestrian hybrid beacon sites while no specific trends were observed at the other two pedestrian hybrid beacon sites. A decrease in the number of motorists not yielding to pedestrians, pedestrians trapped in the middle of the street, and pedestrian-vehicle conflicts were observed at all the three pedestrian hybrid beacon sites. The installation of pedestrian hybrid beacons did not have a negative effect on pedestrian actions at two out of the three sites. Improvements seem to be relatively more consistent 3 months after the installation of the pedestrian hybrid beacon.

  17. Nutritional profile of older adults with chronic venous leg ulcers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Jodi C; Kemmner, Kaitlyn G; Rusnak, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional descriptive pilot study was to describe daily intake of select nutrients important for efficient wound healing and general health in a sample of older adults (64.25 ± 9.49 years of age) with chronic venous leg ulcers (CVLUs; N = 12), compared to recommended dietary allowances (RDA). Anthropometric data were also collected. Compared to RDA, participants on average consumed lower vitamin C (60.03 ± 49.73 mg/d) and higher sodium (3197.07 ± 1455.04 mg/d), sugar (181.21 ± 115.45 g/d), and saturated fat (33.75 ± 1.06 g/d). They also demonstrated a relatively high plasma n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio, a biomarker of inflammation (11.25 ± 1.99). The mean body mass index indicated extreme obesity (41.48 ± 11.47). A multidisciplinary treatment approach that includes routine dietary assessments followed by tailored dietary interventions may improve wound healing and long-term health outcomes in this population.

  18. One year of vertical wind profiles measurements at a Mediterranean coastal site of South Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Avolio, Elenio; Federico, Stefano; Gullì, Daniel; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    In order to develop wind farms projects is challenging to site them on coastal areas both onshore and offshore as suitable sites. Developing projects need high quality databases under a wide range of atmospheric conditions or high resolution models that could resolve the effect of the coastal discontinuity in the surface properties. New parametrizations are important and high quality databases are also needed for formulating them. Ground-based remote sensing devices such as lidars have been shown to be functional for studying the evolution of the vertical wind structure coastal atmospheric boundary layer both on- and offshore. Here, we present results from a year of vertical wind profiles, wind speed and direction, monitoring programme at a site located in the Italian Calabria Region, Central Mediterranean, 600m from the Thyrrenian coastline, where a Lidar Doppler, ZephIr (ZephIr ltd) has been operative since July 2013. The lidar monitors wind speed and direction from 10m up to 300m at 10 vertical levels with an average of 10 minutes and it is supported by a metmast providing: Atmospheric Pressure, Solar Radiation, Precipitation, Relative Humidity, Temperature,Wind Speed and Direction at 10m. We present the characterization of wind profiles during one year period according to the time of the day to transition periods night/day/night classified relating the local scale, breeze scale, to the large scale conditions. The dataset is also functional for techniques for short-term prediction of wind for the renewable energy integration in the distribution grids. The site infrastructure is funded within the Project "Infrastructure of High Technology for Environmental and Climate Monitoring" (I-AMICA) (PONa3_00363) by the Italian National Operative Program (PON 2007-2013) and European Regional Development Fund. Real-time data are show on http://www.i-amica.it/i-amica/?page_id=1122.

  19. Hydro-mechanical simulations of well abandonment at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage verify wellbore system integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Victoria; Kempka, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In geological underground utilisation, operating and abandoned wells have been identified as a main potential leakage pathways for reservoir fluids. In the scope of the well abandonment procedure currently carried out at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage in Germany, a hydro-mechanical model was built to carry out a coupled analysis of the integrity in the entire wellbore system. The main aim of the present study was to assess the impacts of stress changes associated with CO2 injection as well as the cement backfill undertaken in the scope of well abandonment. A numerical model comprising cement sheaths, steel casings, tubing, multiple packers and wellbore annuli was implemented to enable a detailed representation of the entire wellbore system. The numerical model grid has a horizontal discretisation of 5 m x 5 m to focus on near wellbore effects, whereby element sizes increase with increasing distance from the wellbore. Vertical grid discretisation uses a tartan grid type over the entire model thickness of 1,500 m to ensure a sufficient discretisation of all wellbore system elements as well as of the reservoir unit. The total number of elements amounts to 210,672. Mechanical model parameters were taken from geological, drilling, logging and laboratory test data based on Ketzin pilot site-specific information as well as related literature (Kempka et al., 2014). The coupled calculations were performed using an elasto-plastic constitutive law, whereby an initial simulation run ensured a static mechanical equilibrium to represent the initial state before the start of CO2 injection. Thereto, gravitational load of the overburden rocks and pore pressure distribution following available well logs were integrated for initial model parameterisation including a normal faulting stress regime defined by a horizontal to vertical total stress ratio of 0.85. A correction accounting for the temperature and pressure dependent CO2 density was carried out in advance of each

  20. Transcriptional profile of fibroblasts obtained from the primary site, lymph node and bone marrow of breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) influence tumor development at primary as well as in metastatic sites, but there have been no direct comparisons of the transcriptional profiles of stromal cells from different tumor sites. In this study, we used customized cDNA microarrays to compare the gene expression profile of stromal cells from primary tumor (CAF, n = 4), lymph node metastasis (N+, n = 3) and bone marrow (BM, n = 4) obtained from breast cancer patients. Biological validation was done ...

  1. Computational identification of protein methylation sites through bi-profile Bayes feature extraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlin Shao

    Full Text Available Protein methylation is one type of reversible post-translational modifications (PTMs, which plays vital roles in many cellular processes such as transcription activity, DNA repair. Experimental identification of methylation sites on proteins without prior knowledge is costly and time-consuming. In silico prediction of methylation sites might not only provide researches with information on the candidate sites for further determination, but also facilitate to perform downstream characterizations and site-specific investigations. In the present study, a novel approach based on Bi-profile Bayes feature extraction combined with support vector machines (SVMs was employed to develop the model for Prediction of Protein Methylation Sites (BPB-PPMS from primary sequence. Methylation can occur at many residues including arginine, lysine, histidine, glutamine, and proline. For the present, BPB-PPMS is only designed to predict the methylation status for lysine and arginine residues on polypeptides due to the absence of enough experimentally verified data to build and train prediction models for other residues. The performance of BPB-PPMS is measured with a sensitivity of 74.71%, a specificity of 94.32% and an accuracy of 87.98% for arginine as well as a sensitivity of 70.05%, a specificity of 77.08% and an accuracy of 75.51% for lysine in 5-fold cross validation experiments. Results obtained from cross-validation experiments and test on independent data sets suggest that BPB-PPMS presented here might facilitate the identification and annotation of protein methylation. Besides, BPB-PPMS can be extended to build predictors for other types of PTM sites with ease. For public access, BPB-PPMS is available at http://www.bioinfo.bio.cuhk.edu.hk/bpbppms.

  2. Production of gas from coal seams in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin in Poland in the post-injection period of an ECBM pilot site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, F. van; Krzystolik, P.; Wageningen, N. van; Pagnier, H.; Jura, B.; Skiba, J.; Winthaegen, P.; Kobiela, Z.

    2009-01-01

    A pilot site for CO2 storage in coal seams was set-up in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin in Poland in the scope of the RECOPOL project, funded by the European Commission. About 760 tons CO2 were injected into the reservoir from August 2004 to June 2005. Breakthrough of the injected CO2 was established

  3. Production of gas from coal seams in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin in Poland in the post-injection period of an ECBM pilot site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, F. van; Krzystolik, P.; Wageningen, N. van; Pagnier, H.; Jura, B.; Skiba, J.; Winthaegen, P.; Kobiela, Z.

    2009-01-01

    A pilot site for CO2 storage in coal seams was set-up in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin in Poland in the scope of the RECOPOL project, funded by the European Commission. About 760 tons CO2 were injected into the reservoir from August 2004 to June 2005. Breakthrough of the injected CO2 was established

  4. Serum Proteome Profiles in Stricturing Crohn’s Disease: A pilot study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Peter; Zhang, Qibin; Shapiro, Jason; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Mallette, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Bright, Renee; Merrick, Marjorie; Shah, Samir A.; Sands, Bruce E.; Leleiko, Neal

    2015-08-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with different described behaviors, including stricture. At present, there are no laboratory studies that can differentiate stricturing CD from other phenotypes of IBD. We performed a pilot study to examine differences in the proteome among patients with stricturing Crohn’s disease, non-stricturing Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: Serum samples were selected from the Ocean State Crohn’s and Colitis Area Registry (OSCCAR), an established cohort of patients with IBD. Crohn’s disease patients with surgically-resected stricture were matched with similar patients with Crohn’s disease without known stricture, and with UC. Serum samples from each patient were digested and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to characterize the proteome. Statistical analyses were performed to identify peptides and proteins that can differentiate CD with stricture. Results: Samples from 9 patients in each group (27 total patients) were analyzed. Baseline demographic characteristics were similar among the three groups. We quantified 7668 peptides and 897 proteins for analysis. ROC analysis identified a subset of peptides with an area under the curve greater than 0.9, indicating greater separation potential. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was able to distinguish among the three groups with up to 70% accuracy by peptides, and up to 80% accuracy by proteins. We identified the significantly different proteins and peptides, and determined their function based on previously published literature. Conclusions: The serum of patients with stricturing CD, non-stricturing CD, and UC are distinguishable via proteomic analysis. Some of the proteins that differentiate the stricturing phenotype have been implicated in complement activation, fibrinolytic pathways, and lymphocyte adhesion.

  5. A Pilot Metabolic Profiling Study of Patients With Neonatal Jaundice and Response to Phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, A; Qi, S; Su, Z; Shen, H; Yang, Y; Cai, W; Dai, Y

    2016-08-01

    Phototherapy has been widely used in treating neonatal jaundice, but detailed metabonomic profiles of neonatal jaundice patients and response to phototherapy have not been characterized. Our aim was to depict the serum metabolic characteristics of neonatal jaundice patients relative to controls and changes in response to phototherapy. A (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic approach was employed to study the metabolic profiling of serum from healthy infants (n = 25) and from infants with neonatal jaundice (n = 30) pre- and postphototherapy. The acquired data were processed by multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The PLS-DA and OPLS-DA model identified nine metabolites capable of distinguishing patients from controls. In addition, 28 metabolites such as β-glucose, α-glucose, valine, and pyruvate changed in response to phototherapy. This study offers useful information on metabolic disorders in neonatal jaundice patients and the effects of phototherapy on lipids, amino acid, and energy metabolism.

  6. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Anderson, Vinah; Webster, Joan; Sneddon, Anne; Thalib, Lukman; Gillespie, Brigid M

    2014-09-30

    Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS) are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI). Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS) and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing) and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus(®) dressing). All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38-1.68); for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34-2.79). A sample size of 784 (392 per group) would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  7. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Chaboyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus® dressing. All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38–1.68; for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34–2.79. A sample size of 784 (392 per group would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  8. Thermal conductivity of rocksalt and other geologic materials from the site of the proposed waste isolation pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, J.N.; McCreight, J.E.

    1980-03-19

    The measurements first reported by Acton on the thermal conductivity of samples taken from a borehole at the site of the proposed nuclear waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, have been extended to include additional samples and higher temperature measurements. Samples for measurements were taken from several depths of three wells, including the well AEC 8 from which Acton obtained his samples. These samples ranged from relatively pure rocksalt (NaCl) with small amounts of interstitial anhydrite to essentially nonsalt samples composed of gypsum or clay. The measurements in this latest series were conducted at Sandia, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), and at Dynatech Corp. In general, the data from the three laboratories agreed reasonably well for similar coarse grained translucent rock salt samples, with the LASL and Sandia results typically being about 20% higher than those of Dynatceh. On the basis of these experiments, it is concluded that the thermal conductivity of materials found at the site can be predicted to an accuracy +-30% from knowledge of the composition and grain size of these materials.

  9. Concept and approach of human signal-molecular-profiling database: a pilot study on depression using Lab-on-chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tao; Zhao, Xinyan; Yang, Zhaochu

    2013-01-01

    Signal molecular profiling (SMP) in serum can reveal abundant medical information about the human body. The construction of a human signal-molecular-profiling database (HSMPD) will greatly prompt the research of medical science. However, some challenges hinder the construction of HSMPD. A promising strategy is proposed to provide a convenient way for the establishment of HSMPD. Firstly, a low-cost and high-throughput tool for measuring SMP should be developed and standardized. When the SMP-oriented tools were accepted by most hospitals worldwide, SMP information will be decoded by a cloud-based system and stored into the online database naturally. In the pilot study, an ultrasensitive Lab-on-chips (LOC) device was developed as a specific tool for SMP. Clinical serum samples from 10 women within 4 weeks of giving birth, including 2 patients with postpartum depression were studied by the LOC devices, since accumulating evidence has indicated that hormones and cytokines in patients with mood disorders are abnormal. HSMPD may be applied to diagnose depression in the future. Here, five kinds of signal molecules were quantified on the devices, namely, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6 and IL-8. The preliminary results showed that the concentrations of IL-2 and IL-8 in the depression group may be higher than those in the control group, whereas the other kinds of signal molecules did not change significantly. Although the correlations are not enough to induct any diagnostic criterion, the SMP-oriented tool was verified. The results also indicated that the strategy to establish HSMPD is conceivable.

  10. Oil refinery hazardous effluents minimization by membrane filtration: An on-site pilot plant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruno; Crespo, João G; Santos, Maria António; Velizarov, Svetlozar

    2016-10-01

    Experiments for treating two different types of hazardous oil refinery effluents were performed in order to avoid/minimize their adverse impacts on the environment. First, refinery wastewater was subjected to ultrafiltration using a ceramic membrane, treatment, which did not provide an adequate reduction of the polar oil and grease content below the maximal contaminant level allowed. Therefore the option of reducing the polar oil and grease contamination at its main emission source point in the refinery - the spent caustic originating from the refinery kerosene caustic washing unit - using an alkaline-resistant nanofiltration polymeric membrane treatment was tested. It was found that at a constant operating pressure and temperature, 99.9% of the oil and grease and 97.7% of the COD content were rejected at this emission point. Moreover, no noticeable membrane fouling or permeate flux decrease were registered until a spent caustic volume concentration factor of 3. These results allow for a reuse of the purified permeate in the refinery operations, instead of a fresh caustic solution, which besides the improved safety and environmentally related benefits, can result in significant savings of 1.5 M€ per year at the current prices for the biggest Portuguese oil refinery. The capital investment needed for nanofiltration treatment of the spent caustic is estimated to be less than 10% of that associated with the conventional wet air oxidation treatment of the spent caustic that is greater than 9 M€. The payback period was estimated to be 1.1 years. The operating costs for the two treatment options are similar, but the reuse of the nanofiltration spent caustic concentrate for refinery pH control applications can further reduce the operating expenditures. Overall, the pilot plant results obtained and the process economics evaluation data indicate a safer, environmentally friendly and highly competitive solution offered by the proposed nanofiltration treatment, thus

  11. Specific Metabolome Profile of Exhaled Breath Condensate in Patients with Shock and Respiratory Failure: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice Fermier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shock includes different pathophysiological mechanisms not fully understood and remains a challenge to manage. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC may contain relevant biomarkers that could help us make an early diagnosis or better understand the metabolic perturbations resulting from this pathological situation. Objective: we aimed to establish the metabolomics signature of EBC from patients in shock with acute respiratory failure in a pilot study. Material and methods: We explored the metabolic signature of EBC in 12 patients with shock compared to 14 controls using LC-HRMS. We used a non-targeted approach, and we performed a multivariate analysis based on Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA to differentiate between the two groups of patients. Results: We optimized the procedure of EBC collection and LC-HRMS detected more than 1000 ions in this fluid. The optimization of multivariate models led to an excellent model of differentiation for both groups (Q2 > 0.4 after inclusion of only 6 ions. Discussion and conclusion: We validated the procedure of EBC collection and we showed that the metabolome profile of EBC may be relevant in characterizing patients with shock. We performed well in distinguishing these patients from controls, and the identification of relevant compounds may be promising for ICC patients.

  12. Cross-prediction of the groundwater chemistry at the SKB sites in Sweden. Pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaarman, C.; Laaksoharju, M. [Intera KB (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    The possibility to perform a large scale prediction throughout Sweden was tested. The aim of the work was: to collect data and create a groundwater database for current and future use; to see if there is any correlation between data at different sites; to perform a modelling where the groundwater composition at different regions in Sweden is predicted. The outcome of the predictions were compared with the measured data at different sites. The results show that it is possible but more work needs to be done to improve the prediction models. More measurements at depth are needed to enable the use of 3D models. It is also important to include hydrogeological parameters in the groundwater chemical prediction models that are used. 8 refs, 115 figs.

  13. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I. [ed.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center; Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Hamilton, L.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,24O}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual {sup 239}Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,24O}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10{sup {minus}6}, 6 x 10{sup {minus}5}, and 5 x 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  14. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I. (ed.)

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of [sup 239,24O]Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual [sup 239]Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with [sup 239,24O]Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10[sup [minus]6], 6 x 10[sup [minus]5], and 5 x 10[sup [minus]4], respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  15. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I. (ed.)

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of [sup 239,24O]Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual [sup 239]Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with [sup 239,24O]Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10[sup [minus]6], 6 x 10[sup [minus]5], and 5 x 10[sup [minus]4], respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  16. Pilot-scale bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated clayey soil from a sub-Arctic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2014-09-15

    Bioremediation is a potentially cost-effective solution for petroleum contamination in cold region sites. This study investigates the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (C16-C34) in a pilot-scale biopile experiment conducted at 15°C for periods up to 385 days, with a clayey soil, from a crude oil-impacted site in northern Canada. Although several studies on bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from cold region sites have been reported for coarse-textured, sandy soils, there are limited studies of bioremediation of petroleum contamination in fine-textured, clayey soils. Our results indicate that aeration and moisture addition was sufficient for achieving 47% biodegradation and an endpoint of 530 mg/kg for non-volatile (C16-C34) petroleum hydrocarbons. Nutrient amendment with 95 mg-N/kg showed no significant effect on biodegradation compared to a control system without nutrient but similar moisture content. In contrast, in a biopile amended with 1340 mg-N/kg, no statistically significant biodegradation of non-volatile fraction was detected. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of alkB and 16S rRNA genes revealed that inhibition of hydrocarbon biodegradation was associated with a lack of change in microbial community composition. Overall, our data suggests that biopiles are feasible for attaining the bioremediation endpoint in clayey soils. Despite the significantly lower biodegradation rate of 0.009 day(-1) in biopile tank compared to 0.11 day(-1) in slurry bioreactors for C16-C34 hydrocarbons, the biodegradation extents for this fraction were comparable in these two systems.

  17. Pilot-scale bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated clayey soil from a sub-Arctic site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis, E-mail: subhasis.ghoshal@mcgill.ca

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Aeration and moisture addition alone caused extensive hydrocarbon biodegradation. • 30-day slurry reactor remediation endpoints attained in 385 days in biopiles. • High nitrogen concentrations inhibited hydrocarbon degradation. • Inhibition of biodegradation linked to lack of shifts in soil microbial community. - Abstract: Bioremediation is a potentially cost-effective solution for petroleum contamination in cold region sites. This study investigates the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (C16–C34) in a pilot-scale biopile experiment conducted at 15 °C for periods up to 385 days, with a clayey soil, from a crude oil-impacted site in northern Canada. Although several studies on bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from cold region sites have been reported for coarse-textured, sandy soils, there are limited studies of bioremediation of petroleum contamination in fine-textured, clayey soils. Our results indicate that aeration and moisture addition was sufficient for achieving 47% biodegradation and an endpoint of 530 mg/kg for non-volatile (C16–C34) petroleum hydrocarbons. Nutrient amendment with 95 mg-N/kg showed no significant effect on biodegradation compared to a control system without nutrient but similar moisture content. In contrast, in a biopile amended with 1340 mg-N/kg, no statistically significant biodegradation of non-volatile fraction was detected. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of alkB and 16S rRNA genes revealed that inhibition of hydrocarbon biodegradation was associated with a lack of change in microbial community composition. Overall, our data suggests that biopiles are feasible for attaining the bioremediation endpoint in clayey soils. Despite the significantly lower biodegradation rate of 0.009 day{sup −1} in biopile tank compared to 0.11 day{sup −1} in slurry bioreactors for C16–C34 hydrocarbons, the biodegradation extents for this fraction

  18. A Pilot Profile of the Social Entrepreneur in the Constantly Changing Romanian Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ţigu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Social economy and social entrepreneurship are concepts subject of much debate in the academic environment, as their importance is growing in the present times, when the public sector and business environment alike have demonstrated their incapacity to solve specific social problems, such as conserving local traditions and biodiversity or insertion into the labour market of people from vulnerable groups. This article focuses on social entrepreneurs, by aiming to identify their main motivations in the founding and development of a social enterprise, as well as the main challenges faced in their social entrepreneurial activity in a constantly changing business environment. The paper presents a qualitative research conducted on Romanian social entrepreneurs. The results, interpreted through content analysis, indicate that social entrepreneurs, unlike business entrepreneurs, are not profit-driven, but mission driven, their main objective being to make a difference in the society and have a positive impact in the local communities. Furthermore, the research revealed specific challenges faced by Romanian social entrepreneurs, as well as specific differences between social and business entrepreneurs, who aim strictly achieving economic performance. Considering the limitations and future research directions, the implications of the findings are discussed, the paper outlining a profile of the social entrepreneur that can be useful to the public sector for the development of policies aimed at enhancing this type of entrepreneurship, in a constantly changing social environment.

  19. Metabolomic profile related to cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fontana, Beatriz; Morales-Santana, Sonia; Díaz Navarro, Caridad; Rozas-Moreno, Pedro; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente Pérez, Francisca; Pérez del Palacio, José; Muñoz-Torres, Mnuel

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) that represents one of the main causes of mortality in this population. The knowledge of the underlie factors involved in the development of CVD and the discovery of new biomarkers of the disease could help to early identification of high-risk patients. Using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) we analyzed the serum metabolomic profile of 30 subject distributed according three groups: (i) T2DM patients with CVD; (ii) T2DM patients without CVD; (iii) non-diabetic subjects as controls (C) in order to identify potential biomarkers of the CVD related to T2DM. A partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were applied to identify differential metabolites between different groups. Four glycerophospholipids were further identified as potential biomarkers of CVD in T2DM patients. Specifically, a reduction in phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) serum levels were found in T2DM patients compared to controls, presenting the patients with CVD the lowest serum levels of these metabolites. These results show a generalized reduction of circulating phospholipids species in T2DM patients which is more pronounced in those with CVD providing information of the pathways involved in the pathogenesis and progression of CVD associated to T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Strontium and caesium transport in unsaturated soil from Chernobyl Pilot Site under steady flow conditions; Transfert de radioelements en zone non saturee. Etude experimentale et modelisation appliquees au Site Pilote de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szenknect, St

    2003-10-15

    This work is devoted to the quantification and the identification of the predominant processes involved in strontium and caesium transport in unsaturated soil from Chernobyl Pilot Site under steady flow conditions. The transport and fate of radionuclides in the subsurface is affected by various physical and chemical processes including advective and diffusive transport as well as chemical and biological transformations. Laboratory experiments and the use of a multiple tracer approach allow to isolate the contributions of each elementary process and to control the physico-chemical conditions in the system. To be more representative of the field conditions, we decided to perform column miscible displacement experiments. We perform batch and flow-through reactor experiments to characterize the radionuclides sorption mechanisms. Miscible displacement experiments within homogeneous columns and modeling allow to characterize the hydrodynamic properties of the soil and to describe the radionuclides behaviour under dynamic conditions at different water contents. We show that the water content of porous media affect the transport behaviour of inert and strongly sorbing radionuclides. Our results demonstrate that a parametrized transport model that was calibrated under completely saturated conditions was not able to describe the advective-dispersive transport of reactive solutes under unsaturated steady state conditions. Under our experimental conditions, there is no effect of a decrease of the mean water content on the sorption model parameters, but the transport parameters are modified. We established for the studied soil the relation between hydrodynamic dispersion and water content and the relation between pore water velocity and water content. (author)

  1. Expression Profiling of Nonpolar Lipids in Meibum From Patients With Dry Eye: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Keirsey, Jeremy K; Green, Kari B; Nichols, Kelly K

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize differentially expressed lipids in meibum samples from patients with dry eye disease (DED) in order to better understand the underlying pathologic mechanisms. Meibum samples were collected from postmenopausal women with DED (PW-DED; n = 5) and a control group of postmenopausal women without DED (n = 4). Lipid profiles were analyzed by direct infusion full-scan electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). An initial analysis of 145 representative peaks from four classes of lipids in PW-DED samples revealed that additional manual corrections for peak overlap and isotopes only slightly affected the statistical analysis. Therefore, analysis of uncorrected data, which can be applied to a greater number of peaks, was used to compare more than 500 lipid peaks common to PW-DED and control samples. Statistical analysis of peak intensities identified several lipid species that differed significantly between the two groups. Data from contact lens wearers with DED (CL-DED; n = 5) were also analyzed. Many species of the two types of diesters (DE) and very long chain wax esters (WE) were decreased by ∼20% in PW-DED, whereas levels of triacylglycerols were increased by an average of 39% ± 3% in meibum from PW-DED compared to that in the control group. Approximately the same reduction (20%) of similar DE and WE was observed for CL-DED. Statistical analysis of peak intensities from direct infusion ESI-MS results identified differentially expressed lipids in meibum from dry eye patients. Further studies are warranted to support these findings.

  2. CTAG-containing cleavage site profiling to delineate Salmonella into natural clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Tang

    Full Text Available The bacterial genus Salmonella contains thousands of serotypes that infect humans or other hosts, causing mild gastroenteritis to potentially fatal systemic infections in humans. Pathogenically distinct Salmonella serotypes have been classified as individual species or as serological variants of merely one or two species, causing considerable confusion in both research and clinical settings. This situation reflects a long unanswered question regarding whether the Salmonella serotypes exist as discrete genetic clusters (natural species of organisms or as phenotypic (e.g. pathogenic variants of a single (or two natural species with a continuous spectrum of genetic divergence among them. Our recent work, based on genomic sequence divergence analysis, has demonstrated that genetic boundaries exist among Salmonella serotypes, circumscribing them into clear-cut genetic clusters of bacteria.To further test the genetic boundary concept for delineating Salmonella into clearly defined natural lineages (e.g., species, we sampled a small subset of conserved genomic DNA sequences, i.e., the endonuclease cleavage sites that contain the highly conserved CTAG sequence such as TCTAGA for XbaI. We found that the CTAG-containing cleavage sequence profiles could be used to resolve the genetic boundaries as reliably and efficiently as whole genome sequence comparisons but with enormously reduced requirements for time and resources.Profiling of CTAG sequence subsets reflects genetic boundaries among Salmonella lineages and can delineate these bacteria into discrete natural clusters.

  3. Enhanced detection of groundwater contamination from a leaking waste disposal site by microbial community profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouser, Paula J.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Druschel, Gregory K.; Morales, Sergio E.; Hayden, Nancy; O'Grady, Patrick; Stevens, Lori

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater biogeochemistry is adversely impacted when municipal solid waste leachate, rich in nutrients and anthropogenic compounds, percolates into the subsurface from leaking landfills. Detecting leachate contamination using statistical techniques is challenging because well strategies or analytical techniques may be insufficient for detecting low levels of groundwater contamination. We sampled profiles of the microbial community from monitoring wells surrounding a leaking landfill using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Results show in situ monitoring of bacteria, archaea, and the family Geobacteraceae improves characterization of groundwater quality. Bacterial T-RFLP profiles showed shifts correlated to known gradients of leachate and effectively detected changes along plume fringes that were not detected using hydrochemical data. Experimental sediment microcosms exposed to leachate-contaminated groundwater revealed a shift from a β-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria dominated community to one dominated by Firmicutes and δ-Proteobacteria. This shift is consistent with the transition from oxic conditions to an anoxic, iron-reducing environment as a result of landfill leachate-derived contaminants and associated redox conditions. We suggest microbial communities are more sensitive than hydrochemistry data for characterizing low levels of groundwater contamination and thus provide a novel source of information for optimizing detection and long-term monitoring strategies at landfill sites.

  4. Analysis of solutes in groundwaters from the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, K.L.

    1997-09-01

    Between 1976 and 1986, groundwater samples from more than 60 locations in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site were collected and analyzed for a variety of major, minor, and trace solutes. Most of the samples were from the Rustler Formation (the Culebra Dolomite, the Magenta Dolomite, or the zone at the contact between the Rustler and underlying Salado Formations) or the Dewey Lake Red Beds. The analytical data from the laboratories are presented here with accompanying discussions of sample collection methods, supporting field measurements, and laboratory analytical methods. A comparison of four data sets and a preliminary evaluation of the data for the major solutes (Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, Na, K, Ca, and Mg) shows that the data for samples analyzed by UNC/Bendix for SNL seem to be the most reliable, but that at some locations, samples representative of the native, unperturbed groundwater have not been collected. At other locations, the water chemistry has apparently changed between sampling episodes.

  5. Zero-Offset VSP Monitoring of CO2 Storage: Impedance Inversion and Wedge Modelling at the Ketzin Pilot Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Götz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At the CO2 storage pilot site near the town of Ketzin (35 km west of Berlin, Germany the sandstone reservoir at 630 m–650 m depth is thin and heterogeneous. The time-lapse analysis of zero-offset VSP measurements shows that CO2-induced amplitude changes can be observed on near-well corridor stacks. Further, we investigate whether CO2-induced amplitude changes in the monitoring data can be used to derive geometrical and petrophysical parameters governing the migration of CO2 within a brine saturated sandstone aquifer. 2D seismic-elastic modelling is done to test the processing workflow and to perform a wedge modelling study for estimation of the vertical expansion of the CO2 plume. When using the NRMS error as a measure for the similarity between the modelled and recorded repeat traces, the best match is achieved for a plume thickness of 6-7 m within the reservoir sandstone of 8 m thickness. With band limited impedance inversion a velocity reduction at the top of the reservoir of 30%, influenced by casing reverberations as well as CO2 injection, is found. The relation of seismic amplitude to CO2 saturated layer thickness and CO2-induced changes in P-wave velocities are important parameters for the quantification of the injected CO2 volume.

  6. Residents' Attitudes Towards Tourism in a Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems Pilot Site:a Case Study in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yehong; Min Qingwen; Cheng Shengkui

    2009-01-01

    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) is a wide program to promote the conservation and adaptive management of such systems and their associated landscapes,biodiversity,knowledge systems and cultures.Rice-Fish Systems (RFS) in Longxian village of China,as a traditional agricultural system,was selected as one of the five pilot sites of GIAHS in 2005.Researchers have paid more attention to the dynamic conservation and adaptive management of RFS because it is under severe threats from global development challenges.Tourism is suggested to be brought into the RFS conservation program as an alternative industry.This paper presents a comparative study of residents in three types of farm household in Longxian,seeking attitudes to the RFS conservation and tourism development and ways in which such information may guide future strategies.Results show residents,belonging to the household type in which most family members are abroad,have the most positive attitudes to RFS conservation and tourism development;while residents,as other household type in which less than 50% of family members are abroad,are the least sensitive group in these three household types,due to the motivation of moving abroad weakening their enthusiasm to participate in the local activities.Implications are discussed in the context of how resident attitudes will affect the future management of GIAHS conservation and tourism development,and then measures are put forward to foster tourism cooperation and multistakeholders process establishment.

  7. Classifying and profiling Social Networking Site users: a latent segmentation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón-del-Amo, María-del-Carmen; Lorenzo-Romero, Carlota; Gómez-Borja, Miguel-Ángel

    2011-09-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNSs) have showed an exponential growth in the last years. The first step for an efficient use of SNSs stems from an understanding of the individuals' behaviors within these sites. In this research, we have obtained a typology of SNS users through a latent segmentation approach, based on the frequency by which users perform different activities within the SNSs, sociodemographic variables, experience in SNSs, and dimensions related to their interaction patterns. Four different segments have been obtained. The "introvert" and "novel" users are the more occasional. They utilize SNSs mainly to communicate with friends, although "introverts" are more passive users. The "versatile" user performs different activities, although occasionally. Finally, the "expert-communicator" performs a greater variety of activities with a higher frequency. They tend to perform some marketing-related activities such as commenting on ads or gathering information about products and brands as well as commenting ads. The companies can take advantage of these segmentation schemes in different ways: first, by tracking and monitoring information interchange between users regarding their products and brands. Second, they should match the SNS users' profiles with their market targets to use SNSs as marketing tools. Finally, for most business, the expert users could be interesting opinion leaders and potential brand influencers.

  8. Gene methylation profile of gastric cancerous tissue according to tumor site in the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupcinskaite-Noreikiene, Rita; Ugenskiene, Rasa; Noreika, Alius; Rudzianskas, Viktoras; Gedminaite, Jurgita; Skieceviciene, Jurgita; Juozaityte, Elona

    2016-01-26

    There is considerable information on the methylation of the promoter regions of different genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. However, there is a lack of information on how this epigenetic process differs in tumors originating at different sites in the stomach. The aim of this study is to assess the methylation profiles of the MLH1, MGMT, and DAPK-1 genes in cancerous tissues from different stomach sites. Samples were acquired from 81 patients suffering stomach adenocarcinoma who underwent surgery for gastric cancer in the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Hospital Kaunas Clinics in 2009-2012. Gene methylation was investigated with methylation-specific PCR. The study was approved by the Lithuanian Biomedical Research Ethics Committee. The frequencies of methylation in cancerous tissues from the upper, middle, and lower thirds of the stomach were 11.1, 23.1, and 45.4%, respectively, for MLH1; 22.2, 30.8, and 57.6%, respectively, for MGMT; and 44.4, 48.7, and 51.5%, respectively, for DAPK-1. MLH1 and MGMT methylation was observed more often in the lower third of the stomach than in the upper third (p stomach (coefficient, -0.48; p = 0.01). DAPK-1 and MLH1 methylation correlated inversely in tumors in the middle-third of the stomach (coefficient, -0.41; p = 0.01). Gene promoter methylation depends on the gastric tumor location.

  9. Shallow shear-wave velocity profiles and site response characteristics from microtremor array measurements in Metro Manila, the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutas, Rhommel; Yamanaka, Hiroaki

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the outcome of reconnaissance surveys in metropolitan Manila (Metro Manilla), the Philippines, with the aim of mapping shallow shear-wave velocity structures. Metro Manila is a seismically active and densely populated region that is in need of detailed investigation of the subsurface structures, to assess local site effects in seismic hazard estimation. We conducted microtremor array observations and used the spatial autocorrelation method to estimate the shear-wave profiles at 32 sites in major geological settings in Metro Manila. We applied a hybrid genetic simulated annealing algorithm to invert phase velocity data from the spatial autocorrelation method to generate shear-wave velocity models near the global best-fit solution. The comparison between the inferred shear-wave velocity profiles and PS logging showed good agreement in terms of the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves and site responses. Then, we utilised the inferred shear-wave velocity profiles to compute the site amplifications with reference to the motion in engineering bedrock. Subsequently, the site amplifications have been grouped, based on NEHRP site classes. The amplification factor has also been compared with the average shear-wave velocity of the upper 30m at each site, to produce a power-law regression equation that can be used as a starting basis for further site-effects evaluation in the metropolis.

  10. Subsurface profiling using integrated geophysical methods for 2D site response analysis in Bangalore city, India: a new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Deepu; Anbazhagan, P.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, site response analysis has become a mandatory step for the design of important structures. Subsurface investigation is an essential step, from where the input parameters for the site response study like density, shear wave velocity (Vs), thickness and damping characteristics, etc, are obtained. Most site response studies at shallow bedrock sites are one-dimensional (1D) and are usually carried out by using Vs from multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) or a standard penetration test (SPT) for N values with assumptions that soil layers are horizontal, uniform and homogeneous. These assumptions are not completely true in shallow bedrock regions as soil deposits are heterogeneous. The objective of this study is to generate the actual subsurface profiles in two-dimensions at shallow bedrock regions using integrated subsurface investigation testing. The study area selected for this work is Bangalore, India. Three survey lines were selected in Bangalore at two different locations; one at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) Campus and the other at Whitefield. Geophysical surveys like ground penetrating radar (GPR) and 2D MASW were carried out at these survey lines. Geophysical test results are compared and validated with a conventional geotechnical SPT. At the IISc site, the soil profile is obtained from a trench excavated for a proposed pipeline used to compare the geophysical test results. Test results show that GPR is very useful to delineate subsurface layers, especially for shallow depths at both sites (IISc Campus and Whitefield). MASW survey results show variation of Vs values and layer thickness comparatively at deeper depths for both sites. They also show higher density soil strata with high Vs value obtained at the IISc Campus site, whereas at the Whitefield site weaker soil with low shear velocity is observed. Combining these two geophysical methods helped to generate representative 2D subsurface profiles. These subsurface profiles can be

  11. Monitoring of well integrity by magnetic imaging defectoscopy (MID) at the Ketzin pilot site, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemke, Kornelia; Liebscher, Axel; Möller, Fabian

    2017-04-01

    One of the key requirements for safe CO2 storage operation is to ensure wellbore integrity. The CO2 triggered acid in-well environment may lead to pitting and/or surface corrosion and eventually to fatigue of well casings and cementation by this giving raise to wellbore leakage. Corrosion effects are conventionally monitored by measurement of inner casing surface, internal diameter and wall thickness. Caliper logging provides inner surface and internal diameter data while ultrasonic tools measure both the internal diameter and casing thickness as well as the bonding between casing and cement. However, both tools can only monitor and characterize the most inner casing and ultrasonic tools in addition can only be applied in fluid filled wells. At the Ketzin CO2 storage test site, Germany, about 67 kt of CO2 were injected between June 2008 and August 2013 and an interdisciplinary monitoring concept was developed with focus on the storage complex, the overburden, the surface and the wellbores. Four deep wells penetrate the reservoir and their integrity has been monitored by a combination of video inspection, pulsed neutron gamma logging PNG and magnetic imaging defectoscopy MID. MID is an advanced logging method for non-destructive testing and has the great advantages that it can be operated in gas filled boreholes and that it provides information also for outer casings. The MID tool generates electromagnetic pulsed transient eddy currents and records the response of the surrounding media. The distribution and strength of the eddy-currents is then converted into averaged, depth-resolved thicknesses of the individual casings. Run in time-lapse mode, MID provides a measure to detect changes in casing thickness and therefore hints to corrosion. At Ketzin, the four deep wells haven been monitored by repeat MID logging on a roughly annual basis in cooperation with VNG Gasspeicher GmbH (VGS) and GAZPROMENERGODIAGNOSTIKA, applying their in-house MID tool. The MID based depth

  12. Gas monitoring during the CO2 back production field test at the Ketzin pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szizybalski, Alexandra; Zimmer, Martin; Kujawa, Christian; Erzinger, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences operates Europe's first on-shore CO2 storage site in Ketzin, a small town near Berlin. From June 2008 until August 2013 about 67 kt of CO2 were injected into Upper Triassic sandstones in 630 to 650 m depth. The injection phase ended with an experiment to evaluate the influence of additives on CO2 storage. During this experiment 32 t N2 and 613 t CO2 were co-injected into the borehole over a period of 25 days followed by the final injection of 66 t pure CO2. At the beginning of the experiment 10,000 l (10 Nm3) Kr were pumped into the borehole, to separate the previous pure CO2 and the CO2-N2 mixture. For the same reason, CO2 with a different isotopic composition (δ13C = -3.4±0.2o instead of δ13C = -30.6±0.4) was used for the first 548 t of the total 613 t. To demonstrate that the stored CO2 is retrievable a field test was carried out in October 2014 during a period of two weeks. Of interest, in this context, is the composition of the back-produced gas which delivers key information on possible interactions between the CO2, formation fluid and rocks. In total 240 t of gas were produced via the former injection well. The flow rates ranged between 800 and 3,200 kg gas/h. The gas was sampled after the gas/water separator and continuously analysed using a mass spectrometer, a gas chromatograph and a photoacoustic sensor, thus covering all gas components and concentrations. In addition, gas samples were collected for stable carbon isotopes investigations in the laboratory. Preliminary results show that the produced gas consists of > 97% CO2 plus mainly N2. The N2 was detected from the beginning, although the injection in 2013 ended with pure CO2. The N2 concentration decreased from about 3% to 1% during the two weeks of the experiment. In addition to these major components CH4, CO and H2 (up to 0.01%) as well as Kr and SF6 (up to 0.001%, both were used as tracers in 2013) were detected. The gas composition of natural

  13. Post-injection feasibility study with the reflectivity method for the Ketzin pilot site, Germany (CO2 storage in a saline aquifer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Alexandra; Kempka, Thomas; Huang, Fei; Diersch [Gil], Magdalena; Lüth, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    3D time-lapse seismic surveys (4D seismic) have proven to be a suitable technique for monitoring of injected CO2, because when CO2 replaces brine as a free gas it considerably affects elastic properties of porous media. Forward modeling of a 4D seismic response to the CO2-fluid substitution in a storage reservoir is an inevitable step in such studies. At the Ketzin pilot site (CO2 storage) 67 kilotons of CO2 were injected into a saline aquifer between 2008 and 2013. In order to track migration of CO2 at Ketzin, 3D time-lapse seismic data were acquired by means of a baseline pre-injection survey in 2005 and 3 monitor surveys: in 2009, 2012 and in 2015 (the 1st post-injection survey). Results of the 4D seismic forward modeling with the reflectivity method suggest that effects of the injected CO2 on the 4D seismic data at Ketzin are significant regarding both seismic amplitudes and time delays. These results prove the corresponding observations in the real 4D seismic data at the Ketzin pilot site. But reservoir heterogeneity and seismic resolution, as well as random and coherent seismic noise are negative factors to be considered in this interpretation. Results of the 4D seismic forward modeling with the reflectivity method support the conclusion that even small amounts of injected CO2 can be monitored in such post-injected saline aquifer as the CO2 storage reservoir at the Ketzin pilot site both qualitatively and quantitatively with considerable uncertainties (Lüth et al., 2015). Reference: Lueth, S., Ivanova, A., Kempka, T. (2015): Conformity assessment of monitoring and simulation of CO2 storage: A case study from the Ketzin pilot site. - International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 42, p. 329-339.

  14. Cellulase Production Potentials of the Microbial Profile of Some Sugarcane Bagasse Dumping Sites in Ilorin, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamoldeen Abiodun AJIJOLAKEWU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This research work investigated cellulase production potentials of the microbial profile of three sugarcane bagasse dumping sites at Zango area, Ilorin, Nigeria. The microbial isolates were screened for cellulase production with a view to select the best organism for eventual cellulase production. Pour Plate method was used for the isolation and a total of thirteen (13 different organisms including both fungal and bacterial species were isolated and screened. Six (6 fungal isolates identified as Mucor racemosus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Neurospora sitophilus, Penicillium oxalicum and Penicillium citrinum were isolated, while seven (7 different bacterial species isolated include Clostridium cellobioparum, Clostridium thermocellum,Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumillus, Lactobacillus spp, Pseudomonas flavescens and Serratia spp. Generally, bacterial isolates were more in abundance than fungal species. However; fungal isolates were constant and were isolated through the experimental period of three weeks. All the isolates showed cellulase production potential in varying degrees as reflected in the clearance zone around their colonies. Fungal isolates produced more cellulase than the bacterial isolates. Mucor racemosus had the highest clearance zone (75.0 mm among the fungal isolates while Clostridium cellobioparum (35.0 mm were the best producer among bacterial isolates. The least producer among fungal isolates, Penicillium citrinum (40.0 mm, is a little more than the bacterial cellulase producer (35.0 mm and is far greater than the least bacterium Serratia spp (14.0 mm.

  15. The identification of markers for Geoforensic HPLC profiling at close proximity sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, G; Dawson, L A; Brewer, M J; Morgan, R M

    2017-03-01

    Soil is a highly transferable source of trace physical material that is both persistent in the environment and varied in composition. This inherent variability can provide useful information to determine the geographical origin of a questioned sample or when comparing and excluding samples, since the composition of soil is dependent on geographical factors such as climate, bedrock geology and land use. Previous studies have limited forensic relevance due to the requirement for large sample amounts and unrealistic differences between the land use and geographical location of the sample sites. In addition the philosophical differences between the disciplines of earth sciences, for which most analytical techniques have been designed, and forensic sciences, particularly with regard to sample preparation and data interpretation have not been fully considered. This study presents an enhanced technique for the analysis of organic components of geoforensic samples by improving the sample preparation and data analysis strategies used in previous research into the analysis of soil samples by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This study provides two alternative sets of marker peaks to generate HPLC profiles which allow both easy visual comparison of samples and the correct assignment of 100% of the samples to their location of origin when discriminating between locations of interest in multivariate statistical analyses. This technique thereby offers an independent form of analysis that is complementary to inorganic geoforensic techniques and offers an easily accessible method for discriminating between close proximity forensically relevant locations.

  16. The Streptococcus pneumoniae cia regulon: CiaR target sites and transcription profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascher, Thorsten; Zähner, Dorothea; Merai, Michelle; Balmelle, Nadège; de Saizieu, Antoine B; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2003-01-01

    The ciaR-ciaH system is one of 13 two-component signal-transducing systems of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Mutations in the histidine protein kinase CiaH confer increased resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and interfere with the development of genetic competence. In order to identify the genes controlled by the cia system, the cia regulon, DNA fragments targeted by the response regulator CiaR were isolated from restricted chromosomal DNA using the solid-phase DNA binding assay and analyzed by hybridization to an oligonucleotide microarray representing the S. pneumoniae genome. A set of 18 chromosomal regions containing 26 CiaR target sites were detected and proposed to represent the minimal cia regulon. The putative CiaR target loci included genes important for the synthesis and modification of cell wall polymers, peptide pheromone and bacteriocin production, and the htrA-spo0J region. In addition, the transcription profile of cia loss-of-function mutants and those with an apparent activated cia system representing the off and on states of the regulatory system were analyzed. The transcript analysis confirmed the cia-dependent expression of seven putative target loci and revealed three additional cia-regulated loci. Five putative target regions were silent under all conditions, and for the remaining three regions, no cia-dependent expression could be detected. Furthermore, the competence regulon, including the comCDE operon required for induction of competence, was completely repressed by the cia system.

  17. Site-directed mutation of a laccase from Thermus thermophilus: Effect on the activity profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A site-directed mutant R453T of a laccase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 (Tth-laccase was constructed in order to investigate the effect on laccase catalytic properties. The mutated gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Nickel-affinity purification was achieved and followed by copper ion incorporation. The mature mutated enzyme was quantitatively equal to the wild type. A photometric assay based on the oxidation of the substrate 2,2-azino-bis-(3- ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS was employed in comparison with the wild-type Tth-laccase on catalytic properties. The R453T mutant exhibited improvement in substrate affinity and specific activity at room temperature, whereas those parameters were not significantly influenced when the temperature increased up to 65°C or higher. The mutant had better catalytic activity than that of the wild type at acidic pH. Investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy, the mutant Tth-laccase displayed similar profiles at low and high temperatures.

  18. Luminescence profiling of loess-dominated archaeological layers of a Chalcolithic site, Northern Negev Desert fringe, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Gloria I.; Roskin, Joel; Bee'ri, Ron

    2017-04-01

    This study applies a pulsed-photon Portable OSL Reader (PPSL) in investigating the palaeoenviroment and stages of development of a Chalcolithic site revealed during a salvage excavation. The (Shoqet Junction) site, within late Pleistocene loess-dominated sediment, is adjacent to the meandering and ephemeral Hebron Wadi in the Beer-Sheva Valley, at the fringe of the Northern Negev Desert (Israel). The site intermittently covers approximately 8 hectares and was exposed at 0.3 - 0.5 m depths beneath a plowed field. Five areas were excavated down to 4 meters. The site was dominated by an array of underground facilities: tunnels, (capped) shafts, walls, floors and infilled cavities were found within four main layers. The site includes a mixture of sediments: large amounts of organic material, weathered bricks, a powdery loess-like unit and thin Bk horizons. The artifact assemblage is associated with the Ghassulian culture. The objectives of this multi-parameter study, which combines PPSL luminescence profiling with sedimentological and geomorphic analyses, are to (1) analyze the Chalcolithic palaeoenvironments, aeolian and fluvial processes and location and morphology of streambeds, (2) identify possible deterministic physical influences upon the occupations (3) decipher the natural stratigraphic archive and discriminate between human and natural (aeolian/fluvial) induced sedimentation (4) create relative age profiles based on portable OSL measurements and OSL ages, in order to minimize OSL dating. Three main sections were profiled: a natural section - in order to identify the natural sedimentological regime and two walls of two excavation squares down to the sites' alluvial base. A small section above a prominent Bk horizon was also profiled. Altogether 58 samples were obtained for sediment and PPSL analyses. Luminescence profiles in general fit the stratigraphic breaks and enable discrimination between layers. Plowed and surface loess give low reads. Inverse reads

  19. Comprehensive Profiling of Proteome Changes Provide Insights of Industrial Penicillium chrysogenum During Pilot and Industrial Penicillin G Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing-Sheng; Zhao, Yan; Qiao, Bin; Lu, Hua; Chen, Yao; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-07-01

    The intracellular proteomes of the Penicillium chrysogenum throughout pilot and industrial processes were investigated by using 2-DE combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF MS, respectively. We detected a total of 223 spots corresponding to 154 proteins and 231 spots corresponding to 157 proteins throughout pilot and industrial processes, respectively. The levels of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase increased (5.1- and 2.5-fold) under the pilot process, while its levels were no significant changes under the industrial process at 140 and 170 h when compared with that at 2 h. The levels of isocitrate lyase and fumarate hydratase were increased significantly under the industrial process, while their levels had no obvious changes after 20 h of fermentation throughout the pilot process. These results indicate that there were remarkable differences in carbohydrate metabolism (including glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle) of P. chrysogenum during the pilot and industrial fermentations, which likely result in alterations of the primary metabolism and penicillin biosynthesis. Moreover, the differences in the levels of proteins involved in amino acid metabolisms (including valine, cysteine, and α-aminoadipic acid biosynthesis) indicated that the pilot and industrial processes influenced the supplies of penicillin precursors. Compared with that at 2 h, the maximum levels of superoxide (6.9-fold, at 32 h) and catalase (9-fold, at 80 h) during the industrial process and the maximum levels of superoxide (1.2-fold, at 20 h) and catalase (7.7-fold at 128 h) during the pilot process revealed the significant difference in cell redox homeostasis and stress responses during scale-up fermentation. Particularly, 10 spots corresponding to isopenicillin N synthetase and 4 spots corresponding to isopenicillin N (IPN) acyltransferase in pilot and industrial processes were identified, respectively. The levels of IPN acyltransferase (spots

  20. Computing DNA duplex instability profiles efficiently with a two-state model: trends of promoters and binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapti Zoi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA instability profiles have been used recently for predicting the transcriptional start site and the location of core promoters, and to gain insight into promoter action. It was also shown that the use of these profiles can significantly improve the performance of motif finding programs. Results In this work we introduce a new method for computing DNA instability profiles. The model that we use is a modified Ising-type model and it is implemented via statistical mechanics. Our linear time algorithm computes the profile of a 10,000 base-pair long sequence in less than one second. The method we use also allows the computation of the probability that several consecutive bases are unpaired simultaneously. This is a feature that is not available in other linear-time algorithms. We use the model to compare the thermodynamic trends of promoter sequences of several genomes. In addition, we report results that associate the location of local extrema in the instability profiles with the presence of core promoter elements at these locations and with the location of the transcription start sites (TSS. We also analyzed the instability scores of binding sites of several human core promoter elements. We show that the instability scores of functional binding sites of a given core promoter element are significantly different than the scores of sites with the same motif occurring outside the functional range (relative to the TSS. Conclusions The time efficiency of the algorithm and its genome-wide applications makes this work of broad interest to scientists interested in transcriptional regulation, motif discovery, and comparative genomics.

  1. Boundaries to the articulation of possible selves through social networking sites: the case of Facebook profilers' social connectedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwier, Sandra; Araujo, Theo; Boukes, Mark; Willemsen, Lotte

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to contribute to an emerging literature that seeks to understand how identity markers on social networking sites (SNSs) shape interpersonal impressions, and particularly the boundaries that SNSs present for articulating unconstrained "hoped-for possible selves." An experiment employing mock-up Facebook profiles was conducted, showing that appearing with friends on a Facebook profile picture as well as increasingly higher number of Facebook friends strengthened perceptions of a profiler's hoped-for level of social connectedness. Excessive numbers of friends, however, weakened perceptions of a profiler's real-level social connectedness, particularly among participants with smaller social networks on Facebook themselves. The discussion focuses on when people come to find that reasonable boundaries of self-generated information on an SNS have been exceeded.

  2. From Site Characterization through Safe and Successful CO2 Injection Operation to Post-injection Monitoring and Site Closure - Closing the Full Life Cycle Research at the Ketzin Pilot Site, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Initiated in 2004, the Ketzin pilot site near Berlin, Germany, was the first European onshore storage project for research and development on geological CO2 storage. After comprehensive site characterization the site infrastructure was build comprising three deep wells and the injection facility including pumps and storage tanks. The operational CO2 injection period started in June 2008 and ended in August 2013 when the site entered the post-injection closure period. During these five years, a total amount of 67 kt of CO2 was safely injected into an Upper Triassic saline sandstone aquifer at a depth of 630 m - 650 m. In fall 2013, the first observation well was partially plugged in the reservoir section with CO2 resistant cement; full abandonment of this well finished in 2015 after roughly 2 years of cement plug monitoring. Abandonment of the remaining wells will be finished by summer 2017 and hand-over of liability to the competent authority is scheduled for end of 2017. The CO2 injected was mainly of food grade quality (purity > 99.9%). In addition, 1.5 kt of CO2 from the oxyfuel pilot capture facility "Schwarze Pumpe" (purity > 99.7%) was injected in 2011. The injection period terminated with a CO2-N2 co-injection experiment of 650 t of a 95% CO2/5% N2 mixture in summer 2013 to study the effects of impurities in the CO2 stream on the injection operation. During regular operation, the CO2 was pre-heated on-site to 40°C prior to injection to ensure a single-phase injection process and avoid any phase transition or transient states within the injection facility or the reservoir. Between March and July 2013, just prior to the CO2-N2 co-injection experiment, the injection temperature was stepwise decreased down to 10°C within a "cold-injection" experiment to study the effects of two-phase injection conditions. During injection operation, the combination of different geochemical and geophysical monitoring methods enabled detection and mapping of the spatial and

  3. Completion of five years of safe CO2 injection and transition into the post-closure phase at the Ketzin pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Sonja; Moeller, Fabian; Streibel, Martin; Liebscher, Axel; Ketzin Group

    2014-05-01

    The injection of CO2 at the Ketzin pilot site in Germany ended after five years in August 2013. We present the key results from site operation and outline future activities within the post-closure phase. From June 2008 onwards, a total amount of 67 kt of CO2 was safely injected into a saline aquifer (Upper Triassic sandstone) at a depth of 630 m - 650 m. The CO2 used was mainly of food grade quality (purity > 99.9%). In addition, 1.5 kt of CO2 from the pilot capture facility "Schwarze Pumpe" (power plant CO2 with purity > 99.7%) was injected in 2011. During regular operation, the CO2 was pre-heated on-site to 45°C before injection in order to avoid pressure build-up within the reservoir. During the final months of injection a "cold-injection" experiment with a stepwise decrease of the injection temperature down to 10°C was conducted between March and July 2013. In summer 2013, the injection of a mixture of 95% CO2 and 5% N2 was also tested. After ceasing the injection in August the injection facility and pipeline were removed in December 2013. Geological storage of CO2 at the Ketzin pilot site has so far proceeded in a safe and reliable manner. As a result of one of the most comprehensive R&D programs worldwide, a combination of different geochemical and geophysical monitoring methods is able to detect even small quantities of CO2 and map their spatial extent. After the cessation of CO2 injection a series of activities and further investigations are involved in the post-closure phase. The aim is that Ketzin will for the first time ever close the complete life-time cycle of a CO2 storage site at pilot scale. The five wells (1 injection/observation well, 4 pure observation wells) will be successively abandoned within the next few years while monitoring is continuing. The partial plugging of one observation well in the reservoir section was already completed in fall 2013. The new four-years project COMPLETE (CO2 post-injection monitoring and post-closure phase at

  4. Characteristics of Difficult-to-Place Youth in State Custody: A Profile of the Exceptional Care Pilot Project Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Marilyn P.; Schwab, James

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics of Texas youth designated as "most difficult to place" recipients of service under the "Exceptional Care Pilot Project" (N = 46). Findings include, among others, high levels of comorbid psychiatric disturbance (greater than 3 diagnostic groupings), physical (78.3%) and sexual (88%)…

  5. Contrasting Socio-Economic and Demographic Profiles of Two, Small Island, Economic Species: MIRAB versus PROFIT/SITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Oberst

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The MIRAB model developed by Bertram and Watters, based on remittances and aid, has dominated the small island economy literature for two decades. Recently, two challenges have surfaced: the PROFIT formulation emphasizing domestic policy flexibility - a so-called ‘resourcefulness of jurisdiction’ - and a dynamic private sector (Baldacchino, 2006; and the SITE model, stressing the role of tourism (McElroy, 2006. To date, there has been no comparative assessment of these different island models. This article addresses this gap. Its point of departure is to consider SITE islands as a subspecies of the PROFIT cluster. It constructs comprehensive profiles across 27 socio-economic and demographic variables for two island sub-groups with populations of less than three million: 23 MIRAB and 35 PROFIT-SITE. Results indicate PROFIT-SITE islands are much more affluent, socially advanced and demographically mature than their MIRAB counterparts.

  6. Horizontal And Vertical Profiling Of Microbial Communities Across Landscape Features At NGEE Site, Barrow, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, J. K.; Tas, N.; Brodie, E. L.; Graham, D. E.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Torn, M. S.; Wu, Y.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    Low- and high-centered polygons in permafrost-dominated ecosystems have distinct geochemical and hydrological characteristics that are expected to alter microbial processes that govern carbon cycle dynamics in Arctic landscapes. Key questions that must be answered if we are to represent these dynamics and their underlying controls into Earth System Models include: 1) Through which pathways is carbon processed in different areas of these polygons? 2) What regulates the release of C as CO2, or methane, and 3) Which microorganisms are responsible? As part of the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project, we collected samples across a transect of polygon features near Barrow, Alaska. The transect included samples from centers, edges and troughs of high-centered and low-centered polygons, including organic and deeper mineral soil layers. In addition, we took a 1.6 m deep core from our field site and sectioned it vertically to determine the microbial composition at different depths from active layer through upper layers of permafrost. Prior to sectioning, the core was CT-scanned to determine the physical heterogeneity throughout the core. Total DNA was extracted from sub-samples and the microbial community composition in the samples was determined by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The resulting microbial profiles were related to corresponding environmental variables. We found that microbial community composition varied according to location across the polygons. Differences in elevation and moisture content were identified as the primary drivers of the observed changes in microbial composition. Methanogenic archaea were more abundant in the centers of low-centered and wetter polygons than high-centered polygons. These data suggest a potential for increased methane production towards the centers of polygons. By contrast, polygon edges had a greater relative abundance of typically aerobic soil microbes that suggests C loss as CO2 would predominate in these

  7. Implementation of Raman lidar for profiling of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols at the SGP CART site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Blair, Forest H.; Bisson, Scott E.

    There are clearly identified scientific requirements for continuous profiling of atmospheric water vapor at the SGP CART (southern great plains cloud and radiation testbed) site. Research conducted at several laboratories, including our work in a previous ARM instrument development project, has demonstrated the suitability of Raman lidar for providing measurements that are an excellent match to those requirements. We are in the final stages of building a ruggedized Raman lidar system that will reside permanently at the CART site, and that is computer automated to reduce the requirements for operator interaction. In addition to the design goal of profiling water vapor through most of the troposphere during nighttime and through the boundary layer during daytime, the lidar will provide quantitative characterization of aerosols and clouds, including depolarization measurements for particle phase studies.

  8. Astronomical site survey report on dust measurement, wind profile, optical turbulence, and their correlation with seeing over IAO-Hanle - Astronomical site survey report over IAO-Hanle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S.; Kathiravan, S.; Parihar, P. S.; Larson, E. J. L.; Mohanan, Sharika; Angchuk, Dorje; Jorphel, Sonam; Rangarajan, K. E.; Prabhu, K.

    2017-02-01

    The present work discusses astronomical site survey reports on dust content, vertical distribution of atmospheric turbulence, precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface and upper-air data, and their effects on seeing over the Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO) Hanle. Using Laser Particulate Counter, ambient dust measurements at various sizes (0.3 μm to 25 μm) were performed at various locations at the site during November 2015. Estimated volume concentration for the particle size at 0.5 μm was around 10,000 per cubic foot, which is equivalent to ten thousand class of clean room standard protocol. During the measurement, surface wind speed varied from 0-20 m s -1, while estimated aerosol optical depth (AOD) using Sky radiometer (Prede) varied from 0.02-0.04 at 500 nm, which indicates the site is fairly clean. The two independent measurements of dust content and aerosol concentrations at the site agreed well. The turbulence or wind gust at the site was studied with wind profiles at three different heights above the ground. The strength of the wind gust varies with time and altitude. Nocturnal temperature across seasons varied with a moderate at summer (6-8 ∘C) and lower in winter (4-5 ∘C). However, the contrast between the two is significantly small due to cold and extremely dry typical climatic conditions of the site. The present study also examined the effects of surface and upper-air data along with Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) dynamics with seeing measurement over the site. Further, a comparative study of such observed parameters was conducted with other high altitude astronomical observatories across the globe.

  9. Astronomical site survey report on dust measurement, wind profile, optical turbulence, and their correlation with seeing over IAO-Hanle. Astronomical site survey report over IAO-Hanle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S.; Kathiravan, S.; Parihar, P. S.; L. Larson, E. J.; Mohanan, Sharika; Angchuk, Dorje; Jorphel, Sonam; Rangarajan, K. E.; Prabhu, K.

    2017-04-01

    The present work discusses astronomical site survey reports on dust content, vertical distribution of atmospheric turbulence, precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface and upper-air data, and their effects on seeing over the Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO) Hanle. Using Laser Particulate Counter, ambient dust measurements at various sizes (0.3 μm to 25 μm) were performed at various locations at the site during November 2015. Estimated volume concentration for the particle size at 0.5 μm was around 10,000 per cubic foot, which is equivalent to ten thousand class of clean room standard protocol. During the measurement, surface wind speed varied from 0-20 m s -1, while estimated aerosol optical depth (AOD) using Sky radiometer (Prede) varied from 0.02-0.04 at 500 nm, which indicates the site is fairly clean. The two independent measurements of dust content and aerosol concentrations at the site agreed well. The turbulence or wind gust at the site was studied with wind profiles at three different heights above the ground. The strength of the wind gust varies with time and altitude. Nocturnal temperature across seasons varied with a moderate at summer (6-8 ∘C) and lower in winter (4-5 ∘C). However, the contrast between the two is significantly small due to cold and extremely dry typical climatic conditions of the site. The present study also examined the effects of surface and upper-air data along with Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) dynamics with seeing measurement over the site. Further, a comparative study of such observed parameters was conducted with other high altitude astronomical observatories across the globe.

  10. An objective and reproducible landform and topography description approach based on digital terrain analysis used for soil profile site characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Fabian E.; Baruck, Jasmin; Hastik, Richard; Geitner, Clemens

    2015-04-01

    All major soil description and classification systems, including the World Reference Base (WRB) and the German Soil description guidelines (KA5), require the characterization of landform and topography for soil profile sites. This is commonly done at more than one scale, for instance at macro-, meso- and micro scale. However, inherent when humans perform such a task, different surveyors will reach different conclusions due to their subjective perception of landscape structure, based on their individual mind-model of soil-landscape structure, emphasizing different aspects and scales of the landscape. In this study we apply a work-flow using the GRASS GIS extension module r.geomorphon to make use of high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to characterize the landform elements and topography of soil profile sites at different scales, and compare the results with a large number of soil profile site descriptions performed during the course of forestry surveys in South and North Tyrol (Italy and Austria, respectively). The r.geomorphon extension module for the open source geographic information system GRASS GIS applies a pattern recognition algorithm to delineate landform elements based on an input DEM. For each raster cell it computes and characterizes the visible neighborhood using line-of-sight calculations and then applies a lookup-table to classify the raster cell into one of ten landform elements (flat, peak, ridge, shoulder, slope, spur, hollow, footslope, valley and pit). The input parameter search radius (L) represents the maximum number of pixels for line-of-sight calculation, resulting in landforms larger than L to be split into landform components. The use of these visibility calculations makes this landform delineation approach suitable for comparison with the landform descriptions of soil surveyors, as their spatial perception of the landscape surrounding a soil profile site certainly influences their classification of the landform on which the

  11. Firn density profile at Megadunes, East Antarctica, calls for an improved densification model for low accumulation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, M.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2004-12-01

    We report a density profile of the firn at Megadunes, East Antarctica (80o78'S; 124o50'E). The Megadunes site is characterized by a low mass accumulation rate (2.9 g/cm2/yr) and cold temperature (mean annual = -49.5oC). Validating existing firn densification models using a density profile of such a site is important because such models, either purely empirical or mechanistic, have been calibrated with few sites that are analogous to a glacial condition (ultralow accumulation and temperature). We make use of CO2 concentrations in the lock-in (or non-diffusive) zone to obtain the accumulation rate, assuming that the gas in the lock-in zone ages at the same rate as the surrounding ice [Battle et al., 1996], and assuming that the gas enclosure rate must equal the long-term mean accumulation rate. This estimate is preliminary and may change when results from beta analysis of cores become available. Our density profile shows that the widely used pure empirical model by Herron and Langway [1980] overestimates the close-off depth by 16 %, and the semi-mechanistic model by Pimienta and Barnola [Barnola et al., 1991] also overestimates the close-off depth by 26 %. Our study at the Megadunes site indicates that the δ 15N of N2 paradox for glacial ice from East Antarctica would have partly resulted from a poorly calibrated densification model for a `glacial-like' condition and a thick convective zone as we observed at the Megadunes site [Severinghaus et al., in prep].

  12. Pilot-scale data provide enhanced estimates of the life cycle energy and emissions profile of algae biofuels produced via hydrothermal liquefaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowei; Saydah, Benjamin; Eranki, Pragnya; Colosi, Lisa M; Greg Mitchell, B; Rhodes, James; Clarens, Andres F

    2013-11-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used widely to estimate the environmental implications of deploying algae-to-energy systems even though no full-scale facilities have yet to be built. Here, data from a pilot-scale facility using hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is used to estimate the life cycle profiles at full scale. Three scenarios (lab-, pilot-, and full-scale) were defined to understand how development in the industry could impact its life cycle burdens. HTL-derived algae fuels were found to have lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than petroleum fuels. Algae-derived gasoline had significantly lower GHG emissions than corn ethanol. Most algae-based fuels have an energy return on investment between 1 and 3, which is lower than petroleum biofuels. Sensitivity analyses reveal several areas in which improvements by algae bioenergy companies (e.g., biocrude yields, nutrient recycle) and by supporting industries (e.g., CO2 supply chains) could reduce the burdens of the industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Improved Dead Sea sinkhole site characterization at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, based on repeated shear wave reflection seismic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    In October 2014 a high-resolution shallow shear wave reflection seismic survey was carried out at the Dead Sea sinkhole site Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan. It extended a survey undertaken in 2013, also in order to gather time-lapse profiles. In the framework of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association and international partners, this investigation is part of a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ. At the investigation site, characterized by alluvial fan deposits, ongoing subsidence and sinkhole processes in the subsurface create massive reshaping of farming areas, including the destruction of housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure. The sinkhole hazard at the Dead Sea is significant, since similar processes are observed at several coastal segments of the Dead Sea. The new survey (in total 2.1 profile km) was targeted to improve the knowledge about the subsurface structures and to confine the results of the initial survey (1.8 km profile km), with respect to the presence or non-presence of a massive salt layer proposed at nearly 40 m depth. This salt layer is the central part of a widely established process hypothesis to generate shallow cavities by salt subrosion, which subsequently collapse to sinkholes at the surface. Results of the initial survey carried out in 2013 highlighted a new process hypothesis of subsurface mass transport by Dead Sea mud mobilization enclosed in the alluvial fan, so that an extended survey was undertaken in 2014. This, indeed, confirmed that there are no reflection seismic signal responses that would be expected to occur in the presence of a massive salt layer. Since evaluation of both hypothesis by new drilling could not be carried out due to safety reasons and permissions, it remained unclear which hypothesis is valid for the investigation site. However, we combined the 2013 and 2014 reflection seismic profiles and the

  14. Human hair shaft proteomic profiling: individual differences, site specificity and cuticle analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea N. Laatsch

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hair from different individuals can be distinguished by physical properties. Although some data exist on other species, examination of the individual molecular differences within the human hair shaft has not been thoroughly investigated. Shotgun proteomic analysis revealed considerable variation in profile among samples from Caucasian, African–American, Kenyan and Korean subjects. Within these ethnic groups, prominent keratin proteins served to distinguish individual profiles. Differences between ethnic groups, less marked, relied to a large extent on levels of keratin associated proteins. In samples from Caucasian subjects, hair shafts from axillary, beard, pubic and scalp regions exhibited distinguishable profiles, with the last being most different from the others. Finally, the profile of isolated hair cuticle cells was distinguished from that of total hair shaft by levels of more than 20 proteins, the majority of which were prominent keratins. The cuticle also exhibited relatively high levels of epidermal transglutaminase (TGM3, accounting for its observed low degree of protein extraction by denaturants. In addition to providing insight into hair structure, present findings may lead to improvements in differentiating hair from various ethnic origins and offer an approach to extending use of hair in crime scene evidence for distinguishing among individuals.

  15. One Year of Vertical Wind Profiles Measurements at a Mediterranean Coastal Site of South Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Gullì, Daniel; Avolio, Elenio

    2015-01-01

    To exploit wind energy both onshore and offshore in coastal area the effect of the coastal discontinuity is important. The shape of the vertical wind profiles and the related c parameter of the Weibull distribution are impacted by the atmospheric internal boundary layers developing from the coast...

  16. Density profile characterization and modeling at Paranal and Armazones 2k sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marín Julio C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA in the southern hemisphere will be installed at Armazones 2k site in northern Chile. Scarce atmospheric observations are available in the region, particularly radiosonde data. This study analyzes radiosondes launched at Paranal observatory, located at about 21 km from the CTA site, from 24 October and 4 November 2011, to understand the behavior of density in the atmosphere near the CTA site. High-resolution numerical simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model are validated with Paranal radiosondes to quantify its ability to represent the atmospheric conditions in the region. In addition, the seasonal and diurnal evolution of atmospheric density at the CTA site were studied during 2011 using the high-resolution weather forecasts from the WRF model.

  17. Comparison of the effects of variable site temperatures and constant incubation temperatures on the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in pilot-scale experiments with field-aged contaminated soils from a cold regions site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wonjae; Whyte, Lyle; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2011-02-01

    Temporal atmospheric temperature changes during summers at sub-Arctic sites often cause periodic fluctuations in shallow landfarm and surface soil temperatures. However, little information is available on the effect of site-relevant variations on biodegradation performance in cold climates. This study compares the rate and extents of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at variable site temperatures (1-10 °C) representative of summers at a sub-Arctic site reported previously with those obtained under a constant average temperature of 6 °C. The biodegradation was evaluated in pilot-scale landfarming experiments with field-aged petroleum-contaminated soils shipped from Resolution Island (61°30'N, 65°00'W), Nunavut, Canada. Under the variable site temperature conditions biodegradation rate constants of semi- (F2) and non-volatile (F3) hydrocarbon fractions were enhanced by over a factor of two during the 60-d experiment, compared to the constant temperature mode. The decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) under the variable site temperature mode was 55% compared to only 19% under the constant average temperature mode. The enhanced biodegradation is attributable to the non-linear acceleration of microbial activity between 4.7 and 10°C and faster growth of indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading microbial populations. The first-order biodegradation rate constants of 0.018, 0.024 and 0.016 d(-1) for TPH, F2 and F3 fractions at the variable site temperature were in agreement with those determined by an on-site experiment at the same site.

  18. Site and strain-specific variation in gut microbiota profiles and metabolism in experimental mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa K Friswell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gastrointestinal tract microbiota (GTM of mammals is a complex microbial consortium, the composition and activities of which influences mucosal development, immunity, nutrition and drug metabolism. It remains unclear whether the composition of the dominant GTM is conserved within animals of the same strain and whether stable GTMs are selected for by host-specific factors or dictated by environmental variables. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The GTM composition of six highly inbred, genetically distinct strains of mouse (C3H, C57, GFEC, CD1, CBA nu/nu and SCID was profiled using eubacterial -specific PCR-DGGE and quantitative PCR of feces. Animals exhibited strain-specific fecal eubacterial profiles that were highly stable (c. >95% concordance over 26 months for C57. Analyses of mice that had been relocated before and after maturity indicated marked, reproducible changes in fecal consortia and that occurred only in young animals. Implantation of a female BDF1 mouse with genetically distinct (C57 and Agoutie embryos produced highly similar GTM profiles (c. 95% concordance between mother and offspring, regardless of offspring strain, which was also reflected in urinary metabolite profiles. Marked institution-specific GTM profiles were apparent in C3H mice raised in two different research institutions. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Strain-specific data were suggestive of genetic determination of the composition and activities of intestinal symbiotic consortia. However, relocation studies and uterine implantation demonstrated the dominance of environmental influences on the GTM. This was manifested in large variations between isogenic adult mice reared in different research institutions.

  19. Feasibility and acceptability of ambulatory glucose profile in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Sushma Rai; Anjana Hulse; Prasanna Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insulin administration and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) are pillars in the management of diabetes in children. Introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has made it possible to understand the glycemic profiles which are not picked up by SMBG. Recent advent of flash glucose monitoring with inbuilt software to obtain ambulatory glucose profile (AGP) has emerged as a novel method to study glycemic patterns in adults with Type I diabetes. However, the use of AGP i...

  20. Active site specificity profiling of the matrix metalloproteinase family: Proteomic identification of 4300 cleavage sites by nine MMPs explored with structural and synthetic peptide cleavage analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Huesgen, Pitter F; Schilling, Oliver; Bellac, Caroline L; Butler, Georgina S; Cox, Jennifer H; Dufour, Antoine; Goebeler, Verena; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Keller, Ulrich Auf dem; Klein, Theo; Lange, Philipp F; Marino, Giada; Morrison, Charlotte J; Prudova, Anna; Rodriguez, David; Starr, Amanda E; Wang, Yili; Overall, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Secreted and membrane tethered matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key homeostatic proteases regulating the extracellular signaling and structural matrix environment of cells and tissues. For drug targeting of proteases, selectivity for individual molecules is highly desired and can be met by high yield active site specificity profiling. Using the high throughput Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS) method to simultaneously profile both the prime and non-prime sides of the cleavage sites of nine human MMPs, we identified more than 4300 cleavages from P6 to P6' in biologically diverse human peptide libraries. MMP specificity and kinetic efficiency were mainly guided by aliphatic and aromatic residues in P1' (with a ~32-93% preference for leucine depending on the MMP), and basic and small residues in P2' and P3', respectively. A wide differential preference for the hallmark P3 proline was found between MMPs ranging from 15 to 46%, yet when combined in the same peptide with the universally preferred P1' leucine, an unexpected negative cooperativity emerged. This was not observed in previous studies, probably due to the paucity of approaches that profile both the prime and non-prime sides together, and the masking of subsite cooperativity effects by global heat maps and iceLogos. These caveats make it critical to check for these biologically highly important effects by fixing all 20 amino acids one-by-one in the respective subsites and thorough assessing of the inferred specificity logo changes. Indeed an analysis of bona fide MEROPS physiological substrate cleavage data revealed that of the 37 natural substrates with either a P3-Pro or a P1'-Leu only 5 shared both features, confirming the PICS data. Upon probing with several new quenched-fluorescent peptides, rationally designed on our specificity data, the negative cooperativity was explained by reduced non-prime side flexibility constraining accommodation of the rigidifying P3 proline with

  1. Measurements and modeling of the wind profile up to 600 meters at a flat coastal site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This study shows long-term ABL wind profile features by comparing long-range wind lidar measurements and the output from a mesoscale model. The study is based on one-year pulsed lidar (Wind Cube 70) measurements of wind speed and direction from 100 to 600 meters with vertical resolution of 50...... as function of height. It is found that 1) WRF is generally under predicting both the profiles of the measured wind speed, direction and power density, 2) the scatter of observations to model results of the wind speed does not change significantly with height between 100 and 600 meters, and 3) the scale (A......) and shape (k) parameters of the Weibull dis-tribution above 100 m. The latter signifies that the model suggests a wider distri-bution in the wind speed compared to measurements....

  2. Determination of solvation and binding site profile within electropolymerised poly(pyrrole-N-propionic acid)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glidle, A.; Swann, M.J.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2000-01-01

    Specular neutron reflectivity measurements were performed on electropolymerised films of poly(pyrrole-N-propionic acid) to determine the degree to which the solvents are capable of supporting biological macromolecules can penetrate the polymer film. The permeation profile of Ni2+ ions which chela...... to the polymer's carboxylic acid moieties for subsequent modified protein binding was also determined. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  3. Soil Fertility in relation to Landscape Position and Land Use/Cover Types: A Case Study of the Lake Kivu Pilot Learning Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majaliwa Mwanjalolo Jackson-Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the change and distribution of land-uses/covers along the landscape, and evaluated the nutrient status of the top soil layer in the Lake Kivu Pilot Learning Site (LKPLS benchmarked micro-catchments. Soil physical and chemical properties were quantified using triplicate soil samples collected from each land-use/cover at two depths (0–15 and 15–30 cm in three LK PLS Learning Innovation Platform (IP sites (Bufundi in Uganda, Mupfuni-Shanga in D.R. Congo, Gataraga in Rwanda. Small scale agriculture has increased in all the benchmarked micro-catchments at the expense of other land-uses/covers. In the settlement areas land-use/cover distribution along the landscape varied across sites and countries; the major one being eucalyptus woodlots, wetland, and perennials and annuals crops in Bufundi; annuals and perennials crops in Mupfuni-Shanga; and annuals crops in Gataraga. Perennial crops tended to occur at the footslope and valley bottoms, while the annuals occurred at the upper backslopes and summits. Available P and K were relatively higher and C/N ratio (7.28 was the lowest in Mupfuni Shanga. Annual crops had the lowest available P and N across site (P<0.05. The key nutrients N, P and K were below the critical values for plant growth for Bufundi.

  4. Hydrostratigraphic analysis of the MADE site with full-resolution GPR and direct-push hydraulic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, M.; Van Dam, R. L.; Bohling, G.C.; Butler, J.J.; Hyndman, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Full-resolution 3D Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) data were combined with high-resolution hydraulic conductivity (K) data from vertical Direct-Push (DP) profiles to characterize a portion of the highly heterogeneous MAcro Dispersion Experiment (MADE) site. This is an important first step to better understand the influence of aquifer heterogeneities on observed anomalous transport. Statistical evaluation of DP data indicates non-normal distributions that have much higher similarity within each GPR facies than between facies. The analysis of GPR and DP data provides high-resolution estimates of the 3D geometry of hydrostratigraphic zones, which can then be populated with stochastic K fields. The lack of such estimates has been a significant limitation for testing and parameterizing a range of novel transport theories at sites where the traditional advection-dispersion model has proven inadequate. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J.; Hover, J.; Love, P.; Stewart, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment's computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ‘pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to pick-up a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single Virtual Organization (VO), and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO's distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new and improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is highly configurable. It is able to send different types of pilots to sites and exploit different submission mechanisms and queue characteristics. It is tightly integrated with the PanDA job submission framework, coupling pilot flow to the amount of work the site has to run. It gathers information from many sources in order to correctly configure itself for a site and its decision logic can easily be updated. Integrated into AutoPyFactory is a flexible system for delivering both generic and specific job wrappers which can perform many useful actions before starting to run end-user scientific applications, e.g., validation of the middleware, node profiling and diagnostics, and monitoring. AutoPyFactory also has a robust monitoring system that has been invaluable in establishing a reliable pilot factory service for ATLAS.

  6. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  7. The health profile of populations living in contaminated sites: SENTIERI approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirastu, Roberta; Pasetto, Roberto; Zona, Amerigo; Ancona, Carla; Iavarone, Ivano; Martuzzi, Marco; Comba, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    SENTIERI project (Epidemiological Study of Residents in Italian Contaminated Sites) studied mortality in the sites of national interest for environmental remediation (National Priority Contaminated Sites-NPCSs). SENTIERI described mortality of residents in NPCSSs, and it specifically focused on causes of death for which environmental exposure is suspected or ascertained to play an etiologic role. The epidemiological evidence of the causal association was classified a priori into one of these three categories: Sufficient (S), Limited (L), and Inadequate (I). Mortality in the period 1995-2002 was studied for 63 single or grouped causes at the municipal level by computing: crude rate, standardized rate, standardized mortality ratios (SMR), and SMR adjusted for an ad hoc deprivation index. Regional populations were used as references for SMR calculations and 90% CI accompanied SMR values. The deprivation index was constructed using 2001 national census variables for the following socioeconomic domains: education, unemployment, dwelling ownership, and overcrowding. SENTIERI results will allow the priorities setting in remediation intervention so as to prevent adverse health effects from environmental exposure. This paper's objective is to present the rationale, methods, advantages, and limitations underlying SENTIERI project and to describe data and resources required to apply a similar approach in other countries.

  8. Metabolite profiling of plasma and urine from rats with TNBS-induced acute colitis using UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS-based metabonomics--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Choi, Franky F K; Zhou, Yan; Leung, Feung P; Tan, Shun; Lin, Shuhai; Xu, Hongxi; Jia, Wei; Sung, Joseph J Y; Cai, Zongwei; Bian, Zhaoxiang

    2012-07-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease, a relapsing intestinal condition whose precise etiology is still unclear, has continually increased over recent years. Metabolic profiling is an effective method with high sample throughput that can detect and identify potential biomarkers, and thus may be useful in investigating the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, using a metabonomics approach, a pilot study based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) was performed to characterize the metabolic profile of plasma and urine samples of rats with experimental colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Acquired metabolic profile data were processed by multivariate data analysis for differentiation and screening of potential biomarkers. Five metabolites were identified in urine: two tryptophan metabolites [4-(2-aminophenyl)-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid and 4,6-cihydroxyquinoline], two gut microbial metabolites (phenyl-acetylglycine and p-cresol glucuronide), and the bile acid 12α-hydroxy-3-oxocholadienic acid. Seven metabolites were identified in plasma: three members of the bile acid/alcohol group (cholic acid, 12α-hydroxy-3-oxocholadienic acid and cholestane-3,7,12,24,25-pentol) and four lysophosphatidylcholines [LysoPC(20:4), LysoPC(16:0), LysoPC(18:1) and LysoPC(18:0)]. These metabolites are associated with damage of the intestinal barrier function, microbiota homeostasis, immune modulation and the inflammatory response, and play important roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Our results positively support application of the metabonomic approach in study of the pathophysiological mechanism of inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Genome-wide profiling of H3K56 acetylation and transcription factor binding sites in human adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinyui Alice Lo

    Full Text Available The growing epidemic of obesity and metabolic diseases calls for a better understanding of adipocyte biology. The regulation of transcription in adipocytes is particularly important, as it is a target for several therapeutic approaches. Transcriptional outcomes are influenced by both histone modifications and transcription factor binding. Although the epigenetic states and binding sites of several important transcription factors have been profiled in the mouse 3T3-L1 cell line, such data are lacking in human adipocytes. In this study, we identified H3K56 acetylation sites in human adipocytes derived from mesenchymal stem cells. H3K56 is acetylated by CBP and p300, and deacetylated by SIRT1, all are proteins with important roles in diabetes and insulin signaling. We found that while almost half of the genome shows signs of H3K56 acetylation, the highest level of H3K56 acetylation is associated with transcription factors and proteins in the adipokine signaling and Type II Diabetes pathways. In order to discover the transcription factors that recruit acetyltransferases and deacetylases to sites of H3K56 acetylation, we analyzed DNA sequences near H3K56 acetylated regions and found that the E2F recognition sequence was enriched. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing, we confirmed that genes bound by E2F4, as well as those by HSF-1 and C/EBPα, have higher than expected levels of H3K56 acetylation, and that the transcription factor binding sites and acetylation sites are often adjacent but rarely overlap. We also discovered a significant difference between bound targets of C/EBPα in 3T3-L1 and human adipocytes, highlighting the need to construct species-specific epigenetic and transcription factor binding site maps. This is the first genome-wide profile of H3K56 acetylation, E2F4, C/EBPα and HSF-1 binding in human adipocytes, and will serve as an important resource for better understanding adipocyte

  10. A pilot trial assessing urinary gene expression profiling with an mRNA array for diabetic nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The initiation and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN is complex. Quantification of mRNA expression in urinary sediment has emerged as a novel strategy for studying renal diseases. Considering the numerous molecules involved in DN development, a high-throughput platform with parallel detection of multiple mRNAs is needed. In this study, we constructed a self-assembling mRNA array to analyze urinary mRNAs in DN patients with aims to reveal its potential in searching novel biomarkers. METHODS: mRNA array containing 88 genes were fabricated and its performance was evaluated. A pilot study with 9 subjects including 6 DN patients and 3 normal controls were studied with the array. DN patients were assigned into two groups according to their estimate glomerular rate (eGFR: DNI group (eGFR>60 ml/min/1.73 m(2, n = 3 and DNII group (eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m(2, n = 3. Urinary cell pellet was collected from each study participant. Relative abundance of these target mRNAs from urinary pellet was quantified with the array. RESULTS: The array we fabricated displayed high sensitivity and specificity. Moreover, the Cts of Positive PCR Controls in our experiments were 24±0.5 which indicated high repeatability of the array. A total of 29 mRNAs were significantly increased in DN patients compared with controls (p<0.05. Among these genes, α-actinin4, CDH2, ACE, FAT1, synaptopodin, COL4α, twist, NOTCH3 mRNA expression were 15-fold higher than those in normal controls. In contrast, urinary TIMP-1 mRNA was significantly decreased in DN patients (p<0.05. It was shown that CTGF, MCP-1, PAI-1, ACE, CDH1, CDH2 mRNA varied significantly among the 3 study groups, and their mRNA levels increased with DN progression (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Our pilot study demonstrated that mRNA array might serve as a high-throughput and sensitive tool for detecting mRNA expression in urinary sediment. Thus, this primary study indicated that mRNA array probably could be a

  11. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-04-20

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene\\'s function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins\\' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/FullSignalRanker/ © 2015 IEEE.

  12. DNA methylation profiling of the human major histocompatibility complex: a pilot study for the human epigenome project.

    OpenAIRE

    Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Thomas Hildmann; Novik, Karen L; Jörn Lewin; Jörg Tost; Antony V Cox; T Dan Andrews; Howe, Kevin L.; Thomas Otto; Alexander Olek; Judith Fischer; Gut, Ivo G.; Kurt Berlin; Stephan Beck

    2004-01-01

    The Human Epigenome Project aims to identify, catalogue, and interpret genome-wide DNA methylation phenomena. Occurring naturally on cytosine bases at cytosine–guanine dinucleotides, DNA methylation is intimately involved in diverse biological processes and the aetiology of many diseases. Differentially methylated cytosines give rise to distinct profiles, thought to be specific for gene activity, tissue type, and disease state. The identification of such methylation variable positions will si...

  13. Site-specific profiles of estrogenic activity in agricultural areas of California's inland waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Ramon; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E; Floyd, Emily; Kolodziej, Edward P; Snyder, Shane A; Sedlak, David L; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the occurrence and sources of compounds capable of feminizing fish in agriculturally impacted waterways of the Central Valley of California, water samples were extracted and subjected to chemical analyses as well as in vitro and in vivo measurements of vitellogenin in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Among the 16 sites sampled, 6 locations frequently exhibited elevated concentrations of estrogenic substances with 17beta-estradiol equivalents up to 242 ng/L in vitro and 12 microg/kg in vivo. The patterns of activity varied among sites, with two sites showing elevated activity only in vitro, two showing elevated activity only in vivo, and two showing elevated activity in both assays. Sequential elution of solid-phase extraction (SPE) disks followed by bioassay-guided fractionation was used to characterize water samples from the two locations where activity was observed in both bioassays. The highest estrogenic activity was observed in the most nonpolar fractions (80-100% methanol eluent) from the Napa River, while most of the activity in the Sacramento River Delta eluted in the 60% methanol eluent. Quantitative analyses of SPE extracts and additional HPLC fractionation of the SPE extracts by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS indicated concentrations of steroid hormones, alkylphenol polyethoxylates, and herbicides that were at least 1-3 orders of magnitude below bioassay 17beta-estradiol equivalent calculations. Given the different patterns of activity and chemical properties of the estrogenic compounds, it appears that estrogenic activity in these agriculturally impacted surface waters is attributable to multiple compounds. Further investigation is needed to identify the compounds causing the estrogenic activity and to determine the potential impacts of these compounds on feral fish.

  14. CERN pilot greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot installation was situated near Bld. BA6 opposite to the main entrance of the Meyrin site, with respect to Route de Meyrin. See Weekly Bulletin 3/83, and also photo 8305594X, 8505898X, 8302200.

  15. Intensive serial biomarker profiling for the prediction of neutropenic fever in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Chan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutropenic fever (NF is a life-threatening complication of myelosuppressive chemotherapy in patients with hematologic malignancies and triggers the administration of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The ability to accurately predict NF would permit initiation of antimicrobials earlier in the course of infection with the goal of decreasing morbid complications and progression to septic shock and death. Changes in the blood level of inflammatory biomarkers may precede the occurrence of NF. To identify potential biomarkers for the prediction of NF, we performed serial meas- urements of nine biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP, protein C, interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1] using a multiplex ELISA array platform every 6-8 hours in patients undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. We found that the blood levels of IL-6 and CRP increased significantly 24 to 48 hours prior to the onset of fever. In addition, we showed that frequent biomarker monitoring is feasible using a bedside micro sample test device. The results of this pilot study suggest that serial monitoring of IL-6 and CRP levels using a bedside device may be useful in the prediction of NF. Prospective studies involving a larger cohort of patients to validate this observation are warranted. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01144793.

  16. The Health Profile of Populations Living in Contaminated Sites: Sentieri Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Pirastu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available SENTIERI project (Epidemiological Study of Residents in Italian Contaminated Sites studied mortality in the sites of national interest for environmental remediation (National Priority Contaminated Sites—NPCSs. SENTIERI described mortality of residents in NPCSSs, and it specifically focused on causes of death for which environmental exposure is suspected or ascertained to play an etiologic role. The epidemiological evidence of the causal association was classified a priori into one of these three categories: Sufficient (S, Limited (L, and Inadequate (I. Mortality in the period 1995−2002 was studied for 63 single or grouped causes at the municipal level by computing: crude rate, standardized rate, standardized mortality ratios (SMR, and SMR adjusted for an ad hoc deprivation index. Regional populations were used as references for SMR calculations and 90% CI accompanied SMR values. The deprivation index was constructed using 2001 national census variables for the following socioeconomic domains: education, unemployment, dwelling ownership, and overcrowding. SENTIERI results will allow the priorities setting in remediation intervention so as to prevent adverse health effects from environmental exposure. This paper’s objective is to present the rationale, methods, advantages, and limitations underlying SENTIERI project and to describe data and resources required to apply a similar approach in other countries.

  17. ANTIMICROBIOLOGICAL PROFILE AND EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ORGANISM ISOLATED FROM SURGICAL SITE INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Infection that occurs in the wound created by a surgical procedure is generally called as surgical site infection. (1 Surgical site infection is a frequent complication of surgery and its incidence varies from 0.5 to 15% depending upon the type of surgery and status of the patient. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was conducted over a period of 16 months and sample was collected from various surgical departments of Konaseema Institute of Medical Science, Amalapuram. Standard operating procedures for sample collection, transport, culture and susceptibility testing for isolated organisms were followed to ensure procedural quality. Swab samples were plated on nutrient agar, blood agar, and MacConkey agar medium. RESULT Staphylococcus was the most common organism isolated. But Gram-negative organism was more common organism resistant to commonly used antibiotic. CONCLUSION Idea about the antimicrobial sensitivity pattern is essential for selection of drugs. Every institution should have an antimicrobial use policy as per the resistance pattern of organism. So a longterm and large scale study is required to have the idea and detail of resistance pattern.

  18. Properties of blends for profiles and semi-rigid films made of PVC nanocomposites produced in pilot scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obloj-Muzaj, Maria; Abramowicz, Agnieszka; Kumosinski, Marcin; Zielecka, Maria; Kozakiewicz, Janusz; Gorska, Agnieszka

    2016-05-01

    PVC nanocomposites containing 0.5 wt. %/VCM of either nanosilica or hybrid core/shell type nanofiller were produced in-situ in suspension polymerisation. Significant increase in impact strength of PVC composites obtained was observed (higher 25 - 60 % in comparison with PVC). The amount of impact modifier in selected rigid PVC blends (e.g. in window profiles) could be significantly reduced (≥ 50 %). Tensile and flexural properties of nanocomposites were similar to PVC, however, at smaller amount of impact modifier other mechanical properties improve. Tear resistance of rigid films was better.

  19. Feasibility and acceptability of ambulatory glucose profile in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Rai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insulin administration and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG are pillars in the management of diabetes in children. Introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM has made it possible to understand the glycemic profiles which are not picked up by SMBG. Recent advent of flash glucose monitoring with inbuilt software to obtain ambulatory glucose profile (AGP has emerged as a novel method to study glycemic patterns in adults with Type I diabetes. However, the use of AGP in children is yet to be explored. Methods: AGP was used in 46 children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Feasibility was measured regarding data and sensor failure. Acceptability was measured using a questionnaire. Results: Forty-six children (22 girls and 24 boys with a mean age of 10.07 years and mean diabetes duration of 3.4 years were included in the study. In this cohort, for 30 (65.21% subjects, the sensor remained in situ for a complete duration of 14 days. Except for minor discomfort, AGP was well accepted by most of the children and their parents. Conclusion: AGP is a feasible option for monitoring glycemic status in children with diabetes with a high rate of acceptance.

  20. A protease substrate profiling method that links site-specific proteolysis with antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandersjöö, Lisa; Kostallas, George; Löfblom, John; Samuelson, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are involved in many biological processes and have become important tools in biomedical research and industry. Technologies for engineering and characterization of, for example, proteolytic activity and specificity are essential in protease research. Here, we present a novel method for assessment of site-specific proteolysis. The assay utilizes plasmid-encoded reporters that, upon processing by a co-expressed protease, confer antibiotic resistance to bacteria in proportion to the cleavage efficiency. We have demonstrated that cells co-expressing cleavable reporters together with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) could be discriminated from cells with non-cleavable reporters by growth in selective media. Importantly, the resistance to antibiotics proved to correlate with the substrate processing efficiency. Thus, by applying competitive growth of a mock library in antibiotic-containing medium, we could show that the substrate preferred by TEVp was enriched relative to less-efficient substrates. We believe that this simple methodology will facilitate protease substrate identification, and hold great promise for directed evolution of proteases and protease recognition sequences towards improved or even new functionality.

  1. Compulsive use of social networking sites in Belgium: prevalence, profile, and the role of attitude toward work and school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, Rozane; Vangeel, Jolien; Klein, Annabelle; Minotte, Pascal; Rosas, Omar; Meerkerk, Gert-Jan

    2014-03-01

    A representative sample (n=1,000) of the Belgian population aged 18 years and older filled out an online questionnaire on their Internet use in general and their use of social networking sites (SNS) in particular. We measured total time spent on the Internet, time spent on SNS, number of SNS profiles, gender, age, schooling level, income, job occupation, and leisure activities, and we integrated several psychological scales such as the Quick Big Five and the Mastery Scale. Hierarchical multiple regression modeling shows that gender and age explain an important part of the compulsive SNS score (5%) as well as psychological scales (20%), but attitude toward school (additional 3%) and income (2.5%) also add to explained variance in predictive models of compulsive SNS use.

  2. Enhancing the revision of the static geological model of the Stuttgart Formation at the Ketzin pilot site by integration of reservoir simulations and 3D seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, Thomas; Norden, Ben; Ivanova, Alexandra; Lüth, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Pilot-scale carbon dioxide storage has been performed at the Ketzin pilot site in Germany from June 2007 to August 2013 with about 67 kt of CO2 injected into the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation. In this context, the main aims focussed on verification of the technical feasibility of CO2 storage in saline aquifers and development of efficient strategies for CO2 behaviour monitoring and prediction. A static geological model has been already developed at an early stage of this undertaking, and continuously revised with the availability of additional geological and operational data as well as by means of reservoir simulations, allowing for revisions in line with the efforts to achieve a solid history match in view of well bottomhole pressures and CO2 arrival times at the observation wells. Three 3D seismic campaigns followed the 2005 3D seismic baseline in 2009, 2012 and 2015. Consequently, the interpreted seismic data on spatial CO2 thickness distributions in the storage reservoir as well as seismic CO2 detection limits from recent conformity studies enabled us to enhance the previous history-matching results by adding a spatial component to the previous observations, limited to points only. For that purpose, we employed the latest version of the history-matched static geological reservoir model and revised the gridding scheme of the reservoir simulation model by coarsening and introducing local grid refinements at the areas of interest. Further measures to ensure computational efficiency included the application of the MUFITS reservoir simulator (BLACKOIL module) with PVT data derived from the MUFITS GASSTORE module. Observations considered in the inverse model calibration for a simulation time of about 5 years included well bottomhole pressures, CO2 arrival times and seismically determined CO2 thickness maps for 2009 and 2012. Pilot points were employed by means of the PEST++ inverse simulation framework to apply permeability multipliers, interpolated by kriging

  3. Electrical stimulation at distinct peripheral sites in spinal nerve injured rats leads to different afferent activation profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Chung, Chih-Yang; Wacnik, Paul W; Carteret, Alene F; McKelvy, Alvin D; Meyer, Richard A; Raja, Srinivasa N; Guan, Yun

    2011-11-07

    The neurophysiological basis by which neuromodulatory techniques lead to relief of neuropathic pain remains unclear. We investigated whether electrical stimulation at different peripheral sites induces unique profiles of A-fiber afferent activation in nerve-injured rats. At 4-6weeks after subjecting rats to L5 spinal nerve injury (SNL) or sham operation, we recorded the orthodromic compound action potential (AP) at the ipsilateral L4 dorsal root in response to (1) transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, a patch electrode placed on the dorsum of the foot), (2) subcutaneous electrical stimulation (SQS, electrode inserted subcutaneously along the dorsum of the foot), (3) peroneal nerve stimulation (PNS, electrode placed longitudinally abutting the nerve), and (4) sciatic nerve stimulation (SNS). The area under the Aα/β compound AP was measured as a function of the bipolar, constant-current stimulus intensity (0.02-6.0 mA, 0.2 ms). In both nerve-injured and sham-operated groups, the stimulus-response (S-R) functions of the Aα/β compound APs differed substantially with the stimulation site; SNS having the lowest threshold and largest compound AP waveform, followed by PNS, SQS, and TENS. The S-R function to PNS was shifted to the right in the SNL group, compared to that in the sham-operated group. The Aα/β-threshold to PNS was higher in the SNL group than in the sham-operated group. The S-R functions and Aα/β-thresholds to TENS and SQS were comparable between the two groups. Electrical stimulation of different peripheral targets induced distinctive profiles of A-fiber afferent activation, suggesting that the neuronal substrates for the various forms of peripheral neuromodulatory therapies may differ. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Special needs require special attention: a pilot project implementing the paediatric pain profile for children with profound neurological impairment in an in-patient setting following surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Katie A; Franck, Linda S

    2011-09-01

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding the implementation of pain assessment tools for children with profound neurological impairment (PNI) in in-patient settings. This article describes a pilot project to evaluate the Paediatric Pain Profile (PPP) for children with PNI undergoing surgery. Five families of children 5 to 16 years of age with a primary diagnosis of cerebral palsy and admitted for surgical procedures were interviewed. Nineteen nurses completed questionnaires and children's pain management documentation was audited. The project identified issues in three areas of pain management: implementation process, individualised pain management and partnership. The PPP required pre-admission assessment and parental involvement, and was considered time-consuming by nurses. Individualised pain assessment and intervention was difficult to achieve, as was shared assessment and documentation among parents and nurses. Despite initial resistance to change, with greater use there was growing appreciation of the value of components of the PPP. Further exploration of the PPP tool in practice is required before its use can be widely recommended for children with PNI in in-patient settings. Future studies are required to determine which of the available pain assessment tools has the greatest accuracy and utility for assessment of post-operative pain in children with PNI.

  5. Profiling Amino Acids of Jordanian Scalp Hair as a Tool for Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosis: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashaid, Ayat H B; Harrington, Peter de B; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-07-21

    Hair analysis is an area of increasing interest in the fields of medical and forensic sciences. Human scalp hair has attractive features in clinical studies because hair can be sampled easily and noninvasively from human subjects, and unlike blood and urine samples, it contains a chronological record of medication use. Keratin protein is the major component of scalp hair shaft material and it is composed of 21 amino acids. The method used herein for the amino acid determination in hair included keratin protein acid hydrolysis using 6 M hydrochloric acid (HCl), followed by amino acids derivatization using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), and the determination of derivatized amino acids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Amino acid profiles of scalp hair of 27 Jordanian subjects (15 diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 patients and 12 control subjects) were analyzed. A fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) classified the amino acid profiles into diabetic and control groups based on multivariate analyses of the abundance of 14 amino acids. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% for diabetes detection using leave-one-individual-out cross-validation. The areas under the receiver operative characteristics (ROC) curves were 1.0, which represents a highly sensitive and specific diabetes test. The nonessential amino acids Gly and Glu, and the essential amino acid Ile were more abundant in the scalp hair of diabetic patients compared to the hair of control subjects. The associations between the abundance of amino acids of human hair and health status may have clinical applications in providing diagnostic indicator or predicting other chronic or acute diseases.

  6. Subcutaneous gentamicin injection around the cuff in treatment of resistant exit site infection in peritoneal dialysis patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdar, Oguzhan Sıtkı; Ozer, Ozerhan; Erdem, Selahattin; Gunal, Ali Ihsan

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common complications of the peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the infection of the exit site of the peritoneal catheter. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the subcutaneous gentamicin injection around the cuff as a part of routine treatment of the resistant exit site infection (ESI). If the exit site remains infected after a 2-week systemic antibiotics treatment, it is defined as resistant ESI. In these cases, systemic antibiotics were discontinued and a subcutaneous 40-mg gentamicin injection was administered around the external cuff of the PD catheter every 3 days. A total of three or four injections were given to each patient. A subcutaneous gentamicin injection was administered around the cuff in thirteen patients for the treatment of resistant ESI over a 2-year period. The median follow-up time in cured patients was 12 months. Eleven of the thirteen patients had been apparently cured of their resistant ESI, with no recurrence. None of the patients had a gentamicin-resistant species. Subcutaneous gentamicin-related adverse effect was not observed in any patient. Subcutaneous gentamicin injection around the cuff is a well-tolerated and effective strategy for treating resistant ESI. To gain widespread approval of this therapy and reach a consensus about ESI management, additional studies are needed.

  7. A comparative study of glycoprotein concentration, glycoform profile and glycosylation site occupancy using isotope labeling and electrospray linear ion trap mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chih-Yu; Ma, Yi-Chun; Pai, Pei-Jing [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Her, Guor-Rong, E-mail: grher@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concentration, site occupancy and glycoform variation can be differentiated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glycopeptides and peptides were stable isotope labeled and analyzed by ESI-MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nonglycosylated peptide provided glycoprotein concentration variation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glycoform variation was obtained by comparing d{sub 0} and d{sub 4} labeled glycopeptides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The variation of glycosylation site occupancy could be calculated. - Abstract: A strategy is presented for comparative analysis of glycoproteins in which the variation of protein concentration, variation of glycosylation site occupancy and variation of glycoform profile can be determined. A comparative study was performed using stable isotope labeling of glycopeptides and peptides by formaldehyde-H{sub 2} and formaldehyde-D{sub 2} and analysis by ESI-MS analysis. The relative intensity of the nonglycosylated peptide provided information about protein concentration variation. Variation of the glycoform profile was obtained by comparing the glycoform profile of d{sub 0}- and d{sub 4}-dimethyl labeled glycopeptides. By knowing the variation of protein concentration and the variation of glycoform profile, the variation of glycosylation site occupancy could be calculated. The utility of the proposed strategy was demonstrated with ribonuclease B with different protein concentrations, different levels of glycosylation site occupancy and different glycoform profiles.

  8. Comparison of BTX Profiles and Their Mutagenicity Assessment at Two Sites of Agra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyoma Singla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the concentrations of three volatile organic compounds (VOCs, namely, acronym for benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX were assessed because of their role in the tropospheric chemistry. Two representative sites, a roadside and a petrol pump, were chosen for sample collection. VOCs were collected using SKC-activated charcoal tubes and SKC personal sampler and characterized by gas chromatograph using flame ionization detector. Among BTX, benzene had the highest concentration. At the roadside, mean concentration of benzene, toluene, o-,m-xylene, and p-xylene were 14.7 ± 2.4 μgm−3, 8.1 ± 1.2 μgm−3, 2.1 ± 0.8 μgm−3, and 5.1 ± 1.2 μgm−3, respectively. At the petrol pump, the mean concentrations of benzene, toluene, o-,m-xylene and p-xylene were 19.5 ± 3.7 μgm−3, 12.9 ± 1.1 μgm−3, 3.6 ± 0.5 μgm−3 and 11.1 ± 1.5 μgm−3, respectively, and were numerically higher by a fraction of 2. Monthly variation of BTX showed maximum concentration in winter. Inter-species ratios and inter-species correlation indicated traffic as the major source of BTX. Extracts of samples were positive in both Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 without metabolic activation suggesting the presence of direct mutagens in ambient air that can cause both frame-shift and base-pair mutation. The mutagenic response was greater for TA100 than TA98 suggesting greater activity for base-pair mutagenicity than frame-shift mutagenicity and was found to be statistically significant.

  9. Reduction of Ambiguity in Phosphorylation-site Localization in Large-scale Phosphopeptide Profiling by Data Filter using Unique Mass Class Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madar, Inamul Hasan; Back, Seunghoon; Mun, Donggi; Kim, Hokeun; Lee, Sangwon [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae Hun; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The rapid development of shotgun proteomics is paving the way for extensive proteome profiling, while providing extensive information on various post translational modifications (PTMs) that occur to a proteome of interest. For example, the current phosphoproteomic methods can yield more than 10,000 phosphopeptides identified from a proteome sample. Despite these developments, it remains a challenging issue to pinpoint the true phosphorylation sites, especially when multiple sites are possible for phosphorylation in the peptides. We developed the Phospho-UMC filter, which is a simple method of localizing the site of phosphorylation using unique mass classes (UMCs) information to differentiate phosphopeptides with different phosphorylation sites and increase the confidence in phosphorylation site localization. The method was applied to large scale phosphopeptide profiling data and was demonstrated to be effective in the reducing ambiguity associated with the tandem mass spectrometric data analysis of phosphopeptides.

  10. A nonparametric procedure for defining a new humoral immunologic profile in a pilot study on HIV infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Brombin

    Full Text Available This work aims at identifying a set of humoral immunologic parameters that improve prediction of the activation process in HIV patients. Starting from the well-known impact of humoral immunity in HIV infection, there is still a lack of knowledge in defining the role of the modulation of functional activity and titers of serum antibodies from early stage of infection to the development of AIDS. We propose an integrated approach that combines humoral and clinical parameters in defining the host immunity, implementing algorithms associated with virus control. A number of humoral parameters were simultaneously evaluated in a whole range of serum samples from HIV-positive patients. This issue has been afforded accounting for estimation problems typically related to "feasibility" studies where small sample size in each group and large number of parameters are jointly estimated. We used nonparametric statistical procedures to identify biomarkers in our study which included 42 subjects stratified on five different stages of HIV infection, i.e., Elite Controllers (EC, Long Term Non Progressors (LTNP, HAART, AIDS and Acute Infection (AI. The main goal of the paper is to illustrate a novel profiling method for helping to design a further confirmatory study. A set of seventeen different HIV-specific blood humoral factors were analyzed in all subjects, i.e. IgG and IgA to gp120IIIB, to gp120Bal, to whole gp41, to P1 and T20 gp41 epitopes of the MPER-HR2 region, to QARILAV gp41 epitope of the HR1 region and to CCR5; neutralization activity against five different virus strains and ADCC were also evaluated. Patients were selected on the basis of CD4 cell counts, HIV/RNA and clinical status. The Classification and Regression Trees (CART approach has been used to uncover specific patterns of humoral parameters in different stages of HIV disease. Virus neutralization of primary virus strains and antibodies to gp41 were required to classify patients, suggesting

  11. Preliminary Seismic Time-lapse Results of the First Post-injection Monitoring at the Ketzin Pilot Site for CO2 Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Monika, Ivandic; Julin, Christopher; Lüth, Stefan; Bergmann, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Time-lapse surface seismic monitoring methods have proven to be notably successful in imaging the development of the CO2 plume injected into the 630-650 meters deep saline aquifer at the Ketzin pilot site. A 3D baseline survey was acquired in the autumn of 2005 prior to CO2 injection, followed by two 3D repeat surveys conducted in the same season of 2009 and 2012 after injection of about 22 and 61 kt of CO2, respectively. These repeat surveys showed that the CO2 plume was concentrated around the injection well with a preferred WNW propagating trend due to reservoir heterogeneity. The CO2 induced amplitude anomaly continued to grow with more CO2 injected into the reservoir. The CO2 injection ended on August 29, 2013 after a total of about 67 kt injected CO2. In the autumn of 2015, a third 3D repeat survey with a nominal fold of 25 was acquired during the post-injection phase. The acquisition was implemented with an identical template scheme and acquisition parameters as in the previous surveys. About 5500 source points were acquired during the 57 days of active acquisition. The same processing steps as used before were carried out from pre-stack to post-stack. In order to minimize changes unrelated to the site operations, cross-calibration was applied to the data. Preliminary results of the time-lapse analysis show that the obtained amplitude anomaly at the reservoir level is smaller in size than the one observed at the time of the second repeat survey. This may indicate that CO2 dissolution is active, especially east of the injection site, where permeability and flow rate appear to be lower. In comparison to the previous surveys, the maximum amplitude anomaly has moved towards the west, which is consistent with the previously observed propagating tendency of the CO2 plume within the reservoir. No CO2 leakage is observed within the overburden.

  12. Stromal transcriptional profiles reveal hierarchies of anatomical site, serum response and disease and identify disease specific pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filer, Andrew; Antczak, Philipp; Parsonage, Greg N; Legault, Holly M; O'Toole, Margot; Pearson, Mark J; Thomas, Andrew M; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher D; Falciani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts in persistent inflammatory arthritis have been suggested to have parallels with cancer growth and wound healing, both of which involve a stereotypical serum response programme. We tested the hypothesis that a serum response programme can be used to classify diseased tissues, and investigated the serum response programme in fibroblasts from multiple anatomical sites and two diseases. To test our hypothesis we utilized a bioinformatics approach to explore a publicly available microarray dataset including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissue, then extended those findings in a new microarray dataset representing matched synovial, bone marrow and skin fibroblasts cultured from RA and OA patients undergoing arthroplasty. The classical fibroblast serum response programme discretely classified RA, OA and normal synovial tissues. Analysis of low and high serum treated fibroblast microarray data revealed a hierarchy of control, with anatomical site the most powerful classifier followed by response to serum and then disease. In contrast to skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to serum led to convergence of RA and OA expression profiles. Pathway analysis revealed three inter-linked gene networks characterising OA synovial fibroblasts: Cell remodelling through insulin-like growth factors, differentiation and angiogenesis through _3 integrin, and regulation of apoptosis through CD44. We have demonstrated that Fibroblast serum response signatures define disease at the tissue level, and that an OA specific, serum dependent repression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodelling and apoptosis is a critical discriminator between cultured OA and RA synovial fibroblasts.

  13. Serum Oxidative Stress Markers and Lipidomic Profile to Detect NASH Patients Responsive to an Antioxidant Treatment: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Stiuso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver steatosis can evolve to steatohepatitis (NASH through a series of biochemical steps related to oxidative stress in hepatocytes. Antioxidants, such as silybin, have been proposed as a treatment of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and NASH. In this study, we evaluated, in patients with histologically documented NASH, the oxidant/antioxidant status and lipid “fingerprint” in the serum of NASH patients, both in basal conditions and after 12 months of treatment with silybin-based food integrator Realsil (RA. The oxidant/antioxidant status analysis showed the presence of a group of patients with higher basal severity of disease (NAS scores 4.67 ± 2.5 and a second group corresponding to borderline NASH (NAS scores = 3.8 ± 1.5. The chronic treatment with RA changed the NAS score in both groups that reached the statistical significance only in group 2, in which there was also a significant decrease of serum lipid peroxidation. The lipidomic profile showed a lipid composition similar to that of healthy subjects with a restoration of the values of free cholesterol, lysoPC, SM, and PC only in group 2 of patients after treatment with RA. Conclusion. These data suggest that lipidomic and/or oxidative status of serum from patients with NASH could be useful as prognostic markers of response to an antioxidant treatment.

  14. The effect of Ramadan fasting on quiescent systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients' disease activity, health quality of life and lipid profile: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goharifar, Hamid; Faezi, Seyedeh Tahereh; Paragomi, Pedram; Montazeri, Ali; Banihashemi, Arash Tehrani; Akhlaghkhah, Maryam; Abdollahi, Bahar Sadeghi; Kamazani, Zahra; Akbarian, Mahmood

    2015-08-01

    SLE is a common autoimmune disease with considerable morbidity. Ramadan fasting is a religious custom Muslims regularly practice. We aimed to evaluate the effect of Ramadan fasting on SLE patients' disease activity, health quality of life and lipid profile. We conducted this case control study as a pilot study in 40 quiescent SLE patients, 21 cases who decided to fast and 19 controls who decided not to have Ramadan fasting between August and November 2009 in lupus unit of Rheumatology Research Center in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. They were assessed for SLE Disease Activity Index, lipid profile and quality of life with Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey, 1 day before Ramadan, the day after and 3 months after Ramadan fasting. After 24.1 ± 5.4 (mean ± SD) days of fasting, anti-ds DNA increased for 0.34 ± 0.41 mmol/dL in cases versus 0.07 ± 0.31 in controls (P = 0.026). Likewise C3 increased more dramatically in cases (16.8 ± 17.5 vs. 2.3 ± 13.2 mg/dL, P = 0.006). Three months after fasting, anti-ds DNA was still increased 0.28 ± 0.46 mmol/dL in cases while a 0.02 ± 0.43 mmol/dL drop in controls was detected (P = 0.04). On the contrary, C3 returned to baseline. These changes were not accompanied with significant changes in disease activity and health quality of life. Ramadan fasting had no effect on lipid profile except for delayed total cholesterol decrease in cases in comparison with controls (16.4 ± 29.4 decrease vs. 4.6 ± 23.9 mg/dL decrease, P = 0.018). Ramadan fasting probably has no detrimental effect on SLE patients' disease activity and their quality of life in the quiescent phase of disease.

  15. Characterization of Sediments from the Soil Desiccation Pilot Test (SDPT) Site in the BC Cribs and Trenches Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Truex, Michael J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Iovin, Cristian; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Chang, Hyun-shik; Clayton, Ray E.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Ward, Anderson L.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Clayton, Eric T.; Baum, Steven R.; Smith, David M.

    2009-09-25

    This technical report documents the results of laboratory geochemical and hydrologic measurements of sediments collected from new borehole 299-E13-65 (C7047) and comparison of the results with those of nearby borehole 299-13E-62 (C5923) both drilled in the BC Cribs and Trenches Area. The total and water-leachable concentrations of key contaminants will be used to update contaminant-distribution conceptual models and to provide more data for improving baseline risk predictions and remedial alternative selections. Improved understanding of subsurface conditions and methods to remediate these principal contaminants can be also used to evaluate the application of specific technologies to other contaminants across the Hanford Site.

  16. Shear Wave Velocity Profiles Determined from Surface Wave Measurements at Sites Affected by the August 15th, 2007 Earthquake in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblad, B. L.; Bay, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    The shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of near-surface soils is a critical parameter for understanding recorded ground motions and predicting local site effects in an earthquake. In structural design, the Vs profile in the top 30 m is used to modify design response spectra to account for local soil effects. In addition, knowledge of the near- surface Vs profile at strong motion stations can be used to account for changes in frequency content and amplification caused by the local site conditions. Following the August 15th, 2007 earthquake in Peru, a field testing program was performed to measure Vs profiles in the top 20 to 30 m at twenty-two locations in the affected region. The measurements were performed primarily at the sites of damaged school buildings but were also performed at several strong motion station sites as well as a few locations where evidence of soil liquefaction was observed. Nineteen of the sites were located in the severely affected cities of Chincha, Ica, Pisco and Tambo de Mora, with the remaining three sites located in, Lima, Palpa and Paracus. The Vs profiles were determined from surface wave velocity measurements performed with an impact source. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss the range of Vs profile conditions encountered in the regions affected by the Pisco-Peru earthquake. In the city of Ica, the profiles generally exhibited gradually increasing velocities with depth, with velocities which rarely exceeded 400 m/s in the top 30 m. In contrast, the profiles measured in Pisco, often exhibited strong, shallow velocity contrasts with Vs increasing from less than 200 m/s at the surface to over 600 m/s at some sites. The profiles measured in Chincha generally fell in between the ranges measured in Ica and Pisco. Lastly, soil liquefaction was evident throughout Tambo de Mora on the coast of Peru. Measurements indicated very low shear wave velocities of 75 to 125 m/s in the top 4 m, which is consistent with the observed

  17. Process performance of the pilot-scale in situ vitrification of a simulated waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.G.; Koegler, S.S.; Bates, S.O.

    1988-06-01

    Process feasibility studies have been successfully performed on three developmental scales to determine the potential for applying in situ vitrification to intermediate-level (low-level) waste placed in seepage pits and trenches at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the laboratory, testing was performed in crucibles containing a mixture of 50% ORNL soil and 50% limestone. In an engineering-scale test at Pacific Northwest Laboratory a /1/12/-scale simulation of an ORNL waste trench was constructed and vitrified, resulting in a waste product containing soil and limestone concentrations of 68 wt % and 32 wt %, respectively. In the pilot-scale test a /3/8/-scale simulation of the same trench was constructed and vitrified at ORNL, resulting in soil and limestone concentrations of 80% and 20%, respectively, in the waste product. Results of the three scales of testing indicate that the ORNL intermediate-level (low-level) waste sites can be successfully processed by in situ vitrification; the waste form will retain significant quantities of the cesium and strontium. Because cesium-137 and strontium-90 are the major components of the radionuclide inventory in the ORNL seepage pits and trenches, final field process decontamination factors (i.e., losses to the off-gas system relative to the waste inventory) of 1.0 E + 4 are desired to minimize activity buildup in the off-gas system. 17 refs., 34 figs., 13 tabs.

  18. Pilot Study to Evaluate Hydrogen Injection for Stimulating Reduction and Immobilization of Uranium in Groundwater at an ISR Mining Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, L. W.; Cabezas, J.; Gamboa, Y.; Fernandez, W.

    2011-12-01

    State and federal regulations require that groundwater at in-situ recovery (ISR) uranium mining operations be restored to pre-mining conditions. Reverse osmosis (RO) filtration of several pore volumes of the post-leached groundwater and reinjection of the clean permeate is the most common technology currently used for restoring groundwater at uranium ISR sites. However, this approach does not revert the formation back to its initial reducing conditions, which can potentially impede timely groundwater restoration. In-situ biostimulation of indigenous iron- and sulfate reducing bacteria by injection of organic electron donors (e.g., ethanol, acetate, and lactate) to promote soluble uranium reduction and immobilization has been the subject of previous studies. However, injection of organic substrates has been observed to cause aquifer clogging near the injection point. In addition, U(VI) solubility may be enhanced through complexation with carbonate generated by organic carbon oxidation. An alternative approach that may overcome these problems involves the use of hydrogen as a reductant to promote microbial reduction and immobilization of U(VI) in situ. To test this approach, approximately 100,000 scf of compressed hydrogen gas was injected into a leached unconsolidated sand zone over two months at an ISR mining site. During this time groundwater was recirculated between injection and extraction wells (separated by 130 ft) at a rate of about 40 gpm and bromide was coinjected as a conservative tracer. A well monitoring program has been executed since June 2009 to evaluate the performance of the hydrogen injection. Current results show that U(VI) has been reduced from 4.2 to 0.05 ppm in the area surrounding the injection well and to 2.0 ± 0.3 ppm in the area surrounding the extraction well and two intermediate monitoring wells. Other water quality changes near the injection well include significant decreases in concentrations of Mo, sulfate, Fe, Mn, bicarbonate, Ca

  19. A partnership approach to providing on-site HIV services for probationers and parolees: a pilot study from Alabama, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwen Lichtenstein

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV in the United States is concentrated in the South, an impoverished region with marked health disparities and high rates of incarceration, particularly among African Americans. In the Deep South state of Alabama, a policy directive to reduce prison overcrowding has diverted large numbers of convicted felons to community supervision. Probation and parole offices have yet to provide the HIV education and testing services that are offered in state prisons. This study sought to implement on-site HIV services for probationers and parolees through an intersectoral programme involving law enforcement, university and HIV agency employees. The three main objectives were to (1 involve probation/parole officers in planning, execution and assessment of the programme, (2 provide HIV education to the officers and (3 offer voluntary pretest HIV counselling and testing to probationers and parolees. Methods: The partnered programme was conducted between October and December 2015. Offenders who were recently sentenced to probation (“new offenders”, received HIV education during orientation. Offenders already under supervision prior to the programme (“current offenders” learned about the on-site services during scheduled office visits. Outcomes were measured through officer assessments, informal feedback and uptake of HIV services among offenders. Results: A total of 86 new and 249 current offenders reported during the programme (N=335. Almost one-third (31.4% of new offenders sought HIV testing, while only 3.2% of current offenders were screened for HIV. Refusals among current offenders invoked monogamy, time pressures, being tested in prison, fear of positive test results and concerns about being labelled as gay or unfaithful to women partners. Officers rated the programme as worthwhile and feasible to implement at other offices. Conclusions: The partnership approach ensured support from law enforcement and intersectoral cooperation

  20. Cancer trends in Kashmir; common types, site incidence and demographic profiles: National Cancer Registry 2000-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Wani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An assessment of cancer incidence in population is required for prevention, early diagnosis, treatment and resource allocation. This will also guide in the formation of facilities for diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and follow-up for these patients. The demographic trend of cancer will help to identify common types and etiological factors. Efforts at clinical, research and administrative levels are needed to overcome this problem. Settings and Design: Present retro prospective study was conducted in regional cancer center of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: After permission from ethics committee, a retro prospective study of 1 year duration was undertaken to study the profile of cancer patients and to compare it with other cancer registries in India. Statistical Analysis: Pearson′s Chi-square test and simple linear regression were used. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version-16 (University of Bristol information services (www.bristol.ac.uk/is/learning/resources was used. RESULTS: The overall incidence of cancer in Kashmir is on the increase and common sites of cancer are esophagus and gastroesophageal (GE junction, lung, stomach, colorectal, lymphomas, skin, laryngopharynx, acute leukemias, prostate and brain in males.In females common sites are breast, esophagus and GE junction, ovary, colorectal, stomach, lung, gallbladder, lymphomas, acute leukemias and brain. Conclusion: Cancers of esophagus, stomach and lungs have a high incidence both in men and women in Kashmir. Future studies on sources and types of environmental pollution and exposures in relation to these cancers may improve our understanding of risk factors held responsible for causation of these malignancies in this region. This will help in the allocation of available resources for prevention and treatment strategies.

  1. Stromal transcriptional profiles reveal hierarchies of anatomical site, serum response and disease and identify disease specific pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Filer

    Full Text Available Synovial fibroblasts in persistent inflammatory arthritis have been suggested to have parallels with cancer growth and wound healing, both of which involve a stereotypical serum response programme. We tested the hypothesis that a serum response programme can be used to classify diseased tissues, and investigated the serum response programme in fibroblasts from multiple anatomical sites and two diseases. To test our hypothesis we utilized a bioinformatics approach to explore a publicly available microarray dataset including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthritis (OA and normal synovial tissue, then extended those findings in a new microarray dataset representing matched synovial, bone marrow and skin fibroblasts cultured from RA and OA patients undergoing arthroplasty. The classical fibroblast serum response programme discretely classified RA, OA and normal synovial tissues. Analysis of low and high serum treated fibroblast microarray data revealed a hierarchy of control, with anatomical site the most powerful classifier followed by response to serum and then disease. In contrast to skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to serum led to convergence of RA and OA expression profiles. Pathway analysis revealed three inter-linked gene networks characterising OA synovial fibroblasts: Cell remodelling through insulin-like growth factors, differentiation and angiogenesis through _3 integrin, and regulation of apoptosis through CD44. We have demonstrated that Fibroblast serum response signatures define disease at the tissue level, and that an OA specific, serum dependent repression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodelling and apoptosis is a critical discriminator between cultured OA and RA synovial fibroblasts.

  2. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in cervical dystonia: effect of site and repetition in a randomized pilot trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Pirio Richardson

    Full Text Available Dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing due to sustained muscle contraction, which leads to pain and significant disability. New therapeutic targets are needed in this disorder. The objective of this randomized, sham-controlled, blinded exploratory study is to identify a specific motor system target for non-invasive neuromodulation and to evaluate this target in terms of safety and tolerability in the cervical dystonia (CD population. Eight CD subjects were given 15-minute sessions of low-frequency (0.2 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the primary motor cortex (MC, dorsal premotor cortex (dPM, supplementary motor area (SMA, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and a sham condition with each session separated by at least two days. The Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS score was rated in a blinded fashion immediately pre- and post-intervention. Secondary outcomes included physiology and tolerability ratings. The mean change in TWSTRS severity score by site was 0.25 ± 1.7 (ACC, -2.9 ± 3.4 (dPM, -3.0 ± 4.8 (MC, -0.5 ± 1.1 (SHAM, and -1.5 ± 3.2 (SMA with negative numbers indicating improvement in symptom control. TWSTRS scores decreased from Session 1 (15.1 ± 5.1 to Session 5 (11.0 ± 7.6. The treatment was tolerable and safe. Physiology data were acquired on 6 of 8 subjects and showed no change over time. These results suggest rTMS can modulate CD symptoms. Both dPM and MC are areas to be targeted in further rTMS studies. The improvement in TWSTRS scores over time with multiple rTMS sessions deserves further evaluation.

  3. Accurate Profiling of Gene Expression and Alternative Polyadenylation with Whole Transcriptome Termini Site Sequencing (WTTS-Seq)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Li, Rui; Michal, Jennifer J.; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Zhongzhen; Zhao, Hui; Xia, Yin; Du, Weiwei; Wildung, Mark R.; Pouchnik, Derek J.; Harland, Richard M.; Jiang, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Construction of next-generation sequencing (NGS) libraries involves RNA manipulation, which often creates noisy, biased, and artifactual data that contribute to errors in transcriptome analysis. In this study, a total of 19 whole transcriptome termini site sequencing (WTTS-seq) and seven RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) libraries were prepared from Xenopus tropicalis adult and embryo samples to determine the most effective library preparation method to maximize transcriptomics investigation. We strongly suggest that appropriate primers/adaptors are designed to inhibit amplification detours and that PCR overamplification is minimized to maximize transcriptome coverage. Furthermore, genome annotation must be improved so that missing data can be recovered. In addition, a complete understanding of sequencing platforms is critical to limit the formation of false-positive results. Technically, the WTTS-seq method enriches both poly(A)+ RNA and complementary DNA, adds 5′- and 3′-adaptors in one step, pursues strand sequencing and mapping, and profiles both gene expression and alternative polyadenylation (APA). Although RNA-seq is cost prohibitive, tends to produce false-positive results, and fails to detect APA diversity and dynamics, its combination with WTTS-seq is necessary to validate transcriptome-wide APA. PMID:27098915

  4. Selection and Characterization of Geological Sites able to Host a Pilot-Scale CO{sub 2} Storage in the Paris Basin (GeoCarbone-PICOREF); Choix et caracterisation de sites geologiques propices a l'installation d'un pilote pour le stockage de CO{sub 2} dans le bassin de Paris (GeoCarbone-PICOREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosse, E.; Delmas, J.; Dufournet, A.; Houel, P.; Vidal-Gilbert, S.; Ruffier-Meray, V.; Poutrel, A.; Monnet, M.; Mougin, P. [Institut francais du petrole, IFP, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France); Hasanov, V. [Air Liquide, 78 - Jouy-en-Josas (France); Blanchard, F.; Dezayes, C.; Durst, P.; Grataloup, S.; Hanot, F.; Kervevan, C.; Lansiart, M.; Menjoz, A.; Rachez, X.; Thinon, I. [BRGM, 45 - Orleans (France); Garcia, D. [Ecole des Mines, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France); Badinier, G.; Dreux, R.; Rigollet, C.; Saysset, S. [GDF-Suez, 93 - Saint-Denis-La-Plaine (France); Fillacier, S.; Renoux, P. [Geostock, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France); Nedelec, B.; Thoraval, A. [INERIS, Ecole des Mines, 54 - Nancy (France); Lescanne, M. [Total, 64 - Pau (France); Caspard, E.; Collin, P.Y. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR 7193, ISTeP, 75 - Paris (France); Collin, P.Y. [CNRS, UMR 7193, ISTeP, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-05-15

    The objective of the GeoCarbone-PICOREF project was to select and characterize geological sites where CO{sub 2} storage in permeable reservoir could be tested at the pilot scale. Both options of storage in deep saline aquifer and in depleted hydrocarbon field were considered. The typical size envisioned for the pilot was 100 kt CO{sub 2} per year. GeoCarbone-PICOREF initially focused on a 'Regional Domain', ca. 200 * 150 km, in the Paris Basin. It was attractive for the following reasons: 1)detailed geological data is available, due to 50 years of petroleum exploration; 2)basin-scale deep saline aquifers are present, with a preliminary estimate of storage capacity which is at the Gt CO{sub 2} level, namely the carbonate Oolithe Blanche Formation, of Middle Jurassic age, generally located between 1500 and 1800 m depths in the studied area, and several sandstone formations of Triassic age, located between 2000 and 3000 m; 3)several depleted oil fields exist: although offering storage capacities at a much lower level, they do represent very well constrained geological environments, with proven sealing properties; 4)several sources of pure CO{sub 2} were identified in the area, at a flow rate compatible with the pilot size, that would avoid capture costs. 750 km of seismic lines were reprocessed and organized in six sections fitted on well logs. This first dataset provided improved representations of: 1)the gross features of the considered aquifers in the Regional Domain; 2)the structural scheme; 3)lateral continuity of the sealing cap rocks. An inventory of the environmental characteristics was also made, including human occupancy, protected areas, water resource, natural hazards, potential conflicts of use with other resources of the subsurface, etc. From all these criteria, a more restricted geographical domain named the 'Sector', ca. 70 * 70 km, was chosen, the most appropriate for further selection of storage site(s). The geological

  5. Vertical Seismic Profiling at riser drilling site in the rupture area of the 1944 Tonankai Earthquake, Japan (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, R.; Kinoshita, M.; Araki, E.; Byrne, T. B.; McNeill, L. C.; Saffer, D. M.; Eguchi, N. O.; Takahashi, K.; Toczko, S.

    2009-12-01

    A series of scientific drilling expeditions is in operation in the Nankai Trough to reveal the faulting mechanism of the magathrust earthquakes, through clarifying composition, fine structure, mechanical behavior, and environmental variables of the seismogenic faults. In the studied area, extensive seismic surveys for site characterization have been made to image detailed geometry of the fault complex in the accretionary prism as well as Vp distribution around the faults. Although these previous surveys provided invaluable information for understanding seismotectonic processes in this subduction zone, more complete knowledge is needed to be acquired to predict dynamic behavior of the faults, such as geometrical irregularities in short wavelength, Vs and seismic attenuation which are sensitive to fluid distribution in and around fault zones. It is expected that estimation of these parameters would be improved considerably by a seismic exploration using a vertical array of seismographs installed in a deep borehole (VSP: vertical seismic profiling). In July 2009, we made a VSP at one of the drilling sites located just above the rupture area of the 1994 Tonankai Earthquake (M 8.1), during the IODP Exp.319. The well site of our VSP was made by the riser drilling of D/V Chikyu. The seismic array, lowered from Chikyu into the hole, was composed of a three-component accelerometer and vertical separation of the array elements was 15.12 m. The VSP was composed of offset VSP and zero-offset VSP. In the offset VSP, a tuned airgun array towed by R/V Kairei was shot along one straight line (walk-away VSP) and another circular line (walk-around VSP) and seismic signals were recorded by an array consisting of 16 elements installed from 907 to 1,135 m in depth from seafloor. The object of the walk-away VSP is to obtain fine image of the faults using reflection arrivals with less attenuation. It is also expected to obtain spatial variation of Vs from arrival time tomography of

  6. Urinary cytokine profiles according to the site of blockade of the renin-angiotensin system in nephrectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilo César do Vale Baracho

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: It is still unknown how the pharmacological inhibition of the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS impacts the levels of inflammation and fibrosis biomarkers. Objective: This study sought to evaluate the effect of enalapril, candesartan and aliskiren on urinary levels of cytokines in a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Methods: Male Wistar rats were submitted to surgical removal of ¾ of renal parenchyma to induce CKD (¾ nephrectomy, or subjected to sham surgery (control. Animals were then randomized into five groups: Sham surgery receiving vehicle; ¾ Nephrectomy receiving vehicle; ¾ Nephrectomy receiving enalapril (10 mg/kg; ¾ Nephrectomy receiving candesartan (10 mg/kg and ¾ Nephrectomy receiving aliskiren (10 mg/kg. Urine output, water intake, mean arterial pressure (MAP and urinary concentrations of creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Na+, K+, interleukin (IL -1β, IL-6, IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β were measured. Results: Nephrectomy significantly impaired renal function, increased MAP and altered the levels of all evaluated cytokines in urine. Enalapril, candesartan and aliskiren improved renal function and decreased MAP and IL-6 when compared to vehicle-treated nephrectomized group. Candesartan and aliskiren decreased IL-1β, while only candesartan reduced TGF-β and only aliskiren increased IL-10. Conclusion: Enalapril, candesartan and aliskiren presented similar effects on improving renal function and reducing MAP and urinary levels of IL-6 in rats with CKD. On the other hand, cytokine profile differed according to the treatment, suggesting that differential mechanisms were triggered in response to the site of RAS blockade.

  7. Practice-based randomized controlled-comparison clinical trial of chiropractic adjustments and brief massage treatment at sites of subluxation in subjects with essential hypertension: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaugher, Gregory; Long, Cynthia R; Alcantara, Joel; Silveus, Alyssa D; Wood, Herbert; Lotun, Kapildeo; Menke, J Michael; Meeker, William C; Rowe, Stephen H

    2002-05-01

    To determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial in the private practice setting examining short- and long-term effects of chiropractic adjustments for subjects with essential hypertension compared with a brief soft tissue massage, as well as a nontreatment control group. Randomized controlled-comparison trial with 3 parallel groups. Private practice outpatient chiropractic clinic. Twenty-three subjects, aged 24 to 50 years with systolic or diastolic essential hypertension. Two months of full-spine chiropractic care (ie, Gonstead) consisting primarily of specific-contact, short-lever-arm adjustments delivered at motion segments exhibiting signs of subluxation. The massage group had a brief effleurage procedure delivered at localized regions of the spine believed to be exhibiting signs of subluxation. The nontreatment control group rested alone for a period of approximately 5 minutes in an adjustment room. Cost per enrolled subject, as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) measured with a random-0 sphygmomanometer and patient reported health status (SF-36). Pilot study outcome measures also included an assessment of cooperation of subjects to randomization procedures and drop-out rates, recruitment effectiveness, analysis of temporal stability of BPs at the beginning of care, and the effects of inclusion/exclusion criteria on the subject pool. Thirty subjects enrolled, yielding a cost of $161 per enrolled subject. One subject was later determined to be ineligible, and 6 others dropped out. In both the chiropractic and massage therapy groups, all subjects were classified as either overweight or obese; in the control group there were only 2 classified as such. SF-36 profiles for the groups were similar to that of a normal population. The mean change in diastolic BP was -4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -8.6, 0.5) in the chiropractic care group, 0.5 (95% CI: -3.5, 4.5) in the brief massage treatment group, and -4.9 (95% CI: -9.7, -0

  8. Continuous profiles of microstructure, stable water isotopes and impurity content of the 2m snow pack from three polar drill sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Johannes; Schaller, Christoph; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Hörhold, Maria; Schaidt, Maximilian; Sander, Merle; Moser, Dorothea

    2017-04-01

    Interpreting polar ice as climate archive requires profound knowledge about the formation of climate-proxies within the upper snow column. In order to investigate different impact factors on signal formation we performed a multiproxy- approach for 2m deep snow profiles by continuously measuring the 3D-microstructure using core-scale X-CT and the isotopic composition and impurity load in discrete samples of 1.1cm spatial resolution. The study includes profiles from a low-accumulation site on the East Antarctic plateau (Kohnen Station, DML), a typical medium-accumulation site on the North-East-Greenland ice sheet (EGRIP drilling camp) and a high-accumulation site on the Renland ice cap (East-coast of Greenland, RECAP drilling camp). Major observations are the tooth-shaped imprint of structural anisotropy and sulfate concentrations at the low accumulation site, the clear isotopic inter-annual variations that are in line with distinct impurity peaks at the high-accumulation site and the unexpected missing footprint of ice crusts and refrozen melt layers within the impurity- and isotope records for all sites.

  9. Quantitative site-specific reactivity profiling of S-nitrosylation in mouse skeletal muscle using cysteinyl peptide enrichment coupled with mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Dian; Shukla, Anil K.; Chen, Baowei; Kim, Jong-Seo; Nakayasu, Ernesto; Qu, Yi; Aryal, Uma; Weitz, Karl; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp II, David G.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2013-04-01

    S-nitrosylation (SNO) is an important reversible thiol oxidation event that has been increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. While many proteins susceptible to S-nitrosylation have been reported, site-specific identification of physiologically relevant SNO modifications remains an analytical challenge due to the low-abundance and labile nature of the modification. Herein we present further improvement and optimization of the recently reported, resin-assisted cysteinyl peptide enrichment protocol for SNO identification and the extension of this application to mouse skeletal muscle to identify specific sites sensitive to S-nitrosylation by quantitative reactivity profiling. The results of our data indicate that the protein- and peptide-level enrichment protocols provide comparable specificity and coverage of SNO-peptide identifications. S-nitrosylation reactivity profiling was performed by quantitatively comparing the site-specific SNO modification levels in samples treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), an NO donor, at two different physiologically relevant concentrations (i.e., 10 μM and 100 μM). The reactivity profiling experiments overall identified 489 SNO-modified cysteine sites from 197 proteins with the specificity of 95.2% at the unique-peptide-level based on the percentage of Cys-peptides. Among these sites, 260 sites from 135 proteins were observed with relatively high reactivity to S-nitrosylation; such SNO-sensitive sites are more likely to be physiologically relevant. Many of the SNO-sensitive proteins are preferentially localized in mitochondria, contractile fiber and actin cytoskeleton, suggesting the susceptibility of these subcellular compartments to redox regulation. Moreover, the SNO-sensitive proteins seem to be primarily involved in metabolic pathways, including TCA cycle, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glutathione metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting the importance of redox regulation in muscle metabolism and

  10. Stratigraphy of a proposed wind farm site southeast of Block Island: Utilization of borehole samples, downhole logging, and seismic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Dane P. H.

    Seismic stratigraphy, sedimentology, lithostratigraphy, downhole geophysical logging, mineralogy, and palynology were used to study and interpret the upper 70 meters of the inner continental shelf sediments within a proposed wind farm site located approximately two to three nautical miles to the southeast of Block Island, Rhode Island. Core samples and downhole logging collected from borings drilled for geotechnical purposes at proposed wind turbine sites along with seismic surveys in the surrounding area provide the data for this study. Cretaceous coastal plain sediments that consist of non-marine to marine sand, silt, and clay are found overlying bedrock at a contact depth beyond the sampling depth of this study. The upper Cretaceous sediments sampled in borings are correlated with the Magothy/Matawan formations described regionally from New Jersey to Nantucket. An unconformity formed through sub-aerial, fluvial, marine, and glacial erosion marks the upper strata of the Cretaceous sediments separating them from the overlying deposits. The majority of Quaternary deposits overlying the unconformity represent the advance, pulsing, and retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet that reached its southern terminus in the area of Block Island approximately 25,000 to 21,000 years before present. The sequence consists of a basal glacial till overlain by sediments deposited by meltwater environments ranging from deltaic to proglacial lakefloor. A late Pleistocene to early Holocene unconformity marks the top of the glacial sequence and was formed after glacial retreat through fluvial and subaerial erosion/deposition. Overlying the glacial sequence are sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene and Holocene consisting of interbedded gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Sampling of these sediments was limited and surficial reflectors in seismic profiles were masked due to a hard bottom return. However, two depositional periods are interpreted as representing fluvial and estuarine

  11. Selection and Characterization of Geological Sites able to Host a Pilot-Scale CO2 Storage in the Paris Basin (GéoCarbone-PICOREF Choix et caractérisation de sites géologiques propices à l’installation d’un pilote pour le stockage de CO2 dans le bassin de Paris (GéoCarbone-PICOREF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brosse É.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the GéoCarbone-PICOREF project was to select and characterize geological sites where CO2 storage in permeable reservoir could be tested at the pilot scale. Both options of storage in deep saline aquifer and in depleted hydrocarbon field were considered. The typical size envisioned for the pilot was 100 kt CO2 per year. GéoCarbone-PICOREF initially focused on a “Regional Domain”, ca. 200 × 150 km, in the Paris Basin. It was attractive for the following reasons: detailed geological data is available, due to 50 years of petroleum exploration; basin-scale deep saline aquifers are present, with a preliminary estimate of storage capacity which is at the Gt CO2 level, namely the carbonate Oolithe Blanche Formation, of Middle Jurassic age, generally located between 1500 and 1800 m depths in the studied area, and several sandstone formations of Triassic age, located between 2000 and 3000 m; several depleted oil fields exist: although offering storage capacities at a much lower level, they do represent very well constrained geological environments, with proven sealing properties; several sources of pure CO2 were identified in the area, at a flow rate compatible with the pilot size, that would avoid capture costs. 750 km of seismic lines were reprocessed and organized in six sections fitted on well logs. This first dataset provided improved representations of: the gross features of the considered aquifers in the Regional Domain; the structural scheme; lateral continuity of the sealing cap rocks. An inventory of the environmental characteristics was also made, including human occupancy, protected areas, water resource, natural hazards, potential conflicts of use with other resources of the subsurface, etc. From all these criteria, a more restricted geographical domain named the “Sector”, ca. 70 × 70 km, was chosen, the most appropriate for further selection of storage site(s. The geological characterization of the Sector has

  12. Tropospheric ozonesonde profiles at long-term U.S. monitoring sites: 2. Links between Trinidad Head, CA, profile clusters and inland surface ozone measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Ryan M.; Thompson, Anne M.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Johnson, Bryan J.

    2017-01-01

    Much attention has been focused on the transport of ozone (O3) to the western U.S., particularly given the latest revision of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard to 70 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) of O3. This makes quantifying the contributions of stratosphere-to-troposphere exchange, local pollution, and pollution transport to this region essential. To evaluate free-tropospheric and surface O3 in the western U.S., we use self-organizing maps to cluster 18 years of ozonesonde profiles from Trinidad Head, CA. Three of nine O3 mixing ratio profile clusters exhibit thin laminae of high O3 above Trinidad Head. The high O3 layers are located between 1 and 6 km above mean sea level and reside above an inversion associated with a northern location of the Pacific subtropical high. Ancillary data (reanalyses, trajectories, and remotely sensed carbon monoxide) help identify the high O3 sources in one cluster, but distinguishing mixed influences on the elevated O3 in other clusters is difficult. Correlations between the elevated tropospheric O3 and surface O3 at high-altitude monitors at Lassen Volcanic and Yosemite National Parks, and Truckee, CA, are marked and long lasting. The temporal correlations likely result from a combination of transport of baseline O3 and covarying meteorological parameters. Days corresponding to the high O3 clusters exhibit hourly surface O3 anomalies of +5-10 ppbv compared to a climatology; the positive anomalies can last up to 3 days after the ozonesonde profile. The profile and surface O3 links demonstrate the importance of regular ozonesonde profiling at Trinidad Head.

  13. Tropospheric Ozonesonde Profiles at Long-Term U.S. Monitoring Sites: 2. Links Between Trinidad Head, CA, Profile Clusters and Inland Surface Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Ryan M.; Thompson, Anne M.; Oltmans, Samual J.; Johnson, Bryan J.

    2017-01-01

    Much attention has been focused on the transport of ozone (O3) to the western U.S., particularly given the latest revision of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard to 70 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) of O3. This makes quantifying the contributions of stratosphere-to-troposphere exchange, local pollution, and pollution transport to this region essential. To evaluate free-tropospheric and surface O3 in the western U.S., we use self-organizing maps to cluster 18 years of ozonesonde profiles from Trinidad Head, CA. Three of nine O3 mixing ratio profile clusters exhibit thin laminae of high O3 above Trinidad Head. The high O3 layers are located between 1 and 6 km above mean sea level and reside above an inversion associated with a northern location of the Pacific subtropical high. Ancillary data (reanalyses, trajectories, and remotely sensed carbon monoxide) help identify the high O3 sources in one cluster, but distinguishing mixed influences on the elevated O3 in other clusters is difficult. Correlations between the elevated tropospheric O3 and surface O3 at high-altitude monitors at Lassen Volcanic and Yosemite National Parks, and Truckee, CA, are marked and long lasting. The temporal correlations likely result from a combination of transport of baseline O3 and covarying meteorological parameters. Days corresponding to the high O3 clusters exhibit hourly surface O3 anomalies of +5-10 ppbv compared to a climatology; the positive anomalies can last up to 3 days after the ozonesonde profile. The profile and surface O3 links demonstrate the importance of regular ozonesonde profiling at Trinidad Head.

  14. HOW AUTHENTIC SHOULD A LEARNING CONTEXT BE? USING REAL AND SIMULATED PROFILES IN A CLASSROOM INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE SAFETY ON SOCIAL NETWORK SITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Vanderhoven

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rise of social network sites (SNSs, there is an increasing need for safety education within the current cyber society. To this end, a variety of educational materials have been developed to prepare children to be vigilant when interacting on such sites. However, little is known about the critical design aspects necessary to make these materials effective. In this study, we build on the results of two previous studies, in which we found that general instructional principles drawn from constructivism, such as collaborative learning, are not always appropriate to teach children how to behave safely online. This study therefore focuses on the importance of authentic learning and active learning as critical design features. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in secondary schools in order to compare the impact of two classroom interventions about the risks on SNSs. As part of the intervention, students were presented scaffolds towards different risks related to an SNS-profile through a series of questions. In the control condition, these questions concerned a simulated SNS-profile on paper containing signs of many risks. In the experimental condition, students had to answer the same questions about their own SNS-profile on a computer. It was hypothesized that the simulated profile would not be experienced as realistic, and that students would have difficulties identifying with it. On the other hand, teenagers were expected to be able to recognize more risks on the simulated ‘worst-case scenario’ profile than on their own profile, which would facilitate the scaffolding process in the control condition. The results of the study mostly confirmed these hypotheses. Furthermore, the question arose as to whether the intervention based on the student’s own realistic profile was educationally more valuable than the intervention based on the simulated profile, but no such added value was found. On the contrary, the scaffolding questions

  15. Olivine dissolution in the presence of heterotrophic bacteria (Pseudomonas reactants) extracted from Icelandic groundwater of the CO2 injection pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, Liudmila; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Benezeth, Pascale; Gerard, Emmanuelle; Menez, Benedicte; Alfredsson, Helgi

    2010-05-01

    This work is aimed at experimental modeling of the effect of heterotrophic bacteria on dissolution of important rock-forming mineral, olivine, at the conditions of CO2 storage and sequestration. Heterotrophic aerobic gram-negative bacteria were extracted from deep underground water (HK31, 1700 m deep and, t = 25-30°C) of basaltic aquifer located within the Hellisheidi CO2 injection pilot site (Iceland). Following this sampling, we separated, using culture on nutrient agar plates, four different groups of gram-negative aerobic bacteria. The enzymatic activity of studied species has been evaluated using Biolog Ecoplates and their genetic identification was performed using 18-S RNA analysis. The optimal growth conditions of bacteria on Brain Hearth Broth nutrient have been determined as 5 to 37°C and growth media pH varied from 7.0-8.2. Culturing experiments allowed determining the optimal physico-chemical conditions for bacteria experiments in the presence of basic Ca, Mg-containing silicates. Olivine (Fo92) was chosen as typical mineral of basalt, widely considered in carbon dioxide sequestration mechanisms. Dissolution experiments were performed in constant-pH (7 to 9), bicarbonate-buffered (0.001 to 0.05 M) nutrient-diluted media in batch reactors at 0-30 bars of CO2 in the presence of various biomass of Pseudomonas reactants. The release rate of magnesium, silica and iron was measured as a function of time in the presence of live, actively growing, dead (autoclaved or glutaraldehyde-treated) cells and bacteria exometabolites. Both nutrient media diluted 10 times (to 100 mg DOC/L) and inert electrolyte (NaCl, no DOC) were used. Our preliminary results indicate that the pH and dissolved organic matter are the first-order parameters that control the element release from olivine at far from equilibrium conditions. The SEM investigation of reacted surfaces reveal formation of surface roughness with much stronger mineral alteration in the presence of live bacteria

  16. Occurrence and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in organo-mineral particles of alluvial sandy soil profiles at a petroleum-contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhe; Zeng, Fangang; Xue, Nandong; Li, Fasheng

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence and the distribution of 16 USEPA priority pollutants polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in two alluvial sandy soil profiles and in their four sizes of organo-mineral particles (200 μm coarse sand) beside a typical oil sludge storage site in eastern China. PAHs were mainly enriched in the surface soil (0-20 cm) and the concentrations declined in deeper soils, from 3.68 to 0.128 μg/g in profile 1 and 10.8 to 0.143 μg/g in profile 2 (dry wt.). The PAHs in the upper soil layers of this study site mainly came from combustion pollution, whereas in the lower soil layers petroleum contamination became the major source of PAHs. The content of different sized organo-mineral particles of this alluvial sandy soil decreased in the following order: fine sand>coarse sand>silt>clay. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all the different sized soil fractions of this study site were dominated by quartz, calcite and feldspar. The particle surface became smoother with size increasing as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized soil fractions. The highest PAH concentration was associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay>silt>coarse sand>fine sand. Soil organic matter (SOM) content, mineral composition and particle surface characteristics were suggested as three main factors affecting the distribution of PAHs in different sized organo-mineral particles. This study will help to understand the distribution and transport characteristics of PAHs in soil profiles at petroleum-contaminated sites.

  17. High-Resolution Sedimentation Rates at IODP Sites U1424 and U1427 since the late Pliocene from spectral-analyzing GRA Bulk Density and RGB Color Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgas, Thomas; Irino, Tomohisa; Tada, Ryuji

    2016-04-01

    Sedimentation Rates (SRs) for IODP Sites U1424 (lat/lon coordinates: 40o11.40'N, 138o13.90'E; water depth: 2808 mbsl) and U1427 (lat/lon coordinates: 35o57.92'N, 134o26.06'E; water depth: 330 mbsl) were calculated by performing spectral analysis in the depth domain on both RGB color and Gamma-Ray-Attenuation (GRA) bulk density data. Inversion and integration of SRs versus depth from spectral analysis yielded detailed SR profiles in both time and depth domains. Our results show a greater variability in calculated SRs and differed from those established through coarse-scaled biostratigraphy and paleo-magnetic data. Our data analyses produces pulses of distinct high SRs for certain depth/age intervals at both sites, with time lags for such features possibly due to variable oceanographic conditions near-shore for Site U1427 versus those at Site U1424 further offshore. Both GRA and RGB profiles reveal a distinct periodicity in the waveband of Milankovitch cycles and other prominent periodicities in the 10-to-1ky period range. This observation suggests climate variabilities and trends in SRs responding to insolation patterns during the past 1 Myr at both sites and extending to 4.5 Myr for Site U1424. With only few identified eccentricity (100ky) cycle segments throughout the entire normalized spectral amplitude profile, our high-resolution Age-Depth model was tuned to obliquity (41ky) and precessional (19-23ky) cycles to achieving a strong fit with corresponding low-resolution models based on biostratigraphy, paleo-magnetic and, at least for Site U1424, augmenting volcanostratigraphy data. According to our Age-Depth models, relatively low SRs occur when evolutive amplitude spectra are dominated by periods in the range of obliquity and eccentricity. In contrast, significant SR peaks at both sites often occur when strong precessional amplitudes coexist with all other cycles. Lower SRs at Site U1424 have been interpreted to reflect a decrease in diatom flux and relative

  18. A Profile of Native Integration Sites Used by φC31 Integrase in the Bovine Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijuan Qu; Qingwen Ma; Zaiwei Zhou; Haiyan Ma; Ying Huang; Shuzhen Huang; Fanyi Zeng; Yitao Zeng

    2012-01-01

    The Streptomyces phage φC31 integrase can efficiently target attB-beadng transgenes to endogenous pseudo attP sites within mammalian genomes.To better understand the activity of φC31 integrase in the bovine genome,DNA sequences of 44 integration events were analyzed,and 32 pseudo attP sites were identified.The majority of these sites share a sequence motif that contains inverted repeats and has similarities to wild-type attP site.Genomic DNA flanking these sites typically contained repetitive sequence elements,such as short and long interspersed repetitive elements.These sequence features indicate that DNA sequence recognition plays an important role in guiding φC31-mediated site-specific integration.In addition,BF27 integration hotspot sites were identified in the bovine genome,which accounted for 13.6% of all isolated integration events and mapped to an intron of the deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) gene.Also we found that the pseudo attP sites in the bovine genome had other features in common with those in the human genome.This study represents the first time that the sequence features of pseudo attP sites in the bovine genome were analyzed.We conclude that this sitespecific integrase system has great potential for applied modifications of the bovine genome.

  19. WIPP site and vicinity geological field trip. A report of a field trip to the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant project in Southeastern New Mexico, June 16 to 18, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, L

    1980-10-01

    The Environmental Evaluation Group is conducting an assessment of the radiological health risks to people from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. As a part of this work, EEG is making an effort to improve the understanding of those geological issues concerning the WIPP site which may affect the radiological consequences of the proposed repository. One of the important geological issues to be resolved is the timing and the nature of the dissolution processes which may have affected the WIPP site. EEG organized a two-day conference of geological scientists, on January 17-18, 1980. On the basis of the January conference and the June field trip, EEG has formed the following conclusions: (1) it has not been clearly established that the site or the surrounding area has been attacked by deep dissolution to render it unsuitable for the nuclear waste pilot repository; (2) the existence of an isolated breccia pipe at the site unaccompanied by a deep dissolution wedge, is a very remote possibility; (3) more specific information about the origin and the nature of the brine reservoirs is needed. An important question that should be resolved is whether each encounter with artesian brine represents a separate pocket or whether these occurrences are interconnected; (4) Anderson has postulated a major tectonic fault or a fracture system at the Basin margin along the San Simon Swale; (5) the area in the northern part of the WIPP site, identified from geophysical and bore hole data as the disturbed zone, should be further investigated to cleary understand the nature and significance of this structural anomaly; and (6) a major drawback encountered during the discussions of geological issues related to the WIPP site is the absence of published material that brings together all the known information related to a particular issue.

  20. On the value, conservation and sustainable development of GIAHS pilot sites in China%中国GIAHS保护试点:价值、问题与对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵庆文; 何露; 孙业红; 张丹; 袁正; 徐远涛; 白艳莹

    2012-01-01

    severe threat of globalization and inappropriate government interventions. The disappearance of these important agri-heritage systems and their unique agricultural legacy constitutes loss of future opportunities to enjoy the related environmental and cultural benefits. In order to conserve these systems, a program called "Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)" was initiated by Food and Agriculture Organization of United States (FAO) in 2002. The main objective of GIAHS was the dynamic conservation and adaptive management of traditional agricultural systems. There are already four pilot sites in China, including Qingtian Rice-Fish Culture System in Zheji-ang Province, Hani Rice Terraces System in Yunnan Province, Wannian Rice Culture System in Jiangxi Province and Traditional Dong's Rice-Fish-Duck Agroecosystem in Guizhou Province. There are also two candidate sites, including the Traditional Pu'er Tea Agroecosystem in Yunnan Province and Aohan Dryland Farming System in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Re-gion. This study depicted the full picture of GIAHS sites in China, including basic information, system value, system threats and proposed conservations. Based on the above analysis, future directions of agri-heritage system conservation were proposed. There existed different GIAHS values, including ecological values, economic values, socio-cultural values, scientific demonstration values, etc. Ecological values were very important in agri-heritage systems as ecological mechanisms reduced use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides in a sustainable manner. Threats to agri-heritage systems, including decrease in comparative advantage, labor outflow and modern development concepts/technology, were also severe. Based on value and threat analysis, the following proposals were suggested regarding conservation of rice-fish culture: 1) utilization of dynamic conservation methods to improve local farmer livelihoods; 2) enhancement, popularization and building of

  1. An approach to functionally relevant clustering of the protein universe: Active site profile-based clustering of protein structures and sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Stacy T; Westwood, Brian M; Leuthaeuser, Janelle B; Turner, Brandon E; Nguyendac, Don; Shea, Gabrielle; Kumar, Kiran; Hayden, Julia D; Harper, Angela F; Brown, Shoshana D; Morris, John H; Ferrin, Thomas E; Babbitt, Patricia C; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2017-01-05

    Protein function identification remains a significant problem. Solving this problem at the molecular functional level would allow mechanistic determinant identification-amino acids that distinguish details between functional families within a superfamily. Active site profiling was developed to identify mechanistic determinants. DASP and DASP2 were developed as tools to search sequence databases using active site profiling. Here, TuLIP (Two-Level Iterative clustering Process) is introduced as an iterative, divisive clustering process that utilizes active site profiling to separate structurally characterized superfamily members into functionally relevant clusters. Underlying TuLIP is the observation that functionally relevant families (curated by Structure-Function Linkage Database, SFLD) self-identify in DASP2 searches; clusters containing multiple functional families do not. Each TuLIP iteration produces candidate clusters, each evaluated to determine if it self-identifies using DASP2. If so, it is deemed a functionally relevant group. Divisive clustering continues until each structure is either a functionally relevant group member or a singlet. TuLIP is validated on enolase and glutathione transferase structures, superfamilies well-curated by SFLD. Correlation is strong; small numbers of structures prevent statistically significant analysis. TuLIP-identified enolase clusters are used in DASP2 GenBank searches to identify sequences sharing functional site features. Analysis shows a true positive rate of 96%, false negative rate of 4%, and maximum false positive rate of 4%. F-measure and performance analysis on the enolase search results and comparison to GEMMA and SCI-PHY demonstrate that TuLIP avoids the over-division problem of these methods. Mechanistic determinants for enolase families are evaluated and shown to correlate well with literature results.

  2. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Cui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small.

  3. Differential profiles of crack users in respondent-driven and institutional samples: a three-site comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oteo Pérez, A.; Benschop, A.; Korf, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim: Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is increasingly applied in social epidemiological surveys among ‘hidden populations’ of hard drug users. The objective of the present study was to assess whether the profile of frequent crack users recruited through RDS differed from those surveyed in

  4. Site-specific {sup 13}C content by quantitative isotopic {sup 13}C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry: A pilot inter-laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst [Firmenich SA, Corporate R and D Division, P.O. Box 239, 1211 Geneva 8 (Switzerland); Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Naohiro [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Pagelot, Alain [Bruker Biospin SAS, 34 rue de l‘Industrie, 67166 Wissembourg Cedex (France); Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor [Bruker Biospin AG, Industriestrasse 26, 8117 Fällanden (Switzerland); Schleucher, Jürgen [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå University, S-90187 Umeå (Sweden); Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude [European Commission, Joint Research Centre – Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, via E. Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Remaud, Gérald S., E-mail: gerald.remaud@univ-nantes.fr [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First ring test on isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry. •Evaluation of the intra- and inter-variability of the NMR spectrometers used. •Definition of a protocol for qualification of the performance of the spectrometer. -- Abstract: Isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the {sup 13}C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic {sup 13}C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic {sup 13}C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ{sup 13}C{sub i} profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ{sup 13}C{sub i} in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results.

  5. Cross species comparison of C/EBPα and PPARγ profiles in mouse and human adipocytes reveals interdependent retention of binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandelin Albin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factors peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα are key transcriptional regulators of adipocyte differentiation and function. We and others have previously shown that binding sites of these two transcription factors show a high degree of overlap and are associated with the majority of genes upregulated during differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Results Here we have mapped all binding sites of C/EBPα and PPARγ in human SGBS adipocytes and compared these with the genome-wide profiles from mouse adipocytes to systematically investigate what biological features correlate with retention of sites in orthologous regions between mouse and human. Despite a limited interspecies retention of binding sites, several biological features make sites more likely to be retained. First, co-binding of PPARγ and C/EBPα in mouse is the most powerful predictor of retention of the corresponding binding sites in human. Second, vicinity to genes highly upregulated during adipogenesis significantly increases retention. Third, the presence of C/EBPα consensus sites correlate with retention of both factors, indicating that C/EBPα facilitates recruitment of PPARγ. Fourth, retention correlates with overall sequence conservation within the binding regions independent of C/EBPα and PPARγ sequence patterns, indicating that other transcription factors work cooperatively with these two key transcription factors. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive and systematic analysis of what biological features impact on retention of binding sites between human and mouse. Specifically, we show that the binding of C/EBPα and PPARγ in adipocytes have evolved in a highly interdependent manner, indicating a significant cooperativity between these two transcription factors.

  6. Occurrence and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in organo-mineral particles of alluvial sandy soil profiles at a petroleum-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Zhe [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); School of Environment, Renmin University of China, Zhongguancun Street 59, Beijing 100872 (China); Zeng, Fangang [School of Environment, Renmin University of China, Zhongguancun Street 59, Beijing 100872 (China); Xue, Nandong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Fasheng, E-mail: ligulax@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence and the distribution of 16 USEPA priority pollutants polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in two alluvial sandy soil profiles and in their four sizes of organo-mineral particles (< 2 {mu}m clay, 2-20 {mu}m silt, 20-200 {mu}m fine sand, and > 200 {mu}m coarse sand) beside a typical oil sludge storage site in eastern China. PAHs were mainly enriched in the surface soil (0-20 cm) and the concentrations declined in deeper soils, from 3.68 to 0.128 {mu}g/g in profile 1 and 10.8 to 0.143 {mu}g/g in profile 2 (dry wt.). The PAHs in the upper soil layers of this study site mainly came from combustion pollution, whereas in the lower soil layers petroleum contamination became the major source of PAHs. The content of different sized organo-mineral particles of this alluvial sandy soil decreased in the following order: fine sand > coarse sand > silt > clay. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all the different sized soil fractions of this study site were dominated by quartz, calcite and feldspar. The particle surface became smoother with size increasing as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized soil fractions. The highest PAH concentration was associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay > silt > coarse sand > fine sand. Soil organic matter (SOM) content, mineral composition and particle surface characteristics were suggested as three main factors affecting the distribution of PAHs in different sized organo-mineral particles. This study will help to understand the distribution and transport characteristics of PAHs in soil profiles at petroleum-contaminated sites. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized fractions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest PAH concentrations were associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay > silt > coarse sand > fine sand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soil organic

  7. Calculating soil gas fluxes from gas concentration profiles: can we use standard DS models or should we use site-specific DS models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Sinikka; Jochheim, Hubert; Wirth, Stephan; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The apparent gas diffusion coefficient in soil (DS) is an important parameter describing soil aeration. It also links the profiles of soil gas concentration and soil gas flux using Fick's law. Soil gas diffusivity depends mainly on the structure of the pore system and the soil moisture status. There are several standard DS-models available that can easily be used for calculating DS. Another, more laborious option is to calibrate site specific DS models on soil core samples from the respective profile. We tested 4 standard DS models and a site-specific model and compared the resulting soil gas fluxes in two forest soils. Differences between the models were substantial. Another very important effect, however, is that standard DS models are usually derived from a single soil moisture measurement (device), that can result in an substantial offset in soil moisture estimation. The mean soil moisture content at a depth can be addressed more accurately by taking several soil cores. As a consequence, using standard DS models in combination with a single soil moisture measurement is less reliable than using site-specific models based on several soil samples.

  8. Common fragile site profiling in epithelial and erythroid cells reveals that most recurrent cancer deletions lie in fragile sites hosting large genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tallec, Benoît; Millot, Gaël Armel; Blin, Marion Esther; Brison, Olivier; Dutrillaux, Bernard; Debatisse, Michelle

    2013-08-15

    Cancer genomes exhibit numerous deletions, some of which inactivate tumor suppressor genes and/or correspond to unstable genomic regions, notably common fragile sites (CFSs). However, 70%-80% of recurrent deletions cataloged in tumors remain unexplained. Recent findings that CFS setting is cell-type dependent prompted us to reevaluate the contribution of CFS to cancer deletions. By combining extensive CFS molecular mapping and a comprehensive analysis of CFS features, we show that the pool of CFSs for all human cell types consists of chromosome regions with genes over 300 kb long, and different subsets of these loci are committed to fragility in different cell types. Interestingly, we find that transcription of large genes does not dictate CFS fragility. We further demonstrate that, like CFSs, cancer deletions are significantly enriched in genes over 300 kb long. We now provide evidence that over 50% of recurrent cancer deletions originate from CFSs associated with large genes.

  9. OH-PRED: prediction of protein hydroxylation sites by incorporating adapted normal distribution bi-profile Bayes feature extraction and physicochemical properties of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Cang-Zhi; He, Wen-Ying; Yao, Yu-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxylation of proline or lysine residues in proteins is a common post-translational modification event, and such modifications are found in many physiological and pathological processes. Nonetheless, the exact molecular mechanism of hydroxylation remains under investigation. Because experimental identification of hydroxylation is time-consuming and expensive, bioinformatics tools with high accuracy represent desirable alternatives for large-scale rapid identification of protein hydroxylation sites. In view of this, we developed a supporter vector machine-based tool, OH-PRED, for the prediction of protein hydroxylation sites using the adapted normal distribution bi-profile Bayes feature extraction in combination with the physicochemical property indexes of the amino acids. In a jackknife cross validation, OH-PRED yields an accuracy of 91.88% and a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.838 for the prediction of hydroxyproline sites, and yields an accuracy of 97.42% and a MCC of 0.949 for the prediction of hydroxylysine sites. These results demonstrate that OH-PRED increased significantly the prediction accuracy of hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine sites by 7.37 and 14.09%, respectively, when compared with the latest predictor PredHydroxy. In independent tests, OH-PRED also outperforms previously published methods.

  10. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.;

    2012-01-01

    implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  11. The vertical chloride ion profile at the IODP Site C0002, Kumano Basin, off coast of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toki, Tomohiro; Kinoshita, Masataka; Morita, Sumito; Masuda, Harue; Rashid, Harunur; Yoshinishi, Haruka; Nakano, Takanori; Noguchi, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    The vertical profiles of chloride ion (Cl-) concentration and oxygen and hydrogen isotopic ratios in pore fluids of basin-fill sediments in the southern Kumano Basin were examined. A model has been proposed to explain those profiles in conjunction with published data by invoking diffusion and advection of freshwater from methane hydrate dissolution. The model requires a low initial Cl- concentration in the old accretionary prism below the basin before the basin began to fill with sediments. It also requires little or no methane hydrate formation in the old accretionary prism. Given these requirements, an upward fluid advection rate of 1 × 10-12 m/s has been estimated which is very low compared to other accretionary prisms. Our data suggests that the tectonic compaction of the basin-filling sediments and fault activity under the basin sediments have not been that active recently in the Kumano Basin.

  12. Pilot Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Maria Ie

    tensions and negotiations are fundamental characteristics of pilot implementations. Based on the analysis of a project that is pilot implementing an electronic pre-hospital patient record for emergency medical services in Danish health care, I investigate other perceptions of pilot implementations....... The analysis is conducted by means of a theoretical framework that centres on the concept infrastructure. With infrastructure I understand the relation between organised practice and the information systems supporting this practice. Thus, infrastructure is not a thing but a relational and situated concept...... understanding of pilot implementations as enacted interventions into existing infrastructures. Moreover, being embedded in the day-to-day organisation of work pilot implementations intervenes in the conventions of practice making the taken for granted visible. This allows project participants to attend...

  13. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a iveelement model of pilot...... implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  14. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a five-element model of pilot...... implementation, and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can...

  15. Comparison of the atmospheric stability and wind profiles at two wind farm sites over a long marine fetch in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of the atmospheric stability and wind profiles using data from meteorological masts located near two wind farm sites in the North Sea, Egmond aan Zee (up to 116 m) in the Dutch North Sea and Horns Rev (HR; up to 45 m) in the Danish North Sea, is presented. Only the measurements...... that represent long marine fetch are considered. It was observed that within a long marine fetch, the conditions in the North Sea are dominated by unstable [41% at Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Farm (OWEZ) and 33% at HR] and near-neutral conditions (49% at OWEZ and 47% at HR), and stable conditions (10% at OWEZ...

  16. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabari, Anil [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States); Fadipe, Oloruntomi [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States)

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  17. Two decades of genetic profiling yields first evidence of natal philopatry and long-term fidelity to parturition sites in sharks

    KAUST Repository

    Feldheim, Kevin Andrew

    2013-12-09

    Sharks are a globally threatened group of marine fishes that often breed in their natal region of origin. There has even been speculation that female sharks return to their exact birthplace to breed (\\'natal philopatry\\'), which would have important conservation implications. Genetic profiling of lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) from 20 consecutive cohorts (1993-2012) at Bimini, Bahamas, showed that certain females faithfully gave birth at this site for nearly two decades. At least six females born in the 1993-1997 cohorts returned to give birth 14-17 years later, providing the first direct evidence of natal philopatry in the chondrichthyans. Long-term fidelity to specific nursery sites coupled with natal philopatry highlights the merits of emerging spatial and local conservation efforts for these threatened predators. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Boundaries to the articulation of possible selves through social networking sites: the case of Facebook profilers' social connectedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, S.; Araujo, T.; Boukes, M.; Willemsen, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to contribute to an emerging literature that seeks to understand how identity markers on social networking sites (SNSs) shape interpersonal impressions, and particularly the boundaries that SNSs present for articulating unconstrained 'hoped-for possible selves.' An experiment

  19. Boundaries to the articulation of possible selves through social networking sites: the case of Facebook profilers' social connectedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, S.; Araujo, T.; Boukes, M.; Willemsen, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to contribute to an emerging literature that seeks to understand how identity markers on social networking sites (SNSs) shape interpersonal impressions, and particularly the boundaries that SNSs present for articulating unconstrained 'hoped-for possible selves.' An experiment employi

  20. GC-MS Metabolite Profiling of Extreme Southern Pinot noir Wines: Effects of Vintage, Barrel Maturation, and Fermentation Dominate over Vineyard Site and Clone Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueuermann, Claudia; Khakimov, Bekzod; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Bremer, Phil; Silcock, Patrick

    2016-03-23

    Wine is an extremely complex beverage that contains a multitude of volatile and nonvolatile compounds. This study investiged the effect of vineyard site and grapevine clone on the volatile profiles of commercially produced Pinot noir wines from central Otago, New Zealand. Volatile metabolites in Pinot noir wines produced from five grapevine clones grown on six vineyard sites in close proximity, over two consecutive vintages, were surveyed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The raw GC-MS data were processed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC2), and final metabolite data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Winemaking conditions, vintage, and barrel maturation were found to be the most dominant factors. The effects of vineyard site and clone were mostly vintage dependent. Although four compounds including β-citronellol, homovanillyl alcohol, N-(3-methylbutyl)acetamide, and N-(2-phenylethyl)acetamide discriminated the vineyard sites independent of vintage, Pinot noir wines from different clones were only partially discriminated by PCA, and marker compound selection remained challenging.

  1. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a five-element model of pilot...

  2. High-Resolution Profiling of Drosophila Replication Start Sites Reveals a DNA Shape and Chromatin Signature of Metazoan Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Comoglio

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available At every cell cycle, faithful inheritance of metazoan genomes requires the concerted activation of thousands of DNA replication origins. However, the genetic and chromatin features defining metazoan replication start sites remain largely unknown. Here, we delineate the origin repertoire of the Drosophila genome at high resolution. We address the role of origin-proximal G-quadruplexes and suggest that they transiently stall replication forks in vivo. We dissect the chromatin configuration of replication origins and identify a rich spatial organization of chromatin features at initiation sites. DNA shape and chromatin configurations, not strict sequence motifs, mark and predict origins in higher eukaryotes. We further examine the link between transcription and origin firing and reveal that modulation of origin activity across cell types is intimately linked to cell-type-specific transcriptional programs. Our study unravels conserved origin features and provides unique insights into the relationship among DNA topology, chromatin, transcription, and replication initiation across metazoa.

  3. High-resolution profiling of Drosophila replication start sites reveals a DNA shape and chromatin signature of metazoan origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comoglio, Federico; Schlumpf, Tommy; Schmid, Virginia; Rohs, Remo; Beisel, Christian; Paro, Renato

    2015-05-05

    At every cell cycle, faithful inheritance of metazoan genomes requires the concerted activation of thousands of DNA replication origins. However, the genetic and chromatin features defining metazoan replication start sites remain largely unknown. Here, we delineate the origin repertoire of the Drosophila genome at high resolution. We address the role of origin-proximal G-quadruplexes and suggest that they transiently stall replication forks in vivo. We dissect the chromatin configuration of replication origins and identify a rich spatial organization of chromatin features at initiation sites. DNA shape and chromatin configurations, not strict sequence motifs, mark and predict origins in higher eukaryotes. We further examine the link between transcription and origin firing and reveal that modulation of origin activity across cell types is intimately linked to cell-type-specific transcriptional programs. Our study unravels conserved origin features and provides unique insights into the relationship among DNA topology, chromatin, transcription, and replication initiation across metazoa.

  4. Genome-wide ChIP-seq profiling of PPARγ/RXR target sites and gene program during adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ronni; Pedersen, Thomas Åskov; Hagenbeek, Dik

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors which bind to DNA as heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor family. PPARγ is an important regulator of adipocyte differentiation and function. In addition to driving the adipogenic process, PPARγ activates...... directly a large number of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Using ChIP combined with deep sequencing we have generated a genome-wide map of PPARγ-RXR binding to chromatin as well as the activation of associated target genes during differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our analysis shows...... that target sites/genes attain RXR and PPARγ occupancy at different time points and that sites are often co-occupied by C/EBP factors. Coupling this analysis with RNAPII occupancy throughout adipogenesis revealed that PPARg:RXR is specifically associated with induced genes involved in diverse processes...

  5. Sm@C2v(3)-C80: site-hopping motion of endohedral Sm atom and metal-induced effect on redox profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Niu, Ben; Shi, Zujin; Lian, Yongfu; Feng, Lai

    2012-10-01

    A new metallofullerene Sm@C2v(3)-C80 was synthesized and characterized. X-Ray analysis showed that the endohedral Sm atom undergoes a hopping motion between several off-center sites, even at low temperature. In addition, a comparative electrochemical study between Sm@C2v(3)-C80 and Yb@C2v(3)-C80 revealed their different redox potentials, suggesting a metal-induced effect on their redox profiles.A new metallofullerene Sm@C2v(3)-C80 was synthesized and characterized. X-Ray analysis showed that the endohedral Sm atom undergoes a hopping motion between several off-center sites, even at low temperature. In addition, a comparative electrochemical study between Sm@C2v(3)-C80 and Yb@C2v(3)-C80 revealed their different redox potentials, suggesting a metal-induced effect on their redox profiles. CCDC reference number 894168. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32193a

  6. The profile of tumor antigens which can be targeted by immunotherapy depends upon the tumor's anatomical site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Rajani, Karishma; Kottke, Timothy; Rommelfanger-Konkol, Diana; Zaidi, Shane; Thompson, Jill; Pulido, Jose; Ilett, Elizabeth; Donnelly, Oliver; Selby, Peter; Pandha, Hardev; Melcher, Alan; Harrington, Kevin; Diaz, Rosa Maria; Vile, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Previously, we showed that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) engineered to express a cDNA library from human melanoma cells (ASMEL, Altered Self Melanoma Epitope Library) was an effective systemic therapy to treat subcutaneous (s.c.) murine B16 melanomas. Here, we show that intravenous treatment with the same ASMEL VSV-cDNA library was an effective treatment for established intra-cranial (i.c.) melanoma brain tumors. The optimal combination of antigens identified from the ASMEL which treated s.c. B16 tumors (VSV-N-RAS+VSV-CYTC-C+VSV-TYRP-1) was ineffective against i.c. B16 brain tumors. In contrast, combination of VSV-expressed antigens-VSV-HIF-2α+VSV-SOX-10+VSV-C-MYC+VSV-TYRP1-from ASMEL which was highly effective against i.c. B16 brain tumors, had no efficacy against the same tumors growing subcutaneously. Correspondingly, i.c. B16 tumors expressed a HIF-2α(Hi), SOX-10(Hi), c-myc(Hi), TYRP1, N-RAS(lo)Cytc(lo) antigen profile, which differed significantly from the HIF-2α(lo), SOX-10(lo), c-myc(lo), TYRP1, N-RAS(Hi)Cytc(Hi) phenotype of s.c. B16 tumors, and was imposed upon the tumor cells by CD11b(+) cells within the local brain tumor microenvironment. Combining T-cell costimulation with systemic VSV-cDNA treatment, long-term cures of mice with established i.c. tumors were achieved in about 75% of mice. Our data show that the anatomical location of a tumor profoundly affects the profile of antigens that it expresses.

  7. Resistivity soundings and VLF profiles for siting groundwater wells in a fractured basement aquifer in the Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, A. I.; Kruse, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal shortages of groundwater are common in parts of the Arabian Shield, where complex basement hydrogeology can make siting of water wells difficult. To identify optimal production well locations, six 200-400 m-long Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic traverses and ten Vertical Electrical Soundings (VESes) were run at the western edge of the Arabian Shield near At-Taif town, Saudi Arabia. Here wadi sediments overlie fractured Precambrian basement, which in turn overlies unfractured basement. The fractured basement forms the water supply aquifer. Both VLF and VES data indicate significant lateral heterogeneity in the electrical conductivity of both wadi and basement deposits over lengths scales as small as ∼100 m. VES results correlate closely with data from two wells in the study area. The change in resistivity at the wadi-to-fractured basement contact is relatively subtle, but the transition from low resistivity fractured basement to high resistivity unfractured basement is well resolved. Inferred wadi thicknesses range from 0 to 14 m; the electrically conductive fractured basement extends from wadi down to 12-32 m depth. VES data indicate the fractured basement aquifer thickens progressively to the south in this area. A production well, sited on the basis of the VES analysis, successfully yielded 70m3/day. The relationship between VLF and VES data is complex, suggesting that the terrain is heterogeneous on the scale of the different effective sampling volumes of the two methods, and/or that fracture azimuth is locally heterogeneous. Overall resistivities in this study are similar to those observed at other locations in Saudi Arabia, suggesting these methods may be widely applicable for siting of groundwater wells in the complex basement of the Arabian Shield.

  8. Intraspecific variations of Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis genome studied by capillary electrophoresis separation of the intron splice site profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigentini, Ileana; De Lorenzis, Gabriella; Picozzi, Claudia; Imazio, Serena; Merico, Annamaria; Galafassi, Silvia; Piškur, Jure; Foschino, Roberto

    2012-06-15

    In enology, "Brett" character refers to the wine spoilage caused by the yeast Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis and its production of volatile phenolic off-flavours. However, the spoilage potential of this yeast is strain-dependent. Therefore, a rapid and reliable recognition at the strain level is a key point to avoid serious economic losses. The present work provides an operative tool to assess the genetic intraspecific variation in this species through the use of introns as molecular targets. Firstly, the available partial D./B. bruxellensis genome sequence was investigated in order to build primers annealing to introns 5' splice site sequence (ISS). This analysis allowed the detection of a non-random vocabulary flanking the site and, exploiting this feature, the creation of specific probes for strain discrimination. Secondly, the separation of the intron splice site PCR fragments was obtained throughout the set up of a capillary electrophoresis protocol, giving a 94% repeatability threshold in our experimental conditions. The comparison of results obtained with ISS-PCR/CE versus the ones performed by mtDNA RFLP revealed that the former protocol is more discriminating and allowed a reliable identification at strain level. Actually sixty D./B. bruxellensis isolates were recognised as unique strains, showing a level of similarity below 79% and confirming the high genetic polymorphism existing within the species. Two main clusters were grouped at similarity levels of about 46% and 47%, respectively, showing a poor correlation with the geographic area of isolation. Moreover, from the evolutionary point of view, the proposed technique could determine the frequency of the genome rearrangements that can occur in D./B. bruxellesis populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Indications of Coupled Carbon and Iron Cycling at a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Site from Time-Lapse Magnetic Susceptibility (MS) Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, A.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Bekins, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired at hydrocarbon contaminated sites have documented enhanced MS within the smear zone (zone of water table fluctuation at hydrocarbon contaminated location) coincident with the free phase (mobile or free liquids moving down through the unsaturated zone independent of the direction of flow of the groundwater or surface water) hydrocarbon plume These studies suggest that magnetic susceptibility can be used as a tool to: (1) infer regions of hydrocarbon contamination, and (2) investigate intrinsic bioremediation by iron reducing bacteria. We performed a campaign of time-lapse MS monitoring at the National Crude Oil Spill Fate and Natural Attenuation Research Site (Bemidji, MN) between July 2011 and August 2015. This highly instrumented site has multiple boreholes installed through the free phase, dissolved phase and uncontaminated portions of the aquifer impacted by an oil spill resulting from a pipeline rupture in 1979. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired in 2011 showed that MS values in the smear zone are higher than in the dissolved phase plume and background, leading to the hypothesis that MS measurements could be used to monitor the long-term progress of biodegradation at the site. However, repeated MS data acquired in 2014 and 2015 showed strong changes in the character of the MS signal in the smear zone with multiple free phase contamination locations showing a strong suppression of the signal relative to that observed in 2011. Other locations in the dissolved phase of the plume show evidence for vertical migration of the zone of enhanced MS, possibly due to changes in the redox profiles driven by hydrology. Such changes in the MS signal are hypothesized to result from either variations in Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios in the magnetite or changes in the magnetite concentration associated with coupled carbon and iron biogeochemistry. This work is generating a unique time-lapse geophysical dataset providing information on

  10. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Love, P; Stewart, G

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment’s computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ’pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to retrieve a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single VO, and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO’s distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new or improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is hig...

  11. A study of airline pilot morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Adrian J; Larsen, Peter D; Griffiths, Robin F; Aldington, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    It has long been believed that airline pilots are healthier than the general population. There are a number of reasons why this should be the case. However, there is very little evidence to support this belief as fact. This study investigates the health of the pilot population of an Oceanic based airline compared to the health of the general population. Pilots who conducted their medical certificate renewal at the airline's medical unit between 1 November 2009 and 31 October 2010 were included. A medical questionnaire was completed by each pilot at the time of their medical certificate renewal. Data from the questionnaire was entered into a database as well as the pilot's BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, and blood glucose level. The comparison population was the population who completed the New Zealand Health Survey (NZHS) between 2006-2007. Demographic, lifestyle characteristics, and health status data from the pilots was compared to the NZHS using a Chi-squared test. Included in the study were 595 pilots. With respect to most medical conditions, pilots had a lower prevalence when compared to the general population. Pilots had a higher prevalence of kidney disease (3.3% vs 0.6%) and melanoma skin cancer (19 per 1000 vs 0.4 per 1000). This study suggests that pilots in New Zealand are healthier than the general population with respect to most medical conditions. The two medical conditions that were identified as being overrepresented in pilots may be the result of the occupational environment.

  12. Apparent oxygen utilization rates calculated from tritium and helium-3 profiles at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. R. Stanley

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present three years of Apparent Oxygen Utilization Rates (AOUR estimated from oxygen and tracer data collected over the ocean thermocline at monthly resolution between 2003 and 2006 at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site. We estimate water ages by calculating a transit time distribution from tritium and helium-3 data. The vertically integrated AOUR over the upper 500 m, which is a regional estimate of export, during the three years is 3.1 ± 0.5 mol O2 m−2 yr−1. This is comparable to previous AOUR-based estimates of export production at the BATS site but is several times larger than export estimates derived from sediment traps or 234Th fluxes. We compare AOUR determined in this study to AOUR measured in the 1980s and show AOUR is significantly greater today than decades earlier because of changes in AOU, rather than changes in ventilation rates. The changes in AOU may be a methodological artefact associated with problems with early oxygen measurements.

  13. Apparent oxygen utilization rates calculated from tritium and helium-3 profiles at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. R. Stanley

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present three years of Apparent Oxygen Utilization Rates (AOUR estimated from oxygen and tracer data collected over the ocean thermocline at monthly resolution between 2003 and 2006 at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site. We estimate water ages by calculating a transit time distribution from tritium and helium-3 data. The vertically integrated AOUR over the upper 500 m, which is a regional estimate of export, during the three years is 3.1 ± 0.5 mol O2 m−2 yr−1. This is comparable to previous AOUR-based estimates of export production at the BATS site but is several times larger than export estimates derived from sediment traps or 234Th fluxes. We compare AOUR determined in this study to AOUR measured in the 1980s and show AOUR is significantly greater today than decades earlier because of changes in AOU, rather than changes in ventilation rates. The changes in AOU are likely a methodological artefact associated with problems with early oxygen measurements.

  14. Quantitative expression profiling guided by common retroviral insertion sites reveals novel and cell type–specific cancer genes in leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageau, Martin; Miller, Michelle; Lemieux, Sébastien; Lessard, Julie; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Proviral insertional mutagenesis is a powerful tool for the discovery of cancer-associated genes. The ability of integrated proviruses to affect gene expression over long distances combined with the lack of methods to determine the expression levels of large numbers of genes in a systematic and truly quantitative manner have limited the identification of cancer genes by proviral insertional mutagenesis. Here, we have characterized a new model of proviral insertional mutagenesis-induced lymphoid tumors derived from Eed Polycomb group gene mutant mice and quantitatively determined the expression levels of all genes within 100 kb of 20 different retroviral common insertion sites (CISs) identified in these tumors. Using high-throughput quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR), we document an average of 13 CIS-associated genes deregulated per tumor, half of which are leukemia subtype–specific, while the others are coordinately deregulated in the majority of tumors analyzed. Interestingly, we find that genes located distantly from common proviral integration sites are as frequently deregulated as proximal genes, with multiple genes affected per integration. Our studies reveal an unsuspected conservation in the group of genes deregulated among phenotypically similar subtypes of lymphoid leukemias, and suggest that identification of common molecular determinants of this disease is within reach. PMID:17906077

  15. [Effects on the lipid profile in humans of a polyphenol-rich carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) extract in a dairy matrix like a functional food; a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Navarro-Alarcón, Miguel; Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos; Fonollá-Joya, Juristo

    2013-11-01

    The design of functional foods enriched in nutrients that favorably alter the lipid profile to prevent cardiovascular diseases and stimulate bowel function is of great interest. We have assayed a non-extractable-tannates-rich carob-fiber (PF-1®) in a milk matrix developed by Biosearch S.A. to discover its effects on the lipid profile and bowel function of human volunteers. A 4-week interventional study (400 mL daily consumption of this functional food, containing 20 g of PF-1®/L), was conducted: blood samples were analyzed for lipid profile, glucose, transaminases, creatinine and fat-soluble vitamins. The body-mass index and bowel function of the participants in the study were also measured. A tendency for triglyceride levels to diminish was observed in all participants (P = 0.066), and in the normal-cholesterol group in particular (P = 0.078). Another tendency to total cholesterol levels fell in the hypercholesterolemic group (P = 0.061) was also found. In the normal-cholesterol group, total cholesterol (CT), HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels significantly increased with the consumption of the functional food (P function was also recorded by volunteers. This preliminary study highlights the possible positive influence of this functional food on the regulation of the lipid profile and bowel function in humans.

  16. Analysis of empty ATLAS pilot jobs

    CERN Document Server

    Love, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The pilot model used by the ATLAS production system has been in use for many years. The model has proven to be a success with many advantages over push models. However one of the negative side-effects of using a pilot model is the presence of 'empty pilots' running on sites which consume a small amount of walltime and not running a useful payload job. The impact on a site can be significant with previous studies showing a total 0.5% walltime usage with no benefit to either the site or to ATLAS. Another impact is the number of empty pilots being processed by a site's Compute Element and batch system which can be 5% of the total number of pilots being handled. In this paper we review the latest statistics using both ATLAS and site data and highlight edge cases where the number of empty pilots dominate. We also study the effect of tuning the pilot factories to reduce the number of empty pilots.

  17. [Risk profiling in cancer surveillance in contaminated sites: an example from the ISS-AIRTUM collaborative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelan, Dolores; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Coviello, Enzo; Crocetti, Emanuele; Pasetto, Roberto; Pirastu, Roberta; Biggeri, Annibale

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological surveillance on high risk environmental areas or areas covered by cancer registration yields long inventories of relative risks. Summaries of the results' tables must be produced to identify priorities and tailor public health actions. The aim is, therefore, to draw conclusions from each area's disease profile, or from the area signature of each disease.With this inmind, we used data on cancer incidence from 17 Cancer Registries that participated in the ISS-AIRTUM (National Institute of Health-Italian Network of Cancer Registries) study, and we produced conditional and marginal rankings of areas/diseases using a multivariate hierarchical Bayesian model. In this context, it is important to obtain an uncertainty evaluation by calculating the credibility intervals of ranks. The areas marginal ranking shows a large overlapping of credibility intervals, such that it is not possible to speak of a limited number of ISS-AIRTUM areas as being particularly affected. Every ISS-AIRTUMarea, therefore,must be considered individually and ordering themby ranking of cancer incidence wouldn't be appropriate. Instead,marginal ranking of diseases highlights the impact of asbestos exposure in all the analyzed areas.

  18. Performance of on-site pilot static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for treating dairy processing wastewater and chemical oxygen demand balance modeling under different operational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jin Hwan; Park, Jaeyoung; Ellis, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    The performance and operational stability of a pilot-scale static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for the treatment of dairy processing wastewater were investigated under a wide range of organic and hydraulic loading rates and temperature conditions. The SGBR achieved average chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), and total suspended solids (TSS)-removal efficiencies higher than 90% even at high loading rates up to 7.3 kg COD/m(3)/day, with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9 h, and at low temperatures of 11 °C. The average methane yield of 0.26 L CH4/g COD(removed) was possibly affected by a high fraction of particulate COD and operation at low temperatures. The COD mass balance indicated that soluble COD was responsible for most of the methane production. The reactor showed the capacity of the methanogens to maintain their activity and withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads.

  19. Analysis of hydraulic tests of the Culebra and Magenta Dolomites and Dewey Lake Redbeds conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.; Ruskauff, G.J. [Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This report presents interpretations of hydraulic tests conducted at 15 well locations in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico between 1980 and 1996. The WIPP is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic wastes arising form the nation`s defense programs. The WIPP repository lies within bedded halite of the Salado Formation, 2,155 ft below ground surface. The tests reported herein were, with two exceptions, conducted in the Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation, which overlies the Salado Formation. The remaining tests were conducted in the Magenta Member of the Rustler and in the overlying formation, the Dewey Lake Redbeds. This report completes the documentation of hydraulic-test interpretations used as input to the WIPP Compliance Certification Application (US DOE, 1996).

  20. N- and O-linked glycosylation site profiling of the human basic salivary proline-rich protein 3M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, Barbara; Cabras, Tiziana; Sanna, Monica; Piras, Valentina; Liori, Barbara; Pisano, Elisabetta; Iavarone, Federica; Vincenzoni, Federica; Cordaro, Massimo; Faa, Gavino; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we show that the heterogeneous mixture of glycoforms of the basic salivary proline-rich protein 3M, encoded by PRB3-M locus, is a major component of the acidic soluble fraction of human whole saliva in the first years of life. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis of the intact proteoforms before and after N-deglycosylation with Peptide-N-Glycosidase F and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing of peptides obtained after Endoproteinase GluC digestion allowed the structural characterization of the peptide backbone and identification of N- and O-glycosylation sites. The heterogeneous mixture of the proteoforms derives from the combination of 8 different neutral and sialylated glycans O-linked to Threonine 50, and 33 different glycans N-linked to Asparagine residues at positions 66, 87, 108, 129, 150, 171, 192, and 213.

  1. An Atlas of Peroxiredoxins Created Using an Active Site Profile-Based Approach to Functionally Relevant Clustering of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Patricia C.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs or Prdxs) are a large protein superfamily of antioxidant enzymes that rapidly detoxify damaging peroxides and/or affect signal transduction and, thus, have roles in proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Prx superfamily members are widespread across phylogeny and multiple methods have been developed to classify them. Here we present an updated atlas of the Prx superfamily identified using a novel method called MISST (Multi-level Iterative Sequence Searching Technique). MISST is an iterative search process developed to be both agglomerative, to add sequences containing similar functional site features, and divisive, to split groups when functional site features suggest distinct functionally-relevant clusters. Superfamily members need not be identified initially—MISST begins with a minimal representative set of known structures and searches GenBank iteratively. Further, the method’s novelty lies in the manner in which isofunctional groups are selected; rather than use a single or shifting threshold to identify clusters, the groups are deemed isofunctional when they pass a self-identification criterion, such that the group identifies itself and nothing else in a search of GenBank. The method was preliminarily validated on the Prxs, as the Prxs presented challenges of both agglomeration and division. For example, previous sequence analysis clustered the Prx functional families Prx1 and Prx6 into one group. Subsequent expert analysis clearly identified Prx6 as a distinct functionally relevant group. The MISST process distinguishes these two closely related, though functionally distinct, families. Through MISST search iterations, over 38,000 Prx sequences were identified, which the method divided into six isofunctional clusters, consistent with previous expert analysis. The results represent the most complete computational functional analysis of proteins comprising the Prx superfamily. The feasibility of this novel method is demonstrated

  2. A Pilot Study of the Interface Design of Cross-Cultural Web Sites through Usability Testing of Multilanguage Web Sites and Determining the Preferences of Taiwanese and American Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, David Tawei; Chang, Chia-Chi

    2014-01-01

    By conducting usability testing on a multilanguage Web site, this study analyzed the cultural differences between Taiwanese and American users in the performance of assigned tasks. To provide feasible insight into cross-cultural Web site design, Microsoft Office Online (MOO) that supports both traditional Chinese and English and contains an almost…

  3. A Pilot Study of the Interface Design of Cross-Cultural Web Sites through Usability Testing of Multilanguage Web Sites and Determining the Preferences of Taiwanese and American Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, David Tawei; Chang, Chia-Chi

    2014-01-01

    By conducting usability testing on a multilanguage Web site, this study analyzed the cultural differences between Taiwanese and American users in the performance of assigned tasks. To provide feasible insight into cross-cultural Web site design, Microsoft Office Online (MOO) that supports both traditional Chinese and English and contains an almost…

  4. Potential of in vivo real-time gastric gas profiling: a pilot evaluation of heat-stress and modulating dietary cinnamon effect in an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jian Zhen; Cottrell, Jeremy J.; Ha, Nam; Pillai, Naresh; Yao, Chu K.; Berean, Kyle J.; Ward, Stephanie A.; Grando, Danilla; Muir, Jane G.; Harrison, Christopher J.; Wijesiriwardana, Udani; Dunshea, Frank R.; Gibson, Peter R.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-09-01

    Gastroenterologists are still unable to differentiate between some of the most ordinary disorders of the gut and consequently patients are misdiagnosed. We have developed a swallowable gas sensor capsule for addressing this. The gases of the gut are the by-product of the fermentation processes during digestion, affected by the gut state and can consequently provide the needed information regarding the health of the gut. Here we present the first study on gas sensor capsules for revealing the effect of a medical supplement in an animal (pig) model. We characterise the real-time alterations of gastric-gas in response to environmental heat-stress and dietary cinnamon and use the gas profiles for understanding the bio-physiological changes. Under no heat-stress, feeding increases gastric CO2 concentration, while dietary cinnamon reduces it due to decrease in gastric acid and pepsin secretion. Alternatively, heat-stress leads to hyperventilation in pigs, which reduces CO2 concentration and with the cinnamon treatment, CO2 diminishes even more, resulting in health improvement outcomes. Overall, a good repeatability in gas profiles is also observed. The model demonstrates the strong potential of real-time gas profiler in providing new physiological information that will impact understanding of therapeutics, presenting a highly reliable device for monitoring/diagnostics of gastrointestinal disorders.

  5. Concentration profiles, source apportionment and risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in dumpsite soils from Agbogbloshie e-waste dismantling site, Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daso, Adegbenro P; Akortia, Eric; Okonkwo, Jonathan O

    2016-06-01

    methodological approaches for PAH source apportionment, including the use of molecular diagnostic ratios, mostly implicated pyrogenic processes as the main sources of PAHs into the investigated dumpsite soils. Furthermore, their compositional profiles across the sampling sites also suggest similar sources of PAHs into the dumpsite soil.

  6. Mortality profiles of the large herbivores from the Lingjing Xuchang Man Site,Henan Province and the early emergence of the modern human behaviors in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ShuangQuan; LI ZhanYang; ZHANG Yue; GAO Xing

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a detailed study of mortality profiles of the large herbivores from the Middle Palaeolithic (MP) bone assemblage of the Lingjing Xuchang Man Site,Henan Province.Based on the analysis of the crown heights of fossil teeth from this assemblage,we come to a conclusion that aurochs (Bos primigenius) and horse (Equus caballus) are the major prey species in this assemblage and the age structures of these animals can be best described as the "prime-dominated pattern".This study confirmed the well-established notions at many Middle and Upper Palaeolithic sites across Eurasia and Africa that MSA/MP foragers were fully effective in hunting aggressive prey species,particularly aurochs and horse.This find indicates that the hunting behaviors and subsistence strategies were not significantly different between MP and UP (the Upper Palaeolithic) humans in East Asia and hence suggests the early emergence of the modern human behaviors in this area.

  7. Pilot Greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot greenhouse was built in collaboration with the "Association des Maraichers" of Geneva in the frame of the study for making use of the heat rejected as warm water by CERN accelerators and experiments. Among other improvements, more automated and precise regulation systems for heating and ventilation were developed. See also 8305598X.

  8. On-site treatment of high-strength alcohol distillery wastewater by a pilot-scale thermophilic multi-staged UASB (MS-UASB) reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M; Yamauchi, M; Suzuki, T; Ohashi, A; Harada, H

    2006-01-01

    A pilot-scale multi-staged UASB (MS-UASB) reactor with a working volume of 2.5 m3 was operated for thermophilic (55 degrees C) treatment of an alcohol distillery wastewater for a period of over 600 days. The reactor steadily achieved a super-high rate COD removal, that is, 60 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) with over 80% COD removal. However, when higher organic loading rates were further imposed upon the reactor, that is, above 90 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) for barely-based alcohol distillery wastewater (ADWW) and above 100 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) for sweet potato-based ADWW, the reactor performance somewhat deteriorated to 60 and 70% COD removal, respectively. Methanogenic activity (MA) of the retained sludge in the thermophilic MS-UASB reactor was assessed along the time course of continuous run by serum-vial test using different substrates as a vial sole substrate. With the elapsed time of continuous run, hydrogen-utilizing MA, acetate-utilizing MA and propionate-fed MA increased at maximum of 13.2, 1.95 and 0.263 kgCOD kgVSS(-1) d(-1), respectively, indicating that propionate-fed MA attained only 1/50 of hydrogen-utilizing MA and 1/7 of acetate-utilizing MA. Since the ADWW applied herewith is a typical seasonal campaign wastewater, the influence of shut-down upon the decline in sludge MA was also investigated. Hydrogen-utilizing MA and acetate-utilizing MA decreased slightly by 3/4, during a month of non-feeding period, whereas propionate-fed MA were decreased significantly by 1/5. Relatively low values of propionate-fed MA and its vulnerability to adverse conditions suggests that the propionate degradation step is the most critical bottleneck of overall anaerobic degradation of organic matters under thermophilic condition.

  9. A Single Arm Pilot Study of Effects of Berberine on the Menstrual Pattern, Ovulation Rate, Hormonal and Metabolic Profiles in Anovulatory Chinese Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of berberine on the menstrual pattern, ovulation rate, hormonal and metabolic profiles in anovulatory Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.Berberine 0.4 g three times per day was given for four months to 102 anovulatory Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome. The menstrual pattern, ovulation rate, hormonal and metabolic profiles were compared before and after the berberine treatment. Ovulation was confirmed by serum progesterone level ≥10 ng/ml.A total of 98 of 102 subjects (96.1% completed the four month treatment, including 69 (70.4%, 69/98 normal weight and 29 (29.6%, 29/98 overweight/obese. Fourteen women (14.3%, 14/98 had regained regular menses after berberine treatment and there was no significant difference between normal weight and overweight/obese groups. The ovulation rate was 25.0% over four months in the whole group, 22.5% in the normal weight group and 31.0% in the overweight/obese group. Sex hormone binding globulin, insulin resistance, total cholesterol, total triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased after berberine treatment in the normal weight group only.Our study found that administration of berberine alone may improve the menstrual pattern and ovulation rate in anovulatory Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Berberine can also decrease sex hormone binding globulin, insulin resistance, total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in normal weight polycystic ovary syndrome women.Chictr.org ChiCTR-OO-13003943.

  10. Differential expression profiling of circulation microRNAs in PTC patients with non-131I and 131I-avid lungs metastases: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Shen, Chen-Tian; Song, Hong-Jun; Wei, Wei-Jun; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2015-05-01

    Loss of the ability to concentrate (131)I is one of the important causes of radioiodine-refractory disease in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Recent advantages of serum microRNAs (miRNAs) open a new realm of possibilities for noninvasive diagnosis and prognosis of many cancers. The aim of the current study was to identify differential expression profiling of circulation miRNAs in PTC patients with non-(131)I and (131)I-avid lungs metastases. The expressions of miRNAs were examined using miRNA microarray chip. The most significantly changed miRNAs from microarray were verified by using qRT-PCR. The potential miRNAs regulating target genes and their preliminary biological functions were forecasted by Bioinformatic analysis. Compared to (131)I-avid lung metastases, 13 kinds of significantly differential serum miRNAs including 5 upregulated miRNAs (miR-1249, miR-106a, miR-503, miR-34c-5p, miR-1281) and 8 downregulated miRNAs (miR-1915, miR-2861, miR-3196, miR-500, miR-572, miR-33b, miR-554, miR-18a) in PTC patients with non-(131) I-avid lung metastases were identified. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that miR-106a was the core miRNA regulating 193 genes in the network. The results of validation confirmed the up-regulation of miR-106a in non-(131)I-avid lungs metastatic PTC patients. Differentially expressed serum miRNA profiles between PTC patients with non-(131)I and (131)I-avid lungs metastases were analyzed. These findings in our present study could represent new clues for the diagnostic and therapeutic strategy in PTC patients with non-(131)I-avid metastatic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

  12. Alginate dressing and polyurethane film versus paraffin gauze in the treatment of split-thickness skin graft donor sites: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Dominik; Hafner, Jürg; Mayer, Dieter; French, Lars E; Läuchli, Severin

    2013-02-01

    To compare postoperative healing of split-thickness skin graft (STSG) donor sites using traditional dressings (paraffin gauze) or modern wound dressings (alginate dressing and polyurethane film) in a randomized controlled trial. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to treatment of an STSG donor site with an alginate dressing and a polyurethane film or nonadherent paraffin gauze. Outcome variables were pain (measured with a visual analog scale), amount of dressing changes, healing time, cosmetic outcome, treatment costs, and overall satisfaction with the procedure. There was no significant difference in pain (postoperative day 1: 2.1 vs 1.2, P = .26; postoperative days 5-7: 1.0 vs 0.9, P = .47; final removal: 1.9 vs 1.0, P = .19) and time to healing (18.1 vs 15.4 days, P = .29) between alginate/polyurethane film dressing and nonadherent paraffin gauze. The semiocclusive dressings with polyurethane film required multiple dressing changes, whereas the nonadherent paraffin gauze could be left in place until complete epithelialization. Treatment costs were substantially lower for paraffin gauze. Semiocclusive dressings with alginate dressings and polyurethane film showed no advantages over treatment with paraffin gauze. With lower costs and better patient acceptance, paraffin gauze dressings were the preferred treatment for STSG donor sites.

  13. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 3: Appendix BIR Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (WTWBIR) establishes a methodology for grouping wastes of similar physical and chemical properties, from across the US Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic (TRU) waste system, into a series of ``waste profiles`` that can be used as the basis for waste form discussions with regulatory agencies. The majority of this document reports TRU waste inventories of DOE defense sites. An appendix is included which provides estimates of commercial TRU waste from the West Valley Demonstration Project. The WIPP baseline inventory is estimated using waste streams identified by the DOE TRU waste generator/storage sites, supplemented by information from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) and the 1994 Integrated Data Base (IDB). The sites provided and/or authorized all information in the Waste Stream Profiles except the EPA (hazardous waste) codes for the mixed inventories. These codes were taken from the MWIR (if a WTWBIR mixed waste stream was not in MWIR, the sites were consulted). The IDB was used to generate the WIPP radionuclide inventory. Each waste stream is defined in a waste stream profile and has been assigned a waste matrix code (WMC) by the DOE TRU waste generator/storage site. Waste stream profiles with WMCs that have similar physical and chemical properties can be combined into a waste matrix code group (WMCG), which is then documented in a site-specific waste profile for each TRU waste generator/storage site that contains waste streams in that particular WMCG.

  14. Analysis of Serum Metabolic Profile by Ultra-performance Liquid Chromatography-mass Spectrometry for Biomarkers Discovery: Application in a Pilot Study to Discriminate Patients with Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis (TB is a chronic wasting inflammatory disease characterized by multisystem involvement, which can cause metabolic derangements in afflicted patients. Metabolic signatures have been exploited in the study of several diseases. However, the serum that is successfully used in TB diagnosis on the basis of metabolic profiling is not by much. Methods: Orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis was capable of distinguishing TB patients from both healthy subjects and patients with conditions other than TB. Therefore, TB-specific metabolic profiling was established. Clusters of potential biomarkers for differentiating TB active from non-TB diseases were identified using Mann-Whitney U-test. Multiple logistic regression analysis of metabolites was calculated to determine the suitable biomarker group that allows the efficient differentiation of patients with TB active from the control subjects. Results: From among 271 participants, 12 metabolites were found to contribute to the distinction between the TB active group and the control groups. These metabolites were mainly involved in the metabolic pathways of the following three biomolecules: Fatty acids, amino acids, and lipids. The receiver operating characteristic curves of 3D, 7D, and 11D-phytanic acid, behenic acid, and threoninyl-γ-glutamate exhibited excellent efficiency with area under the curve (AUC values of 0.904 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0863-0.944, 0.93 (95% CI: 0.893-0.966, and 0.964 (95% CI: 00.941-0.988, respectively. The largest and smallest resulting AUCs were 0.964 and 0.720, indicating that these biomarkers may be involved in the disease mechanisms. The combination of lysophosphatidylcholine (18:0, behenic acid, threoninyl-γ-glutamate, and presqualene diphosphate was used to represent the most suitable biomarker group for the differentiation of patients with TB active from the control subjects, with an AUC value of 0.991. Conclusion: The

  15. High frequency Barium profiles in shells of the Great Scallop Pecten maximus: a methodical long-term and multi-site survey in Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Church

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal barium/calcium ([Ba]/[Ca]shell ratios were measured every third daily striae in 39 flat valves of the Great Scallop Pecten maximus collected in temperate coastal environments of Western Europe. A methodical evaluation of the ([Ba]/[Ca]shell ratio was performed for the first time and demonstrates that ([Ba]/[Ca]shell profiles are reproducible for several scallop individuals from the same population (2-year old; 3 shells/year, over a 7-year period (1998–2004, and from different coastal environments in France (42–49° N. As previously determined in the shells of other bivalve species, ([Ba]/[Ca]shell profiles generally exhibited a background ratio punctuated by two transient maxima occurring in early and late summer. Background partition coefficient (DBa=0.11±0.03, in 2000 was similar to that previously reported in P. maximus shells, suggesting a direct shell uptake of dissolved seawater Ba (Gillikin et al., 2008. The 7-year survey in the Bay of Brest of the high frequency ([Ba]/[Ca]shell profiles in the scallop's shell was exploited to better constrain both the occurrence and the amplitude of the summer Ba relative enrichments as influenced by environmental processes. Seawater Ba contents in 2000 underlined significant particulate Ba inputs at the sediment water interface (SWI during ([Ba]/[Ca]shell peak events. These Ba inputs are thus suggested to be subsequently induced by a pelagic biogenic process, which mainly occurs under summer post-bloom conditions in relationship to the cycling of particulate organic matter and associated Ba. The long term survey reveals that such pelagic Ba cycling processes are responsible for particulate Ba inputs to the sediment water interface (SWI. Subsequent indirect Ba uptake by the bivalve results in higher ([Ba]/[Ca]shell ratios, in that archived Ba within the shell cannot be used as a direct paleo productivity tracer. Our methodical approach, based on a multi-year and multi-site-survey of ([Ba

  16. A Geochemical Approach for Monitoring a CO2 Pilot Site: Rousse, France. A Major gases, CO2-Carbon Isotopes and Noble Gases Combined Approach Une méthode géochimique pour la surveillance d’un site pilote de stockage de CO2 : Rousse, France. Approche combinant les gaz majeurs, l’isotopie du carbone du CO2 et les gaz rares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia B.

    2012-02-01

    storage pilot suggest that noble gas compositions produced by oxyfuel process are sufficiently exotic compared to compositions found in nature (reservoir, aquifer and air to be directly used as tracers of the injected CO2, and to detect and quantify leaks at soil and aquifer levels. Ce papier presente la caracterisation geochimique des differents gaz, naturels et anthropogeniques, impliques dans un pilote de stockage de CO2 en champ de gaz naturel appauvri (Rousse, France. Dans ce pilote, le CO2 est produit par oxycombustion d’un gaz naturel transforme en gaz domestique a l’usine de Lacq. Ce CO2 est transporte dans un pipeline de 30 km de longueur jusqu’au reservoir de gaz appauvri de Rousse. Les gaz produits a Rousse avant injection de CO2, le gaz commercial de Lacq et le CO2 resultant de l’oxycombustion ont ete echantillonnes, ainsi que les gaz situes dans un puits de surveillance (a une profondeur de 45 m et les gaz du sol situes au voisinage de Rousse. Pour tous ces echantillons, la composition en gaz majeurs, la signature isotopique du carbone ainsi que l’abondance et signature isotopique des gaz rares ont ete determinees. Les compositions gazeuses du gaz naturel de Rousse sont comparables a celle du gaz domestique de Lacq avec le methane comme compose principal et la fraction C2-C5 et CO2 comme gaz residuels. Les gaz des sols refletent typiquement des melanges entre l’air (pole pur et le CO2 d’origine biogenique (avec des teneurs maximales de l’ordre de 9-10 %, tandis que les gaz presents dans le puits de monitoring refletent typiquement la composition de l’air sans exces de CO2. Le gaz de Rousse et le gaz domestique du site de Lacq ont une composition isotopique δ13CCH4 egale a –41,0 ‰ et –43,0 ‰ respectivement. Le CO2 injecte sur Rousse a une composition isotopique δ13CCO2 egale a –40,0 ‰ a la sortie de la chambre d’oxycombustion, tandis que la composition isotopique δ13CCO2 des gaz des sols est comprise entre –15 et –25

  17. Clinical impact of pharmacogenetic profiling with a clinical decision support tool in polypharmacy home health patients: A prospective pilot randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, John C.; Neradilek, Moni B.; Moyer, Nicolas A.; Ashcraft, Kristine C.; Thirumaran, Ranjit K.

    2017-01-01

    Background In polypharmacy patients under home health management, pharmacogenetic testing coupled with guidance from a clinical decision support tool (CDST) on reducing drug, gene, and cumulative interaction risk may provide valuable insights in prescription drug treatment, reducing re-hospitalization and emergency department (ED) visits. We assessed the clinical impact of pharmacogenetic profiling integrating binary and cumulative drug and gene interaction warnings on home health polypharmacy patients. Methods and findings This prospective, open-label, randomized controlled trial was conducted at one hospital-based home health agency between February 2015 and February 2016. Recruitment came from patient referrals to home health at hospital discharge. Eligible patients were aged 50 years and older and taking or initiating treatment with medications with potential or significant drug-gene-based interactions. Subjects (n = 110) were randomized to pharmacogenetic profiling (n = 57). The study pharmacist reviewed drug-drug, drug-gene, and cumulative drug and/or gene interactions using the YouScript® CDST to provide drug therapy recommendations to clinicians. The control group (n = 53) received treatment as usual including pharmacist guided medication management using a standard drug information resource. The primary outcome measure was the number of re-hospitalizations and ED visits at 30 and 60 days after discharge from the hospital. The mean number of re-hospitalizations per patient in the tested vs. untested group was 0.25 vs. 0.38 at 30 days (relative risk (RR), 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32–1.28; P = 0.21) and 0.33 vs. 0.70 at 60 days following enrollment (RR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27–0.82; P = 0.007). The mean number of ED visits per patient in the tested vs. untested group was 0.25 vs. 0.40 at 30 days (RR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.31–1.21; P = 0.16) and 0.39 vs. 0.66 at 60 days (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34–0.99; P = 0.045). Differences in composite outcomes at

  18. Savannah River Site Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Program - Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221-HET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    2001-01-24

    This document, along with referenced supporting documents provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. This heterogeneous debris transuranic waste stream was generated after January 25, 1990 and before March 20, 1997. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration, equipment, process operations and waste management practices. Information contained in this report was obtained from numerous sources including: facility safety basis documentation, historical document archives, generator and storage facility waste records and documents, and interviews with cognizant personnel.

  19. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

  20. The Integrated Coastal Area Management (ICAM) Initiative in the Nyali-Bamburi-Shanzu Site, Mombasa, Kenya.

    OpenAIRE

    Mwandotto, B.A.J.

    1997-01-01

    A multi-institutional planning team headed by Coast Development Authority (CDA) in Kenya initiated an Integrated Coastal Area Management (ICAM) process in 1994. The pilot study site was Nyali-Bamburi-Shanzu area in Mombasa. The objective was to provide a starting point for addressing urgent coastal issues facing the area and to enrich the dialogue on how to address urgent coastal management problems nationwide. The pertinent coastal issues that were profiled in a participatory and interactive...

  1. Volatility and entrainment of feed components and product glass characteristics during pilot-scale vitrification of simulated Hanford site low-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shade, J.W.

    1996-05-03

    Commercially available melter technologies were tested for application to vitrification of Hanford site low-level waste (LLW). Testing was conducted at vendor facilities using a non-radioactive LLW simulant. Technologies tested included four Joule-heated melter types, a carbon electrode melter, a cyclone combustion melter, and a plasma torch-fired melter. A variety of samples were collected during the vendor tests and analyzed to provide data to support evaluation of the technologies. This paper describes the evaluation of melter feed component volatility and entrainment losses and product glass samples produced during the vendor tests. All vendors produced glasses that met minimum leach criteria established for the test glass formulations, although in many cases the waste oxide loading was less than intended. Entrainment was much lower in Joule-heated systems than in the combustion or plasma torch-fired systems. Volatility of alkali metals, halogens, B, Mo, and P were severe for non-Joule-heated systems. While losses of sulfur were significant for all systems, the volatility of other components was greatly reduced for some configurations of Joule-heated melters. Data on approaches to reduce NO{sub x} generation, resulting from high nitrate and nitrite content in the double-shell slurry feed, are also presented.

  2. Cosmetic outcome and surgical site infection rates of antibacterial absorbable (Polyglactin 910) suture compared to Chinese silk suture in breast cancer surgery: a randomized pilot research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhong-tao; Jessica Shen; Martin Weisberg; ZHANG Hong-wei; FANG Xue-dong; WANG Li-ming; LI Xiao-xi; LI Ya-fen; SUN Xiao-wei; Judith Carver; Dorella Simpkins

    2011-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this multicenter post-market study was to compare the cosmetic outcome of triclosan-coated VICRYL* Plus sutures with Chinese silk sutures for skin closure of modified radical mastectomy. A secondary objective was to assess the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI).Methods Patients undergoing modified radical mastectomy were randomly assigned to coated VICRYL* Plus antibacterial (Polyglactin 910) suture or Chinese silk suture. Cosmetic outcomes were evaluated postoperatively at days 12 (±2) and 30 (±5), and the evidence of SSI was assessed at days 3, 5, 7, 12 (±2), 30 (±5), and 90 (±7). Cosmetic outcomes were independently assessed via visual analogue scale (VAS) score evaluations of blinded incision photographs (primary endpoint) and surgeon-assessed modified Hollander Scale (mHCS) scores (secondary endpoint).SSI assessments used both CDC criteria and ASEPSIS scores.Results Six Chinese hospitals randomized 101 women undergoing modified radical mastectomy to closure with coated VICRYL* Plus suture (n=51) or Chinese silk suture (n=50). Mean VAS cosmetic outcome scores for antibacterial suture (67.2) were better than for Chinese silk (45.4) at day 30 (P<0.0001)). Mean mHCS cosmetic outcome total scores, were also higher for antibacterial suture (5.7) than for Chinese silk (5.0) at day 30 (P=0.002).Conclusions Patients using coated VICRYL* Plus suture had significantly better cosmetic outcomes than those with Chinese silk sutures. Patients using coated VICRYL* Plus suture had a lower SSI incidence compared to the Chinese silk sutures, although the difference did not reach statistical significance. (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00768222)

  3. Laparo-Endoscopic Single-Site Surgery for Radical and Cytoreductive Nephrectomy, Renal Vein Thrombectomy, and Partial Nephrectomy: A Prospective Pilot Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ithaar H. Derweesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery (LESS may diminish morbidity of laparoscopic surgery. We prospectively evaluated feasibility and outcomes of LESS-Radical Nephrectomy (LESS-RN and Partial Nephrectomy (LESS-PN. Methods. 10 patients underwent LESS-RN (6 and LESS-PN (4 between 2/2009-5/2009. LESS-RN included 2 with renal vein thrombectomy, one of which was also cytoreductive. Transperitoneal LESS access was obtained by periumbilical incision. Patient/tumor characteristics, oncologic, and quality of life (QoL outcomes were analyzed. Results. 3 Men/7 Women (mean age 58.7 years, median follow-up 9.8 months underwent LESS. 9/10 cases were completed successfully. All had negative margins. Mean operative time was 161 minutes, estimated blood loss was 125 mL, and incision size was 4.4 cm. Median tumor size for LESS-RN and -PN was 5.0 and 1.7 cm (=.045. Median LESS-PN ischemia time was 24 minutes; mean preoperative/postoperative creatinine were 0.7/0.8 mg/dL (=.19. Mean pain score at discharge was 1.3. Mean preoperative, 3-, and 6-month postoperative SF-36 QoL Score was 73.8, 74.4 and 77.1 (=.222. All patients are currently alive. Conclusions. LESS-RN, renal vein thrombectomy, and PN are technically feasible and safe while maintaining adherence to oncologic principles, with excellent QoL preservation and low discharge pain scores. Further study is requisite.

  4. Recruitment Strategies and Costs Associated With Enrolling People With Insomnia and High Blood Pressure Into an Online Behavioral Sleep Intervention: A Single-Site Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Faye S; Davis, Tara D; Dunbar, Sandra B

    Recruitment in clinical research is a common challenge and source of study failure. The reporting of recruitment methods and costs in hypertension trials is limited especially for smaller, single-site trials, online intervention trials, and trials using newer online recruitment strategies. The aims of this study are to describe and examine the feasibility of newer online-e-mail recruitment strategies and traditional recruitment strategies used to enroll participants with insomnia and high blood pressure into an online behavioral sleep intervention study (Sleeping for Heart Health). The 16 online-e-mail-based and traditional recruitment strategies used are described. Recruitment strategy feasibility was examined by study interest and enrollee yields, conversion rates, and costs (direct, remuneration, labor, and cost per enrollee). From August 2014 to October 2015, 183 people were screened and 58 (31.7%) enrolled in the study (51.1 ± 12.9 years, 63.8% female, 72.4% African American, 136 ± 12/88 ± 7 mm Hg, 87.9% self-reported hypertension, 67.2% self-reported antihypertensive medication use). The recruitment strategies yielding the highest enrollees were the university hospital phone waiting message system (25.4%), Craigslist (22.4%), and flyers (20.3%) at a per enrollee cost of $42.84, $98.90, and $128.27, respectively. The university hospital phone waiting message system (55.6%) and flyers (54.5%) had the highest interested participant to enrolled participant conversion rate of all recruitment strategies. Approximately 70% of all enrolled participants were recruited from the university hospital phone waiting message system, Craigslist, or flyers. Given the recruitment challenges that most researchers face, we encourage the documenting, assessing, and reporting of detailed recruitment strategies and associated recruitment costs so that other researchers may benefit.

  5. Biological, chemical, in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Hellenic Centre for Marine Research at OceanSITES site PYLOS from 2010-03-23 to 2016-07-16 (NCEI Accession 0131162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biological, chemical, in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE,...

  6. Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Helmholtz-Zentrum Fr Ozeanforschung and Leibniz Institut Fur Meereswissenschaften at OceanSITES site CIS from 2002-08-21 to 2015-01-27 (NCEI Accession 0131474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CHLOROPHYLL, CHLOROPHYLL A CONCENTRATION,...

  7. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography at OceanSITES site MOVE6 from 2004-02-26 to 2005-11-22 (NCEI Accession 0139311)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE, LATITUDE, LONGITUDE and WATER...

  8. Gridded in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory at OceanSITES site KEO from 2004-06-01 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0130542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  9. Chemical, in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by National Research Council at OceanSITES site W1M3A from 2004-06-18 to 2016-07-22 (NCEI Accession 0131499)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE,...

  10. Gridded in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory at OceanSITES site PIRATA from 1997-09-10 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0130543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  11. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by University of Hawaii at Manoa and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution at OceanSITES site WHOTS from 2004-08-12 to 2016-09-02 (NCEI Accession 0131449)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT...

  12. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute at OceanSITES site MBARI from 2004-04-30 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including ABSOLUTE HUMIDITY, AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE,...

  13. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution at OceanSITES site NTAS from 2001-03-30 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131154)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT...

  14. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory at OceanSITES site KEO from 2004-06-01 to 2015-09-07 (NCEI Accession 0130037)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT...

  15. Gridded in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory at OceanSITES site RAMA from 1993-07-25 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0130544)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  16. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) at OceanSITES site JKEO from 2008-02-29 to 2012-06-23 (NCEI Accession 0130035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION,...

  17. Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization at OceanSITES site SOTS from 2011-08-03 to 2013-10-13 (NCEI Accession 0130050)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CHLOROPHYLL, CONDUCTIVITY, DISSOLVED OXYGEN,...

  18. Biological, chemical, in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Hellenic Centre for Marine Research at OceanSITES site E1M3A from 2007-08-01 to 2015-07-07 (NCEI Accession 0130474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biological, chemical, in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE,...

  19. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution at OceanSITES site Stratus from 2000-10-07 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131163)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT...

  20. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography at OceanSITES site MOVE5 from 2002-02-05 to 2004-02-17 (NCEI Accession 0130045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CURRENT DIRECTION, CURRENT SPEED, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  1. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography at OceanSITES site MOVE1 from 2000-01-28 to 2016-02-03 (NCEI Accession 0130041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT DIRECTION, CURRENT SPEED, DEPTH - OBSERVATION,...

  2. Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by National Oceanography Centre, Southampton at OceanSITES site PAP from 2002-10-06 to 2016-04-25 (NCEI Accession 0130048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CHLOROPHYLL, CHLOROPHYLL A CONCENTRATION,...

  3. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory at OceanSITES site PAPA from 2007-06-07 to 2016-07-05 (NCEI Accession 0130049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT...

  4. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Leibniz Institut Fur Meereswissenschaften at OceanSITES site TENATSO from 2006-07-08 to 2008-02-19 (NCEI Accession 0130540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CONDUCTIVITY, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE, LATITUDE,...

  5. Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences at OceanSITES site BATS from 1988-10-20 to 2012-08-13 (NCEI Accession 0130027)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including BACTERIA, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, DISSOLVED INORGANIC...

  6. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography at OceanSITES site MOVE2 from 2000-02-02 to 2011-10-29 (NCEI Accession 0130042)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT DIRECTION, CURRENT SPEED, DEPTH - OBSERVATION,...

  7. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography at OceanSITES site MOVE7 from 2004-03-06 to 2009-02-13 (NCEI Accession 0139417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE, LATITUDE, LONGITUDE and WATER...

  8. Gridded in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory at OceanSITES site PAPA from 2007-06-07 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0130475)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  9. Comprehensive Characterization a Tidal Energy Site (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polagye, B. L.; Thomson, J. M.; Bassett, C. S.; Epler, J.; Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center

    2010-12-01

    Northern Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington is the proposed location of a pilot tidal energy project. Site-specific characterization of the physical and biological environment is required for device engineering and environmental analysis. However, the deep water and strong currents which make the site attractive for tidal energy development also pose unique challenges to collecting comprehensive information. This talk focuses on efforts to optimally site hydrokinetic turbines and estimate their acoustic impact, based on 18 months of field data collected to date. Additional characterization efforts being undertaken by the University of Washington branch of the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center and its partners include marine mammal presence and behavior, water quality, seabed geology, and biofouling potential. Because kinetic power density varies with the cube of horizontal current velocity, an accurate map of spatial current variations is required to optimally site hydrokinetic turbines. Acoustic Doppler profilers deployed on the seabed show operationally meaningful variations in flow characteristics (e.g., power density, directionality, vertical shear) and tidal harmonic constituents over length scales of less than 100m. This is, in part, attributed to the proximity of this site to a headland. Because of these variations, interpolation between stationary measurement locations introduces potentially high uncertainty. The use of shipboard acoustic Doppler profilers is shown to be an effective tool for mapping peak currents and, combined with information from seabed profilers, may be able to resolve power density variations in the project area. Because noise levels from operating turbines are expected to exceed regulatory thresholds for incidental harassment of marine mammals known to be present in the project area, an estimate of the acoustic footprint is required to permit the pilot project. This requires site-specific descriptions of pre

  10. Molecular Profiling of Odontogenic Tumors - Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gültekin Sibel Elif

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: In the pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors which arise from the rests of the dental apparatus in the jaw, several molecular pathways have been shown to play critical roles such as genetic alterations in the hedgehog, BRAF/Ras/MAPK, epidermal growth factor receptor. Next generation genomic sequencing has identified gene mutations in many different tumors. Materials and Methods: Here we report four types of odontogenic tumor including six cases in which five had mutation according to next generation sequencing analysis from archival paraffin blocks that diagnosed previously as ameloblastoma (solid, amloblastoma (unicystic-mural, ameloblastic fibroma, squamous odontogenic tumor, and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor. Results: All ameloblastomatic tumors were shown BRAF mutation and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors were KRAS mutation. Conclusion: This evidence may highlight the poorly understood pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors. Further comparisons need to be made with other benign and malignant odontogenic tumors so that unique odontogenic features may be found.

  11. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  12. A pilot study on the assessment of trace organic contaminants including pharmaceuticals and personal care products from on-site wastewater treatment systems along Skaneateles Lake in New York State, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Bikram; Codru, Neculai; Dziewulski, David M; Wilson, Lloyd R; Xue, Jingchuan; Yun, Sehun; Braun-Howland, Ellen; Minihane, Christine; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-04-01

    On-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs or septic systems) are designed to treat and dispose effluents on the same property that produces the wastewater. Approximately 25% of the U.S. population is served by such facilities. Nevertheless, studies on the treatment efficiency and discharge of organic contaminants through septic effluents are lacking. This pilot study showed the occurrence of organic contaminants including pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), perfluoroalkyl surfactants (PFASs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in septic effluents, adjacent lake water samples, household drinking water in homes that use lake water or a well adjacent to the lake as a source of drinking water, and offshore lake water samples. Septic effluent as well as lake and tap water samples were collected from several households with OWTSs around Skaneateles Lake located in central New York. The advanced on-site systems were installed in some households for the purpose of limiting nutrient levels in the effluent to protect the local surface water. Additionally, because many of these systems serve homes with limited land, advanced treatment systems were needed. The median concentrations of ten PPCPs (ranged from 0.45 to 388 ng/L) and eleven PFASs (ranged from 0.20 to 14.6 ng/L) in septic water were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.01) than in lake water samples. The median concentrations of PPCPs and PFASs in lake and tap water samples were not significantly different (p ≥ 0.65). The median concentrations of ∑PBDEs in septic, lake, and tap water samples were 7.47, 3.49, and 2.22 ng/L, respectively, and those for ∑PCBs were 33.1, 29.2, and 28.6 ng/L, respectively. The mass flux of PPCPs (i.e. the mass flow of PPCPs per unit area per unit time) through the disposal of treated septic effluent from textile biofilter and aerobic treatments to the dispersal unit ranged from 12 (carbamazepine) to 66900 μg/m(2)/day

  13. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography at OceanSITES site CCE2 from 2010-01-17 to 2014-04-29 (NCEI Accession 0130029)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT DIRECTION, CURRENT SPEED, CURRENT SPEED - EAST/WEST...

  14. Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by University of Hawaii at Manoa at OceanSITES site ALOHA from 1988-10-30 to 2016-10-05 (NCEI Accession 0129905)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CHLOROPHYLL, CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT SPEED - EAST/WEST...

  15. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Columbia University and Columbia University; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at OceanSITES site MAK from 2006-11-30 to 2015-08-13 (NCEI Accession 0130039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CURRENT SPEED - EAST/WEST COMPONENT (U), CURRENT SPEED - NORTH/SOUTH...

  16. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution at OceanSITES site LINE-W from 2001-10-05 to 2008-09-23 (NCEI Accession 0130038)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CURRENT SPEED - EAST/WEST COMPONENT (U), CURRENT SPEED - NORTH/SOUTH...

  17. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Oceanographic Observatory of Villefranche-sur-Mer at OceanSITES site LION from 2007-09-09 to 2014-07-04 (NCEI Accession 0139310)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CURRENT DIRECTION, CURRENT SPEED, CURRENT SPEED - UP/DOWN COMPONENT (W),...

  18. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research at OceanSITES site LOCO-IRMINGSEA from 0053-08-28 to 8110-07-16 (NCEI Accession 0130741)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT DIRECTION, CURRENT SPEED, CURRENT SPEED - EAST/WEST...

  19. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research at OceanSITES site FRAM from 0018-03-19 to 2014-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0139307)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CURRENT SPEED - EAST/WEST COMPONENT (U), CURRENT SPEED - NORTH/SOUTH...

  20. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research at OceanSITES site LOCO-MOZCHANNEL from 0103-11-16 to 8159-12-18 (NCEI Accession 0130742)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CONDUCTIVITY, CURRENT DIRECTION, CURRENT SPEED, CURRENT SPEED - EAST/WEST...

  1. LHCb: Pilot Framework and the DIRAC WMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Graciani, R; Casajus, A

    2009-01-01

    DIRAC, the LHCb community Grid solution, has pioneered the use of pilot jobs in the Grid. Pilot jobs provide a homogeneous interface to an heterogeneous set of computing resources. At the same time, pilot jobs allow to delay the scheduling decision to the last moment, thus taking into account the precise running conditions at the resource and last moment requests to the system. The DIRAC Workload Management System provides one single scheduling mechanism for jobs with very different profiles. To achieve an overall optimisation, it organizes pending jobs in task queues, both for individual users and production activities. Task queues are created with jobs having similar requirements. Following the VO policy a priority is assigned to each task queue. Pilot submission and subsequent job matching are based on these priorities following a statistical approach. Details of the implementation and the security aspects of this framework will be discussed.

  2. Analysis of empty ATLAS pilot jobs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00006364; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In this analysis we quantify the wallclock time used by short empty pilot jobs on a number of WLCG compute resources. Pilot factory logs and site batch logs are used to provide independent accounts of the usage. Results show a wide variation of wallclock time used by short jobs depending on the site and queue, and changing with time. For a reference dataset of all jobs in August 2016, the fraction of wallclock time used by empty jobs per studied site ranged from 0.1% to 0.8%. The variation in wallclock usage may be explained by different workloads for each resource with a greater fraction when the workload is low. Aside from the wall time used by empty pilots, we also looked at how many pilots were empty as a fraction of all pilots sent. Binning the August dataset into days, empty fractions between 2% and 90% were observed.  The higher fractions correlate well with periods of few actual payloads being sent to the site.

  3. Overview of research and networking with ground based remote sensing for atmospheric profiling at the Cabauw experimental site for atmospheric research (Cesar) - the Netherlandse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apituley, A.; Russchenberg, H.; Marel, van der H.; Bosveld, F.; Boers, R.; Brink, ten H.; Leeuw, de G.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Abresser-Rastburg, B.; Röckmann, T.

    2008-01-01

    CESAR, the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research, is the Dutch focal point for collaboration on climate monitoring and atmospheric research and is situated on the KNMI meteorological research site near Cabauw in the Netherlands (Cabauw, 51.97 N, 4.93 E). CESAR addresses challenging topic

  4. Pilot Boarding Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot boarding areas are locations at sea where pilots familiar with local waters board incoming vessels to navigate their passage to a destination port. Pilotage is...

  5. Climatotherapy in Japan: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Hitomi; Kusaka, Yukinori; Hirai, Takayoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko; Schuh, Angela

    2017-08-01

    Twenty-nine urban inhabitants participated in a half-day climatotherapy programme at the moderate mountain area and lowland area in the northwest part of the main island of Japan. The current study was aimed to investigate physically and mentally the objective and subjective influence of our short programme, which was a prospective pilot study of single intervention. Blood pressure was significantly descended during terrain cure at the uphill mountain path and returned after fresh-air rest cure, while there was no significant change throughout the programme at lowland flat path. Heart rate was significantly ascended and descended at both area, and more clearly changed at the mountain path. Profile of Mood Status brief form Japanese version administered before and after our half-day programme. Age adjusted T score of negative subscales, `tension-anxiety', `depression', `anger-hostility', `fatigue' and `confusion' were significantly lower after climatotherapy at both sites. Whereas, there was no significant change concerning `vigour' score. This short-version climatotherapy programme has been designed for people without enough time for long stay at health resort. It turned out our half-day climatotherapy programme contribute to mood status improvement. In addition, repeated practice of our short-version programme including endurance exercise with cool body shell using uphill path can be expected that blood pressure will go toward the normal range and heart rate will decrease both in usual time and during exercise. Therefore, health benefits can be expected of this climatotherapy programme.

  6. Polychlorinated biphenyls in human hair at an e-waste site in China: composition profiles and chiral signatures in comparison to dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing; Yan, Xiao; Chen, She-Jun; Peng, Xiao-Wu; Hu, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Ke-Hui; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian; Yang, Zhong-Yi

    2013-04-01

    We analyzed the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in human hair collected from an electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area in southern China and compared their composition profiles and chiral signatures to those of workplace and domestic dust. The PCB concentrations showed significant age dependence in dismantling workers' hair but not in residents' hair. Among residents, PCB concentrations decreased in the following order: elderly people>students>pre-school children>adults. The PCB homologue and congener profiles of the workers' hair were similar to those of the workplace dust. However, the PCB homologue profile of the residents' hair was clearly different from that of the domestic dust. The chiral congener CB95 generally exhibited a racemic or near-racemic composition in both hair and dust, with enantiomer fractions (EFs) ranging from 0.485 to 0.525 in hair and from 0.479 to 0.504 in dust. The EFs of CB132 in dust (0.477-0.513) were closer to a racemic chiral signature than those in hair (0.378-0.521), but this difference was not significant. Our results suggest that the chiral signature of PCBs may be a better tool than the PCB composition profile for identifying the external and internal sources of organic contaminants in human hair. Further measurements of chiral PCB signatures in hair and blood from the same individuals are needed to identify the external and internal sources of PCBs in human hair.

  7. SOURCE APPORTIONMENT OF PM2.5 IN SEATTLE, WA URBAN IMPROVE SITE: COMPARISON OF THREE RECEPTOR MODELS AND SOURCE PROFILES

    Science.gov (United States)

    IMPROVE protocol data were collected at the urban Beacon Hill monitoring site in Seattle, WA from 1996-99. The 289 sets of PM2.5 filters were analyzed for: metals using PIXIE and XRF, anions using ion chromatography, elemental hydrogen (H) by proton scattering, and elemental an...

  8. The ATLAS PanDA Pilot in Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) was designed to meet ATLAS requirements for a data-driven workload management system capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. Submitted jobs are executed on worker nodes by pilot jobs sent to the grid sites by pilot factories. This poster provides an overview of the PanDA pilot system and presents major features added in light of recent operational experience, including multi-job processing, advanced job recovery for jobs with output storage failures, gLExec based identity switching from the generic pilot to the actual user, and other security measures. The PanDA system serves all ATLAS distributed processing and is the primary system for distributed analysis; it is currently used at over 100 sites world-wide. We analyze the performance of the pilot system in processing real LHC data on the OSG, EGI and Nordugrid infrastructures used by ATLAS, and describe plans for its evolution.

  9. Similarities between the Binding Sites of SB-206553 at Serotonin Type 2 and Alpha7 Acetylcholine Nicotinic Receptors: Rationale for Its Polypharmacological Profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Möller-Acuña

    Full Text Available Evidence from systems biology indicates that promiscuous drugs, i.e. those that act simultaneously at various protein targets, are clinically better in terms of efficacy, than those that act in a more selective fashion. This has generated a new trend in drug development called polypharmacology. However, the rational design of promiscuous compounds is a difficult task, particularly when the drugs are aimed to act at receptors with diverse structure, function and endogenous ligand. In the present work, using docking and molecular dynamics methodologies, we established the most probable binding sites of SB-206553, a drug originally described as a competitive antagonist of serotonin type 2B/2C metabotropic receptors (5-HT2B/2CRs and more recently as a positive allosteric modulator of the ionotropic α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR. To this end, we employed the crystal structures of the 5-HT2BR and acetylcholine binding protein as templates to build homology models of the 5-HT2CR and α7 nAChR, respectively. Then, using a statistical algorithm, the similarity between these binding sites was determined. Our analysis showed that the most plausible binding sites for SB-206553 at 5-HT2Rs and α7 nAChR are remarkably similar, both in size and chemical nature of the amino acid residues lining these pockets, thus providing a rationale to explain its affinity towards both receptor types. Finally, using a computational tool for multiple binding site alignment, we determined a consensus binding site, which should be useful for the rational design of novel compounds acting simultaneously at these two types of highly different protein targets.

  10. PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON and PARTICULATE ORGANIC NITROGEN profile, discrete sample and site samples data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean on the NATHANIEL B. PALMER cruises NBP0103, NBP0104 and others as part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC project from 2001-04-29 to 2002-09-12 (NODC Accession 0112164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112164 includes profile, discrete sample, site samples and chemical data collected aboard the NATHANIEL B. PALMER during cruises NBP0103, NBP0104,...

  11. Profiling of aerosol microphysical properties at several EARLINET/AERONET sites during the July 2012 ChArMEx/EMEP campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Granados-Muñoz, María; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Nepomuceno Pereira, Sergio; Basart, Sara; María Baldasano, José; Belegante, Livio; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Comerón, Adolfo; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Dubovik, Oleg; Ilic, Luka; Kokkalis, Panos; Muñoz-Porcar, Constantino; Nickovic, Slobodan; Nicolae, Doina; José Olmo, Francisco; Papayannis, Alexander; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Schepanski, Kerstin; Sicard, Michaël; Vukovic, Ana; Wandinger, Ulla; Dulac, François; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2016-06-01

    The simultaneous analysis of aerosol microphysical properties profiles at different European stations is made in the framework of the ChArMEx/EMEP 2012 field campaign (9-11 July 2012). During and in support of this campaign, five lidar ground-based stations (Athens, Barcelona, Bucharest, Évora, and Granada) performed 72 h of continuous lidar measurements and collocated and coincident sun-photometer measurements. Therefore it was possible to retrieve volume concentration profiles with the Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC). Results indicated the presence of a mineral dust plume affecting the western Mediterranean region (mainly the Granada station), whereas a different aerosol plume was observed over the Balkans area. LIRIC profiles showed a predominance of coarse spheroid particles above Granada, as expected for mineral dust, and an aerosol plume composed mainly of fine and coarse spherical particles above Athens and Bucharest. Due to the exceptional characteristics of the ChArMEx database, the analysis of the microphysical properties profiles' temporal evolution was also possible. An in-depth analysis was performed mainly at the Granada station because of the availability of continuous lidar measurements and frequent AERONET inversion retrievals. The analysis at Granada was of special interest since the station was affected by mineral dust during the complete analyzed period. LIRIC was found to be a very useful tool for performing continuous monitoring of mineral dust, allowing for the analysis of the dynamics of the dust event in the vertical and temporal coordinates. Results obtained here illustrate the importance of having collocated and simultaneous advanced lidar and sun-photometer measurements in order to characterize the aerosol microphysical properties in both the vertical and temporal coordinates at a regional scale. In addition, this study revealed that the use of the depolarization information as input in LIRIC in the stations of Bucharest,

  12. The Success Factor Profile for clinical computer innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Nancy M; Smith, Janis B; Conner, Susan R; Campion, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    Fifty to seventy percent of information system projects fail. Most of the failures are not the victims of flawed technology, but rather organizational and people related issues. When Vanderbilt University Medical Center began an intensive electronic health record (EHR) effort, a process was carefully designed to select the clinical areas where new tools could be developed and pilot tested. The Success Factor Profile was created to guide the selection of sites most likely to have innovation success. This paper describes both the tools and the processes used to select clinical sites for new computer tools development and pilot implementation. Early results demonstrated that the tools provided structure for the decision making process, permitting side-by-side comparison of "apples and oranges." Selecting the site most likely to succeed with computer application innovation and early implementation has broad applicability in healthcare informatics. Failure to succeed with early system users is not only costly, but also discourages users and developers alike, and may damage the reputation of the tools and systems across the institution.

  13. A wind chart to characterize potential offshore wind energy sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Jesus, F.; Menéndez, M.; Guanche, R.; Losada, I. J.

    2014-10-01

    Offshore wind industry needs to improve wind assessment in order to decrease the uncertainty associated to wind resource and its influence on financial requirements. Here, several features related to offshore wind resource assessment are discussed, such as input wind data, estimation of long-term and extreme wind statistics, the wind profile and climate variations. This work proposes an analytical method to characterize wind resource. Final product is a wind chart containing useful wind information that can be applied to any offshore sites. Using long-term time series of meteorological variables (e.g. wind speed and direction at different heights), the methodology is applied to five pilot sites in different countries along European Atlantic corridor and it is used to describe and compare offshore wind behavior.

  14. Wastewater treatment pilot

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the functionality of the wastewater treatment pilot and produce a learning manual-handout, as well as to define the parameters of wastewater clarification by studying the nutrient removal and the effluent clarification level of the processed wastewater. As part of the Environmental Engineering studies, Tampere University of Applied Sciences has invested on a Wastewater Treatment Pilot. The pilot simulates the basic wastewater treatment practices u...

  15. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Araceli Rivera Casado

    Full Text Available The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil spill-impacted sites containing from 16 to 340 g/Kg total hydrocarbons (THC was assessed to investigate if this is a C18:3 species and if the hydrocarbon removal during the phytoremediation process has a relationship with the fatty acid profile of this plant. The fatty acid profile was specific to each vegetative organ and was strongly affected by the hydrocarbons level in the impacted sites. Leaf extracts of plants from uncontaminated soil produced palmitic acid (C16, octadecanoic acid (C18:0, unsaturated oleic acids (C18:1-C18:3, and unsaturated eichosanoic (C20:2-C20:3 acids with a noticeable absence of the unsaturated hexadecatrienoic acid (C16:3; this finding demonstrates, for the first time, that C. laxus is a C18:3 plant. In plants from the phytoremediation systems, the total fatty acid contents in the leaf and the corm were negatively affected by the hydrocarbons presence; however, the effect was positive in root. Interestingly, under contaminated conditions, unusual fatty acids such as odd numbered carbons (C15, C17, C21, and C23 and uncommon unsaturated chains (C20:3n6 and C20:4 were produced together with a remarkable quantity of C22:2 and C24:0 chains in the corm and the leaf. These results demonstrate that weathered hydrocarbons may drastically affect the lipidic composition of C. laxus at the fatty acid level, suggesting that this species adjusts the cover lipid composition in its vegetative organs, mainly in roots, in response to the weathered hydrocarbon presence and uptake during the phytoremediation process.

  16. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Rodríguez Vázquez, Refugio; Esparza García, Fernando José; Pérez Vargas, Josefina; Ariza Castolo, Armando; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Gómez Guzmán, Octavio

    2015-01-01

    The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil spill-impacted sites containing from 16 to 340 g/Kg total hydrocarbons (THC) was assessed to investigate if this is a C18:3 species and if the hydrocarbon removal during the phytoremediation process has a relationship with the fatty acid profile of this plant. The fatty acid profile was specific to each vegetative organ and was strongly affected by the hydrocarbons level in the impacted sites. Leaf extracts of plants from uncontaminated soil produced palmitic acid (C16), octadecanoic acid (C18:0), unsaturated oleic acids (C18:1-C18:3), and unsaturated eichosanoic (C20:2-C20:3) acids with a noticeable absence of the unsaturated hexadecatrienoic acid (C16:3); this finding demonstrates, for the first time, that C. laxus is a C18:3 plant. In plants from the phytoremediation systems, the total fatty acid contents in the leaf and the corm were negatively affected by the hydrocarbons presence; however, the effect was positive in root. Interestingly, under contaminated conditions, unusual fatty acids such as odd numbered carbons (C15, C17, C21, and C23) and uncommon unsaturated chains (C20:3n6 and C20:4) were produced together with a remarkable quantity of C22:2 and C24:0 chains in the corm and the leaf. These results demonstrate that weathered hydrocarbons may drastically affect the lipidic composition of C. laxus at the fatty acid level, suggesting that this species adjusts the cover lipid composition in its vegetative organs, mainly in roots, in response to the weathered hydrocarbon presence and uptake during the phytoremediation process. PMID:26473488

  17. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Casado, Noemí Araceli; Montes Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Rodríguez Vázquez, Refugio; Esparza García, Fernando José; Pérez Vargas, Josefina; Ariza Castolo, Armando; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Gómez Guzmán, Octavio; Calva Calva, Graciano

    2015-01-01

    The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil spill-impacted sites containing from 16 to 340 g/Kg total hydrocarbons (THC) was assessed to investigate if this is a C18:3 species and if the hydrocarbon removal during the phytoremediation process has a relationship with the fatty acid profile of this plant. The fatty acid profile was specific to each vegetative organ and was strongly affected by the hydrocarbons level in the impacted sites. Leaf extracts of plants from uncontaminated soil produced palmitic acid (C16), octadecanoic acid (C18:0), unsaturated oleic acids (C18:1-C18:3), and unsaturated eichosanoic (C20:2-C20:3) acids with a noticeable absence of the unsaturated hexadecatrienoic acid (C16:3); this finding demonstrates, for the first time, that C. laxus is a C18:3 plant. In plants from the phytoremediation systems, the total fatty acid contents in the leaf and the corm were negatively affected by the hydrocarbons presence; however, the effect was positive in root. Interestingly, under contaminated conditions, unusual fatty acids such as odd numbered carbons (C15, C17, C21, and C23) and uncommon unsaturated chains (C20:3n6 and C20:4) were produced together with a remarkable quantity of C22:2 and C24:0 chains in the corm and the leaf. These results demonstrate that weathered hydrocarbons may drastically affect the lipidic composition of C. laxus at the fatty acid level, suggesting that this species adjusts the cover lipid composition in its vegetative organs, mainly in roots, in response to the weathered hydrocarbon presence and uptake during the phytoremediation process.

  18. A two-site chlorine decay model for the combined effects of pH, water distribution temperature and in-home heating profiles using differential evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boning; Reckhow, David A; Li, Yun

    2014-04-15

    A general framework for modeling the bulk chlorine decay that accommodates effects of pH, temperature in water distribution system and in-home heating profiles is developed. With a single set of readily interpreted parameters, and various fictive concentrations of reactive constituents in the water, chlorine decay for the different water systems could be simultaneously modeled. Differential Evolution is employed to estimate the parameters stochastically. By using Bayesian Information Criterion, it is shown that a model consisting of two reactive species is preferred over models that consist of one or three reactive species. The flexibility and power of the framework is demonstrated with a case study of both types of effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High frequency Barium profiles in shells of the Great Scallop Pecten maximus: a methodical long-term and multi-site survey in Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Church

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal barium/calcium ([Ba]/[Ca]shell ratios were measured every third daily striae in 39 flat valves of the Great Scallop Pecten maximus (2-year old; 3 shells/year collected in temperate coastal environments of Western Europe. Variations of ([Ba]/[Ca]shell ratio were first demonstrated reproducible for several scallop individuals from the same population, over a 7-year period (1998–2004, and from different coastal environments in France (42–49° N. As in previous studies, ([Ba]/[Ca]shell profiles exhibited a background ratio punctuated by transient maxima occurring in summer. Background partition coefficient (DBa=0.11±0.03, in 2000 was similar to that previously reported in P. maximus shells (DBa=0.18, suggesting a direct shell uptake of dissolved seawater Ba (Gillikin et al., 2008. Special attention was then dedicated to the complete monitoring of high resolution ([Ba]/[Ca]shell profiles in bivalve shells (7 years, Bay of Brest to better constrain environmental processes influencing both the occurrence and the amplitude of summer peaks. In 2000, seawater Ba analyses underlined significant particulate Ba inputs at the seawater interface (SWI during ([Ba]/[Ca]shell peak events. These Ba inputs are suggested to be subsequent to and rather induced by a pelagic biogenic process. The long term survey revealed first that archived Ba within the shell cannot be used as a direct paleo productivity tracer, and second that complex pelagic/benthic processes in the Ba cycle are responsible of particulate Ba inputs to the SWI, subsequently taken up by the bivalve and recorded as higher ([Ba]/[Ca]shell ratios. When these processes will be better constrained, high frequency observations of Ba in scallop shells would provide new insights into filter feeding dynamics and into Ba biogeochemistry in coastal environments.

  20. Characteristics of tropospheric ozone variability over an urban site in Southeast Asia: A study based on MOZAIC and MOZART vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, L. K.; Sheel, Varun; Kajino, M.; Gunthe, Sachin S.; Thouret, Valérie; Nedelec, P.; Smit, Herman G.

    2013-08-01

    Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) profiles of O3 and CO were analyzed to study their variation in the troposphere over Bangkok. Mixing ratios of O3 and CO were enhanced in planetary boundary layer (PBL) being highest in winter followed by summer and wet seasons. The daytime profiles of O3 show higher values compared to nighttime observations in PBL region, but little differences were observed in the free troposphere. The decreasing mixing ratios of O3 in the lower and upper troposphere were associated with shallow and deep convections, respectively. Back trajectory and fire count data indicate that the seasonal variations in trace gases were caused mainly by the regional shift in long-range transport and biomass-burning patterns. In wet season, flow of oceanic air and negligible presence of local biomass burning resulted in lowest O3 and CO, while their high levels in dry season were due to extensive biomass burning and transport of continental air masses. The Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART) underestimated both O3 and CO in the PBL region but overestimated these in the free troposphere. Simulations of O3 and CO also show the daytime/nighttime differences but do not capture several key features observed in the vertical distributions. The observed and simulated values of O3 and CO during September-November 2006 were significantly higher than the same period of 2005. The year-to-year differences were mainly due to El Niño-led extensive fires in Indonesia during 2006 but normal condition during 2005.

  1. Explosive Formulation Pilot Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pilot Plant for Explosive Formulation supports the development of new explosives that are comprised of several components. This system is particularly beneficial...

  2. Multi-Body-Site Microbiome and Culture Profiling of Military Trainees Suffering from Skin and Soft Tissue Infections at Fort Benning, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jatinder; Johnson, Ryan C; Schlett, Carey D; Elassal, Emad M; Crawford, Katrina B; Mor, Deepika; Lanier, Jeffrey B; Law, Natasha N; Walters, William A; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Bennett, Jason W; Hall, Eric R; Millar, Eugene V; Ellis, Michael W; Merrell, D Scott

    2016-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are common in the general population, with increased prevalence among military trainees. Previous research has revealed numerous nasal microbial signatures that correlate with SSTI development and Staphylococcus aureus colonization. Thus, we hypothesized that the ecology of the inguinal, oropharynx, and perianal regions may also be altered in response to SSTI and/or S. aureus colonization. We collected body site samples from 46 military trainees with purulent abscess (SSTI group) as well as from 66 asymptomatic controls (non-SSTI group). We also collected abscess cavity samples to assess the microbial composition of these infections. Samples were analyzed by culture, and the microbial communities were characterized by high-throughput sequencing. We found that the nasal, inguinal, and perianal regions were similar in microbial composition and significantly differed from the oropharynx. We also observed differences in Anaerococcus and Streptococcus abundance between the SSTI and non-SSTI groups for the nasal and oropharyngeal regions, respectively. Furthermore, we detected community membership differences between the SSTI and non-SSTI groups for the nasal and inguinal sites. Compared to that of the other regions, the microbial compositions of the nares of S. aureus carriers and noncarriers were dramatically different; we noted an inverse correlation between the presence of Corynebacterium and the presence of Staphylococcus in the nares. This correlation was also observed for the inguinal region. Culture analysis revealed elevated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization levels for the SSTI group in the nasal and inguinal body sites. Together, these data suggest significant microbial variability in patients with SSTI as well as between S. aureus carriers and noncarriers. IMPORTANCE While it is evident that nasal colonization with S. aureus increases the likelihood of SSTI, there is a significant lack of

  3. Risk propensity in commercial and military pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Bruno; Taillemite, Jean Pierre; Jouve, Elisabeth; Blin, Olivier

    2003-08-01

    Flight safety is dependent on the quality of the decision-making process, which is closely related to risk taking. The purpose of this descriptive study was to evaluate risk propensity among commercial and military pilots. Since commercial and military flights are conducted in different environments with different safety policies, our hypothesis was that risk propensity levels observed in these different settings will not be the same. We tested 96 French pilots, 63 who were flying commercial aircraft (mean age 43 yr) and 33 serving in military aviation (mean age 33 yr), with the Evaluation of Risk (EVAR) visual analog scale, designed to rate risk proneness, and the Barrat impulsiveness scale. EVAR is composed of 24 items distributed among 5 factors: "self-control," "danger-seeking," "energy," "impulsiveness," and "invincibility." We observed significantly higher scores in all EVAR factors except "impulsiveness" in military pilots compared with commercial pilots. This different risk profile was corroborated by Barrat scores and was not explained by the significant age difference. The observed difference in risk propensity cannot be explained by this descriptive study. A prospective evaluation of risk proneness beginning with the selection process and continuing through training and military and commercial flying is necessary to assess how a risk proneness profile is determined.

  4. Vegetation and Stratigraphic Interpretation of the Mazovian (Holsteinian Interglacial Profile from Dobropol and other New Sites in the West Polesie Region (SE Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrynowiecka Anna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Geological mapping in eastern Poland resulted in the new find of organic deposits near Włodawa. Pollen and plant macrofossils analyses at the Dobropol site proved deposition during the Mazovian (Holsteinian Interglacial (MIS 11. Pollen spectra indicated strong predominance of Carpinus in the optimum phase (pollen period III, suggesting intensive influence of continental climate in this part of Po land. The paleolake Dobropol was shallow, with many species of rushes in a littoral zone. During the Liviecian (MIS 10 and the Krznanian (MIS 8 Glaciations the reservoir was occupied by an ice-dam lake, in which silt and clay de position prevailed. The Mazovian Interglacial organic deposits were also recorded in immediate surroundings of the study area. Based on geological and paleobotanical examination of the Dobropol site, the ice sheet of the Krznanian Glaciation seemed to have reached at least the southern part of Włodawa. The ice sheet has not covered pre sum ably the whole study area as its advance occurred in several lobes. The surroundings of Włodawa in the West Polesie Region are the third largest Mazovian paleo-lakeland area in Po land, apart from the vicinities of Biała Podlaska and the Łuków Plain.

  5. Adenosine A2A receptor binding profile of two antagonists, ST1535 and KW6002: consideration on the presence of atypical adenosine A2A binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Riccioni

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors seem to exist in typical (more in striatum and atypical (more in hippocampus and cortex subtypes. In the present study, we investigated the affinity of two adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, ST1535 [2 butyl -9-methyl-8-(2H-1,2,3-triazol 2-yl-9H-purin-6-xylamine] and KW6002 [(E-1,3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6,dione] to the “typical” and “atypical” A2A binding sites. Affinity was determined by radioligand competition experiments in membranes from rat striatum and hippocampus. Displacement of the adenosine analog [3H]CGS21680 [2-p-(2-carboxyethylphenethyl-amino-5’-N-ethylcarbox-amidoadenosine] was evaluated in the absence or in the presence of either CSC [8-(3-chlorostyryl-caffeine], an adenosine A2A antagonist that pharmacologically isolates atypical binding sites, or DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist that pharmacologically isolates typical binding site. ZM241385 [84-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl [1,2,4]-triazol[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl amino]ethyl phenol] and SCH58261 [(5-amino-7-(β-phenylethyl-2-(8-furylpyrazolo(4,3-e-1,2,4-triazolo(1,5-c pyrimidine], two other adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, which were reported to differently bind to atypical and typical A2A receptors, were used as reference compounds. ST1535, KW6002, ZM241385 and SCH58261 displaced [3H]CGS21680 with higher affinity in striatum than in hippocampus. In hippocampus, no typical adenosine A2A binding was detected, and ST1535 was the only compound that occupied atypical A2A adenosine receptors. Present data are explained in terms of heteromeric association among adenosine A2A, A2B and A1 receptors, rather than with the presence of atypical A2A receptor subtype.

  6. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  7. The natural abundance of 15N in litter and soil profiles under six temperate tree species: N cycling depends on tree species traits and site fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Nilsson, Lars Ola; Schmidt, Inger Kappel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of tree species on the natural 15N abundance in forest stands under elevated ambient N deposition.We analysed δ15N in litter, the forest floor and three mineral soil horizons along with ecosystem N status variables at six sites planted three decades ago with five...... European broadleaved tree species and Norway spruce.Litter δ15N and 15N enrichment factor (δ15Nlitter–δ15Nsoil) were positively correlated with N status based on soil and litter N pools, nitrification, subsoil nitrate concentration and forest growth. Tree species differences were also significant...... for these N variables and for the litter δ15N and enrichment factor. Litter from ash and sycamore maple with high N status and low fungal mycelia activity was enriched in 15N (+0.9 delta units) relative to other tree species (European beech, pedunculate oak, lime and Norway spruce) even though the latter...

  8. A pilot eduroam service at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Eduroam is a secure, worldwide roaming Wi-Fi access service developed for the international research and education community. It allows people from participating institutions to obtain an Internet connection when visiting other participating institutions by simply opening their laptop.   A pilot eduroam service has been available in IT for some months. Now this pilot service will be extended to most parts of the CERN site from early January. Introduction of this pilot service brings two advantages: CERN users who register with the eduroam service here at CERN will have easy and quick access to Wi-Fi services at many other academic institutions across Europe and beyond;   People visiting CERN from other eduroam institutes will be able to connect to the Wi-Fi network at CERN without waiting for a network connection request to be approved. Being a eduroam user obviously has advantages but, like many computing services, eduroam provides a way for malicious people to steal passwords...

  9. A pilot eduroam service at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Eduroam is a secure, worldwide roaming Wi-Fi access service developed for the international research and education community. It allows people from participating institutions to obtain an Internet connection when visiting other participating institutions by simply opening their laptop.   A pilot eduroam service has been available in IT for some months. Now this pilot service will be extended to most parts of the CERN site from early January. Introduction of this pilot service brings two advantages: CERN users who register with the eduroam service here at CERN will have easy and quick access to Wi-Fi services at many other academic institutions across Europe and beyond;   People visiting CERN from other eduroam institutes will be able to connect to the Wi-Fi network at CERN without waiting for a network connection request to be approved. Being a eduroam user obviously has advantages but, like many computing services, eduroam provides a way for malicious people to steal passwords...

  10. Activity-based protein profiling of the hepatitis C virus replication in Huh-7 hepatoma cells using a non-directed active site probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKay Craig S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV poses a growing threat to global health as it often leads to serious liver diseases and is one of the primary causes for liver transplantation. Currently, no vaccines are available to prevent HCV infection and clinical treatments have limited success. Since HCV has a small proteome, it relies on many host cell proteins to complete its life cycle. In this study, we used a non-directed phenyl sulfonate ester probe (PS4≡ to selectively target a broad range of enzyme families that show differential activity during HCV replication in Huh-7 cells. Results The PS4≡ probe successfully targeted 19 active proteins in nine distinct protein families, some that were predominantly labeled in situ compared to the in vitro labeled cell homogenate. Nine proteins revealed altered activity levels during HCV replication. Some candidates identified, such as heat shock 70 kDa protein 8 (or HSP70 cognate, have been shown to influence viral release and abundance of cellular lipid droplets. Other differentially active PS4≡ targets, such as electron transfer flavoprotein alpha, protein disulfide isomerase A5, and nuclear distribution gene C homolog, constitute novel proteins that potentially mediate HCV propagation. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the practicality and versatility of non-directed activity-based protein profiling (ABPP to complement directed methods and accelerate the discovery of altered protein activities associated with pathological states such as HCV replication. Collectively, these results highlight the ability of in situ ABPP approaches to facilitate the identification of enzymes that are either predominantly or exclusively labeled in living cells. Several of these differentially active enzymes represent possible HCV-host interactions that could be targeted for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.

  11. Investigating the Effects of Three Needling Parameters (Manipulation, Retention Time, and Insertion Site on Needling Sensation and Pain Profiles: A Study of Eight Deep Needling Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Y. K. Loyeung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In traditional Chinese acupuncture, needle sensation (deqi is purported to contribute to a therapeutic outcome. While researchers have attempted to define deqi qualitatively, few have examined the effects of needling parameters on its intensity. Methods. 24 healthy subjects completed eight interventions scheduled at least one week apart, which involved manual acupuncture to LI4 or a designated nonacupoint (NAP on the hand, with real or simulated manipulation each three minutes and needle retentions of one or 21 minutes. Intensities of needling sensation and pain were reported every three minutes and sensation qualities were reported post-intervention. Results. Immediately after needle insertion, similar levels of mean needle sensation and of pain were reported independent of intervention. At subsequent measurement times, only two interventions (one at LI4 and one at NAP maintained statistically significantly elevated needle sensation and pain scores and reported higher numbers of needle sensation descriptors. For both, the needle was retained for 21 minutes and manipulated every three minutes. Neither intervention differed significantly in terms of levels of pain, and needle sensation or numbers and qualities of needle sensation described. Conclusion. In this group of healthy subjects, the initial needling for all eight interventions elicited similar levels of needle sensation and pain. These levels were only maintained if there was ongoing of needle manipulation and retention of the needle. By contrast, the strength of needle sensation or pain experienced was independent of insertion site.

  12. Discriminatory profile of rDNA sites and trend for acrocentric chromosome formation in the genus Trachinotus Lacépède, 1801 (Perciformes, Carangidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uedson Jacobina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal traits have provided valuable information for phylogeny and taxonomy of several fish groups. Three Atlantic Carangidae species of the genus Trachinotus Lacépède, 1801 (T. goodei Jordan et Evermann, 1896, T. carolinus (Linnaeus, 1766 and T. falcatus (Linnaeus, 1758 were investigated,2n=48 chromosomes but different chromosomal arms (FN number, i.e., 52, 56 and 58, respectively, in view of the different number of two-armed chromosomes found in their karyotypes. Thus, T. goodei, T. carolinus and T. falcatus present a progressive distance from the probable basal karyotype proposed for Perciformes (2n=48 acrocentrics, FN=48. At first sight, these findings do not agree with the phylogenetic hypothesis based on mitochondrial sequences, where T. goodei appear as the most derived species, followed by T. falcatus and T. carolinus, respectively. However, the chromosomal mapping of ribosomal DNAs was informative for clarifying this apparent conflict. Indeed, the multiple 5S and 18S rDNA sites found in T. goodei corroborate the most derived condition for this species. In this sense, the occurrence of the unexpected number of two-armed chromosomes and FN value for this species, as well as for T. carolinus, must be due to additional rounds of acrocentric formation in these species, modifying the macrostructure of their karyotypes.

  13. Investigating the effects of three needling parameters (manipulation, retention time, and insertion site) on needling sensation and pain profiles: a study of eight deep needling interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyeung, Bertrand Y K; Cobbin, Deirdre M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In traditional Chinese acupuncture, needle sensation (deqi) is purported to contribute to a therapeutic outcome. While researchers have attempted to define deqi qualitatively, few have examined the effects of needling parameters on its intensity. Methods. 24 healthy subjects completed eight interventions scheduled at least one week apart, which involved manual acupuncture to LI4 or a designated nonacupoint (NAP) on the hand, with real or simulated manipulation each three minutes and needle retentions of one or 21 minutes. Intensities of needling sensation and pain were reported every three minutes and sensation qualities were reported post-intervention. Results. Immediately after needle insertion, similar levels of mean needle sensation and of pain were reported independent of intervention. At subsequent measurement times, only two interventions (one at LI4 and one at NAP) maintained statistically significantly elevated needle sensation and pain scores and reported higher numbers of needle sensation descriptors. For both, the needle was retained for 21 minutes and manipulated every three minutes. Neither intervention differed significantly in terms of levels of pain, and needle sensation or numbers and qualities of needle sensation described. Conclusion. In this group of healthy subjects, the initial needling for all eight interventions elicited similar levels of needle sensation and pain. These levels were only maintained if there was ongoing of needle manipulation and retention of the needle. By contrast, the strength of needle sensation or pain experienced was independent of insertion site.

  14. Two ScFv antibody libraries derived from identical VL-VH framework with different binding site designs display distinct binding profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huovinen, Tuomas; Syrjänpää, Markku; Sanmark, Hanna; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine; Azhayev, Alex; Wang, Qi; Vehniäinen, Markus; Lamminmäki, Urpo

    2013-10-01

    In directed evolution experiments, a single randomization scheme of an antibody gene does not provide optimal diversity for recognition of all sizes of antigens. In this study, we have expanded the recognition potential of our universal library, termed ScFvP, with a second distinct diversification scheme. In the second library, termed ScFvM, diversity was designed closer to the center of the antigen binding site in the same antibody framework as earlier. Also, the CDR-H3 loop structures were redesigned to be shorter, 5-12 aa and mostly without the canonical salt bridge between Arg106H and Asp116H to increase the flexibility of the loop and to allow more space in the center of the paratope for binding smaller targets. Antibodies were selected from the two libraries against various antigens separately and as a mixture. The origin and characteristics of the retrieved antibodies indicate that complementary diversity results in complementary functionality widening the spectrum of targets amenable for selection.

  15. Investigation of the vertical distribution and speciation of (137)Cs in soil profiles at burnt and unburnt forest sites in the Belarusian Exclusion Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdall, M; Bondar, Y; Skipperud, L; Zabrotski, V; Pettersen, M Nandrup; Selnæs, Ø G; Brown, J E

    2017-09-01

    The effects of fire events on contaminant radionuclides within soils of the Belarusian Exclusion Zone were investigated. A number of cores were taken from locations known to have been subject to fire events in the past as well as a series of cores from nearby unburnt locations. Both burnt and unburnt cores were analyzed for contaminant radionuclides as well as a range of relevant soil parameters. The distribution of (137)Cs between various fractions (reversibly bound, irreversibly bound and insoluble) was analyzed. Results indicate no evidence of enhancement or enrichment of radionuclides within the soil column although this does not negate the possibility that such effects were evident at some point in the past, the fire events at two of the sites having occurred almost ten years earlier. Evidence was present of a persistent effect on how (137)Cs was distributed between different fractions of the soil, primarily in relation to the proportions associated with oxides of Fe and Mn and organic matter. The results of the study appear to indicate that the long-term effects of a forest fire on contaminant (137)Cs within the soil column are expressed through changes in the physico-chemical forms of the nuclide to a larger extent than simple redistribution of the contaminant within the soil column. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic Profiling as a Screening Tool for Cytotoxic Compounds: Identification of 3-Alkyl Pyridine Alkaloids from Sponges Collected at a Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vent Site North of Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdottir, Eydis; Magnusdottir, Manuela; Astarita, Giuseppe; Köck, Matthias; Ögmundsdottir, Helga M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Margret; Rapp, Hans Tore; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Paglia, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-eight sponge specimens were collected at a shallow water hydrothermal vent site north of Iceland. Extracts were prepared and tested in vitro for cytotoxic activity, and eight of them were shown to be cytotoxic. A mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics approach was used to determine the chemical composition of the extracts. This analysis highlighted clear differences in the metabolomes of three sponge specimens, and all of them were identified as Haliclona (Rhizoniera) rosea (Bowerbank, 1866). Therefore, these specimens were selected for further investigation. Haliclona rosea metabolomes contained a class of potential key compounds, the 3-alkyl pyridine alkaloids (3-APA) responsible for the cytotoxic activity of the fractions. Several 3-APA compounds were tentatively identified including haliclamines, cyclostellettamines, viscosalines and viscosamines. Among these compounds, cyclostellettamine P was tentatively identified for the first time by using ion mobility MS in time-aligned parallel (TAP) fragmentation mode. In this work, we show the potential of applying metabolomics strategies and in particular the utility of coupling ion mobility with MS for the molecular characterization of sponge specimens. PMID:28241423

  17. Metabolic Profiling as a Screening Tool for Cytotoxic Compounds: Identification of 3-Alkyl Pyridine Alkaloids from Sponges Collected at a Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vent Site North of Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eydis Einarsdottir

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-eight sponge specimens were collected at a shallow water hydrothermal vent site north of Iceland. Extracts were prepared and tested in vitro for cytotoxic activity, and eight of them were shown to be cytotoxic. A mass spectrometry (MS-based metabolomics approach was used to determine the chemical composition of the extracts. This analysis highlighted clear differences in the metabolomes of three sponge specimens, and all of them were identified as Haliclona (Rhizoniera rosea (Bowerbank, 1866. Therefore, these specimens were selected for further investigation. Haliclona rosea metabolomes contained a class of potential key compounds, the 3-alkyl pyridine alkaloids (3-APA responsible for the cytotoxic activity of the fractions. Several 3-APA compounds were tentatively identified including haliclamines, cyclostellettamines, viscosalines and viscosamines. Among these compounds, cyclostellettamine P was tentatively identified for the first time by using ion mobility MS in time-aligned parallel (TAP fragmentation mode. In this work, we show the potential of applying metabolomics strategies and in particular the utility of coupling ion mobility with MS for the molecular characterization of sponge specimens.

  18. Using phenotype microarrays in the assessment of the antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated from wastewater in on-site treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałowiecki, Łukasz; Chojniak, Joanna; Dorgeloh, Elmar; Hegedusova, Berta; Ejhed, Helene; Magnér, Jörgen; Płaza, Grażyna

    2017-04-27

    The scope of the study was to apply Phenotype Biolog MicroArray (PM) technology to test the antibiotic sensitivity of the bacterial strains isolated from on-site wastewater treatment facilities. In the first step of the study, the percentage values of resistant bacteria from total heterotrophic bacteria growing on solid media supplemented with various antibiotics were determined. In the untreated wastewater, the average shares of kanamycin-, streptomycin-, and tetracycline-resistant bacteria were 53, 56, and 42%, respectively. Meanwhile, the shares of kanamycin-, streptomycin-, and tetracycline-resistant bacteria in the treated wastewater were 39, 33, and 29%, respectively. To evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of the bacteria present in the wastewater, using the phenotype microarrays (PMs), the most common isolates from the treated wastewater were chosen: Serratia marcescens ss marcescens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila, Microbacterium flavescens, Alcaligenes faecalis ss faecalis, Flavobacterium hydatis, Variovorax paradoxus, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and Aeromonas bestiarum. The strains were classified as multi-antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most of them were resistant to more than 30 antibiotics from various chemical classes. Phenotype microarrays could be successfully used as an additional tool for evaluation of the multi-antibiotic resistance of environmental bacteria and in preliminary determination of the range of inhibition concentration.

  19. Privacy and Social Networking Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Dianne M.; Duven, Carolyn J.

    2008-01-01

    College students are relying on the Internet to make connections with other people every day. As the Internet has developed and grown, so have the capabilities for interaction. Social networking sites, a group of Web sites that provide people with the opportunity to create an online profile and to share that profile with others, are a part of…

  20. Mental health diagnoses and counseling among pilots of remotely piloted aircraft in the United States Air Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Jean L; Webber, Bryant J

    2013-03-01

    Remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), also known as drones, have been used extensively in the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Although RPA pilots in the U.S. Air Force (USAF) have reported high levels of stress and fatigue, rates of mental health (MH) diagnoses and counseling in this population are unknown. We calculated incidence rates of 12 specific MH outcomes among all active component USAF RPA pilots between 1 October 2003 and 31 December 2011, and by various demographic and military variables. We compared these rates to those among all active component USAF manned aircraft (MA) pilots deployed to Iraq/Afghanistan during the same period. The unadjusted incidence rates of all MH outcomes among RPA pilots (n=709) and MA pilots (n=5,256) were 25.0 per 1,000 person-years and 15.9 per 1,000 person-years, respectively (adjusted incidence rate ratio=1.1, 95% confidence interval=0.9-1.5; adjusted for age, number of deployments, time in service, and history of any MH outcome). Th ere was no significant difference in the rates of MH diagnoses, including post-traumatic stress disorder, depressive disorders, and anxiety disorders between RPA and MA pilots. Military policymakers and clinicians should recognize that RPA and MA pilots have similar MH risk profiles.

  1. Recent Improvements in the ATLAS PanDA Pilot

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Contreras, C; Compostella, G; De, K; Potekhin, M; Dos Santos, T; Maeno, T; Wenaus, T

    2012-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) in the ATLAS experiment uses pilots to execute submitted jobs on the worker nodes. The pilots are designed to deal with different runtime conditions and failure scenarios, and support many storage systems. This talk will give a brief overview of the PanDA pilot system and will present major features and recent improvements including CernVM File System integration, the job retry mechanism, advanced job monitoring including JEM technology, and validation of new pilot code using the HammerCloud stress-testing system. PanDA is used for all ATLAS distributed production and is the primary system for distributed analysis. It is currently used at over 100 sites world-wide. We analyze the performance of the pilot system in processing LHC data on the OSG, EGI and Nordugrid infrastructures used by ATLAS, and describe plans for its further evolution.

  2. Application of DNA Profiling in Resolving Aviation Forensic Toxicology Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Pilot: Bone ,.muscle,.skin,.and.lung Toxicological Findings Pilot: Propoxyphene.0 .308.µg/g.in.muscle.and.0 .341. µg/g.in.skin Norpropoxyphene.0 .671...Female Passenger: Negative Male Passenger: Diazepam ,.nordiazepam,.and.zolpi- dem.present.in.body.tissue Reason for DNA Profiling

  3. Intercomparison of aerosol physical and physical properties derived from surface radiometers and in-situ aircraft profiles over six Maryland sites during the DRAGON and DISCOVER-AQ campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, J. S.; Thornhill, K. L.; Holben, B. N.; Anderson, B. E.; Eck, T. F.; Giles, D. M.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Sinyuk, A.; Kenny, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) project and international collaborators deployed more than 40 Cimel sunphotometers in the Baltimore-Washington, DC region for the summer 2011 DRAGON-USA (Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observational Network) campaign. This unprecedented mesoscale network was comprised of automatic sun/sky radiometers distributed with roughly 10km grid spacing (covering an area of ~60km x 120km) which operated continuously for more than two months. The DRAGON-USA campaign was concurrent with the NASA sponsored DISCOVER-AQ air quality experiment which performed 14 days of research flights in July concentrating on repeated multiple daily profile measurements of gaseous and particulate pollution over 6 primary sun photometer sites. Atmospheric conditions varied from clean and dry to extremely hazy and humid on flight days with corresponding aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm ranging from ~0.06 to ~0.90 and precipitable water (PW) ranging from ~1.5 cm to ~4.5 cm. In-situ aerosol properties were measured on the NASA P-3B by the NASA Langley Aerosol Group Experiment (LARGE) team using a suite of instruments to characterize ambient aerosol optical and microphysical properties. Size distributions were made with a custom scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an Ultrahigh Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS) from Droplet Measurement Technologies, and Aerosol Particle Sizer (APS) from TSI. Aerosol optical measurements were made with a TSI-3563 3-wavelength integrating nephelometer and a 3-wavelength Radiance Research Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). We present preliminary comparisons of coincident single scattering albedo (at three wavelengths) and column integrated size distributions retrieved from the surface Cimel sunphotometer almucantar sky radiances and from aircraft in-situ observations during flight profiles at key sites.

  4. Simulating Visual Attention Allocation of Pilots in an Advanced Cockpit Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frische, F.; Osterloh, J.-P.; Luedtke, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results of experiments conducted with human line pilots and a cognitive pilot model during interaction with a new 40 Flight Management System (FMS). The aim of these experiments was to gather human pilot behavior data in order to calibrate the behavior of the model. Human behavior is mainly triggered by visual perception. Thus, the main aspect was to setup a profile of human pilots' visual attention allocation in a cockpit environment containing the new FMS. We first performed statistical analyses of eye tracker data and then compared our results to common results of familiar analyses in standard cockpit environments. The comparison has shown a significant influence of the new system on the visual performance of human pilots. Further on, analyses of the pilot models' visual performance have been performed. A comparison to human pilots' visual performance revealed important improvement potentials.

  5. Optimal Siting and Sizing of Multiple DG Units for the Enhancement of Voltage Profile and Loss Minimization in Transmission Systems Using Nature Inspired Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika Ramamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Power grid becomes smarter nowadays along with technological development. The benefits of smart grid can be enhanced through the integration of renewable energy sources. In this paper, several studies have been made to reconfigure a conventional network into a smart grid. Amongst all the renewable sources, solar power takes the prominent position due to its availability in abundance. Proposed methodology presented in this paper is aimed at minimizing network power losses and at improving the voltage stability within the frame work of system operation and security constraints in a transmission system. Locations and capacities of DGs have a significant impact on the system losses in a transmission system. In this paper, combined nature inspired algorithms are presented for optimal location and sizing of DGs. This paper proposes a two-step optimization technique in order to integrate DG. In a first step, the best size of DG is determined through PSO metaheuristics and the results obtained through PSO is tested for reverse power flow by negative load approach to find possible bus locations. Then, optimal location is found by Loss Sensitivity Factor (LSF and weak (WK bus methods and the results are compared. In a second step, optimal sizing of DGs is determined by PSO, GSA, and hybrid PSOGSA algorithms. Apart from optimal sizing and siting of DGs, different scenarios with number of DGs (3, 4, and 5 and PQ capacities of DGs (P alone, Q alone, and  P and Q both are also analyzed and the results are analyzed in this paper. A detailed performance analysis is carried out on IEEE 30-bus system to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  6. Optimal Siting and Sizing of Multiple DG Units for the Enhancement of Voltage Profile and Loss Minimization in Transmission Systems Using Nature Inspired Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ambika; Ramachandran, Rajeswari

    2016-01-01

    Power grid becomes smarter nowadays along with technological development. The benefits of smart grid can be enhanced through the integration of renewable energy sources. In this paper, several studies have been made to reconfigure a conventional network into a smart grid. Amongst all the renewable sources, solar power takes the prominent position due to its availability in abundance. Proposed methodology presented in this paper is aimed at minimizing network power losses and at improving the voltage stability within the frame work of system operation and security constraints in a transmission system. Locations and capacities of DGs have a significant impact on the system losses in a transmission system. In this paper, combined nature inspired algorithms are presented for optimal location and sizing of DGs. This paper proposes a two-step optimization technique in order to integrate DG. In a first step, the best size of DG is determined through PSO metaheuristics and the results obtained through PSO is tested for reverse power flow by negative load approach to find possible bus locations. Then, optimal location is found by Loss Sensitivity Factor (LSF) and weak (WK) bus methods and the results are compared. In a second step, optimal sizing of DGs is determined by PSO, GSA, and hybrid PSOGSA algorithms. Apart from optimal sizing and siting of DGs, different scenarios with number of DGs (3, 4, and 5) and PQ capacities of DGs (P alone, Q alone, and P and Q both) are also analyzed and the results are analyzed in this paper. A detailed performance analysis is carried out on IEEE 30-bus system to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  7. 14 CFR 61.94 - Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Student pilot seeking a sport pilot... Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations at... operational control tower in other airspace. (a) A student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or...

  8. Pollution profiles, health risk of VOCs and biohazards emitted from municipal solid waste transfer station and elimination by an integrated biological-photocatalytic flow system: A pilot-scale investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guiying [The State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang, Zhengyong; Sun, Hongwei; Chen, Jiangyao [The State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); An, Taicheng, E-mail: antc99@gig.ac.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Li, Bing [Experiment Medical Research Centre, Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► VOCs and biohazards emitted during garbage compressing process were monitored. ► BTF–PC integrated reactor was employed for VOCs and biohazards removal. ► Health risk of target VOCs and biohazards were assessed before and after treatment. -- Abstract: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and biohazards air pollution in municipal solid waste transfer station were investigated. As compressor working, the concentrations of almost all quantified 14 VOCs (0.32–306.03 μg m{sup −3}) were much higher than those as compressor off (0–13.31 μg m{sup −3}). Comparatively, only 3 VOCs with extremely low concentrations could be detected at control area. Total microorganism was 7567 CFU m{sup −3} as compressor working, which was 1.14 and 6.22 times higher than that of compressor off and control area, respectively. Bacteria were the most abundant microorganism at all three sampling places. At pilot-scale, during whole 60-day treatment, for VOCs, the average removal efficiencies were over 92% after biotrickling filter–photocatalytic (BTF–PC) treatment. Although non-cancer and cancer risks of some VOCs were over the concern level before treatment, almost all VOCs were removed substantially and both potential risks were below the concern after BTF–PC treatment. Additionally, biohazard concentrations decreased dramatically and air quality was purified from polluted to cleanness after PC treatment. All results demonstrated that the integrated technology possessed high removal capacity and long stability for the removal of VOCs and biohazards at a pilot scale.

  9. India: From SITE to INSAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    Identifies core of India's illiteracy problem and describes use of educational technology to educate rural children. Highlights include descriptions of the Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE) project; motivation behind low-cost educational aids development in rural areas; an educational radio pilot project; and development and…

  10. India: From SITE to INSAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    Identifies core of India's illiteracy problem and describes use of educational technology to educate rural children. Highlights include descriptions of the Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE) project; motivation behind low-cost educational aids development in rural areas; an educational radio pilot project; and development and…

  11. 76 FR 75553 - Completion of the Broker Self-Assessment Outreach Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... agreement, anti- dumping and countervailing duty. It was discovered in the BSA Pilot that the compliance... compliance, professional ethics and professional development of their employees to meet its overall objective... pilot demonstrated that business profiles and process management within the brokerage community is...

  12. Development of 1000kW-class MCFC pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooue, M.; Yasue, H. [MCFC Research Association, Mie (Japan); Takasu, K.; Tsuchitori, T.

    1996-12-31

    This pilot plant is a part of the New Sunshine Program which has proceeded by the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. MCFC Research Association is entrusted with the development of the pilot plant, and constructing it at Kawagoe site. Following items will be verified by this pilot plant operation. (a) Development of 250kW class stack and confirmation of stack performance and decay rate. (b) System verification such as basic process, control system and operation characteristics, toward commercialization. (c) To get design data for demonstration plant.

  13. 民航飞行员胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂C水平及其与血糖血脂关系的研究%Survey on the cystatin C level in civil pilots and its influence to blood glucose and lipid profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁炳怀; 朱凤霞; 贺亚杰; 史丽娜; 杨静

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨民航飞行员的胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂C(Cys C)水平及其与血糖血脂之间的关系. 方法 287名参加例行体检的男性飞行员(平均年龄为39.6±8.3岁),纳入本次研究,分别测定其空腹血糖(FBG)、总胆固醇(TC)、甘油三酯(TG)、高密度脂蛋白胆固醇(HDL-C)、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL-C)及Cys C水平.对所得结果进行统计学分析. 结果 血脂代谢紊乱及空腹血糖受损的民航飞行员血清Cys C水平较正常组显著增高(P<0.01);Cys C水平与年龄无显著相关;随着脂代谢紊乱程度的增加,Cys C呈显著增高趋势(F=5.80~11.26,P<0.01);Pearson相关分析结果显示,Cys C与TG、HDL、LDL及FBG存在显著相关(P<0.05);多因素回归分析显示,TG、HDL-C、LDL-C、FBG水平是CysC水平的显著影响因素(P<0.05). 结论 Cys C水平与民航飞行员的糖、脂代谢紊乱等心血管疾病(CVD)危险因素显著相关,未来可能作为此类人群CVD发病危险评估及预警的重要指标,为飞行安全提供保障.%Objective To investigate the relationship between the levels of serum Cystatin C (Cys C) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) and lipid profiles in Chinese civil pilot. Methods Two hundred and eight-seven pilots of Civil Aviation Administration of China (Male, 39.6±8.3 yrs) were involved in the study by taking the chance of their regular physical examination. The levels of FBG, lipid profiles and Cys C were measured for final statistic analysis. Results Cys C levels of the pilots with dyslipidemia and injured glucose tolerance were significantly higher than that in normal group (P ~0.01). Cys C level was insignificantly correlated with age. Furthermore Cys C showed an increasing tendency with the deterioration of lipid metabolism (F= 5.80-11.26, P< 0.01). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and FBG were the significant influence factors

  14. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  15. DIRAC pilot framework and the DIRAC Workload Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casajus, Adrian; Graciani, Ricardo; Paterson, Stuart; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; LHCb DIRAC Team

    2010-04-01

    DIRAC, the LHCb community Grid solution, has pioneered the use of pilot jobs in the Grid. Pilot Jobs provide a homogeneous interface to an heterogeneous set of computing resources. At the same time, Pilot Jobs allow to delay the scheduling decision to the last moment, thus taking into account the precise running conditions at the resource and last moment requests to the system. The DIRAC Workload Management System provides one single scheduling mechanism for jobs with very different profiles. To achieve an overall optimisation, it organizes pending jobs in task queues, both for individual users and production activities. Task queues are created with jobs having similar requirements. Following the VO policy a priority is assigned to each task queue. Pilot submission and subsequent job matching are based on these priorities following a statistical approach.

  16. PULSE Pilot Certification Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Pape-Lindstrom

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The pilot certification process is an ambitious, nationwide endeavor designed to motivate important changes in life sciences education that are in line with the recommendations of the 2011 Vision and Change Report: A Call to Action (American Association for the Advancement of Science [AAAS], 2011.  It is the goal of the certification process to acknowledge departments that have progressed towards full implementation of the tenets of Vision and Change and to motivate departments that have not begun to adopt the recommendations to consider doing so.  More than 70 life science departments applied to be part of the pilot certification process, funded by a National Science Foundation grant, and eight were selected based on initial evidence of transformed and innovative educational practices.  The programs chosen represent a wide variety of schools, including two-year colleges, liberal-arts institutions, regional comprehensive colleges, research universities and minority serving institutions.  Outcomes from this pilot were released June 1, 2015 (www.pulsecommunity.org, with all eight programs being recognized as having progressed along a continuum of change.  Five levels of achievement were defined as PULSE Pilot Progression Levels.  Of the eight departments in the pilot, one achieved “PULSE Progression Level III: Accomplished”.  Six departments achieved “PULSE Progression Level II: Developing” and one pilot department achieved “PULSE Progression Level I: Beginning”.  All of the schools have made significant movement towards the recommendations of Vision and Change relative to a traditional life sciences curriculum.  Overall, the response from the eight pilot schools has been positive. 

  17. Thomson scattering at Pilot-PSI and Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, G. J.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Hoen, Mhjt; Koppers, W. R.; Shumack, A. E.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Westerhout, J.; Wright, G. M.; Rapp, J.

    2009-01-01

    A robust and sensitive Thomson scattering (TS) system has been developed for the high density low temperature plasma in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI, which routinely and reproducibly measures electron density and temperature profiles along a detection chord of 25 mm with a spatial

  18. Lipid Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Lipid Profile Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... as: Lipid Panel; Coronary Risk Panel Formal name: Lipid Profile Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; ...

  19. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  20. Arra-Funded Geotechnical Characterization of Seismographic Station Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, W. S.; Yong, A.; Stokoe, K. H.; Diehl, J.; Martin, A. J.; Jack, S.

    2010-12-01

    Through the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the USGS allocated funding to help support research capabilities, as well as improve and upgrade facilities in the bureau. As part of this effort, the USGS contracted a consortium consisting of principals from academia and commerce to perform geotechnical site characterization at 189 seismographic station sites—185 in California and four in the central U.S. In this pilot project of the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS), site characterizations will be conducted at: 130 Southern California Seismographic Network (SCSN), 25 California Geological Survey (CGS), 30 Northern California Seismographic Network (NCSN), and four Central U.S. (CEUS) sites. Each site investigation, involving passive and active surface-wave techniques, includes one or more of established approaches such as the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR), 2-D array microtremor, 1-D refraction microtremor (ReMi), spectral analysis of surface wave (SASW), and multi-channel analysis of surface wave (MASW) methods. From this multi-method approach, we determine Vs (shear-wave velocity) profiles and the calculated Vs30 (the average shear-wave velocity in the upper 30 meters depth) for each site. In general, preliminary results based on field reports indicate observed records match expected values for surficial geologic conditions. Unexpected results are typically attributable to inaccurate or coarse map information and alternative explanations are verified through interpretations of local geologic structure observed during field investigations. For example, we find map-based geology to be consistent with observed records at the SCSN station CI.PLS, but not the case for CI.CWC, where inaccurate map information are at odds with our recorded velocities. At station CI.TIN (near edge of basalt outcrop) and NCSN station NC.MMLB (on rhyolite outcrop), the records observed in the shallow surface do not match expected rock values. Our pilot

  1. Genome-wide profiling of p63 DNA-binding sites identifies an element that regulates gene expression during limb development in the 7q21 SHFM1 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn N Kouwenhoven

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous mutations in p63 are associated with split hand/foot malformations (SHFM, orofacial clefting, and ectodermal abnormalities. Elucidation of the p63 gene network that includes target genes and regulatory elements may reveal new genes for other malformation disorders. We performed genome-wide DNA-binding profiling by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq in primary human keratinocytes, and identified potential target genes and regulatory elements controlled by p63. We show that p63 binds to an enhancer element in the SHFM1 locus on chromosome 7q and that this element controls expression of DLX6 and possibly DLX5, both of which are important for limb development. A unique micro-deletion including this enhancer element, but not the DLX5/DLX6 genes, was identified in a patient with SHFM. Our study strongly indicates disruption of a non-coding cis-regulatory element located more than 250 kb from the DLX5/DLX6 genes as a novel disease mechanism in SHFM1. These data provide a proof-of-concept that the catalogue of p63 binding sites identified in this study may be of relevance to the studies of SHFM and other congenital malformations that resemble the p63-associated phenotypes.

  2. Insect γ-aminobutyric acid receptors and isoxazoline insecticides: toxicological profiles relative to the binding sites of [³H]fluralaner, [³H]-4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate, and [³H]avermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunqing; Casida, John E

    2014-02-05

    Isoxazoline insecticides, such as fluralaner (formerly A1443), are noncompetitive γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABA-R) antagonists with selective toxicity for insects versus mammals. The isoxazoline target in house fly ( Musca domestica ) brain has subnanomolar affinity for [³H]fluralaner and a unique pattern of sensitivity to isoxazolines and avermectin B(1a) (AVE) but not to fipronil and α-endosulfan. Inhibitor specificity profiles for 15 isoxazolines examined with Musca GABA-R and [³H]fluralaner, [³H]-4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate ([³H]EBOB), and [³H]AVE binding follow the same structure-activity trends although without high correlation. The 3 most potent of the 15 isoxazolines tested in Musca [³H]fluralaner, [³H]EBOB, and [³H]AVE binding assays and in honeybee (Apis mellifera) brain [³H]fluralaner assays are generally those most toxic to Musca and four agricultural pests. Fluralaner does not inhibit [³H]EBOB binding to the human GABA-R recombinant β₃ homopentamer, which is highly sensitive to all of the commercial GABAergic insecticides. The unique isoxazoline binding site may resurrect the GABA-R as a major insecticide target.

  3. Service Catalog Pilot Project Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the ServCat pilot project and offers recommendations for the full-scale implementation of the database. During the pilot project a total of...

  4. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  5. PILOT optical alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longval, Y.; Mot, B.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Baustista, L.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Bray, N.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P..; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-07-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 μm with an angular resolution about two arcminutes. Pilot optics is composed an off-axis Gregorian type telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We combined the optical, 3D dimensional measurement methods and thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. The talk describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015.

  6. Pilot selection and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Personality and situational factors relevant to individual and group performance in highly demanding environments, such as those faced by astronauts or by jet transport crew, are discussed. It is emphasized that although technical competence and proficiency in pilot selection are prerequisites for safety, operating a modern jet transport is a group endeavor that requires the effective coordination of the entire crew. A self-report test battery for measuring positive and negative personality traits of pilot candidates, termed the Personal Characteristics Inventory, is described.

  7. Empirical profile mixture models for phylogenetic reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Si Quang, Le; Gascuel, Olivier; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Previous studies have shown that accounting for site-specific amino acid replacement patterns using mixtures of stationary probability profiles offers a promising approach for improving...

  8. Karolinske psychodynamic profile (KAPP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Birgit Bork; Søgaard, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil......psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil...

  9. Advanced Multiple Aperture Seeing Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Deqing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the seeing profile of the atmospheric turbulence as a function of altitude are crucial for solar astronomical site characterization, as well as the optimized design and performance estimation of solar Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO). Knowledge of the seeing distribution, up to 30 km, with a potential new solar observation site, is required for future solar MCAO developments. Current optical seeing profile measurement techniques are limited by the need to use a large facility solar telescope for such seeing profile measurements, which is a serious limitation on characterizing a site's seeing conditions in terms of the seeing profile. Based on our previous work, we propose a compact solar seeing profiler called the Advanced Multiple Aperture Seeing Profile (A-MASP). A-MASP consists of two small telescopes, each with a 100 mm aperture. The two small telescopes can be installed on a commercial computerized tripod to track solar granule structures for seeing profile measurement. A-MASP is extreme simple and portable, which makes it an ideal system to bring to a potential new site for seeing profile measurements.

  10. User Participation in Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør Martinsdóttir á; Hertzum, Morten

    2014-01-01

    implementation as a method for participatory design. We find that to foster participation and learning about user needs a pilot implementation must create a space for reflecting on use, in addition to the space for using the pilot system. The space for reflection must also exist during the activities preparing...... the use of the pilot system because the porters and nurses learned about their needs throughout the pilot implementation, not just during use. Finally, we discuss how the scope and duration of a pilot implementation influence the conditions for participation....

  11. Evaluatie pilot elektronische volgsystemen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, F.; Post, B.

    2006-01-01

    Naast het uitvoeren van een onderzoek naar de ervaringen met EVS (Elektronisch Volgsysteem) in het buitenland, worden er bij de sectoren GW (Gevangeniswezen), jeugd en tbs een aantal pilot-projecten opgestart waarbij gebruik wordt gemaakt van elektronische volgsystemen met GPS-techniek (GPS = Global

  12. Priming a Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus; Ie Pedersen, Maria

    Abstract. We report on the initial findings of an action research study about effects specifications. It is a part of larger IS pilot implementation project conducted in the Danish healthcare sector. Through interviews and a workshop we have identified and specified the main effects that comprise...

  13. Priming a Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus Rotvit Perlt; Pedersen, Maria Ie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. We report on the initial findings of an exploratory action research study about effects specifications using the systems development method Effects-driven IT development. It is part of a larger IS pilot implementation project conducted in the Danish healthcare sector. Through interviews...

  14. Pilot project as enabler?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, Margit; Glimø, Helle; Holm, Catrine Granzow;

    This article deals with a systemic perspective on transition. The field of study addressed is a pilot project as enabler of transition in a highly complex polycentric context. From a Luhmannian systemic approach, a framework is created to understand and address barriers of change occurred using p...

  15. [Do pilots need stereopsis ?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepgen, R

    1993-02-01

    Pilots so far are required to have a good quality of stereopsis. Many people do not meet this requirement. But is this requirement justified by research in aviation medicine and psychology of perception? This question is discussed on the basis of the theoretical and empirical literature. The answer is: No.

  16. Evaluatie pilot Endogene Factoren

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viet AL; Fiolet D; Voortman JK; Rover C de; Hanning C; Uitenbroek D; Loon AJM van; PZO; GGD Achterhoek; GGD Midden Holland; GG&GD Amsterdam

    2004-01-01

    As a part of the project on the Local and National Monitor for Public Health several pilot studies were carried out in three Municipal Health Centres (GGDs). The first aim was to investigate the feasibility of a physical examination at the health centre in combination with a health interview (or pos

  17. Priming a Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus; Ie Pedersen, Maria

    Abstract. We report on the initial findings of an action research study about effects specifications. It is a part of larger IS pilot implementation project conducted in the Danish healthcare sector. Through interviews and a workshop we have identified and specified the main effects that comprise...

  18. Laboratory to pilot scale: Microwave extraction for polyphenols lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périno, Sandrine; Pierson, Jean T; Ruiz, Karine; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Chemat, Farid

    2016-08-01

    Microwave hydrodiffusion and gravity (MHG) technique has been applied to pilot-scale solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) of polyphenols from Lettuce sativa. Following the dictates of green extraction and with the aim to save time and energy, the lab-scale knowledge on SFME was exploited for the development of a pilot-scale process. The investigation entailed the optimization of all main parameters (temperature, time, extracted water volume, etc.) and we showed that the polyphenols composition profile under SFME was similar to the classic methods though a bit lower in total content. The energy consumption in the optimized procedure (30min) was 1W/g of fresh matrix.

  19. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-09-09

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan required each US Department of Energy (DOE) site that characterizes transuranic waste to be sent the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan that addresses applicable requirements specified in the QAPP.

  20. Use of large-scale transient stresses and a coupled adjoint-sensitivity/kriging approach to calibrate a groundwater-flow model at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); LaVenue, A.M. (INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A coupled adjoint-sensitivity/kriging approach was used to calibrate a groundwater-flow model to 10 years of human-induced transient hydraulic stresses at the WIPP site in New Mexico, USA. Transmissivity data obtained from local-scale hydraulic tests were first kriged to define an initial transmissivity distribution. Steady-state model calibration was then performed employing adjoint-sensitivity techniques to identify regions where transmissivity changes would improve the model fit to the observed steady-state heads. Subsequent transient calibration to large-scale hydraulic stresses created by shaft construction and long-term pumping tests aided in the identification of smaller scale features not detected during steady-state calibration. This transient calibration resulted in a much more reliable and defendable model for use in performance-assessment calculations. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the San Juan Basin CO{sub 2} pilot test site at Pump Canyon New Mexico, using perfluorocarbon tracers, CO{sub 2} soil-gas flux and soil-gas hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Arthur W; Diehl, J Rodney; Strazisar, Brian R; Wilson, Thomas; H Stanko, Dennis C

    2012-05-01

    Near-surface monitoring and subsurface characterization activities were undertaken in collaboration with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons (1.670 × 107 kg) of CO{sub 2} were injected into 3 seams of the Fruitland coal between July 2008 and April 2009. Between September 18 and October 30, 2008, two additions of approximately 20 L each of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers were mixed with the CO{sub 2} at the injection wellhead. PFC tracers in soil-gas and in the atmosphere were monitored over a period of 2 years using a rectangular array of permanent installations. Additional monitors were placed near existing well bores and at other locations of potential leakage identified during the pre-injection site survey. Monitoring was conducted using sorbent containing tubes to collect any released PFC tracer from soil-gas or the atmosphere. Near-surface monitoring activities also included CO{sub 2} surface flux and carbon isotopes, soil-gas hydrocarbon levels, and electrical conductivity in the soil. The value of the PFC tracers was demonstrated when a significant leakage event was detected near an offset production well. Subsurface characterization activities, including 3D seismic interpretation and attribute analysis, were conducted to evaluate reservoir integrity and the potential that leakage of injected CO{sub 2} might occur. Leakage from the injection reservoir was not detected. PFC tracers made breakthroughs at 2 of 3 offset wells which were not otherwise directly observable in produced gases containing 20–30% CO{sub 2}. These results have aided reservoir geophysical and simulation investigations to track the underground movement of CO{sub 2}. 3D seismic analysis provided a possible interpretation for the order of appearance of tracers at production wells.

  2. MPI support in the DIRAC Pilot Job Workload Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Hamar, V.

    2012-12-01

    Parallel job execution in the grid environment using MPI technology presents a number of challenges for the sites providing this support. Multiple flavors of the MPI libraries, shared working directories required by certain applications, special settings for the batch systems make the MPI support difficult for the site managers. On the other hand the workload management systems with Pilot Jobs became ubiquitous although the support for the MPI applications in the Pilot frameworks was not available. This support was recently added in the DIRAC Project in the context of the GISELA Latin American Grid Initiative. Special services for dynamic allocation of virtual computer pools on the grid sites were developed in order to deploy MPI rings corresponding to the requirements of the jobs in the central task queue of the DIRAC Workload Management System. Pilot Jobs using user space file system techniques install the required MPI software automatically. The same technique is used to emulate shared working directories for the parallel MPI processes. This makes it possible to execute MPI jobs even on the sites not supporting them officially. Reusing so constructed MPI rings for execution of a series of parallel jobs increases dramatically their efficiency and turnaround. In this contribution we describe the design and implementation of the DIRAC MPI Service as well as its support for various types of MPI libraries. Advantages of coupling the MPI support with the Pilot frameworks are outlined and examples of usage with real applications are presented.

  3. Virtual Service, Real Data: Results of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbee, Jo; Ward, David; Ma, Wei

    2002-01-01

    Describes a pilot project at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign reference and undergraduate libraries to test the feasibility of offering real-time online reference service via their Web site. Discusses software selection, policies and procedures, promotion and marketing, user interface, training and staffing, data collection, and…

  4. PILOT DECONTAMINATION THROUGH PILOT SEQUENCE HOPPING IN MASSIVE MIMO SYSTEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The invention relates to a system for determining channel coefficients of channels in a wireless cellular network. The wireless cellular network comprises a plurality of cells wherein each cell comprises a base station configured to communicate with users within the cell and wherein a communication...... path between one of the users and one of the base stations define one of the channels. The system comprises a pilot generation unit configured to assign pilot sequences randomly among the users and a pilot processing unit configured to filter the pilot sequences received from a user of interest so...... that the channel coefficient of the channel of the user of interest is determined. The pilot sequences received from the user of interest are contaminated by other non-orthogonal or identical pilot sequences from other users of the cell of interest or other cells. The filter is configured so that the contamination...

  5. Effects of a recreational physical activity and healthy habits orientation program, using an illustrated diary, on the cardiovascular risk profile of overweight and obese schoolchildren: a pilot study in a public school in Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Militão AG

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Angeliete Garcez Militão,1,2 Margô Gomes de Oliveira Karnikowski,3 Fernanda Rodrigues da Silva,4 Elba Sancho Garcez Militão,3 Raiane Maiara dos Santos Pereira,5 Carmen Silvia Grubert Campbell,2,5 1Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rondonia, Brazil; 2Post-Graduate Program in Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brazil; 3University of Brasilia, Brazil; 4Laboratory of Physical Evaluation and Training, 5Laboratory of Physical Education and Health Studies, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brazil Introduction: Educative strategies need to be adopted to encourage the consumption of healthy foods and to promote physical activity in childhood and adolescence. The effects of recreational physical activity and a health-habit orientation program using an illustrated diary on the cardiovascular risk profile of overweight and obese children was investigated. Methods: The weight and height of 314 schoolchildren aged between 9 and 11 years old, in a public school in Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil, were recorded. According to the body mass index (BMI classification proposed by the World Health Organization, 84 were overweight or obese for their age and sex. Of these children, 34 (40% participated in the study. Students were divided into two groups matched for sex, age, BMI, percent body fat (%BF: the intervention group (IG, n = 17 and the control group (CG, n = 17. The IG underwent a program of 10 weeks of exercise with recreational activities and health-habit orientation using an illustrated diary of habits, while no such interventions were used with the CG during the study period. Before and after the intervention, the children's weight, height, BMI, %BF, waist circumference (WC, maximum oxygen intake (VO2max, total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoprotein (HDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL, triglycerides, glucose, eating habits, and physical activity level (PAL were assessed. In analyzing the data, we used

  6. Operating a production pilot factory serving several scientific domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfiligoi, I.; Würthwein, F.; Andrews, W.; Dost, J. M.; MacNeill, I.; McCrea, A.; Sheripon, E.; Murphy, C. W.

    2011-12-01

    Pilot infrastructures are becoming prominent players in the Grid environment. One of the major advantages is represented by the reduced effort required by the user communities (also known as Virtual Organizations or VOs) due to the outsourcing of the Grid interfacing services, i.e. the pilot factory, to Grid experts. One such pilot factory, based on the glideinWMS pilot infrastructure, is being operated by the Open Science Grid at University of California San Diego (UCSD). This pilot factory is serving multiple VOs from several scientific domains. Currently the three major clients are the analysis operations of the HEP experiment CMS, the community VO HCC, which serves mostly math, biology and computer science users, and the structural biology VO NEBioGrid. The UCSD glidein factory allows the served VOs to use Grid resources distributed over 150 sites in North and South America, in Europe, and in Asia. This paper presents the steps taken to create a production quality pilot factory, together with the challenges encountered along the road.

  7. The fighter pilot's egg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Dale W.

    1990-03-01

    Of common interest to fighter pilots is what maneuver should be flown to accomplish a 360° heading change in the least time. Among the infinite possibilities, analytic expressions for a very commonly used maneuver, a roughly circular planar turn that accomplishes the required heading change, are derived and examined under four realistic assumptions. Contrary to common belief, the time to complete the stated heading change turns out to be independent of the inclination of the plane of the turn.

  8. Pilot Candidate Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    pilot selection system and to best support up-front track selection for SUPT? Assumptions The USAF Trainer Masterplan does not include a plan to...replace the T-41 with a new flight screening aircraft. In addition, the Masterplan states that candidates will be track selected prior to entry into primary...training. (3:10) While the Masterplan is not a static document and aircraft procurement plans and/or the timing of track selection are subject to

  9. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be sent, as a script to be run, or it can be fetched from a remote location. A pilot 2.0 can run on every computing resource, e.g.: on CREAM Computing elements, on DIRAC Computing elements, on Virtual Machines as part of the contextualization script, or IAAC resources, provided that these machines are properly configured, hiding all the details of the Worker Nodes (WNs) infrastructure. Pilots 2.0 can be generated server and client side. Pilots 2.0 are the “pilots to fly in all the skies”, aiming at easy use of computing power, in whatever form it is presented. Another aim is the unification and simplification of the monitoring infrastructure for all kinds of computing resources, by using pilots as a network of distributed sensors coordinated by a central resource monitoring system. Pilots 2.0 have been developed using the command pattern. VOs using DIRAC can tune pilots 2.0 as they need, and extend or replace each and every pilot command in an easy way. In this

  10. The ATLAS PanDA Pilot in Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, P; The ATLAS collaboration; De, K; Maeno, T; Stradling, A; Wenaus, T

    2011-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) [1-2] was designed to meet ATLAS [3] requirements for a data-driven workload management system capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. Submitted jobs are executed on worker nodes by pilot jobs sent to the grid sites by pilot factories. This paper provides an overview of the PanDA pilot [4] system and presents major features added in light of recent operational experience, including multi-job processing, advanced job recovery for jobs with output storage failures, gLExec [5-6] based identity switching from the generic pilot to the actual user, and other security measures. The PanDA system serves all ATLAS distributed processing and is the primary system for distributed analysis; it is currently used at over 100 sites world-wide. We analyze the performance of the pilot system in processing real LHC data on the OSG [7], EGI [8] and Nordugrid [9-10] infrastructures used by ATLAS, and describe plans for its evolution.

  11. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  12. 76 FR 19267 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 61 RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical... for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools. This document reinstates two... entitled, ``Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Final Rule'' (74 FR 42500). That...

  13. Module design for EC pilot projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donon, J.; Anguet, J.; Desombre, A.; Coureau, P.

    1982-10-01

    The solar cell module designed for use at the Nice Airport and Mont Bouquet, France pilot projects has a 73 W output and is made up of 72 100-mm diameter single-crystal silicon cells. A cost reduction is obtained through the use of a laminated encapsulation structure which incorporates low iron content glass, polyvinyl butyral, and a Tedlar/aluminum sheet backing. These technologies have been selected to yield high reliability in severe environmental conditions and to permit fast on-site installation. It is hoped that this solar cell module can be used in tropical climates.

  14. Breakthrough Listen on MWA Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S.; Siemion, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Tremblay, S.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a pilot study, using the Voltage Capture System, for Breakthrough Listen on the MWA. Breakthrough Listen (BL) is a major new project that aims to dramatically improve the coverage of parameter space in the search for intelligent life beyond Earth. BL has already deployed hardware and software to the Green Bank Telescope, and will bring a similar program with the Parkes Telescope online in the second half of 2016. The low frequency sky is however currently very poorly explored. The superb capabilities of the MWA (large field of view, low frequency of operation, and location in a very radio quiet site) provide a unique opportunity for a pilot study to obtain voltage data for a SETI (Search For Extraterrestrial Intelligence) study of the Galactic Plane. We propose commensal observations, piggybacking on the proposed pulsar search of Tremblay et al. Using existing VCS software, combined with the pipeline developed for Breakthrough Listen at GBT and Parkes, we will perform a blind search for candidate signals from extraterrestrial intelligence. Although the chances of a detection are not large, particularly for a pilot study such as that proposed here, the Breakthrough Listen team plan to perform extensive testing and analysis on the data obtained which should be useful for other users of the MWA VCS. We will make the secondary SETI data products and associated documentation available as a resource to the community via the Breakthrough Listen online archive.

  15. LANCELOT pilot report, June 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin; Meyer, Bente

    The aim of the Lancelot pilot evaluation process was to understand how teachers learn to teach and to relate to the online environment through the specific context of the Lancelot live online course. Following the Action Research in the autumn of 2006 the LANCELOT live online language course...... was revised for the piloting in the spring of 2007. A second aim of the pilot evaluation has therefore been to assess the revision of the course following the Action Research....

  16. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  17. PILOT FERMENTERS OF CAPACITY TYPE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu I Sidorov

    2012-01-01

      Basic information about modern pilot fermentation apparatus in sterile implementation used for the down-scaling of processes of cultivation of microorganisms, vegetable and animal cells, leading...

  18. Leadership Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robert M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents profiles of three leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Robert Mills Gagne, Florida State University; Robert Heinich, Indiana University; and Charles Francis Schuller, University of Georgia. (SLW)

  19. 75 FR 39091 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Program (62 FR 48693). A request for participation in the Pilot Program must be initiated by the filing of... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... (SJU) preliminary application for participation in the airport privatization pilot program...

  20. 14 CFR 61.51 - Pilot logbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Except for a student pilot performing the duties of pilot in command of an airship requiring more than... of command of an airship requiring more than one pilot flight crewmember; (ii) Has a solo flight...

  1. 77 FR 58208 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Privatization Pilot Program and has determined that the final application is substantially complete and accepted... privatization pilot program and authorizes the Department of Transportation to grant exemptions from certain...

  2. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  3. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  4. Design considerations for a steam-injection pilot with in-situ foaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, M.H.; Sanyal, S.K.; Horn, A.J.

    1982-08-01

    This report reviews the necessary aspects of the planning, operation, evaluation, environmental impact and cost to implement a field pilot of steam injection with in-situ foaming. The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI) is planning to implement such a pilot in Kern County, California. The cost of the pilot will be shared by the US Department of Energy and an oil company. Some important aspects of drilling and completion programs and their specifications, permits from regulatory bodies, and downhole tools to improve steam stimulation are discussed. The essential surface facilities which include water treatment plant, steam generator, demulsifier and dehydrator are considered. The necessary laboratory research in support of the pilot has been recommended. The formation evaluation and reservoir engineering effort for the pilot has been divided into three phases: reservoir definition, reservoir monitoring and post-pilot study. Appropriate techniques applicable to each phase of the test have been discussed. The environmental impact regulations as related to the steam injection process have been considered. In particular, the environmental problems associated with the burning of crude oil and desulfurization of flue gas have been discussed. Other environmental considerations such as solid and liquid waste disposal, health and safety are also discussed. An estimate of the cost of this field test is presented. Three scenarii (for pilots with high, medium, and low investment potentials, respectively) are presented. Since this report was prepared, a specific site for the supri pilot has been chosen. Appendices G and H present the details on this site.

  5. 75 FR 56857 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 141 RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification AGENCY... Register on August 21, 2009. That final rule revised the training, qualification, certification, and... Certification and Training Branch, AFS-810, General Aviation and Commercial Division, Flight Standards...

  6. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species: e0140103

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noemí Araceli Rivera Casado; del Carmen Montes Horcasitas; Refugio Rodríguez Vázquez; Fernando José Esparza García; Josefina Pérez Vargas; Armando Ariza Castolo; Ronald Ferrera-Cerrato; Octavio Gómez Guzmán; Graciano Calva Calva

    2015-01-01

      The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil...

  7. Ocean Current Velocity Moored Time-Series Records collected from moored Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers near Grammanik Bank Spawning Aggregation Site (SPAG) and Frenchcap Cay, United States Virgin Islands, from April 24, 2011 to September 25, 2011 (NODC Accession 0088064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nortek 600kHz Aquadopp acoustic current profilers were deployed between April 2011 and September 2011 on shallow water moorings located on the coastal shelf south of...

  8. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  9. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  10. Hijama (wet cupping) for female infertility treatment: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Abduljabbar; Anhar Gazzaz; Samiha Mourad; Ayman Oraif

    2016-01-01

    Background: To assess the effectiveness of wet cupping (Hijama) as a treatment of female factor infertility. The primary outcome measured was pregnancy rates after Hijama. The secondary outcome measured was the effect on the reproductive hormonal profile before and after Hijama. Methods: A pilot clinical study was conducted for the use of Hijama as treatment for female infertility at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from September 2013 to May 2015. Inclusion criteria included: patients w...

  11. Wind farm pilot project in Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Osta, W.; Belhag, M.; Klat, M.; Fallah, I.; Kalifa, Y. [Center for Solar Energy Studies, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-11-01

    Libya is an oil producing country, yet it is trying to develop its renewable sources of energy such as solar and wind energy. Libya has a reasonable wind potential that should be harnessed and exploited to contribute, partly, to the total electric energy demand. The Center for Solar Energy Studies is undertaking a pilot project of a small wind farm of about 1.5 MW. This project aims to transfer technological know-how in the field of wind energy applications to electricity generation as well as to grid connection. It is the first wind farm to be established in Libya. Several sites in the Tripoli area were investigated in order to choose the most suitable site for this project. Analysis of wind data was performed for each site using WASP software. According to this analysis, Zwara (120 km West of Tripoli) was chosen to be the site of the project. The average wind speed (at 10m height) is 6.9 m s{sup -1} and the site`s available power is 399 W m{sup -2}. A weather station (WICOM II-d from the Ammonite company) was installed near the site to doubly ensure the site`s evaluation and assessment. The compilation and analysis of the wind data from this weather station, to some extent, is in agreement with the analysis performed on wind data from the meteorological station, which is very encouraging to the further continuation of this project. Some companies were contacted to obtain offers for WECS for the wind farm. Two companies were selected to provide the WECS for the wind farm. Four V27 225 kW wind turbines from Vestas will be installed in addition to two 300 kW wind turbines from Nordtank (NTK 300/31). (Author)

  12. Motivational Engineering for Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Frederick I.; And Others

    The study was an investigation of student pilot motivation for, and toward, the Air Training Command's undergraduate pilot training (UPT) program. The motivation hygiene approach was used to identify the motivational factors operating in the UPT program systematically. This approach has been used extensively in industry and with success in a…

  13. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  14. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131178)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  15. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  16. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  17. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0131444)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  18. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S155W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130856)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  19. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S95W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-06-05 (NCEI Accession 0131447)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  20. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N110W from 2006-11-22 to 2016-10-07 (NCEI Accession 0130052)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  1. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S110W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  2. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130848)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  3. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N95W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130852)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  4. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S95W from 2006-11-09 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131165)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  5. Chemical, in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Meteo France, Oceanographic Laboratory of Villefranche-sur-Mer and Oceanographic Observatory of Villefranche-sur-Mer at OceanSITES site DYFAMED from 1995-06-12 to 2016-05-18 (NCEI Accession 0130030)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, in situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT...

  6. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130062)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  7. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S125W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  8. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S155W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131196)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  9. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N110W from 2006-11-20 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130060)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  10. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  11. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N125W from 2006-09-01 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  12. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N110W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131166)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  13. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N125W from 2006-08-27 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131167)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  14. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N155W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-05 (NCEI Accession 0130063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  15. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N125W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-09-11 (NCEI Accession 0130061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  16. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N155W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  17. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S155W from 2007-07-22 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131177)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  18. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131172)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  19. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S110W from 2006-11-22 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  20. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T9N140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0131448)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  1. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S95W from 2006-11-08 to 2016-07-07 (NCEI Accession 0131186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  2. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130857)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  3. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N95W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  4. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S125W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131195)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  5. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  6. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  7. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  8. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N95W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  9. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Italian National Institute of Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics; Experimental Geophysical Observatory at OceanSITES site E2M3A from 2002-09-16 to 2009-10-13 (NCEI Accession 0130031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CONDUCTIVITY, DEPTH -...

  10. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N95W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-08-25 (NCEI Accession 0131173)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  11. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S180W from 2006-11-16 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0131446)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  12. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131191)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  13. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2S180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  14. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131184)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  15. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8S170W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0131445)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  16. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T2N165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  17. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N180W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131192)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  18. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S110W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131174)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  19. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N125W from 2006-08-26 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  20. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  1. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  2. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory at OceanSITES site P12N23W from 2006-06-08 to 2013-02-27 (NCEI Accession 0130047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  3. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N110W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131187)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  4. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N155W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131169)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  5. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T0N140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0130054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, BAROMETRIC PRESSURE, CURRENT DIRECTION,...

  6. Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Canary Island Oceanographic Laboratory, Center for Marine Environmental Sciences and Universitaet Bremen at OceanSITES site ESTOC from 1994-02-10 to 2010-11-11 (NCEI Accession 0130032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CHLOROPHYLL, CONDUCTIVITY, DEPTH - OBSERVATION,...

  7. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  8. In situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Centre D'Oceanologie de Marseille and University of the Mediterranean Aix-Marseille II at OceanSITES site ANTARES from 2005-09-15 to 2011-10-10 (NCEI Accession 0130026)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including CONDUCTIVITY, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE, LATITUDE,...

  9. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5N165E from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131170)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  10. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S125W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131175)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  11. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T8N155W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  12. In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile data collected by US DOC; NOAA; NWS; National Data Buoy Center at OceanSITES site T5S140W from 2006-08-25 to 2016-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0131176)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ, meteorological, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including AIR TEMPERATURE, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE,...

  13. Chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by University of Bergen; Bjerknes Center for Climate Research; Geophysical Institute at OceanSITES site STATION-M from 1948-10-01 to 2009-11-24 (NCEI Accession 0130051)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including DEPTH - OBSERVATION, DISSOLVED OXYGEN, LATITUDE, LONGITUDE,...

  14. Distinguishing ichthyoses by protein profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Rice

    Full Text Available To explore the usefulness of protein profiling for characterization of ichthyoses, we here determined the profile of human epidermal stratum corneum by shotgun proteomics. Samples were analyzed after collection on tape circles from six anatomic sites (forearm, palm, lower leg, forehead, abdomen, upper back, demonstrating site-specific differences in profiles. Additional samples were collected from the forearms of subjects with ichthyosis vulgaris (filaggrin (FLG deficiency, recessive X-linked ichthyosis (steroid sulfatase (STS deficiency and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis type lamellar ichthyosis (transglutaminase 1 (TGM1 deficiency. The ichthyosis protein expression patterns were readily distinguishable from each other and from phenotypically normal epidermis. In general, the degree of departure from normal was lower from ichthyosis vulgaris than from lamellar ichthyosis, parallel to the severity of the phenotype. Analysis of samples from families with ichthyosis vulgaris and concomitant modifying gene mutations (STS deficiency, GJB2 deficiency permitted correlation of alterations in protein profile with more complex genetic constellations.

  15. Distinguishing ichthyoses by protein profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Robert H; Bradshaw, Katie M; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Rocke, David M; Eigenheer, Richard A; Phinney, Brett S; Schmuth, Matthias; Gruber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    To explore the usefulness of protein profiling for characterization of ichthyoses, we here determined the profile of human epidermal stratum corneum by shotgun proteomics. Samples were analyzed after collection on tape circles from six anatomic sites (forearm, palm, lower leg, forehead, abdomen, upper back), demonstrating site-specific differences in profiles. Additional samples were collected from the forearms of subjects with ichthyosis vulgaris (filaggrin (FLG) deficiency), recessive X-linked ichthyosis (steroid sulfatase (STS) deficiency) and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis type lamellar ichthyosis (transglutaminase 1 (TGM1) deficiency). The ichthyosis protein expression patterns were readily distinguishable from each other and from phenotypically normal epidermis. In general, the degree of departure from normal was lower from ichthyosis vulgaris than from lamellar ichthyosis, parallel to the severity of the phenotype. Analysis of samples from families with ichthyosis vulgaris and concomitant modifying gene mutations (STS deficiency, GJB2 deficiency) permitted correlation of alterations in protein profile with more complex genetic constellations.

  16. Use of predefined biochemical admission profiles does not reduce the number of tests or total cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Haidl, Felix; Folkestad, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the use of predefined biochemical profiles as an alternative to individually ordered blood tests by the treating physicians resulted in fewer tests or a lower total cost.......The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the use of predefined biochemical profiles as an alternative to individually ordered blood tests by the treating physicians resulted in fewer tests or a lower total cost....

  17. Prediction of pilot induced oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PANĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in the design of flight-control systems for aircraft under pilotedcontrol is the determination of handling qualities and pilot-induced oscillations (PIO tendencieswhen significant nonlinearities exist in the vehicle description. The paper presents a method to detectpossible pilot-induced oscillations of Category II (with rate and position limiting, a phenomenonusually due to a misadaptation between the pilot and the aircraft response during some tasks in whichtight closed loop control of the aircraft is required from the pilot. For the analysis of Pilot in the LoopOscillations an approach, based on robust stability analysis of a system subject to uncertainparameters, is proposed. In this analysis the nonlinear elements are substituted by linear uncertainparameters. This approach assumes that PIO are characterized by a limit cycle behavior.

  18. Methodology of Pilot Performance Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kalavsky

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the development of the methodology of measuring pilot performance under real flight conditions. It provides the basic information on a research project realized to obtain new information regarding training and education of pilots. The introduction is focused on the analytical part of the project and the outputs in terms of the current state of the art. Detailed view is cast on the issue of measuring pilot performance under specific conditions of the cockpit or the flight simulator. The article is zooming in on the two selected and developed methods of pilot performance in terms of the defined indicators evaluated, conditions of compliance for conducting research and procedures of the methodology of pilot performance measurements.

  19. Latent Profile Analyses of Test Anxiety: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Embse, Nathaniel P.; Mata, Andrea D.; Segool, Natasha; Scott, Emma-Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In an era of test-based accountability, there has been a renewed interest in understanding the relationship between test anxiety and test performance. The development and validation of test anxiety scales have grown with the rise of test anxiety research. Research is needed to critically examine the psychometric properties of these scales prior to…

  20. Profile summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    All drugs appearing in the Adis Profile Summary table have been selected based on information contained in R&D Insight trade mark, a proprietary product of Adis International. The information in the profiles is gathered from the world's medical and scientific literature, at international conferences and symposia, and directly from the developing companies themselves. The emphasis of Drugs in R&D is on the clinical potential of new drugs, and selection of agents for inclusion is based on products in late-phase clinical development that have recently had a significant change in status.