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Sample records for pilot patient study

  1. Self moving patients to the operation theatre - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvarfordh, Anna Pernilla; Rovsing, Marie Louise; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate patients' satisfaction with walking to the operation theatre instead of being driven in a bed or wheel chair, and to identify the need for information. In total, 75 patients (aged 15-83 years) participated in the study. A questionnaire...

  2. Patient satisfaction with colonoscopy: A literature review and pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Lucas; Arthurs, Erin; Sewitch, Maida J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend that colonoscopic colorectal cancer screening be undertaken every 10 years after the age of 50 years. However, because the procedure does not meet criteria that promote screening uptake, patient satisfaction with colonoscopy may encourage repeat screening. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature and conduct a pilot study of patient satisfaction with the colonoscopy experience. METHODS: All cohort studies from January 1997 to August 2008 in the MEDLINE database that measured either patient satisfaction with colonoscopy, patient willingness to return for colonoscopy under the same conditions or patient preference for colonoscopy compared with other large bowel procedures were identified. The search was supplemented by journal citation lists in the retrieved articles. RESULTS: Of the 29 studies identified, 15 met the inclusion criteria. Consistently, the vast majority of patients (approximately 95%) were very satisfied with their colonoscopy experience. Patient satisfaction was similar for screening and nonscreening colonoscopy. Patient willingness to return for the procedure ranged from 73% to 100%. Of the five studies that examined modality preference, three studies reported the majority of patients preferred colonography to colonoscopy and two studies reported the reverse. Our pilot study findings mirrored those of other studies that were conducted in the United States. The major limitation of the included studies was that patients who were most dissatisfied may have gone elsewhere to have their colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients were very satisfied with colonoscopy. The majority were willing to return for repeat testing under the same conditions, and colonoscopy was not preferred over other modalities. However, studies were limited by methodological shortcomings. PMID:19319384

  3. PACAP38 dose-response pilot study in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollesen, Anne Luise Haulund; Guo, Song; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravenous infusion of 10 pmol/kg/min pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP38) induces migraine-like attacks in migraine patients without aura (MO). Here, we conducted a pilot study and investigated if lower doses of PACAP38 exert similar migraine......-inducing abilities. METHODS: We randomly allocated six MO patients to receive intravenous infusion of 4, 6, and 8 pmol/kg/min of PACAP38 over 20 minutes in a double-blind, three-way cross-over study. Headache and migraine characteristics were recorded during hospital (0-2 hours) and post-hospital (2-13 hours) phases...

  4. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls.

  5. Pilot Study of a Patient-Centered Radiology Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, J Shannon; Furtado, Vanessa F; Keller, Lisa A; Lotti, Judith Borsody; Saltalamacchia, Catherine A; Lennes, Inga T; Salazar, Gloria M

    2017-02-01

    The Radiology Process Model (RPM) was previously described in terms of its conceptual basis and proposed survey items. The current study describes the first pilot application of the RPM in the field and the results of initial psychometric analysis. We used an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot RPM survey in 100 patients having outpatient interventional radiology procedures. The 24 survey items had 4 or 5 levels of severity. We assessed for missing data, items that patients found confusing, any suggestions by patients for additional items and clarity of items from patient feedback. Factor analysis was performed and internal consistency measured. Construct validity was assessed by correlation of patient responses to the items as a summated scale with a visual analog scale (VAS) they completed indicating their interventional radiology experience. The visual analog scale and the RPM summated scale were strongly correlated (r = 0.7). Factor analysis showed four factors: interactions with facility and doctors/staff, time-sensitive aspects, pain, and anxiety. The items showed high internal consistency (alpha: 0.86) as a group and approximately 0.7 to 0.9 by the factors. Analysis shows that two items could be deleted (cost and communication between radiologist and referrers). Revision of two items and potential addition of others are discussed. The RPM shows initial evidence of psychometric validity and internal consistency reliability. Minor changes are anticipated before wider use. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microcirculation and atherothrombotic parameters in prolactinoma patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuwer, Anne Q; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M; Battjes, Suzanne; van Zijderveld, Rogier; Stuijver, Danka J F; Bisschop, Peter H; Twickler, Marcel Th B; Meijers, Joost C M; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Stroes, Erik S

    2012-12-01

    Atherothrombosis is a multifactorial process, governed by an interaction between the vessel wall, hemodynamic factors and systemic atherothrombotic risk factors. Recent in vitro, human ex vivo and animal studies have implicated the hormone prolactin as an atherothrombotic mediator. To address this issue, we evaluated the anatomy and function of various microvascular beds as well as plasma atherothrombosis markers in patients with elevated prolactin levels. In this pilot study, involving 10 prolactinoma patients and 10 control subjects, sidestream dark field (SDF) imaging revealed a marked perturbation of the sublingual microcirculation in prolactinoma patients compared to control subjects, as attested to by significant changes in microvascular flow index (2.74 ± 0.12 vs. 2.91 ± 0.05, respectively; P = 0.0006), in heterogeneity index (0.28 [IQR 0.18-0.31] vs. 0.09 [IQR 0.08-0.17], respectively; P = 0.002) and lower proportion of perfused vessels (90 ± 4.0% vs. 95 ± 3.0%, respectively; P = 0.016). In the retina, fluorescein angiography (FAG) confirmed these data, since prolactinoma patients more often have dilatated perifoveal capillaries. In plasma, prolactinoma patients displayed several pro-atherogenic disturbances, including a higher endogenous thrombin potential and prothrombin levels as well as decreased HDL-cholesterol levels. Prolactinoma patients are characterized by microvascular dysfunction as well as plasma markers indicating a pro-atherothrombotic state. Further studies are required to assess if prolactin is causally involved in atherothrombotic disease.

  7. Pilot Study of Flow and Meaningfulness as Psychological Learning Concepts in Patient Education: A Short Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicic, Sara; Nørby, Karina; Bruun Johansen, Clea

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this pilot study was to explore patient experiences of meaningfulness and flow related to group based patient education in type 2 diabetes. Meaningfulness and flow are underexposed as psychological learning concepts in patient education, and the ambition...... of this study was to investigate the applicability of these concepts of positive psychological theory in a patient education setting. Methods: This pilot study combines participating observation of group based patient education and 8 qualitative interviews with 4 patients with type 2 diabetes. Meaning...

  8. Pilot Study of Flow and Meaningfulness as Psychological Learning Concepts in Patient Education: A Short Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicic, Sara; Nørby, Karina; Bruun Johansen, Clea;

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this pilot study was to explore patient experiences of meaningfulness and flow related to group based patient education in type 2 diabetes. Meaningfulness and flow are underexposed as psychological learning concepts in patient education, and the ambition...... of this study was to investigate the applicability of these concepts of positive psychological theory in a patient education setting. Methods: This pilot study combines participating observation of group based patient education and 8 qualitative interviews with 4 patients with type 2 diabetes. Meaning...

  9. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Styron

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This project focused on a pilot project implemented during the 2013-2014 academic year. The overall purpose was to facilitate interprofessional collaborative practice innovations through the development of leadership, core competencies, and the use of technology, especially among nurses. Nursing, medicine, and physician assistant students were educated on the IOM competencies for interprofessional teams and the core competencies identified by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel [1] to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to practice in the collaborative practice environments. The project addressed four goals: Develop faculty expertise and leadership in interprofessional collaborative practice to provide a current, high quality education to nursing, physician assistant, and medical students; Implement a culturally responsive and respectful collaborative interprofessional practice curriculum to prepare nurses, physician assistants, and medical students to deliver high quality, efficient, team-based care in a dynamically evolving environment; Focus interprofessional collaborative practice education on models and practices that lead to improvement in patient outcomes; and Evaluate the program and disseminate best practices. Findings from this pilot include strategies to engage different health professions' students and faculty, partnering with community agencies, building an effective interprofessional team to guide the project, and seeking funding for extension and expansion of the offerings.

  10. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Styron

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This project focused on a pilot project implemented during the 2013-2014 academic year. The overall purpose was to facilitate interprofessional collaborative practice innovations through the development of leadership, core competencies, and the use of technology, especially among nurses. Nursing, medicine, and physician assistant students were educated on the IOM competencies for interprofessional teams and the core competencies identified by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel [1] to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to practice in the collaborative practice environments. The project addressed four goals: Develop faculty expertise and leadership in interprofessional collaborative practice to provide a current, high quality education to nursing, physician assistant, and medical students; Implement a culturally responsive and respectful collaborative interprofessional practice curriculum to prepare nurses, physician assistants, and medical students to deliver high quality, efficient, team-based care in a dynamically evolving environment; Focus interprofessional collaborative practice education on models and practices that lead to improvement in patient outcomes; and Evaluate the program and disseminate best practices. Findings from this pilot include strategies to engage different health professions' students and faculty, partnering with community agencies, building an effective interprofessional team to guide the project, and seeking funding for extension and expansion of the offerings.

  11. [Fear of falling in a fall clinic for geriatric patients: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dautzenberg, P.L.; Buurman, B.H.; Loonen, A.J.; Wouters, C.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this pilot study we want to determine how often fear of falling occurs in geriatric patients visiting a fall clinic and to study the characteristics of fear of falling and its consequences. DESIGN: Retrospective study of patient's records. METHOD: A random sample of 100 medical records

  12. Acromegalic patients lost to follow-up: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Nuez, Maria José Braga La; Leal, Vera Lucia Gomes; Chinen, Renata N; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 50 % of all acromegalic patients will require lifelong medical treatment to normalize mortality rates and reduce morbidity. Thus, adherence to therapy is essential to achieve treatment goals. To date, no study has evaluated the frequency and reasons for loss to follow-up in the acromegalic population. The current study aimed at evaluating the frequency of acromegalic patient loss to follow-up in three reference centers and the reasons responsible for their low compliance with treatment. All of the files for the acromegalic patients in the three centers were reviewed. Those patients, who had not followed up with the hospital for more than a year, were contacted via phone and/or mail and invited to participate. Patients who agreed to participate were interviewed, and blood samples were collected. A total of 239 files were reviewed; from these 42 patients (17.6 %) were identified who were lost to follow-up. It was possible to contact 27 of these patients, 10 of whom did not attend the appointments for more than one time and 17 of whom agreed to participate in the study. Fifteen of these 17 patients had active disease (88.2 %), and all of the patients restarted treatment in the original centers. The main reason for loss to follow-up was an absence of symptoms. High-quality follow-up is important in acromegaly to successfully achieve the aims of the treatment. An active search for patients may allow the resumption of treatment in a significant proportion of these cases, contributing to reduced morbidity and mortality in this patient population.

  13. Etanercept in the treatment of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbelt, M.; Wilde, P.C.M. de; Damme, P.A. van; Hoyng, C.B.; Putte, L.B.A. van de; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This pilot study evaluated the effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor-a antiinflammatory treatment with etanercept (Enbrel(R)) on sicca, systemic, and histological signs in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS). METHODS: Fifteen patients with well defined primary SS were treated wit

  14. Multi-family treatment for patients with persistent auditory hallucinations and their relatives : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenner, JA; van de Willige, G; Wiersma, D

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To test feasibility and effectiveness of multi-family treatment (MFT) for patients with persistent auditory hallucinations. Method: A naturalistic pilot study with 6-month follow-up of 12 patients and 10 relatives. Pre- and post-treatment assessment concerned compliance, satisfaction, sub

  15. The Process of Oncology Nurse Practitioner Patient Navigation: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Frances

    2016-04-01

    Oncology nurse practitioner (ONP) patient navigators may improve clinical outcomes. However, no standard measures of the process of oncology patient navigation or of related clinical outcomes exist, and research in this area is limited. The exploratory pilot study detailed in this article used grounded theory and interviews with three ONPs to define the processes employed by ONP patient navigators in caring for patients with cancer.
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  16. Myopathy in Patients Taking Atorvastatin: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj, K; Jain, N; Madhu, S V

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of statin-induced myopathy. A total of 200 patients aged ≥ 40 years and taking atorvastatin 10 mg/day or more for at least 2 weeks were recruited in the study. A detailed history of participants and anthropometry of study participants was recorded, and features of myopathy were explained. Biochemical investigations along with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and Vitamin D were done in all patients. Mean age of study population was 54.81 ± 9.10 years. Sixty-five percent (65.5%) of atorvastatin users had coronary heart disease, 62.5% were hypertensive, 38% had diabetes. Thirty-five percent (35.5%) patients were taking 10 mg/day atorvastatin, 45% were taking 20 mg/day, and 19.5% were taking 40 mg/day. The overall frequency of myopathy among statin users was 7.5% which was significantly higher with increasing dose of atorvastatin (1.4% in 10 mg/day group, 10% in 20 mg/day group, and 12.8% in 40 mg/day, P < 0.05). The frequency of atorvastatin-related myopathy was higher in females 8.65% compared to 6.25% in males. Serum TSH levels in patients with myopathy were 4.05 ± 7.76 μIU/ml while in those without myopathy were 3.13 ± 2.88 μIU/ml (P = 0.649). Serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D levels were measured in 66 patients randomly. Mean levels in patients with myopathy were 15.98 ± 12.94 ng/ml and without myopathy were 10.20 ± 5.64 ng/ml (P = 0.285). The present study demonstrates that a significantly higher number of patients taking atorvastatin develop myopathy in real life clinical condition. The frequency of myopathy increases with increase in atorvastatin dose.

  17. Feasibility and impact of a physical exercise program in patients with advanced cancer: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dungen, I.A. van den; Verhagen, C.A.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Berg, J.P. van den; Vissers, K.C.P.; Engels, Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of completing an exercise program in patients with advanced cancer and to obtain preliminary data of its impact on physical and quality of life (QoL) outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a nonrandomized pilot study. Participants were 26 palliative

  18. Laughter and Stress Relief in Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a therapeutic laughter program and the number of program sessions on anxiety, depression, and stress in breast cancer patients. A randomized controlled trial was conducted involving 31 patients who received four sessions of therapeutic laughter program comprised and 29 who were assigned to the no-program control group. Scores for anxiety, depression, and stress were measured using an 11-point numerical rating scale. While no change was detected in the control group, the program group reported reductions of 1.94, 1.84, and 2.06 points for anxiety, depression, and stress, respectively (p<0.01, p<0.01, and p<0.01. Scores decreased significantly after the first therapeutic laughter session (p<0.05, p<0.01, and p<0.01. As the therapeutic laughter program was effective after only a single session in reducing anxiety, depression, and stress in breast cancer patients, it could be recommended as a first-line complementary/alternative therapy.

  19. A pilot study to improve adherence among MS patients who discontinue treatment against medical advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Jared; Bruce, Amanda; Lynch, Sharon; Strober, Lauren; O'Bryan, Sean; Sobotka, Deborah; Thelen, Joan; Ness, Abigail; Glusman, Morgan; Goggin, Kathy; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Catley, Delwyn

    2016-04-01

    Between 30 and 50% of MS patients may prematurely discontinue disease modifying therapies. Little research has examined how to best talk with patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether telephone counseling increases disease modifying therapy (DMT) re-initiation among nonadherent patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants were eligible if they had relapsing-remitting disease, had stopped taking a DMT, and had no plan to re-initiate treatment despite a provider recommendation. Following a baseline assessment, 81 patients were randomly assigned to either five 20 min, weekly sessions of Motivational Interviewing/Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MI-CBT) or Treatment as Usual (TAU) with brief education. At 10 weeks, patients initially assigned to TAU switched over to MI-CBT. Compared to patients in the TAU group, patients undergoing MI-CBT were significantly more likely to indicate they were re-initiating DMT (41.7 vs. 14.3%). These significant results were replicated among patients crossing over from TAU to MI-CBT. Treatment satisfaction was high, with 97% of participants reporting that they would recommend MI-CBT to other patients with MS. Results of this pilot study provide initial support for the use of MI-CBT among MS patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice.Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01925690.

  20. Therapeutic Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation in a Pilot Study of Crohn's Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Linlin; Weaver, Veronika; Smith, Jill P.; Bingaman, Sandra; Hartman, Terryl J.; Cantorna, Margherita T.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Low vitamin D status may be associated with Crohn's disease. A pilot study was performed in patients with mild-to-moderate Crohn's disease to determine the dose of vitamin D needed to raise serum vitamin D levels above 40 ng/ml. METHODS: Patients were evaluated for severity of symptoms using the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) and patients with mild-to-moderate (150–400 CDAI scores) Crohn's disease were entered into the study (n=18). Vitamin D3 oral therapy was initiated at ...

  1. A pilot study of the efficacy of oral midazolam for sedation in pediatric dental patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, D. A.; Nenniger, S. A.; Yacobi, R.; Magathan, J. G.; Grad, H. A.; Copp, P. E.; Charendoff, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    Oral midazolam is being used for conscious sedation in dentistry with little documentation assessing its efficacy. In order to accumulate preliminary data, a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover, multi-site pilot study was conducted. The objective was to determine if 0.6 mg/kg of oral midazolam was an equally effective or superior means of achieving conscious sedation in the uncooperative pediatric dental patient, compared with a commonly used agent, 50 mg/kg of oral chloral hydrat...

  2. An Educational Intervention to Train Professional Nurses in Promoting Patient Engagement: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barello, Serena; Graffigna, Guendalina; Pitacco, Giuliana; Mislej, Maila; Cortale, Maurizio; Provenzi, Livio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Growing evidence recognizes that patients who are motivated to take an active role in their care can experience a range of health benefits and reduced healthcare costs. Nurses play a critical role in the effort to make patients fully engaged in their disease management. Trainings devoted to increase nurses' skills and knowledge to assess and promote patient engagement are today a medical education priority. To address this goal, we developed a program of nurse education training in patient engagement strategies (NET-PES). This paper presents pilot feasibility study and preliminary participants outcomes for NET-PES. Methods: This is a pilot feasibility study of a 2-session program on patient engagement designed to improve professional nurses' ability to engage chronic patients in their medical journey; the training mainly focused on passing patient engagement assessment skills to clinicians as a crucial mean to improve care experience. A pre-post pilot evaluation of NET-PES included 46 nurses working with chronic conditions. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure patient engagement skills. The design included self-report questionnaire completed before and after the training for evaluation purposes. Participants met in a large group for didactic presentations and then they were split into small groups in which they used role-play and case discussion to reflect upon the value of patient engagement measurement in relation to difficult cases from own practice. Results: Forty-six nurses participated in the training program. The satisfaction questionnaire showed that the program met the educational objectives and was considered to be useful and relevant by the participants. Results demonstrated changes on clinicians' attitudes and skills in promoting engagement. Moreover, practitioners demonstrated increases on confidence regarding their ability to support their patients' engagement in the care process. Conclusions

  3. The influence of individualized music on patients in physical restraints: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelli, Linda M; Kanski, Genevieve W; Wu, Yow-Wu Bill

    This pilot study explored the relationship between listening to preferred music and the behavioral responses of patients who are physically restrained. Thirty patients, ranging in age from 65 to 93, participated in one of three groups. The first group included patients who were out of restraining devices while listening to preferred music. Patients in the second group were out of restraining devices and not exposed to music. The third group comprised patients who were in restraining devices while listening to preferred music. Listening to preferred music had no significant effect on decreasing patients' negative behaviors or on increasing positive behaviors observed during the intervention phase of the study. The higher mean scores for positive behaviors and lower mean scores for negative behaviors for the first group may indicate some benefits to patients who are out of restraints and listening to preferred music.

  4. Preoperative therapeutic programme for elderly patients scheduled for elective abdominal oncological surgery: A randomized controlled pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dronkers, J.J.; Lamberts, H.; Reutelingsperger, I.M.M.D.; Naber, R.H.; Dronkers-Landman, C.M.; Veldman, A.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Investigation of the feasibility and preliminary effect of a short-term intensive preoperative exercise programme for elderly patients scheduled for elective abdominal oncological surgery. Design: Single-blind randomized controlled pilot study. Setting: Ordinary hospital in the Netherland

  5. Medication coaching program for patients with minor stroke or TIA: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sides Elizabeth G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients who are hospitalized with a first or recurrent stroke often are discharged with new medications or adjustment to the doses of pre-admission medications, which can be confusing and pose safety issues if misunderstood. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of medication coaching via telephone after discharge in patients with stroke. Methods Two-arm pilot study of a medication coaching program with 30 patients (20 intervention, 10 control. Consecutive patients admitted with stroke or TIA with at least 2 medications changed between admission and discharge were included. The medication coach contacted intervention arm patients post-discharge via phone call to discuss risk factors, review medications and triage patients’ questions to a stroke nurse and/or pharmacist. Intervention and control participants were contacted at 3 months for outcomes. The main outcomes were feasibility (appropriateness of script, ability to reach participants, and provide requested information and participant evaluation of medication coaching. Results The median lengths of the coaching and follow-up calls with requested answers to these questions were 27 minutes and 12 minutes, respectively, and participant evaluations of the coaching were positive. The intervention participants were more likely to have seen their primary care provider than were control participants by 3 months post discharge. Conclusions This medication coaching study executed early after discharge demonstrated feasibility of coaching and educating stroke patients with a trained coach. Results from our small pilot showed a possible trend towards improved appointment-keeping with primary care providers in those who received coaching.

  6. Reiki for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy in a Brazilian Hospital: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Pamela; da Motta, Pedro Mourão Roxo; da Silva, Luis G; Stephan, Celso; Lima, Carmen Silvia Passos; de Barros, Nelson Filice

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore whether individualized Reiki given to cancer patients at a Brazilian hospital improved symptoms and well-being. Data from 36 patients who received 5 Reiki sessions were collected using the MYMOP and were compared before and after their treatment and also with 14 patients who did not receive Reiki and who acted as a comparison group. Twenty-one patients reported feeling better, 12 felt worse, and 3 reported no change. Of the comparison group, 6 patients reported feeling better and 8 felt worse. The Reiki practice delivered as part of the integrative care in oncology did produce clinically significant effects, although not statistically significant results, for more than half of the patients undergoing cancer treatment.

  7. Isothermal dialysis to control intradialytic hypotension and patient comfort: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Bellury, Lanell; Baird, Marianne; Van Brackle, Lewis N; Aduddell, Kathie

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal hemodialysis to improve intradialytic tolerance in hypotension-prone patients has been effective in outpatient settings. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine thermal control in an acute care setting and describe comfort issues associated with thermal control Although complaints of cold or shivering occurred more frequently with the isothermal hemodialysis group, cold discomfort was managed by nursing interventions and was not a cause of significant discomfort. No statistically significant difference was observed in blood pressure or patient's comfort level between standard and isothermal dialysis. However, isothermal hemodialysis may be an appropriate hemodialysis option for control of intradialytic hypotension in the acute care setting. Further research is recommended.

  8. Oral Pirfenidone in patients with chronic fibrosis resulting from radiotherapy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell James B

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibrosis is a common side effect after treatment with ionizing radiation. Several methods to ameliorate debilitating fibrosis have been employed but without consistent results. The goal of this pilot study is to determine if Pirfenidone, a novel regulator of cytokine gene expression, has the potential to ameliorate established radiation-induced fibrosis. Methods Open label, prospective pilot study of 800 mg three times/day, orally administered Pirfenidone was administered to enrolled patients who were had completed radiation therapy and who had established radiation-induced fibrosis. Range of motion (ROM was assessed using standard measures, and subjective measures of pain, fatigue, disability and global health were measured every three months. Results Seven patients were enrolled of whom 3 had ROM assessments of 1 site and 2 had ROM assessments of 2 sites. Of these assessments, 6 revealed increased ROM during drug intervention while 1 revealed a decreased ROM. There was an overall improvement in the mental composite score of the SF36 while physical composite score was decreased and the vitality score was unchanged. Two patients were removed from the study because of syncopal episodes. Conclusion Several patients experienced improved function of at least 25% and reported subjective improvement. Pirfenidone may benefit patients with radiation-induced fibrosis and is worthy of a larger well controlled trial.

  9. Tampering by office-based methadone maintenance patients with methadone take home privileges: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Nathan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT is among the most widely studied treatments for opiate dependence with proven benefits for patients and society. When misused, however, methadone can also be lethal. The issue of methadone diversion is a major concern for all MMT programs. A potential source for such diversion is from those MMT patients who receive daily take home methadone doses. Using a reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography method, seven of the nine patients who were randomly selected to have all of their remaining methadone take home doses (within a 24 hour period analyzed, returned lower than expected quantities of methadone. This finding suggests the possibility that such patients may have tampered with their daily take home doses. Larger prospective observational studies are clearly needed to test the supposition of this pilot study.

  10. Treatment of Aspergillus fumigatus in patients with cystic fibrosis: a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn D Aaron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many patients with cystic fibrosis develop persistent airway infection/colonization with Aspergillus fumigatus, however the impact of A. fumigatus on clinical outcomes remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether treatment directed against Aspergillus fumigatus improves pulmonary function and clinical outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. METHODS: We performed a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled pilot clinical trial involving 35 patients with CF whose sputum cultures were chronically positive for A. fumigatus. Participants were centrally randomized to receive either oral itraconazole 5 mg/kg/d (N = 18 or placebo (N = 17 for 24 weeks. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who experienced a respiratory exacerbation requiring intravenous antibiotics over the 24 week treatment period. Secondary outcomes included changes in FEV(1 and quality of life. RESULTS: Over the 24 week treatment period, 4 of 18 (22% patients randomized to itraconazole experienced a respiratory exacerbation requiring intravenous antibiotics, compared to 5 of 16 (31% placebo treated patients, P = 0.70. FEV(1 declined by 4.62% over 24 weeks in the patients randomized to itraconazole, compared to a 0.32% improvement in the placebo group (between group difference = -4.94%, 95% CI: -15.33 to 5.45, P = 0.34. Quality of life did not differ between the 2 treatment groups throughout the study. Therapeutic itraconazole blood levels were not achieved in 43% of patients randomized to itraconazole. CONCLUSION: We did not identify clinical benefit from itraconazole treatment for CF patients whose sputum was chronically colonized with A. fumigatus. Limitations of this pilot study were its small sample size, and failure to achieve therapeutic levels of itraconazole in many patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00528190.

  11. Active video gaming in patients with renal transplant: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dorothy Wei Yun; Sills, Laura L; MacDonald, Sara B; Maianski, Ziv; Alwayn, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Patients with renal transplant are at higher risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population. Physical activity has been shown to reduce the risk of CVD mortality in these patients. Unfortunately, barriers such as the harsh Canadian climate prevent patients from engaging in and harvesting the health benefits of physical activity. This pilot study explored active video gaming (AVG) as a way for patients with renal transplant to obtain physical activity and examined its effect on their functional status and quality of life (QOL). We recruited nine patients for an 8-week prospective pilot study. All patients received a Microsoft Xbox 360™ video gaming console, a Microsoft Kinect™ sensor, and the video game Your Shape Fitness Evolved 2012. Assessment of each participant before and after the intervention included blood pressure measures, a 6-minute walk test, and the Godin Leisure Time Questionnaire (GLTQ). We analyzed all nine patients at the end of the 8-week study period, and found no changes in blood pressure or GLTQ scores. However, there was a significant increase in the 6-minute walk distance (P = 0.022), which represented a consistent increase for most patients (correlation = 0.977). In addition, participants over the age of 45 years (n = 4) were more likely to use the AVG system (P = 0.042). AVG has the potential to improve the functional status in patients with renal transplant. Further research is required to corroborate the full health benefits of AVG in this patient population.

  12. Glutamine supplementation favors weight loss in nondieting obese female patients. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, A; Molfino, A; Lacaria, M T; Canelli, A; De Leo, S; Preziosa, I; Rossi Fanelli, F

    2014-11-01

    Glutamine supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in critically ill patients, and prevents obesity in animals fed a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that glutamine supplementation favors weight loss in humans. Obese and overweight female patients (n=6) were enrolled in a pilot, cross-over study. After recording anthropometric (that is, body weight, waist circumference) and metabolic (that is, glycemia, insulinemia, homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)) characteristics, patients were randomly assigned to 4-week supplementation with glutamine or isonitrogenous protein supplement (0.5 g/KgBW/day). During supplementation, patients did not change their dietary habits nor lifestyle. At the end, anthropometric and metabolic features were assessed, and after 2 weeks of washout, patients were switched to the other supplement for 4 weeks. Body weight and waist circumference significantly declined only after glutamine supplementation (85.0±10.4 Kg vs 82.2±10.1 Kg, and 102.7±2.0 cm vs 98.9±2.9 cm, respectively; P=0.01). Insulinemia and HOMA-IR declined by 20% after glutamine, but not significantly so. This pilot study shows that glutamine is safe and effective in favoring weight loss and possibly enhancing glucose metabolism.

  13. Usability of digital media in patients with COPD: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Amy; Janssen, Anton; Amft, Oliver; Wouters, Emiel F M; Spruit, Martijn A

    2013-04-01

    Digital media can be integrated in tele-monitoring solutions, serving as the main interface between the patient and the caregiver. Consequently, the selection of the most appropriate digital medium for the specified target group is critical to ensure compliance with the tele-monitoring system. This pilot study aims to gather insights from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on the ease-of-use, efficacy, effectiveness, and satisfaction of different types of digital media. Five off-the-shelf digital media devices were tested on nine patients at CIRO+ in Horn, The Netherlands. Usability was evaluated by asking patients to use each device to answer questions related to their symptoms and health status. Subsequently, patients completed a paper-based device usability questionnaire, which assessed prior experience with digital media, device dimensions, device controllability, response speed, screen readability, ease-of-use, and overall satisfaction. After testing all the devices, patients ranked the devices according to their preference. We identified the netbook as the preferred type of device due to its good controllability, fast response time, and large screen size. The smartphone was the least favorite device as patients found the size of the screen to be too small, which made it difficult to interact with. The pilot study has provided important insights to guide the selection of the most appropriate type of digital medium for implementation in tele-monitoring solutions for patients with COPD. As the digital medium is an important interface to the patient in tele-monitoring solutions, it is essential that patients feel motivated to interact with the digital medium on a regular basis.

  14. Self-help group and the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis - Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Eliášová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The goal of the pilot study was to compare the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis in the Presov region with or without the support of a self-help group. Design: The character of this pilot study on patients with MS was related to the use of self-help groups and their impact on the assessment of the quality of life of the respondents, with the help of a questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF. Methods: The research was carried out in the Prešov region with the help of the standardized WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. Ninety-one patients with MS participated in the pilot study (46 respondents attended a self-help group and 35 did not. Results: The groups, when compared, aided by the statistically evaluated WHOQOL-BREF domains, were found to show significant differences in their evaluation of quality of life in three domains: domain one: physical health; domain two: surviving; domain three: social relations. Better scores were achieved in these domains by those who attended a group. In the physical sphere, we noticed significant differences in sleep quality, and sexual satisfaction (p < 0.001, while in social and economic areas, there were significant differences in satisfaction with personal relationships (p < 0.001, and economic circumstances (p < 0.01, self-contentment (p < 0.01, and coping with negative feelings (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Patients with multiple sclerosis can live normal lives provided they are supported by their families, friends, health care professionals, and self-help groups.

  15. Excessive adiposity and sedentary lifestyles are prevalent in cancer patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Almeida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer aetiology is multifactorial; risk factors comprise obesity, central adiposity, physical inactivity and excessive/deficient intake of foods and/or nutrients with pro-carcinogenic/protective effects. We aim to analyze the pattern of nutritional status, food intake and physical activity in a cohort of cancer patients. This pilot cross-sectional study was conducted in 64 outpatients referred for Radiotherapy. Nutritional parameters evaluated: BMI, waist circumference, body composition by tetrapolar bioimpedance (Xitron®. Usual food intake was collected with a short food frequency questionnaire and physical activity was assessed with Jacksons' questionnaire. Overweight/obesity and excessive body fat mass prevalence was of 53% and 61%, respectively. Central obesity, which indicates moderate/high cardio-metabolic risk, was found in 78% of patients. Food frequency analysis showed a poor intake in vegetables and a high intake in meat and carbohydrates. Physical inactivity was prevalent. This pilot study in cancer patients, showed a high prevalence of overweight/obesity, excessive fat mass and central obesity, simultaneously with sedentary lifestyles and an inadequate diet, poor in protective foods and excessive in deleterious ones. Thus, these patients exhibit a high risk pattern for cancer development and for a poorer prognosis. The implementation of measures to promote balanced and protective diets and to encourage physical activity practice is urgently needed.

  16. Microvolt T-wave alternans in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoueiry, G; Abdallah, M; Shariff, M; Kowalski, M; Lafferty, J

    2015-01-01

    We designed a prospective observational study targeting a selective population of patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting with normal systolic function. In this study we looked at the prevalence of pre-operative microvolt T-wave alternans and if it predicts atrial fibrillation after surgery. The inclusion criteria included all patients referred to the cardiothoracic outpatient clinic for elective bypass, who can perform aerobic exercise, with a recent exercise stress test exercising at least to 85% of the maximal predicted heart rate (220 - age) and with non-limiting chest pain at maximal exercise. Twenty patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria between May 2008 and February 2010. The hospital course of those patients was followed, and in-hospital events were recorded. Nine out twenty (45%) of patients had a non-negative microvolt T-wave alternans tracing. Six patients (30%) developed new onset atrial fibrillation post surgery. Patients with non-negative microvolt level T-wave alternans are more likely to develop atrial fibrillation post coronary artery bypass grafting then patients with negative microvolt level T-wave alternans (p=0.05). This pilot study provides the first clinical evidence that patients with ischemic heart disease and normal systolic function have a high prevalence of abnormal microvolt T-wave alternans and might be at higher risk of sudden cardiac death. In addition our results show that microvolt level T-wave alternans predicts post coronary artery bypass grafting new onset atrial fibrillation.

  17. Therapeutic role of Vitamin B12 in patients of chronic tinnitus: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Charu; Kawatra, Rahul; Gupta, Jaya; Awasthi, Vishnu; Dungana, Homnath

    2016-01-01

    True tinnitus is a phantom auditory perception arising from a source or trigger in the cochlea, brainstem, or at higher centers and has no detectable acoustic generator. The most accepted is the famous neurophysiologic model of Jastreboff, which stresses that tinnitus, is a subcortical perception and results from the processing of weak neural activity in the periphery. The aim of this study is to determine the role of Vitamin B12 in treatment of chronic tinnitus. In this randomized, double-blind pilot study, total 40 patients were enrolled, of which 20 in Group A (cases) received intramuscular therapy of 1 ml Vitamin B12 (2500 mcg) weekly for a period of 6 weeks and Group B (20) patients received placebo isotonic saline 01 ml intramuscular. The patients were subjected to Vitamin B12 assay and audiometry pre- and post-therapy. Of the total patients of tinnitus, 17 were Vitamin B12 deficient that is 42.5% showed deficiency when the normal levels were considered to be 250 pg/ml. A paired t-test showed that in Group A, patients with Vitamin B12 deficiency showed significant improvement in mean tinnitus severity index score and visual analog scale (VAS) after Vitamin B12 therapy. This pilot study highlights the significant prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency in North Indian population and improvement in tinnitus severity scores and VAS in cobalamin-deficient patients receiving intramuscular Vitamin B12 weekly for 6 weeks further provides a link between cobalamin deficiency and tinnitus thereby suggestive of a therapeutic role of B12 in cobalamin-deficient patients of tinnitus.

  18. Therapeutic role of Vitamin B12 in patients of chronic tinnitus: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available True tinnitus is a phantom auditory perception arising from a source or trigger in the cochlea, brainstem, or at higher centers and has no detectable acoustic generator. The most accepted is the famous neurophysiologic model of Jastreboff, which stresses that tinnitus, is a subcortical perception and results from the processing of weak neural activity in the periphery. The aim of this study is to determine the role of Vitamin B12 in treatment of chronic tinnitus. In this randomized, double-blind pilot study, total 40 patients were enrolled, of which 20 in Group A (cases received intramuscular therapy of 1 ml Vitamin B12 (2500 mcg weekly for a period of 6 weeks and Group B (20 patients received placebo isotonic saline 01 ml intramuscular. The patients were subjected to Vitamin B12 assay and audiometry pre- and post-therapy. Of the total patients of tinnitus, 17 were Vitamin B12 deficient that is 42.5% showed deficiency when the normal levels were considered to be 250 pg/ml. A paired t-test showed that in Group A, patients with Vitamin B12 deficiency showed significant improvement in mean tinnitus severity index score and visual analog scale (VAS after Vitamin B12 therapy. This pilot study highlights the significant prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency in North Indian population and improvement in tinnitus severity scores and VAS in cobalamin-deficient patients receiving intramuscular Vitamin B12 weekly for 6 weeks further provides a link between cobalamin deficiency and tinnitus thereby suggestive of a therapeutic role of B12 in cobalamin-deficient patients of tinnitus.

  19. Serum metabolomic profiles from patients with acute kidney injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinchun; Shannon, Melissa; Ando, Yosuke; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Khan, Nasim A; Portilla, Didier; Beger, Richard D

    2012-04-15

    Low sensitivity of current clinical markers (serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN)) in early stages of the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) limits their utility. Rapid LC/MS-based metabolic profiling of serum demonstrated in a pilot study that metabolomics could provide novel indicators of AKI. Metabolic profiles of serum samples from seventeen hospitalized patients with newly diagnosed AKI were compared with the profiles of serum from age-matched subjects with normal kidney function. Increases in acylcarnitines and amino acids (methionine, homocysteine, pyroglutamate, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and phenylalanine) and a reduction in serum levels of arginine and several lysophosphatidyl cholines were observed in patients with AKI compared to healthy subjects. Increases in homocysteine, ADMA and pyroglutamate have been recognized as biomarkers of cardiovascular and renal disease, and acylcarnitines represent biomarkers of defective fatty acid oxidation. The results of this pilot study demonstrate the utility of metabolomics in the discovery of novel serum biomarkers that can facilitate the diagnosis and determine prognosis of AKI in hospitalized patients.

  20. Isolating the benefits of fluid restriction in patients with heart failure: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Smith, Andrew; Culler, Steven D; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2015-12-01

    Fluid restriction (FR) in persons with heart failure (HF) is often prescribed, yet self-regulation and the troublesome symptom of thirst are difficult for patients to manage. The purpose of this pilot study was to test an educational and behavioral intervention (EBI) on adherence with prescribed FR and outcome measures of fluid congestion, symptom distress, and health related quality of life (HRQL). Secondary aims were to describe the relationships between self-reported and objectively measured determinants of fluid status and symptoms, and assess the psychometric properties of piloted instruments, and intervention effect sizes. NYHA Class II-IV (n=25, 44-83 years, 56% male, 20% minority, mean EF 23.0+11.7%) participants were randomized to the EBI or attention control (AC) and evaluated at baseline, 3 and 6 months. EBI patients trended toward decreasing fluid ingestion (p=0.08), experienced less HF symptom frequency (p=0.13) and severity (p=0.06), and increased symptoms of thirst (pfluid congestion between groups. These outcomes suggest that patients receiving the EBI drank slightly less fluid, experienced less typical HF symptoms, greater thirst distress and stable HRQOL. Moderate to large effect sizes for the measures used were observed, and outcomes suggest that a randomized trial of various levels of FR would not potentiate fluid congestion but should specifically address preservation of HRQOL and thirst symptoms. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  1. Pilot study of sexual dysfunction in patients with psoriasis: Influence of biologic therapy

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    Ricardo Ruiz-Villaverde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease that affects 1 to 3% of the population in most industrialized countries. It is commonly associated with a variety of psychological problems including low self-esteem, depression, suicidal thoughts, and sexual dysfunction. Materials and Methods : We have performed a pilot study in which we have tried to assess the impact on sexual dysfunction in patients with psoriasis who have started treatment with biological therapy using validated indexes in Spanish: International Index of Erectile Function for men and female sexual function index in women. Results : Considering the men and women from our study, an improvement in FSFI by an average of 9.5 and 6.3 points is observed, respectively. Conclusion: We considered our series as a first step for a more detailed approach to the study of sexual function in patients with psoriasis.

  2. Pilot study of "miracle fruit" to improve food palatability for patients receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, Marlene K; Satiroff, Bernadette A

    2012-10-01

    Taste changes in patients undergoing chemotherapy are common and can be of long duration, are associated with poor nutrition, and can reduce quality of life. A pilot study of the fruit Synsepalum dulcificum-known as "miracle fruit"-as a novel supportive intervention was conducted with eight patients with cancer who were being treated with chemotherapy and reporting taste changes. Miraculin, a naturally occurring protein in miracle fruit, has the unusual ability to transduce a sweet signal in an acidic environment, profoundly changing food taste profiles for a short duration, masking unpleasant tastes, and increasing the palatability of certain foods. This pilot study was designed to determine whether consumption of the Miracle Fruit™ supplement would improve chemotherapy-associated taste changes, thereby improving the taste of food and ultimately leading to better nutrition. Four of the participants were given a two-week supply of the supplement and the other four were given a two-week supply of a placebo. After two weeks, the supplement group received a two-week supply of the placebo and the placebo group received a two-week supply of the supplement. Participants recorded food and drink intake in daily food dairies and rated taste changes with each food as better, worse, or no change. All study participants reported positive taste changes with the supplement.

  3. Personal abilities in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. A pilot study using the existence scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, Johannes P; Kopriva-Altfahrt, Gertrude; Söllner, Wolfgang; König, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Personality psychology is increasingly used in various clinical medicine settings to help in decision-making in difficult situations, especially in chronic disease. Patients with chronic renal disease are very dependent on modern medicine, and psychological aspects could help give answers in certain circumstances. Logotherapy and Existence analysis, after Viktor Frankl (Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy), is the theory of the possibilities and conditions for a fulfilled existence and evaluates a different aspect of personality psychology, namely meaning (in life). We used the existence scale questionnaire in this pilot study to investigate the personal abilities self-distancing, self-transcendence, freedom and responsibility in dialysis patients and compared a group of hemodialysis (HD) patients with patients treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). We studied a mixed dialysis cohort (24 HD, 24 CAPD) at two Austrian centers (Innsbruck Medical University Hospital and Wilhelminenspital of the City of Vienna). Overall, results for dialysis patients (n = 48) were very close to those reported for healthy persons; however, CAPD patients scored significantly better than HD patients (p = 0.017) on the subscale self-distancing. This significant difference was also seen in the overall scores (p = 0.045). Our results might indicate that contented CAPD patients have personal abilities that predestine them for this type of treatment. The existence scale might help decide between CAPD and HD treatment alternatives.

  4. Determinants of outcome for patients undergoing lumbar discectomy: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Oonagh T

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: One-third of patients who undergo lumbar discectomy continue to suffer from persistent pain postoperatively. Greater preoperative warmth thresholds and greater preoperative cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of stable serum nitric oxide metabolites are associated with a worse outcome. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between patient outcome (defined using the Modified Stauffer-Coventry evaluating criteria) and preoperative pain perception threshold to an electrical stimulus. METHODS: A prospective observational pilot study of patients (n = 39) was performed. Quantitative sensory testing, visual analogue scales for anxiety and pain, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HADS) Scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire were completed, and serum nitric oxide metabolites were measured perioperatively. Excised disc tissue was examined histologically, and immunohistochemistry for phospholipase A2 was performed. RESULTS: Ten patients (26%) had an unsatisfactory outcome. Those with a satisfactory outcome had greater preoperative pain perception thresholds over the affected dermatome, which decreased by 2 months postoperatively. These patients also demonstrated a decrease in nitric oxide metabolites from preoperatively to 18 h postoperatively. Greater preoperative HADS scores, and greater pain intensity 4 h and 24 h postoperatively were associated with an unsatisfactory outcome. CONCLUSION: Patients with a satisfactory outcome demonstrate a decrease in pain perception thresholds and plasma concentration of stable nitric oxide metabolites during the perioperative period. Patients with an unsatisfactory outcome following lumbar discectomy experience greater preoperative anxiety and greater pain during the early postoperative period. These findings justify a larger prospective observational study.

  5. Pilot study of a robotic protocol to treat shoulder subluxation in patients with chronic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Shoulder subluxation is a frequent complication of motor impairment after stroke, leading to soft tissue damage, stretching of the joint capsule, rotator cuff injury, and in some cases pain, thus limiting use of the affected extremity beyond weakness. In this pilot study, we determined whether robotic treatment of chronic shoulder subluxation can lead to functional improvement and whether any improvement was robust. Methods 18 patients with chronic stroke (3.9 ± 2.9 years from acute stroke), completed 6 weeks of robotic training using the linear shoulder robot. Training was performed 3 times per week on alternate days. Each session consisted of 3 sets of 320 repetitions of the affected arm, and the robotic protocol alternated between training vertical arm movements, shoulder flexion and extension, in an anti-gravity plane, and training horizontal arm movements, scapular protraction and retraction, in a gravity eliminated plane. Results Training with the linear robot improved shoulder stability, motor power, and resulted in improved functional outcomes that were robust 3 months after training. Conclusion In this uncontrolled pilot study, the robotic protocol effectively treated shoulder subluxation in chronic stroke patients. Treatment of subluxation can lead to improved functional use of the affected arm, likely by increasing motor power in the trained muscles. PMID:23914834

  6. Pilot Study to Evaluate the Appropriate Management of Patients With Coexistent Bacterial Vaginosis and Cervicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane R. Schwebke

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A pilot study was performed to obtain preliminary data regarding the need for targeted therapy of bacterial vaginosis (BV when it accompanies clinically defined cervicitis. Specifically, women attending a sexually transmitted disease (STD clinic with clinically defined BV and cervicitis were treated in the first phase of the study with doxycycline alone. In phase II, the patients received doxycycline and concomitant intravaginal metronidazole gel. All patients were reexamined 3–4 weeks after therapy. Persistence of BV occurred in 18/19 (95% of women in phase I vs. 1/7 (14% of women in phase II (P < 0.001. We concluded that, in women with coexistent clinically defined cervicitis and BV, the treatment of cervicitis does not result in a normalization of the vaginal flora.

  7. Neurophysiological assessment for evaluating residual cognition in vegetative and minimally conscious state patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Salvo, Simona; Caminiti, Fabrizia; Bonanno, Lilla; De Cola, Maria Cristina; Corallo, Francesco; Caizzone, Antonio; Rifici, Carmela; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess residual cognitive function and perform outcome evaluation in vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) patients, using Neurowave, a system able to monitor event-related potentials (ERPs) induced by neurosensory stimulation. Eleven VS and five MCS patients underwent neurological examination and clinical evaluation performed using validated clinical and behavioral scales; they also underwent neurosensory stimulation, which consisted of administration of target images (rare stimuli), relevant to the patient's personal history and having emotional significance, alternated with nontarget images ("standard" stimuli), which had no emotional significance. All simultaneous ERP responses at baseline (T0) and at three months from T0 (T1) were recorded. At T0 we found significant differences between the VS and MCS patients for the N200 (p=0.02) and P300 (p=0.04) waves. The neurophysiological analysis at T1 showed a significant difference only for P300 (p=0.02), probably due to the improvements observed in the VS subjects for the N100 (p=0.009) and N200 (p=0.02) sensory components. Neurophysiological assessment for evaluating residual cognition in vegetative and minimally conscious state patients: a pilot study Our findings seem to show the value of ERP monitoring in VS and MCS patients as a means of investigating residual cognitive function. This approach could guide early therapeutic and rehabilitation interventions, and contribute to identifying better diagnostic and prognostic markers for use in unresponsive or low-responsive patients.

  8. Behavior management approach for agitated behavior in Japanese patients with dementia: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junko; Nakaaki, Shutaro; Torii, Katsuyoshi; Oka, Mizuki; Negi, Atsushi; Tatsumi, Hiroshi; Narumoto, Jin; Furukawa, Toshi A; Mimura, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Background Agitated behaviors are frequently observed in patients with dementia and can cause severe distress to caregivers. However, little evidence of the efficacy of nonpharmacological interventions for agitated behaviors exists for patients with dementia. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate a behavioral management program developed by the Seattle Protocols for patients with agitated behaviors in Japan. Methods Eighteen patients with dementia (Alzheimer’s disease, n = 14; dementia with Lewy bodies, n = 4) participated in an open study testing the effectiveness of a behavioral management program. The intervention consisted of 20 sessions over the course of 3 months. The primary outcomes were severity of agitation in dementia, as measured using the Agitated Behavior in Dementia scale (ABID) and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). Results The behavioral management program resulted in significant reductions in total scores on both the ABID and CMAI. Although both physically agitated and verbally agitated behavior scores on the ABID improved significantly, symptoms of psychosis did not improve after the intervention. Conclusion The behavioral management technique may be beneficial to distressed caregivers of patients with dementia. In the future, a well designed study to develop the behavioral management program more fully is needed. PMID:23293522

  9. Conifer Green Needle Complex in Patients with Precancerous Gastric Lesions: An Observational Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Bespalov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Helicobacter pylori infection is common and can lead to precancerous gastric lesions. Standard antibiotic therapy has a failure rate of more than 25% from antibiotic resistance. The primary aim of this observational pilot study was to test the feasibility of a large-scale clinical trial of Conifer Green Needle Complex (CGNC to treat precancerous gastric lesions. Secondary aims were to investigate H. pylori infection, stomach function, and histopathology of the gastric mucosa. Methods. A tablet form of CGNC (extracted from Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies (L Karst was prescribed to 26 patients with precancerous gastric lesions (two tablets, 100 mg CGNC/tablet, three times per day for six months. Another 24 patients received no treatment. Results. Compared with control patients, CGNC-treated patients showed total or partial regression (using the quantitative Rome III diagnostic criteria of dyspeptic symptoms (92.3%, p<0.0001, eradication of H. pylori infection (57.1%, p<0.03, a reduction in endoscopic signs of gastritis (92.3%, p<0.001, an increase of pepsinogen-pepsin in the gastric juice (57.7%, p<0.05, and total regression or reduction in the degree of intestinal metaplasia (46.2%, p<0.05 and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration (53.8%, p<0.05. Conclusions. This study justifies a randomised-controlled trial with CGNC in patients with atrophic gastritis.

  10. Difference in motor fatigue between patients with stroke and patients with multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida eSehle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is often reported in stroke patients. However, it is still unclear if fatigue in stroke patients is more prominent, more frequent or more typical than in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and if the pathophysiology differs between these two populations. The purpose of this study was to compare motor fatigue and fatigue induced changes in kinematic gait parameters between stroke patients, MS patients and healthy persons. Gait parameters at the beginning and end of a treadmill walking test were assessed in 10 stroke patients, 40 MS patients and 20 healthy subjects. The recently developed Fatigue index Kliniken Schmieder (FKS based on change of the movement’s attractor and its variability was used to measure motor fatigue. Six stroke patients had a pathological FKS. The FKS (indicating the level of motor fatigue in stroke patients was similar compared to MS patients. Stroke patients had smaller step length, step height and greater step width, circumduction with the right and left leg as well as greater sway compared to the other groups at the beginning and at the end of test. A severe walking impairment in stroke patients does not necessarily cause a pathological FKS indicating motor fatigue. Moreover, the FKS can be used as a measure of motor fatigue in stroke and MS and may also be applicable to other diseases.

  11. Improving maintenance medication adherence in adult inflammatory bowel disease patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. Matteson-Kome

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication nonadherence in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD may lead to suboptimal control of the disease, decreased quality of life, and poor outcomes. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility, intervention mechanism, and potential effectiveness of a three-month continuous self-improvement (CSI intervention to enhance medication adherence (MA in adult nonadherent IBD patients. Adult IBD patients taking a daily or twice-daily dosed maintenance medication were screened electronically for two months to determine baseline MA levels. Nonadherent IBD participants were randomized to the CSI or the attention control (AC intervention and monitored for three months. The CSI intervention consisted of a data evaluation and system refinement process in which system changes were identified and implemented. The AC group was given educational information regarding IBD disease process, extra-intestinal manifestations of IBD, and medical therapy. Demographic statistics, change scores for within and between- group differences, and effect size estimates were calculated. Nine nonadherent participants (medication adherence score <0.85 were eligible for randomization. The intervention was found feasible and acceptable. Although no statistically significant improvement in MA was found (P=0.14, adherence improved in 3 of 4 of the CSI group and 1 of 2 in the attention control group. The effect size calculation of 1.9 will determine the sample size for future study. The results of this pilot study showed the intervention was feasible and had a positive effect on MA change score and adherence levels. A larger fully powered study is needed to test of the effectiveness of this innovative intervention.

  12. A pilot study of an exercise-based patient education program in people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Stephanie; Mahli, Mohammed; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Lutz, Christina; Liebherr, Magnus; Schubert, Patric; Haas, Christian T

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical exercise leads to numerous positive effects in PwMS. However, long-term effects of exercise may only be achievable if training is implemented in daily routine. Enabling patients to exercise regularly, we developed a patient education program focused on evidence-based information of training. PwMS were educated in neurophysiological effects of physical exercise, exercise-induced benefits for PwMS, and risk factors (e.g., weather). Fifteen PwMS were analyzed before (T 0) and after (T 1) a 12-week patient education. Afterwards, participants performed their exercises autonomously for 32 weeks and were tested in sustainability tests (T 2). Guided interviews were carried out, additionally. Significant improvements from T 0 to T 1 were found in 6MWT, gait velocity, TUG, fatigue, and quality of life. Significant results of TUG and gait velocity from T 1 to T 2 demonstrated that participants kept few effects after the 32-week training phase. Qualitative analyses showed improved self-confidence and identified training strategies and barriers. This pilot study provides evidence that PwMS are able to acquire good knowledge about physical exercise and apply this knowledge successfully in training management. One might conclude that this exercise-based patient education seems to be a feasible option to maintain or improve patients' integral constitution concerning physical and mental health.

  13. Potential determinants of efficacy of mirror therapy in stroke patients – A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Maddalena; Morkisch, Nadine; Fritzsch, Claire; Mehnert, Jan; Steinbrink, Jens; Niedeggen, Michael; Dohle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mirror therapy (MT) was found to improve motor function after stroke. However, there is high variability between patients regarding motor recovery. Objectives: The following pilot study was designed to identify potential factors determining this variability between patients with severe upper limb paresis, receiving MT. Methods: Eleven sub-acute stroke patients with severe upper limb paresis participated, receiving in-patient rehabilitation. After a set of pre-assessments (including measurement of brain activity at the primary motor cortex and precuneus during the mirror illusion, using near-infrared spectroscopy as described previously), four weeks of MT were applied, followed by a set of post-assessments. Discriminant group analysis for MT responders and non-responders was performed. Results: Six out of eleven patients were defined as responders and five as non-responders on the basis of their functional motor improvement. The initial motor function and the activity shift in both precunei (mirror index) were found to discriminate significantly between responders and non-responders. Conclusions: In line with earlier results, initial motor function was confirmed as crucial determinant of motor recovery. Additionally, activity response to the mirror illusion in both precunei was found to be a candidate for determination of the efficacy of MT. PMID:26409402

  14. Potential determinants of efficacy of mirror therapy in stroke patients--A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Maddalena; Morkisch, Nadine; Fritzsch, Claire; Mehnert, Jan; Steinbrink, Jens; Niedeggen, Michael; Dohle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mirror therapy (MT) was found to improve motor function after stroke. However, there is high variability between patients regarding motor recovery. The following pilot study was designed to identify potential factors determining this variability between patients with severe upper limb paresis, receiving MT. Eleven sub-acute stroke patients with severe upper limb paresis participated, receiving in-patient rehabilitation. After a set of pre-assessments (including measurement of brain activity at the primary motor cortex and precuneus during the mirror illusion, using near-infrared spectroscopy as described previously), four weeks of MT were applied, followed by a set of post-assessments. Discriminant group analysis for MT responders and non-responders was performed. Six out of eleven patients were defined as responders and five as non-responders on the basis of their functional motor improvement. The initial motor function and the activity shift in both precunei (mirror index) were found to discriminate significantly between responders and non-responders. In line with earlier results, initial motor function was confirmed as crucial determinant of motor recovery. Additionally, activity response to the mirror illusion in both precunei was found to be a candidate for determination of the efficacy of MT.

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation program in patients with Chagas heart failure: a single-arm pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Felippe Felix Mediano

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The benefit of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR program for patients with Chagas heart failure (CHF remains unclear. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of CR for CHF patients. METHODS: A single-arm pilot study, including 12 patients with CHF, was performed. Patients participated in an 8-month physical exercise intervention, comprising aerobic, strength, and stretching exercises (3 times per week, 60 minutes per session. Nutritional and pharmaceutical counseling were also performed. Functional capacity (cardiopulmonary exercise test, muscle respiratory strength (manovacuometry, and body composition (anthropometry and skinfolds were evaluated at baseline, and after 4 and 8 months of intervention. Cardiac function (echocardiography, biomarkers (lipid profile, glucose, and glycated hemoglobin and quality of life (Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire were assessed at baseline and at the end of the intervention. RESULTS: Seven of 12 patients included in the study completed the 8-month follow-up period. Only 2 moderate adverse events occurred during the exercise training. Functional capacity improved after 4 months of CR, while left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and respiratory strength improved after 8 months. Patients with right ventricular (RV dysfunction at baseline exhibited an improvement in functional capacity after 4 months, and improvements in left ventricular (LV diastolic pressure, respiratory strength, and quality of life at the end of follow-up. Conversely, those with normal baseline RV function demonstrated LVEF increases that were not observed in patients with RV dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: CR was feasible, safe, and has important clinical benefits for patients with CHF, specifically for cardiac function and muscle respiratory strength.

  16. Ganirelix for luteolysis in poor responder patients undergoing IVF treatment: a Scandinavian multicenter 'extended pilot study'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lena; Andersen, A.N.; Lindenberg, Svend;

    2010-01-01

    To enhance oocyte yield and pregnancy outcome in poor responder women undergoing IVF treatment, daily low dose GnRH antagonist administration was given during the late luteal phase to induce luteolysis and possibly secure a more synchronous cohort of recruitable follicles. An open extended pilot...... study in four Scandinavian fertility centers was done including 60 patients. Poor response was defined as when 2000 IU FSH. GnRH antagonist (ganirelix) was given, 0.25 mg s.c. daily, from days 3 to 5...... before expected start of menstruation and continued for 4-7 days. On cycle day 2-3 a starting dose of rFSH (300-400 IU/day) was given. At a leading follicle diameter of 14 mm, ganirelix administration was resumed until final oocyte maturation was induced with 10,000 IU hCG. GnRH antagonist only...

  17. Patient Navigation for Mothers with Depression who Have Children in Head Start: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Linhart, Yaminette; Silverstein, Michael; Grote, Nancy; Cadena, Lynn; Feinberg, Emily; Ruth, Betty J; Cabral, Howard

    2016-10-01

    This study assesses the potential of social work-facilitated patient navigation to help mothers with depression engage with mental health care. We conducted a randomized pilot trial (N = 47) in Head Start-a U.S. preschool program for low-income children. Seven lay navigators received training and supervision from professional social workers. After 6 months, more navigated participants engaged with a psychologist, therapist, or social worker (45% vs. 13%, 95% confidence interval [CI] [2, 57]); engaged with any provider, (55% vs. 26%, 95% CI [1, 56]); and reported having a "depression care provider" (80% vs. 41%, 95% CI [9, 65]). Community-based navigation appears feasible; however, more definitive testing is necessary.

  18. Biomechanical podiatric evaluation in an Italian cohort of patients with systemic sclerosis: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Ravenni, Giovanni; Ciampi, Benedetta; Del Rosso, Angela; El Aoufy, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    Objective Foot problems are often present in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) patients, however studies regarding podiatric problems related to SSc are lacking and there are no data evaluating the foot biomechanical changes. The aim of the present pilot study was to evaluate podiatric problems in an Italian cohort of SSc patients by assessing received podiatric services, foot pain and disability and biomechanical foot deformity. Material and Methods 25 consecutive SSc patients were enrolled from the Division of Rheumatology, University of Florence. All SSc patients were assessed by: Standards of Care for People with Foot Musculoskeletal Health problems: Audit Tool, Foot Function Index (FFI), Weight and non-weight bearing foot joint assessment, (Foot Posture Index (FPI) and Gait Cycle), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 (SF-36). Results Audit Tool - Only 7 (28%) out of the 25 patients with SSc had a specific podiatric assessment and treatment: no patient received a foot health assessment within the first 6 months of disease diagnosis and no patient received information about foot involvement. 1 patient (4%) received foot assessment every year; 1 patient (4%) received specific information about the disease and 5 patients (20%) received information about the benefits of using adapted footwear and insoles. FFI - Values of pain, disability and activity limitations, reported in FFI, are 4.7±5.1, 5.1±3.2 and 3.2±3.1 (M±DS), respectively. Non-weight bearing foot joint assessment shows a rearfoot varus deformity in 64% of patients, forefoot varus deformity in 42% and 6% forefoot valgus deformity. Weight bearing foot joint assessment, through FPI shows a pronated foot 20% of patients with and 34% with highly pronated overall foot posture. Gait analysis shows that 64% of patients has a contact of the calcaneus in invertion while 36% in eversion. In the midstance, 78% have the foot in pronation and 22% in supination, while in

  19. Patient-physician Communication Barrier: A Pilot Study Evaluating Patient Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tm; Hassali, Ma; Al-Haddad, Msm

    2011-07-01

    This study aims to identify the patient-physician communication barriers in the primary healthcare setting in Pulau Penang, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was designed to attain the objectives of the study. A self-developed 17-item study tool was used to explore respondent's perception about the barriers they have faced while communicating with physician. The reliability scale was applied and internal consistency of the study tool was estimated on the basis of Cronbach's alpha (α = 0.58). The data analysis was conducted using statistical package for social sciences students SPSS 13(®). Chi Square test was used to test the difference between proportions. A total of n = 69 patients responded to this survey. A higher participation was seen by the male respondents, 39 (56.5%). About 52 (76.5%) of the respondents were satisfied with the information provided by the physician. In an effort to identify the patient-physician barriers, a poor understanding among the patients and physician was revealed. 16 (23.5%) respondents disclosed lack of satisfaction from the information provided to them. Overall, it is seen that lack of physician-patient understanding was the main reason that result hindrance in the affective communication. Moreover, there is a possibility that a low level of health literacy among the patients and inability of the physician to affectively listen to patients may be the other factors that result in a deficient communication.

  20. Rosiglitazone Add-On in Treatment of Depressed Patients with Insulin Resistance: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie L. Rasgon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of cross-sectional studies have suggested an association between insulin resistance (IR and affective disorders. However, limited data exist on potential changes in IR in a prospective treatment of depression. The present pilot study tested the hypothesis that improvement of IR with the addition of an insulin-sensitizing agent would improve mood in nondiabetic patients with unipolar or bipolar depression, who had surrogate blood markers suggestive of IR. Surrogate IR-criteria blood markers were fasting plasma glucose >100 mg/dl or triglyceride (TG to high density lipoprotein (HDL ratio >3.0. Open-label rosiglitazone, titrated to a dose of 8 mg/day, was administered for 12 weeks to 12 patients with depressive disorder receiving treatment as usual (TAU. Eight patients who completed the 12-week study exhibited significant declines in both depression severity by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression scale, with moderate effect sizes noted. Modest improvement in Matsuda Index scores was also noted at 12 weeks, yet declines in depression severity scores were not associated with improvements in the endocrine markers (Matsuda Index, TG/HDL ratio, and body mass index. These results suggest the potential novel use for an insulin-sensitizing agent in the treatment of depressive disorders. Larger placebo-controlled studies are warranted.

  1. Effects of Reiki on Pain, Anxiety, and Blood Pressure in Patients Undergoing Knee Replacement: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ann Linda; Vitale, Anne; Brownell, Elise; Kryak, Elizabeth; Rand, William

    This blinded, controlled pilot study investigated the effects of Reiki on 46 patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Of the 3 groups, Reiki, Sham Reiki, and Standard of Care, only the Reiki group showed significant reductions in pain, blood pressure, respiration rate, and state anxiety, which provides evidence for a full-scale clinical study.

  2. Collaborative Care for Patients With Severe Personality Disorders: Preliminary Results and Active Ingredients From a Pilot Study (Part I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr Barbara Stringer; Pieter Karman; Ad Kerkhof; Bauke Koekkoek; Aartjan Beekman; prof Berno van Meijel; Adriaan Hoogendoorn

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test if a collaborative care program (CCP) with nurses in a coordinating position is beneficial for patients with severe personality disorders. DESIGN AND METHODS: A pilot study with a comparative multiple case study design using mixed methods investigating active ingredients and

  3. Percutaneous nerve stimulation in chronic neuropathic pain patients due to spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsky, David Jos; Ettema, Frank Willem Leo; van der Leeden, Marike; Dekker, Joost; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke Marjan

    2014-03-01

    The long-term prognosis for neuropathic pain resolution following spinal cord injury (SCI) is often poor. In many SCI patients, neuropathic pain continues or even worsens over time. Thus, new treatment approaches are needed. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility and effect of percutaneous (electrical) nerve stimulation (P(E)NS) in SCI patients with chronic neuropathic pain. In 18 weeks, 12 P(E)NS treatments were scheduled. Assessment with questionnaires was performed at baseline (T0), after 8 weeks (T8), 18 weeks (T18), and 12 weeks post-treatment (T30). From 26 screened patients, 17 were included. In total, 91.2% questionnaires were returned, 2 patients dropped out, and 4.2% of the patients reported minor side effects. Pain scores on the week pain diary measured with the numerical rating scale improved significantly at T8, from 6.5 at baseline to 5.4, and were still significantly improved at T18. Pain reduction of ≥ 30% directly after a session was reported in 64.6% sessions. In total, 6 patients experienced reduction in size of the pain areas at T18 and T30, with a mean reduction of 45.8% at T18 and 45.3% at T30. P(E)NS is feasible as an intervention in SCI patients and might have a positive effect on pain reduction in a part of this patient group. © 2013 The Authors Pain Practice © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  4. Quality of life and coping strategies in Lebanese Multiple Sclerosis patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Natali; Ammar, Diala; Darwish, Hala

    2016-03-01

    Coping strategies used by Multiple Sclerosis patients play a key role in adjusting to the disease and affect their overall quality of life. This relationship has been investigated in developed countries, but none has been studied in developing ones such as Lebanon. Factors including barriers to health care delivery, economic pressure and political instability influence which coping strategies are used and often increases the use of negative coping mechanisms. The current pilot study explored the association between different coping strategies with quality of life and depression, anxiety, fatigue and social support in 34 Lebanese Multiple Sclerosis patients. Results indicated that Multiple Sclerosis patients using positive coping strategies had significantly higher scores of quality of life (U=46, p=.038) and social support (U=33.5, p=.011), and lower depression (U=44, p=.030) and anxiety levels (U=46.5, p=.038) as compared to those using negative coping strategies. Specifically, escape avoidance coping strategy was associated with poor quality of life scores (r=-.609, pstrategies is needed to develop proper therapeutic interventions which increase quality of life. Future studies are required to confirm these results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Pilot Study of an Exercise-Based Patient Education Program in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kersten

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that physical exercise leads to numerous positive effects in PwMS. However, long-term effects of exercise may only be achievable if training is implemented in daily routine. Enabling patients to exercise regularly, we developed a patient education program focused on evidence-based information of training. PwMS were educated in neurophysiological effects of physical exercise, exercise-induced benefits for PwMS, and risk factors (e.g., weather. Fifteen PwMS were analyzed before (T0 and after (T1 a 12-week patient education. Afterwards, participants performed their exercises autonomously for 32 weeks and were tested in sustainability tests (T2. Guided interviews were carried out, additionally. Significant improvements from T0 to T1 were found in 6MWT, gait velocity, TUG, fatigue, and quality of life. Significant results of TUG and gait velocity from T1 to T2 demonstrated that participants kept few effects after the 32-week training phase. Qualitative analyses showed improved self-confidence and identified training strategies and barriers. This pilot study provides evidence that PwMS are able to acquire good knowledge about physical exercise and apply this knowledge successfully in training management. One might conclude that this exercise-based patient education seems to be a feasible option to maintain or improve patients’ integral constitution concerning physical and mental health.

  6. Pilot study of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum and radiation therapy in patients with high grade astrocytomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feun, L.G.; Stewart, D.J.; Maor, M.; Leavens, M.; Savaraj, N.; Burgess, M.A.; Yung, W.K.; Benjamin, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot study was performed combining cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP) and radiation therapy to treat patients with high-grade astrocytomas. CDDP at a dose of 40 mg/m2/week intravenously was given during the course of cranial irradiation. Following irradiation, CDDP was given every three weeks on a schedule of 35-40 mg/m2/day for three days until toxicity became unacceptable or until tumor progression occurred. Radiation therapy consisted of 6 000 rads over a seven week period or 5 000 rads followed by an additional 1 500 rads to the tumor site. Patients were followed by computerized axial tomography (CT) scan and neurologic examination. Thirty patients were entered onto the study; 22 were considered evaluable. The median survival was 53 weeks and the median time to progression was 21 weeks. Toxicity was generally tolerable; however, ototoxicity may be enhanced by this treatment. CDDP combined with cranial irradiation is tolerable and feasible, although close follow-up is recommended in case CDDP has to be temporarily interrupted.

  7. Ultra Low-Dose Naloxone and Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Elderly Patients Undergoing Joint Replacement Surgery: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Imasogie, Ngozi N; Sudha Singh; Watson, James T.; Debbie Hurley; Patricia Morley-Forster

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A pilot study was conducted to assess whether both the rationale and feasibility exist for future randomized clinical trials to evaluate the combined use of naloxone infusion and tramadol/acetaminophen as opioid-sparing drugs in elderly patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery.DESIGN: Ten patients 70 years of age or older undergoing either total knee (n=7) or total hip (n=3) arthroplasty were treated prospectively. Each patient received two tablets of tramadol/...

  8. Pilot Study of Gleevec/Imatinib Mesylate (STI-571, NSC 716051) in Neurofibromatosis (NF1) Patients with Plexiform Neurofibromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Mesylate (STI-571, NSC 716051) In Neurofibromatosis ( NF1 ) Patients with Plexiform Neurofibromas PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kent Robertson, M.D...Imatinib Mesylate (STI-571, NSC 716051) In Neurofibromatosis ( NF1 ) Patients with Plexiform Neurofibromas 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0120 5c. PROGRAM...Section I - Introduction of research The goal of this Pilot Study is to trial multiple techniques for determining the response of NF1 patients with

  9. Prenatal latex sensitization in patients with spina bifida: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Michael; Goettler, Susanne; Eschenburg, Georg; Kracht, Thorben; Kunkel, Philip; Von der Wense, Axel; Reinshagen, Konrad

    2014-03-01

    Patients with spina bifida are particularly vulnerable to developing immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated latex sensitization. Even though many risk factors leading to latex allergy in these patients have been described, it is still unclear whether the increased prevalence of latex sensitization is disease associated or due to the procedures used to treat spina bifida. The aim of this study was to assess prenatal latex sensitization in patients with spina bifida by examining IgE levels in umbilical cord blood. Patients with spina bifida and matched healthy infants were recruited from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf and Children's Hospital Altona. Latex-specific and total IgE were assessed in umbilical cord blood using ImmunoCAP testing to evaluate the degree of prenatal latex sensitization. Twenty-two subjects, 10 with spina bifida and 12 healthy individuals, were included. Subjects were selected after matching for sex, gestational age, weight, parental allergy profile, number of prenatal examinations, and utilization of latex tools during pregnancy (propensity score estimates, p = 0.36). In patients with spina bifida, latex-specific and total IgE levels were significantly higher than those in healthy individuals (p = 0.001). After normalization to total IgE, latex-specific IgE levels were higher, yet not significantly increased (p = 0.085). Perinatally, there is a significant augmentation of total and latex-specific IgE in patients with spina bifida. After correcting for total IgE, latex-specific IgE was increased, yet not significantly higher than in matched, healthy controls. This pilot study gives novel insights in the immunological reactions related to spina bifida. The increased latex-specific IgE levels could possibly be associated with the occurrence of a latex allergy in the future.

  10. Pupil cycle time and contrast sensitivity in type II diabetes mellitus patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyoung Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pupil cycle time (PCT has been widely used for examination of ocular diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Aims: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the difference of contrast sensitivity according to PCT results, and the secondary aim was to determine the factors associated with PCT difference for type II diabetes patients. Settings and Design: A clinical pilot study that included a total of 60 eyes of 60 type II diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: We divided all patients into three groups according to PCT results. Group A and Group C were composed of patients who had upper one third PCT and lower one third PCT, respectively. We analyzed difference of age, diabetes duration, hypertension duration, mean best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, mean spherical equivalent (SE, HbA1C, glomerular filtration rate (GFR, stage of diabetic retinopathy, and Cardiac Autonomic Function Score (CAFS. Contrast sensitivity and decrease of visual acuity by glare were also estimated and analyzed for 28 eyes of 28 non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR patients. Group [NPDR] A and Group [NPDR] C were defined as those who had lower one third PCT and upper one third PCT, respectively. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 17.0 software. Results and Conclusions: Each group contained 20 eyes. Significant differences between Group A and Group C were observed in duration of diabetes and CAFS (P ≤ 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively. Contrast sensitivity in Group [NPDR] A was significantly more than in Group [NPDR] C at all cpds (all P ≤ 0.001. We found that PCT can influence contrast sensitivity or glare in diabetes patients and also confirmed a significant correlation of PCT with CAFS and duration of diabetes.

  11. Patients' perception of quality of pre-operative informed consent in athens, Greece: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Falagas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We sought to perform a study to record and evaluate patients' views of the way surgeons communicate informed consent (IC in Greece. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A prospective pilot study was carried out in Athens from 9/2007 to 4/2008. The study sample was extracted from patients, operated by eight different surgeons, who volunteered to fill in a post-surgery self-report questionnaire on IC. A composite delivered information index and a patient-physician relationship index were constructed for the purposes of the analysis. In total, 77 patients (42 males volunteered to respond to the questionnaire. The delivered information index scores ranged from 3 to 10, the mean score was 8, and the standard deviation (SD was 1.9. All patients were aware of their underlying diagnosis and reason for surgery. However, a considerable proportion of the respondents (14.3% achieved a score below or equal to 5. The patient-physician relationship scores ranged from 0 to 20, the mean score was 16 and the standard deviation (SD was 4.3. The better the patient-physician relationship, the more information was finally delivered to the patient from the physician (Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficient was 0.4 and p<0.001. Delivered information index was significantly higher among participants who comprehended the right to informed consent, compared to participants who did not (p<0.001, and among participants who were given information regarding other possible therapeutic options (p = 0.001. 43% of the respondents answered that less than 10 minutes were spent on the consent process, 58.4% of patients stated that they had not been informed about other possible therapeutic choices and 28.6% did not really comprehend their legal rights to IC. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the inherent limitations and the small sample size that do not permit to draw any firm conclusions, results indicate that a successful IC process may be associated with specific elements such as

  12. Ultra Low-Dose Naloxone and Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Elderly Patients Undergoing Joint Replacement Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngozi N Imasogie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A pilot study was conducted to assess whether both the rationale and feasibility exist for future randomized clinical trials to evaluate the combined use of naloxone infusion and tramadol/acetaminophen as opioid-sparing drugs in elderly patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery.

  13. Correction of Cortisol Overreplacement Ameliorates Morbidities in Patients with Hypopituitarism: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Danilowicz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hyporituitarism in adults is known to be associated with deleterious effects on body composition, lipid profile and quality of life (QoL. This was attributed to GH deficiency. The potential role of glucocorticoid overreplacement had never been investigated. Objective: To investigate whether reduction in glucocorticoid replacement dose to more physiological one could ameliorate the "AO-GHD"-attributed symptomatology in patients with hypopituitarism. Design: Eleven patients with panhypopituitarism taking 20-30 mg/day of hydrocortisone, but on no GH replacement were switched to 10 to 15 mg of hydrocortisone daily. Both basally and 6-12 months later, their body mass index, body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, lipid profile, and the score of quality of life, QOL-AGHDA were measured. Results: Within 6-12 months of lower hydrocortisone dose, subjects lost an average of 7.1 kg of total body fat and 4.1 kg of abdominal fat. No changes were seen in lean body mass, bone mineral content and HOMA-IR Plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations decreased significantly (<0.05 and the QoL improved (p=0.018. Conclusions: Our pilot study suggests that decreasing the glucocorticoid replacement dose to ~ 15 mg/ day is beneficial in terms of patients' body composition, lipid profile and quality of life.

  14. The association of patients' oral health literacy and dental school communication tools: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Amy; Yue, Olivia; Atchison, Kathryn A; Richards, Jessica K; Holtzman, Jennifer S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess adult patients' ability to read and understand two communication tools at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry: the dental school clinic website and a patient education brochure pertaining to sedation in children that was written by dental school personnel. A convenience sample of 100 adults seeking treatment at the school's general dental clinic during 2012-13 completed a health literacy screening instrument. They were then asked to read clinic educational and informational materials and complete a survey. Analyses were conducted to determine the association between the subjects' oral health literacy and sociodemographics and their ability to locate and interpret information in written oral health information materials. SMOG and Flesch-Kincade formulas were used to assess the readability level of the electronic and written communication tools. The results demonstrated an association between these adults' oral health literacy and their dental knowledge and ability to navigate health information website resources and understand health education materials. Health literacy was not associated with age or gender, but was associated with education and race/ethnicity. The SMOG Readability Index determined that the website and the sedation form were written at a ninth grade reading level. These results suggest that dental schools and other health care organizations should incorporate a health-literate approach for their digital and written materials to enhance patients' ability to navigate and understand health information, regardless of their health literacy.

  15. Effects of multiple training modalities in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Shu-Yu; Hsu, Chia-Ling; Huang, Shu-Wan; Ma, Tzu-Chiao; Hsieh, Wen-Chien; Yang, Yuan-Han

    2016-01-01

    Objective This pilot study investigated the effects of multiple training modalities on cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, caregivers’ burden, and quality of life in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Patients and methods This intervention study was conducted in 24 patients with AD aged ≥65 years with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) score of 0.5–1. The patients were assigned to receive multiple training modalities (1 hour for each training: Tai Chi, calligraphy, and drawing) over a 6-week period in either the experimental group (n=14) or the comparison group (n=10). A series of neuropsychological tests – namely the Traditional Chinese version Mini-Mental Status Examination, Cognitive Assessment Screening Instrument (CASI), Neuropsychiatric Inventory and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Caregiver Distress Scale, and the Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes scale – were conducted at the baseline and after the intervention. The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) and Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale were used to assess the quality of life and caregivers’ burden, respectively. Independent sample t-test and paired sample t-test were used to analyze the data. Results After the intervention, the experimental group reported higher scores in the orientation domain of CASI (P=0.007) and in the psychiatry domain of WHOQOL-BREF (P=0.042) compared with the comparison group. Caregivers’ distress was significantly decreased in the experimental group (P=0.035) but not in the comparison group (P=0.430). Conclusion The multiple training modalities improved scores in the orientation domain of CASI and psychiatry domain of WHOQOL-BREF in patients with AD. Moreover, the intervention reduced caregivers’ distress. PMID:27843319

  16. Next-generation personalised medicine for high-risk paediatric cancer patients - The INFORM pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worst, Barbara C; van Tilburg, Cornelis M; Balasubramanian, Gnana Prakash; Fiesel, Petra; Witt, Ruth; Freitag, Angelika; Boudalil, Miream; Previti, Christopher; Wolf, Stephan; Schmidt, Sabine; Chotewutmontri, Sasithorn; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Schick, Matthias; Schlesner, Matthias; Hutter, Barbara; Taylor, Lenka; Borst, Tobias; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, Claus R; Milde, Till; Pfaff, Elke; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Stackelberg, Arend; Meisel, Roland; Borkhardt, Arndt; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Dirksen, Uta; Jürgens, Heribert; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, Andre O; Westermann, Frank; Fischer, Matthias; Burkhardt, Birgit; Wößmann, Wilhelm; Nathrath, Michaela; Bielack, Stefan S; Frühwald, Michael C; Fulda, Simone; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koscielniak, Ewa; Schwab, Matthias; Tremmel, Roman; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Schulte, Johannes H; Brors, Benedikt; von Deimling, Andreas; Lichter, Peter; Eggert, Angelika; Capper, David; Pfister, Stefan M; Jones, David T W; Witt, Olaf

    2016-09-01

    The 'Individualized Therapy for Relapsed Malignancies in Childhood' (INFORM) precision medicine study is a nationwide German program for children with high-risk relapsed/refractory malignancies, which aims to identify therapeutic targets on an individualised basis. In a pilot phase, reported here, we developed the logistical and analytical pipelines necessary for rapid and comprehensive molecular profiling in a clinical setting. Fifty-seven patients from 20 centers were prospectively recruited. Malignancies investigated included sarcomas (n = 25), brain tumours (n = 23), and others (n = 9). Whole-exome, low-coverage whole-genome, and RNA sequencing were complemented with methylation and expression microarray analyses. Alterations were assessed for potential targetability according to a customised prioritisation algorithm and subsequently discussed in an interdisciplinary molecular tumour board. Next-generation sequencing data were generated for 52 patients, with the full analysis possible in 46 of 52. Turnaround time from sample receipt until first report averaged 28 d. Twenty-six patients (50%) harbored a potentially druggable alteration with a prioritisation score of 'intermediate' or higher (level 4 of 7). Common targets included receptor tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and cell cycle control. Ten patients received a targeted therapy based on these findings, with responses observed in some previously treatment-refractory tumours. Comparative primary relapse analysis revealed substantial tumour evolution as well as one case of unsuspected secondary malignancy, highlighting the importance of re-biopsy at relapse. This study demonstrates the feasibility of comprehensive, real-time molecular profiling for high-risk paediatric cancer patients. This extended proof-of-concept, with examples of treatment consequences, expands upon previous personalised oncology endeavors

  17. Effect of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic neuropathic pain among patients with type 2 diabetes - A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Viswanathan; Seena Rajsekar; Bamila Selvaraj; Satyavani Kumpatla

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and can severely limit patients′ daily functions. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety and effect of using a polyherbal formulation in reducing the symptoms of diabetic neuropathic pain in comparison with placebo among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 50 (M:F = 33:17) consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with painful diabetic neuropathy were enrolled in this study....

  18. A Pilot Study of Diffusion-Weighted MRI in Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C. Cuneo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In the current study we examined the ability of diffusion MRI (dMRI to predict pathologic response in pancreatic cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation. METHODS: We performed a prospective pilot study of dMRI in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. Patients underwent dMRI prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Surgical specimens were graded according to the percent tumor cell destruction. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC maps were used to generate whole-tumor derived ADC histogram distributions and mean ADC values. The primary objective of the study was to correlate ADC parameters with pathologic and CT response. RESULTS: Ten of the 12 patients enrolled on the study completed chemoradiation and had surgery. Three were found to be unresectable at the time of surgery and no specimen was obtained. Out of the 7 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy, 3 had a grade III histopathologic response (>90% tumor cell destruction, 2 had a grade IIB response (51% to 90% tumor cell destruction, 1 had a grade IIA response (11% to 50% tumor cell destruction, and 1 had a grade I response (>90% viable tumor. Median survival for patients with a grade III response, grade I-II response, and unresectable disease were 25.6, 18.7, and 6.1 months, respectively. There was a significant correlation between pre-treatment mean tumor ADC values and the amount of tumor cell destruction after chemoradiation with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.94 (P = .001. Mean pre-treatment ADC was 161 × 10−5 mm2/s (n = 3 in responding patients (>90% tumor cell destruction compared to 125 × 10−5 mm2/s (n = 4 in non-responding patients (>10% viable tumor. CT imaging showed no significant change in tumor size in responders or non-responders. CONCLUSIONS: dMRI may be useful to predict response to chemoradiation in pancreatic cancer. In our study, tumors with a low ADC mean value at baseline responded poorly to standard chemoradiation and

  19. EFFECT OF DANCE EXERCISE ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME: A PILOT STUDY

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    Sang-Wook Song

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group. The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD-K. Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048, word list delayed recall (p = 0.038, word list recognition (p = 0.007, and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037. However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome.

  20. VIRTUAL AVATAR FOR EMOTION RECOGNITION IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA: A PILOT STUDY

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    Samuel Marcos Pablos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Persons who suffer from schizophrenia have difficulties in recognizing emotions in others’ facial expressions, which affects their capabilities for social interaction and hinders their social integration. Photographic images have traditionally been used to explore emotion recognition impairments in schizophrenia patients, which lack of the dynamism that is inherent to face to face social interactions. In order to overcome those inconveniences, in the present work the use of an animated, virtual face is approached. The avatar has the appearance of a highly realistic human face and is able to express different emotions dynamically, introducing some advantages over photograph-based approaches such as its dynamic appearance.We present the results of a pilot study in order to assess the validity of the interface as a tool for clinical psychiatrists. 20 subjects who suffer from schizophrenia of long evolution and 20 control subjects were invited to recognize a set of facial emotions showed by a virtual avatar and images. The objective of the study is to explore the possibilities of using a realistic-looking avatar for the assessment of emotion recognition deficits in patients who suffer schizophrenia. Our results suggest that the proposed avatar may be a suitable tool for the diagnosis and treatment of deficits in the facial recognition of emotions.

  1. Exploring Real-time Patient Decision-making for Acute Care: A Pilot Study

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    Adam L. Sharp

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research has described emergency department (ED use patterns in detail. However, evidence is lacking on how, at the time a decision is made, patients decide if healthcare is required or where to seek care. Methods: Using community-based participatory research methods, we conducted a mixed-methods descriptive pilot study. Due to the exploratory, hypothesis-generating nature of this research, we did not perform power calculations, and financial constraints only allowed for 20 participants. Hypothetical vignettes for the 10 most common low acuity primary care complaints (cough, sore throat, back pain, etc. were texted to patients twice daily over six weeks, none designed to influence the patient’s decision to seek care. We conducted focus groups to gain contextual information about participant decision-making. Descriptive statistics summarized responses to texts for each scenario. Qualitative analysis of open-ended text message responses and focus group discussions identified themes associated with decision-making for acute care needs. Results: We received text survey responses from 18/20 recruited participants who responded to 72% (1092/1512 of the texted vignettes. In 48% of the vignettes, participants reported they would do nothing, for 34% of the vignettes participants reported they would seek care with a primary care provider, and 18% of responses reported they would seek ED care. Participants were not more likely to visit an ED during “off-hours.” Our qualitative findings showed: 1 patients don’t understand when care is needed; 2 patients don’t understand where they should seek care. Conclusion: Participants were unclear when or where to seek care for common acute health problems, suggesting a need for patient education. Similar research is necessary in different populations and regarding the role of urgent care in acute care delivery. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:675-681

  2. Copper isotope effect in serum of cancer patients. A pilot study.

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    Télouk, Philippe; Puisieux, Alain; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Clapisson, Gilles; Lamboux, Aline; Albarede, Francis

    2015-02-01

    The isotope effect describes mass-dependent variations of natural isotope abundances for a particular element. In this pilot study, we measured the (65)Cu/(63)Cu ratios in the serums of 20 breast and 8 colorectal cancer patients, which correspond to, respectively, 90 and 49 samples taken at different times with molecular biomarker documentation. Copper isotope compositions were determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). When compared with the literature data from a control group of 50 healthy blood donors, abundances of Cu isotopes predict mortality in the colorectal cancer group with a probability p = 0.018. For the breast cancer patients and the group of control women the probability goes down to p = 0.0006 and the AUC under the ROC curve is 0.75. Most patients considered in this preliminary study and with serum δ(65)Cu lower than the threshold value of -0.35‰ (per mil) did not survive. As a marker, a drop in δ(65)Cu precedes molecular biomarkers by several months. The observed decrease of δ(65)Cu in the serum of cancer patients is assigned to the extensive oxidative chelation of copper by cytosolic lactate. The potential of Cu isotope variability as a new diagnostic tool for breast and colorectal cancer seems strong. Shifts in Cu isotope compositions fingerprint cytosolic Cu chelation by lactate mono- and bidentates. This simple scheme provides a straightforward explanation for isotopically light Cu in the serum and isotopically heavy Cu in cancer cells: Cu(+) escaping chelation by lactate and excreted into the blood stream is isotopically light. Low δ(65)Cu values in serum therefore reveal the strength of lactate production by the Warburg effect.

  3. Effects of multiple training modalities in patients with Alzheimer's disease: a pilot study.

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    Tai, Shu-Yu; Hsu, Chia-Ling; Huang, Shu-Wan; Ma, Tzu-Chiao; Hsieh, Wen-Chien; Yang, Yuan-Han

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the effects of multiple training modalities on cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, caregivers' burden, and quality of life in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This intervention study was conducted in 24 patients with AD aged ≥65 years with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) score of 0.5-1. The patients were assigned to receive multiple training modalities (1 hour for each training: Tai Chi, calligraphy, and drawing) over a 6-week period in either the experimental group (n=14) or the comparison group (n=10). A series of neuropsychological tests - namely the Traditional Chinese version Mini-Mental Status Examination, Cognitive Assessment Screening Instrument (CASI), Neuropsychiatric Inventory and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Caregiver Distress Scale, and the Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes scale - were conducted at the baseline and after the intervention. The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) and Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale were used to assess the quality of life and caregivers' burden, respectively. Independent sample t-test and paired sample t-test were used to analyze the data. After the intervention, the experimental group reported higher scores in the orientation domain of CASI (P=0.007) and in the psychiatry domain of WHOQOL-BREF (P=0.042) compared with the comparison group. Caregivers' distress was significantly decreased in the experimental group (P=0.035) but not in the comparison group (P=0.430). The multiple training modalities improved scores in the orientation domain of CASI and psychiatry domain of WHOQOL-BREF in patients with AD. Moreover, the intervention reduced caregivers' distress.

  4. Generalist care managers for the treatment of depressed medicaid patients in North Carolina: A pilot study

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    Ellis Alan R

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most states, mental illness costs are an increasing share of Medicaid expenditures. Specialized depression care managers (CM have consistently demonstrated improvements in patient outcomes relative to usual primary care (UC, but are costly and may not be fully utilized in smaller practices. A generalist care manager (GCM could manage multiple chronic conditions and be more accepted and cost-effective than the specialist depression CM. We designed a pilot program to demonstrate the feasibility of training/deploying GCMs into primary care settings. Methods We randomized depressed adult Medicaid patients in 2 primary care practices in Western North Carolina to a GCM intervention or to UC. GCMs, already providing services in diabetes and asthma in both study arms, were further trained to provide depression services including self-management, decision support, use of information systems, and care management. The following data were analyzed: baseline, 3- and 6-month Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9 scores; baseline and 6-month Short Form (SF 12 scores; Medicaid claims data; questionnaire on patients' perceptions of treatment; GCM case notes; physician and office staff time study; and physician and office staff focus group discussions. Results Forty-five patients were enrolled, the majority with preexisting depression. Both groups improved; the GCM group did not demonstrate better clinical and functional outcomes than the UC group. Patients in the GCM group were more likely to have prescriptions of correct dosing by chart data. GCMs most often addressed comorbid conditions (36%, then social issues (27% and appointment reminders (14%. GCMs recorded an average of 46 interactions per patient in the GCM arm. Focus group data demonstrated that physicians valued using GCMs. A time study documented that staff required no more time interacting with GCMs, whereas physicians spent an average of 4 minutes more per week. Conclusion GCMs

  5. Periodontal treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease: a pilot study.

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    Almeida, S; Figueredo, C M; Lemos, C; Bregman, R; Fischer, R G

    2017-04-01

    This pilot cohort study evaluated the effect of periodontal treatment on renal function, metabolic markers and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in patients with pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) presenting chronic periodontitis. Twenty-six patients with CKD and severe chronic periodontitis were selected. Periodontal parameters included plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), triglycerides, total cholesterol, albumin and ADMA levels were evaluated at baseline, 90 and 180 d after periodontal therapy. eGFR was evaluated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. All periodontal clinical parameters significantly improved (p periodontal therapy. There was a significant improvement on the median values (25%; 75% percentiles) of eGFR from 34.6 (27; 44.7) mL/min/1.73 m(2) on baseline to 37.6 (29.7; 57) mL/min/1.73 m(2) on day 90, and to 37.6 (28.6; 56) mL/min/1.73 m(2) (p periodontal treatment. No significant differences were observed at the median values of metabolic markers comparing baseline and 180 d after periodontal treatment. The results point to a link of kidney disease with endothelium dysfunction and periodontitis, suggesting that periodontal treatment may be beneficial to the course of CKD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effects of erythritol on endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

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    Flint, Nir; Hamburg, Naomi M; Holbrook, Monika; Dorsey, Pamela G; LeLeiko, Rebecca M; Berger, Alvin; de Cock, Peter; Bosscher, Douwina; Vita, Joseph A

    2014-01-01

    Sugar substitutes are important in the dietary management of diabetes mellitus. Erythritol is a non-caloric dietary bulk sweetener that reverses endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats. We completed a pilot study to examine the effects of erythritol on vascular function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Participants (n = 24) consumed erythritol 36 g/day as an orange-flavored beverage for 4 weeks and a single dose of 24 g during the baseline and final visits. We assessed vascular function before and after acute (2 h) and chronic (4 weeks) erythritol consumption. Acute erythritol improved endothelial function measured by fingertip peripheral arterial tonometry (0.52 ± 0.48 to 0.87 ± 0.29 au, P = 0.005). Chronic erythritol decreased central pulse pressure (47 ± 13 to 41 ± 9 mmHg, P = 0.02) and tended to decrease carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (P = 0.06). Thus, erythritol consumption acutely improved small vessel endothelial function, and chronic treatment reduced central aortic stiffness. Erythritol may be a preferred sugar substitute for patients with diabetes mellitus.

  7. A pilot study of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome

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    Wall GC

    2007-12-01

    . However, a significantly higher proportion of respondents who “ever-used” dietary and herbal supplements discussed CAM with a pharmacist compared to those who never used dietary and herbal supplements [chi square=6.03, p=0.014]. Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that CAM use is common in patients diagnosed with FMS. Compared to other healthcare providers, respondents were least likely to discuss CAM with a pharmacist. However, respondents who used dietary and herbal supplements were more likely to discuss CAM with a pharmacist compared to those who did not, suggesting the potential influence of pharmacist intervention.

  8. A pilot study of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome

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    Wall, Geoffrey C.; Krypel, Linda L.; Miller, Michael J.; Rees, Derek M.

    , a significantly higher proportion of respondents who “ever-used” dietary and herbal supplements discussed CAM with a pharmacist compared to those who never used dietary and herbal supplements [chi square=6.03, p=0.014]. Conclusion This pilot study suggests that CAM use is common in patients diagnosed with FMS. Compared to other healthcare providers, respondents were least likely to discuss CAM with a pharmacist. However, respondents who used dietary and herbal supplements were more likely to discuss CAM with a pharmacist compared to those who did not, suggesting the potential influence of pharmacist intervention. PMID:25170357

  9. Effects of comprehensive osteopathic manipulative treatment on balance in elderly patients: a pilot study.

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    Lopez, Daniel; King, Hollis H; Knebl, Janice A; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Collins, Deraan; Patterson, Rita M

    2011-06-01

    Falls, many of which are caused by balance problems, are a leading cause of injuries in elderly persons. Few studies have investigated osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) for patients with balance problems. To test whether an OMT protocol with an emphasis on cranial manipulation can improve vestibular balance control structures and postural stability in a healthy elderly population. A pilot prospective clinical trial. Research laboratories of the University of North Texas Health Science Center Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Worth. Forty healthy elderly patients aged 65 or older were enrolled and separated into an OMT group and a control group. Owing to the recruitment process and limited time for the study, the first 20 patients to enroll were in the OMT group, and the next 20 were in the control group. Patients were excluded if they had a condition that could impair balance. The OMT protocol comprised 7 OMT techniques applied weekly by the same osteopathic physician before balance tests. Patients in the control group received no treatment. Patients were asked to stand on a force plate and to perform 3 balance tests: (1) eyes open, (2) eyes closed, and (3) a modified Romberg test. The center of pressure between their feet was recorded for 30 seconds. The average center of pressure displacement for each test was used to determine anteroposterior (AP) sway and mediolateral (ML) sway. Balance tests were performed each week for 4 weeks. Tests were performed at the same time of day as the first test. Changes in AP sway values between visits 1 and 4 were as follows: eyes open, -0.72 and 0.75 mm for the control and OMT groups, respectively; eyes closed, -0.49 and 0.44 mm; and Romberg test, -0.17 and 0.52 mm. The changes in ML sway values between visits 1 and 4 were as follows: eyes open, -0.58 and 0.07 mm for the control and OMT groups, respectively; eyes closed, -0.21 and 0.03 mm; and Romberg test, -0.15 and 0.39 mm. The OMT group had significantly

  10. A serious exergame for patients suffering from chronic musculoskeletal back and neck pain: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosterink, Stephanie M.; Huis in 't Veld, Rianne M.H.A.; Schönauer, Christian; Kaufmann, Hannes; Hermens, Hermie J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Over recent years, the popularity of videogames has gone beyond youth and gamers and is slowly entering the field of professional healthcare. Exergames are an attractive alternative to physical therapy. The primary aim of this pilot study was to explore the user experience (usability,

  11. Association between plasma endocannabinoids and appetite in hemodialysis patients: a pilot study

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    Weight loss is a well-recognized complication in subjects undergoing hemodialysis for impaired kidney function. This pilot study explored whether plasma levels of compounds known to mediate appetite, the endocannabinoids (EC) and EC-like compounds derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), ar...

  12. Electrophysiological effects of 12C on patients undergoing heavy ions therapy at GSI: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannita, W. G.; Narici, L.; Debus, J.; Carozzo, S.; Saturno, M.; Schardt, D.; Schulz-Ertner, D.

    Phosphenes light flashes observed in space have been attributed to heavy ions interfering with the retina photoreceptors However their generating mechanisms are still undefined and neurons of the retina and non-ocular visual structures are as sensitive to ionizing agents as retinal photoreceptors Multiple sources are therefore possible that could question safety in manned space travel Patients undergoing 12C ion therapy of skull tumors also involving the anterior optic pathway often report phosphenes similar to those described by astronauts and volunteers in accelerator experiments In a pilot study their occurrence either within each beam pulse or shortly after it in case of very short pulses correlated with the beam position and local dose deposited near the optic nerve or eye during irradiation Further research is in progress at the GSI Biophysics facilities in Darmstadt FRG Purposes of the study are 1- to identify electrophysiological cortical concomitants of phosphenes 2- to correlate phosphenes with irradiated portions of the anterior visual pathways and with known basic mechanisms of vision and 3- to obtain information to be used in the understanding of phosphenes observed in space We will present preliminary results from the first measurements

  13. An intervention to improve care and reduce costs for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions: a pilot study

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    Kostrowski Shannon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A small percentage of high-risk patients accounts for a large proportion of Medicaid spending in the United States, which has become an urgent policy issue. Our objective was to pilot a novel patient-centered intervention for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions to determine its potential to improve care and reduce costs. Methods Community and hospital-based care management and coordination intervention with pre-post analysis of health care utilization. We enrolled Medicaid fee-for-service patients aged 18-64 who were admitted to an urban public hospital and identified as being at high risk for hospital readmission by a validated predictive algorithm. Enrolled patients were evaluated using qualitative and quantitative interview techniques to identify needs such as transportation to/advocacy during medical appointments, mental health/substance use treatment, and home visits. A community housing partner initiated housing applications in-hospital for homeless patients. Care managers facilitated appropriate discharge plans then worked closely with patients in the community using a harm reduction approach. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled; all were male, 18/19 were substance users, and 17/19 were homeless. Patients had a total of 64 inpatient admissions in the 12 months before the intervention, versus 40 in the following 12 months, a 37.5% reduction. Most patients (73.3% had fewer inpatient admissions in the year after the intervention compared to the prior year. Overall ED visits also decreased after study enrollment, while outpatient clinic visits increased. Yearly study hospital Medicaid reimbursements fell an average of $16,383 per patient. Conclusions A pilot intervention for high-cost patients shows promising results for health services usage. We are currently expanding our model to serve more patients at additional hospitals to see if the pilot's success can be replicated. Trial registration

  14. Atlas vertebra realignment and achievement of arterial pressure goal in hypertensive patients: a pilot study.

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    Bakris, G; Dickholtz, M; Meyer, P M; Kravitz, G; Avery, E; Miller, M; Brown, J; Woodfield, C; Bell, B

    2007-05-01

    Anatomical abnormalities of the cervical spine at the level of the Atlas vertebra are associated with relative ischaemia of the brainstem circulation and increased blood pressure (BP). Manual correction of this mal-alignment has been associated with reduced arterial pressure. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that correcting mal-alignment of the Atlas vertebra reduces and maintains a lower BP. Using a double blind, placebo-controlled design at a single center, 50 drug naïve (n=26) or washed out (n=24) patients with Stage 1 hypertension were randomized to receive a National Upper Cervical Chiropractic (NUCCA) procedure or a sham procedure. Patients received no antihypertensive meds during the 8-week study duration. The primary end point was changed in systolic and diastolic BP comparing baseline and week 8, with a 90% power to detect an 8/5 mm Hg difference at week 8 over the placebo group. The study cohort had a mean age 52.7+/-9.6 years, consisted of 70% males. At week 8, there were differences in systolic BP (-17+/-9 mm Hg, NUCCA versus -3+/-11 mm Hg, placebo; P<0.0001) and diastolic BP (-10+/-11 mm Hg, NUCCA versus -2+/-7 mm Hg; P=0.002). Lateral displacement of Atlas vertebra (1.0, baseline versus 0.04 degrees week 8, NUCCA versus 0.6, baseline versus 0.5 degrees , placebo; P=0.002). Heart rate was not reduced in the NUCCA group (-0.3 beats per minute, NUCCA, versus 0.5 beats per minute, placebo). No adverse effects were recorded. We conclude that restoration of Atlas alignment is associated with marked and sustained reductions in BP similar to the use of two-drug combination therapy.

  15. Behavior management approach for agitated behavior in Japanese patients with dementia: a pilot study

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    Sato J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Junko Sato,1 Shutaro Nakaaki,2 Katsuyoshi Torii,1 Mizuki Oka,2 Atsushi Negi,1 Hiroshi Tatsumi,3 Jin Narumoto,4 Toshi A Furukawa,5 Masaru Mimura21Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 3Department of Health Science, Faculty of Psychological and Physical Science, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, 4Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, 5Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior (Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, JapanBackground: Agitated behaviors are frequently observed in patients with dementia and can cause severe distress to caregivers. However, little evidence of the efficacy of nonpharmacological interventions for agitated behaviors exists for patients with dementia. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate a behavioral management program developed by the Seattle Protocols for patients with agitated behaviors in Japan.Methods: Eighteen patients with dementia (Alzheimer’s disease, n = 14; dementia with Lewy bodies, n = 4 participated in an open study testing the effectiveness of a behavioral management program. The intervention consisted of 20 sessions over the course of 3 months. The primary outcomes were severity of agitation in dementia, as measured using the Agitated Behavior in Dementia scale (ABID and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI.Results: The behavioral management program resulted in significant reductions in total scores on both the ABID and CMAI. Although both physically agitated and verbally agitated behavior scores on the ABID improved significantly, symptoms of psychosis did not improve after the intervention.Conclusion: The behavioral management technique may be beneficial to distressed caregivers of

  16. Clinical signs and symptoms of tinnitus in temporomandibular joint disorders: A pilot study comparing patients and non-patients

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    Amisha Kanji

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tinnitus is one of the otologic symptoms commonly reported to be associated with temporomandibular disorder (TMD, and questions regarding its nature and cause continue to plague the clinical and research community.Objectives: The current pilot study aimed to investigate the clinical signs and symptoms of presenting tinnitus in a group of individuals with TMD (group A, and compare them with a group with tinnitus but without TMD (group B. Twenty participants were included in the study, 10 from each group.Methods: All participants underwent basic audiological as well as ear, nose and throat (ENT evaluations to establish group A and group B. For tinnitus assessment, all participants completed a tinnitus survey questionnaire, and their tinnitus was evaluated using tinnitus matching procedures.Results: Findings revealed clinically relevant differences in attributes of tinnitus in patients with and without TMD. Most of the participants in group A matched their tinnitus to a 6 000 Hz tone or noise, at lower intensity levels than participants in group B, although these results were not statistically significant. Participants in group A associated their tinnitus with a single sound whereas some participants in group B associated it with more than one sound. More participants in group B reported the duration of their tinnitus as constant.Conclusions: Tinnitus may occur in patients with TMD, and be of high frequency. This highlights the importance of thorough assessment for patients with tinnitus as this might have implications for diagnosis and management.

  17. Vitamin D-mediated calcium absorption in patients with clinically stable Crohn's disease: a pilot study.

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    Kumari, Meena; Khazai, Natasha B; Ziegler, Thomas R; Nanes, Mark S; Abrams, Steven A; Tangpricha, Vin

    2010-08-01

    Vitamin D is the critical hormone for intestinal absorption of calcium. Optimal calcium absorption is important for proper mineralization of bone in the prevention of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures, among other important functions. Diseases associated with gut inflammation, such as Crohn's disease (CD), may impair calcium absorption. This pilot study evaluated vitamin D- dependent calcium absorption in subjects with CD. Male subjects with CD (n=4) and healthy age-matched controls (n=5) were studied. All subjects had fractional calcium absorption (FCA; by the dual calcium isotope method), serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, serum calcium and 24 h urinary calcium excretion measurements at baseline. The FCA in response to vitamin D therapy was re-assessed following administration of oral calcitriol 0.25 mcg twice daily for 1 wk, followed by oral calcitriol 0.50 mcg twice daily for 1 wk. Serum calcium and 24 h urinary calcium determinations were re-assessed after each increasing dose of calcitriol as safety measures. There was no significant difference in calcium FCA at baseline or after increasing doses of calcitriol between the CD and controls. FCA in the control and CD group was approximately 35% at baseline, which increased to 60% after calcitriol therapy. No subject developed hypercalcemia or hypercalciuria. Our results suggest that CD patients have a normal response to vitamin D in enhancing the efficacy of calcium absorption. This suggests that stable CD patients can follow calcium and vitamin D guidelines of non-CD adults. Other factors independent of vitamin D status may impair intestinal calcium absorption in CD, including the degree and location of inflammation, presence of surgical resection and/or use of glucocorticoids.

  18. Consumption of gluten with gluten-degrading enzyme by celiac patients: A pilot-study

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    Tack, Greetje J; van de Water, Jolanda MW; Bruins, Maaike J; Kooy-Winkelaar, Engelina MC; van Bergen, Jeroen; Bonnet, Petra; Vreugdenhil, Anita CE; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Edens, Luppo; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Schreurs, Marco WJ; Mulder, Chris J; Koning, Frits

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assesses the safety and efficacy of Aspergillus niger prolyl endoprotease (AN-PEP) to mitigate the immunogenic effects of gluten in celiac patients. METHODS: Patients with initial diagnosis of celiac disease as confirmed by positive serology with subtotal or total villous atrophy on duodenal biopsies who adhere to a strict gluten-free diet (GFD) resulting in normalised antibodies and mucosal healing classified as Marsh 0 or I were included. In a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled pilot study, patients consumed toast (approximately 7 g/d gluten) with AN-PEP for 2 wk (safety phase). After a 2-wk washout period with adherence of the usual GFD, 14 patients were randomised to gluten intake with either AN-PEP or placebo for 2 wk (efficacy phase). Measurements at baseline included complaints, quality-of-life, serum antibodies, immunophenotyping of T-cells and duodenal mucosa immunohistology. Furthermore, serum and quality of life questionnaires were collected during and after the safety, washout and efficacy phase. Duodenal biopsies were collected after the safety phase and after the efficacy phase. A change in histological evaluation according to the modified Marsh classification was the primary endpoint. RESULTS: In total, 16 adults were enrolled in the study. No serious adverse events occurred during the trial and no patients withdrew during the trial. The mean score for the gastrointestinal subcategory of the celiac disease quality (CDQ) was relatively high throughout the study, indicating that AN-PEP was well tolerated. In the efficacy phase, the CDQ scores of patients consuming gluten with placebo or gluten with AN-PEP did not significantly deteriorate and moreover no differences between the groups were observed. During the efficacy phase, neither the placebo nor the AN-PEP group developed significant antibody titers. The IgA-EM concentrations remained negative in both groups. Two patients were excluded from entering the efficacy phase as their

  19. Group therapy module to enhance self-esteem in patients with borderline personality disorder: a pilot study.

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    Jacob, Gitta A; Gabriel, Susanne; Roepke, Stefan; Stoffers, Jutta M; Lieb, Klaus; Lammers, Claas-Hinrich

    2010-01-01

    Psychotherapeutic treatments of borderline personality disorder (BPD) often focus on severe behavioral problems. Until now, few techniques have been developed to specifically address low self-esteem in BPD. We developed a 6-session psychoeducative group therapy module to treat low self-esteem in BPD patients. After developing and piloting the therapy module, a controlled outpatient pilot study was performed. Nineteen female BPD patients participated in the group module after discharge from an inpatient DBT program. Twenty-four female BPD patients served as controls. Outcome was assessed by different self-esteem measures. Results showed a greater improvement in self-esteem in the intervention group. The findings suggest that the therapy module is an effective adjunctive treatment in increasing self-esteem in BPD.

  20. Referral to a Commercial Weight Management Program in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease: A PILOT STUDY IN THE NETHERLANDS.

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    Minneboo, Madelon; Peters, Ron J G; Miller-Kovach, Karen; Lemmens, Jeanine; Bucx, Jeroen J J

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the impact of a commercial weight management program on weight change in obese patients with coronary heart disease. An observational, single-center pilot study in the Netherlands. Forty-five patients diagnosed with a recent acute coronary syndrome and a body mass index of >30 kg/m2 were recruited. The commercial weight management intervention (Weight Watchers) promotes a hypoenergetic and balanced diet, increased physical activity, and group support. The program included weekly 30-minute in-hospital meetings with an experienced coach. The program was offered in parallel with a cardiac rehabilitation program. Thirty-five patients completed the program. Of these patients, 32 patients (91%) decreased body weight. Mean weight change was -5.8 kg (range: +0.6 kg to -15.4 kg), and 20 patients (57%) achieved the target of 5% weight loss of their initial weight. Twenty-seven patients continued the commercial weight loss program after 14 weeks, the mean followup of these patients was 34 weeks and their mean weight change was -9.1 kg (range: 0.0-23.0 kg). Obese patients, discharged after an acute coronary syndrome, who were referred to a commercial weight management program, achieved significant weight loss. Although this is a nonrandomized pilot study with patients who were selected by motivation and by the ability to participate in the program, the proportion of weight loss is significant and promising.

  1. The upper respiratory tract microbiome of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia of unknown aetiology: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L Wiemken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   The composition of the upper respiratory tract microbiome may play an important role in the development of lower respiratory tract infections. Here, we characterised the microbiome of the nasopharynx and oropharynx of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with unknown aetiology in an attempt to obtain insight into the aetiology of CAP. A random sample of 10 patients hospitalised with CAP previously enrolled in a separate clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registry, Study ID: NCT01248715 in which a complete microbiological workup was not able to define an aetiology were analysed in this pilot study. This larger trial (n = 1,221 enrolled patients from 9 adult hospitals in Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were obtained for metagenomic analysis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae was performed in all patients. One patient had a distinct nasophararyngeal microbiome consisting largely of Haemophilus influenzae. This was the only patient with a negative PCR for S. pneumoniae in both nasophararyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens. Overall, substantial differences were found between nasophararyngeal and oropharyngeal microbiomes. The upper respiratory tract microbiome of only one patient suggested H. influenzae as a probable aetiology of CAP. Although this was a pilot study of only 10 patients, the presence of S. pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract of the other 9 patients warrants further investigation.

  2. Autonomic dysfunction: A comparative study of patients with Alzheimer's and frontotemporal dementia – A pilot study

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    Thomas Gregor Issac

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In frontotemporal dementia (FTD and Alzheimer's disease (AD, central autonomic structures get affected early. An insight into autonomic functions in these patients is likely to be of diagnostic importance and thus help in prognosticating and also probably explain unexplained sudden death in some of these patients. Objectives: The objective of this study is to identify autonomic dysfunction prevailing in patients. Then, if there is dysfunction, is the pattern same or different in these two conditions. And if different it will serve as an additional biomarker for specific diagnosis. Patients and Methods: There were 25 patients and 25 controls and six patients and three controls in AD and FTD groups, respectively. The participants who were recruited were assessed for heart rate variability and conventional cardiac autonomic function testing. The parameters were analyzed using LabChart version 7 software and compared with control population using appropriate statistical methods using SPSS version 22 software. Results: The mean overall total power was low in the FTD group (P < 0.001, and there was significant reduction in the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals and root mean square of successive differences (P < 0.001 with elevated sympathovagal balance in the FTD group (P = 0.04. Patients with AD also showed sympathetic dominance, but there was in addition parasympathetic suppression unlike in the FTD group. Conclusion: This study reveals autonomic dysfunction in patients with FTD and AD. Both conditions show sympathetic dominance, probably consecutive to the involvement of central autonomic regulatory structures as a shared domain. It remains to be confirmed if these findings are the cause or effect of neurodegeneration and might open up newer territories of research based on the causal role of neurotransmitters in these regions and thus lead to novel therapeutic options such as yoga. The presence of parasympathetic

  3. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  4. Autonomic dysfunction: A comparative study of patients with Alzheimer's and frontotemporal dementia – A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Thomas Gregor; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Gupta, Neelesh; Rukmani, Malligurki Raghurama; Deepika, S.; Sathyaprabha, T. N.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), central autonomic structures get affected early. An insight into autonomic functions in these patients is likely to be of diagnostic importance and thus help in prognosticating and also probably explain unexplained sudden death in some of these patients. Objectives: The objective of this study is to identify autonomic dysfunction prevailing in patients. Then, if there is dysfunction, is the pattern same or different in these two conditions. And if different it will serve as an additional biomarker for specific diagnosis. Patients and Methods: There were 25 patients and 25 controls and six patients and three controls in AD and FTD groups, respectively. The participants who were recruited were assessed for heart rate variability and conventional cardiac autonomic function testing. The parameters were analyzed using LabChart version 7 software and compared with control population using appropriate statistical methods using SPSS version 22 software. Results: The mean overall total power was low in the FTD group (P yoga. The presence of parasympathetic suppression in AD in addition helps differentiate these two conditions. PMID:28149088

  5. Decoding emotion of the other differs among schizophrenia patients and schizoaffective patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagar Tadmor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The deficit in ability to attribute mental states such as thoughts, beliefs, and intentions of another person is a key component in the functional impairment of social cognition in schizophrenia. In the current study, we compared the ability of persons with first episode schizophrenia (FE-SZ and individuals with schizophrenia displaying symptomatic remission (SZ-CR to decode the mental state of others with healthy individuals and schizoaffective patients. In addition, we analyzed the effect of dopamine-related genes polymorphism on the ability to decode the mental state of another, and searched for different genetic signatures. Our results show that overall, individuals with schizophrenia performed worse in the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” (eyes test, a simple well-defined task to infer the mental state of others than healthy individuals. Within the schizophrenia group, schizoaffective scored significantly higher than FE-SZ, SZ-CR, and healthy individuals. No difference was observed in performance between FE-SZ and SZ-CR subjects. Interestingly, FE-SZ and SZ-CR, but not schizoaffective individuals, performed worse in decoding negative and neutral emotional valance than the healthy control group. At the genetic level, we observed a significant effect of the DAT genotype, but not D4R genotype, on the eyes test performance. Our data suggest that understanding the mental state of another person is a trait marker of the illness, and might serve as an intermediate phenotype in the diagnostic process of schizophrenia disorders, and raise the possibility that DA-related DAT gene might have a role in decoding the mental state of another person.

  6. A Pilot Study for Linking Adolescent Patients to an Interactive Tobacco Prevention Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Calabro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: The American Academy of Pediatrics and professional guidelines recommend intervening with adolescents about avoiding tobacco use in the health-care setting. Barriers in the clinical setting limit consistent provision of this critical service. Objectives: This pilot study compared 2 approaches for referring adolescents to an evidence-based tobacco prevention and cessation program in the outpatient setting. Secondary aims assessed tobacco use, knowledge, and program evaluation. Design, Setting, and Participants: The study setting was a medical and dental clinic. Participants aged 13 to 18 received tobacco advice and instructions to work through “A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience.” The program addresses health concerns of adolescents about tobacco use and is founded on behavioral change theories. The link to access it is featured on the website of the National Cancer Institute’s Research-Tested Interventions. Participants (N = 197 were randomized to 1 of 2 approaches (ie, a program link via e-mail or referral by a printed card. Results: The program was accessed by 57% (112 of 197 of participants. Both referral approaches were equally effective. Non-Hispanics were twice as likely to access the program as Hispanics (adjusted odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-3.8, P < .05. Over 95% of participants identified themselves as nonusers of tobacco and evaluated the program as beneficial in increasing knowledge and motivation to remain tobacco-free. Conclusion: Linking adolescent patients to an evidence-based tobacco prevention/cessation program at a community health clinic was highly promising and feasible. We present conclusions for future research.

  7. Visual performance and aberration associated with contact lens wear in patients with keratoconus: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdu M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mustafa Abdu, Norhani Mohidin, Bariah Mohd-Ali Optometry and Vision Science Program, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Rigid gas permeable (RGP and silicone hydrogel (SH contact lenses with specific designs are currently being used to improve visual function in patients with keratoconus. However, there are minimal data available comparing the effects of these lenses on visual function in patients with keratoconus. The objectives of this study were to compare visual acuity and contrast sensitivity using spectacles, RGP lenses, and SH lenses, and to evaluate the effects of RGP and SH lenses on higher-order aberrations and visual quality in eyes with keratoconus. The relationship between visual outcomes, aberration, and visual quality were also examined. Methods: This was a pilot study involving 13 eyes from nine subjects with keratoconus. Subjects were fitted with RGP and SH contact lenses. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were measured using Snellen and Pelli-Robson charts, respectively. Ocular aberrations and visual quality were measured using an OPD-Scan II device. All measurements were conducted before and after contact lens wear. Results: Significantly better visual acuity was obtained with RGP lenses than with spectacles or SH lenses (P<0.001. No significant difference in contrast sensitivity values was detected between RGP and SH lenses (P=0.06. Both SH and RGP lenses significantly reduced total ocular and higher-order aberrations (P<0.001 when compared with spectacles, but RGP lenses reduced trefoil, coma, and spherical aberrations more than SH lenses. No significant difference in astigmatic aberrations was found between RGP and SH lenses (P=0.12. Negative correlations were found between visual acuity and coma aberration and contrast sensitivity with higher-order aberrations and coma, trefoil, and astigmatic

  8. Effects of multiple training modalities in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai SY

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shu-Yu Tai,1–4 Chia-Ling Hsu,5 Shu-Wan Huang,5 Tzu-Chiao Ma,6,7 Wen-Chien Hsieh,8,9 Yuan-Han Yang5,7,10,11 1Department of Family Medicine, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 2Department of Family Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 3Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, 4Research Center for Environmental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, 5Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 6Graduate Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, 7Mentality Protection Center, Fo Guang Shan Compassion Foundation, 8Department of Social Work, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 9Department of Sociology and Social Work, Kaohsiung Medical University, 10Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 11Department of and Master’s Program in Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan Objective: This pilot study investigated the effects of multiple training modalities on cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, caregivers’ burden, and quality of life in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD.Patients and methods: This intervention study was conducted in 24 patients with AD aged ≥65 years with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR score of 0.5–1. The patients were assigned to receive multiple training modalities (1 hour for each training: Tai Chi, calligraphy, and drawing over a 6-week period in either the experimental group (n=14 or the comparison group (n=10. A series of neuropsychological tests – namely the Traditional Chinese version Mini-Mental Status Examination, Cognitive Assessment Screening Instrument (CASI, Neuropsychiatric Inventory and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Caregiver Distress Scale, and the Clinical Dementia

  9. Incorporating patient preferences into drug development and regulatory decision making: Results from a quantitative pilot study with cancer patients, carers, and regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postmus, D; Mavris, M; Hillege, H L; Salmonson, T; Ryll, B; Plate, A; Moulon, I; Eichler, H-G; Bere, N; Pignatti, F

    2016-05-01

    Currently, patient preference studies are not required to be included in marketing authorization applications to regulatory authorities, and the role and methodology for such studies have not been agreed upon. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) conducted a pilot study to gain experience on how the collection of individual preferences can inform the regulatory review. Using a short online questionnaire, ordinal statements regarding the desirability of different outcomes in the treatment of advanced cancer were elicited from 139 participants (98 regulators, 29 patient or carers, and 12 healthcare professionals). This was followed by face-to-face meetings to gather feedback and validate the individual responses. In this article we summarize the EMA pilot study and discuss the role of patient preference studies within the regulatory review. Based on the results, we conclude that our preference elicitation instrument was easy to implement and sufficiently precise to learn about the distribution of the participants' individual preferences.

  10. Tactile stimulation as a complementary treatment of temporomandibular disorders in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiels, Anne-Marie; Helkimo, Martti; Magnusson, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    Pain of long duration is a common suffering in modern man. One such pain condition is fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Opinions about what treatment regimen that are to be used in these patients are diverging, and many of the treatments suggested are not, or only poorly, scientifically investigated. The aim of this pilot investigation was to evaluate if FMS patients with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) refractory to conservative TMD treatment would respond positively to tactile stimulation in respect of local and/or general symptoms. Ten female patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria received such treatment once a week during a 10-week period. At the end of treatment, a positive effect on both clinical signs and subjective symptoms of TMD, as well as on general body pain, was registered. Eight out of 10 patients also perceived an improved quality of their sleep. At follow-ups after 3 and 6 months some relapse of both signs and symptoms could be seen, but there was still an improvement compared to the initial degree of local and general complaints. At the 6-months follow-up, half of the patients also reported a lasting improvement of their sleep quality. One hypothetical explanation to the positive treatment effect experienced by the tactile stimulation might be the resulting improvement of the patients' quality of sleep leading to increased serotonin levels. The results of the present pilot study are so encouraging that they warrant an extended, controlled study.

  11. The eye drop chart: a pilot study for improving administration of and compliance with topical treatments in glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McVeigh KA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Katherine Anne McVeigh,1 Georgios Vakros21Department of Ophthalmology, Royal United Hospital, Combe Park, Bath, UK; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Queen’s Hospital, Romford, Essex, UKAim: In order to improve patient education, compliance, and administration of eye drops prescribed for patients suffering with glaucoma within a UK ophthalmology department, an eye drop chart (EDC was designed, developed, and piloted with patients attending the glaucoma clinic over 1 month.Methods: A cross-sectional prospective pilot study of 25 patients using an administration aid and a self-reported questionnaire. Chi-square tests were used to compare responses pre- and postintervention.Results: Results demonstrated an impressive improvement in nine of eleven categories assessed regarding drop administration and compliance. Patients stating that they always wash their hands increased significantly from 64% (13 participants to 92% (23 participants (P=0.029, and those who always shake the bottle improved from 40% (10 to 84% (21 (P=0.001. Punctal occlusion techniques improved from 44% (11 to 72% (18 (P=0.015. Finally, patients who always discarded the bottle after 28 days of use rose from 68% to 92%, though the difference was not significant (P=0.09. Only the number of drops being administered to the eye and the length of time left between the application of drops remained relatively unchanged. Sixty-four percent reported finding EDC helpful or useful, 52% had positive responses when asked if they would continue using EDC, and 88% would recommend it to a friend.Conclusion: Although there are limitations to the data as they are subjective, descriptive, and limited to sample size of 25, the results of this pilot study have shown promise. The EDC appears to be a cost-effective way at improving patients’ use of topical ocular medications.Keywords: glaucoma, administration, compliance, aid, drop chart

  12. Combined down-regulation by aromatase inhibitor and GnRH-agonist in IVF patients with endometriomas-A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssl, Kristine; Loft, Anne; Freiesleben, Nina L C

    2009-01-01

    . The aim of this study was to test the concept of combined down-regulation prior to IVF in patients with endometriomas. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective pilot study in a university-based tertiary fertility clinic including 20 infertile patients with endometriomas undergoing IVF/ICSI. The patients received...

  13. Tablet computers for hospitalized patients: a pilot study to improve inpatient engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greysen, S Ryan; Khanna, Raman R; Jacolbia, Ronald; Lee, Herman M; Auerbach, Andrew D

    2014-06-01

    Inadequate patient engagement in hospital care inhibits high-quality care and successful transitions to home. Tablet computers may provide opportunities to engage patients, particularly during inactive times between provider visits, tests, and treatments, by providing interactive health education modules as well as access to their personal health record (PHR). We conducted a pilot project to explore inpatient satisfaction with bedside tablets and barriers to usability. Additionally, we evaluated use of these devices to deliver 2 specific Web-based programs: (1) an interactive video to improve inpatient education about hospital safety, and (2) PHR access to promote inpatient engagement in discharge planning. We enrolled 30 patients; 17 (60%) were aged 40 years or older, 17 (60%) were women, 17 (60%) owned smartphones, and 6 (22%) owned tablet computers. Twenty-seven (90%) reported high overall satisfaction with the device, and 26 (87%) required ≤ 30 minutes for basic orientation (70% required ≤ 15 minutes). Twenty-five (83%) independently completed an interactive educational module on hospital patient safety. Twenty-one (70%) accessed their personal health record (PHR) to view their medication list, verify scheduled appointments, or send a message to their primary care physician. Next steps include education on high-risk medications, assessment of discharge barriers, and training clinical staff (such as respiratory therapists, registered nurses, or nurse practitioners) to deliver tablet interventions. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Adjuvant interferon gamma in patients with drug – resistant pulmonary tuberculosis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbonell Dalia

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB is increasing in the world and drug-resistant (DR disease beckons new treatments. Methods To evaluate the action of interferon (IFN gamma as immunoadjuvant to chemotherapy on pulmonary DR-TB patients, a pilot, open label clinical trial was carried out in the Cuban reference ward for the management of this disease. The eight subjects existing in the country at the moment received, as in-patients, 1 × 106 IU of recombinant human IFN gamma intramuscularly, daily for one month and then three times per week up to 6 months as adjuvant to the indicated chemotherapy, according to their antibiograms and WHO guidelines. Sputum samples collection for direct smear observation and culture as well as routine clinical and thorax radiography assessments were done monthly. Results Sputum smears and cultures became negative for acid-fast-bacilli before three months of treatment in all patients. Lesion size was reduced at the end of 6 months treatment; the lesions disappeared in one case. Clinical improvement was also evident; body mass index increased in general. Interferon gamma was well tolerated. Few adverse events were registered, mostly mild; fever and arthralgias prevailed. Conclusions These data suggest that IFN gamma is useful and well tolerated as adjunctive therapy in patients with DR-TB. Further controlled clinical trials are encouraged.

  15. Effect of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic neuropathic pain among patients with type 2 diabetes - A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and can severely limit patients′ daily functions. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety and effect of using a polyherbal formulation in reducing the symptoms of diabetic neuropathic pain in comparison with placebo among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 50 (M:F = 33:17 consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with painful diabetic neuropathy were enrolled in this study. All these patients had either two or more symptoms of diabetic neuropathy such as pain, burning and pricking sensations and numbness in their feet. They were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 26 patients were treated with polyherbal formulation cream and group 2 (n = 24 patients were administered placebo. The patients were followed up for six months. Changes in the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy of each patient were recorded at baseline, third and sixth month using the Diabetic Neuropathic Score. Results: The mean age of the patients, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin (HbA 1c were similar in both groups at baseline. During follow up visits, there was a decrease in the HbA 1c levels in the study and control groups. The symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy were also similar in both groups at baseline. A significant decrease in symptoms of neuropathic pain was observed among the group of patients treated with polyherbal formulation cream (76.9 per cent compared to the placebo-treated group (12.5 per cent (P<0.001, at the end of the final follow up. Interpretation & conclusions: In this pilot study polyherbal formulation cream was found to be effective as well as safe to treat painful diabetic neuropathy. However, its long term use needs to be evaluated for any further effectiveness and side effects.

  16. Albuminuria Reduction after High Dose of Vitamin D in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Soares Felício

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSome studies suggest an association between diabetic kidney disease (DKD and vitamin D (VD, but there is no data about the effect of high dose of VD on DKD in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Our pilot study aims to evaluate albuminuria reduction in patients with T1DM supplemented with high dose of VD.Methods22 patients received doses of 4,000 and 10,000 IU/day of cholecalciferol for 12 weeks according to patient’s previous VD levels. They were submitted to continuous glucose monitoring system, 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio before and after VD supplementation.ResultsThere was a reduction of DKD prevalence at the end of the study (68 vs 32%; p = 0.05, with no changes on insulin doses, glycated hemoglobin, glycemic variability and blood pressure values. A correlation between percentage variation of VD levels (ΔVD and albuminuria at the end of the study was presented (r = −0.5; p < 0.05. Among T1DM patients with DKD at the beginning of the study, 8/13 (62% had their DKD stage improved, while the other five ones (38% showed no changes (p < 0.05.ConclusionOur pilot study suggests an association between VD high dose supplementation, lower prevalence and improvement in stages of DKD in T1DM.

  17. Influence of the actions observed on cervical motion in patients with chronic neck pain: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-la-Puente-Ranea, Lucía; García-Calvo, Beatriz; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to prove if the action-observation (AOb) improved the cervical range of motion (CROM) in patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain (CNP). Double blind pilot study. A total of 28 subjects were randomly assigned to an effective-movement group (n=14) and an ineffective-movement group (n=14). The follow-up consisted of: pretreatment, posttreatment and 10 min after second measurement (motor imagery). Outcome measures were CROM, and pres-sure pain detection thresholds (PPDTs). No statistical differences were found in baseline on CROM and on the PPDT. Test for independent groups revealed significant changes in cervical rotation movement. Both groups in posttreatment (P=0.042; Cohen d=0.81) and after 10 min (P=0.019; Cohen d=0.9). For intragroup PPDT, the Wilcoxon test revealed significant effects in the effective movement at C2 of the pre to 10-min post (P=0.040). However, the ineffective movement revealed a significant reduction in PPDT in zygapophyseal joint of C5–C6 as the pre to post (P=0.010) as the pre to 10-min post (P=0.041) periods. In conclusions this pilot study demonstrated that the effective AOb produced significant changes versus ineffective AOb in the CROM and it could influences in PPT in subject with CNP immediately. PMID:27656633

  18. Effects of periodontal treatment on the medical status of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Joichiro; Hasegawa, Akihiko; Hayashi, Kohei; Suzuki, Takafumi; Ishii, Makiko; Otsuka, Hideharu; Yatabe, Kazuhiro; Goto, Seiichi; Tatsumi, Junichi; Shin, Kitetsu

    2017-04-21

    Studies have demonstrated that periodontal disease is associated with the development of systemic complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate which markers among various systemic disease parameters are affected by periodontal treatment in patients with T2DM. Twelve patients with T2DM were given oral hygiene instructions and subsequent subgingival scaling and root planing. The periodontal status was recorded, and blood and urine samples were taken to measure various parameters of glucose control and systemic status at baseline and 1 month following the periodontal treatment. Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After the periodontal treatment, the glycated hemoglobin value was significantly improved. The levels of urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and albumin, which are markers of renal dysfunction, also decreased significantly after treatment. Among the parameters measured in serum, the γ-glutamyl transpeptidase level, which is usually interpreted as a marker of liver dysfunction, was significantly reduced. The serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were also significantly reduced by periodontal treatment. Within the limitations of this pilot study, periodontal treatment may be effective not only in improving metabolic control, but also in reducing the risk of diabetic kidney and liver disease in patients with T2DM.

  19. Maximum clenching force of patients with moderate loss of posterior tooth support: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Charles H; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Young, Henry M; Jones, Jack S; Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F

    2002-11-01

    Patients who have lost moderate posterior tooth support may also lose clenching force as a result of sensitivity to increased loading to the remaining teeth and possibly a loss of muscle strength, because clenching forces are limited to avoid stress to the remaining teeth. Few studies have correlated moderate posterior tooth loss with maximum clenching force. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the hypothesis that moderate loss of posterior tooth support will have a significant effect on maximum clenching force. The maximum clenching force of 44 adults, ages 28 to 76 (mean 46), with posterior tooth loss was compared with the maximum clenching force of a control group of 20 healthy full dentition adults, ages 18 to 55 (mean 30), by use of a bilateral strain-gauged transducer. The transducer consisted of 2 stainless steel plates separated by a steel sphere that balanced occlusal forces between right and left sides. Acrylic resin pads were fabricated for each patient to protect the cusps of the teeth. The overall accuracy was found to be within 2.3% of full scale over a range of 0 to 4000 N (0 to 900 lbs). The calibration reliability of the system was checked frequently by use of a dead weight of 222 N (50 lbs). Clenching forces were supported by first and second molars and second premolars when possible. The instrumentation, methods, and operator were the same for both groups. A 2-tailed Student t test (alpha=0.01) and a pooled estimate of the mean were used to determine possible statistical significance. To test for possible correlations between clenching force and lost tooth support and between clenching force and age, a linear regression correlation coefficient R was calculated. For the 44 subjects with posterior tooth loss, the mean clenching force was 462 N (104 lbs), with a range of 98 to 1031 N (22 to 232 lbs). This compares with a mean of 720 N (162 lbs) with a range of 244 to 1243 N (55 to 280 lbs) for the full-dentition subjects. A 2-tailed t test

  20. Effect of oral lactulose on clinical and immunohistochemical parameters in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manns Michael P

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prebiotic potential of lactulose is well established and preclinical studies demonstrated a protective effect of lactulose in murine models of colitis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical and histological efficacy of lactulose in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, for which probiotic therapy yielded promising results. Methods Patients were treated with standard medication alone or combined with 10 g lactulose daily as adjuvant therapy for 4 months. Clinical efficacy of treatment was assessed using clinical activity indices, a quality of life index (IBDQ, endoscopic scores, defecation frequency and monitoring corticosteroid medication. Orsomucoid, alpha1-antitrypsin and other laboratory parameters were determined. In addition, in some participants colonic biopsies were analyzed with haematoxylin-eosin staining or with antibodies against HLA-DR, CD68, IgA and CD3, and evaluated systematically. All measurements were performed both at enrolment and at the end of the trial. Results 14 patients presenting ulcerative colitis (UC and 17 patients presenting Crohn's disease (CD, most of them in a clinically active state, were enrolled in this pilot study. After 4 month no significant improvement of clinical activity index, endoscopic score or immunohistochemical parameters was observed in CD or UC patients receiving lactulose in comparison to the control group. However, significant improvement of quality of life was observed in UC patients receiving lactulose compared to the control group (p = 0.04. Conclusion The findings of the present pilot study indicate that oral lactulose has no beneficial effects in IBD patients in particular with regard to clinical activity, endoscopic score or immunohistochemical parameters. The importance of the beneficial effect of lactulose in UC patients regarding the quality of life needs further evaluation in larger controlled clinical trials. Trial registration

  1. Cold Therapy in Migraine Patients: Open-label, Non-controlled, Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Some patients with headache report that they have frequently used physical therapies such as application of cold to relieve their headache. There are only a few reported studies related to cold therapies in patients with migraine. In this study, we investigated the effect of cold application on migraine patients. Twenty-eight migraine patients were included. Cold therapy was administered to them by gel cap. Patients used this cap during their two migraine attacks. Before and after the c...

  2. Power spectrum density analysis for the influence of complete denture on the brain function of edentulous patients - pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, Praveen; Anitha, Kuttae Viswanathan; Reddy, Jetti Ramesh; Muthukumar, Balasubramanium

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This pilot study was to find the influence of complete denture on the brain activity and cognitive function of edentulous patients measured through Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study recruited 20 patients aged from 50 to 60 years requiring complete dentures with inclusion and exclusion criteria. The brain function and cognitive function were analyzed with a mental state questionnaire and a 15-minute analysis of power spectral density of EEG alpha waves. The analysis included edentulous phase and post denture insertion adaptive phase, each done before and after chewing. The results obtained were statistically evaluated. RESULTS Power Spectral Density (PSD) values increased from edentulous phase to post denture insertion adaption phase. The data were grouped as edentulous phase before chewing (EEG p1-0.0064), edentulous phase after chewing (EEG p2-0.0073), post denture insertion adaptive phase before chewing (EEG p3-0.0077), and post denture insertion adaptive phase after chewing (EEG p4-0.0096). The acquired values were statistically analyzed using paired t-test, which showed statistically significant results (P<.05). CONCLUSION This pilot study showed functional improvement in brain function of edentulous patients with complete dentures rehabilitation. PMID:27350852

  3. A Blended Intervention for Patients With Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis in the Physical Therapy Practice: Development and a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossen, Daniël; Kloek, Corelien; Snippe, Harm Wouter; Dekker, Joost; de Bakker, Dinny; Veenhof, Cindy

    2016-02-24

    Blended care, a combination of online and face-to-face care, is seen as a promising treatment option. However, actual use of blended interventions in practice is disappointing. The objective of this study was two folded. The first aim was to develop a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis that matches the values of the users and that can be implemented in the daily routine of physical therapists. The second aim was to investigate the feasibility through interviews and a pilot study. In this paper, we employed the first 3 steps of the CeHRes road map to develop a blended intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. We used interviews, a focus group and discussions with stakeholders to explore the needs, values, and requirements with respect to our to-be-developed blended intervention, which we called e-Exercise. The first version of e-Exercise was tested in a pilot study. Feasibility outcomes, including recruitment rates within each practice, website usage (assignments completed and website visits), and user satisfaction, were measured. In addition, therapists and patients from the pilot study were interviewed to investigate users' experiences. The study captured important information about stakeholders' needs and perspectives. Based on our findings, we created a first version and attuned the application's content, functionality, and structure. Patients and, to lesser extent, physical therapists were satisfied with the e-Exercise intervention. Eight patients were recruited by 8 physical therapists. Of the 8 patients, 6 completed more than 7 of 12 modules. This study outlines the development and feasibility of a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. E-Exercise offers an alternative approach in the physical therapy treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis. This study provides valuable information to conduct a further trial to evaluate the (cost) effectiveness of

  4. Financial impact of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation on patients and families over 2 years: results from a multicenter pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzen, E M; Thao, V; Hahn, T; Lee, S J; McCarthy, P L; Rizzo, J D; Ammi, M; Drexler, R; Flesch, S; James, H; Omondi, N; Murphy, E; Pederson, K; Majhail, N S

    2016-09-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a procedure that can significantly influence the socioeconomic wellbeing of patients, caregivers and their families. Among 30 allogeneic HCT recipients and their caregivers enrolled on a pilot study evaluating the feasibility of studying financial impact of HCT, 16 agreed to participate in the long-term phase, completed a baseline questionnaire and received phone interviews at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months post HCT. Analyses showed that by 2 years post HCT, 54% of patients who previously contributed to household earnings had not returned to work and 80% of patients/caregivers reported transplant as having moderate to great impact on household income. However, patients' levels of confidence in their abilities to meet household financial obligations increased from baseline to 2 years. A relatively large proportion of patients reported inability to pay for medical care through this time period. Case studies demonstrated that patients' individual perceptions of the financial impact of HCT varies considerably, regardless of actual income. We demonstrate the feasibility of conducting a study to evaluate the financial impact of allogeneic HCT through 2 years post transplantation. Some patients/caregivers continue to experience a significant long-term financial burden after this procedure. Our study lays the foundation for a larger evaluation of patient/caregiver financial burden associated with HCT.

  5. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  6. Ablative fractional CO2 resurfacing for photoaging of the hands: pilot study of 10 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, William G; Hanke, C William

    2011-01-01

    Extrinsic aging of the hands involves alterations in pigmentation, wrinkling, and texture as a result of chronic ultraviolet and environmental exposures. Inherent tissue properties of the skin of the dorsal hand have made it challenging to safely and effectively improve all three parameters of photoaging with a single device. Recent successes with non-ablative fractional lasers on the hands, as well as success of ablative fractional lasers on the neck and chest, raise the question of potential efficacy of ablative lasers for photorejuvenation of the hands. This was a prospective pilot study of ablative fractional CO(2) laser in 10 participants, each receiving three treatments to one hand at 4-6-week intervals. Subjective assessments by investigator and participants were performed 1 month after each treatment. At 1-month follow-up after final treatment, investigators rated mean improvement of 26-50% for wrinkles, 51-75% for pigment, and 26-50% for texture. Participants rated mean improvement after final treatment as 26-50% for wrinkles, 51-75% for pigment, and 51-75% for texture. Other than significant edema noted in one participant after the first treatment, side effects were limited to transient erythema and edema, with no long-term scarring or pigmentary alteration. In this pilot study, ablative fractional resurfacing was safe and effective for the treatment of all markers of extrinsic aging of the hands. A high degree of improvement was achieved in two to three treatments with no long-term sequelae. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pilot study of a three-step diagnostic pathway for young and old patients with Parkinson's disease dementia: screen, test and then diagnose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, S.H.M.; Sleegers, M.J.; Dautzenberg, P.LJ.; Bergen, F.S. van; Bruggen, J.P.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To pilot a three-step diagnostic model for young and old patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). METHODS: Prospective investigator-blinded study. We developed a screening questionnaire for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their caregivers. Further, patients were subjec

  8. Impact of osteopathic treatment on pain in adult patients with cystic fibrosis--a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Dominique; Soubeiran, Lucile; Gourmelon, Fabrice; Grenet, Dominique; Serreau, Raphaël; Perrodeau, Elodie; Zegarra-Parodi, Rafael; Boutron, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common complication in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with shorter survival. We evaluated the impact of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on pain in adults with CF. A pilot multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted with three parallel arms: OMT (group A, 16 patients), sham OMT (sham treatment, group B, 8 patients) and no treatment (group C, 8 patients). Medical investigators and patients were double-blind to treatment for groups A and B, who received OMT or sham OMT monthly for 6 months. Pain was rated as a composite of its intensity and duration over the previous month. The evolution of chest/back pain after 6 months was compared between group A and groups B+C combined (control group). The evolution of cervical pain, headache and quality of life (QOL) were similarly evaluated. There was no statistically significant difference between the treatment and control groups in the decrease of chest/back pain (difference = -2.20 IC95% [-4.81; 0.42], p = 0.098); also, group A did not differ from group B. However, chest/back pain decreased more in groups A (p = 0.002) and B (p = 0.006) than in group C. Cervical pain, headache and QOL scores did not differ between the treatment and control groups. This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of evaluating the efficacy of OMT to treat the pain of patients with CF. The lack of difference between the group treated with OMT and the control group may be due to the small number of patients included in this trial, which also precludes any definitive conclusion about the greater decrease of pain in patients receiving OMT or sham OMT than in those with no intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01293019.

  9. Impact of osteopathic treatment on pain in adult patients with cystic fibrosis--a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Hubert

    Full Text Available Pain is a common complication in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF and is associated with shorter survival. We evaluated the impact of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT on pain in adults with CF.A pilot multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted with three parallel arms: OMT (group A, 16 patients, sham OMT (sham treatment, group B, 8 patients and no treatment (group C, 8 patients. Medical investigators and patients were double-blind to treatment for groups A and B, who received OMT or sham OMT monthly for 6 months. Pain was rated as a composite of its intensity and duration over the previous month. The evolution of chest/back pain after 6 months was compared between group A and groups B+C combined (control group. The evolution of cervical pain, headache and quality of life (QOL were similarly evaluated.There was no statistically significant difference between the treatment and control groups in the decrease of chest/back pain (difference = -2.20 IC95% [-4.81; 0.42], p = 0.098; also, group A did not differ from group B. However, chest/back pain decreased more in groups A (p = 0.002 and B (p = 0.006 than in group C. Cervical pain, headache and QOL scores did not differ between the treatment and control groups.This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of evaluating the efficacy of OMT to treat the pain of patients with CF. The lack of difference between the group treated with OMT and the control group may be due to the small number of patients included in this trial, which also precludes any definitive conclusion about the greater decrease of pain in patients receiving OMT or sham OMT than in those with no intervention.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01293019.

  10. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  11. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  12. How do Thai patients with end stage renal disease adapt to being dependent on haemodialysis?: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yodchai, Kantaporn; Dunning, Trisha; Hutchinson, Alison M; Oumtanee, Areewan; Savage, Sally

    2011-12-01

    Researchers have explored the experiences of patients on haemodialysis (HD); however, most studies do not include Thai patients. Thus, the way Thai patients experience and adapt to HD is unknown. To conduct a pilot study to explore how HD affects Thai patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) and understand HD patients' perspectives about adapting to being dependant on HD. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews that focused on problems, feelings, thoughts, attitudes and ways of adapting to HD. Grounded theory (GT) method was selected to guide data collection and analysis. Five patients (age range 24-66 years; mean 45.40 years; mode = 24) participated in the study. Four main coping processes emerged during data analysis: planning, adjustment and avoidance, belief in religion and superstition and living with hope. In addition, the patients reported a range of adverse effects of HD including fluid restriction, fatigue, effects on sexual activity, altered body image, fear of dying, stress and depression and suicide. Thai patients with ESRD felt treatment, including HD, adversely affected their lives and required physical, psychological and social changes to enable them to cope. They reported use of a range of strategies to deal with the adverse effects. © 2011 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  13. Development of a telemedical monitoring concept for the care of malnourished geriatric home-dwelling patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Matthias; van den Berg, Neeltje; Kraft, Kathleen; Schmekel, Stefanie; Gärtner, Simone; Krüger, Janine; Meyer, Jens; Lerch, Markus M; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2012-06-01

    Elderly patients are at high risk of malnutrition and sarcopenia, promoting further morbidity which in turn decreases quality of life and increases the claiming of medical services and associated costs. Early and sustained administration of oral nutritional supplements has been shown to improve the nutritional status with robust clinical benefit. Many patients however, poorly adhere to prescribed supplements, so consistent monitoring is needed. Clinical monitoring usually ends with the discharge rendering the continuation of nutritional supplement therapy in the patient's home problematic. We developed a telemedicine based health care concept for intensive home monitoring. In a first randomized controlled prospective study we analyzed the feasibility of this innovative approach. The intervention group received oral nutritional supplements and telemedical monitoring with daily assessment of body weight, number of taken oral energy supplements and state of health. The control group received usual care. 13 patients were included in each group, eight patients of the intervention group left the study prematurely, five patients were closely monitored and used the devices for a mean 67 ± 63.5 days. Follow up data of body weight and BMI showed no relevant differences between both groups. The results and experiences gained in this pilot study demonstrate that telemedical systems provide encouraging new options to enable an intensive monitoring of malnourished patients. A continuous intensive therapy monitoring of this patient group however, is a particular challenge. Albeit possibilities, limitations and useful parameters were identified, which will be used to improve the conception in an ongoing prospective randomized trial.

  14. Lifestyle modification with diet and exercise in obese patients with heart failure - A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a paucity of data regarding intentional weight loss in obese heart failure patients. This study sought to ascertain the safety and effectiveness of a lifestyle modification program in patients with systolic heart failure and metabolic syndrome. Patients (n=20) with systolic heart failure (e...

  15. Patient acceptance and perceived utility of pre-consultation prevention summaries and reminders in general practice: pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylward Paul

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients attending general practices receive only about sixty per cent of the preventive services that are indicated for them. This pilot study explores patient acceptability and perceived utility of automatically generated prevention summary and reminder sheets provided to patients immediately before consultations with their general practitioners. Methods Adult patients attending a general practitioner in a practice in Adelaide and a general practitioner in a practice in Melbourne, Australia for consultations in January and February 2009 received automatically-generated prevention summary and reminder sheets that highlighted indicated preventive activities that were due to be performed, and that encouraged the patient to discuss these with the general practitioner in the consultation. Patients completed a post-consultation questionnaire and were interviewed about their experience of receiving the sheets. Results Sixty patients, median age 53 years (interquartile range 40-74 years, and 58% female, were recruited. Seventy eight per cent of patients found the sheets clear and easy to understand, 75% found them very or quite useful, 72% reported they had addressed with their general practitioner all of the preventive activities that were listed on the sheets as being due to be performed. A further 13% indicated that they had addressed most or some of the activities. 78% of patients said that they would like to keep receiving the sheets. Themes emerging from interviews with patients included: patient knowledge was enhanced; patient conceptions of health and the GP consultation were broadened; the consultation was enhanced; patient pro-activity was encouraged; patients were encouraged to plan their health care; the intervention was suitable for a variety of patients. Conclusions Most patients reported that they found the prevention summary and reminder sheets acceptable and useful. The actual increase in performance of preventive

  16. Feasibility of epilepsy follow-up care through telemedicine: a pilot study on the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Nizamuddin; Mann, Carly; Sinclair, D Barry; Heino, Angela; Iskiw, Blayne; Quigley, Daphne; Ohinmaa, Arto

    2008-04-01

    Cost analysis and patient satisfaction with telemedicine in epilepsy care. This controlled study included out-of-town epilepsy patients coming to follow-up at the University of Alberta hospital epilepsy clinic. After an informed consent, patients were randomized to either conventional (n = 18) or telemedicine (n = 23) clinics. Patients or caregivers filled patient satisfaction and travel cost questionnaires in both alternatives. Cost per visit analysis included costs of traveling, lodging, and lost productivity. Average age of the population was 41 years (range 19-73; 45% women). Eighty-three percent of patients preferred their next visit through telemedicine. About 90% of patients indicated a need for companion travel (mainly by car) to conventional clinic. For the conventional group patients the value of lost productivity was CAD $201, hotel cost CAD $8.50, and the value of car mileage CAD $256.50, totaling about CAD $466.00. Patient costs for telemedicine were CAD $35.85. Telemedicine production costs are similar to the patients' savings in traveling and lost productivity. About 90% of patients in both groups were satisfied with the quality of the service. Telemedicine can play a role in follow-up care of epilepsy patients, reduce patient costs, and improve patient satisfaction. This is the first full-time epilepsy telemedicine clinic in Western Canada.

  17. Efficacy of IP6 + inositol in the treatment of breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: prospective, randomized, pilot clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacić, Ivan; Druzijanić, Nikica; Karlo, Robert; Skifić, Ivan; Jagić, Stjepan

    2010-02-12

    Prospective, randomized, pilot clinical study was conducted to evaluate the beneficial effects of inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) + Inositol in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant therapy. Patients with invasive ductal breast cancer where polychemotherapy was indicated were monitored in the period from 2005-2007. Fourteen patients in the same stage of ductal invasive breast cancer were involved in the study, divided in two randomized groups. One group was subjected to take IP6 + Inositol while the other group was taking placebo. In both groups of patients the same laboratory parameters were monitored. When the treatment was finished, all patients have filled questionnaires QLQ C30 and QLQ-BR23 to determine the quality of life. Patients receiving chemotherapy, along with IP6 + Inositol did not have cytopenia, drop in leukocyte and platelet counts. Red blood cell counts and tumor markers were unaltered in both groups. However, patients who took IP6 + Inositol had significantly better quality of life (p = 0.05) and functional status (p = 0.0003) and were able to perform their daily activities. IP6 + Inositol as an adjunctive therapy is valuable help in ameliorating the side effects and preserving quality of life among the patients treated with chemotherapy.

  18. Cosmetic Contact Sensitivity in Patients with Melasma: Results of a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha, Neel; Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Some of the patients with melasma perhaps have pigmented cosmetic dermatitis. However, cosmetic contact sensitivity in melasma remains poorly studied particularly in the Indian context. Objectives. To study cosmetic contact sensitivity in patients with melasma. Materials and Methods. 67 (F : M = 55 : 12) consecutive patients with melasma between 19 and 49 years of age were patch tested sequentially during January–December, 2012, with Indian Cosmetic and Fragrance Series, Indian Sunscreen Series, p-phenylenediamine, and patient's own cosmetic products. Results. 52 (78%) patients were in the age group of 20–40 years. The duration of melasma varied from 1 month to 20 years. Centrofacial, malar, and mandibular patterns were observed in 48 (72%), 18 (27%), and 1 (1%) patients, respectively. Indian Cosmetics and Fragrance Series elicited positive reactions in 29 (43.3%) patients. Cetrimide was the most common contact sensitizers eliciting positivity in 15 (52%) patients, followed by gallate mix in 9 (31%) patients and thiomersal in 7 (24%) patients. Only 2 of the 42 patients showed positive reaction from their own cosmetics while the other 5 patients had irritant reaction. Indian Sunscreen Series did not elicit any positive reaction. Conclusion. Cosmetics contact sensitivity appears as an important cause of melasma not associated with pregnancy, lactation, or hormone therapy. PMID:25132846

  19. Comprehension of confidence intervals - development and piloting of patient information materials for people with multiple sclerosis: qualitative study and pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Anne C; Backhus, Imke; Fuest, Franz; Riemann-Lorenz, Karin; Köpke, Sascha; van de Roemer, Adrianus; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-09-20

    Presentation of confidence intervals alongside information about treatment effects can support informed treatment choices in people with multiple sclerosis. We aimed to develop and pilot-test different written patient information materials explaining confidence intervals in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Further, a questionnaire on comprehension of confidence intervals was developed and piloted. We developed different patient information versions aiming to explain confidence intervals. We used an illustrative example to test three different approaches: (1) short version, (2) "average weight" version and (3) "worm prophylaxis" version. Interviews were conducted using think-aloud and teach-back approaches to test feasibility and analysed using qualitative content analysis. To assess comprehension of confidence intervals, a six-item multiple choice questionnaire was developed and tested in a pilot randomised controlled trial using the online survey software UNIPARK. Here, the average weight version (intervention group) was tested against a standard patient information version on confidence intervals (control group). People with multiple sclerosis were invited to take part using existing mailing-lists of people with multiple sclerosis in Germany and were randomised using the UNIPARK algorithm. Participants were blinded towards group allocation. Primary endpoint was comprehension of confidence intervals, assessed with the six-item multiple choice questionnaire with six points representing perfect knowledge. Feasibility of the patient information versions was tested with 16 people with multiple sclerosis. For the pilot randomised controlled trial, 64 people with multiple sclerosis were randomised (intervention group: n = 36; control group: n = 28). More questions were answered correctly in the intervention group compared to the control group (mean 4.8 vs 3.8, mean difference 1.1 (95 % CI 0.42-1.69), p = 0.002). The questionnaire

  20. Feasibility of training nurses in motivational interviewing to improve patient experience in mental health inpatient rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, M; Crowley, J; Smedley, N; Mutti, M-F; Cashen, A; Thompson, T; Foster, J

    2017-05-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Recently, concerns have been raised about how well United Kingdom National Health Service nurses care for their patients and their level of compassion. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an established approach to helping people make positive behaviour changes, through directive, person-centred counselling within a collaborative relationship between clinician and recipient. Based on evidence that MI may influence nursing practice positively, an investigation into the feasibility of training nurses on mental health inpatient rehabilitation wards ('rehabilitation') in MI to improve patient experience was reported. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This pilot study demonstrates that training rehabilitation nurses in MI is feasible and provides preliminary evidence suggesting that a larger study to examine efficacy is warranted, including a calculation of sample size required to draw robust statistical conclusions. Nurses evaluated the training as highly relevant to their work. Patients responded well to interviews and focus groups with support from experts-by-experience; they were generally fairly satisfied with the rehabilitation ward and slight improvements in their experience were found following MI training for nurses but not at 6-month follow-up. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Rehabilitation nurses may face conflicting demands between ensuring patients with severe difficulties meet their basic needs and working with them to develop greater independence. Qualitative findings question whether nurse-patient interactions are fully valued as nursing interventions in inpatient rehabilitation. Learning MI might be a useful way of helping nurses think in detail about their interactions with patients and how to improve communications with their patients. The principles of MI should be incorporated into pre-registration training. Introduction There is limited research addressing the experiences of patients in inpatient

  1. Cosmetic Contact Sensitivity in Patients with Melasma: Results of a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neel Prabha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Some of the patients with melasma perhaps have pigmented cosmetic dermatitis. However, cosmetic contact sensitivity in melasma remains poorly studied particularly in the Indian context. Objectives. To study cosmetic contact sensitivity in patients with melasma. Materials and Methods. 67 (F : M = 55 : 12 consecutive patients with melasma between 19 and 49 years of age were patch tested sequentially during January–December, 2012, with Indian Cosmetic and Fragrance Series, Indian Sunscreen Series, p-phenylenediamine, and patient’s own cosmetic products. Results. 52 (78% patients were in the age group of 20–40 years. The duration of melasma varied from 1 month to 20 years. Centrofacial, malar, and mandibular patterns were observed in 48 (72%, 18 (27%, and 1 (1% patients, respectively. Indian Cosmetics and Fragrance Series elicited positive reactions in 29 (43.3% patients. Cetrimide was the most common contact sensitizers eliciting positivity in 15 (52% patients, followed by gallate mix in 9 (31% patients and thiomersal in 7 (24% patients. Only 2 of the 42 patients showed positive reaction from their own cosmetics while the other 5 patients had irritant reaction. Indian Sunscreen Series did not elicit any positive reaction. Conclusion. Cosmetics contact sensitivity appears as an important cause of melasma not associated with pregnancy, lactation, or hormone therapy.

  2. Laboratory tests to identify patients at risk of early major adverse events: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M; Bebee, B; Bailey, J; Robbins, R; Hart, G K; Bellomo, R

    2014-10-01

    To test whether commonly measured laboratory variables can identify surgical patients at risk of major adverse events (death, unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) admission or rapid response team (RRT) activation). We conducted a prospective observational study in a surgical ward of a university-affiliated hospital in a cohort of 834 surgical patients admitted for >24 h. We applied a previously validated multivariable model-derived risk assessment to each combined set of common laboratory tests to identify patients at risk. We compared the clinical course of such patients with that of control patients from the same ward who had blood tests but were identified as low risk. We studied 7955 batches and 73,428 individual tests in 834 patients (males 55%; average age 65.8 ± 17.6 years). Among these patients, 66 (7.9%) were identified as 'high risk'. High-risk patients were older (75.9 vs 61.8 years of age; P identify surgical ward patients at risk of early major adverse events. Further studies are needed to assess whether such identification system can be used to trigger interventions that help improve patient outcomes. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  3. Patients views and experiences in online reporting adverse drug reactions: findings of a national pilot study in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Michiko Yamamoto,1 Kiyoshi Kubota,2 Mitsuhiro Okazaki,3 Akira Dobashi,3 Masayuki Hashiguchi,4 Hirohisa Doi,1 Machi Suka,5 Mayumi Mochizuki4 1Education Center for Clinical Pharmacy Practice, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan; 3Education and Research Institute of Information Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Tokyo, Japan; 4Division for Evaluation and Analysis of Drug Information, Faculty of Pharmacy, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; 5Department of Public Health and Environmental Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Background: Patients have been allowed to report adverse drug reactions (ADRs directly to the government in some countries, which would contribute to pharmacovigilance.Objective: We started a pilot study to determine whether web-based patient ADR reporting would work in Japan. This article aims to describe the characteristics of the patient reporters, and to clarify patient views and experiences of reporting.Methods: Patients who submitted online ADR reports were contacted to respond to an ADR reporting questionnaire; only consenting reporters were included. Subjects with multiple responses were excluded from analysis. The questionnaire consisted of both closed and open questions. Questionnaire responses were examined using Pearson’s chi-squared test.Results: A total of 220 web-based ADR reports were collected from January to December 2011; questionnaires were sent to 190 reporters, excluding those who gave multiple reports and those that refused to be contacted. Responses were obtained from 94 individuals (effective response rate: 49.5%. The median respondent age was 46.0 years. Sixty-three respondents found out about this pilot study on the Internet (67.0%. The numbers of respondents claiming that they had difficulty recalling the time/date of ADR occurrence were 16 patient

  4. APpropriAteness of percutaneous Coronary interventions in patients with ischaemic HEart disease in Italy: the APACHE pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Sergio; Marino, Marcello; Crimi, Gabriele; Maiorana, Florinda; Rizzotti, Diego; Lettieri, Corrado; Bettari, Luca; Zuccari, Marco; Sganzerla, Paolo; Tresoldi, Simone; Adamo, Marianna; Ghiringhelli, Sergio; Sponzilli, Carlo; Pasquetto, Giampaolo; Pavei, Andrea; Pedon, Luigi; Bassan, Luciano; Bollati, Mario; Camisasca, Paola; Trabattoni, Daniela; Brancati, Marta; Poli, Arnaldo; Panciroli, Claudio; Lettino, Maddalena; Tarelli, Giuseppe; Tarantini, Giuseppe; De Luca, Leonardo; Varbella, Ferdinando; Musumeci, Giuseppe; De Servi, Stefano

    2017-09-05

    To first explore in Italy appropriateness of indication, adherence to guideline recommendations and mode of selection for coronary revascularisation. Retrospective, pilot study. 22 percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)-performing hospitals (20 patients per site), 13 (59%) with on-site cardiac surgery. 440 patients who received PCI for stable coronary artery disease (CAD) or non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome were independently selected in a 4:1 ratio with half diabetics. Proportion of patients who received appropriate PCI using validated appropriate use scores (ie, AUS≥7). Also, in patients with stable CAD, we examined adherence to the following European Society of Cardiology recommendations: (A) per cent of patients with complex coronary anatomy treated after heart team discussion; (B) per cent of fractional flow reserve-guided PCI for borderline stenoses in patients without documented ischaemia; (C) per cent of patients receiving guideline-directed medical therapy at the time of PCI as well as use of provocative test of ischaemia according to pretest probability (PTP) of CAD. Of the 401 mappable PCIs (91%), 38.7% (95% CI 33.9 to 43.6) were classified as appropriate, 47.6% (95% CI 42.7 to 52.6) as uncertain and 13.7% (95% CI 10.5% to 17.5%) as inappropriate. Median PTP in patients with stable CAD without known coronary anatomy was 69% (78% intermediate PTP, 22% high PTP). Ischaemia testing use was similar (p=0.71) in patients with intermediate (n=140, 63%) and with high PTP (n=40, 66%). In patients with stable CAD (n=352) guideline adherence to the three recommendations explored was: (A) 11%; (B) 25%; (C) 23%. AUS was higher in patients evaluated by the heart team as compared with patients who were not (7 (6.8) vs 5 (4.7); p=0.001). Use of heart team approaches and adherence to guideline recommendations on coronary revascularisation in a real-world setting is limited. This pilot study documents the feasibility of measuring appropriateness and guideline

  5. Questions elderly patients have about on-going therapy: a pilot study to assist in communication with physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberlin, C; Assa, M; Rubin, D; Zaenger, P

    2001-12-01

    This pilot study examined the prevalence and types of questions elderly patients have about their current drug therapy. It also evaluated the effectiveness of a brief intervention to prepare patients to ask questions about drug therapy during medical visits. The research used a posttest-only experimental design. Forty-five elderly patients seen at a primary care clinic during a one-month period consented to participate and completed the study. After consent, subjects were randomly assigned to intervention and control conditions. A brief interview with intervention group subjects conducted by a medical student assigned to the clinic as part of a summer research experience helped subjects formulate questions they had about current therapy before they went into medical visits. Patient-physician visits were audiotaped and patient questions about medications and health care were tallied. Subjects in the intervention group were significantly more likely to ask questions of providers than were subjects in the control group. Intervention group subjects were found to ask a wider variety of medication-related questions than were control group subjects, including questions related to proper use, problems perceived with medications, and effectiveness of treatment. Assisting patients to formulate questions before medical visits results in an increased likelihood that patients will ask questions and will ask a wider variety of questions during the medical visit.

  6. Group psychoeducation for forensic and dangerous non-forensic long-term patients with schizophrenia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Aho-Mustonen

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The effectiveness of patient psychoeducation has only rarely been studied among forensic populations. This paper examines the outcomes of an eight-time psychoeducational group comprised of schizophrenic patients in a forensic hospital setting in Finland. Methods: The intervention group contained forensic or dangerous non-forensic long-term patients with schizophrenia. Treatment outcomes were compared between the intervention group (n = 7 and a matched treatment-as-usual control group (n = 8. The group provided information about schizophrenia and its treatment and cognitive-behavioural elements were used to enhance patients' learning and coping. The results were obtained from a knowledge of schizophrenia, awareness of mental disorder, attitudes toward psychiatric treatment and medication, and depression. Results: The results of this pilot study suggest that even severely ill patients were able to gain improved knowledge about their illness, and psychoeducation also had positive impact on their awareness of the illness. The results showed no significant changes in attitudes toward psychiatric treatment or medication, or depressive symptoms. No significant changes in any measures were found in the control group. Conclusions: Despite our positive results further research with larger samples is needed to discover the effectiveness of patient education as a component of the comprehensive treatment of forensic patients with schizophrenia.

  7. Group psychoeducation for forensic and dangerous non-forensic long-term patients with schizophrenia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Aho-Mustonen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The effectiveness of patient psychoeducation has only rarely been studied among forensic populations. This paper examines the outcomes of an eight-time psychoeducational group comprised of schizophrenic patients in a forensic hospital setting in Finland. Methods: The intervention group contained forensic or dangerous non-forensic long-term patients with schizophrenia. Treatment outcomes were compared between the intervention group (n = 7 and a matched treatment-as-usual control group (n = 8. The group provided information about schizophrenia and its treatment and cognitive-behavioural elements were used to enhance patients' learning and coping. The results were obtained from a knowledge of schizophrenia, awareness of mental disorder, attitudes toward psychiatric treatment and medication, and depression. Results: The results of this pilot study suggest that even severely ill patients were able to gain improved knowledge about their illness, and psychoeducation also had positive impact on their awareness of the illness. The results showed no significant changes in attitudes toward psychiatric treatment or medication, or depressive symptoms. No significant changes in any measures were found in the control group. Conclusions: Despite our positive results further research with larger samples is needed to discover the effectiveness of patient education as a component of the comprehensive treatment of forensic patients with schizophrenia.

  8. Patient satisfaction relating to implant treatment by undergraduate and postgraduate dental students--a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrison, P

    2009-08-01

    Recordings of patient satisfaction with provision of dental implant treatment are scarce. This study aimed to evaluate satisfaction amongst patients attending for provision of implant treatment by training undergraduate and postgraduate students at Dublin Dental School and Hospital (DDSH). A questionnaire was formulated and distributed to 100 individuals randomly selected from records of patients who had received implant treatment via student clinics in the previous 5 years. The response rate was 68%. Results showed a high overall level of satisfaction with treatment received.

  9. Breast-cancer patients' participation behavior and coping during presurgical consultations: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetis, Maria K; Robinson, Jeffrey D; Kearney, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In the context of breast-cancer care, there is extremely little research on the association between observed (i.e., taped and coded) communication behaviors and patients' health outcomes, especially those other than satisfaction. In the context of presurgical consultations between female breast cancer patients and a surgeon, the aim of this exploratory study was to test the association between communication-based participation behaviors and pre-post consultation changes in aspects of patients' mental adjustment to cancer (i.e., coping). Participants included 51 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer and a surgical oncologist from a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center in the northeastern United States. Outcomes were changes in patients' fighting spirit, helplessness/hopelessness, anxious preoccupation, cognitive avoidance, and fatalism (measured immediately before and after consultations via survey), and the main predictors were three communication-based participation behaviors coded from videotapes of consultations: patient question asking, patient assertion of treatment preferences, and surgeon solicitation of patient question/concern/opinion. Patients who more frequently asserted their treatment preferences experienced increases in their fighting spirit (p = .01) and decreases in their anxious preoccupation (p = .02). When companions (e.g., sister, spouse) asked more questions, patients experienced decreases in their anxious preoccupation (p = .05). These findings suggest that, in the present context, there may be specific, trainable communication behaviors, such as patients asserting their treatment preferences and companions asking questions, that may improve patients' psychosocial health outcomes.

  10. Speech therapy in patients with excessive supragastric belching--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmink, G J M; Ten Cate, L; Bredenoord, A J; Timmer, R; Weusten, B L A M; Smout, A J P M

    2010-01-01

    In patients whose main symptom is excessive belching, supragastric belching appears to be the predominant mechanism. This belch pattern is characterized by a rapid influx of air into the oesophagus, immediately followed by rapid air expulsion. The rate at which supragastric belching occurs is influenced by attention and distraction, suggesting a behavioural disorder and speech therapy may be of benefit to these patients. In 17 consecutive patients with excessive belching, concurrent impedance monitoring and high-resolution manometry were performed to ascertain the mechanism of belching. Patients with supragastric belches were referred to a speech therapist, who was familiar with the concept of supragastric belching. Before and after treatment by the speech therapist, patients filled out a VAS scale regarding the severity of their symptoms. In all patients, supragastric belches were identified with impedance monitoring. Eleven patients were referred to a speech therapist, six patients were not able or willing to undergo repetitive treatments. Eleven patients completed treatment by the speech therapist consisting of 10 (8-10) sessions. Overall, the VAS scales showed a significant improvement of the severity of symptoms (P 30%) in their symptoms and four patients reported a modest decrease (Speech therapy performed by a well-informed speech pathologist leads to a significant symptom reduction in patients with excessive supragastric belching. This is the first study indicating benefit of a treatment for excessive belching.

  11. Effect of therapeutic infra-red in patients with non-specific low back pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Naseri, Nasrin; Entezary, Ebrahim; Irani, Shahnur; Jalaie, Shohreh; Hasson, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of infra-red (IR) in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain (NSLBP). Ten patients with NSLBP (5 men and 5 women) and disease duration of 21.7 ± 11.50 months participated in this pilot study. Patients had a mean age of 36.40 ± 10.11 years (range = 25-55). Patients were treated with infra-red (IR) for 10 sessions, each for 15 min, 3 days per week, for a period of 4 weeks. Outcome measures were the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), the Functional Rating Index (FRI), the Modified-Modified Schober Test (MMST), and the Biering-Sorensen test to assess pain severity, disability, lumbar flexion and extension range of motion (ROM), and back extensor endurance, respectively. Data were collected at: baseline - study entry (T0); end of 5th treatment session after 2 weeks (T1); and end of the treatment after 4 weeks (T2). The results of the ANOVA demonstrated a statistically significant main effect of IR on all outcomes of pain, function, lumbar flexion-extension ROM, and back extensor endurance. The treatment effect sizes ranged from large to small. IR was effective in improving pain, function, lumbar ROM, and back extensor endurance in a sample of patients with NSLBP. Treatment effect sizes ranged from large to small indicating clinically relevant improvements primarily in pain and function for patients with NSLBP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparing Self-Injection Teaching Strategies for Patients With Breast Cancer and Their Caregivers: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Cartlidge, Erica; Romanoff, Sonya; Thom, Bridgette; Burrows Walters, Chasity

    2016-10-01

    A prospective, quasiexperimental pilot study with a sequential design was performed to compare two methods of teaching self-injection. The study examined 50 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant or neoadjuvant treatment and their caregivers to determine if simulation during the teaching experience affects patient/caregiver satisfaction, worry, and self-confidence, as well as nurse satisfaction. Structured questionnaires were administered before the teaching, immediately after the teaching, and after the injection was performed at home. Nurses who performed the teaching also completed a questionnaire after the teaching. Use of simulation did not affect patient/caregiver satisfaction, worry, or self-confidence. The largest impact on learner worry was the actual teaching experience, regardless of the methodology used. Nurses reported greater levels of satisfaction when simulation was part of the teaching. Patient/caregiver satisfaction with the teaching experience decreased after performing the injection at home. Additional research is needed to identify the best methodology for teaching patients and caregivers self-injection. Data from this study revealed that the addition of simulation during teaching does not always translate to better education. In addition, based on patient/caregiver reports, no substitution exists for actual injection administration.

  13. Patient perspectives on communication with the medical team: pilot study using the Communication Assessment Tool-Team (CAT-T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Laura Min; Tanabe, Paula; Pang, Peter S; Gisondi, Michael A; Courtney, D Mark; Engel, Kirsten G; Donlan, Sarah M; Adams, James G; Makoul, Gregory

    2008-11-01

    Effective communication is an essential aspect of high-quality patient care and a core competency for physicians. To date, assessment of communication skills in team-based settings has not been well established. We sought to tailor a psychometrically validated instrument, the Communication Assessment Tool, for use in Team settings (CAT-T), and test the feasibility of collecting patient perspectives of communication with medical teams in the emergency department (ED). A prospective, cross-sectional study in an academic, tertiary, urban, Level 1 trauma center using the CAT-T, a 15-item instrument. Items were answered via a 5-point scale, with 5 = excellent. All adult ED patients (> or = 18 y/o) were eligible if the following exclusion criteria did not apply: primary psychiatric issues, critically ill, physiologically unstable, non-English speaking, or under arrest. 81 patients were enrolled (mean age: 44, S.D. = 17; 44% male). Highest ratings were for treating the patient with respect (69% excellent), paying attention to the patient (69% excellent), and showing care and concern (69% excellent). Lowest ratings were for greeting the patient appropriately (54%), encouraging the patient to ask questions (54%), showing interest in the patient's ideas about his or her health (53% excellent), and involving the patient in decisions as much as he or she wanted (53% excellent). Although this pilot study has several methodological limitations, it demonstrates a signal that patient assessment of communication with the medical team is feasible and offers important feedback. Results indicate the need to improve communication in the ED. In the ED, focusing on the medical team rather then individual caregivers may more accurately reflect patients' experience.

  14. Cold Therapy in Migraine Patients: Open-label, Non-controlled, Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Ucler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Some patients with headache report that they have frequently used physical therapies such as application of cold to relieve their headache. There are only a few reported studies related to cold therapies in patients with migraine. In this study, we investigated the effect of cold application on migraine patients. Twenty-eight migraine patients were included. Cold therapy was administered to them by gel cap. Patients used this cap during their two migraine attacks. Before and after the cold therapy, headache severity was recorded by using visual analogue scale (VAS. Patients used this cap for 25 min in each application. They recorded their VAS score just after the therapy and 25 min, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h later. Two patients could not use this therapy due to side effects (one due to cold intolerance and one due to vertigo in both applications. Therefore, therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in 26 patients. Twenty-five minutes after treatment of the first attack, VAS score was decreased from 7.89 ± 1.93 to 5.54 ± 2.96 (P < 0.01. Twenty-five minutes after treatment of the second attack, VAS score was decreased from 7.7 ± 1.8 to 5.4 ± 3.55 (P < 0.01. Cold application alone may be effective in some patients suffering from migraine attacks. Its combination with conventional drugs should be investigated in future studies.

  15. Cold Therapy in Migraine Patients: Open-label, Non-controlled, Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucler, Serap; Coskun, Ozlem; Inan, Levent E; Kanatli, Yonca

    2006-12-01

    Some patients with headache report that they have frequently used physical therapies such as application of cold to relieve their headache. There are only a few reported studies related to cold therapies in patients with migraine. In this study, we investigated the effect of cold application on migraine patients. Twenty-eight migraine patients were included. Cold therapy was administered to them by gel cap. Patients used this cap during their two migraine attacks. Before and after the cold therapy, headache severity was recorded by using visual analogue scale (VAS). Patients used this cap for 25 min in each application. They recorded their VAS score just after the therapy and 25 min, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h later. Two patients could not use this therapy due to side effects (one due to cold intolerance and one due to vertigo) in both applications. Therefore, therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in 26 patients. Twenty-five minutes after treatment of the first attack, VAS score was decreased from 7.89 +/- 1.93 to 5.54 +/- 2.96 (P < 0.01). Twenty-five minutes after treatment of the second attack, VAS score was decreased from 7.7 +/- 1.8 to 5.4 +/- 3.55 (P < 0.01). Cold application alone may be effective in some patients suffering from migraine attacks. Its combination with conventional drugs should be investigated in future studies.

  16. Effects of quetiapine and olanzapine in patients with psychosis and violent behavior: a pilot randomized, open-label, comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobbi G

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabriella Gobbi,1,2 Stefano Comai,1 Guy Debonnel1,2,† 1Neurobiological Psychiatric Unit, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University and McGill University Health Center, 2Institut Philippe Pinel, Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada †Guy Debonnel passed away on November 4, 2006 Objective: Patients suffering from psychosis are more likely than the general population to commit aggressive acts, but the therapeutics of aggressive behavior are still a matter of debate. Methods: This pilot randomized, open-label study compared the efficacy of quetiapine versus olanzapine in reducing impulsive and aggressive behaviors (primary endpoints and psychotic symptoms (secondary endpoints from baseline to days 1, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70, in 15 violent schizophrenic patients hospitalized in a maximum-security psychiatric hospital. Results: Quetiapine (525±45 mg and olanzapine (18.5±4.8 mg were both efficacious in reducing Impulsivity Rating Scale from baseline to day 70. In addition, both treatments reduced the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and Clinical Global Impression Scale scores at day 70 compared to baseline, and no differences were observed between treatments. Moreover, quetiapine, but not olanzapine, yielded an improvement of depressive symptoms in the items “depression” in Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and “blunted affect” in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Modified Overt Aggression Scale scores were also decreased from baseline to the endpoint, but due to the limited number of patients, it was not possible to detect a significant difference. Conclusion: In this pilot study, quetiapine and olanzapine equally decreased impulsive and psychotic symptoms after 8 weeks of treatment. Double-blind, large studies are needed to confirm the validity of these two treatments in highly aggressive and violent schizophrenic patients. Keywords: schizophrenia, aggression

  17. Patients' Evaluations of Complete Denture Therapy and Their Association with Related Variables: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Beatriz Ferreira Oliveira; dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Santos, Jarbas Francisco Fernandes; Marchini, Leonardo

    2015-07-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important goal in complete denture therapy, and many factors influence this parameter. This study aimed to evaluate expectations before and satisfaction after therapy with complete dentures. As a secondary objective, other variables that may interfere with patient satisfaction were also evaluated. A representative sample of 99 patients assigned visual analog scale (VAS) scores to their expectations before and satisfaction after therapy regarding chewing, esthetics, comfort, and phonetics. Demographic data and answers to a questionnaire concerning the dentists' conduct were recorded. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the association among studied variables and patients' expectation and satisfaction with their dentures. The average VAS scores were high for both expectations and satisfaction, and satisfaction exceeded expectations. Patients' expectations about esthetics and comfort were associated with age and self-reported time of using complete dentures. Patient satisfaction regarding chewing was associated with the number of postdelivery adjustments. Also, patient satisfaction regarding esthetics was associated with gender and esthetic expectations. In regard to phonetic satisfaction, associations were verified among self-reported time of using complete dentures, comfort and phonetics expectations, and dentists' explanations. Comfort satisfaction was associated only with educational level. Patient satisfaction regarding complete dentures exceeded expectations and an expressive majority of positive evaluations of the dentists was noticed. Many patient-related variables seemed to influence their evaluations of their dentures. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Hijama improves overall quality of life in chronic renal failure patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Danial, Khurram

    2015-09-01

    Present study assesses the therapeutic effectiveness of Hijama (blood letting) inpatients of chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis for past several years with almost no urinary output.24 patients from Sindh Government Qatar Hospital Karachi were selected randomly under going dialysis 2-3 times/week for an average of 3 years under supervision of Dr. Khurram Danial, in-charge nephrologist at dialysis Centre Sindh Government Qatar Hospital Karachi after the written consent from patients. Each patient was subjected to Hijama session once a week after dialysis for a period of one year in a nearby hospital Aligarh Shifa with the consent of the ethical committee of the hospital. Serum urea, creatinine, complete blood count and electrolytes were determined prior to Hijama as baseline values and were again recorded on monthly basis for twelve months of Hijama sessions. The patient's feedback regarding quality of life after each Hijama session shows that almost all the patients reported a significant recovery from severe fatigue which they used to face during the interval between the dialysis sessions. There was significant recovery in all patients from anorexia and insomnia with the improvement in quality of life as compared to patients not undergoing Hijama. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures were shifted towards normal in almost all patients after Hijama. Serum Creatinine level was declined significantly, while electrolyte and hematological parameters were also improved significantly. The hemoglobin of all patients undergoing Hijama was maintained near normal without any blood transfusion, which was frequently needed in patients not undergoing Hijama sessions. There was insignificant improvement in Urinary output in 2 out of 24 patients. Results of the present study suggest that Hijama may be performed safely in patients of chronic renal failure on dialysis with overall improvement in quality of life, since there was reduction in fatigue, improvement in

  19. Heart rate variability during treatment of breakthrough pain in patients with advanced cancer: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Eva Katharina; Huber, Patrick; Engler, Tobias; Watzke, Herbert Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background Decisions on the intensity of analgesic therapy and judgments regarding its efficacy are difficult at the end of life, when many patients are not fully conscious and pain is a very common symptom. In healthy individuals and in postoperative settings, nociception and subsequent pain relief have been shown to induce changes in the autonomic nervous system (ANS), which can be detected by measuring heart rate variability (HRV). Objectives The changes in the ANS were studied by measuring HRV during opioid therapy for cancer breakthrough pain (CBTP) in palliative-care patients with cancer and compared these changes with patient-reported pain levels on a numeric rating scale (NRS). Patients and methods The study included ten patients with advanced cancer and baseline opioid therapy. In each patient, a 24-hour peak-to-peak HRV measurement with a sampling rate of 4,000 Hz was performed. High frequency (HF), low frequency (LF), total power, pNN50 (indicating parasympathetic activity), and log LF/HF were obtained in two intervals prior to therapy and in four intervals thereafter. Intensity of CBTP was recorded using a patient-reported NRS prior to therapy and 30 minutes afterward. Results CBTP occurred in seven patients (three males and four females; mean age: 62 ± 5.2 years) and was treated with opioids. A highly significant positive correlation was found between opioid-induced reduction in patient-reported pain intensity based on NRS and changes in log LF/HF (r > 0.700; p 2 points on the NRS but remained unchanged in the other patients. Conclusion Our data suggest that log LF/HF may be a useful surrogate marker for alleviation of CBTP in patients with advanced cancer and might allow detection of pain without active contribution from patients. PMID:28003771

  20. [Patient satisfaction in the outpatient department--a pilot study for customer satisfaction in ENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K; Meyer, J; Jahnke, I; Wollenberg, B; Schmidt, C

    2009-03-01

    Customer satisfaction in German hospitals is becoming more important because of increasing competition in the healthcare market. Because the majority of patients with ear-nose-throat (ENT) problems are treated in an outpatient setting, this competition is not only taking place among hospitals but also among specialists in private practices. To assess patient preferences, reliable and valid questionnaires are necessary, which so far exist only for inpatients. The aim of the study was to develop an instrument with which to discover areas for potential improvement of the outpatient department. The questionnaire was developed according to the guidelines of the EORTC and tested in a prestudy. During the time of observation, 98 patients were available, of whom 79 could be included in the study. The return rate was 71%. Of these patients, 18 were female and 38 male; the median age was 56 years. There were no differences between the study group and the yearly clinic average in terms of age, gender, or ratio of tumor patients. Patients mainly complained about waiting times in the outpatient department and diagnostic units as well as high patient turnover. Concerning positive aspects, patients mentioned the medical competence of the treating physicians; concerning negative aspects, the building infrastructure was noted. The questionnaire showed sufficient psychometric properties and helped find areas for improvement in the outpatient department. However, a complete picture of the department will be feasible only with repeated measures, especially when taking steps to improve the department's processes.

  1. How to select elderly colorectal cancer patients for surger y:a pilot study in an Italian academic medical center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giampaolo Ugolini; Francesco Pasini; Federico Ghignone; Davide Zattoni; Maria Letizia Bacchi Reggiani; Daniele Parlanti; Isacco Montroni

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Cancer is one of the most common diagnoses in elderly patients. Of all types of abdominal cancer, colorectal cancer (CRC) is undoubtedly the most frequent. Median age at diagnosis is approximately 70 years old worldwide. Due to the multiple comorbidities affecting elderly people, frailty evaluation is very important in order to avoid over-or under-treatment. hTis pilot study was designed to investigate the variables capable of predicting the long-term risk of mortality and living situation atfer surgery for CRC. Methods:Patients with 70 years old and older undergoing elective surgery for CRC were prospectively enrolled in the study. hTe patients were preoperatively screened using 11 internationally-validated-frailty-assessment tests. hTe endpoints of the study were long-term mortality and living situation. hTe data were analyzed using univariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis to verify the predictive value of score indices in order to identify possible risk factors. Results:Forty-six patients were studied. hTe median follow-up time atfer surgery was 4.6 years (range, 2.9-5.7 years) and no patients were lost to follow-up. hTe overall mortality rate was 39%. Four of the patients who survived (4/28, 14%) lost their functional autonomy. hTe preoperative impaired Timed Up and Go (TUG), Eastern Cooperative Group Performance Status (ECOG PS), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13) scoring systems were signiifcantly associated with increased long term mortality risk. Conclusion:Simpliifed frailty-assessing tools should be routinely used in elderly cancer patients before treatment in order to stratify patient risk. hTe TUG, ECOG-PS, IADLs and VES-13 scoring systems are potentially able to predict long-term mortality and disability. Additional studies will be needed to conifrm the preliminary data in order to improve management strategies for oncogeriatric surgical patients.

  2. How to select elderly colorectal cancer patients for surgery: a pilot study in an Italian academic medical center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, Giampaolo; Pasini, Francesco; Ghignone, Federico; Zattoni, Davide; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Parlanti, Daniele; Montroni, Isacco

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cancer is one of the most common diagnoses in elderly patients. Of all types of abdominal cancer, colorectal cancer (CRC) is undoubtedly the most frequent. Median age at diagnosis is approximately 70 years old worldwide. Due to the multiple comorbidities affecting elderly people, frailty evaluation is very important in order to avoid over- or under-treatment. This pilot study was designed to investigate the variables capable of predicting the long-term risk of mortality and living situation after surgery for CRC. Methods Patients with 70 years old and older undergoing elective surgery for CRC were prospectively enrolled in the study. The patients were preoperatively screened using 11 internationally-validated-frailty-assessment tests. The endpoints of the study were long-term mortality and living situation. The data were analyzed using univariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis to verify the predictive value of score indices in order to identify possible risk factors. Results Forty-six patients were studied. The median follow-up time after surgery was 4.6 years (range, 2.9-5.7 years) and no patients were lost to follow-up. The overall mortality rate was 39%. Four of the patients who survived (4/28, 14%) lost their functional autonomy. The preoperative impaired Timed Up and Go (TUG), Eastern Cooperative Group Performance Status (ECOG PS), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13) scoring systems were significantly associated with increased long term mortality risk. Conclusion Simplified frailty-assessing tools should be routinely used in elderly cancer patients before treatment in order to stratify patient risk. The TUG, ECOG-PS, IADLs and VES-13 scoring systems are potentially able to predict long-term mortality and disability. Additional studies will be needed to confirm the preliminary data in order to improve management strategies for oncogeriatric surgical patients. PMID:26779367

  3. Effect of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic neuropathic pain among patients with type 2 diabetes - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Rajsekar, Seena; Selvaraj, Bamila; Kumpatla, Satyavani

    2016-08-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and can severely limit patients' daily functions. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety and effect of using a polyherbal formulation in reducing the symptoms of diabetic neuropathic pain in comparison with placebo among patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 50 (M:F = 33:17) consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with painful diabetic neuropathy were enrolled in this study. All these patients had either two or more symptoms of diabetic neuropathy such as pain, burning and pricking sensations and numbness in their feet. They were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 26) patients were treated with polyherbal formulation cream and group 2 (n = 24) patients were administered placebo. The patients were followed up for six months. Changes in the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy of each patient were recorded at baseline, third and sixth month using the Diabetic Neuropathic Score. The mean age of the patients, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ) were similar in both groups at baseline. During follow up visits, there was a decrease in the HbA 1c levels in the study and control groups. The symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy were also similar in both groups at baseline. A significant decrease in symptoms of neuropathic pain was observed among the group of patients treated with polyherbal formulation cream (76.9 per cent) compared to the placebo-treated group (12.5 per cent) (Pcream was found to be effective as well as safe to treat painful diabetic neuropathy. However, its long term use needs to be evaluated for any further effectiveness and side effects.

  4. Pulse wave velocity in patients with severe head injury a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, S; McKelvey, T; Rydenhag, B; Ritzén, C Eriksson

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the potential of pulse wave velocity measurements to reflect changes in compliant cerebral arteries/arterioles in head injured patients. The approach utilizes the electrocardiogram and intracranial pressure signals to measure the wave transit time between heart and cranial cavity. Thirty five clinical records of nineteen head injured patients, with different levels of cerebrovascular pressure-reactivity response, were investigated through the study. Results were compared with magnitude of normalized transfer function at the fundamental cardiac frequency. In patients with intact cerebrovascular pressure-reactivity, magnitude of normalized transfer function at the fundamental cardiac component was found to be highly correlated with pulse wave transit time.

  5. High acceptability of cognitive screening in HIV-infected patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Fasel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available With combined antiretroviral therapy (cART life expectancy of HIV-infected persons is close to the one of non-infected persons. Identifying neurocognitive deficits in ageing HIV-infected individuals is important. This study aimed to evaluate the acceptability of screening neurocognitive deficits in HIV-infected patients. Thirty patients (26 men, 4 women from the HIV clinic were examined with a new screening test and an in-depth neuropsychological examination. The screening tests consisted of questions and examinations on cognition in everyday situations, mood and selected cognitive functions (word list memory, grooved pegboard, psychomotor speed, trail-making test, psychomotor speed and executive functions, digit symbol test. Also, patients received a questionnaire to evaluate test acceptance. The mean age of the patients was 52.5 (30–74 years, mean education 12.5 (8–18 years. Seven patients had HIV-stage CDC A, 12 B and 11 CDC stage C. The mean CD4 count was 657 cells/µl, the mean HIV viral load<20 cop./µl. All patients were treated with cART (7 with efavirenz. The screening test was done assisted by a nurse and lasted 26 minutes (mean. The screening indicated pathological signs of neurocognitive function in 11 (42% patients. The in-depth neuropsychological assessment revealed pathological conditions in 25 (83% of patients; i.e. 16 (53% patients had ANI (asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment, 8 (27% had MND (mild neurocognitive disorder and 1 (3% had HAD (HIV-associated dementia. Most patients (43.3% judged the test as not too difficult and 56.6% as partly difficult. 96.6% of patients viewed the instructions of nurses as clear, 3.3% as unclear. 93.3% felt the test has not affected privacy and 83.3% estimated the screening as valuable and not worriesome. 83.4% of all patients were interested in their results and for none of the patients the test was too long. The test acceptability by the study nurses was also good. Only in 3.4% of tested

  6. Thiamine in septic shock patients with alcohol use disorders: An observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Mathias Johan; Moskowitz, Ari; Patel, Parth Vijay; Grossestreuer, Anne Victoria; Uber, Amy; Stankovic, Nikola; Andersen, Lars Wiuff; Donnino, Michael William

    2017-08-16

    Alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) have been associated with increased sepsis-related mortality. As patients with AUDs are often thiamine deficient, we investigated practice patterns relating to thiamine administration in patients with AUDs presenting with septic shock and explored the association between receipt of thiamine and mortality. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients presenting with septic shock between 2008 and 2014 at a single tertiary care center. We identified patients with an AUD diagnosis, orders for microbial cultures and use of antibiotics, vasopressor dependency, and lactate levels≥4mmol/L. We excluded those who received thiamine later than 48h of sepsis onset. We included 53 patients. Thirty-four (64%) patients received thiamine. Five patients (15%) received their first thiamine dose in the emergency department. The median time to thiamine administration was 9 (quartiles: 4, 18) hours. The first thiamine dose was most often given parenterally (68%) and for 100mg (88%). In those receiving thiamine, 15/34 (44%) died, compared to 15/19 (79%) of those not receiving thiamine, p=0.02. A considerable proportion of patients with AUDs admitted for septic shock do not receive thiamine. Thiamine administration in this patient population was associated with decreased mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced cancer: A pilot study in Institute of Oncology Bucharest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorescu, Alexandru C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives First objective was better understanding of the indications of chemotherapy in elderly with advanced cancer, tolerability and toxicity of chemotherapy in this age group. The second objective was to define current practice in chemotherapy for elderly people with advanced cancer for a selected group of patients treated in Institute of Oncology Bucharest (IOB). Materials and Methods The study makes a clinical analysis of medical records of 27 patients from the archive of Institute of Oncology Bucharest treated by the same doctor. Patients were selected according to: age ≥ 65 years, ECOG performance status 0–1, normal blood counts and blood biochemistry, histological confirmation of the diagnosis of cancer, patients should received at least 3 cycles of chemotherapy. We extract characteristics of the patients to see if they were a homogeneous group of patients and to compare them with data from the literature. Overall survival was calculated by the Kaplan Meyer curve. Results 295 patients more then 65 years were treated in our site in 2 years 2011, 2012. 93 patients received chemotherapy and only 27 patients were enrolled in this study following inclusion criteria. Common sites of cancer were lung and breast. The most used cytostatics for lung cancer was gemcitabine and carboplatine and cyclophosphamide, metotrexat and 5 fluorouracil for breast cancer. Toxicity was mild with the prevalence of hematologic toxicity. Overall survival without taking into account the type of cancer was 27.7 month. Conclusions For selected patients, chemotherapy was well tolerated and appears to prolong survival regardless of the location of cancer. The relatively small number of elderly patients who received chemotherapy is probably due to lack of compliance to treatment, the increased number of co-morbidities and evaluation of performance status only by the ECOG index known not to be good enough to establish the indication of chemotherapy. PMID:27847881

  8. Combined transcranial direct current stimulation and robot-assisted arm training in subacute stroke patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, S; Werner, C; Schonhardt, E M; Bardeleben, A; Jenrich, W; Kirker, S G B

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary reports suggest that central stimulation may enhance the effect of conventional physical therapies after stroke. This pilot study examines the safety and methodology of using transcranial direct stimulation (tDCS) with robot-assisted arm training (AT), to inform planning a larger randomised controlled trial. Ten patients, after an ischaemic stroke 4-8 weeks before study onset, no history of epilepsy, participated. Eight had a cortical lesion and 2 had subcortical lesions: all had severe arm paresis and, co-incidentally, 5 had severe aphasia. Over six weeks, they received thirty 20 min-sessions of AT. During the first 7 minutes, 1.5mA of tDCS was applied, with the anode over the lesioned hemisphere and the cathode above the contralateral orbit. Arm and language impairment were assessed with the Fugl-Meyer motor score (FM, full range 0-66) and the Aachener Aphasie Test. No major side effects occurred. Arm function of three patients (two with a subcortical lesion) improved significantly, with FM scores increasing from 6 to 28, 10 to 49 and 11 to 48. In the remaining seven patients, all with cortical lesions, arm function changed little, FM scores did not increase more than 5 points. Unexpectedly, aphasia improved in 4 patients. These procedures are safe, and easy to use in a clinical setting. In future studies, patients should be stratified by degree of arm weakness and lesion site, also the unexpected aphasia improvement warrants following-up.

  9. Development of self-care educational material for patients with heart failure in Japan: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Sano, Miho; Seki, Satomi; Kogure, Asuka; Kobukata, Kihoko; Ochiai, Ryota; Wakita, Sanae; Kazuma, Keiko

    2012-06-01

    This study assessed the need for information regarding heart failure and self-care, developed self-care educational material, and investigated the feasibility of the material. A total of 22 hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 63 years) completed a self-administered questionnaire. We found that more than 90% of patients desired information, particularly about heart failure symptoms, time to notify healthcare providers, prognosis, and exercise/physical activity. After examining the eight existing brochures for Japanese heart failure patients, we developed self-care educational material. This was based on heart failure guidelines and on the results of our inquiry regarding information needs. Finally, a pilot study was conducted in nine hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 57 years). None of the patients had difficulty reading or understanding the educational material. The self-administrated questionnaire survey revealed that comprehension of the following improved after the educational sessions with the material: heart failure symptoms, medication, weighing, sodium intake, and fluid intake (P study suggests that the material was readable and had a beneficial effect on heart failure comprehension. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Intervention with vitamins in patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolek MK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael K Smolek,1 Neil F Notaroberto,1,2 Arley G Jaramillo,1,2 Lisa R Pradillo1,2 1CLEVER Eye Institute, 2EyeCare 20/20, Slidell, LA, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether a combination of vitamins B6, B9, and B12 is an effective intervention for reducing the signs and symptoms of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Methods: Ten subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 20 eyes with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy were recruited from a private practice ophthalmology clinic for this open-label, uncontrolled, prospective six-month study. Metanx® vitamin tablets (containing 3 mg L-methylfolate calcium, 35 mg pyridoxal-5′-phosphate, and 2 mg methylcobalamin were administered at a dosage of two tablets daily. Primary outcome indicators were the percent change in mean retinal sensitivity threshold measured by macular microperimetry and the percent change in mean central retinal thickness measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Results: Three subjects were lost to follow-up. In the remaining seven subjects, two of 14 eyes had foveal edema that prevented microperimetry measurements due to poor fixation. The remaining 12 eyes showed a nonlinear improvement in mean threshold retinal sensitivity (P < 0.001. Overall change in mean central retinal thickness in 14 eyes was linear (R2 = 0.625; P = 0.034, with a significant reduction between one and six months (P = 0.012. Conclusion: In this pilot study, the Metanx intervention appeared to have some beneficial effects with respect to reducing retinal edema and increasing light sensitivity in subjects with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Keywords: diabetes, diabetic retinopathy, vitamin B, homocysteine, nitric oxide, microperimetry

  11. Ichthyotherapy as Alternative Treatment for Patients with Psoriasis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Grassberger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ichthyotherapy (therapy with the so-called ‘Doctorfish of Kangal’, Garra rufa has been shown to be effective in patients with psoriasis in the Kangal hot springs in Turkey. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of ichthyotherapy in combination with short-term ultraviolet A sunbed radiation in the treatment of psoriasis under controlled conditions. We retrospectively analyzed 67 patients diagnosed with psoriasis who underwent 3 weeks of ichthyotherapy at an outpatient treatment facility in Lower Austria between 2002 and 2004. Main outcome measures are as follows: overall relative reduction in Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI score; proportion of patients with an improvement in their PASI score of ≥75% (PASI-75 and ≥50% (PASI-50; patient-reported outcomes assessed with a custom questionnaire; and patient follow-up with a questionnaire sent out in March 2005. Safety was evaluated by reviewing adverse events and vital signs. Overall there was a 71.7% reduction in PASI score compared to baseline (P < 0.0001. Of the 67 patients studied, 31 (46.3% achieved PASI-75 and 61 patients (91% achieved at least PASI-50. Patients reported substantial satisfaction with the treatment. The reported mean remission period was 8.58 months [95% confidence interval (CI 6.05–11.11]. A total of 87.5% of patients reported a more favorable outcome with ichthyotherapy, when asked to compare ichthyotherapy to other previously tried therapies. Sixty-five percent stated that after the relapse their symptoms were less severe than before treatment. There were no significant adverse events. The benefit demonstrated in this study along with the favorable safety profile suggests that ichthyotherapy could provide a viable treatment option for patients with psoriasis.

  12. Specific Metabolome Profile of Exhaled Breath Condensate in Patients with Shock and Respiratory Failure: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice Fermier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shock includes different pathophysiological mechanisms not fully understood and remains a challenge to manage. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC may contain relevant biomarkers that could help us make an early diagnosis or better understand the metabolic perturbations resulting from this pathological situation. Objective: we aimed to establish the metabolomics signature of EBC from patients in shock with acute respiratory failure in a pilot study. Material and methods: We explored the metabolic signature of EBC in 12 patients with shock compared to 14 controls using LC-HRMS. We used a non-targeted approach, and we performed a multivariate analysis based on Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA to differentiate between the two groups of patients. Results: We optimized the procedure of EBC collection and LC-HRMS detected more than 1000 ions in this fluid. The optimization of multivariate models led to an excellent model of differentiation for both groups (Q2 > 0.4 after inclusion of only 6 ions. Discussion and conclusion: We validated the procedure of EBC collection and we showed that the metabolome profile of EBC may be relevant in characterizing patients with shock. We performed well in distinguishing these patients from controls, and the identification of relevant compounds may be promising for ICC patients.

  13. Pilot study of Bortezomib for Patients with Imatinib-Refractory Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic or Accelerated Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fabio P S; Kantarjian, Hagop; McConkey, David; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stefan; Borthakur, Gautam; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Wright, John; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background Proteasome inhibitors are anticancer compounds that disrupt the proteolytic activity of the proteasome and lead to tumor cell growth arrest and apoptosis. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor that is currently approved for use in multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. It induces apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells in vitro, but the activity of bortezomib in patients with imatinib-resistant CML is unknown. Methods We conducted a pilot trial to evaluate the activity of single agent bortezomib in CML. Seven patients with imatinib-refractory CML were treated with bortezomib at a dose of 1.5 mg/m2 on days 1, 4, 8 and 11 every 3 weeks. Results The median number of cycles received was 2. No patient had a hematologic or cytogenetic response. Three patients had a temporary decrease in basophil counts associated with therapy with bortezomib. Six patients developed grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicities. Conclusion Bortezomib had minimal efficacy and considerable toxicity in patients with imatinib-refractory CML. Further studies should focus on alternative approaches to employ proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of CML, such as in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or as a strategy to eradicate leukemic stem cells. PMID:21816374

  14. Information needs of neuro-oncology patients and their caregivers: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khryshchuk, Olga

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with primary brain tumors (PBT often have acute depression, anxiety and complications of social adaptation. The goal of this study was to examine difficulties and information needs of patients with PBT and their caregivers during diagnostic and treatment period. METHODS: Thirteen in-depth interviews were conducted with convenience sample of nine patients and four caregivers who were under treatment in the Kyiv “Feofaniya” clinic in October 2011 – April 2012. Convenience strategy was used because of poor availability of the target group. Data collection was stopped when saturation was achieved.RESULTS: PBT patients and their caregivers need information about diagnosis and prognosis, while uncertainty about the future is increased due to a long diagnostic period and delayed contacts with neuro-oncology professionals. In making decision, patients rely on the doctors, which confirms the paternalistic relationships. Most patients avoid talking about their feelings with the family and tend to deny the change of roles in the family due to illness. Those who consider chances of recovery as high express need for psychological support, but those who are emotionally suppressed and scared, don’t want to discuss their state with professionals. Caregivers also experience increased responsibility and fear about the future. Possibly, religious patients have lower information needs and willingness to discuss the disease and its treatment with the doctor. CONCLUSIONS: During the diagnostics patients face problems of uncertainty regarding the diagnosis, the availability of appropriate health professional, and the treatment strategy. Communication with doctor and quality of information provided to the patient is important as well as professional psychological support for patients and their caregivers. Limitations of the study include poor sample strategy, all participants were recruited from a single clinic, which is not the typical for

  15. Oxidative stress in immunocompetent patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefler, S; Rodríguez, A; Martín-Loeches, I; Sanchez, V; Marín, J; Llauradó, M; Romeu, M; Díaz, E; Nogués, R; Giralt, M

    2014-03-01

    A comparison was made of the oxidative stress (OS) levels of patients with either viral or bacterial severe community-acquired pneumonia (sCAP) and of patients without infection (healthy volunteers (HV) and patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI)). A prospective observational study was made. Critically ill patients with sCAP. The TBARS level was measured as an index of oxidative injury. SOD, CAT and redox glutathione system (GSH, GSSG, GR, GPx) activities were measured as reflecting antioxidant capacity. Severity of illness was assessed by the APACHE II, SOFA and SIRS scores. Thirty-seven subjects were included: 15 patients with CAP (12 of bacterial origin [BCAP] and 3 due to 2009 A/H1N1 virus [VCAP]), 10 HV and 12 AMI patients. Intensive care CAP mortality was 26.7% (n=4). Plasmatic TBARS levels were higher in CAP patients than in HV, but similar to those recorded in AMI patients. In contrast, VCAP was associated with lower TBARS levels, and some components of the glutathione redox system were higher in BCAP patients and HV. The OS levels did not differ between survivors and non-survivors. Our results suggest the occurrence of higher OS in sCAP patients compared with HV. In contrast, lower TBARS levels were observed in VCAP patients, suggesting an increase of antioxidant activity related to the redox glutathione system. However, further research involving a larger cohort is needed in order to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. High Frequency of Fibromyalgia in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina N. Magrey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Widespread pain from fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is observed in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. We hypothesized that there is increased frequency of FMS in patients with PsA that contributes to fatigue and pain. Method. We prospectively enrolled patients with PsA based on the Classification criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis and healthy subjects were used as controls. The frequency of FMS was determined using London Fibromyalgia Epidemiologic Study Screening Questionnaire (LFESSQ and Symptoms Intensity scale (SIs. Results. 34 PsA patients and 44 controls fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Median age of PsA patients was 52 years with 53.33% females. Median age of controls was 50.5 years with 59% females. FMS was present in 53.33% of PsA patients compared to 4.54% of the controls (, based on LFESSQ. 37.50% of PsA had FMS compared to 6.66% of controls ( based on SIs. There was a significant correlation between LFESSQ and SIs in the psoriatic group (. 76.66% of PsA patients complained of fatigue compared to 40.90% of controls, but the mean fatigue score between the two groups was comparable (5.03 versus 5.18. Conclusion. FMS-associated pain and fatigue are significantly more frequent in patients with PsA compared to controls.

  17. Adrenal gland volume measurement in septic shock and control patients: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nougaret, Stephanie; Aufort, S.; Gallix, B. [Hopital Saint Eloi, Department of Abdominal Imaging, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France); Jung, B.; Chanques, G.; Jaber, S. [Hopital Saint Eloi, Intensive Care Unit, Department of Critical Care and Anesthesiology: DAR B, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France)

    2010-10-15

    To compare adrenal gland volume in septic shock patients and control patients by using semi-automated volumetry. Adrenal gland volume and its inter-observer variability were measured with tomodensitometry using semi-automated software in 104 septic shock patients and in 40 control patients. The volumes of control and septic shock patients were compared and the relationship between volume and outcome in intensive care was studied. The mean total volume of both adrenal glands was 7.2 {+-} 2.0 cm{sup 3} in control subjects and 13.3 {+-} 4.7 cm{sup 3} for total adrenal gland volume in septic shock patients (p < 0.0001). Measurement reproducibility was excellent with a concordance correlation coefficient value of 0.87. The increasing adrenal gland volume was associated with a higher rate of survival in intensive care. The present study reports that with semi-automated software, adrenal gland volume can be measured easily and reproducibly. Adrenal gland volume was found to be nearly double in sepsis compared with control patients. The absence of increased volume during sepsis would appear to be associated with a higher rate of mortality and may represent a prognosis factor which may help the clinician to guide their strategy. (orig.)

  18. A pilot usability study of MINWii, a music therapy game for demented patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, Mélodie; Benveniste, Samuel; Boespflug, Sandra; Jouvelot, Pierre; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2011-01-01

    MINWii is a music therapy game for the renarcissization of demented patients. It lets players improvise or play songs of their choice by pointing at a virtual keyboard with a Wiimote Pistol. We present the results of a three-month usability study we conducted with 7 institutionalized patients suffering from mild to moderately severe Alzheimer's disease at the LUSAGE Living Lab in Paris. We demonstrate that MINWii is indeed usable by AD patients despite their motor and cognitive impairments: our results, which were largely computed automatically thanks to MINWii's extensive logging capabilities, show either an instant mastery or a clear learning effect depending on patients' cognitive abilities. Moreover, patients were overall very satisfied with the game and expressed a desire to repeat the experience: MINWii fosters positive interaction with the caregivers and elicits powerful reminiscence with even the most severely impaired patients. This study justifies future research to assess the lasting effects of playing MINWii on both quality of life and cognitive impairment in demented patients.

  19. The effect of a structured intervention on caregivers of patients with dementia and problem behaviors: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Alessandro; Riva, Emma; Tettamanti, Mauro; Lucca, Ugo; Liscio, Mariarosaria; Petrucci, Bianca; Porro, Gabriella Salvini

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to assess the effect of a structured intervention on caregiver stress and the institutionalization rate of patients with dementia and problem behaviors. Caregivers contacting the Federazione Alzheimer Italia (AI) to receive help, advice, or information in relation to problem behaviors of outpatients were enrolled. Eligible caregiver-patient dyads were randomized to receive either a structured intervention or the counseling AI usually provides (control group). After basal assessment, families were reassessed at 6 and 12 months. Problem behavior (particularly agitation) was the only variable significantly correlated (P = 0.006) with the baseline caregivers' stress score. Thirty-nine families completed the 12-month follow-up; the mean problem behavior score was significantly lower in the intervention than the control group (p < 0.03); the time needed for care of the patient increased by 0.5 +/- 9.7 hours/day in the control group and decreased by 0.3 +/- 4.1 in the intervention group (p = 0.4, Wilcoxon test). The main determinant of institutionalization seemed to be the level of caregiver stress (p = 0.03). In patients of the intervention group, there was a significant reduction in the frequency of delusions. This pilot study suggests that caregiver stress is relieved by a structured intervention. The number of families lost to follow-up, the relatively short duration of the study, and the ceiling effect due to the severity of the clinical characteristics of patients probably all partly dilute the observed findings.

  20. cDNA microarray analysis of human keratinocytes cells of patients submitted to chemoradiotherapy and oral photobiomodulation therapy: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Heliton S; Wajnberg, Gabriel; Pinho, Marcos B; Jorge, Natasha Andressa Nogueira; de Moraes, Joyce Luana Melo; Stefanoff, Claudio Gustavo; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Araújo, Carlos M M; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; Rampini, Mariana P; Dias, Fernando L; de Araujo-Souza, Patricia Savio; Passetti, Fabio; Ferreira, Carlos G

    2017-08-24

    Oral mucositis is an acute toxicity that occurs in patients submitted to chemoradiotherapy to treat head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated differences in gene expression in the keratinocytes of the oral mucosa of patients treated with photobiomodulation therapy and tried to associate the molecular mechanisms with clinical findings. From June 2009 to December 2010, 27 patients were included in a randomized double-blind pilot study. Buccal smears from 13 patients were obtained at days 1 and 10 of chemoradiotherapy, and overall gene expression of samples from both dates were analyzed by complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray. In addition, samples from other 14 patients were also collected at D1 and D10 of chemoradiotherapy for subsequent validation of cDNA microarray findings by qPCR. The expression array analysis identified 105 upregulated and 60 downregulated genes in our post-treatment samples when compared with controls. Among the upregulated genes with the highest fold change, it was interesting to observe the presence of genes related to keratinocyte differentiation. Among downregulated genes were observed genes related to cytotoxicity and immune response. The results indicate that genes known to be induced during differentiation of human epidermal keratinocytes were upregulated while genes associated with cytotoxicity and immune response were downregulated in the laser group. These results support previous clinical findings indicating that the lower incidence of oral mucositis associated with photobiomodulation therapy might be correlated to the activation of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation.

  1. Comparative evaluation of two different vestibuloplasty surgical procedures in cleft patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; Pedro, Patrícia Franco; Kogawa, Evelyn Mikaela; Pereira, Tatiana; de Barros Carrilho, Guilherme Paes; Aiello, Carlos Alberto; Freitas, Patrícia Zambonato

    2005-07-01

    Patients with a cleft lip or palate often present alterations in the labial aspect of the ridge, resulting in a shallow vestibule. This study compares the results of two different surgical procedures on deepening of the labial sulcus. Ten patients with a cleft lip and palate were separated into two groups and underwent different vestibuloplasty procedures. An experimental group used a removable retention splint. Preoperative and 4-month postoperative sulcus heights were measured and analyzed statistically. No statistically significant differences could be detected between groups. The results indicated that to reach consistent results, a larger number of patients must be submitted to this evaluation.

  2. Ganirelix for luteolysis in poor responder patients undergoing IVF treatment: a Scandinavian multicenter 'extended pilot study'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lena; Andersen, A.N.; Lindenberg, Svend

    2010-01-01

    To enhance oocyte yield and pregnancy outcome in poor responder women undergoing IVF treatment, daily low dose GnRH antagonist administration was given during the late luteal phase to induce luteolysis and possibly secure a more synchronous cohort of recruitable follicles. An open extended pilot ...

  3. Self-regulation and weight reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes : A pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, S.; de Gucht, V.; Maes, S.; Schroevers, M.; Chatrou, M.; Haak, H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a self-regulation (SR) weight reduction intervention on weight, body mass index(BMI), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (primary outcomes), exercise, nutrition and quality of life (secondary outcomes). Methods: A pilot intervention (n = 53) based on SR-principles

  4. Determinants of outcome for patients undergoing lumbar discectomy: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Oonagh T

    2010-08-01

    One-third of patients who undergo lumbar discectomy continue to suffer from persistent pain postoperatively. Greater preoperative warmth thresholds and greater preoperative cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of stable serum nitric oxide metabolites are associated with a worse outcome. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between patient outcome (defined using the Modified Stauffer-Coventry evaluating criteria) and preoperative pain perception threshold to an electrical stimulus.

  5. Feasibility of virtual therapy in rehabilitation of Parkinson's disease patients: pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Loureiro,Ana Paula Cunha; Ribas,Cristiane Gonçalves; Zotz,Talita Gianello Gnoato; Chen,Rebeca; Ribas,Flávia

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Among Parkinson's disease (PD) motor disabilities, postural and balance alterations are important parameters to physical therapists who need to choose specific, targeted therapies for their patients. Among many therapy options, virtual therapy is studied as to whether it can be a viable rehabilitation method. OBJECTIVE: To verify the applicability of virtual rehabilitation in PD patients for the improvement of their balance and quality of life. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six voluntee...

  6. Surveillance of febrile patients in a district and evaluation of their spatiotemporal associations: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Lap-yip

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fever is an undifferentiated clinical feature that may enhance the sensitivity of syndromic surveillance systems. By studying the spatiotemporal associations of febrile patients, it may allow early detection of case clustering that indicates imminent threat of infectious disease outbreaks in the community. Methods We captured consecutive emergency department visits that led to hospitalization in a district hospital in Hong Kong during the period of 12 Sep 2005 to 14 Oct 2005. We recorded demographic data, provisional diagnoses, temperature on presentation and residential location for each patient-episode, and geocoded the residential addresses. We applied Geographical Information System technology to study the geographical distribution these cases, and their associations within a 50-m buffer zone spatially. A case cluster was defined by three or more spatially associated febrile patients within each three consecutive days. Results One thousand and sixty six patient-episodes were eligible for analysis; 42% of them had fever (>37°C; oral temperature on presentation. Two hundred and four patient-episodes (19.1% came from residential care homes for elderly (RCHE. We detected a total of 40 case clusters during the study period. Clustered cases were of older age; 57 (33.3% were residents of RCHE. We found a median of 3 patients (range: 3 - 8 and time span of 3 days (range: 2 - 8 days in each cluster. Twenty five clusters had 2 or more patients living in the same building block; 18 of them were from RCHE. Conclusions It is technically feasible to perform surveillance on febrile patients and studying their spatiotemporal associations. The information is potentially useful for early detection of impending infectious disease threats.

  7. Effects of Salivary Oxidative Markers on Edentulous Patients' Satisfaction with Prosthetic Denture Treatments: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Huang Chang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess relationships among periodontal conditions, salivary antioxidant levels, and patients' satisfaction with their prostheses.This study was conducted at the Division of Prosthodontics, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital. The periodontal condition of patients was based on an assessment of the plaque index (PI and gingival index (GI. The pH value, flow rate, and buffer capacity of the saliva were estimated. The salivary total antioxidant status (TAS and superoxide dismutase (SOD level were also determined. Patients' satisfaction with prosthetic treatments was evaluated using the Chinese version of the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14C. A multivariate regression model was used to determine whether patients' satisfaction with prosthetic treatment was affected by their oral health status.In total, 35 edentulous patients were recruited. In the Spearman correlation analysis, salivary pH (r = -0.36, p = 0.03 and the buffer ability (r = -0.48, p<0.01 were associated with OHIP-14C scores. In the multivariate analysis, patients who had a higher GI also had a higher score of physical disabilities (β = 1.38, p = 0.04. Levels of SOD increased with the scores of psychological discomfort (β = 0.33 U/g protein, p = 0.04.This study suggested that both the GI and SOD levels were associated with patients' satisfaction with prosthetic treatments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to elucidate the relationship between OHIP scores and salivary oxidative markers in edentulous patients.

  8. Diabetes self-management among low-income Spanish-speaking patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosal, Milagros C; Olendzki, Barbara; Reed, George W; Gumieniak, Olga; Scavron, Jeffrey; Ockene, Ira

    2005-06-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related morbidity and mortality is higher among low-income Hispanics when compared to that of Whites. However, little is known about how to effectively promote self-management in this population. The objectives were first to determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial of an innovative self-management intervention to improve metabolic control in low-income Spanish-speaking individuals with type 2 diabetes and second to obtain preliminary data of possible intervention effects. Participants for this pilot study were recruited from a community health center, an elder program, and a community-wide database developed by the community health center, in collaboration with other agencies serving the community, by surveying households in the entire community. Participants were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 15) or a control (n = 10) condition. Assessments were conducted at baseline and at 3 months and 6 months postrandomization. The intervention consisted of 10 group sessions that targeted diabetes knowledge, attitudes, and self-management skills through culturally specific and literacy-sensitive strategies. The intervention used a cognitive-behavioral theoretical framework. Recruitment rates at the community health center, elder program, and community registry were 48%, 69%, and 8%, respectively. Completion rates for baseline, 3-month, and 6-month assessments were 100%, 92%, and 92%, respectively. Each intervention participant attended an average of 7.8 out of 10 sessions, and as a group the participants showed high adherence to intervention activities (93% turned in daily logs, and 80% self-monitored glucose levels at least daily). There was an overall Group x Time interaction (p = .02) indicating group differences in glycosylated hemoglobin over time. The estimated glycosylated hemoglobin decrease at 3 months for the intervention group was -0.8% (95% confidence intervals = -1.1%, -0

  9. The atrial fibrillation ablation pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analyse...... tachycardia, and 4 patients died (1 haemorrhagic stroke, 1 ventricular fibrillation in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, 1 cancer, and 1 of unknown cause). CONCLUSION: The AFib Ablation Pilot Study provided crucial information on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of catheter ablation of AFib...

  10. Heart rate variability during treatment of breakthrough pain in patients with advanced cancer: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masel EK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Eva Katharina Masel, Patrick Huber, Tobias Engler, Herbert Hans WatzkeClinical Division of Palliative Care, Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Background: Decisions on the intensity of analgesic therapy and judgments regarding its efficacy are difficult at the end of life, when many patients are not fully conscious and pain is a very common symptom. In healthy individuals and in postoperative settings, nociception and subsequent pain relief have been shown to induce changes in the autonomic nervous system (ANS, which can be detected by measuring heart rate variability (HRV. Objectives: The changes in the ANS were studied by measuring HRV during opioid therapy for cancer breakthrough pain (CBTP in palliative-care patients with cancer and compared these changes with patient-reported pain levels on a numeric rating scale (NRS. Patients and methods: The study included ten patients with advanced cancer and baseline opioid therapy. In each patient, a 24-hour peak-to-peak HRV measurement with a sampling rate of 4,000 Hz was performed. High frequency (HF, low frequency (LF, total power, pNN50 (indicating parasympathetic activity, and log LF/HF were obtained in two intervals prior to therapy and in four intervals thereafter. Intensity of CBTP was recorded using a patient-reported NRS prior to therapy and 30 minutes afterward. Results: CBTP occurred in seven patients (three males and four females; mean age: 62 ± 5.2 years and was treated with opioids. A highly significant positive correlation was found between opioid-induced reduction in patient-reported pain intensity based on NRS and changes in log LF/HF (r > 0.700; p < 0.05. Log LF/HF decreased in patients who had a reduction in pain of >2 points on the NRS but remained unchanged in the other patients. Conclusion: Our data suggest that log LF/HF may be a useful surrogate marker for alleviation of CBTP in patients with advanced cancer and might

  11. Unrecognized Hypoxia and Respiratory Depression in Emergency Department Patients Sedated For Psychomotor Agitation: Pilot Study

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    Kenneth Deitch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The incidence of respiratory depression in patients who are chemically sedated in the emergency department (ED is not well understood. As the drugs used for chemical restraint are respiratory depressants, improving respiratory monitoring practice in the ED may be warranted. The objective of this study is to describe the incidence of respiratory depression in patients chemically sedated for violent behavior and psychomotor agitation in the ED. Methods: Adult patients who met eligibility criteria with psychomotor agitation and violent behavior who were chemically sedated were eligible. SpO2 and ETCO2 (end-tidal CO2 was recorded and saved every 5 seconds. Demographic data, history of drug or alcohol abuse, medical and psychiatric history, HR and BP every 5 minutes, any physician intervention for hypoxia or respiratory depression, or adverse events were also recorded. We defined respiratory depression as an ETCO2 of >50 mmHg, a change of 10% above or below baseline, or a loss of waveform for >15 seconds. Hypoxia was defined as a SpO2 of 15 seconds. Results: We enrolled 59 patients, and excluded 9 because of >35% data loss. Twenty-eight (28/50 patients developed respiratory depression at least once during their chemical restraint (56%, 95% CI 42-69%; the median number of events was 2 (range 1-6. Twenty-one (21/50 patients had at least one hypoxic event during their chemical restraint (42%, 95% CI 29-55%; the median number of events was 2 (range 1-5. Nineteen (19/21 (90%, 95% CI 71-97% of the patients that developed hypoxia had a corresponding ETCO2 change. Fifteen (15/19 (79%, 95% CI 56-91% patients who became hypoxic met criteria for respiratory depression before the onset of hypoxia. The sensitivity of ETCO2 to predict the onset of a hypoxic event was 90.48% (95% CI: 68-98% and specificity 69% (95% CI: 49-84%. Five patients received respiratory interventions from the healthcare team to improve respiration [Airway repositioning: (2

  12. Voucher-Based Contingent Reinforcement of Smoking Abstinence among Methadone-Maintained Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly E.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Thomas, Colleen S.; Heil, Sarah H.; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a contingency management (CM) intervention to promote smoking cessation in methadone-maintained patients. Twenty participants, randomized into contingent (n = 10) or noncontingent (n = 10) experimental conditions, completed the 14-day study. Abstinence was determined using breath carbon monoxide and urine…

  13. Brain MRI CO2 stress testing: a pilot study in patients with concussion.

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    W Alan C Mutch

    Full Text Available There is a real need for quantifiable neuro-imaging biomarkers in concussion. Here we outline a brain BOLD-MRI CO2 stress test to assess the condition.This study was approved by the REB at the University of Manitoba. A group of volunteers without prior concussion were compared to post-concussion syndrome (PCS patients--both symptomatic and recovered asymptomatic. Five 3-minute periods of BOLD imaging at 3.0 T were studied--baseline 1 (BL1--at basal CO2 tension, hypocapnia (CO2 decreased ∼5 mmHg, BL2, hypercapnia (CO2 increased ∼10 mmHg and BL3. Data were processed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM for 1st level analysis to compare each subject's response to the CO2 stress at the p = 0.001 level. A 2nd level analysis compared each PCS patient's response to the mean response of the control subjects at the p = 0.05 level.We report on 5 control subjects, 8 symptomatic and 4 asymptomatic PCS patients. Both increased and decreased response to CO2 was seen in all PCS patients in the 2nd level analysis. The responses were quantified as reactive voxel counts: whole brain voxel counts (2.0±1.6%, p = 0.012 for symptomatic patients for CO2 response controls: 0.49±0.31%, p = 0.053 for asymptomatic patients for CO2 response controls.Quantifiable alterations in regional cerebrovascular responsiveness are present in concussion patients during provocative CO2 challenge and BOLD MRI and not in healthy controls. Future longitudinal studies must aim to clarify the relationship between CO2 responsiveness and individual patient symptoms and outcomes.

  14. A prospective study of anxiety in ICD patients with a pilot randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with moderate to severe anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qintar, Mohammed; George, Jason J; Panko, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    consisted of two parts: part 1 (N = 690) was a prospective cross-sectional observational study of consecutive ICD patients. Patients completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7), Florida Shock Anxiety Scale (FSAS), and Florida Patient Acceptance Survey (FPAS......PURPOSE: Stress and anxiety are potential consequences from arrhythmias and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks that can contribute to substantial morbidity. We assessed anxiety associated with an ICD and whether cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) reduces anxiety. METHODS: The study......) psychometric tests. Part 2 (N = 29) was a pilot randomized controlled trial of CBT (three sessions in 3 months) vs. usual care (UC) in patients with BAI ≥ 19 from part 1. RESULTS: The median BAI and GAD-7 scores were 5 and 2, respectively. By BAI scores, 64.5 % had minimal and 3.9 % had severe anxiety. By GAD...

  15. 3,3'-diindolylmethane modulates estrogen metabolism in patients with thyroid proliferative disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajoria, Shilpi; Suriano, Robert; Parmar, Perminder Singh; Wilson, Yushan Lisa; Megwalu, Uchechukwu; Moscatello, Augustine; Bradlow, H Leon; Sepkovic, Daniel W; Geliebter, Jan; Schantz, Stimson P; Tiwari, Raj K

    2011-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is four to five times higher in women than in men, suggesting a role for estrogen (E₂) in the pathogenesis of thyroid proliferative disease (TPD) that comprises cancer and goiter. The objective of this study was to investigate the antiestrogenic activity of 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), a bioactive compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, in patients with TPD. In this limited phase I clinical trial study, patients found to have TPD were administered 300 mg of DIM per day for 14 days. Patients subsequently underwent a total or partial thyroidectomy, and tissue, urine, and serum samples were collected. Pre- and post-DIM serum and urine samples were analyzed for DIM levels as well as estrogen metabolites. DIM levels were also determined in thyroid tissue samples. DIM was detectable in thyroid tissue, serum, and urine of patients after 14 days of supplementation. Urine analyses revealed that DIM modulated estrogen metabolism in patients with TPD. There was an increase in the ratio of 2-hydroxyestrones (C-2) to 16α-hydroxyestrone (C-16), consistent with antiestrogenic activity that results in more of C-2 product compared with C-16. Our data suggest that DIM enhances estrogen metabolism in TPD patients and can potentially serve as an antiestrogenic dietary supplement to help reduce the risk of developing TPD. The fact that DIM is detected in thyroid tissue implicates that it can manifest its antiestrogenic activity in situ to modulate TPD.

  16. Performance of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration on artistic tasks: A pilot study

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    Maria Cristina Anauate

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Several studies have addressed visuospatial and executive skills in artistic activities in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD and Alzheimer's disease (AD. Objective: To investigate the performance of FTLD patients compared to controls on two artistic tasks. Methods: Four FTLD patients with mean age of 57 (8.7 years and schooling of 12.2 (4.5 years plus 10 controls with mean age of 62.9 (8.6 years and schooling of 12.3 (4.6 years, were assessed using the Lowenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA and by a three-stage artistic protocol including visual observation, copying and collage, based on a Sisley painting. Results: FTLD patients had lower scores than controls on Visuospatial Perception, Copy, Collage, Examiner's Observation, and Total, showing distinct patterns of performance according to FTLD sub-type: semantic PPA, nonfluent PPA and bvFTD. Conclusion: FTLD patients presented impairment in the visuospatial and executive skills required to perform artistic tasks. We demonstrated that the application of the instrument as a complimentary method for assessing cognitive skills in this group of patients is possible. Further studies addressing larger and more homogeneous samples of FTLD patients as well as other dementias are warranted.

  17. Hemocoagulation disorders in extensively burned patients: pilot study for scoring of the DIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipový, B; Kaloudová, Y; Matýsková, M; Penka, M; Rihová, H; Brychta, P

    2008-01-01

    To apply results of the hemocoagulation parameters to the DIC (disseminated intravascular coagulation) score system. Compare parameters of the DIC score in patients with extensive burn trauma (hospitalized at the Intensive Care Unit, ICU) and patients with lesser extent of burn injury (hospitalized at the standard unit). To use these data within the evidence based medicine for the prediction of organ damage and multi-organ failure. Prospective study. We have included total of 36 patients in the group within four months. Twelve patients were hospitalized at the ICU, 24 patients were hospitalized at the intermedial care and standard unit. Repeatedly, we have taken blood from patients to evaluate the hemocoagulation parameters. In patients hospitalized at the ICU, the blood was taken from the central vein (prior to the drawn, the access was flushed with 100 ml of F1/1, the blood was taken from different access than from the one administering heparin), in patients hospitalized at the standard unit the blood was taken from a peripheral vein. The results were then put into the tables established according to the ISTH (International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis). Next, the DIC score was calculated to predict severity of hemocoagulation balance disorders in burn trauma, or occurrence of complications during the treatment. Part 1: We have evaluated 12 patients (4 females) hospitalized at the ICU. At the day of injury the overt DIC score reached 1.25 (0-3), fifth day after the injury the average value of overt DIC score was 1.83 (0-3), one day after the autotransplantation it was 2.08 (0-3) and at the day of discharge from the hospital 0. In the deceased patient the DIC score reached value of 2. Part 2: We evaluated 24 patients (10 females) hospitalized at the standard unit. The extent of their burn injury was 5.9% TBSA (0.5-12% TBSA), age 49.13 years (17-94 years). At the day of injury the overt DIC score reached 0.25 (0-2). Fifth day after the injury the average

  18. Relationships betveen pain intensity and heart rate variability in patients after abdominal surgery: a pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Ling-hua; MA Tso-chiang; TSAY Shiow-luan; JONG Gwo-ping

    2012-01-01

    Background A link between postoperative pain intensity and heart rate variability (HRV) had not been well established.This study aimed to investigate the correlation between post-operative pain intensity and HRV.Methods The subjects in this cross-sectional correlation study comprised of patients who had undergone abdominal surgery in a regional teaching hospital in central Taiwan during the period July 2009-November 2009.The visual analogue scale (VAS) and the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ) were used to measure post-operative pain.HRV was measured as the standard deviation of normal RR interval,and by power spectral analysis that included high frequency (HF),low frequency (LF),very low frequency power,and LF/HF ratio.Results Atotal of 34 subjects were included in this study.We found that the day after the surgery,the mean VAS score was 47.50±20.98 and the mean SF-MPQ score was 18.06±8.90,indicating a moderate degree of pain.Moderate to severe degrees of tenderness were reported by 70.6% of the patients,moderate to severe degrees of gnawing pain were experienced by 67.7% of the patients,moderate to severe degrees of tiring-exhaustion pain were reported by 64.7% of the patients,and 41.2% of the patients who experienced moderate to severe pain believed that the pain was punishing-cruel.The standard deviation of normal RR interval and high frequency values obtained from male patients or married patients were higher than female patients or unmarried (P <0.05).The correlation of the standard deviation of normal RR interval,high frequency,very low frequency value and patient's age were negative (p <0.05).The total SF-MPQ pain scores positively correlated with the LF/HF ratio (P <0.05).Conclusions The multidimensional pain assessment tool (SF-MPQ) reflects better the patients' post-operative pain than the single-dimensional assessment tool (VAS).HRV positively correlated with SF-MPQ scores in patients after abdominal surgery.

  19. The prediction of difficult intubation in obese patients using mirror indirect laryngoscopy: A prospective pilot study

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    Arne O Budde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation in obese patients is higher than in the general population. Classical predictors of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation have been shown to be unreliable. We prospectively evaluated indirect mirror laryngoscopy as a predictor of difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients. Materials and Methods: 60 patients with a body mass index (BMI greater than 30, scheduled to undergo general anesthesia, were enrolled. Indirect mirror laryngoscopy was performed and was graded 1-4 according to Cormack and Lehane. A view of grade 3-4 was classified as predicting difficult laryngoscopy. Additional assessments for comparison were the Samsoon and Young modification of the Mallampati airway classification, Wilson Risk Sum Score, neck circumference, and BMI. The view obtained upon direct laryngoscopy after induction of general anesthesia was classified according to Cormack and Lehane as grade 1-4. Results: Sixty patients met the inclusion criteria; however, 8 (13.3% patients had an excessive gag reflex, and examination of the larynx was not possible. 15.4% of patients who underwent direct laryngoscopy had a Cormack and Lehane grade 3 or 4 view and were classified as difficult. Mirror laryngoscopy had a tendency toward statistical significance in predicting difficult laryngoscopy in these patients. Conclusions: This study is consistent with previous studies, which have demonstrated that no one individual traditional test has proven to be adequate in predicting difficult airways in the obese population. However, the new application of an old test - indirect mirror laryngoscopy - could be a useful additional test to predict difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients.

  20. Whose Experience Is Measured?: A Pilot Study of Patient Satisfaction Demographics in Pediatric Otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Carrie L.; Benke, James R.; Ishman, Stacey L.; Smith, David F.; Boss, Emily F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Despite a national emphasis on patient-centered care and cultural competency, minority and low-income children continue to experience disparities in health care quality. Patient satisfaction scores are a core quality indicator. The objective of this study was to evaluate race and insurance-related disparities in parent participation with pediatric otolaryngology satisfaction surveys. Study Design Observational analysis of patient satisfaction survey respondents from a tertiary pediatric otolaryngology division. Methods Demographics of survey respondents (Press Ganey Medical Practice Survey©) between January and July 2012 were compared to a clinic comparison group using t test and chi-square analyses. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess likelihood to complete a survey based on race or insurance status. Results A total of 130 survey respondents were compared to 1,251 patients in the comparison group. The mean patient age for which the parent survey was completed was 5.7 years (6.1 years for the comparison group, P =0.18); 59.2% of children were ≤5 years old. Relative to the comparison group, survey respondents were more often white (77.7% vs. 58.1%; P <0.001) and privately insured (84.6% vs. 60.8%; P <0.001). Similarly, after controlling for confounding variables, parents of children who were white (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.13–2.78, P =0.013) or privately insured (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.74–4.85, P <0.001) were most likely to complete a survey. Conclusion Methods to evaluate satisfaction did not capture the racial or socioeconomic patient distribution within this pediatric division. These findings challenge the validity of applying patient satisfaction scores, as currently measured, to indicate health care quality. Future efforts to measure and improve patient experience should be inclusive of a culturally diverse population. Level of Evidence 2c. PMID:23853050

  1. Tailor-made rehabilitation approach using multiple types of hybrid assistive limb robots for acute stroke patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Morishita, Takashi; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Saita, Kazuya; Hyakutake, Koichi; Watanabe, Junko; Shiota, Etsuji; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    This article investigated the feasibility of a tailor-made neurorehabilitation approach using multiple types of hybrid assistive limb (HAL) robots for acute stroke patients. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent rehabilitation using the HAL robots. The Brunnstrom stage, Barthel index (BI), and functional independence measure (FIM) were evaluated at baseline and when patients were transferred to a rehabilitation facility. Scores were compared between the multiple-robot rehabilitation and single-robot rehabilitation groups. Nine hemiplegic acute stroke patients (five men and four women; mean age 59.4 ± 12.5 years; four hemorrhagic stroke and five ischemic stroke) underwent rehabilitation using multiple types of HAL robots for 19.4 ± 12.5 days, and 14 patients (six men and eight women; mean age 63.2 ± 13.9 years; nine hemorrhagic stroke and five ischemic stroke) underwent rehabilitation using a single type of HAL robot for 14.9 ± 8.9 days. The multiple-robot rehabilitation group showed significantly better outcomes in the Brunnstrom stage of the upper extremity, BI, and FIM scores. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first pilot study demonstrating the feasibility of rehabilitation using multiple exoskeleton robots. The tailor-made rehabilitation approach may be useful for the treatment of acute stroke.

  2. Prognostic Importance of Lesion Location on Functional Outcome in Patients with Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke: a Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Zuccher, Paola; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Bovi, Paolo; Moretto, Giuseppe; Waldner, Andreas; Saltuari, Leopold; Smania, Nicola

    2017-02-01

    To date, few studies focused on prediction of functional recovery after cerebellar stroke. The main aim of this prospective pilot study was to determine the association between cerebellar lesion location and functional outcome in adults with acute cerebellar infarction. We examined 14 patients with first-ever unilateral cerebellar ischemic stroke within 7 days and at 90 days from the onset of stroke by means of the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Cerebellar lesions were traced from magnetic resonance imaging performed within 72 h since stroke and region of interest were generated. The association between the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale score and lesion location was determined with the voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping methods implemented in the MRIcro software. Colored lesion-symptom maps representing the z statistics were generated and overlaid onto the MNI-ICBM 152 linear probabilistic atlas of the human brain and the Johns Hopkins University white matter templates. Our results documented that injuries to the V, VI, VIIA Crus I, VIIA Crus II, VIIB, VIIIA, and VIIIB lobules and the middle cerebellar peduncle are significantly associated with the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) score at 1 week after the onset of stroke. Furthermore, we found that injuries to the VI, VIIA Crus I, VIIA Crus II, VIIB, VIIIA, and VIIIB lobules, the dentate nucleus, and the middle cerebellar peduncle are significantly associated with the ICARS score at 3 months since the cerebellar stroke onset. The findings of this pilot study might improve prognostic accuracy of functional outcome in patients with acute cerebellar infarction.

  3. On-line computerized diagnosis of pain-related disability and psychological status of TMD patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, A U; Tan, K B; Hoe, J K; Yap, R H; Jaffar, J

    2001-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is a collective term embracing a number of clinical problems, which involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint or both. Virtually all theories dealing with the aetiology and treatment of TMD have recognized the importance of psychological factors. This paper reports the development of a computerized on-line program (NUS TMD v1.1) for the diagnosis of pain-related disability and psychological status of TMD patients based on Axis II of the research diagnostic criteria (RDC)/TMD (Dworkin, S.F. & LeResche, L. 1992. Journal of Craniomandibular Disorders: Facial Oral Pain, 6, 301), which was developed to redress the lack of diagnostic criteria in TMD research. Methods adopted by RDC/TMD for use in assessing Axis II status include a seven-item questionnaire for grading chronic pain severity, the Symptom Checklist 90 Revised (SCL-90-R) and a jaw disability checklist. A pilot study, based on 37 new TMD patient records, was conducted to study the pain-related disability and psychological status of TMD patients using this newly developed program. The mean age of the predominantly Chinese population (86.5%) was 32.19 years (range 20-72 years) with a sex distribution of 24 females and 13 males. Most patients (78%) had low disability, with 12 patients having low intensity and 17 patients having high intensity pain. Approximately 73% of the sample population were moderately or severely depressed. Patients that were moderately and severely depressed had significantly higher scores for limitation related to mandibular functioning than normal patients. The three most frequent jaw disabilities were: eating hard foods (84%), yawning (78%) and chewing (65%).

  4. Remediation therapy in patients with alcohol use disorders and neurocognitive disorders: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixidor López, Lídia; Frías-Torres, Cindy; Moreno-España, José; Ortega, Lluisa; Barrio, Pablo; Gual, Antoni

    2016-09-29

    Many alcohol-dependent patients suffer from cognitive impairment of variable severity, manifested by alterations in retrograde and anterograde memory, visuospatial processing, cognitive abilities and attention, some of which are reversible. In this context, cognitive remediation therapies could significantly improve patients' performance; therefore, these are considered a valuable alternative. The aim of this study was to implement cognitive remediation therapy in patients with alcohol dependence and cognitive impairment and evaluate its viability and effectiveness. The participants were sixteen abstinent, alcohol-dependent patients (mean age of 59 years, 63% males) from the Addictive Behaviours Unit of a tertiary hospital. Over 6 months, a nurse led 1-hour weekly sessions (24 sessions in total) during which exercises for improving functional, social and cognitive performance were completed. Patients were assessed at baseline, at the end of the study and 6 months later, using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Memory Alteration Test (M@T). Their respective scores were 26.4 (SD 3.16), 29 (SD 1.67) and 27 (SD 3.1) for the MMSE and 38.7 (SD 6.81), 45.7 (SD 5.6) and 41.1 (SD 7.86) for the M@T. Changes were assessed with both Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, with mostly statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). Assistance and satisfaction were high. Therefore, the therapy was viable, widely accepted and effective.

  5. Lactate levels as a marker of tissue hypoperfusion in acute heart failure patients seen in the emergency department: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kori Sauser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute heart failure (AHF may lead to subclinical tissue ischemia due to hypoperfusion from inadequate forward flow or congestion. The aim of the present study is to test whether lactate levels are elevated in emergency department (ED patients with AHF. A prospective pilot study of ED AHF patients was conducted. Venous lactate level was measured at baseline and 6-12 hours after initial draw. Of the 50 patients enrolled, mean age was 65.3 years, 68% were male. Only 7 (14% had an elevated lactate on either draw, with no differences in baseline characteristics between patients with and without elevated lactate. Patients with an elevated lactate had a higher mean heart rate (99 vs 81, P=0.03 and trended toward an increased rate of abnormal initial temperature (57 vs 23%, P=0.06. In this pilot study, only a minority of acute HF patients had an elevated lactate on presentation.

  6. The effect of Spirulina platensis versus soybean on insulin resistance in HIV-infected patients: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Azabji-Kenfack; Ekali, Loni G; Eugene, Sobngwi; Arnold, Onana E; Sandrine, Edie D; von der Weid, Denis; Gbaguidi, Emmanuel; Ngogang, Jeanne; Mbanya, Jean C

    2011-07-01

    HIV-infected patients develop abnormalities of glucose metabolism due to the virus and antiretroviral drugs. Spirulina and soybean are nutritional supplements that are cheap, accessible in our community and affect glucose metabolism. We carried out a randomized study to assess the effect of Spirulina platensis versus soybean as a food supplement on HIV/HAART-associated insulin resistance (IR) in 33 insulin-resistant HIV-infected patients. The study lasted for two months at the National Obesity Centre of Cameroon. Insulin resistance was measured using the short insulin tolerance test. Physical activity and diet did not change over the study duration. On-treatment analysis was used to analyze data. The Mann-Whitney U test, the Students T test and the Chi square test were used as appropriate. Curve gradients were analyzed using ANCOVA. Seventeen subjects were randomized to spirulina and 16 to soybean. Each received 19 g of supplement daily. The follow up rate was 65% vs. 100% for spirulina and soybean groups, respectively, and both groups were comparable at baseline. After eight weeks, insulin sensitivity (IS) increased by 224.7% vs. 60% in the spirulina and soybean groups respectively (p spirulina versus soybean, respectively, improved their IS (p = 0.049) with a 1.45 (1.05-2.02) chance of improving insulin sensitivity on spirulina. This pilot study suggests that insulin sensitivity in HIV patients improves more when spirulina rather than soybean is used as a nutritional supplement. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01141777.

  7. The Care-Integrated Concentration Meditation Program for Patients With Weaning Difficulty: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinhuatoey, Benjamard; Songwathana, Praneed; Petpichetchian, Wongchan

    2016-01-01

    Because of the multifaceted process of weaning patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation, enhancing weaning success remains a challenge. The Care-Integrated Concentration Meditation Program was developed on the basis of Buddhist philosophy and implemented to determine its procedural feasibility. A qualitative case study with 3 participants was conducted, and the process and initial outcomes were evaluated.

  8. Patients' handling of a standardized medication plan: a pilot study and method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botermann, Lea; Krueger, Katrin; Eickhoff, Christiane; Kloft, Charlotte; Schulz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The Action Plan for Medication Safety by the German Federal Ministry of Health introduced a standardized medication plan (MP), a printable document for the patient. The practical handling needs to be tested before the nationwide implementation in Germany. Therefore, the aims of our study were 1) to develop an instrument to evaluate the usage of the standardized MP, 2) to assess if patients can locate, and 3) understand important information. Moreover, we explored patients' opinion and suggestions regarding the standardized MP template. We conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate the practical handling of the standardized MP. We interviewed 40 adult patients in seven community pharmacies in Germany, who took at least five medicines regularly and gave their written informed consent. The interview consisted of questions regarding finding and understanding information provided on a mock-up MP, patients' opinion and the execution of the information on the MP by filling pill boxes. We eventually developed a new evaluation method to quantify the practical handling of the MP by rating the pill boxes filled by the patients. Overall, the participants rated the MP positively. Thirty-nine (98%) participants found important information on a mock-up standardized MP. Patients were questioned to identify if they understood information on medical intake as it relates to meals. In particular, they were questioned about medicine intake "1 hour before a meal", which 98% (n=39) interpreted correctly, and "during a meal", which 100% (n=40) interpreted correctly. The less precise advice of "before a meal" was interpreted correctly by 73% (n=29), and only 15% (n=6) correctly interpreted the term "after the meal". The evaluation of the filled pill boxes resulted in the "Evaluation Tool to test the handling of the Medication Plan" (ET-MP) - a weighted scoring system. The standardized MP is clearly arranged, and patients are able to find important information. The findings of this study

  9. in the assessment of the rate of disability in patients with morbid obesity – pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyn Sosada

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to the constant increase in the number of morbidly obese patients, an adequate tool for assessing the functioning and disability of these patients is being sought. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (IC F could be that tool. Objectives. The aim of this study is to examine the usefulness of the IC F scale in assessing the functioning of morbidly obese patients in two selected areas in reference to recognized scales. Material and methods . The study group included 76 patients with morbid obesity qualified for bariatric treatment. The ICF was applied to assess the function and limitations of each individual. Two domains of the IC F were selected: Body Functions and Structures and Activities and Participation. The usefulness of the IC F was compared to that of the Barthel and EPQ-R scales. Results . In morbidly obese patients, a correlation between motor functions and IC F and BMI, as well as age, was observed. A significant correlation was observed between BMI and psychomotor control, appropriateness and range of emotions experienced, age and amount of sleep, quality of sleep, memory retrieval and psychomotor functions. Women’s mental functions were significantly worse than those of men. In terms of interpersonal relations, a correlation between BMI and regulating behavior within interactions was observed. Conclusions . The IC F is a useful tool for the study and description of the functioning of patients with morbid obesity. The selected domains are described better than by the previously used Barthel scale. Women with morbid obesity tend to have more impaired mental functioning than morbidly obese men.

  10. Effect of Music Therapy on Pain and Anxiety Levels of Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Priyadharshini; Nair, Shoba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer patients with pain. Study Design: In this quantitative study, a comparative study was done on fourteen cancer patients admitted for pain relief under the Department of Pain and Palliative Medicine, of a tertiary care hospital, having moderate to severe pain (numerical pain rating scale [NRS] – of 4 to 10). Subjects and Methods: Convenience sampling was used. Patients were allocated to test group or control group nonrandomly. The test group patients were subjected to music therapy for 20 min while the control group patients were kept occupied by talking to them for 20 min. The NRS scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional pain scores and the Hamilton anxiety rating scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional anxiety scores in the two groups. Statistics: Student's t-test was used for comparing the pre- and post-interventional data. Two sample t-test was used to compare the data obtained from the control and study groups. Results: Statistically significant reduction seen in the pain scores in the test group after music therapy (P = 0.003). No statistically significant reduction seen in the pain score in the control group (P = 0.356). There was a statistically significant reduction in the postintervention pain scores in the test group compared to the control group (P = 0.034). The reduction in anxiety levels in both groups after intervention was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy was found to lower the pain score of a patient who

  11. Effect of music therapy on pain and anxiety levels of cancer patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadharshini Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer patients with pain. Study Design: In this quantitative study, a comparative study was done on fourteen cancer patients admitted for pain relief under the Department of Pain and Palliative Medicine, of a tertiary care hospital, having moderate to severe pain (numerical pain rating scale [NRS] - of 4 to 10. Subjects and Methods: Convenience sampling was used. Patients were allocated to test group or control group nonrandomly. The test group patients were subjected to music therapy for 20 min while the control group patients were kept occupied by talking to them for 20 min. The NRS scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional pain scores and the Hamilton anxiety rating scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional anxiety scores in the two groups. Statistics: Student′s t-test was used for comparing the pre- and post-interventional data. Two sample t-test was used to compare the data obtained from the control and study groups. Results: Statistically significant reduction seen in the pain scores in the test group after music therapy (P = 0.003. No statistically significant reduction seen in the pain score in the control group (P = 0.356. There was a statistically significant reduction in the postintervention pain scores in the test group compared to the control group (P = 0.034. The reduction in anxiety levels in both groups after intervention was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy was found to lower the pain score of

  12. The effect of individualized patient education, along with emotional support, on the quality of life of breast cancer patients - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjad, Sehrish; Ali, Asho; Gul, Raisa B; Mateen, Ahmed; Rozi, Shafquat

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of individualized patient education along with emotional support on the quality of life (QoL) of breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. It also aimed to determine the intervention's feasibility in the Pakistani context. A quasi-experimental design, with pre- and post-test, in two groups, via time block, was used. The study was conducted at a public hospital in Karachi with a sample of 50 patients; 25 patients each in the intervention and control group. The intervention was delivered over a period of six weeks. It comprised verbal and written patient education, availability of a nurse during patients' chemotherapy administration and over the telephone, and a telephone follow-up of the patients by the nurse. patients' QoL was assessed at baseline and at the sixth week of receiving chemotherapy. Tests indicated a significant improvement in the overall QoL, breast cancer subscale scores, and the physical and emotional well-being of the intervention group, as compared to the control group. The intervention effect size was moderate (0.655) for the QoL. The intervention was found to be effective in improving patients' QoL. However, a larger study, in a multi-center setting, is recommended to ascertain the findings of this pilot study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immediate effect of mind sound resonance technique on state anxiety and cognitive functions in patients suffering from generalized anxiety disorder: A self-controlled pilot study

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    Vipin Dhansoia

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that MSRT may have a potential role in reducing state anxiety and enhancing psychomotor performance in patients suffering from GAD immediately after the practice. These findings need confirmation from studies with a larger sample size and randomized controlled design, which are implicated in the future.

  14. Pilot Study of the Pharmacokinetics of Cefotaxime in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedijk, Joost B.; Valk-Swinkels, Corinne G. H.; Rijpstra, Tom A.; Touw, Daan J.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Van Der Voort, Peter H. J.; Van 't Veer, Nils E.; Van Der Meer, Nardo J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of cefotaxime (CTX) in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) when treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in the intensive care unit (ICU). This single-center prospective observational pilot study was

  15. Pattern of utilization of benzodiazepines in patients with hypertension: A pilot study

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    Divac Nevena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The analysis of drug prescribing in general practice in Serbia showed that the use of benzodiazepines is most frequently associated with hypertension. The aim of this study was to establish the correlation of the characteristics of patients with hypertension to antihypertensive drug therapy, and the intake of benzodiazepines. Methods. A special questionnaire was used for interviewing the patients (n = 171 chronically treated for hypertenson. Statistical tests used were χ2-test and Student's t-test. Results. No differences were noted in terms of age, gender, education, body weight, smoking habits and blood pressure (155±4.9/100±2.7 mmHg vs. 160±2.2/105±3.7 mmHg, between the group I (antihypertensive drugs+benzodiazepines: n = 79, and the group II (antihypertensives only: n = 92. The patients taking benzodiazepines received a lower number of different antihypertensive drugs (2.3±0.09 vs. 2.7±0.10; p < 0.01, but the total antihypertensive drug load was significantly greater than in the group II (2.6±0.10 vs. 1.9±0.15 defined daily doses (DDD/patient/day; p < 0.01. Benzodiazepines were taken for anxiety (62% and hypertension (21%, rarely for insomnia, mostly once a day, at bedtime. About half the patients took benzodiazepines regularly for months or years aware of the risk for addiction. Diazepam was used by 82% of the patients. The average daily exposure to benzodiazepines was 0.45±0.05 DDD/patient/day. The drug was bought without prescription in 25% of the patients, and without consulting a physician in 12% of them. Conclusion. The study confirmed a close association of hypertension with the use of benzodiazepines. The frequent use of benzodiazepines in the patients with hypertension might be caused by an inadequate response to antihypertensive drug therapy, besides anxiety and insomnia. The therapeutic efficacy of a long-term use of low doses of benzodiazepines in hypertension requires further investigation.

  16. Effects of Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on pain, function, and ultrasonographic features of chronic stroke patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A total of 18 chronic stroke patients (33 knee joints) with unilateral or bilateral knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥1) were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly allocated to an experimental group receiving ESWT (n=9) or a control group receiving sham ESWT (n=9). For the ESWT group, patients received 1,000 pulses weekly for 3 weeks, totaling to an energy dose of 0.05 mJ/mm2 on the proximal medial tibia of the affected knee. The assessments were performed before the treatment, immediately after the first treatment, and 1 week after the last treatment using the following: the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain; patient perception of the clinical severity of OA; the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (ambulation and chair/bed transfer); the Functional Independence Measure scale (FIM; bed/chair/wheelchair transfer, toilet transfer, walking, and stairs); and ultrasonographic features (articular cartilage thickness, Doppler activity, and joint effusion height). Results The experimental group showed a significant improvement in VAS score (4.50±1.87 to 2.71±1.38) and patient perception of the clinical severity of OA (1.87±0.83 to 2.75±0.46). The bed/chair/wheelchair transfer components of the FIM score also improved significantly (4.12±1.55 to 4.62±1.30). In terms of the ultrasonographic features, increased Doppler activity was observed in the medial knee in the experimental group immediately following ESWT. Conclusion It is suggested that ESWT may reduce pain and improve function in chronic stroke patients with OA, and may increase vascular activity at the target site. PMID:27847716

  17. Nutritional Status in Patients with Major Depressive Disorders: A Pilot Study in Tabriz, Iran

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    Bahram Pourghassem Gargari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was conducted to assess the nutritional status in Iranian major depres-sive disorder patients. We also determined the relationship between nutrients intake with depres-sion severity.Methods: Seventy major depressive patients were selected randomly from outpatient depressive subjects, referred to Razi Psychiatry Hospital in Tabriz, Iran in 2007. Dietary intakes were rec-orded and compared with dietary reference intakes (DRIs. Definition of the disease and its se-verity were according to DSM-IV-TR and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, respectively. Nu-tritionist III program, Chi-square, correlation and t-test were used for data analyses. Demo-graphic, clinical and laboratory data were analyzed using SPSS software for windows (ver-sion13.0.Results: According to dietary analysis, 11.4% and 55% of patients had dietary protein and energy deficiency, respectively. 97.1% and 95.7% of patients had less folate and B12 intakes than recom-mended dietary allowances. The mean (Mean ± SD for plasma folate and B12 was 5.18±6.11 ng/ml and 389.05±346.9 pg/ml, respectively. Low plasma folate and B12 was observed in 51.4% and 50.0 % of patients, respectively. There was no significant relationship between blood folate and B12 levels with depression severity. Similarly, nutrients intake had no effect on depression se-verity.Conclusions: Low plasma concentrations and low dietary intakes of folate and B12 are common among Tabrizian depressive patients. It seems that nutritional intervention for increasing folate and vitamin B12 intake must be considered as health promotive and preventative program for pa-tients suffering from depression disorders.

  18. Preoperative ambulatory inspiratory muscle training in patients undergoing esophagectomy. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrelli, Taciana Freitas; de Carvalho Ramos, Marisa; Guglielminetti, Rachel; Silva, Alex Augusto; Crema, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    A major decline in pulmonary function is observed on the first day after upper abdominal surgery. This decline can reduce vital and inspiratory capacity and can culminate in restrictive lung diseases that cause atelectasis, reduced diaphragm movement, and respiratory insufficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative ambulatory respiratory muscle training in patients undergoing esophagectomy. The sample consisted of 20 adult patients (14 men [70%] and 6 women [30%]) with a diagnosis of advanced chagasic megaesophagus. A significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure was observed after inspiratory muscle training when compared with baseline values (from -55.059 ± 18.359 to -76.286 ± 16.786). Preoperative ambulatory inspiratory muscle training was effective in increasing respiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing esophagectomy and contributed to the prevention of postoperative complications.

  19. The benefits of medical qigong in patients with cancer: a descriptive pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overcash, Janine; Will, Kathryn M; Lipetz, Debra Weisenburger

    2013-12-01

    Medical Qigong (MQ) is a mind-body exercise that includes movement and meditation and is beneficial in reducing high blood pressure, high cholesterol, anxiety, stress, pain, and incidence of falls. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether patients with cancer and survivors who participated in an MQ class experienced a change in fatigue, depression, and sleep from a preintervention evaluation to a postintervention evaluation. Participants were patients diagnosed with cancer who participated in MQ classes. Some were actively undergoing cancer treatment (e.g., surgery, hormone therapy, radiation therapy, chemotherapy) and some were receiving no treatment. Patients diagnosed with cancer and enrolled in an MQ class were invited to participate. A packet of surveys was completed before the first class and before the final class. Scores showed a reduced depression score after completing the five-week MQ course. Those findings indicate that MQ is helpful in reducing some of the problems associated with cancer and cancer treatment.

  20. Effect of Music Therapy on Pain and Anxiety Levels of Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Priyadharshini; Nair, Shoba

    2016-01-01

    The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer patients with pain. In this quantitative study, a comparative study was done on fourteen cancer patients admitted for pain relief under the Department of Pain and Palliative Medicine, of a tertiary care hospital, having moderate to severe pain (numerical pain rating scale [NRS] - of 4 to 10). Convenience sampling was used. Patients were allocated to test group or control group nonrandomly. The test group patients were subjected to music therapy for 20 min while the control group patients were kept occupied by talking to them for 20 min. The NRS scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional pain scores and the Hamilton anxiety rating scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional anxiety scores in the two groups. Student's t-test was used for comparing the pre- and post-interventional data. Two sample t-test was used to compare the data obtained from the control and study groups. Statistically significant reduction seen in the pain scores in the test group after music therapy (P = 0.003). No statistically significant reduction seen in the pain score in the control group (P = 0.356). There was a statistically significant reduction in the postintervention pain scores in the test group compared to the control group (P = 0.034). The reduction in anxiety levels in both groups after intervention was not statistically significant. Music therapy was found to lower the pain score of a patient who had received standard palliative care for pain reduction. It was also more effective than the

  1. A pilot cross-sectional study of patients presenting with cellulitis to emergency departments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quirke, M

    2014-11-01

    To characterise the Emergency Department (ED) prevalence of cellulitis, factors predicting oral antibiotic therapy and the utility of the Clinical Resource Efficiency Support Team (CREST) guideline in predicting patient management in the ED setting, a prospective, cross-sectional study of consecutive adult patients presenting to 3 Irish EDs was performed. The overall prevalence of cellulitis was 12 per 1,000 ED visits. Of 59 patients enrolled, 45.8% were discharged. Predictors of treatment with oral antibiotics were: CREST, Class 1 allocation (odds ratio (OR) 6.81, 95% Cl =1.5-30.1, p=0.012), patient self-referral (OR= 6.2, 95% Cl 1.9- 20.0, p=0.03) and symptom duration longer than 48 hours (OR 1.2, 95% Cl = 1.0-1.5,p=0.049). In conflict with guideline recommendation, 43% of patients in CREST Class 1 received IV therapy. Treatment with oral antibiotics was predicted by CREST Class 1 allocation, self-referral, symptom duration of more than 48 hours and absence of pre-EO antibiotic therapy.

  2. Differential methylation of the oxytocin receptor gene in patients with anorexia nervosa: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youl-Ri Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Recent studies in patients with anorexia nervosa suggest that oxytocin may be involved in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa. We examined whether there was evidence of variation in methylation status of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene in patients with anorexia nervosa that might account for these findings. METHODS: We analyzed the methylation status of the CpG sites in a region from the exon 1 to the MT2 regions of the OXTR gene in buccal cells from 15 patients and 36 healthy women using bisulfite sequencing. We further examined whether methylation status was associated with markers of illness severity or form. RESULTS: We identified six CpG sites with significant differences in average methylation levels between the patient and control groups. Among the six differentially methylated CpG sites, five showed higher than average methylation levels in patients than those in the control group (64.9-88.8% vs. 6.6-45.0%. The methylation levels of these five CpG sites were negatively associated with body mass index (BMI. BMI, eating disorders psychopathology, and anxiety were identified in a regression analysis as factors affecting the methylation levels of these CpG sites with more variation accounted for by BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Epigenetic misregulation of the OXTR gene may be implicated in anorexia nervosa, which may either be a mechanism linking environmental adversity to risk or may be a secondary consequence of the illness.

  3. Gas emission during laparoscopic colorectal surgery using a bipolar vessel sealing device: A pilot study on four patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianella Michele

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dissection during laparoscopic surgery produces smoke containing potentially toxic substances. The aim of the present study was to analyze smoke samples produced during laparoscopic colon surgery using a bipolar vessel sealing device (LigaSure™. Methods Four consecutive patients undergoing left-sided colectomy were enrolled in this pilot study. Smoke was produced by the use of LigaSure™. Samples (5,5l were evacuated from the pneumoperitoneum in a closed system into a reservoir. Analysis was performed with CO2-laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy and confirmed by a Fourier-transform infrared spectrum. The detected spectra were compared to the available spectra of known toxins. Results Samples from four laparoscopic sigmoid resections were analyzed. No relevant differences were noted regarding patient and operation characteristics. The gas samples were stable over time proven by congruent control measurements as late as 24 h after sampling. The absorption spectra differed considerably between the patients. One broad absorption line at 100 ppm indicating H2O and several unknown molecules were detected. With a sensitivity of alpha min ca 10-5 cm-1 no known toxic substances like phenol or indole were identified. Conclusion The use of a vessel sealing device during laparoscopic surgery does not produce known toxic substances in relevant quantity. Further studies are needed to identify unknown molecules and to analyze gas emission under various conditions.

  4. Influence of sex hormone levels on gingival enlargement in adolescent patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosadurga, Rajesh; Nabeel Althaf, M. S.; Hegde, Shashikanth; Rajesh, Kashyap S.; Arun Kumar, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sex hormones may be a modifying factor in the periodontal disease pathogenesis. Aim: The association between gingival enlargement and sex hormone levels in adolescent patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy needs to be determined. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in the Department of Periodontology in association with the Department of Orthodontics, Yenepoya Dental College, Yenepoya University, Mangaluru. Materials and Methods: A pilot study was conducted on 21 adolescent patients between the age group of 13–19 years, who had undergone fixed orthodontic therapy for at least 3 months. Apicocoronally, the gingival enlargement was assessed by the index described by Miller and Damm. Miranda and Brunet index was used to assess gingival overgrowth in the buccal–lingual direction in the interdental papilla. Furthermore, the patients were assigned to two groups - Group 1-GE and Group 2-non-GE. Sex hormones assessed were estradiol and progesterone in females and testosterone in males in both groups. Results: 57.1% of the study population had enlargement of the gingiva. The mean plaque score was 0.59 and 0.56, respectively, in both groups. A statistically significant relationship was found between estradiol and testosterone levels with gingival enlargement. However, a significant relationship was not obtained for progesterone levels with the gingival enlargement. Conclusion: Direct correlation between estradiol, testosterone, and gingival enlargement was seen. PMID:27994419

  5. Influence of sex hormone levels on gingival enlargement in adolescent patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Hosadurga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sex hormones may be a modifying factor in the periodontal disease pathogenesis. Aim: The association between gingival enlargement and sex hormone levels in adolescent patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy needs to be determined. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in the Department of Periodontology in association with the Department of Orthodontics, Yenepoya Dental College, Yenepoya University, Mangaluru. Materials and Methods: A pilot study was conducted on 21 adolescent patients between the age group of 13–19 years, who had undergone fixed orthodontic therapy for at least 3 months. Apicocoronally, the gingival enlargement was assessed by the index described by Miller and Damm. Miranda and Brunet index was used to assess gingival overgrowth in the buccal–lingual direction in the interdental papilla. Furthermore, the patients were assigned to two groups - Group 1-GE and Group 2-non-GE. Sex hormones assessed were estradiol and progesterone in females and testosterone in males in both groups. Results: 57.1% of the study population had enlargement of the gingiva. The mean plaque score was 0.59 and 0.56, respectively, in both groups. A statistically significant relationship was found between estradiol and testosterone levels with gingival enlargement. However, a significant relationship was not obtained for progesterone levels with the gingival enlargement. Conclusion: Direct correlation between estradiol, testosterone, and gingival enlargement was seen.

  6. Evaluation of a nurse-led telephone follow-up clinic for patients with indolent and chronic hematological malignancies: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overend, Aldyn; Khoo, Kong; Delorme, Michael; Krause, Vanessa; Avanessian, Ardashes; Saltman, David

    2008-01-01

    A physician/nurse collaborative team sought to determine whether a nurse-led telephone clinic (Teleclinic) could effectively and safely be used to follow patients with indolent and chronic hematological malignancies. Patients seen at their routine follow-up visit were assessed for eligibility for the Teleclinic, then referred to the pilot Teleclinic by their oncologist. Patients were interviewed by telephone by an oncology nurse experienced in hematologic malignancies. Fifty-three patients consented to participate in the pilot study. Following their Teleclinic interview, patients were asked to complete a "Subject Satisfaction Questionnaire" (SSQ). Overall patient satisfaction with the Teleclinic was high. It was determined that patients with low-grade and chronic hematological malignancies could be followed effectively and safely by an oncology nurse-led telephone clinic.

  7. Human leukocyte antigen genotypes and trial of desensitization in patients with oxcarbazepine-induced skin rash: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bolyun; Yu, Hee Joon; Kang, Eun-Suk; Lee, Munhyang; Lee, Jeehun

    2014-08-01

    Skin rash associated with specific antiepileptic drugs occurs not infrequently and it usually necessitates discontinuation of the causative drugs. An alternative strategy is to desensitize the individual to the offending drug. We checked the human leukocyte antigen genotypes and conducted a pilot study to investigate the usefulness and safety of desensitization in pediatric patients with skin rash associated with oxcarbazepine. We enrolled 19 patients with epilepsy who had discontinued oxcarbazepine because of skin rash despite an initial good response and then became refractory to other antiepileptic drugs along with an individual with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with a similar situation. High-resolution HLA-A and -B genotyping was performed to investigate the genetic risk. The desensitization began with 0.1 mg daily reaching 120 mg on the thirty-first day. Thereafter, the dose was increased at a rate of 12 mg/day. Nineteen patients completed the desensitization protocol to a target dosage over 2-5 months. Five patients developed itching and erythema during desensitization, but the symptoms disappeared after withholding a dose increment transiently. There were no human leukocyte antigen genotypes relevant to aromatic antiepileptic drug-induced severe hypersensitivity reactions. The seizure frequency was reduced to less than at baseline in 18 individuals. This study demonstrated 95% efficacy, including 42% seizure-free patients and the favorable tolerability of desensitization to oxcarbazepine in patients with intractable epilepsy and one patient with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. Screening for sensitive human leukocyte antigen types and exclusion of severe hypersensitivity reactions should precede desensitization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Comparison Of Relationship Of Depression,Cognitive,Motor And Functional Deficities In Chronic Stroke Patients (A Pilot Study

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    Amin Ghaffari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim and background: One of the most important psychological disorders that arise after a stroke for people with subsequent depression, which leads to reduced quality of life, optimal rehabilitation failure, loss of cognitive tasks and decrease the recovery process.In this study communication patterns of depression with cognitive, motor and function deficites in people with chronic stroke has been studied. Methods and materials: it is a pilot study of cross-sectional study, 40 patients with chronic stroke (more than 6 months selected sampling method. depression (Beck Depression Inventory, cognition (attention test TMT-A & B and Wechsler memory, motor (Motorcity index, basic activities of daily living (Barthel scale and instrumental activities of daily living (Lawton scale were evaluated. Results: The results of the study revealed a significant positive correlation between post stroke depression with verbal memory(r=./386 ،P<./05, attention(r=./549 ،P<./05, motor status(r=./550 ،P<./05 and independence in activities of daily living(r=./653 ،P<./05 Conclusion: According to the findings, the study of factors affecting  post stroke depression(PSD clinical and practical aspects are necessary. Cognitive rehabilitation programs with motor rehabilitation can reduce depression in patients with stroke in the direction of independence in activities of daily living and greater participation in society .

  9. A Pilot Metabolic Profiling Study of Patients With Neonatal Jaundice and Response to Phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, A; Qi, S; Su, Z; Shen, H; Yang, Y; Cai, W; Dai, Y

    2016-08-01

    Phototherapy has been widely used in treating neonatal jaundice, but detailed metabonomic profiles of neonatal jaundice patients and response to phototherapy have not been characterized. Our aim was to depict the serum metabolic characteristics of neonatal jaundice patients relative to controls and changes in response to phototherapy. A (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic approach was employed to study the metabolic profiling of serum from healthy infants (n = 25) and from infants with neonatal jaundice (n = 30) pre- and postphototherapy. The acquired data were processed by multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The PLS-DA and OPLS-DA model identified nine metabolites capable of distinguishing patients from controls. In addition, 28 metabolites such as β-glucose, α-glucose, valine, and pyruvate changed in response to phototherapy. This study offers useful information on metabolic disorders in neonatal jaundice patients and the effects of phototherapy on lipids, amino acid, and energy metabolism.

  10. Multicenter pilot study: safety of automated chest percussion in patients at risk for intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, DaiWai M; Bader, Mary Kay; Dennis, Christina; Mahanes, Dea; Riemen, Kristina

    2010-06-01

    In the critical care setting, the focus of care during the first few weeks following acute brain injury is prevention of secondary brain injury by optimizing cerebral perfusion. Ensuring adequate oxygenation and perfusion of cerebral tissues requires attention to all of the body systems. Chest percussion therapy (CPT) promotes pulmonary hygiene and optimizes gas exchange by opening the alveoli. However, many patients with brain injury have intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, and conventional wisdom supports limiting activities such as CPT that may stimulate the patient and increase ICP. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of CPT on ICP. Thirty participants were enrolled over a 6-month period. Data were collected at 1-minute intervals for 1 hour. Each patient was randomized to receive automated CPT (using specialty beds) for 10 minutes, starting at 10, 20, 30, or 40 minutes into the hour. There were no differences in mean ICP values before, during, or after CPT. This study provides evidence that it is safe to perform CPT in patients with ICP monitoring in situ.

  11. Early bacterial genome detection in body fluids from patients with severe sepsis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugard, Anthony; Chainier, Delphine; Barraud, Olivier; Garnier, Fabien; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Vignon, Philippe; François, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and interest of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing for bacterial genomes in body fluids other than blood in patients with acute severe sepsis. Twenty-six consecutive patients admitted for severe sepsis or septic shock were prospectively studied. Body fluids were sampled as clinically indicated and tested using standard microbiological methods and modified RT-PCR methods (universal PCR and specific PCRs). Results of standard microbiological tests were compared with those of PCR tests. Direct RT-PCR testing was successfully performed on all nonblood body fluids. Of 29 body fluids collected, 23 were positive for at least 1 microorganism with conventional tests. Of 18 microbiological tests positive for a single microorganism, 15 fully agreed with RT-PCR assays, and the remaining 3 samples were infected with bacteria not screened by PCR testing. Among the 5 polymicrobial results obtained with conventional tests, RT-PCR agreed in 4 patients. The RT-PCR tests allowed additional clinically relevant bacterial identification in 3 of 6 samples with negative microbiological culture. Our results indicate that direct PCR testing may improve the detection of bacteria in body fluids other than blood in patients with acute severe sepsis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in Japanese Parkinson’s disease patients: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmei, Issei; Kobayashi, Kei; Oe, Yuki; Takagishi, Yuriko; Kanie, Ayako; Ito, Masaya; Takebayashi, Yoshitake; Murata, Miho; Horikoshi, Masaru; Dobkin, Roseanne D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for Japanese Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with depression. To increase cultural acceptability, we developed the CBT program using manga, a type of Japanese comic novel. Methods Participants included 19 non-demented PD patients who had depressive symptoms (GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score ≥8). A CBT program comprising six sessions was individually administered. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of the CBT program in terms of the dropout rate and occurrence of adverse events. The primary outcome was depressive symptom reduction in the GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression upon completion of CBT. Secondary outcomes included changes in the self-report measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale), functional impairment, and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey). Results Of the 19 participants (mean age =63.8 years, standard deviation [SD] =9.9 years; mean Hohen–Yahr score =1.7, SD =0.8), one patient (5%) withdrew. No severe adverse event was observed. The patients reported significant improvements in depression (Hedges’ g =−1.02, 95% confidence interval =−1.62 to −0.39). The effects were maintained over a 3-month follow-up period. Most of the secondary outcome measurements showed a small-to-moderate but nonsignificant effect size from baseline to post-intervention. Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence that CBT is feasible among Japanese PD patients with depression. Similar approaches may be effective for people with PD from other cultural backgrounds. The results warrant replication in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:27354802

  13. Pilot study on objective measurement of abdominal wall strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael; Goldberg, Ross F; Dinkins, Maryane M; Asbun, Horacio J; Daniel Smith, C; Preissler, Susanne; Bowers, Steven P

    2011-11-01

    Outcomes after ventral incisional hernia (VIH) repair are measured by recurrence rate and subjective measures. No objective metrics evaluate functional outcomes after abdominal wall reconstruction. This study aimed to develop testing of abdominal wall strength (AWS) that could be validated as a useful metric. Data were prospectively collected during 9 months from 35 patients. A total of 10 patients were evaluated before and after VIH repair, for a total of 45 encounters. The patients were tested simultaneously or in succession by two of three examiners. Data were collected for three tests: double leg lowering (DLL), trunk raising (TR), and supine reaching (SR). Raw data were compared and tested for validity, and continuous data were transformed to categorical data. Agreement was measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for DLL and using kappa for the ordinal measures. Simultaneous testing yielded the following interobserver reliability: DLL (0.96 and 0.87), TR (1.00 and 0.95), and SR (0.76). Reproducibility was assessed by consecutive tests, with correlation as follows: DLL (0.81), TR (0.81), and RCH (0.21). Due to poor interobserver reliability for the SR test compared with the DLL and TR tests, the SR test was excluded from calculation of an overall score. Based on raw data distribution from the DLL and TR tests, the DLL data were categorized into 10º increments, allowing construction of a 10-point score. The median AWS score was 5 (interquartile range [IQR], 4-7), and there was agreement within 1 point for 42 of the 45 encounters (93%). The findings from this study demonstrate that the 10-point AWS score may measure AWS in an accurate and reproducible fashion, with potential for objective description of abdominal wall function of VIH patients. This score may help to identify patients suited for abdominal wall reconstruction while measuring progress after VIH repair. Further longitudinal outcomes studies are needed.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at the lumbosacral level in patients with spinal stenosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Se-Woong; Lee, Hack-Jin; Nam, Koong-Ho; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Dong; Jeong, Eun-Jin; Chung, Sun G; Kim, Keewon; Kim, Dong-Joo

    2017-01-01

    Spinal stenosis is a common degenerative condition. However, how neurogenic claudication develops has not been clearly elucidated. Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid physiology at the lumbosacral level has not received adequate attention. This study was conducted to compare cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics at the lumbosacral spinal level between patients with spinal stenosis and healthy controls. Twelve subjects (four patients and eight healthy controls; 25-77 years old; seven males) underwent phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to quantify cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. The cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities were measured at the L2 and S1 levels. All subjects were evaluated at rest and after walking (to provoke neurogenic claudication in the patients). The caudal peak flow velocity in the sacral spine (-0.25 ± 0.28 cm/s) was attenuated compared to that in the lumbar spine (-0.93 ± 0.46 cm/s) in both patients and controls. The lumbar caudal peak flow velocity was slower in patients (-0.65 ± 0.22 cm/s) than controls (-1.07 ± 0.49 cm/s) and this difference became more pronounced after walking (-0.66 ± 0.37 cm/s in patients, -1.35 ± 0.52 cm/s in controls; p = 0.028). The sacral cerebrospinal fluid flow after walking was barely detectable in patients (caudal peak flow velocity: -0.09 ± 0.03 cm/s). Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lumbosacral spine were more attenuated in patients with spinal stenosis than healthy controls. After walking, the patients experiencing claudication did not exhibit an increase in the cerebrospinal fluid flow rate as the controls did. Altered cerebrospinal fluid dynamics may partially explain the pathophysiology of spinal stenosis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:104-112, 2017.

  15. Re: Prospective Pilot Study of Mirabegron in Pediatric Patients with Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinharib Çitgez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available EDITORIAL COMMENT Overactive bladder (OAB is a highly prevalent disorder in the pediatric population. This event negatively affects and impairs children’s development. Antimuscarinics are the mainstay pharmacological management of OAB, but their side effects profile limits their use. Mirabegron, a new molecule with a distinct mechanism of action (b3-adrenoreceptor agonist, was recently approved as monotherapy for idiopathic OAB in adults but has not been studied in the pediatric population. Blais et al. have evaluated the efficacy and safety of mirabegron in the treatment of urinary incontinence in children with idiopathic OAB who were refractory to and/or intolerant of antimuscarinics. This prospective off-label study, using an adjusted-dose regimen of mirabegron (25-50 mg, included pediatric patients with refractory urinary incontinence due to OAB. Patients without symptom improvement or with partial response under intensive behavioral protocol and medical therapy (at least two different antimuscarinic agents were included in the study. Their primary outcome was better reported efficacy than with the use of prior anticholinergic medication. Secondary end points were tolerability and safety. Families were questioned for continence, side effects, compliance, and Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC questionnaire. A total of 58 patients (14 girls, 44 boys were enrolled in a mirabegron open-label trial. The median age at initiation of mirabegron was 10.1 years [interquartile range (IQR: 8.8-13.5]. The median duration of treatment was 11.5 months (IQR: 6.0-15.0. The median bladder capacity improved from 150 ml to 200 ml (p<0.001. Continence improved in 52 of 58, with 13 being completely dry. The median PPBC score improved from 4.0 to 2.0 (p<0.001. The authors also assessed the safety of mirabegron. All electrocardiogram and blood tests remained normal. No significant change in blood pressure (<5 mmHg and heart rate (fewer than five beats

  16. Intensive serial biomarker profiling for the prediction of neutropenic fever in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Chan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutropenic fever (NF is a life-threatening complication of myelosuppressive chemotherapy in patients with hematologic malignancies and triggers the administration of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The ability to accurately predict NF would permit initiation of antimicrobials earlier in the course of infection with the goal of decreasing morbid complications and progression to septic shock and death. Changes in the blood level of inflammatory biomarkers may precede the occurrence of NF. To identify potential biomarkers for the prediction of NF, we performed serial meas- urements of nine biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP, protein C, interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1] using a multiplex ELISA array platform every 6-8 hours in patients undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. We found that the blood levels of IL-6 and CRP increased significantly 24 to 48 hours prior to the onset of fever. In addition, we showed that frequent biomarker monitoring is feasible using a bedside micro sample test device. The results of this pilot study suggest that serial monitoring of IL-6 and CRP levels using a bedside device may be useful in the prediction of NF. Prospective studies involving a larger cohort of patients to validate this observation are warranted. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01144793.

  17. Spiritual care of cancer patients by integrated medicine in urban green space: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakau, Maiko; Imanishi, Jiro; Imanishi, Junichi; Watanabe, Satoko; Imanishi, Ayumi; Baba, Takeshi; Hirai, Kei; Ito, Toshinori; Chiba, Wataru; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2013-01-01

    Psycho-oncological care, including spiritual care, is essential for cancer patients. Integrated medicine, a therapy combining modern western medicine with various kinds of complementary and alternative medicine, can be appropriate for the spiritual care of cancer because of the multidimensional characteristics of the spirituality. In particular, therapies that enable patients to establish a deeper contact with nature, inspire feelings of life and growth of plants, and involve meditation may be useful for spiritual care as well as related aspects such as emotion. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of spiritual care of cancer patients by integrated medicine in a green environment. The present study involved 22 cancer patients. Integrated medicine consisted of forest therapy, horticultural therapy, yoga meditation, and support group therapy, and sessions were conducted once a week for 12 weeks. The spirituality (the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual well-being), quality of life (Short Form-36 Health Survey Questionnaire), fatigue (Cancer Fatigue Scale), psychological state (Profile of Mood States, short form, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and natural killer cell activity were assessed before and after intervention. In Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual well-being, there were significant differences in functional well-being and spiritual well-being pre- and postintervention. This program improved quality of life and reduced cancer-associated fatigue. Furthermore, some aspects of psychological state were improved and natural killer cell activity was increased. It is indicated that integrated medicine performed in a green environment is potentially useful for the emotional and spiritual well-being of cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Medical Nutrition Therapy for Patients With Advanced Systemic Sclerosis (MNT PASS): A Pilot Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Bethany; Allen, Tara S; Southwood, Courtney; Brenner, Darren; Hirano, Ikuo; Sheean, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and associations with short-term outcomes of a medical nutrition therapy (MNT) intervention in patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc). Eighteen patients with SSc, gastrointestinal (GI) involvement, and unintentional weight loss were consented and recruited for a 6-week MNT intervention, in addition to their usual medical management. MNT emphasized increased calorie and protein intake, modified textures, and lifestyle modifications. Symptoms, anthropometrics, diet (24-hour recall), and body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) were assessed pre- and postintervention. Sarcopenia was defined as appendicular lean height (ALH) for women <5.45 kg/m(2) and for men <7.26 kg/m(2). Descriptive, parametric, and nonparametric statistics were conducted. Participants (n = 18) were predominantly white (78%), female (89%), malnourished (83%), and 51.3 ± 11.0 years of age with a body mass index of 22.6 ± 6.7 kg/m(2). Significant decreases in nutrition symptom scores (12.8 vs 7.6, P < .05) and improvements in ALH (5.6 ± 0.8 vs 5.8 ± 0.8 kg/m(2), respectively; P = .05) occurred pre- vs postintervention, respectively (n = 14). Sarcopenia was observed in 54% of participants at baseline and 39% at follow-up ( P = .02). Caloric intake (1400 vs 1577 kcal/d, P = .12) and macronutrient distribution (ie, % fat, protein, carbohydrate) did not change significantly pre- vs postintervention, respectively. Individually tailored MNT can improve symptom burden and potentially ALH in patients with SSc involving the GI tract. This study underscores the clinical potential of multidisciplinary patient management and the need for larger nutrition intervention trials of longer duration in these patients.

  19. Effect of fluorescein angiography on renal functions in type 2 diabetes patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed H Almalki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescein angiography (FA is an important tool for the diagnosis and management of diabetic retinopathy. However, the safety of fluorescein sodium on renal functions is not fully understood. One hundred type 2 diabetes patients, within the Ophthalmology Outpatient Clinic at Alexandria Main University Hospital, Egypt, were enrolled in this prospective observational study to determine the safety of FA on renal function. Serum creatinine and cystatin C were measured pre- and 2 days post-FA. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL was measured pre- and 4 hours post-FA. Renal injury was defined as a 25% increase in serum creatinine, cystatin C, or uNGAL. The study included 71 females and 29 males, with a mean age of 55.73 ± 7.29 years. Baseline serum cystatin C and uNGAL were 0.89 ± 0.34 mg/L and 21.7 ± 2.39 ng/mL, respectively. Serum cystatin C and uNGAL significantly increased after FA to 0.95 ± 0.36 and 27 ± 2.81, respectively (P <0.001. Eleven patients (11% experienced more than a 25% rise in serum cystatin C from baseline, whereas 40 patients (40% experienced more than a 25% increase in uNGAL levels after FA. However, the mean serum creatinine level did not change significantly after FA (P = 0.061. Only one patient experienced more than a 25% rise in serum creatinine from baseline. FA showed a significant increase in early sensitive acute kidney injury biomarkers (as serum cystatin C and uNGAL in substantial number of patients, suggesting but still not proving, a potential harmful effect of FA on kidney functions. These findings were not demonstrated using ordinary serum creatinine.

  20. Conserved Metabolic Changes in Nondiabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Bariatric Surgery Patients: Global Metabolomic Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide insight into the mechanism by which bariatric surgical procedures led to weight loss and improvement or resolution of diabetes. Global biochemical profiling was used to evaluate changes occurring in nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients experiencing either less extreme sleeve gastrectomy or a full gastric bypass. We were able to identify changes in metabolism that were affected by standard preoperation liquid weight loss diet as well as by bariat...

  1. Effect of music therapy on pain and anxiety levels of cancer patients: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Priyadharshini Krishnaswamy; Shoba Nair

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer ...

  2. Subjective Experiences of Speech and Language Therapy in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Spurgeon; Clarke, Carl E; Cath Sackley

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Parkinson’s disease can produce a range of speech-language pathologies, which may require intervention. While evaluations of speech-language therapy have been undertaken, no work has been undertaken to capture patients’ experiences of therapy. This was the aim of the present study. Methods. Semistructured interviews, using themes derived from the literature, were conducted with nine Parkinson’s disease patients, all of whom had undergone speech-language therapy. Participants’ respons...

  3. The Effectiveness and Applicability of Compensatory Cognitive Training for Japanese Patients with Schizophrenia: A Pilot Study

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    Sadao Otsuka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although cognitive remediation or training for schizophrenia has been developed, few studies on the subject have focused on Japanese patients. The aim of the present study was to examine the effectiveness and applicability of compensatory cognitive training (CCT in Japanese patients with schizophrenia. Twenty-six participants diagnosed with schizophrenia were assigned to either the CCT plus treatment as usual group (n=13 or the treatment as usual alone group (n=13. CCT is a 12-session, manualized, group-based training that coaches compensatory strategies in four cognitive domains (prospective memory, attention, verbal memory, and executive functions. Cognitive, functional, and clinical symptom measures were implemented at baseline, after treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Mixed design analyses of variance with group and time for each measure demonstrated that effects of CCT on verbal memory, processing speed, and social functioning at postintervention were significant, and the effects on processing speed were maintained at follow-up. Our study suggests that CCT has beneficial effects on cognitive performance, improving functional outcomes in Japanese patients with schizophrenia. Additionally, the high degrees of attendance rates and level of satisfaction rated by the CCT participants ensure the applicability of this methodology to this population.

  4. A Pilot Study Evaluating Steroid-Induced Diabetes after Antiemetic Dexamethasone Therapy in Chemotherapy-Treated Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yusook; Han, Hye Sook; Lee, Hyo Duk; Yang, Jiyoul; Jeong, Jiwon; Choi, Moon Ki; Kwon, Jihyun; Jeon, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Tae-Keun; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Kim, Seung Taik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dexamethasone is a mainstay antiemetic regimen for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the incidence of and factors associated with steroid-induced diabetes in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with dexamethasone as an antiemetic. Materials and Methods Non-diabetic patients with newly diagnosed gastrointestinal cancer who received at least three cycles of highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy with dexamethasone as an antiemetic were enrolled. Fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour postprandial glucose levels, and hemoglobin A1C tests for the diagnosis of diabetes were performed before chemotherapy and at 3 and 6 months after the start of chemotherapy. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as an index for measurement of insulin resistance, defined as a HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5. Results Between January 2012 and November 2013, 101 patients with no history of diabetes underwent laboratory tests for assessment of eligibility; 77 of these patients were included in the analysis. Forty-five patients (58.4%) were insulin resistant and 17 (22.1%) developed steroid-induced diabetes at 3 or 6 months after the first chemotherapy, which included dexamethasone as an antiemetic. Multivariate analysis showed significant association of the incidence of steroid-induced diabetes with the cumulative dose of dexamethasone (p=0.049). Conclusion We suggest that development of steroid-induced diabetes after antiemetic dexamethasone therapy occurs in approximately 20% of non-diabetic cancer patients; this is particularly significant for patients receiving high doses of dexamethasone. PMID:26987397

  5. Identifying patient preferences for communicating risk estimates: A descriptive pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor Annette M

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients increasingly seek more active involvement in health care decisions, but little is known about how to communicate complex risk information to patients. The objective of this study was to elicit patient preferences for the presentation and framing of complex risk information. Method To accomplish this, eight focus group discussions and 15 one-on-one interviews were conducted, where women were presented with risk data in a variety of different graphical formats, metrics, and time horizons. Risk data were based on a hypothetical woman's risk for coronary heart disease, hip fracture, and breast cancer, with and without hormone replacement therapy. Participants' preferences were assessed using likert scales, ranking, and abstractions of focus group discussions. Results Forty peri- and postmenopausal women were recruited through hospital fliers (n = 25 and a community health fair (n = 15. Mean age was 51 years, 50% were non-Caucasian, and all had completed high school. Bar graphs were preferred by 83% of participants over line graphs, thermometer graphs, 100 representative faces, and survival curves. Lifetime risk estimates were preferred over 10 or 20-year horizons, and absolute risks were preferred over relative risks and number needed to treat. Conclusion Although there are many different formats for presenting and framing risk information, simple bar charts depicting absolute lifetime risk were rated and ranked highest overall for patient preferences for format.

  6. Working Memory Training in Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Hubacher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is evidence that patients with schizophrenia suffer from decline in working memory performance with consequences for psychosocial outcome. Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of a computerized working memory training program (BrainStim in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Methods. Twenty-nine inpatients with chronic schizophrenia were assigned to either the intervention group receiving working memory training (N=15 or the control group without intervention (N=14. Training was performed four times a week for 45 minutes during four weeks under neuropsychological supervision. At baseline and followup all participants underwent neuropsychological testing. Results. Pre-post comparisons of neuropsychological measures showed improvements in visual and verbal working memories and visual short-term memory with small and large effect sizes in the intervention group. In contrast, the control group showed decreased performance in verbal working memory and only slight changes in visual working memory and visual and verbal short-term memories after 4 weeks. Analyses of training profiles during application of BrainStim revealed increased performance over the 4-week training period. Conclusions. The applied training tool BrainStim improved working memory and short-term memory in patients with chronic schizophrenia. The present study implies that chronic schizophrenic patients can benefit from computerized cognitive remediation training of working memory in a clinical setting.

  7. Kinesthetic taping improves walking function in patients with stroke: a pilot cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeskov, Birgitte; Carver, Line Tornehøj; von Essen-Leise, Anders; Henriksen, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of severe disability and impaired motor function. Treatment modalities that improve motor function in patients with stroke are needed. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of kinesthetic taping of the anterior thigh and knee on maximal walking speed and clinical indices of spasticity in patients with stroke. Thirty-two patients (9 women) receiving rehabilitation after stroke (average, 50 days since stroke) who had impaired walking ability were recruited. Primary outcome was maximal walking speed measured by the 10-meter walk test. Secondary outcomes were number of steps taken during the test and clinical signs of spasticity measured by the Tardieu Scale. Tests were conducted before and immediately after application of kinesthetic tape to the anterior thigh and knee of the paretic lower limb. After application of the tape, the maximal walking speed increased, on average, by 0.08 m/s (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.12; P stroke. Such a positive effect on motor function could be a valuable adjunct in physical therapy and rehabilitation of patients with stroke.

  8. Does Routine Midazolam Administration Prior to Nasogastric Tube Insertion in the Emergency Department Decrease Patients' Pain? (A Pilot Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Chelsea Taylor; Buinewicz, Jacob Dillon; Sewatsky, Thomas Patrick; Zgonis, Evangelia; Gutierrez, Kathy; O'Keefe, Michael F; Freeman, Kalev

    2016-07-01

    Patients report pain and discomfort with nasogastric tube (NGT) intubation. We tested the hypothesis that premedication with midazolam alleviates pain during NGT placement in the emergency department (ED) by > 13 on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). We performed a double-blind randomized controlled pilot study, assigning ED patients requiring NGT placement to midazolam or placebo. All patients received intranasal cophenylcaine; additionally, they received an intravenous (IV) dose of the study drug, either 2 mg of IV midazolam or saline control. Nurses placed NGTs while observed by research staff, who then interviewed subjects to determine the primary outcome of pain using a VAS. Additional data collected from patients and their nurses included discomfort during the procedure, difficulty of tube insertion, and complications. We enrolled 23 eligible patients and obtained complete data in all: 10 midazolam and 13 controls. We found a significant reduction in mean pain VAS score of -31 (95% confidence interval = -53 to -9 mm) with 2 mg of midazolam (mean ± SD = 52 ± 30 mm), compared to placebo (mean ± SD = 21 ± 18 mm), more than double the effect size considered clinically relevant. Treatment did not impact ease of placement and there were no serious adverse effects. Premedication with 2 mg of IV midazolam reduces pain of NGT insertion in ED patients without the need for full procedural sedation. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  9. Health-related quality of life of patients following selected types of lumbar spinal surgery: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Androwich Ida

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 500,000 spinal surgeries are performed annually in the United States. Although pain relief and improved health-related quality of life (HRQOL are expectations following lumbar spinal surgery, there is limited research regarding this experience from the individual's perspective. In addition, no studies have examined the HRQOL of persons who have had this surgery using a comprehensive approach. The intent of this study was to address this deficiency by an assessment of both the individual and environmental factors that impact perceived HRQOL using the Wilson and Cleary Model for Health-Related Quality of Life in persons who have undergone lumbar spinal surgery. Methods This was a pilot study of 57 adult patients undergoing elective lumbar spinal surgery for either herniated disk and/or degenerative changes. Individuals completed questionnaires measuring perceived pain, mood, functional status, general health perceptions, social support and HRQOL preoperatively and three months following surgery. Descriptive statistics, dependent t-tests, and MANOVAs were used to describe and compare the differences of the study variables over time. Results Preliminary results indicate overall perceived physical HRQOL was significantly improved postoperatively (t [56] = 6.45, p Conclusion Although perceived physical HRQOL was significantly improved three months postoperatively, fatigue and lack of vigor were issues for subjects postoperatively. Excessive fatigue and low vigor may have implications for successful rehabilitation and return to work for patients following lumbar spinal surgery. Further research is needed with a larger sample size and subgroup analyses to confirm these results.

  10. Cephalic versus digital plethysmographic variability index measurement: a comparative pilot study in cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Pellissier, Arnaud; Saplacan, Vladimir; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Fellahi, Jean-Luc

    2014-12-01

    Noninvasive measurement of digital plethysmographic variability index (PVI(digital)) has been proposed to predict fluid responsiveness, with conflicting results. The authors tested the hypothesis that cephalic sites of PVI measurement (namely PVI(ear) and PVI(forehead)) could be more discriminant than PVI(digital) to predict fluid responsiveness after cardiac surgery. A prospective observational study. A cardiac surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Fifty adult patients. Investigation before and after fluid challenge. Patients were prospectively included within the first 6-hour postoperative period and investigated before and after fluid challenge. A positive response to fluid challenge was defined as a 15% increase in cardiac index. PVI(digital), PVI(ear), PVI(forehead), and invasive arterial pulse-pressure variation (PPV) measurements were recorded simultaneously, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were built. Forty-one (82%) patients were responders and 9 (18%) patients were nonresponders to fluid challenge. ROCAUC were 0.74 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.60-0.86), 0.81 (95% CI: 0.68-0.91), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.75-0.95) and 0.87 (95% CI: 0.75-0.95) for PVI(digital), PVI(ear), PVI(forehead), and PPV, respectively. Significant differences were observed between PVI(forehead) and PVI(digital) (absolute difference in ROCAUC = 0.134 [95% CI: 0.003-0.265], p = 0.045) and between PPV and PVI(digital) (absolute difference in ROCAUC = 0.129 [95% CI: 0.011-0.247], p = 0.033). The percentage of patients within the inconclusive class of response was 46%, 70%, 44%, and 26% for PVI(digital), PVI(ear), PVI(forehead), and PPV, respectively. PVI(forehead) was more discriminant than PVI(digital) and could be a valuable alternative to arterial PPV in predicting fluid responsiveness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pilot study of the efficacy and safety of lettuce seed oil in patients with sleep disorders

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    Yakoot M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa Yakoot1, Sherine Helmy2, Kamal Fawal31Green Clinic Research Center, 2Pharco Pharmaceutical Company, 3Mamorah Psychiatric Hospital, Alexandria, EgyptBackground: Lactuca sativa (garden lettuce is a popular salad herb. It has been in use in folk medicine since ancient times as both an appetite stimulant and as an aid to sleep. L. sativa seed oil (Sedan® has demonstrated a pronounced sedative effect and potentiated the hypnotic effect of barbiturates in animal models. It also exhibited significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we evaluated the sedative and hypnotic effects of L. sativa in patients suffering from insomnia.Methods: Sixty patients suffering from insomnia with or without anxiety were randomized to receive capsules containing L. sativa seed oil 1000 mg (n = 30 or placebo (n = 30. All patients were asked to complete a verbal questionnaire before the start of the trial and 1 week after starting treatment.Results: Improvements in the modified State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Sleep rating scale scores were significantly greater in patients receiving L. sativa seed oil compared with those on placebo (P < 0.05. No side effects were found to be attributable to L. sativa seed oil at the given dosage.Conclusion: L. sativa seed oil was found to be a useful sleeping aid and may be a hazard-free line of treatment, especially in geriatric patients suffering from mild-to-moderate forms of anxiety and sleeping difficulties.Keywords: Lactuca sativa seed oil, insomnia, sleeping disorder, anxiety

  12. Conserved Metabolic Changes in Nondiabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Bariatric Surgery Patients: Global Metabolomic Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarosiek, Konrad; Pappan, Kirk L; Gandhi, Ankit V; Saxena, Shivam; Kang, Christopher Y; McMahon, Heather; Chipitsyna, Galina I; Tichansky, David S; Arafat, Hwyda A

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide insight into the mechanism by which bariatric surgical procedures led to weight loss and improvement or resolution of diabetes. Global biochemical profiling was used to evaluate changes occurring in nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients experiencing either less extreme sleeve gastrectomy or a full gastric bypass. We were able to identify changes in metabolism that were affected by standard preoperation liquid weight loss diet as well as by bariatric surgery itself. Preoperation weight-loss diet was associated with a strong lipid metabolism signature largely related to the consumption of adipose reserves for energy production. Glucose usage shift away from glycolytic pyruvate production toward pentose phosphate pathway, via glucose-6-phosphate, appeared to be shared across all patients regardless of T2D status or bariatric surgery procedure. Our results suggested that bariatric surgery might promote antioxidant defense and insulin sensitivity through both increased heme synthesis and HO activity or expression. Changes in histidine and its metabolites following surgery might be an indication of altered gut microbiome ecology or liver function. This initial study provided broad understanding of how metabolism changed globally in morbidly obese nondiabetic and T2D patients following weight-loss surgery.

  13. Conserved Metabolic Changes in Nondiabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Bariatric Surgery Patients: Global Metabolomic Pilot Study

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    Konrad Sarosiek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to provide insight into the mechanism by which bariatric surgical procedures led to weight loss and improvement or resolution of diabetes. Global biochemical profiling was used to evaluate changes occurring in nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic (T2D patients experiencing either less extreme sleeve gastrectomy or a full gastric bypass. We were able to identify changes in metabolism that were affected by standard preoperation liquid weight loss diet as well as by bariatric surgery itself. Preoperation weight-loss diet was associated with a strong lipid metabolism signature largely related to the consumption of adipose reserves for energy production. Glucose usage shift away from glycolytic pyruvate production toward pentose phosphate pathway, via glucose-6-phosphate, appeared to be shared across all patients regardless of T2D status or bariatric surgery procedure. Our results suggested that bariatric surgery might promote antioxidant defense and insulin sensitivity through both increased heme synthesis and HO activity or expression. Changes in histidine and its metabolites following surgery might be an indication of altered gut microbiome ecology or liver function. This initial study provided broad understanding of how metabolism changed globally in morbidly obese nondiabetic and T2D patients following weight-loss surgery.

  14. Analysis of Trunk Rolling Performances by Mattress Mobility Detection System in Poststroke Patients: A Pilot Study

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    Shang-Lin Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation of kinematic variables with quality of trunk control in poststroke patients. Methods. This cross-sectional study included stroke subjects with mild to moderate motor deficit corresponding to Brunnstrom stages 3-4. Trunk functional performance was measured using bed mobility monitor system. All tasks were repeated ten times for both directions in each subject. Outcome measurements included the movement time and displacement of center of pressure (CoP from supine to side lying and returning. Results. The results revealed that a significant longer turning time was observed when turning from the paretic side toward the nonparetic side compared to the other direction, with an estimated mean difference of 0.427 sec (P=0.005. We found a significant difference in the time of rolling back to supine position between two directions. The displacement of CoP in rolling back from side lying on the nonparetic side was smaller than that from the paretic side with an estimated mean difference of −0.797 cm (P=0.023. Conclusions. The impaired trunk mobility was associated with increased movement time and decreased displacement of CoP in poststroke patients. Trunk rolling performance has potential in assessment of stroke patients.

  15. Alterations in tone of voice in patients with restrictive anorexia nervosa: A pilot study

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    Concepción García-Santana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the tone of voice (acoustic perception in patients with restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN-R. Our goal was to study whether or not there is an alteration of the tone in restrictive anorexia nervosa when the disease has started in the puberty. The total sample consisted of 148 subjects divided in two groups: control (n=102 and AN-R (n=46. The voice´s fundamental frequencies (F0 were determined based on the repetition of two phonemes ("a" and "i" and measured by a microphone Plantonic 300 and a digital recorder. We analyzed the voice´s F0 using Praat software. We present the first data for the normal range of the F0 in Spanish healthy women from 9 to 17 years old who were Spanish native speakers. Finally, we show a comparison of data between AN-R patients and control group.

  16. Down-regulation of MicroRNA-126 in Glioblastoma and its Correlation with Patient Prognosis: A Pilot Study.

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    Han, In Bo; Kim, Minsoo; Lee, Soo Hong; Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Se Hoon; Chang, Jong Hee; Teng, Yang D

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant tumor of the adult human brain. Although microRNA-126 (miR-126) has been reported to exhibit expression abnormalities in various types of cancer, to date very few studies have examined changes in miR-126 level in glioblastoma. In this pilot study, we investigated the changes in miR-126 expression in newly-dissected primary glioblastoma to explore possible roles of miR-126 in patient prognosis. Total RNA was extracted from tumoral and adjacent non-cancerous tissues from 14 patients' paired frozen specimens. Using an established quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR protocol, the levels of miR-126 in glioblastoma and adjacent non-tumor brain tissues were compared against small nucleolar RNA U48 (RNU48) as a reference gene. The expression of miR-126 in glioblastoma samples was significantly lower than in paired non-tumoral controls (pglioblastoma patients with higher relative intratumoral miR-126 expression (i.e. 53-79% relative to that of the control tissue; n=7) had significantly improved survival duration than patients whose miR-126 levels were lower (i.e. 12-48%, n=7; stratified log-rank analysis p=0.011 when the dividing threshold was set at ≥51%; total: n=14, male: 8; female: 6). Thus, intraglioblastoma miR-126 may be down-regulated relative to normal tissue and patients with less down-regulation of intratumoral miR-126 expression could have improved postsurgical prognosis. Future clinical studies with larger sample sizes should be performed to validate this observation.

  17. Anatomical variants of the superficial temporal artery in patients with microtia: a pilot descriptive study

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    Yong, Chong Kong; Das, Srijit; Huei, Yap Lok

    2016-01-01

    Superficial temporal artery (STA) based pedicled fascial flap plays a pivotal role in ear reconstruction for microtia patients. There is paucity of literature on the anatomy of the STA in microtia patients. The present study aimed to describe any possible anatomical variations seen in the STA of patients afflicted with microtia. Pre-operative carotid computer tomographic angiography images of patients under the microtia database of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit at a tertiary medical centre were selected and 3-dimensionally reconstructed. Measurements were made on the 3D reconstructed computed tomographic angiography images of the STA on both the sides of the microtic ear and the non-microtic ear to assess its various anatomical parameters. We managed to obtain a total of 39 computed tomographic angiography images of STAs for analysis. There was a significant difference in the number of main branches of STA between the two groups (P=0.006). The proportion of ears with 2 main branches was higher in the non-microtia group (89.5%) compared to the microtia group (45.0%). A significant difference was found in the STA diameter between the two groups (P=0.012). The mean diameter of STA in the non-microtia group was larger by 0.4 mm. Furthermore, the median angle of STA was larger on the side of the non-microtic ears compared to that of microtic ears by 24.5°, with a P-value of 0.011. The results of the study may be of clinical importance while planning and performing ear reconstructive surgeries using STA based pedicled fascial flaps. PMID:28127502

  18. Low back pain prevalence and characteristics in caregivers of stroke patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcinkaya, Ebru Yilmaz; Ones, Kadriye; Ayna, Ata Bora; Turkyilmaz, Aysegul Kucukali; Erden, Nuran

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and features of low back pain (LBP) among stroke caregivers. Participants included 64 caregivers of stroke survivors in our inpatient clinic. Age, gender, body weight, FIMTM, and Brunnstrom Scale of patients and low back pain history, Short Form-36 (SF-36), Beck Depression Measure (BDM), and Oswestry Disability Scale (ODS) of caregivers were reported. Descriptive statistics, Spearman correlation, and Mann-Whitney U test were used. Fifty-three (82.8 %) of caregivers had LBP. Stroke survivors of caregivers with LBP (group 1) had significantly lower FIMTM scores when compared with stroke survivors of caregivers without LBP (group 2) (P Caregivers had a higher frequency of LBP in this study. However it was a study with a small number of participants. There are many studies about stroke caregivers' depression and life quality. LBP should also be investigated.

  19. The effects of short-term fasting on tolerance to (neo) adjuvant chemotherapy in HER2-negative breast cancer patients: a randomized pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, S. de; Vreeswijk, M.P.; Welters, M.J.; Gravesteijn, G.; Boei, J.J.; Jochems, A.; Houtsma, D.; Putter, H.; Hoeven, J.J.M. van der; Nortier, J.W.; Pijl, H.; Kroep, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical evidence shows that short-term fasting (STF) protects healthy cells against side effects of chemotherapy and makes cancer cells more vulnerable to it. This pilot study examines the feasibility of STF and its effects on tolerance of chemotherapy in a homogeneous patient group

  20. A Chaplain-led Spiritual Life Review Pilot Study for Patients with Brain Cancers and Other Degenerative Neurologic Diseases

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    Katherine M. Piderman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This pilot study was designed to describe changes in spiritual well-being (SWB, spiritual coping, and quality of life (QOL in patients with brain cancer or other neurodegenerative diseases participating in a chaplain-led spiritual life review interview and development of a spiritual legacy document (SLD. Methods: Eligible participants were enrolled and completed baseline questionnaires. They were interviewed by a board-certified chaplain about spiritual influences, beliefs, practices, values, and spiritual struggles. An SLD was prepared for each participant, and one month follow-up questionnaires were completed. Two cases are summarized, and spiritual development themes are illustrated within a spiritual development framework. Results: A total of 27 patients completed baseline questionnaires and the interview; 24 completed the SLD, and 15 completed the follow-up questionnaire. Increases in SWB, religious coping, and QOL were detected. The majority maintained the highest (best scores of negative religious coping, demonstrating minimal spiritual struggle. Conclusions: Despite the challenges of brain cancers and other neurodegenerative diseases, participants demonstrated improvements in SWB, positive religious coping, and QOL. Patient comments indicate that benefit is related to the opportunity to reflect on and integrate spiritual experiences and to preserve them for others. Research with a larger, more diverse sample is needed, as well as clinical applications for those too vulnerable to participate in longitudinal follow-up.

  1. Surgical nurses' attitudes towards caring for patients dying of cancer - a pilot study of an educational intervention on existential issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, C; Melin-Johansson, C; Henoch, I; Axelsson, B; Danielson, E

    2014-07-01

    This is a randomised controlled pilot study using a mixed methods design. The overall aim was to test an educational intervention on existential issues and to describe surgical nurses' perceived attitudes towards caring for patients dying of cancer. Specific aims were to examine whether the educational intervention consisting of lectures and reflective discussions, affects nurses' perceived confidence in communication and to explore nurses' experiences and reflections on existential issues after participating in the intervention. Forty-two nurses from three surgical wards at one hospital were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Nurses in both groups completed a questionnaire at equivalent time intervals: at baseline before the educational intervention, directly after the intervention, and 3 and 6 months later. Eleven face-to-face interviews were conducted with nurses directly after the intervention and 6 months later. Significant short-term and long-term changes were reported. Main results concerned the significant long-term effects regarding nurses' increased confidence and decreased powerlessness in communication, and their increased feelings of value when caring for a dying patient. In addition, nurses described enhanced awareness and increased reflection. Results indicate that an understanding of the patient's situation, derived from enhanced awareness and increased reflection, precedes changes in attitudes towards communication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in Japanese Parkinson's disease patients: a pilot study

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    Shinmei I

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Issei Shinmei,1,2 Kei Kobayashi,3 Yuki Oe,1 Yuriko Takagishi,1,4 Ayako Kanie,1 Masaya Ito,1 Yoshitake Takebayashi,1,5 Miho Murata,3 Masaru Horikoshi,1 Roseanne D Dobkin6 1National Center for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Research, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan; 3Department of Neurology, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan; 4Department of Psychology, Surugadai University, Saitama, Japan; 5Risk Analysis Research Center, The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo, Japan; 6Department of Psychiatry, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical school, NJ, USA Objectives: This study evaluated the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT for Japanese Parkinson’s disease (PD patients with depression. To increase cultural acceptability, we developed the CBT program using manga, a type of Japanese comic novel.Methods: Participants included 19 non-demented PD patients who had depressive symptoms (GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score ≥8. A CBT program comprising six sessions was individually administered. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of the CBT program in terms of the dropout rate and occurrence of adverse events. The primary outcome was depressive symptom reduction in the GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression upon completion of CBT. Secondary outcomes included changes in the self-report measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression, anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale, functional impairment, and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey.Results: Of the 19 participants (mean age =63.8 years, standard deviation [SD] =9.9 years; mean Hohen–Yahr score

  3. Cognitive Existential Couple Therapy for newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients and their partners: a descriptive pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Anna L; Love, Anthony W; Bloch, Sidney; Street, Annette F; Duchesne, Gillian M; Dunai, Judy; Couper, Jeremy W

    2013-02-01

    This paper aims to describe 'Cognitive Existential Couple Therapy' (CECT), a novel couples-based intervention for men with early stage prostate cancer (PCa) and their partners, and to report preliminary findings from a pilot study that investigated the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention and the measures to be used in a subsequent randomised controlled trial. A manualised CECT programme was delivered to 12 couples facing a diagnosis of PCa within the previous 12 months by psychiatrists and clinical psychologists. Participants completed measures of psychological distress, marital function and coping pattern before and after CECT. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine couples shortly after the completion of CECT. The application of CECT was both feasible and acceptable as indicated by favourable participant compliance (10 of the 12 couples attended all six designated sessions), completion of measures before and after CECT and participation in semi-structured interviews by nine couples. Preliminary results included reduced levels of avoidance and hyperarousal after the programme, with this effect stronger in partners than in patients. Interviews demonstrated that couples valued the therapist's contribution to their overall care. Previous research suggests that a couple-focused psychological intervention is desirable in the context of early stage PCa. This pilot study has established that CECT is acceptable, feasible and valued by couples facing a recent PCa diagnosis and demonstrates a potential for reduced psychological distress following CECT. A randomised controlled trial is currently being undertaken to validate the efficacy of this novel approach. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. [Tunnelled internal jugular vein catheters with taurolidine lock: an acceptable challenge to arterio-venous fistula in 70 years old haemodialyzed patients: a prospective pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branger, Bernard; Reboul, Pascal; Prelipcean, Camélia; Noguera, Maria Eugenia; Cariou, Sylvain; Granolleras, Céline; Vecina, Frédérique; Zabadani, Bachir; Boubenider, Samir; Rousseau, Philippe; Deshodt, Gérard; Ramperez, Pierre; Hory, Bernard; Picard, Eric; Branchereau, Pascal; Fabbro-Peray, Pascale; Fourcade, Jacques

    2011-07-01

    Arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is still in 2010 the gold standard of vascular(2) access in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Nevertheless it may be difficult to obtain and/or to use AVF in elderly. With this prospective randomised pilot study, we compare two strategies of vascular access in 70 years old or more new HD patients. AVF were compared to tunnelled jugular vein catheters (TIJC) with taurolidine as bacterial lock solution. Results were as follow: [table: see text] The responses with the visual analogic scale of comfort was 8/10 for TIJC and 5/10 with AVF * Ptaurolidine because of partial clotting of catheters. Albuminemia was significantly lower in AVF failure patients compared to AVF success patients (24.8g/L vs 31.1g/L). This pilot study allows to conclude that TIJC is an acceptable challenge to AVF in haemodialysed patients of 70 years or more in a two years long use.

  5. [Morphological and electrophysiological changes of the heart atria in necropsy patients with atrial fibrillation - a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matějková, Adéla; Steiner, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common supraventricular tachycardia, has a morphological base, so called remodelation of atrial myocardium, with its abnormal conduction pattern as a consequence. The remodelation regards electrical, contractile, and structural properties. In this pilot study we attempted to find relations between the myocardial morphological (scarring, amyloidosis, left atrial enlargement) and electrophysiological (ECG characteristics of the P-wave) changes in patients with AF. We examined 40 hearts of necropsy patients - 20 with a history of AF and 20 with no history of AF. Grossly, the heart weight and the size of the left atrium (LA) were evaluated. Histologically, 7 standard sites from the atria were examined. In each specimen, the degree of myocardial scarring and of deposition of isolated atrial amyloid (IAA) were assessed. We failed to show any significant difference in the P-wave pattern between patients with and without AF. Morphologically, however, there were several differences - the patients with AF had significantly heavier hearts, larger left atria, more severely scarred myocardium of the LA and the atrial septum, and more severe deposition of IAA in both atria in comparison to the control group of patients with sinus rhythm. The left atrial distribution of both fibrosis and amyloidosis was irregular. In patients with AF the former was most pronounced in the LA ceiling while the latter in the LA anterior wall. The entire series showed more marked amyloidosis in the left than in the right atrium. An interesting finding was the universal absence of IAA in the sinoatrial node. The knowledge of distribution of atrial myocardial structural changes could be utilized by pathologists in taking specimens for histology and also by cardiologists in targeting the radiofrequency ablation therapy.

  6. Ultra low-dose naloxone and tramadol/acetaminophen in elderly patients undergoing joint replacement surgery: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasogie, Ngozi N; Singh, Sudha; Watson, James T; Hurley, Debbie; Morley-Forster, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to assess whether both the rationale and feasibility exist for future randomized clinical trials to evaluate the combined use of naloxone infusion and tramadol/acetaminophen as opioid-sparing drugs in elderly patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery. Ten patients 70 years of age or older undergoing either total knee (n=7) or total hip (n=3) arthroplasty were treated prospectively. Each patient received two tablets of tramadol/acetaminophen (Tramacet; Janssen-Ortho Inc, Canada) preoperatively and every 6 h postoperatively, as well as a naloxone infusion started preoperatively at 0.25 microg/kg/h and continued up to 48 h postoperatively. In addition, standard intraoperative care was provided with 0.2 mg of intrathecal morphine, 1.4 mL of 0.75% bupivacaine, and an intra-articular infiltration of 100 mL of 0.3% ropivacaine and 30 mg of ketorolac, as well as standard postoperative morphine via patient-controlled analgesia orders and celecoxib 200 mg twice daily for five days. Compared with seven historical controls, also 70 years of age or older, who had undergone either a total knee (n=4) or total hip (n=3) arthroplasty, postoperative opioid use was reduced by 80%. Except for transient nausea and vomiting in 40% and 20% of patients, respectively, the 10 patients on tramadol/acetaminophen and naloxone tolerated the new regimen without difficulty. Consequently, a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial comparing standard therapy versus standard therapy plus these two drugs seems warranted. In such a trial, it would require approximately 20 subjects per treatment arm to detect a 80% decrease in morphine use.

  7. Effect of barnidipine on blood pressure and serum metabolic parameters in patients with essential hypertension: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirou, Athanasia; Rizos, Evangelos; Liberopoulos, Evangelos N; Kolaitis, Nikolaos; Achimastos, Apostolos; Tselepis, Alexandros D; Elisaf, Moses

    2006-12-01

    The effect of barnidipine, a calcium channel blocker, on metabolic parameters is not well known. The authors conducted the present pilot study to evaluate the possible effects of barnidipine on parameters involved in atherogenesis, oxidative stress, and clotting activity. This open-label intervention study included 40 adult patients with essential hypertension who received barnidipine 10 mg once daily. Barnidipine significantly reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as isoprostane levels, which represent a reliable marker of oxidative stress. In contrast, barnidipine had a neutral effect on lipid profile and apolipoprotein levels, did not influence glucose homeostasis, had no effect on renal function, and did not cause any changes in electrolyte levels. Moreover, barnidipine did not affect either the clotting/fibrinolytic status (evaluated by measurement of fibrinogen, total plasminogen activator inhibitor, tissue plasminogen activator, and a2 antiplasmin) or the enzymatic activity of the inflammatory/anti-inflammatory mediators lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and paraoxonase 1, respectively. Barnidipine should be mainly considered as an antihypertensive agent with neutral effects on most of the studied metabolic parameters in hypertensive patients. Any antioxidant effect of barnidipine needs further investigation.

  8. Masitinib treatment in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis: a randomized pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermersch Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment options for patients suffering from progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS remain inadequate. Mast cells actively participate in the pathogenesis of MS, in part because they release large amounts of various mediators that sustain the inflammatory network. Masitinib, a selective oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, effectively inhibits the survival, migration and activity of mast cells. This exploratory study assessed the safety and clinical benefit of masitinib in the treatment of primary progressive MS (PPMS or relapse-free secondary progressive MS (rfSPMS. Methods Multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, proof-of-concept trial. Masitinib was administered orally at 3 to 6 mg/kg/day for at least 12 months, with dose adjustment permitted in event of insufficient response with no toxicity. The primary response endpoint was the change relative to baseline in the multiple sclerosis functional composite score (MSFC. Clinical response was defined as an increase in MSFC score relative to baseline of > 100%. Results Thirty-five patients were randomized to receive masitinib (N = 27 or placebo (N = 8. Masitinib was relatively well tolerated with the most common adverse events being asthenia, rash, nausea, edema, and diarrhea. The overall frequency of adverse events was similar to the placebo group, however, a higher incidence of severe and serious events was associated with masitinib treatment. Masitinib appeared to have a positive effect on MS-related impairment for PPMS and rfSPMS patients, as evidenced by an improvement in MSFC scores relative to baseline, compared with a worsening MSFC score in patients receiving placebo; +103% ± 189 versus -60% ± 190 at month-12, respectively. This positive, albeit non-statistically significant response was observed as early as month-3 and sustained through to month-18, with similar trends seen in the PPMS and rfSPMS subpopulations. A total of 7/22 (32

  9. Comparison between full face and hemifacial CBCT cephalograms in clinically symmetrical patients: a pilot study

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    Cintia Helena Zingaretti Junqueira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: One of the advantages of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT is the possibility of obtaining images of conventional lateral cephalograms derived from partial or complete reconstruction of facial images. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at comparing full face, right and left hemifacial CBCT cephalograms of orthodontic patients without clinical facial asymmetry. METHODS: The sample comprised nine clinically symmetrical patients who had pretreament full face CBCT. The CBCTs were reconstructed so as to obtain full face, right and left hemifacial cephalograms. Two observers, at two different times, obtained linear and angular measurements for the images using Dolphin 3D software. Dependent and independent t-tests were used to assess the reproducibility of measurements. Analysis of Variance and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare the variables obtained in the CBCT derived cephalometric views. RESULTS: There was good reproducibility for CBCT scans and no statistically significant differences between measurements of full face, right and left hemifacial CBCT scans. CONCLUSIONS: Cephalometric measurements in full face, right and left hemifacial CBCT scans in clinically symmetrical patients are similar.

  10. Health related quality of life of chronic patients with immune system diseases: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Campos Ribeiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Health related quality of life (HRQL and survival are two important outcome measures in chronic diseases. This study aimed to compared HRQL in patients with different chronic diseases of immune system and normative data from the general Portuguese Population. It was selected 103 out-patients, by convenience, to complete SF-36v2. The lowest scores were found among measures for general health (41.0, vitality (47.5, bodily pain (51.0, mental health (56.4; women, except for role-physical, and patients with auto-immune diseases have had the worse scores on all assessed dimension of subjective health, when compared with normative data. Highest scores were obtained in the following scales: physical functioning (69.1, social functioning (66.9, role-emotional (64.9. Living with chronic immune disease have impact on HRQL and it can be expected that the Portuguese version of SF-36v2 provide valid and reliable HRQL data.

  11. Comparison between full face and hemifacial CBCT cephalograms in clinically symmetrical patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Cintia Helena Zingaretti; Janson, Guilherme; Junqueira, Marisa Helena Zingaretti; Mendes, Lucas Marzullo; Favilla, Eduardo Esberard; Garib, Daniela Gamba

    2015-01-01

    One of the advantages of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the possibility of obtaining images of conventional lateral cephalograms derived from partial or complete reconstruction of facial images. This study aimed at comparing full face, right and left hemifacial CBCT cephalograms of orthodontic patients without clinical facial asymmetry. The sample comprised nine clinically symmetrical patients who had pretreatment full face CBCT. The CBCTs were reconstructed so as to obtain full face, right and left hemifacial cephalograms. Two observers, at two different times, obtained linear and angular measurements for the images using Dolphin 3D software. Dependent and independent t-tests were used to assess the reproducibility of measurements. Analysis of Variance and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare the variables obtained in the CBCT derived cephalometric views. There was good reproducibility for CBCT scans and no statistically significant differences between measurements of full face, right and left hemifacial CBCT scans. Cephalometric measurements in full face, right and left hemifacial CBCT scans in clinically symmetrical patients are similar.

  12. Combination of Mangifera indica L. extract supplementation plus methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Mantecón, Ana M; Garrido, Gabino; Delgado-Hernández, René; Garrido-Suárez, Bárbara B

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects and the safety of Mangifera indica extract (Vimang tablets, 300 mg) combined with methotrexate (MTX) on reducing disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty patients with active RA underwent a year of treatment with MTX (12.5 mg/week) associated to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and/or prednisone (5-10 mg/day) were randomly allocated to the experimental group (n=10), that received the extract supplementation (900 mg/day) or preceding usual treatment (n=10) during 180 days. RA activity was evaluated using the tender and swollen joint counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, disease activity score-28 (DAS 28), visual analogue scale (VAS) and health assessment questionnaire (HAQ). Treatment's efficacy was demonstrated with ACR criteria. Only the patients of MTX-Vimang group revealed statistically significant improvement in DAS 28 parameters with respect baseline data but no differences were observed between groups. ACR improvements amounted 80% only in MTX-Vimang group at the 90 days (p<0.001). In MTX-Vimang group, 100% of patients decreased NSAIDs administration (p<0.01) and 70% of those eradicated gastrointestinal side effects (p<0.01) ensuing of the preceding treatment. Other adverse effects were not reported.

  13. Rehabilitation of stroke patients using Yamamoto New Scalp Acupuncture: a pilot study.

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    Hegyi, Gabriella; Szigeti, Gyula P

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether acupuncture, especially Yamamoto's New Scalp Acupuncture (YNSA), is of value in additional to standard poststroke motor rehabilitation. A prospective, assessor-blinded randomized control trial was carried out in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit with day hospital service. After inclusion, patients were stratified into control group and acupuncture group, randomly. The Barthel Index, the Rivermead Scale Index, and the Visual Analogue Scale were used to follow the efficacy of treatment. In the acupuncture group, all the sensory, motor, and functional scores improved significantly during the examination period until 2 years after injury. The Barthel Index is increased from 4±2 to 95±4 in the acupuncture group. This index also increased in the control group (from 4±2 to 75±4), but the changes were significantly less than in the acupuncture group. A significant spontaneous recovery during the 2-year follow-up was found, but the YNSA treatment facilitated the functional recovery. Improved moving function and more flexible joints and ligaments were observed in comparison to the patients' condition prior to treatment. The data suggest that the YNSA is a useful method to treat stroke patients and enhance their quality of life.

  14. Gonioscopic ab interno laser sclerostomy. A pilot study in glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latina, M A; Melamed, S; March, W F; Kass, M A; Kolker, A E

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of gonioscopic ab interno laser sclerostomy (GLS) in patients with glaucoma. The technique of GLS involves iontophoresis of methylene blue dye (1%) at the limbus to focally dye the sclera and to provide subsequent delivery of 10-microsecond pulsed laser energy to the dyed area through a goniolens. The laser emits at 660 nm, a wavelength that is maximally absorbed by the methylene blue dye. Patients were evaluated for fistula formation, intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction, and adverse sequelae. Thirty-eight treatments were performed in 35 eyes. Successful complete sclerostomies were achieved in 21 eyes (55%), which was associated with an acute mean reduction in IOP of 23 mmHg. Mean preoperative IOP for all patients was 35 mmHg, and 1 hour after treatment it was reduced to 18.5 mmHg. In 4 of the 38 treatments, there was no acute IOP reduction, and these eyes were judged as failures. The mean follow-up time was 8.2 months with a maximum follow-up of 15 months. By 9 months, 50% of patients had an IOP of 22 mmHg or lower. The number of antiglaucoma medications decreased from 3.1 to 1.7 for all eyes over the 15-month follow-up period. Hyphemas (13%) were the only major complication, and these resolved spontaneously. In only one case did the IOP increase after the procedure. The results of this trial indicate that GLS is technically feasible, and preliminary results of IOP control are promising.

  15. Relation of distortion product otoacoustic emission and tinnitus in normal hearing patients: A pilot study

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    Datt Modh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tinnitus, the perception of the sound in the absence of an external acoustic source, disrupts the daily life 1 out of every 200 adults, yet its physiological basis remains largely a mystery. The generation of tinnitus is commonly linked with the impaired functioning of the outer hair cells (OHC inside the cochlea. Otoacoustic emissions are the objective test used to assess their activity. Objective: The objective of the investigation was to study the features of Distortion product OtoAcoustic emissions (DPOAE in a group of tinnitus patients with normal hearing and to find out whether there is any difference in DPOAE findings in the tinnitus patients with normal hearing and in persons with normal hearing with no complaint of tinnitus. Materials and Methods: The participants consisted of two groups. The subject group consisted of 16 ears of patients, in which 6 subjects were having tinnitus in both ears while 4 subjects were having tinnitus only in one ear. All subjects were aged between 20 to 60 years with complaint of tinnitus with audiometrically normal hearing. Control group was comprised of 16 audiometrically normal hearing ears of persons who were age and gender matched with the subject groups and had no complaint of tinnitus. Both the subject group as well as control group was subjected for DPOAE test. Findings of both the groups were compared using the unpaired t test. Result and conclusion: It was observed that the amplitudes of DPOAE were significantly lower in tinnitus patients than that of persons without complaint of tinnitus, at a frequency of 1281-1560, 5120-6250, 7243-8837 Hz, which imply that decrease of DPOAEs amplitudes may be related to the presence of tinnitus. It can be concluded that there is association between tinnitus and reduced OHC activity which indicate the OHC of cochlea are involved in the generation of tinnitus.

  16. Functional results and visceral perception after ileo neo-rectal anastomosis in patients: a pilot study.

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    Andriesse, G I; Gooszen, H G; Schipper, M E; Akkermans, L M; van Vroonhoven, T J; van Laarhoven, C J

    2001-05-01

    To reduce pouch related complications after restorative proctocolectomy, an alternative procedure was developed, the ileo neo-rectal anastomosis (INRA). This technique consists of rectal mucosa replacement by ileal mucosa and straight ileorectal anastomosis. Our study provides a detailed description of the functional results after INRA. Eleven patients underwent an INRA procedure with a temporary ileostomy. Anorectal function tests were performed two months prior to and six and 12 months after closure of the ileostomy and comprised: anal manometry, ultrasound examination, rectal balloon distension, and transmucosal electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Function was subsequently related to the histopathology of rectal biopsy samples. Median stool frequency decreased from 15/24 hours (10-25) to 6/24 hours (4-11) at one year. All patients reported full continence. Anal sensibility, and resting and squeeze pressures did not change after INRA. Rectal compliance decreased (2.1 (0.7-2.8) v 1.5 (0.4-2.2) and 1.4 (0.8-3.7) ml/mm Hg (p=0.03)) but the maximum tolerated volume increased (70 (50-118) v 96 (39-176) (NS) and 122 (56-185) ml (p=0.03)). Decreasing rectal sensitivity was found: the maximum tolerated pressure increased (14 (8-24) v 22 (8-34) (NS) and 26 (14-40) (p=0.02)) and the rectal threshold for TENS displayed a similar tendency. All patients displayed a low grade chronic inflammatory infiltrate in neorectal biopsy samples before closure of the ileostomy, with no change during follow up. The technique of INRA provides a safe alternative for restorative surgery. Stool frequency after INRA improves with time and seems to be related to decreasing sensitivity and not to histopathological changes in the neorectum. Furthermore, after the INRA procedure, all patients reported full continence.

  17. Clinical predictors of dengue fever co-infected with leptospirosis among patients admitted for dengue fever - a pilot study.

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    Suppiah, Jeyanthi; Chan, Shie-Yien; Ng, Min-Wern; Khaw, Yam-Sim; Ching, Siew-Mooi; Mat-Nor, Lailatul Akmar; Ahmad-Najimudin, Naematul Ain; Chee, Hui-Yee

    2017-06-28

    Dengue and leptospirosis infections are currently two major endemics in Malaysia. Owing to the overlapping clinical symptoms between both the diseases, frequent misdiagnosis and confusion of treatment occurs. As a solution, the present work initiated a pilot study to investigate the incidence related to co-infection of leptospirosis among dengue patients. This enables the identification of more parameters to predict the occurrence of co-infection. Two hundred sixty eight serum specimens collected from patients that were diagnosed for dengue fever were confirmed for dengue virus serotyping by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Clinical, laboratory and demographic data were extracted from the hospital database to identify patients with confirmed leptospirosis infection among the dengue patients. Thus, frequency of co-infection was calculated and association of the dataset with dengue-leptospirosis co-infection was statistically determined. The frequency of dengue co-infection with leptospirosis was 4.1%. Male has higher preponderance of developing the co-infection and end result of shock as clinical symptom is more likely present among co-infected cases. It is also noteworthy that, DENV 1 is the common dengue serotype among all cases identified as dengue-leptospirosis co-infection in this study. The increasing incidence of leptospirosis among dengue infected patients has posed the need to precisely identify the presence of co-infection for the betterment of treatment without mistakenly ruling out either one of them. Thus, anticipating the possible clinical symptoms and laboratory results of dengue-leptospirosis co-infection is essential.

  18. Anti-inflammatory nutritional intervention in patients with relapsing-remitting and primary-progressive multiple sclerosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco; Larocca, Marilena; Trotta, Vincenzo; Mennella, Ilario; Vitaglione, Paola; Ettorre, Michele; Graverini, Antonio; De Santis, Alessandro; Di Monte, Elisabetta; Coniglio, Maria Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the influence of nutritional intervention on inflammatory status and wellness in people with multiple sclerosis. To this end, in a seven-month pilot study we investigated the effects of a calorie-restricted, semi-vegetarian diet and administration of vitamin D and other dietary supplements (fish oil, lipoic acid, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, resveratrol and multivitamin complex) in 33 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 10 patients with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis. At 0/3/6 months, patients had neurological examination, filled questionnaires and underwent anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses. Serum fatty acids and vitamin D levels were measured as markers of dietary compliance and nutritional efficacy of treatment, whereas serum gelatinase levels were analyzed as markers of inflammatory status. All patients had insufficient levels of vitamin D at baseline, but their values did not ameliorate following a weekly administration of 5000  IU, and rather decreased over time. Conversely, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increased already after three months, even under dietary restriction only. Co-treatment with interferon-beta in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis was irrelevant to vitamin D levels. After six months nutritional treatment, no significant changes in neurological signs were observed in any group. However, serum levels of the activated isoforms of gelatinase matrix metalloproteinase-9 decreased by 59% in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis and by 51% in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients under nutritional intervention, including dietary supplements. This study indicates that a healthy nutritional intervention is well accepted by people with multiple sclerosis and may ameliorate their physical and inflammatory status.

  19. Anti-inflammatory nutritional intervention in patients with relapsing-remitting and primary-progressive multiple sclerosis: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Rocco; Larocca, Marilena; Trotta, Vincenzo; Mennella, Ilario; Vitaglione, Paola; Ettorre, Michele; Graverini, Antonio; De Santis, Alessandro; Di Monte, Elisabetta; Coniglio, Maria Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the influence of nutritional intervention on inflammatory status and wellness in people with multiple sclerosis. To this end, in a seven-month pilot study we investigated the effects of a calorie-restricted, semi-vegetarian diet and administration of vitamin D and other dietary supplements (fish oil, lipoic acid, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, resveratrol and multivitamin complex) in 33 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 10 patients with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis. At 0/3/6 months, patients had neurological examination, filled questionnaires and underwent anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses. Serum fatty acids and vitamin D levels were measured as markers of dietary compliance and nutritional efficacy of treatment, whereas serum gelatinase levels were analyzed as markers of inflammatory status. All patients had insufficient levels of vitamin D at baseline, but their values did not ameliorate following a weekly administration of 5000  IU, and rather decreased over time. Conversely, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increased already after three months, even under dietary restriction only. Co-treatment with interferon-beta in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis was irrelevant to vitamin D levels. After six months nutritional treatment, no significant changes in neurological signs were observed in any group. However, serum levels of the activated isoforms of gelatinase matrix metalloproteinase-9 decreased by 59% in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis and by 51% in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients under nutritional intervention, including dietary supplements. This study indicates that a healthy nutritional intervention is well accepted by people with multiple sclerosis and may ameliorate their physical and inflammatory status. PMID:26785711

  20. Pilot study of psilocybin treatment for anxiety in patients with advanced-stage cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Charles S; Danforth, Alicia L; Chopra, Gurpreet S; Hagerty, Marycie; McKay, Charles R; Halberstadt, Adam L; Greer, George R

    2011-01-01

    Researchers conducted extensive investigations of hallucinogens in the 1950s and 1960s. By the early 1970s, however, political and cultural pressures forced the cessation of all projects. This investigation reexamines a potentially promising clinical application of hallucinogens in the treatment of anxiety reactive to advanced-stage cancer. To explore the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in patients with advanced-stage cancer and reactive anxiety. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of patients with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety, with subjects acting as their own control, using a moderate dose (0.2 mg/kg) of psilocybin. A clinical research unit within a large public sector academic medical center. Twelve adults with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety. In addition to monitoring safety and subjective experience before and during experimental treatment sessions, follow-up data including results from the Beck Depression Inventory, Profile of Mood States, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were collected unblinded for 6 months after treatment. Safe physiological and psychological responses were documented during treatment sessions. There were no clinically significant adverse events with psilocybin. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory trait anxiety subscale demonstrated a significant reduction in anxiety at 1 and 3 months after treatment. The Beck Depression Inventory revealed an improvement of mood that reached significance at 6 months; the Profile of Mood States identified mood improvement after treatment with psilocybin that approached but did not reach significance. This study established the feasibility and safety of administering moderate doses of psilocybin to patients with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety. Some of the data revealed a positive trend toward improved mood and anxiety. These results support the need for more research in this long-neglected field. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00302744.

  1. EFFECTS OF STOTT’S PILATES VERSUS YOGIC EXERCISE IN FIBROMYALGIA PATIENTS: A PILOT STUDY

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    Ashika Tanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS can be defined as a rheumatological condition characterised by chronic widespread pain, a reduced pain threshold as well as hyperalgesia and allodynia. It is a nonarticular painful condition with generalised tender points. Purpose: The aim of this randomised study was to compare the effects of Stott’s Pilates versus Yogic exercise on pain, tenderness, pressure threshold, depression & fatigue in Fibromyalgia patients, which is chronic musculoskeletal disorder. Methodology: Female and male (n=20 who had a diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria were selected from Dr. D.Y.Patil hospital, Physiotherapy department O.P.D. The participants were randomly assigned into 2 groups. In group A, a Pilates exercise program of 1 hour was given by a certified trainer to 10 participants 6 days a week for 4 weeks. In group B, Yoga program of 1 hour was given by certified instructor to10 participants 6 days a week for 4 weeks. In both groups, pre- (1st day and post treatment (4th week evaluation was performed by VAS (Visual Analogue Scale, TPI (Tender Point Index, AS (Algometric Score, BDI (Beck Depression Inventory and FSS (Fatigue Severity Scale. Results: Twenty participants completed the study. In Group A significant difference were observed for VAS, TPI, BDI & FSS (statistically p0.05. Conclusion: Hence, we suggest Pilates exercise and Yoga both are equally effective in treating fibromyalgia patients.

  2. Effects of Repetitive Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment in Patients with Acute Cerebral Infarction: A Pilot Study

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    Cheng-Hsin Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke is controversial. This prospective study assessed the efficacy and safety of HBOT as adjuvant treatment on 46 acute ischemic stroke in patients who did not receive thrombolytic therapy. The HBOT group (n=16 received conventional medical treatment with 10 sessions of adjunctive HBOT within 3–5 days after stroke onset, while the control group (n=30 received the same treatment but without HBOT. Early (around two weeks after onset and late (one month after onset outcomes (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS scores and efficacy (changes of NIHSS scores of HBOT were evaluated. The baseline clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Both early and late outcomes of the HBOT group showed significant difference (P≤0.001. In the control group, there was only significant difference in early outcome (P=0.004. For early efficacy, there was no difference when comparing changes of NIHSS scores between the two groups (P=0.140 but there was statistically significant difference when comparing changes of NIHSS scores at one month (P≤0.001. The HBOT used in this study may be effective for patients with acute ischemic stroke and is a safe and harmless adjunctive treatment.

  3. Patients with chronic pain after abdominal surgery show less preoperative endogenous pain inhibition and more postoperative hyperalgesia: a pilot study.

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    Wilder-Smith, Oliver Hamilton; Schreyer, Tobias; Scheffer, Gert Jan; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-06-01

    Chronic pain is common and undesirable after surgery. Progression from acute to chronic pain involves altered pain processing. The authors studied relationships between presence of chronic pain versus preoperative descending pain control (diffuse noxious inhibitory controls; DNICs) and postoperative persistence and spread of skin and deep tissue hyperalgesia (change in electric/pressure pain tolerance thresholds; ePTT/pPTT) up to 6 months postoperatively. In 20 patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgery under standardized anesthesia, we determined ePTT/pPTT (close to [abdomen] and distant from [leg] incision), eDNIC/pDNIC (change in ePTT/pPTT with cold pressor pain task; only preoperatively), and a 100 mm long pain visual analogue scale (VAS) (0 mm = no pain, 100 mm = worst pain imaginable), both at rest and on movement preoperatively, and 1 day and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Patients reporting chronic pain 6 months postoperatively had more abdominal and leg skin hyperalgesia over the postoperative period. More inhibitory preoperative eDNIC was associated with less late postoperative pain, without affecting skin hyperalgesia. More inhibitory pDNIC was linked to less postoperative leg deep tissue hyperalgesia, without affecting pain VAS. This pilot study for the first time links chronic pain after surgery, poorer preoperative inhibitory pain modulation (DNIC), and greater postoperative degree, persistence, and spread of hyperalgesia. If confirmed, these results support the potential clinical utility of perioperative pain processing testing.

  4. Relationship between Cognitive Performance and Motor Dysfunction in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot Cross-Sectional Study

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    Valentina Varalta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot cross-sectional study was to extensively investigate the relationships between cognitive performance and motor dysfunction involving balance and gait ability in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Twenty subjects with Parkinson’s disease underwent a cognitive (outcomes: Frontal Assessment Battery-Italian version, Montreal overall Cognitive Assessment, Trail Making Test, Semantic Verbal Fluency Test, and Memory with Interference Test and motor (outcomes: Berg Balance Scale, 10-Meter Walking Test, 6-Minute Walking Test, Timed Up and Go Test performed also under dual task condition, and Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale assessment. Our correlation analyses showed that balance skills are significantly correlated with executive functions, cognitive impairment, and ability to switch attention between two tasks. Furthermore, functional mobility showed a significant correlation with cognitive impairment, verbal fluency, and ability to switch attention between two tasks. In addition, the functional mobility evaluated under the dual task condition showed a significant correlation with cognitive impairment and ability to switch attention between two tasks. These findings might help early identification of cognitive deficits or motor dysfunctions in patients with Parkinson’s disease who may benefit from rehabilitative strategies. Future prospective larger-scale studies are needed to strengthen our results.

  5. Quetiapine fumarate augmentation for patients with a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder: a pilot study

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    Chen Yi-Chih

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comorbid anxiety symptoms,in patients with a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder, leads to poor patient outcomes and burdens the healthcare system. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of extended-release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR for the treatment of patients with either a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder with comorbid anxiety symptoms compared to a placebo, as an adjunct to antidepressant therapy. Methods Thirty-nine patients with a diagnosis of a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder with comorbid anxiety symptoms were enrolled in this study. Patients with a stable dose of antidepressant therapy were randomized according to a 2:1 probability of receiving either quetiapine XR or a placebo adjunctive treatment for 8 weeks. The efficacy was assessed by the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A and the Clinical Global Impression of severity (CGI-S score at baseline, week 1, 4, and 8. Results A total of 35 patients were included in this intention-to treat (ITT population for the efficacy analysis (quetiapine XR: 22 patients; placebo: 13 patients. At week 4, statistically significant differences were observed on both the HAM-A score (p = 0.003 and the CGI-S score (p = 0.025, favouring the quetiapine XR (−13.00 ± 4.14 compared to placebo (−6.63 ± 5.42. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups with regard to changes from the baseline to week 8 on the HAM-A score (p = 0.332 or the CGI-S score (p = 0.833. Conclusions Augmentation of antidepressant treatment with quetiapine XR did not result in clinical improvement according to the outcome measure of anxiety using the HAM-A and CGI-S scores at week 8, among the patients with either a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder with comorbid anxiety symptoms. However, treatment with quetiapine XR as an adjunct to antidepressant therapy appeared to provide a short

  6. A cognitive-existential intervention to improve existential and global quality of life in cancer patients: A pilot study.

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    Gagnon, Pierre; Fillion, Lise; Robitaille, Marie-Anik; Girard, Michèle; Tardif, François; Cochrane, Jean-Philippe; Le Moignan Moreau, Joanie; Breitbart, William

    2015-08-01

    We developed a specific cognitive-existential intervention to improve existential distress in nonmetastatic cancer patients. The present study reports the feasibility of implementing and evaluating this intervention, which involved 12 weekly sessions in both individual and group formats, and explores the efficacy of the intervention on existential and global quality of life (QoL) measures. Some 33 nonmetastatic cancer patients were randomized between the group intervention, the individual intervention, and the usual condition of care. Evaluation of the intervention on the existential and global QoL of patients was performed using the existential well-being subscale and the global scale of the McGill Quality of Life (MQoL) Questionnaire. All participants agreed that their participation in the program helped them deal with their illness and their personal life. Some 88.9% of participants agreed that this program should be proposed for all cancer patients, and 94.5% agreed that this intervention helped them to reflect on the meaning of their life. At post-intervention, both existential and psychological QoL improved in the group intervention versus usual care (p = 0.086 and 0.077, respectively). At the three-month follow-up, global and psychological QoL improved in the individual intervention versus usual care (p = 0.056 and 0.047, respectively). This pilot study confirms the relevance of the intervention and the feasibility of the recruitment and randomization processes. The data strongly suggest a potential efficacy of the intervention for existential and global quality of life, which will have to be confirmed in a larger study.

  7. A cognitive–existential intervention to improve existential and global quality of life in cancer patients: A pilot study

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    GAGNON, PIERRE; FILLION, LISE; ROBITAILLE, MARIE-ANIK; GIRARD, MICHÈLE; TARDIF, FRANÇOIS; COCHRANE, JEAN-PHILIPPE; LE MOIGNAN MOREAU, JOANIE; BREITBART, WILLIAM

    2017-01-01

    Objective We developed a specific cognitive–existential intervention to improve existential distress in nonmetastatic cancer patients. The present study reports the feasibility of implementing and evaluating this intervention, which involved 12 weekly sessions in both individual and group formats, and explores the efficacy of the intervention on existential and global quality of life (QoL) measures. Method Some 33 nonmetastatic cancer patients were randomized between the group intervention, the individual intervention, and the usual condition of care. Evaluation of the intervention on the existential and global QoL of patients was performed using the existential well-being subscale and the global scale of the McGill Quality of Life (MQoL) Questionnaire. Results All participants agreed that their participation in the program helped them deal with their illness and their personal life. Some 88.9% of participants agreed that this program should be proposed for all cancer patients, and 94.5% agreed that this intervention helped them to reflect on the meaning of their life. At post-intervention, both existential and psychological QoL improved in the group intervention versus usual care (p = 0.086 and 0.077, respectively). At the three-month follow-up, global and psychological QoL improved in the individual intervention versus usual care (p = 0.056 and 0.047, respectively). Significance of results This pilot study confirms the relevance of the intervention and the feasibility of the recruitment and randomization processes. The data strongly suggest a potential efficacy of the intervention for existential and global quality of life, which will have to be confirmed in a larger study. PMID:25050872

  8. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance in patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain – a pilot study

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    Eriksson Magnus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cervical pain is widespread, most victims are only mildly and occasionally affected. A minority, however, suffer chronic pain and/or functional impairments. Although there is abundant literature regarding nontraumatic neck pain, little focuses on diagnostic criteria. During the last decade, research on neck pain has been designed to evaluate underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, without noteworthy success. Independent researchers have investigated postural balance and cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility among patients with chronic neck pain, and have (in most cases concluded the source of the problem is a reduced ability in the neck's proprioceptive system. Here, we investigated cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance among patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain. Methods Ours was a two-group, observational pilot study of patients with complaints of continuous neck pain during the 3 months prior to recruitment. Thirteen patients with chronic neck pain of nontraumatic origin were recruited from an institutional outpatient clinic. Sixteen healthy persons were recruited as a control group. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility was assessed by exploring head repositioning accuracy and postural balance was measured with computerized static posturography. Results Parameters of cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility were not reduced. However, in one of six test movements (flexion, global repositioning errors were significantly larger in the experimental group than in the control group (p Conclusion In patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain, we found statistically significant global repositioning errors in only one of six test movements. In this cohort, we found no evidence of impaired postural balance. Head repositioning accuracy and computerized static posturography are imperfect measures of functional proprioceptive impairments. Validity of (and procedures for using these

  9. Meaning-centered dream work with hospice patients: A pilot study.

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    Wright, Scott T; Grant, Pei C; Depner, Rachel M; Donnelly, James P; Kerr, Christopher W

    2015-10-01

    Hospice patients often struggle with loss of meaning, while many experience meaningful dreams. The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary exploration into the process and therapeutic outcomes of meaning-centered dream work with hospice patients. A meaning-centered variation of the cognitive-experiential model of dream work (Hill, 1996; 2004) was tested with participants. This variation was influenced by the tenets of meaning-centered psychotherapy (Breitbart et al., 2012). A total of 12 dream-work sessions were conducted with 7 hospice patients (5 women), and session transcripts were analyzed using the consensual qualitative research (CQR) method (Hill, 2012). Participants also completed measures of gains from dream interpretation in terms of existential well-being and quality of life. Participants' dreams generally featured familiar settings and living family and friends. Reported images from dreams were usually connected to feelings, relationships, and the concerns of waking life. Participants typically interpreted their dreams as meaning that they needed to change their way of thinking, address legacy concerns, or complete unfinished business. Generally, participants developed and implemented action plans based on these interpretations, despite their physical limitations. Participants described dream-work sessions as meaningful, comforting, and helpful. High scores on a measure of gains from dream interpretation were reported, consistent with qualitative findings. No adverse effects were reported or indicated by assessments. Our results provided initial support for the feasibility and helpfulness of dream work in this population. Implications for counseling with the dying and directions for future research were also explored.

  10. Patient engagement with a mobile web-based telemonitoring system for heart failure self-management: a pilot study.

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    Zan, Shiyi; Agboola, Stephen; Moore, Stephanie A; Parks, Kimberly A; Kvedar, Joseph C; Jethwani, Kamal

    2015-04-01

    Intensive remote monitoring programs for congestive heart failure have been successful in reducing costly readmissions, but may not be appropriate for all patients. There is an opportunity to leverage the increasing accessibility of mobile technologies and consumer-facing digital devices to empower patients in monitoring their own health outside of the hospital setting. The iGetBetter system, a secure Web- and telephone-based heart failure remote monitoring program, which leverages mobile technology and portable digital devices, offers a creative solution at lower cost. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of using the iGetBetter system for disease self-management in patients with heart failure. This was a single-arm prospective study in which 21 ambulatory, adult heart failure patients used the intervention for heart failure self-management over a 90-day study period. Patients were instructed to take their weight, blood pressure, and heart rate measurements each morning using a WS-30 bluetooth weight scale, a self-inflating blood pressure cuff (Withings LLC, Issy les Moulineaux, France), and an iPad Mini tablet computer (Apple Inc, Cupertino, CA, USA) equipped with cellular Internet connectivity to view their measurements on the Internet. Outcomes assessed included usability and satisfaction, engagement with the intervention, hospital resource utilization, and heart failure-related quality of life. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize data, and matched controls identified from the electronic medical record were used as comparison for evaluating hospitalizations. There were 20 participants (mean age 53 years) that completed the study. Almost all participants (19/20, 95%) reported feeling more connected to their health care team and more confident in performing care plan activities, and 18/20 (90%) felt better prepared to start discussions about their health with their doctor. Although heart failure-related quality of life

  11. High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV screening and detection in healthy patient saliva samples: a pilot study

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    Wang Robert C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human papillomaviruses (HPV are a large family of non-enveloped DNA viruses, mainly associated with cervical cancers. Recent epidemiologic evidence has suggested that HPV may be an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal cancers. Evidence now suggests HPV may modulate the malignancy process in some tobacco- and alcohol-induced oropharynx tumors, but might also be the primary oncogenic factor for inducing carcinogenesis among some non-smokers. More evidence, however, is needed regarding oral HPV prevalence among healthy adults to estimate risk. The goal of this study was to perform an HPV screening of normal healthy adults to assess oral HPV prevalence. Methods Healthy adult patients at a US dental school were selected to participate in this pilot study. DNA was isolated from saliva samples and screened for high-risk HPV strains HPV16 and HPV18 and further processed using qPCR for quantification and to confirm analytical sensitivity and specificity. Results Chi-square analysis revealed the patient sample was representative of the general clinic population with respect to gender, race and age (p Conclusions The successful recruitment and screening of healthy adult patients revealed HPV16, but not HPV18, was present in a small subset. These results provide new information about oral HPV status, which may help to contextualize results from other studies that demonstrate oral cancer rates have risen in the US among both females and minorities and in some geographic areas that are not solely explained by rates of tobacco and alcohol use. The results of this study may be of significant value to further our understanding of oral health and disease risk, as well as to help design future studies exploring the role of other factors that influence oral HPV exposure, as well as the short- and long-term consequences of oral HPV infection.

  12. Glycosylation changes in the salivary glycoproteins of alcohol-dependent patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Ewa M; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Kaluza, Anna; Szajda, Sławomir D; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Szulc, Agata; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Ferens-Sieczkowska, Miroslawa

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation of serum proteins is affected with prolonged heavy drinking, and carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) is well established and highly specific biomarker of sustained alcohol consumption. However, total amount of sialic acid is not the only glycoepitope that may be altered as a result of the disease. This work is focused on glycan structures altered in salivary glycoproteins of alcoholics, indicating the most efficient carriers of such marker glycoepitopes. Salivary glycoproteins of 31 alcohol-dependent patients and 21 healthy controls were studied by means of lectin ELISA and lectin blotting with the lectins specific for core and antennary fucose, α2,3-bound sialic acid as well as T and Tn antigens in O-glycans. In direct lectin ELISA, core fucosylation, α2,3 sialylation and expression of T-antigen were significantly lowered in the saliva of alcohol-dependent patients. In lectin blotting ten glycoprotein bands were analyzed. The profile of disease-related alterations was found to be complex, but all six lectins studied here were able to detect altered glycan structures. In some glycoproteins the tendency to correct the glycosylation profile was observed after 7 weeks of abstinence. Alterations in the glycosylation profiles in the salivary glycoproteins of alcohol-dependent people were found. Some of salivary glycoproteins, such as α-amylase, clusterin, haptoglobin, heavy and light chains of immunoglobulins, and transferrin, seem to be worthy of detailed glycosylation analysis in the detection of alcohol dependence. Further studies may allow one to estimate if such glycomarkers may also reflect the amount of alcohol intake or the duration of alcohol intake.

  13. Will it hurt? Patients' experience of X-ray examinations: a pilot study

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    Chesson, Rosemary A. [Health Services Research Group, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Good, Maureen [Royal Aberdeen Children' s Hospital, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Hart, Cleone L. [Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Moray Health Services, Elgin (United Kingdom)

    2002-01-01

    Background: There is a worldwide trend towards involving patients in health care, but little is known about children's expectations of routine radiological procedures. Objective: To determine children's perceptions of X-ray examinations. Materials and methods: A convenience sample was selected from consecutive patients referred to a children's hospital in Scotland. Children were allocated either to a drawing study (n=20) or a two-stage interview (n=25). The investigation was restricted to first-time users of the radiological service aged 7-14 years if accompanied by a parent and consent having been obtained. Children were excluded if pain control was administered in the Accident and Emergency Department. Children's drawings were reported on by an art therapist and a child psychiatrist. Results: All children approached agreed to participate. Seventeen children provided accurate pictures of the X-ray examination room. Concordance existed between the psychiatrist's and art therapist's reports. Children at interview had at least a minimal level of knowledge of X-rays and this was from (1) family, friends and neighbours, (2) the school classroom, and (3) television programmes. Conclusions: Children had anxieties revealed through drawings and interviews. We recommend drawings for establishing children's views of radiology. (orig.)

  14. Functional visual acuity in patients with successfully treated amblyopia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Sujin; Hiraoka, Takahiro; Kotsuka, Junko; Sato, Yumiko; Izumida, Shinya; Kato, Atsuko; Ueno, Yuta; Fukuda, Shinichi; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to use conventional visual acuity measurements to quantify the functional visual acuity (FVA) in eyes with successfully treated amblyopia, and to compare the findings with those for contralateral normal eyes. Nineteen patients (7 boys, 12 girls; age 7.5 ± 2.2 years) with successfully treated unilateral amblyopia and the same conventional decimal visual acuity in both eyes (better than 1.0) were enrolled. FVA, the visual maintenance ratio (VMR), maximum and minimum visual acuity, and the average response time were recorded for both eyes of all patients using an FVA measurement system. The differences in FVA values between eyes were analyzed. The mean LogMAR FVA scores, VMR (p amblyopia than for the contralateral normal eyes. There was no significant difference in the average response time. Our results indicate that FVA and VMR were poorer for eyes with treated amblyopia than for normal eyes, even though the treatment for amblyopia was considered successful on the basis of conventional visual acuity measurements. These results suggest that visual function is impaired in eyes with amblyopia, regardless of treatment success, and that FVA measurements can provide highly valuable diagnosis and treatment information that is not readily provided by conventional visual acuity measurements.

  15. Spinal cord stimulation affects T-wave alternans in patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Paolo; Castagno, Davide; Massa, Riccardo; De Luca, Anna; Castellano, Maddalena; Chirio, Claudio; Grimaldi, Roberto

    2008-04-01

    An antiarrhythmic effect of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been recognized in an animal model. The actual mechanism is still mainly unknown. An adrenergic output reduction has been advocated as the main mechanism, although a modulation effect on the arrhythmic substrate has not yet been investigated. We studied T-wave alternans (TWA) modifications to test the hypothesis that SCS affects the arrhythmic substrate. We performed TWA assessment in three high-risk patients who previously had undergone implantation of both implantable cardioverter defibrillator and SCS to treat refractory angina. The test was performed after switching off the SCS and after 2 and 24 h stimulation at the default amplitude. The protocol was executed 2 months apart in order to assess the reproducibility of the results, collecting a total of 18 TWA reports. In all the three patients, we observed a significant reduction of TWA amplitude after 2 h stimulation. All the tests were classified as negative after 24 h stimulation with the nominal parameters. Spinal cord stimulation results in a decrease in the TWA magnitude, and thus it seems to positively affect the arrhythmic substrate in a time-dependent manner.

  16. The Health Buddies App as a Novel Tool to Improve Adherence and Knowledge in Atrial Fibrillation Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desteghe, Lien; Kluts, Kiki; Vijgen, Johan; Koopman, Pieter; Dilling-Boer, Dagmara; Schurmans, Joris; Dendale, Paul; Heidbuchel, Hein

    2017-07-19

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) constitutes an important risk for stroke, especially in an ageing population. A new app (Health Buddies) was developed as a tool to improve adherence to non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in an elderly AF population by providing a virtual contract with their grandchildren, spelling out daily challenges for both. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and usability of the Health Buddies app in AF patients. Two workshops were conducted to steer app development and to test a first prototype. The feasibility of the finalized app was investigated by assessing the number of eligible AF patients (based on current prescription of NOACs, the presence of grandchildren between 5 and 15 years old, availability of a mobile phone, computer, or tablet), and the proportion of those who were willing to participate. Participants had to use the app for 3 months. The motivation of the patients to use the app was assessed based on the number of logins to the app. Their perception of its usefulness was examined by specific questionnaires. Additionally, the effects on knowledge level about AF and its treatment, and adherence to NOAC intake were investigated. Out of 830 screened AF patients, 410 were taking NOACs and 114 were eligible for inclusion. However, only 3.7% (15/410) of the total NOAC population or 13.2% of the eligible patients (15/114) were willing to participate. The main reasons for not participating were no interest to participate in general or in the concept in particular (29/99, 29%), not feeling comfortable using technology (22/99, 22%), no interest by the grandchildren or their parents (20/99, 20%), or too busy a lifestyle (12/99, 12%). App use significantly decreased towards the end of the study period in both patients (P=.009) and grandchildren (Papp scored positively on clarity, novelty, stimulation, and attractiveness as measured with the user experience questionnaire. Patients evaluated the educational

  17. Respiratory motor training and neuromuscular plasticity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovechkin, Alexander V; Sayenko, Dimitry G; Ovechkina, Elena N; Aslan, Sevda C; Pitts, Teresa; Folz, Rodney J

    2016-07-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of a full-scale investigation of the neurophysiological mechanisms of COPD-induced respiratory neuromuscular control deficits. Characterization of respiratory single- and multi-muscle activation patterns using surface electromyography (sEMG) were assessed along with functional measures at baseline and following 21±2 (mean±SD) sessions of respiratory motor training (RMT) performed during a one-month period in four patients with GOLD stage II or III COPD. Pre-training, the individuals with COPD showed significantly increased (prespiratory muscle activity and disorganized multi-muscle activation patterns in association with lowered spirometrical measures and decreased fast- and slow-twitch fiber activity as compared to healthy controls (N=4). Following RMT, functional and respiratory sEMG activation outcomes during quite breathing and forced expiratory efforts were improved suggesting that functional improvements, induced by task-specific RMT, are evidence respiratory neuromuscular networks re-organization.

  18. EFFECTS OF OMEGA-3 AND PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTATION ON NUTRITIONAL AND INFLAMMATORY INDICES IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS – A PILOT STUDY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azuan Mat Daud Zulfitri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Intervention to correct malnutrition and chronic inflammation in dialysis patients is often impeded by poor compliance due to medical and socioeconomic barriers. Therefore we performed a pilot study to investigate the technical feasibility of “directly observed treatment” of nutritional supplementation (protein and omega-3 fatty acids and its effects on nutritional and inflammatory markers in low socio-economic status hemodialysis population. Sixty-three eligible patients agreed to participate. Two intervention groups received 30 mL of a liquid protein supplement plus either 2.4 gm omega-3 (1.8 gm eicosapentaenoic acid + 0.6 gm docosahexaenoic acid or a placebo, three times per week after their routine dialysis session for 6 months. Serum albumin, plasma lipids, and other indicators of nutritional and inflammatory status were measured. Statistical differences after treatment and between groups were determined using paired t-test and independent t-test, respectively. Directly observed nutritional supplementation resulted in a significant improvement in the LDLC/HDLC ratio in the omega-3 group as compared to the placebo group (P = 0.043. For the omega-3 group, serum albumin was also marginally higher after 6 months as compared to baseline (P = 0.07. Other nutritional and inflammatory markers were unaffected by intervention. In conclusion, “Directly observed treatment” is technically feasible with an omega-3 based supplement (as opposed to a pure protein supplement showed beneficial effects on the lipid profile.

  19. The Effect of Spirulina platensis versus Soybean on Insulin Resistance in HIV-Infected Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Ngogang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available HIV-infected patients develop abnormalities of glucose metabolism due to the virus and antiretroviral drugs. Spirulina and soybean are nutritional supplements that are cheap, accessible in our community and affect glucose metabolism. We carried out a randomized study to assess the effect of Spirulina platensis versus soybean as a food supplement on HIV/HAART-associated insulin resistance (IR in 33 insulin-resistant HIV-infected patients. The study lasted for two months at the National Obesity Centre of Cameroon. Insulin resistance was measured using the short insulin tolerance test. Physical activity and diet did not change over the study duration. On-treatment analysis was used to analyze data. The Mann-Whitney U test, the Students T test and the Chi square test were used as appropriate. Curve gradients were analyzed using ANCOVA. Seventeen subjects were randomized to spirulina and 16 to soybean. Each received 19 g of supplement daily. The follow up rate was 65% vs. 100% for spirulina and soybean groups, respectively, and both groups were comparable at baseline. After eight weeks, insulin sensitivity (IS increased by 224.7% vs. 60% in the spirulina and soybean groups respectively (p < 0.001. One hundred per cent vs. 69% of subjects on spirulina versus soybean, respectively, improved their IS (p = 0.049 with a 1.45 (1.05–2.02 chance of improving insulin sensitivity on spirulina. This pilot study suggests that insulin sensitivity in HIV patients improves more when spirulina rather than soybean is used as a nutritional supplement. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01141777.

  20. Osteopathic manipulative treatment results in sustained relief from spinal pain in older patients: A pilot crossover study

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    Pannunzio A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment is commonly used to complement conventional treatment of back pain. The present study verified whether OMT, associated with training program, reduces spinal pain in older. A pilot randomized, double-blind crossover study was conducted at Sport Association of Milan, Italy. We recruited 19 subjects above 60 years old, with presence of SP for more than 3 weeks and with intensity score higher than 3 (NRS score. All patients underwent a multi-component group exercise program for older adults and were randomized in two groups: in the study group (SG OMT was added, while the control group (CG continued with the exercise only. After 6 weeks a crossover was applied to the 2 groups and OMT was added to CG, while SG continued with the exercise only. Self-reported measures: the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS was used at each time to evaluate treatment outcomes. At pre-crossover, SG had a significant improvement in pain perception (p<0.05, while CG had a not significate improvement in pain perception (p=0.33.At post-crossover, the SG remains relatively stable (p=0.37, while CG after OMT addition have a significant benefit on pain perception (p=0.001. At follow-up, pain improvement is sustained (p=0.32. OMT associated to exercise reduce spinal pain in older patients. Our study suggests that OMT associated to exercise leads to significant improvement on pain relief in patients with chronic SP in a short term and the exercise allows to maintain these improvements for several months

  1. The Effect of Spirulina platensis versus Soybean on Insulin Resistance in HIV-Infected Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Azabji-Kenfack; Ekali, Loni G.; Eugene, Sobngwi; Arnold, Onana E.; Sandrine, Edie D.; von der Weid, Denis; Gbaguidi, Emmanuel; Ngogang, Jeanne; Mbanya, Jean C.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-infected patients develop abnormalities of glucose metabolism due to the virus and antiretroviral drugs. Spirulina and soybean are nutritional supplements that are cheap, accessible in our community and affect glucose metabolism. We carried out a randomized study to assess the effect of Spirulina platensis versus soybean as a food supplement on HIV/HAART-associated insulin resistance (IR) in 33 insulin-resistant HIV-infected patients. The study lasted for two months at the National Obesity Centre of Cameroon. Insulin resistance was measured using the short insulin tolerance test. Physical activity and diet did not change over the study duration. On-treatment analysis was used to analyze data. The Mann-Whitney U test, the Students T test and the Chi square test were used as appropriate. Curve gradients were analyzed using ANCOVA. Seventeen subjects were randomized to spirulina and 16 to soybean. Each received 19 g of supplement daily. The follow up rate was 65% vs. 100% for spirulina and soybean groups, respectively, and both groups were comparable at baseline. After eight weeks, insulin sensitivity (IS) increased by 224.7% vs. 60% in the spirulina and soybean groups respectively (p < 0.001). One hundred per cent vs. 69% of subjects on spirulina versus soybean, respectively, improved their IS (p = 0.049) with a 1.45 (1.05–2.02) chance of improving insulin sensitivity on spirulina. This pilot study suggests that insulin sensitivity in HIV patients improves more when spirulina rather than soybean is used as a nutritional supplement. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01141777. PMID:22254118

  2. A Comparison of the Relation of Depression, and Cognitive, Motor and Functional Deficits in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ghaffari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim and background: One of the most important psychological disorders after stroke is depression, which leads to reduced quality of life, optimal rehabilitation failure, loss of cognitive tasks and decrease in the recovery process. In this research, relation between patterns of depression and cognitive, motor and function deficits in people with chronic stroke was studied. Methods and materials: In a pilot cross-sectional study, 40 patients with chronic stroke (more than 6 months were enrolled. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory, cognition (attention test TMT-A & B and Wechsler memory, motor (Motorcity index, basic activities of daily living (Barthel scale and instrumental activities of daily living (Lawton scale were evaluated. Results: The results of the study revealed a significant positive correlation between post stroke depression and verbal memory (r=0.440،P<.05, attention (r=0.615،P<.05, motor function(r-0.368،P<.05, independence in basic activities of daily living (r=0.781،P<.05 and instrumental activities of daily living (r=0.741, P<.05. Conclusion: According to the findings, further studies of factors affecting post stroke depression (PSD clinical and practical aspects are necessary. Cognitive rehabilitation programs with motor rehabilitation can decrease depression and gain independence in activities of daily living and more participation in society activities.

  3. Cognitive rehabilitation training in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy and cognitive deficits: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschio, Marta; Dinapoli, Loredana; Fabi, Alessandra; Giannarelli, Diana; Cantelmi, Tonino

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this pilot observational study was to evaluate effect of cognitive rehabilitation training (RehabTr) on cognitive performances in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy (BTRE) and cognitive disturbances. Medical inclusion criteria: patients (M/F) ≥ 18 years ≤ 75 with symptomatic seizures due to primary brain tumors or brain metastases in stable treatment with antiepileptic drugs; previous surgical resection or biopsy; >70 Karnofsky Performance Status; stable oncological disease. Eligible patients recruited from 100 consecutive patients with BTRE at first visit to our Center from 2011 to 2012. All recruited patients were administered battery of neuropsychological tests exploring various cognitive domains. Patients considered to have a neuropsychological deficit were those with at least one test score for a given domain indicative of impairment. Thirty patients out of 100 showed cognitive deficits, and were offered participation in RehabTr, of which 16 accepted (5 low grade glioma, 4 high grade glioma, 2 glioblastoma, 2 meningioma and 3 metastases) and 14 declined for various reasons. The RehabTr consisted of one weekly individual session of 1 h, for a total of 10 weeks, carried out by a trained psychologist. The functions trained were: memory, attention, visuo-spatial functions, language and reasoning by means of Training NeuroPsicologico (TNP(®)) software. To evaluate the effect of the RehabTr, the same battery of tests was administered directly after cognitive rehabilitation (T1), and at six-month follow-up (T2). Statistical analysis with Student T test for paired data showed that short-term verbal memory, episodic memory, fluency and long term visuo-spatial memory improved immediately after the T1 and remained stable at T2. At final follow-up all patients showed an improvement in at least one domain that had been lower than normal at baseline. Our results demonstrated a positive effect of rehabilitative training at different times, and, for

  4. Sexual Well-Being in Patients with Blepharospasm, Spasmodic Torticollis, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perozzo, Paola; Salatino, Adriana; Cerrato, Paolo; Ricci, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Mood, anxiety, and other psychological symptoms are common in dystonic patients suffering from blepharospasm (BSP) and spasmodic torticollis (ST). Since sexual well-being is an important aspect of mental health, here, we investigated whether these patients may also experience a worsening of their sexual life. In particular, quality of sexual life was evaluated in patients suffering from BSP (N = 30), ST (N = 30), and in a control group of patient with Hemifacial spasm (HFS; N = 30), undergoing botulinum toxin type A therapy. A group of 30 age-matched healthy volunteers constituted an additional control group. Patients were evaluated just before the periodic injection of botulinum toxin. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Sexual Functioning Inventory, a reduced form of the Golombok Rust Inventory, previously employed in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and anxiety (STAI-X1/X2) were also assessed. Results revealed that sexual functioning was significantly affected in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS with respect to healthy controls. Dystonic patients manifested more sexual dysfunction than patients with HFS. Overall, females had a poorer quality of sexual life than males and, among females, women with BSP were the most dysfunctional. Psychological symptoms were present in patients with dystonia, but not in patients with HFS. As discussed in the paper, several factors might be taken into account to explain worse quality of sexual life in patients with dystonia compared to patients with hemifacial spasm. Among them an important role might be played by the central origin of dystonia pathophysiology (i.e., altered activity of cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical circuits). Future investigations are necessary to further explore these preliminary findings, considering that this is the first time that sexual well-being is evaluated in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS, and comparable data are not available. PMID:27761118

  5. Sexual Well-Being in Patients with Blepharospasm, Spasmodic Torticollis, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perozzo, Paola; Salatino, Adriana; Cerrato, Paolo; Ricci, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Mood, anxiety, and other psychological symptoms are common in dystonic patients suffering from blepharospasm (BSP) and spasmodic torticollis (ST). Since sexual well-being is an important aspect of mental health, here, we investigated whether these patients may also experience a worsening of their sexual life. In particular, quality of sexual life was evaluated in patients suffering from BSP (N = 30), ST (N = 30), and in a control group of patient with Hemifacial spasm (HFS; N = 30), undergoing botulinum toxin type A therapy. A group of 30 age-matched healthy volunteers constituted an additional control group. Patients were evaluated just before the periodic injection of botulinum toxin. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Sexual Functioning Inventory, a reduced form of the Golombok Rust Inventory, previously employed in patients with Parkinson's disease. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and anxiety (STAI-X1/X2) were also assessed. Results revealed that sexual functioning was significantly affected in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS with respect to healthy controls. Dystonic patients manifested more sexual dysfunction than patients with HFS. Overall, females had a poorer quality of sexual life than males and, among females, women with BSP were the most dysfunctional. Psychological symptoms were present in patients with dystonia, but not in patients with HFS. As discussed in the paper, several factors might be taken into account to explain worse quality of sexual life in patients with dystonia compared to patients with hemifacial spasm. Among them an important role might be played by the central origin of dystonia pathophysiology (i.e., altered activity of cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical circuits). Future investigations are necessary to further explore these preliminary findings, considering that this is the first time that sexual well-being is evaluated in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS, and comparable data are not available.

  6. Sexual well-being in patients with blepharospasm, spasmodic torticollis and hemifacial spasm: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Perozzo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mood, anxiety and other psychological symptoms are common in dystonic patients suffering from blepharospam (BSP and spasmodic torticollis (ST. Since sexual well-being is an important aspect of mental health, here, we investigated whether these patients may also experience a worsening of their sexual life. In particular, quality of sexual life was evaluated in patients suffering from BSP (N=30, ST (N=30, and in a control group of patient with Hemifacial spasm (HFS; N=30, undergoing botulinum toxin type A therapy. A group of 30 age-matched healthy volunteers constituted an additional control group. Patients were evaluated just before the periodic injection of botulinum toxin. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Sexual Functioning Inventory (SFI, a reduced form of the Gollombok Rust Inventory, previously employed in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory and anxiety (STAI-X1/X2 were also assessed. Results revealed that sexual functioning was significantly affected in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS with respect to healthy controls. Dystonic patients manifested more sexual dysfunction than patients with HFS. Overall, females had a poorer quality of sexual life than males and, among females, women with BSP were the most dysfunctional. Psychological symptoms were present in patients with dystonia, but not in patients with HFS. As discussed in the paper, several factors might be taken into account to explain worse quality of sexual life in patients with dystonia compared to patients with hemifacial spasm. Among them an important role might be played by the central origin of dystonia pathophysiology (i.e. altered activity of cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical circuits. Future investigations are necessary to further explore these preliminary findings, considering that this is the first time that sexual well-being is evaluated in patients with BSP, ST and HFS, and comparable data are not available.

  7. Paraguayan Education Study: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia

    A qualitative pilot study, guided by an ecological framework, illustrates the complexities involved in studying the unique linguistic situation in Paraguay between Spanish and the indigenous language of Guarani, and its relationship with education. The pilot study interviewing eight kindergarten children. Seventy five children have been…

  8. Effect of itopride, a new prokinetic, in patients with mild GERD: A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Sung Kim; Tae Hyeon Kim; Chang Soo Choi; Young Woo Shon; Sang Wook Kim; Geom Seog Seo; Yong Ho Nah; Myung Gyu Choi; Suck Chei Choi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Itopride is a newly developed prokinetic agent, which enhances gastric motility through both antidopaminergic and anti-acetylcholinesterasic actions. The importance of esophageal motor dysfunction in the pathogenesis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) makes it interesting to examine the effect of itopride on esophageal acid exposure.METHODS: The effect of itopride on esophageal acid reflux variables for 24 h was studied in 26 patients with GERD symptoms, pre-entry total acid exposure time (pH<4) of more than 5% and mild esophagitis (SavaryMiller grades Ⅰ, Ⅱ) proven by endoscopy. Ambulatory 24-h pH-metry and symptom assessment were performed after treatments with 150 or 300 mg itopride thrice a day (t.i.d.) for 30 d in random order, using an open label method.For evaluating the safety of itopride, blood biochemical laboratory test was performed and the serum prolactin level was also examined before and after treatment.RESULTS: Total symptom score was significantly decreased after treatment in 150- or 300-mg group. Itopride 300mg was significantly effective than 150 mg on decreasing the total per cent time with pH<4, total time with pH<4and DeMeester score. No serious adverse effects were observed with administration of itopride in both groups.CONCLUSION: Itopride 100 mg t.i.d, is effective on decreasing pathologic reflux in patient with GERD and therefore it has the potential to be effective in the treatment of this disease.

  9. Expression Profiling of Nonpolar Lipids in Meibum From Patients With Dry Eye: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Keirsey, Jeremy K; Green, Kari B; Nichols, Kelly K

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize differentially expressed lipids in meibum samples from patients with dry eye disease (DED) in order to better understand the underlying pathologic mechanisms. Meibum samples were collected from postmenopausal women with DED (PW-DED; n = 5) and a control group of postmenopausal women without DED (n = 4). Lipid profiles were analyzed by direct infusion full-scan electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). An initial analysis of 145 representative peaks from four classes of lipids in PW-DED samples revealed that additional manual corrections for peak overlap and isotopes only slightly affected the statistical analysis. Therefore, analysis of uncorrected data, which can be applied to a greater number of peaks, was used to compare more than 500 lipid peaks common to PW-DED and control samples. Statistical analysis of peak intensities identified several lipid species that differed significantly between the two groups. Data from contact lens wearers with DED (CL-DED; n = 5) were also analyzed. Many species of the two types of diesters (DE) and very long chain wax esters (WE) were decreased by ∼20% in PW-DED, whereas levels of triacylglycerols were increased by an average of 39% ± 3% in meibum from PW-DED compared to that in the control group. Approximately the same reduction (20%) of similar DE and WE was observed for CL-DED. Statistical analysis of peak intensities from direct infusion ESI-MS results identified differentially expressed lipids in meibum from dry eye patients. Further studies are warranted to support these findings.

  10. Impact of physical activity in group versus individual physical activity on fatigue in patients with breast cancer: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiens, Christine; Filion, Myriam; Brien, Marie-Chantale; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Laflamme, Christian; Lemieux, Julie

    2017-10-01

    Physical activity improves the quality of life of cancer survivors, but whether there is a difference between individual vs. group physical activity is unknown. To compare fatigue at 12 weeks in breast cancer survivors after participation in a program of group vs. individual video-assisted physical activity. This was a randomized phase II pilot study carried out in breast cancer survivors at a tertiary breast cancer center. Eligible patients were randomized to individual or group 12-week physical activity program. The primary outcome was fatigue (FACT-F). Aerobic capacity (6-min walk test), muscular strength, and quality-of-life (FACT-G and FACT-B) were assessed. Because of poor accrual, 200 consecutive breast cancer patients were surveyed about their physical activity habits to assess reasons for low recruitment. For all participants (n = 26; n = 12 for group vs. n = 14 for individual), there were some improvement in FACT-F, FACT-G, FACT-B, physical activity level, aerobic capacity, and shoulder strength. Among the 200 patients surveyed, 58% were interested to increase their physical activity level, 15% declared that they were already exercising enough, 9% declared being unable to, 3% declared having no time, and 2% declared having no interest, and other reasons (13%). Among the 200 patients surveyed, 25% preferred in group, 57% preferred alone, and 18% had no preference. Low recruitment precluded conclusions about the efficacy of physical activity practiced in group vs. individually, but both groups derived a benefit. Low willingness to change exercising habits could be the biggest barrier to physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lesion-Specific Immune Response in Granulomas of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumar Subbian

    Full Text Available The formation and maintenance of granulomas is central to the host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection. It is widely accepted that the lungs of patients with tuberculosis (TB usually contain multiple infection foci, and that the granulomas evolve and differentiate independently, resulting in considerable heterogeneity. Although gene expression profiles of human blood cells have been proposed as biomarkers of Mtb infection and/or active disease, the immune profiles of discrete lesion types has not been studied extensively. Using histology, immunopathology and genome-wide transcriptome analysis, we explored the immunological profile of human lung TB granulomas. We show that although the different granulomas share core similarities in their immunological/inflammatory characteristics, they also exhibit significant divergence. Despite similar numbers of CD68+ macrophages in the different lesions, the extent of immune reactivity, as determined by the density of CD3+ T cells in the macrophage rich areas, and the extent of fibrosis, shows considerable variation. Both quantitative and qualitative differences among significantly differentially expressed genes (SDEG were noted in each of the lesion types studied. Further, network/pathway analysis of SDEG revealed differential regulation of inflammatory response, immune cell trafficking, and cell mediated immune response in the different lesions. Our data highlight the formidable challenges facing ongoing efforts to identify peripheral blood biomarkers due to the diversity of lesion types and complexity of local immune responses in the lung.

  12. Nutritional status in Parkinson's disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, J M; Ash, S; Silburn, P A; Kerr, G K

    2013-02-01

    People with Parkinson's disease (PD) are at higher risk of malnutrition due to PD symptoms and pharmacotherapy side effects. When pharmacotherapy is no longer effective for symptom control, deep-brain stimulation (DBS) surgery may be considered. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status of people with PD who may be at higher risk of malnutrition related to unsatisfactory symptom management with optimised medical therapy. This was an observational study using a convenience sample. Participants were seen during their hospital admission for their deep brain stimulation surgery. People with PD scheduled for DBS surgery were recruited from a Brisbane neurological clinic (n=15). The Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), weight, height and body composition were assessed to determine nutritional status. Six participants (40%) were classified as moderately malnourished (SGA-B). Eight participants (53%) reported previous unintentional weight loss (average loss of 13%). On average, participants classified as well-nourished (SGA-A) were younger, had shorter disease durations, lower PG-SGA scores, higher body mass (BMI) and fat free mass indices (FFMI) when compared to malnourished participants (SGA-B). Five participants had previously received dietetic advice but only one in relation to unintentional weight loss. Malnutrition remains unrecognised and untreated in this group despite unintentional weight loss and presence of nutrition impact symptoms. Improving nutritional status prior to surgery may improve surgical outcomes.

  13. Evaluating the use of the wilbarger intervention with schizophrenic patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withersty, David J; Stout, Janet; Mogge, Neil L; Nesland, Anita; David Allen, G

    2005-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia have difficulty processing sensory information. The authors hypothesized that the Wilbarger intervention, an occupational therapy technique successfully used to treat children with sensory integration deficits, might prove beneficial if used with schizophrenic patients. Thirty inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders voluntarily participated. Each was evaluated using the sensory integration subscale of the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES) both pre- and post-intervention. The Wilbarger was scheduled to be administered five times per day for seven days per week for four weeks. Participants averaged 19.5 days (mean) in the study (median=27.5 days) and received 80.4 (mean) (106.5 median) interventions.Those receiving 90 or more interventions improved significantly on the graphesthesia subtest (t(28)=2.498; p<0.019), the right/left confusion subtest (t(28)=2.373; p<0.025) and the post-total score (t(28)=2.184; p<0.037). Sensory subscales of the NES statistically improved after use of the Wilbarger intervention. Further studies are planned to determine the duration and clinical significance of the noted changes.

  14. Ketogenic diet also benefits Dravet syndrome patients receiving stiripentol: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbout, Rima; Copioli, Cristiana; Chipaux, Mathilde; Chemaly, Nicole; Desguerre, Isabelle; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    We aimed to test the efficacy of ketogenic diet (KD) in patients with Dravet syndrome (DS) not satisfactorily controlled by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). We included prospectively 15 DS patients aged >3 years with partial response to AEDs including stiripentol. All patients had a seizure diary and clinical examination with Conners and Achenbach scales before KD, at 1 month following onset and every 3 months thereafter. At 1 month, 10 patients (66%) had a decrease of seizure frequency ≥75%. Efficacy was maintained in eight responders at 3 and 6 months and in six responders at 9 months. Five patients (33%) remained on KD over 12 months, and one was seizure-free. In addition to efficacy on seizure frequency, KD was beneficial on behavior disturbances including hyperactivity. This effect was reported in all responders and in a few nonresponders. KD might have a double effect, on seizure control and on hyperactivity and behavior disturbances in patients with DS.

  15. Improvement in Stress, General Self-Efficacy, and Health Related Quality of Life following Patient Education for Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Trude; Veenstra, Marijke; Vatn, Morten H; Wahl, Astrid K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate changes in general self-efficacy, health related quality of life (HRQoL), and stress among patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET) following a multidisciplinary educational intervention. Forty-one patients were enrolled in this exploratory pilot study. A total of 37 patients completed the full 26-week intervention based on the principles of self-efficacy. General self-efficacy was measured by the General Self-Efficacy Scale, HRQoL was measured with the SF-36, and stress was measured with the Impact of Event Scale. Mixed effect models were used to evaluate changes in general self-efficacy, mental and physical components of HRQoL, and stress adjusting for demographic and clinical variables. Results showed significant improvements in patients' general self-efficacy (β = 0.71; P stress (β = -2.10, P = 0.008). Findings suggest that patients with NET have the capacity to improve their ability to cope with their disease, problem-solve, improve their physical status, and reduce their stress following an educational intervention based on the principles of self-efficacy. These preliminary data provide a basis for future randomized controlled trials to test interventions to improve HRQoL for patients with NET.

  16. Staff and patient perceptions of noise in SA hospitals – a pilot study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Reenen, Coralie A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available hospital context, noise can negatively influence patient and staff outcomes, such as patient recovery time and staff burn-out,3 and should be monitored and controlled. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends an equivalent continuous sound...BA in wards. Few hospitals world-wide comply with the WHO recommendations.6,7 In South Africa, little research has been done regarding noise levels in hospitals. Findings show that neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) exceed Staff and patient perceptions...

  17. Patient-reported symptoms of radiation dermatitis during breast cancer radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Park, Won; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Im-Ryung; Kang, Danbee; Cho, Juhee

    2017-07-01

    To find out which symptoms most frequently and severely affect breast cancer patients during radiotherapy and how patients manage the symptoms and unmet needs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 111 patients who receive radiotherapy for breast cancer from January to April 2015 at Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, South Korea. Participants were asked about symptoms and discomfort due to radiotherapy, management methods for radiation dermatitis, unmet needs for radiation dermatitis care, and clinical and socio-demographic information. Of total, 108 out of 111 patients (97.3%) reported symptoms related to radiation dermatitis. Hyperpigmentation was the most commonly reported uncomfortable symptom followed by erythema. On average, patients reported 8.6 radiotherapy-induced skin problems (range, 0-11). Of total, 59 (53.2%) patients stated that they wanted care for radiation dermatitis, and 80.0, 59.4, and 51% of patients searched for information, used products, and visited the hospital to manage radiotherapy-related skin problems. Patients who experienced dryness, burning feelings, irritation, roughness, and hyperpigmentation were 11.73, 7.02, 5.10, 4.27, and 2.80 times more likely to have management needs than patients without those symptoms, respectively, adjusting age, current cycle of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and type of surgery. Most of the breast cancer patients experience multiple symptoms associated with radiation dermatitis. Hyperpigmentation was the most common and uncomfortable symptom followed by erythema. Majority of patients wanted management for radiation dermatitis and patients who experienced dryness, burning feelings, irritation, roughness, and hyperpigmentation had higher needs for radiation dermatitis management.

  18. Quantitative balance and gait measurement in patients with frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer diseases: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selva Ganapathy Velayutham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alzhiemers disease and Frontotemporal dementia are common neurodegenerative dementias with a wide prevalence. Falls are a common cause of morbidity in these patients. Identifying subclinical involvement of these parameters might serve as a tool in differential analysis of these distinct parameters involved in these conditions and also help in planning preventive strategies to prevent falls. Patients and Methods: Eight patients in age and gender matched patients in each group were compared with normal controls. Standardizes methods of gait and balance aseesment were done in all persons. Results: Results revealed subclinical involvement of gait and balancesin all groups specially during divided attention. The parameters were significantly more affected in patients. Patients with AD and FTD had involement of over all ambulation index balance more affected in AD patients FTD patients showed step cycle, stride length abnormalities. Discussion: There is balance and gait involvement in normal ageing as well as patients with AD and FTD. The pattern of involvement in AD correlates with WHERE pathway involvement and FTD with frontal subcortical circuits involvement. Conclusion: Identification the differential patterns of involvement in subclinical stage might help to differentiate normal ageing and the different types of cortical dementias. This could serve as an additional biomarker and also assist in initiating appropriate training methods to prevent future falls.

  19. Psychological barriers to tobacco cessation in Indian buprenorphine-naloxone maintained patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyali Mandal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The prevalence of smoking in opioid agonist treatment programmes remains high, leading to significant tobacco related health hazards and mortality. This is the first study from India addressing tobacco cessation and related barriers among recipients of buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance treatment. Aims: The purpose of the study was to investigate Indian buprenorphine-naloxone maintained patients′ willingness to quit tobacco use, to determine its possible association with demographic, agonist maintenance treatment, tobacco use related variables and personal health and risk perceptions related to health hazards associated with tobacco use. Settings and Design: The study was cross-sectional, observational. It was conducted in the out-patient department of a national level de-addiction centre in India. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five males on buprenorphine-naloxone treatment were assessed using Tobacco Use Characteristics, Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND and FTND-ST, Readiness to Change questionnaire (RCQ, Smoker′s Perceived Health Risk Evaluation (SPHERE, Importance of Intervention scale and a semi-structured questionnaire. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics, Kruskal-Wallis Chi-square test, Spearman rank order correlation, paired-t test, ANOVA (STATA 9.2 statistical package. Results: Around 65.4% of the subjects were smokers, 9% were using smokeless tobacco only whereas 25.6% were using both. Mean duration of tobacco use was 20 ± 1.5 years. Only 20% had past quit attempts. Only 24% were in action phase of change. Personal health and risk perceptions were poor and only 61.62% considered intervention tobacco smoking cessation important. Conclusions: Higher severity of nicotine dependence, low perception of harm from tobacco warrant immediate attention and need for on-site treatment opportunity.

  20. Label-free reflectance hyperspectral imaging for tumor margin assessment: a pilot study on surgical specimens of cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Baowei; Lu, Guolan; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Hongzheng; Little, James V.; Patel, Mihir R.; Griffith, Christopher C.; El-Diery, Mark W.; Chen, Amy Y.

    2017-08-01

    A label-free, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) approach has been proposed for tumor margin assessment. HSI data, i.e., hypercube (x,y,λ), consist of a series of high-resolution images of the same field of view that are acquired at different wavelengths. Every pixel on an HSI image has an optical spectrum. In this pilot clinical study, a pipeline of a machine-learning-based quantification method for HSI data was implemented and evaluated in patient specimens. Spectral features from HSI data were used for the classification of cancer and normal tissue. Surgical tissue specimens were collected from 16 human patients who underwent head and neck (H&N) cancer surgery. HSI, autofluorescence images, and fluorescence images with 2-deoxy-2-[(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]-D-glucose (2-NBDG) and proflavine were acquired from each specimen. Digitized histologic slides were examined by an H&N pathologist. The HSI and classification method were able to distinguish between cancer and normal tissue from the oral cavity with an average accuracy of 90%±8%, sensitivity of 89%±9%, and specificity of 91%±6%. For tissue specimens from the thyroid, the method achieved an average accuracy of 94%±6%, sensitivity of 94%±6%, and specificity of 95%±6%. HSI outperformed autofluorescence imaging or fluorescence imaging with vital dye (2-NBDG or proflavine). This study demonstrated the feasibility of label-free, HSI for tumor margin assessment in surgical tissue specimens of H&N cancer patients. Further development of the HSI technology is warranted for its application in image-guided surgery.

  1. Multi-modal memory restructuring for patients suffering from combat-related PTSD: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M. van den; Brinkman, W.P.; Vermetten, E.; Neerincx, M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the design and evaluation of a multimedia software application, which can be used in the treatment of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The application allows patients and therapist to visualize the patients' past experience using maps, personal photos, stories

  2. Metabolomic profile related to cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fontana, Beatriz; Morales-Santana, Sonia; Díaz Navarro, Caridad; Rozas-Moreno, Pedro; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente Pérez, Francisca; Pérez del Palacio, José; Muñoz-Torres, Mnuel

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) that represents one of the main causes of mortality in this population. The knowledge of the underlie factors involved in the development of CVD and the discovery of new biomarkers of the disease could help to early identification of high-risk patients. Using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) we analyzed the serum metabolomic profile of 30 subject distributed according three groups: (i) T2DM patients with CVD; (ii) T2DM patients without CVD; (iii) non-diabetic subjects as controls (C) in order to identify potential biomarkers of the CVD related to T2DM. A partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were applied to identify differential metabolites between different groups. Four glycerophospholipids were further identified as potential biomarkers of CVD in T2DM patients. Specifically, a reduction in phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) serum levels were found in T2DM patients compared to controls, presenting the patients with CVD the lowest serum levels of these metabolites. These results show a generalized reduction of circulating phospholipids species in T2DM patients which is more pronounced in those with CVD providing information of the pathways involved in the pathogenesis and progression of CVD associated to T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of cefetaxime in ICU-patients treated with continuous renal replacement : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk-Swinkels, C.G.H.; Rijpstra, T.A.; Van Der Meer, B.J.M.; Touw, D.J.; van't Veer, N.E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Data on the optimal dosage of cefotaxime (CTX) in patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is sparse and equivocal [1]. We conducted a trial investigating the concentrations of CTX in general ICU and post-cardiac surgery ICU patients who were treated with CRRT bec

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with early cortical dementia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gregor Issac

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The diagnostic accuracy of the currently available tools carries poor sensitivity resulting in significant delay in specific diagnosis of cortical dementias. Considering the properties of default mode networking of the brain it is highly probable that specific changes may be seen in frontotemporal dementias (FTDs and Alzheimer′s disease sufficiently early. Aim: The aim of this study is to look for changes in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS in cortical dementia. Materials and Methods: Evaluated with a single pulse TMS with the figure of eight coil and recorded from right first dorsal interossei (FDI. Resting Motor Threshold (RMT was estimated on the opposite motor cortex (T1. Second site of stimulation was cervical spine at C7-T2. Central motor conduction time (CMCT is equal toT1-T2.Silent Period (SP identified by applying TMS pulse to contracting FDI. Conclusions: RMT was reduced in seven out of eight Alzheimer′s dementias. CMCT was in the upper limit of normal in both patients with FTD. The most consistent observation was that SP was reduced and there were escape discharges noticed during the SP suggesting increased cortical excitability and decreased cortical inhibition. This suggests probable early asymptomatic changes in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA nergic and cholinergic system is taking place. This if confirmed may give some insight into early diagnosis and therapeutic role of GABA agonists in these disorders.

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with early cortical dementia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Thomas Gregor; Chandra, S R; Nagaraju, B C

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of the currently available tools carries poor sensitivity resulting in significant delay in specific diagnosis of cortical dementias. Considering the properties of default mode networking of the brain it is highly probable that specific changes may be seen in frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) and Alzheimer's disease sufficiently early. The aim of this study is to look for changes in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in cortical dementia. Evaluated with a single pulse TMS with the figure of eight coil and recorded from right first dorsal interossei (FDI). Resting Motor Threshold (RMT) was estimated on the opposite motor cortex (T1). Second site of stimulation was cervical spine at C7-T2. Central motor conduction time (CMCT) is equal toT1-T2. Silent Period (SP) identified by applying TMS pulse to contracting FDI. RMT was reduced in seven out of eight Alzheimer's dementias. CMCT was in the upper limit of normal in both patients with FTD. The most consistent observation was that SP was reduced and there were escape discharges noticed during the SP suggesting increased cortical excitability and decreased cortical inhibition. This suggests probable early asymptomatic changes in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) nergic and cholinergic system is taking place. This if confirmed may give some insight into early diagnosis and therapeutic role of GABA agonists in these disorders.

  6. A phase I pilot study evaluating the beneficial effects of black raspberries in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresty, Laura A; Fromkes, John J; Frankel, Wendy L; Hammond, Cynthia D; Seeram, Navindra P; Baird, Maureen; Stoner, Gary D

    2016-07-07

    Black raspberries inhibit a broad range of cancers in preclinical models which has led to clinical evaluations targeting premalignant lesions of the colon, oral cavity and esophagus. A phase I pilot study was conducted in twenty Barrett's esophagus (BE) patients to investigate the effect of lyophilized black raspberries (LBR) on urinary metabolites and markers of lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and tissue markers of cellular proliferation, detoxification, and inflammation. Surveys, biopsies, blood and urine samples were collected before and after 6 months of LBR treatment (32 or 45 g). LBR significantly reduced urinary excretion of 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α, a marker of lipid peroxidation linked to oxidative stress and free radical damage. Urinary levels of the ellagitannin metabolites, urolithin A-glucuronide, urolithin A-sulfate and dimethylellagic acid glucuronide were significantly increased following 12 and 26 weeks of LBR consumption and may prove useful as indicators of compliance in future clinical studies. Immunohistochemical staining of BE biopsies following LBR treatment showed significant increases in mean GST-pi levels, with 55.6% of subjects responding favorably. In summary, LBR significantly decreased urinary lipid peroxidation levels and significantly increased GST-pi, a marker of detoxification, in BE epithelium. Still, LBR may need to be formulated differently, administered at higher concentrations or multiple times a day to increase efficacy.

  7. Usefulness of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the spasticity of the subscapularis in patients with stroke: a pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wook Kim; Ji Cheol Shin; Jeong-Gyu Yoon; Yong-Kyun Kim; Sang Chul Lee

    2013-01-01

    Background There are not many studies about treatment of shoulder spasticity.Although botulinum toxin injection has been reported to be effective for shoulder spasticity,the effectiveness was judged by pain and limited motion change,but not the spasticity itself.Shoulder spasticity is considered to play an important role in hemiplegic frozen shoulder.However,the subscapularis muscle,unlike the pectoralis major muscle,is located deep beneath scapula,where conventional injection is difficult to perform.As extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been reported to be effective for spasticity relief,and we thought spasticity of subscapularis muscle located deep beneath the scapula would be a good candidate for ESWT treatment.This study was to evaluate the beneficial effects of radial ESWT (rESWT) on spastic subscapularis muscle in stroke patients.Methods This is an uncontrolled,prospective,unicenter,clinical pilot study.Stroke patients (n=57; mean age 55.4years) with spastic shoulders were recruited between June 2011 and February 2012 at the University Rehabilitation Hospital.rESWT was administered to each patient every two or three days for two weeks (five total treatments).Evaluation consisted of 11 measurements for each patient; at the start of each of the five treatments and once per week during the following six weeks.Spasticity was measured at external rotator muscles of the shoulder using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS),and passive range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder in external rotation was recorded.Pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS) during passive ROM of the shoulder in external rotation,and was additionally recorded for patients who preserved cognitive and communicative ability (Pain group).Results Reduction in MAS and VAS and improvement of ROM during and after rESWT treatments were prominent compared to baseline.The reduction in MAS and VAS and improvement of ROM continued four weeks after the last treatment and the effects of the

  8. Usefulness of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the spasticity of the subscapularis in patients with stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Wook; Shin, Ji Cheol; Yoon, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Sang Chul

    2013-01-01

    There are not many studies about treatment of shoulder spasticity. Although botulinum toxin injection has been reported to be effective for shoulder spasticity, the effectiveness was judged by pain and limited motion change, but not the spasticity itself. Shoulder spasticity is considered to play an important role in hemiplegic frozen shoulder. However, the subscapularis muscle, unlike the pectoralis major muscle, is located deep beneath scapula, where conventional injection is difficult to perform. As extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been reported to be effective for spasticity relief, and we thought spasticity of subscapularis muscle located deep beneath the scapula would be a good candidate for ESWT treatment. This study was to evaluate the beneficial effects of radial ESWT (rESWT) on spastic subscapularis muscle in stroke patients. This is an uncontrolled, prospective, unicenter, clinical pilot study. Stroke patients (n = 57; mean age 55.4 years) with spastic shoulders were recruited between June 2011 and February 2012 at the University Rehabilitation Hospital. rESWT was administered to each patient every two or three days for two weeks (five total treatments). Evaluation consisted of 11 measurements for each patient; at the start of each of the five treatments and once per week during the following six weeks. Spasticity was measured at external rotator muscles of the shoulder using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS), and passive range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder in external rotation was recorded. Pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS) during passive ROM of the shoulder in external rotation, and was additionally recorded for patients who preserved cognitive and communicative ability (Pain group). Reduction in MAS and VAS and improvement of ROM during and after rESWT treatments were prominent compared to baseline. The reduction in MAS and VAS and improvement of ROM continued four weeks after the last treatment and the effects of the

  9. Dying patients' thoughts of ending their lives: a pilot study of rural New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Gloria; Gibson, Joan McIver; Clements, Paul T

    2004-08-01

    Forty-nine hospice patients in rural New Mexico were directly interviewed concerning their thoughts about ending their lives. Thirty-one patients (63%) did not have thoughts of ending their lives, whereas 18 patients (37%) reported having suicidal thoughts. There were no differences between patients with and without thoughts of suicide related to gender; ethnicity; age; education; disease; religion; importance of religion; location of hospice agency; remaining financial, family, or spiritual issues; satisfaction with hospice care; sum of hospice personnel seen; or sum of medical equipment used. There were significant differences between patients with and without thoughts of suicide related to the number of household members (p = .02); the symptoms of trouble sleeping (p = .04) and nervousness (p =.03); and Medicare insurance coverage for hospice care (p =.01). No other symptom, including pain and hopelessness, was significant. Seven (39%) of the 18 patients who thought of ending their lives told someone about these thoughts. There were no variable differences between patients who did and did not tell someone about these thoughts.

  10. Improvement of QOL and Immunological Function With Lentinula Edodes Mycelia in Patients Undergoing Cancer Immunotherapy: An Open Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Keishi; Itoh, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Yasunobu

    2016-07-01

    Context • Combined treatment with an extract of Lentinula edodes mycelia (LEM) and chemotherapy has been reported to improve quality of life (QOL) and immunological function in cancer patients. However, those effects have not been elucidated for patients receiving cancer immunotherapy. Objective • The present study intended to investigate the effects of oral LEM on QOL and immunological function in cancer patients receiving immunotherapy. Design • The research team designed an open-label, single-armed pilot study. Setting • The study took place at Bio-Thera Clinic, a facility associated with Tokyo Women's Medical University in Tokyo, Japan. Participants • The participants were 10 cancer patients undergoing cancer immunotherapy at Bio-Thera Clinic. Intervention • The participants received either dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccine therapy or CD3-activated T-lymphocyte (CAT) therapy as immunotherapy. They received the immunotherapy only for the first 4 wk of the study, and then oral LEM (1800 mg/d) was added for the next 4 wk. Outcome Measures • Preintervention and at 4 and 8 wk after the start of the study, participants completed a QOL survey, and immunological parameters were measured. Results • Participants' QOL symptom scores increased (ie, worsened) by 5.1 ± 1.7 during the first 4 wk of treatment when they were receiving immunotherapy only, but it decreased (ie, improved) by -2.5 ± 1.6 during the next 4 wk when the immunotherapy was combined with the LEM, P immunotherapy combined with LEM showed that the amount of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) produced in the peripheral blood tended to increase as compared with that during the first 4 wk of immunotherapy only. The rise in IFN-γ was correlated with changes in several regulatory T cells (Tregs) (ie, forkhead box P3 [FOXP3]+/cluster of differentiation 4 [CD4]+ and transforming growth factor beta [TGF-β]). Conclusions • The findings suggest that a combined treatment of LEM and immunotherapy might

  11. Pilot Study of Kano "Attractive Quality" Techniques to Identify Change in Emergency Department Patient Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamkonda, Venkatesh R; Kumar, Rishi; Scanlan-Hanson, Lori N; Hess, Jennifer J; Hellmich, Thomas R; Bellamkonda, Erica; Campbell, Ronna L; Hess, Erik P; Nestler, David M

    2016-11-01

    We describe the use of the Kano Attractive Quality analytic tool to improve an identified patient experience gap in perceived compassion by emergency department (ED) providers. In phase 1, point-of-service surveying assessed baseline patient perception of ED provider compassion. Phase 2 deployed Kano surveys to predict the effect of 4 proposed interventions on patient perception. Finally, phase 3 compared patients receiving standard care versus the Kano-identified intervention to assess the actual effect on patient experience. In phase 1, 193 of 200 surveys (97%) were completed, showing a baseline median score of 4 out of 5 (interquartile range [IQR] 3 to 5), with top box percentage of 33% for patients' perception of receiving compassionate care. In phase 2, 158 of 180 surveys (88%) using Kano-formatted questions were completed, and the data predicted that increasing shared decisionmaking would cause the greatest improvement in the patient experience. Finally, in phase 3, 45 of 49 surveys (92%) were returned and demonstrated a significant improvement in perceived concern and sensitivity, 5 (IQR 5 to 5) versus 4 (IQR 3 to 5) with a difference of 1 (95% CI 0.1-1.9) and a top box rating of 79% versus 35% with a difference of 44% (95% CI 12-66) by patients who received dedicated shared decisionmaking interventions versus those receiving standard of care. Kano analysis is likely predictive of change in patient experience. Kano methods may prove as useful in changing management of the health care industry as it has been in other industries. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pilot study employing heart rate variability biofeedback training to decrease anxiety in patients with eating disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scolnick, Barbara; Mostofsky, David I; Keane, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback, a technique which encourages slow meditative breathing, was offered to 25 in-patients with various eating disorder diagnoses-anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder...

  13. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls: A case-control and pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houcken, W.; Teeuw, W.J.; Bizarro, S.; Rodriguez, E.A.; Mulders, T.A.; van den Born, B.-J.H.; Loos, B.G.

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal

  14. Pilot study employing heart rate variability biofeedback training to decrease anxiety in patients with eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback, a technique which encourages slow meditative breathing, was offered to 25 in-patients with various eating disorder diagnoses-anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. We found that this modality had no serious side effects, and was subjectively useful to most participants. An enhanced ability to generate highly coherent HRV patterns in patients with recent onset anorexia nervosa was observed. PMID:24917934

  15. Pilot study employing heart rate variability biofeedback training to decrease anxiety in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolnick, Barbara; Mostofsky, David I; Keane, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback, a technique which encourages slow meditative breathing, was offered to 25 in-patients with various eating disorder diagnoses-anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. We found that this modality had no serious side effects, and was subjectively useful to most participants. An enhanced ability to generate highly coherent HRV patterns in patients with recent onset anorexia nervosa was observed.

  16. A Pilot Study of an Exercise-Based Patient Education Program in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Kersten; Mohammed Mahli; Julia Drosselmeyer; Christina Lutz; Magnus Liebherr; Patric Schubert; Haas, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical exercise leads to numerous positive effects in PwMS. However, long-term effects of exercise may only be achievable if training is implemented in daily routine. Enabling patients to exercise regularly, we developed a patient education program focused on evidence-based information of training. PwMS were educated in neurophysiological effects of physical exercise, exercise-induced benefit...

  17. Clinical outcomes of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with secondary lymphedema: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hasuk; Kim, Ho Jeong

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the clinical effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in patients with secondary lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. In a prospective clinical trial, ESWT was performed consecutively 4 times over two weeks in 7 patients who were diagnosed with stage 3 secondary lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Each patient was treated with four sessions of ESWT (0.056-0.068 mJ/mm(2), 2,000 impulses). The parameters were the circumference of the arm, thickness of the skin and volume of the arm. We measured these parameters with baseline values before ESWT and repeated the evaluation after each ESWT treatment. Subjective data on skin thickness, edema and sensory impairment were obtained using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The mean volume of the affected arm after four consecutive ESWT was significantly reduced from 2,332 to 2,144 mL (p<0.05). The circumference and thickness of the skin fold of the affected arm were significantly decreased after the fourth ESWT (p<0.05). The three VAS scores were significantly improved after the fourth ESWT. Almost all patients were satisfied with this treatment and felt softer texture in their affected arm after treatment. ESWT is an effective modality in the treatment of stage 3 lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. ESWT reduced the circumference and the thickness of arms with lymphedema and satisfied almost all patients with lymphedema. Therefore, this treatment provides clinically favorable outcome to patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

  18. A manual therapy intervention improves symptoms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Signorini, Massimo; Bassetti, Massimo; Del Rosso, Angela; Orlandi, Martina; De Scisciolo, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    In carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), manual therapy interventions (MTI) reduce tissue adhesion and increase wrist mobility. We evaluated the efficacy of a MTI in relieving CTS signs and symptoms. Twenty-two CTS patients (pts) (41 hands) were treated with a MTI, consisting in 6 treatments (2/week for 3 weeks) of soft tissues of wrist and hands and of carpal bones. Pts were assessed for hand sensitivity, paresthesia, hand strength, hand and forearm pain, night awakening; Phalen test, thenar eminence hypotrophy and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS). Median nerve was studied by sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) and distal motor latency (DML). CTS was scored as minimal, mild, medium, severe and extreme. We considered as control group the same pts assessed before treatment: at baseline (T0a) and after 12 weeks (T0b). Pts were evaluated at the end of treatment (T1) and after 24-week (T2) follow-up. At T0b, versus T0a, forearm pain and Phalen test positivity were increased and hand strength reduced (p < 0.05). BCTQ-SSS and BCTQ-FSS scores improved at T1 versus T0b (p < 0.05) with the amelioration maintained at T2. At T1, the number of pts with paresthesia, night awakening, hypoesthesia, Phalen test, hand strength reduction and hand sensitivity was reduced with the lacking of symptoms maintained at T2 (p < 0.05). No changes in SNCV, DML and CTS scoring were shown. MTI improved CTS signs and symptoms, with benefits maintained at follow-up. Thus, it may be valid as a conservative therapy.

  19. Improvement in Stress, General Self-Efficacy, and Health Related Quality of Life following Patient Education for Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trude Haugland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate changes in general self-efficacy, health related quality of life (HRQoL, and stress among patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET following a multidisciplinary educational intervention. Forty-one patients were enrolled in this exploratory pilot study. A total of 37 patients completed the full 26-week intervention based on the principles of self-efficacy. General self-efficacy was measured by the General Self-Efficacy Scale, HRQoL was measured with the SF-36, and stress was measured with the Impact of Event Scale. Mixed effect models were used to evaluate changes in general self-efficacy, mental and physical components of HRQoL, and stress adjusting for demographic and clinical variables. Results showed significant improvements in patients’ general self-efficacy (β = 0.71; P<0.05, physical component scores of HRQoL (β = 3.09; P<0.01, and stress (β=-2.10, P=0.008. Findings suggest that patients with NET have the capacity to improve their ability to cope with their disease, problem-solve, improve their physical status, and reduce their stress following an educational intervention based on the principles of self-efficacy. These preliminary data provide a basis for future randomized controlled trials to test interventions to improve HRQoL for patients with NET.

  20. Evaluating the interactive web-based program, activate your heart, for cardiac rehabilitation patients: a pilot study.

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    Brough, Christopher; Boyce, Sally; Houchen-Wolloff, Linzy; Sewell, Louise; Singh, Sally

    2014-10-29

    Conventional cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are traditionally based on time-constrained, structured, group-based programs, usually set in hospitals or leisure centers. Uptake for CR remains poor, despite the ongoing evidence demonstrating its benefits. Additional alternative forms of CR are needed. An Internet-based approach may offer an alternative mode of delivering CR that may improve overall uptake. Activate Your Heart (AYH) is a Web-based CR program that has been designed to support individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this pilot study was to observe the outcome for participants following the AYH program. We conducted a prospective observational trial, recruiting low-risk patients with CHD. Measures of exercise, exercise capacity, using the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test (ISWT), dietary habits, and psychosocial well-being were conducted by a CR specialist at baseline and at 8 weeks following the Web-based intervention. We recruited 41 participants; 33 completed the program. We documented significant improvements in the ISWT distance (mean change 49.69 meters, SD 68.8, PLife (QOL) (mean change 0.28, SD 0.4, P<.001). Dietary habits improved with an increased proportion of patients consuming at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables per day, (22 [71%] to 29 [94%] P=.01) and an increased proportion of patients consuming at least 2 portions of oily fish per week (14 [45%] to 21 [68%], P=.01). We did not detect changes in anxiety and depression scores or exercise behavior. We observed important improvements in exercise capacity, QOL, and dietary habits in a group of participants following a Web-based CR program. The program may offer an alternative approach to CR. A mobile version has been developed and we need to conduct further trials to establish its value compared to supervised CR.

  1. Short-term effects of phenylephrine on systemic and regional hemodynamics in patients with septic shock: a crossover pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Andrea; Lange, Matthias; Ertmer, Christian; Dünser, Martin; Rehberg, Sebastian; Bachetoni, Alessandra; D'Alessandro, Marladomenica; Van Aken, Hugo; Guarracino, Fabio; Pietropaoli, Paolo; Traber, Daniel L; Westphal, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Clinical studies evaluating the use of phenylephrine in septic shock are lacking. The present study was designed as a prospective, crossover pilot study to compare the effects of norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine on systemic and regional hemodynamics in patients with catecholamine-dependent septic shock. In 15 septic shock patients, NE (0.82 +/- 0.689 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) was replaced with phenylephrine (4.39 +/- 5.23 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) titrated to maintain MAP between 65 and 75 mmHg. After 8 h of phenylephrine infusion treatment was switched back to NE. Data from right heart catheterization, acid-base balance, thermo-dye dilution catheter, gastric tonometry, and renal function were obtained before, during, and after replacing NE with phenylephrine. Variables of systemic hemodynamics, global oxygen transport, and acid-base balance remained unchanged after replacing NE with phenylephrine except for a significant decrease in heart rate (phenylephrine, 89 +/- 18 vs. NE, 93 +/- 18 bpm; P < 0.05). However, plasma disappearance rate (phenylephrine, 13.5 +/- 7.1 vs. NE, 16.4 +/- 8.7% x min(-1)) and clearance of indocyanine green (phenylephrine, 330 +/- 197 vs. NE, 380 +/- 227 mL x min(-1) x m(-2)), as well as creatinine clearance (phenylephrine, 81.3 +/- 78.4 vs. NE, 94.3 +/- 93.5 mL x min(-1)) were significantly decreased by phenylephrine infusion (each P < 0.05). In addition, phenylephrine increased arterial lactate concentrations as compared with NE infusion (1.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 1.4 +/- 1.1 mM; P < 0.05). After switching back to NE, all variables returned to values obtained before phenylephrine infusion except creatinine clearance and gastric tonometry values. Our results suggest that for the same MAP, phenylephrine causes a more pronounced hepatosplanchnic vasoconstriction as compared with NE.

  2. Gene expression in response to exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Keech

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a debilitating disorder of unknown pathogenesis, characterised by fatigue, which is exacerbated after minimal exercise. We examined the effect of a single bout of aerobic exercise on leucocyte mRNA expression of genes putatively linked to exaggerated afferent signalling as an under-pinning of the fatigue state. A carefully-characterised sample of patients with CFS (N = 10 and healthy matched control participants (N = 12 were included. Participant ratings of fatigue and other symptoms, as well as blood samples, were obtained at baseline, and five other time-points up to 72 hours after 25 minutes of moderate-intensity cycling exercise. Leucocyte mRNA of 19 metabolite-sensing, adrenergic, immune and neurotransmission genes was examined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients with CFS reported substantial fatigue, functional impairment and poor sleep at baseline (all p < 0.02, and exercise immediately induced worsened patients’ fatigue (effect size, ES = 1.17. There were no significant changes in gene expression after exercise and patients did not differ from control participants at any time point. Higher levels of expression of ficolin (FCN1 and a purinergic receptor (P2RX4 in patients with CFS were found when all time points were combined. Patients with CFS did not show significant exercise-induced changes in leucocyte mRNA of 19 metabolite-sensing, adrenergic, immune and neurotransmission genes despite a prominent exacerbation of fatigue.

  3. The use of kinesiology taping method in patients with rheumatoid hand--pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczegielniak, Jan; Łuniewski, Jacek; Bogacz, Katarzyna; Sliwiński, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) most frequently affects smaller joints in the hands and feet. Among the most common deformations resulting from the progression of the disease are ulnar deviation, Boutonniere deformity, swan neck deformity, contractures and limited range of movement in the hand and wrist joints, muscular atrophy of long and short muscles. The topic of this article is the influence of using Kinesiology Taping method on the functioning of the hand of the patient suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. The research involved 20 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (16 women, 4 men), treated in the Hospital in Kup. Average age of patients was 62.2. Research subjects, apart from pharmacological treatment in the hospital ward, received standard physiotherapy. In case of 10 patients additional K-Active Tape applications were used to correct ulnar positioning of the hand and improve hand functioning. Prior to physiotherapy, all patients were given a hand functioning test and a dynamometer measurement was made. The tests were repeated after the 2-week rehabilitation process has been completed. The results were subjected to statistical analysis with the use of the Wilcoxon test and the U Mann-Whitney test. The assessment of the correlation between analysed parameters was made with the use of linear correlation test. In the group where Kinesiology Tape applications were used, hand muscle strength increased significantly (p0.8). Results suggest Kinesiology Taping method useful for physiotherapy of rheumatoid hand.

  4. Effects of indacaterol versus tiotropium on exercise tolerance in patients with moderate COPD: a pilot randomized crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Cortozi Berton

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To compare a once-daily long-acting β2 agonist (indacaterol 150 µg with a once-daily long-acting anticholinergic (tiotropium 5 µg in terms of their effects on exercise endurance (limit of tolerance, Tlim in patients with moderate COPD. Secondary endpoints were their effects on lung hyperinflation, exercise-related dyspnea, and daily-life dyspnea. Methods: This was a randomized, single-blind, crossover pilot study involving 20 patients (mean age, 60.9 ± 10.0 years; mean FEV1, 69 ± 7% of predicted. Spirometric parameters, Transition Dyspnea Index scores, Tlim, and exertional dyspnea were compared after three weeks of each treatment (with a one-week washout period between treatments. Results: Nineteen patients completed the study (one having been excluded because of COPD exacerbation. Improvement in Tlim from baseline tended to be greater after treatment with tiotropium than after treatment with indacaterol (96 ± 163 s vs. 8 ± 82 s; p = 0.06. Tlim significantly improved from baseline after treatment with tiotropium (having increased from 396 ± 319 s to 493 ± 347 s; p = 0.010 but not after treatment with indacaterol (having increased from 393 ± 246 to 401 ± 254 s; p = 0.678. There were no differences between the two treatments regarding improvements in Borg dyspnea scores and lung hyperinflation at "isotime" and peak exercise. There were also no significant differences between treatments regarding Transition Dyspnea Index scores (1.5 ± 2.1 vs. 0.9 ± 2.3; p = 0.39. Conclusions: In patients with moderate COPD, tiotropium tends to improve Tlim in comparison with indacaterol. No significant differences were observed between the two treatments regarding their effects on lung hyperinflation, exercise-related dyspnea, and daily-life dyspnea. Future studies, including a larger number of patients, are required in order to confirm our findings and explore mechanistic explanations. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01693003

  5. Investigation of Pathogenic Genes in Peri-Implantitis from Implant Clustering Failure Patients: A Whole-Exome Sequencing Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soohyung; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Han, Dong-Hoo

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a frequently occurring gum disease linked to multi-factorial traits with various environmental and genetic causalities and no known concrete pathogenesis. The varying severity of peri-implantitis among patients with relatively similar environments suggests a genetic aspect which needs to be investigated to understand and regulate the pathogenesis of the disease. Six unrelated individuals with multiple clusterization implant failure due to severe peri-implantitis were chosen for this study. These six individuals had relatively healthy lifestyles, with minimal environmental causalities affecting peri-implantitis. Research was undertaken to investigate pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis albeit with a small number of subjects and incomplete elimination of environmental causalities. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on collected saliva samples via self DNA collection kit. Common variants with minor allele frequencies (MAF) > = 0.05 from all control datasets were eliminated and variants having high and moderate impact and loss of function were used for comparison. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to reveal functional groups associated with the genetic variants. 2,022 genes were left after filtering against dbSNP, the 1000 Genomes East Asian population, and healthy Korean randomized subsample data (GSK project). 175 (p-value implant failure. This result may demonstrate the feasibility of and provide pilot data for a larger research project aimed at discovering biomarkers for early diagnosis of peri-implantitis. PMID:24921256

  6. Serum levels of sulpiride enantiomers after oral treatment with racemic sulpiride in psychiatric patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M J; Härtter, S; Köhler, D; Hiemke, C

    2001-01-01

    Sulpiride (SULP), a substituted benzamide with high selectivity for D2-like dopamine receptors, has a chiral structure and is used in most countries as the racemate. In an open pilot study, we investigated 26 inpatients (13 female, 13 male) with schizophrenic or depressive disorder treated with SULP (mean daily dosage 64-1062 mg) administered orally, either as a monotherapy or as an add-on treatment to a stable and unchanged medication for 3-60 days. Serum levels of total SULP and of its enantiomers were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedures. Clinically relevant indicators of hepatic and renal function as well as retrospectively assessed clinical outcome parameters were correlated with serum levels of racemic SULP, L-SULP, D-SULP, and the L:D-SULP ratio. A significant correlation between mean daily dosage and serum levels of SULP, L-SULP, and D-SULP emerged (p < 0.05) which was not influenced by age, gender, diagnosis, hepatic, or renal function. The ratio of L:D-SULP serum levels was <1 (range 0.66-0.97) in all patients. A slight negative correlation between CGI improvement and the ratio of L:D-SULP (p < 0.10) and a positive correlation between racemic SULP concentrations and side-effects at endpoint was found (p < 0.05).

  7. Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA not detected in faecal samples from Buruli ulcer patients: results of a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred S Sarfo

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that in a Buruli ulcer (BU endemic region of southeastern Australia, significant numbers of possums (native tree-dwelling marsupials have clinical BU disease. Furthermore, based on quantitative PCR (qPCR analysis, animals with BU lesions (and some without shed M. ulcerans DNA in their faeces, indicative of bacterial loads of up to 10(8 organisms/gram. These findings led us to propose that humans might also harbour M. ulcerans in their gastrointestinal tract and shed the bacterium in their faeces. We conducted a pilot study and collected faecal swabs from 26 patients with confirmed BU and 31 healthy household controls. Faecal samples were also collected from 10 healthy controls from non-endemic regions in Ghana. All 67 specimens were negative when tested by IS2404 PCR. The detection sensitivity of this method was ≥10(4 bacteria per gram (wet-weight of human faecal material. We conclude that the human gastrointestinal tract is unlikely to be a significant reservoir of M. ulcerans.

  8. Does caregiver knowledge matter for hospice enrollment and beyond? Pilot study of minority hospice patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyusuk; Essex, Elizabeth Lehr; Samson, Linda

    2009-01-01

    We examined the level of hospice knowledge of caregivers of minority elderly hospice patients and determined how it influences the hospice enrollment decision and the decision on the use of hospice services after enrollment. Based on qualitative analysis of medical records and interviews with caregivers of minority elderly hospice patients who received personal care from paid caregivers (eg, other than family caregivers), we found that hospice knowledge increased access to hospice among minority patients who otherwise would not opt for hospice or enroll too late for comprehensive hospice care services. Furthermore, the highest level of knowledge-acquired through caregivers' health care occupations-appears to influence hospice care after hospice enrollment. Caregivers with that level of knowledge made requests for changes in site of care and/or additional services that may enhance the quality of hospice care that their loved ones receive.

  9. Dietary egg whites for phosphorus control in maintenance haemodialysis patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lynn M; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Markewich, Theodore; Colman, Sara; Benner, Debbie; Sim, John J; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2011-03-01

    High dietary protein intake is associated with greater survival in maintenance haemodialysis (MHD) patients. High-protein foods may increase dietary phosphorus burden, which is associated with increased mortality in these patients. Hypothesis is: an egg white based diet with low phosphorus to protein ratio (egg whites without phosphorus additives, as principal protein source. Thirteen otherwise stable MHD patients with serum phosphorus >4.0 mg/dl agreed to consume eight ounces (225 g) of pasteurised liquid egg whites one meal per day for six weeks. Recipes were suggested to improve diet variety. Thirteen participating patients included seven women, three African Americans and five diabetics. Twelve patients exhibited drop in serum phosphorus. Mean population fall in serum phosphorus was 0.94 mg/dl, i.e. from 5.58 ± 1.34 (mean ± SD) to 4.63 ± 1.18 (p = 0.003). Serum albumin showed an increase by 0.19 g/dl, i.e. from 4.02 ± 0.29 to 4.21 ± 0.36 g/dl (p = 0.014). Changes in phosphorus pill count were not statistically significant (p = 0.88). The egg white diet was well tolerated, and recipe variety appreciated. Pasteurised liquid egg whites may be an effective diet component lowering serum phosphorus without risking malnutrition. Controlled trials are indicated to examine egg white based dietary interventions in MHD patients at home or during haemodialysis treatment. © 2011 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  10. Evaluating and Training Substance Abuse Counselors: A Pilot Study Assessing Standardized Patients as Authentic Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussell, Holly E.; Lewy, Colleen S.; McFarland, Bentson H.

    2009-01-01

    Clinician training and supervision are needed to transfer evidence-based practices to community-based treatment organizations. Standardized patients (SPs) are used for clinician training and evaluating. However, to be effective for substance abuse counselors, SPs must realistically portray substance abuse treatment clients. The current study…

  11. Using Simulation to Train Junior Psychiatry Residents to Work with Agitated Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Daniel; Young, Meredith; Chalk, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the benefit and feasibility of introducing a new, simulation-based learning intervention for junior psychiatry residents. Method: Junior psychiatry residents were invited to participate in a new simulation-based learning intervention focusing on agitated patients. Questionnaires were used to explore the success of…

  12. Chronic pancreatitis patients show hyperalgesia of central origin: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buscher, H.C.J.L.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Goor, H. van

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pain of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging to manage, with treatment all too often being unsuccessful. A main reason for this is lacking understanding of underlying mechanisms of chronic pain in these patients. AIM: To document, using somatic quantitative sensory testing, chang

  13. Intestinal microbiota in adult patients with Short Bowel Syndrome: Preliminary results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Stefania; Torre, Ida; Santarpia, Lidia; Iervolino, Carmela; Del Piano, Concetta; Puggina, Anna; Pastorino, Roberta; Dragic, Miroslav; Amore, Rosarita; Borriello, Tonia; Palladino, Raffaele; Pennino, Francesca; Contaldo, Franco; Pasanisi, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal bacterial flora plays a central role in human intestinal health and disease. Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS), a clinical condition deriving from extensive bowel resections, influence intestinal microbiota (IM) composition in order to reach a new metabolic balance. Little is known about IM in adult patients after wide intestinal resections. Fecal samples from 12 SBS patients and 16 controls were analyzed in their microbial profile by using both culture-dependent method and quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR). The two methods revealed significant lower concentrations of Bacteroidetes (p-value = .02), Firmicutes (p-value = .05), Bifidobacterium (p-value < .01), and Methanobrevibacter Smithii (p-value = .04) in SBS patients than controls. The significantly different fecal microbiome in SBS patients compared with healthy controls could open new perspectives on the care of their intestinal functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. Is heart rate variability related to gait impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease? A pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, M.B.; Synhaeve, N.E.; Mirelman, A.; Bloem, B.R.; Giladi, N.; Hausdorff, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Impairments in gait and autonomic function are common in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). These are likely independent symptoms, based on different etiologic mechanisms. However, a few recent reports have observed an association between motor function, in particular ga

  15. Correlation of hippocampal atrophy with hyperhomocysteinemia in hemodialysis patients: An exploratory pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesato, Kyoko; Ohtake, Takayasu; Mochida, Yasuhiro; Ishioka, Kunihiro; Oka, Machiko; Moriya, Hidekazu; Hidaka, Sumi; Kobayashi, Shuzo

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the important critical issues in hemodialysis (HD) patients. However, the associating factors of brain atrophy in HD patients have not been fully elucidated. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 34 of total 72 HD outpatients in our dialysis center. These MRI images were analyzed by an application software; Voxel-based Specific Regional Analysis System for Alzheimer's Disease (VSRAD). VSRAD quantitatively calculates the extent of brain atrophy (percent of volume reduction) comparing with a MRI imaging database of 80 age-matched healthy controls. The extent of both hippocampal and whole-brain atrophy was evaluated with possible contributing factors. In all patients, the mean extent of hippocampal atrophy was 27.3%, and the mean extent of whole-brain atrophy was 11.2%. The extent of hippocampal atrophy was significantly correlated with low body mass index (BMI), total serum homocysteine (tHcy) levels, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The extent of whole-brain atrophy showed significant correlations with age, hypoalbuminemia, and baPWV. Based on the multiple regression analysis, tHcy was an independent determinant of hippocampal atrophy (β = 0.460, R2 = 0.189, Patrophy (β = 0.594, R2 = 0.333, Patrophy was significantly correlated with hyperhomocysteinemia in HD patients.

  16. Speech therapy in patients with excessive supragastric belching - a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmink, G. J. M.; Ten Cate, L.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Timmer, R.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2010-01-01

    P>In patients whose main symptom is excessive belching, supragastric belching appears to be the predominant mechanism. This belch pattern is characterized by a rapid influx of air into the oesophagus, immediately followed by rapid air expulsion. The rate at which supragastric belching occurs is infl

  17. Normobaric oxygen therapy in acute ischemic stroke: A pilot study in Indian patients

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    Padma M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical and radiological assessment of effects of normobaric high-flow oxygen therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS. Materials and Methods: Patients with anterior circulation ischemic strokes presenting within 12 h of onset, ineligible for intravenous thrombolysis, an National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score of >4, a mean transit time (MTT lesion larger than diffusion-weighted image (DWI (perfusiondiffusion mismatch, and an evidence of cortical hypoperfusion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were included into the trial. Active chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, requirement of >3/L min oxygen delivery to maintain SaO2 > 95%, rapidly improving neurological deficits, pregnancy, contraindications to MRI, or unstable medical conditions were excluded. The experimental group received humidified oxygen at flow rates of 10 L/min for 12 h. The NIHSS, modified Rankin Score (mRS, Barthel Index (BI were measured at 0, 1, 7 day of admission and at 3 months follow-up. MRI with DWI/PWI was performed at admission, 24 h later and at 3 months follow-up. Results: Of 40 patients (mean age = 55.8 years ± 13.2 (range, 26-82, 20 patients were randomized to normobaric oxygen (NBO. The mean NIHSS in NBO and control groups were 14.25 and 12.7 at admission which decreased to 11.6 and 9.5 on the seventh day, and 9.4 and 9.05 at 3 months, respectively. The mean mRS (3.7/3.7 and BI (58.2/53.9 in NBO and control groups improved to 2/2.2 and 73.05/73.8 at the end of 3 months, respectively. Conclusions: NBO did not improve the clinical scores of stroke outcome in Indian patients with AIS.

  18. Periprostatic adipose tissue from obese prostate cancer patients promotes tumor and endothelial cell proliferation: a functional and MR imaging pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N; Brendler, Charles B; Plunkett, Beth A; Crawford, Susan E; Fitchev, Philip S; Morgan, Gina; Cornwell, Mona L; McGuire, Michael S; Wyrwicz, Alice M; Doll, Jennifer A

    2014-02-01

    Obesity, particularly visceral adiposity, confers a worse prognosis for prostate cancer (PCa) patients, and increasing periprostatic adipose (PPA) tissue thickness or density is positively associated with more aggressive disease. However, the cellular mechanism of this activity remains unclear. Therefore, in this pilot study, we assessed the functional activity of PPA tissue secretions and established a biochemical profile of PPA as compared to subcutaneous adipose (SQA) tissues from lean, overweight and obese PCa patients. Adipose tissues were collected from PCa patients undergoing surgical prostate removal. Tissues were analyzed by histologic and magnetic resonance (MR) techniques. Explant tissue culture secretions were used in proliferation assays on PCa and endothelial cells. PPA secretions obtained from obese patients were significantly more pro-proliferative in both PCa and endothelial cells as compared to PPA obtained from lean or overweight men and SQA tissues. Consistent with this, PPA microvessel density was increased, and the T2 relaxation time was decreased, compared to SQA tissues, and we observed a modest, inverse correlation between the T2 and tumor stage. Moreover, the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids, obtained using MR spectroscopy, showed a modest, inverse correlation with Gleason score. These pilot data show that PPA stimulates PCa cell proliferation and angiogenesis and that obesity intensifies this activity, thus generating a mechanistic hypothesis to explain the worse prognosis observed in obese PCa patients. Our pilot study also shows that MR technology may be useful in further elucidating the relationship between obesity and PCa progression.

  19. Energy expenditure in chronic stroke patients playing Wii Sports: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stam Henk J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability in modern western countries. Stroke survivors often have functional limitations which might lead to a vicious circle of reduced physical activity, deconditioning and further physical deterioration. Current evidence suggests that routine moderate- or vigorous-intensity physical activity is essential for maintenance and improvement of health among stroke survivors. Nevertheless, long-term participation in physical activities is low among people with disabilities. Active video games, such as Nintendo Wii Sports, might maintain interest and improve long-term participation in physical activities; however, the intensity of physical activity among chronic stroke patients while playing Wii Sports is unknown. We investigated the energy expenditure of chronic stroke patients while playing Wii Sports tennis and boxing. Methods Ten chronic (≥ 6 months stroke patients comprising a convenience sample, who were able to walk independently on level ground, were recruited from a rehabilitation centre. They were instructed to play Wii Sports tennis and boxing in random order for 15 minutes each, with a 10-minute break between games. A portable gas analyzer was used to measure oxygen uptake (VO2 during sitting and during Wii Sports game play. Energy expenditure was expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs, calculated as VO2 during Wii Sports divided by VO2 during sitting. We classified physical activity as moderate (3-6 METs or vigorous (> 6 METs according to the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association Guidelines. Results Among the 10 chronic stroke patients, 3 were unable to play tennis because they had problems with timing of hitting the ball, and 2 were excluded from the boxing group because of a technical problem with the portable gas analyzer. The mean (± SD energy expenditure during Wii Sports game play was 3.7 (± 0.6 METs for tennis and 4.1 (

  20. Restless leg syndrome in hospitalized psychiatric patients in Lebanon: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talih F

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Farid Talih,1 Jean Ajaltouni,1 Firas Kobeissy2 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon Objectives: To characterize and describe the prevalence of restless leg syndrome (RLS in hospitalized psychiatric patients and to investigate the correlations between patient profile and RLS.Methods: Demographic information, psychiatric diagnoses, psychotropic medication use, and history of substance use were collected from hospitalized psychiatric patients at the American University of Beirut Medical Center; Beirut, Lebanon. A validated questionnaire to evaluate RLS symptomatology was also administered to 126 participants who agreed to participate, as well as questionnaires for insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Statistical analysis was conducted to detect the prevalence of RLS among the participants and to examine correlations with RLS in a hospitalized psychiatric population.Results: Out of the 126 participants who completed the survey, RLS was detected in 18% of the participants. Of interest, RLS was also found to be associated with higher depressive symptomatology, suicidal ideation, and working night shifts. Keywords: restless leg syndrome, insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms

  1. Selenium and topiramate attenuates blood oxidative toxicity in patients with epilepsy: a clinical pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yürekli, Vedat Ali; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2013-05-01

    It is well known that oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiology of epilepsy. We investigated effects of selenium (Se) and topiramate (TPM) combination supplementation on antioxidant and oxidant values in control and patients with epilepsy and refractory epilepsy. For the aim, we used control (n = 19), epilepsy + TPM (n = 19), epilepsy + TPM + Se (n = 15) groups. We also used control (n = 15), refractory epilepsy (n = 15), and refractory epilepsy + Se (n = 8) groups. TPM (0.2 mg/daily) and Se, as sodium selenite (twice daily with 0.1 mg doses), were orally supplemented to the patients for 45 days. Erythrocyte lipid peroxidation levels were higher in refractory epilepsy groups than in control although its level and seizure numbers were decreased in TPM and TPM + Se supplemented groups of the patients. The erythrocyte reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), plasma total antioxidant status (TAS), and vitamin E concentration in refractory epilepsy group were lower than in control. However, the erythrocyte and plasma TAS, erythrocyte GSH and GSH-Px, and plasma vitamins A and C values were increased either by Se or Se + TPM in epilepsy and refractory epilepsy groups. There were no effects of TPM and Se on plasma β-carotene values in the groups. In conclusion, TPM and selenium caused protective effects on the epilepsy and refractory epilepsy-induced oxidative injury by inhibiting free radical production and supporting antioxidant redox system.

  2. Hypertonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock: a prospective randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haren, Frank M P; Sleigh, James; Boerma, E Christiaan; La Pine, Mary; Bahr, Mohamed; Pickkers, Peter; van der Hoeven, Johannes G

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the short-term effects of hypertonic fluid versus isotonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock. This was a double-blind, prospective randomized controlled trial in a 15-bed intensive care unit. Twenty-four patients with septic shock were randomized to receive 250 mL 7.2% NaCl/6% hydroxyethyl starch (HT group) or 500 mL 6% hydroxyethyl starch (IT group). Hemodynamic measurements included mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), central venous pressure, stroke volume index, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index, gastric tonometry, and sublingual microcirculatory flow as assessed by sidestream dark field imaging. Systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities of the medial mitral annulus were measured using echocardiography to assess left ventricular contractility. Log transformation of the ratio MAP divided by the norepinephrine infusion rate (log MAP/NE) quantified the combined effect on both parameters. Compared with the IT group, hypertonic solution treatment resulted in an improvement in log MAP/NE (P = 0.008), as well as an increase in systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities (P = 0.03) and stroke volume index (P = 0.017). No differences between the groups were found for preload parameters (central venous pressure, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index) or for afterload parameters (systemic vascular resistance index, MAP). Hypertonic solution treatment decreased the need for ongoing fluid resuscitation (P = 0.046). No differences between groups were observed regarding tonometry or the sublingual microvascular variables. In patients with septic shock, hypertonic fluid administration did not promote gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion or sublingual microcirculatory blood flow in comparison to isotonic fluid. Independent of changes in preload or afterload, hypertonic fluid administration improved the cardiac contractility and vascular tone compared with isotonic fluid. The need for ongoing fluid

  3. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed.

  4. Measures and time points relevant for post-surgical follow-up in patients with inflammatory arthritis: a pilot study

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    Tägil Magnus

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatic diseases commonly affect joints and other structures in the hand. Surgery is a traditional way to treat hand problems in inflammatory rheumatic diseases with the purposes of pain relief, restore function and prevent progression. There are numerous measures to choose from, and a combination of outcome measures is recommended. This study evaluated if instruments commonly used in rheumatologic clinical practice are suitable to measure outcome of hand surgery and to identify time points relevant for follow-up. Methods Thirty-one patients (median age 56 years, median disease duration 15 years with inflammatory rheumatic disease and need for post-surgical occupational therapy intervention formed this pilot study group. Hand function was assessed regarding grip strength (Grippit, pain (VAS, range of motion (ROM (Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI and grip ability (Grip Ability Test (GAT. Activities of daily life (ADL were assessed by means of Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Outcome (DASH and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM. The instruments were evaluated by responsiveness and feasibility; follow-up points were 0, 3, 6 and 12 months. Results All instruments showed significant change at one or more follow-up points. Satisfaction with activities (COPM showed the best responsiveness (SMR>0.8, while ROM measured with SOFI had low responsiveness at most follow-up time points. The responsiveness of the instruments was stable between 6 and 12 month follow-up which imply that 6 month is an appropriate time for evaluating short-term effect of hand surgery in rheumatic diseases. Conclusion We suggest a core set of instruments measuring pain, grip strength, grip ability, perceived symptoms and self-defined daily activities. This study has shown that VAS pain, the Grippit instrument, GAT, DASH symptom scale and COPM are suitable outcome instruments for hand surgery, while SOFI may be a more insensitive

  5. Cognitive bias modification for attention and interpretation reduces trait and state anxiety in anxious patients referred to an out-patient service: results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosan, Lee; Hoppitt, Laura; Shelfer, Lorna; Sillence, Alison; Mackintosh, Bundy

    2011-09-01

    It is well established that anxious individuals show biases in information processing, such that they attend preferentially to threatening stimuli and interpret emotional ambiguity in a threatening way. It has also been established that these biases in attention and interpretation can causally influence anxiety. Recent advances in experimental work have involved the development of a paradigm known as Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM), a constellation of procedures which directly modify bias using computerised tasks. Excitingly, these procedures have been shown to reduce bias in attention to threat (CBM-A), and to promote a positive interpretive bias (CBM-I) in anxious populations; furthermore, these modifications are associated with reductions in anxiety. We believe that these techniques have the potential to create a real clinical impact for people with anxiety. Initial studies involved volunteer participants who reached criteria for clinical diagnoses to be made, but emerging evidence suggests that patients referred for therapy also benefit. For the purposes of experimentation researchers have normally looked at one procedure at a time. In order to try to maximise the potential clinical impact we wished to investigate whether the combination of the procedures would be more effective than either alone. We also wished to investigate whether the procedures could be carried out in routine clinical settings with patients referred to an out-patient psychological treatment service. We therefore carried out a pilot study using a combined approach of CBM-A and CBM-I with a sample of 13 anxious patients referred to an out-patient psychology service for cognitive therapy. The results showed successful reductions in threat related attentional and interpretive bias, as well as reductions in trait and state anxiety. Participant reports describe the procedures as acceptable, with the attentional task experienced as boring, but the interpretive one experienced as helpful. While

  6. Nonmotor Symptoms Groups in Parkinson's Disease Patients: Results of a Pilot, Exploratory Study

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    Santiago Perez Lloret

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmotor symptoms (NMS like neuropsychiatric symptoms, sleep disturbances or autonomic symptoms are a common feature of Parkinson's disease (PD. To explore the existence of groups of NMS and to relate them to PD characteristics, 71 idiopathic non-demented PD out-patients were recruited. Sleep was evaluated by the PD Sleep Scale (PDSS. Several neuropsychiatric, gastrointestinal and urogenital symptoms were obtained from the NMSQuest. Sialorrhea or dysphagia severity was obtained from the Unified PD Rating Scale activities of daily living section. MADRS depression scale was also administered. Exploratory factor analysis revealed the presence of 5 factors, explaining 70% of variance. The first factor included PDSS measurement of sleep quality, nocturnal restlessness, off-related problems and daytime somnolence; the second factor included nocturia (PDSS and nocturnal activity; the third one included gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms; the forth one included nocturnal psychosis (PDSS, sialorrhea and dysphagia (UPDRS; and the last one included the MADRS score as well as neuropsychiatric symptoms. Sleep disorders correlated with presence of wearing-off, nocturia with age >69 years, and nocturnal psychosis with levodopa equivalent dose or UPDRS II score. Neuropsychiatric symptoms correlated with UPDRS II+III score and non-tricyclic antidepressants. These results support the occurrence of significant NMS grouping in PD patients.

  7. A pilot study imaging integrin αvβ3 with RGD PET/CT in suspected lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Song [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jinan, Shandong (China); University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wu, Honghu [Wuyi County People' s Hospital of Hengshui City, Hengshui, Hebei Province (China); Li, Wenwu; Zhao, Shuqiang; Teng, Xuepeng; Lu, Hong [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Department of Radiology, Jinan, Shandong (China); Hu, Xudong; Wang, Suzhen; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2015-12-15

    Angiogenesis is an essential step in tumour development and metastasis. Integrin αvβ3 plays a major role in angiogenesis, tumour growth and progression. A new tracer, {sup 18}F-AL-NOTA-PRGD2, denoted as {sup 18}F-alfatide, has been developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of integrin αvβ3. This is a pilot study to test the safety and diagnostic value of {sup 18}F- arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) PET/computed tomography (CT) in suspected lung cancer patients. Twenty-six patients with suspected lung cancer on enhanced CT underwent {sup 18}F-alfatide RGD PET/CT examination before surgery and puncture biopsy. Standard uptake values (SUVs) and the tumour-to-blood ratios were measured, and diagnoses were pathologically confirmed. RGD PET/CT with {sup 18}F-alfatide was performed successfully in all patients and no clinically significant adverse events were observed. The {sup 18}F-alfatide RGD PET/CT analysis correctly recognized 17 patients with lung cancer, 4 patients (hamartoma) as true negative, and 5 patients (4 chronic inflammation and 1 inflammatory pseudotumour) as false positive. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of {sup 18}F-alfatide RGD PET/CT for the diagnosis of suspected lung cancer patients was 100, 44.44, 80.77, 77.27, and 100 %, respectively. The area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.75 (P = 0.038), and ROC analysis suggested an SUVmax cut-off value of 2.65 to differentiate between malignant lesions and benign lesions. The SUV for malignant lesions was 5.37 ± 2.17, significantly higher than that for hamartomas (1.60 ± 0.11; P < 0.001). The difference between the tumour-to-blood ratio for malignant lesions (4.13 ± 0.91) and tissue of interest-to-blood ratio for hamartomas (1.56 ± 0.24) was also statistically significant (P < 0.001). Neither the SUVmax nor the tumour-to-blood ratio was significantly different between malignant

  8. Prevalence and distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis genovars in Indian infertile patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawre, Jyoti; Dhawan, Benu; Malhotra, Neena; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Broor, Shobha; Chaudhry, Rama

    2016-12-01

    To determine the prevalence and distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis genovars in patients with infertility by PCR-RFLP and ompA gene sequencing. Prevalence of other etiological agents (viz., Ureaplasma spp. and Mycoplasma hominis) were also assessed. Endocervical swabs were collected from 477 women and urine was collected from 151 men attending the Infertility Clinic. The samples were screened for C. trachomatis by cryptic plasmid, ompA gene and nested ompA gene PCR. Genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP and sequencing. Samples were screened for Ureaplasma spp. and M. hominis. The prevalence of C. trachomatis in infertile women and their male partners were 15.7% (75 of 477) and 10.0% (15 of 151) respectively. Secondary infertility was significantly associated with chlamydial infection. Genovar E was the most prevalent followed by genovar D and F. Twenty-four C. trachomatis strains were selected for ompA gene sequencing. No mixed infection was picked. Variability in ompA sequences was seen in 50.0%. Both PCR-RFLP and ompA gene sequencing showed concordant results. High prevalence of C. trachomatis in infertile couples warrants routine screening for C. trachomatis infection in all infertile couples. Genotyping of the ompA gene of C. trachomatis may be a valuable tool in understanding the natural history of C. trachomatis infection.

  9. Vitamin D-mediated calcium absorption in patients with clinically stable Crohn’s disease: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, Meena; Khazai, Natasha B.; Ziegler, Thomas R; Nanes, Mark S.; Abrams, Steven A.; Tangpricha, Vin

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is the critical hormone for intestinal absorption of calcium. Optimal calcium absorption is important for proper mineralization of bone in the prevention of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures, among other important functions. Diseases associated with gut inflammation, such as Crohn’s disease (CD), may impair calcium absorption. This pilot study evaluated vitamin D- dependent calcium absorption in subjects with CD. Male subjects with CD (n = 4) and healthy age-matched controls (...

  10. Outcome prioritisation tool for medication review in older patients with multimorbidity: a pilot study in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    van Summeren, Jojanneke JGT; Schuling, Jan; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Denig, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Background Several methods have been developed to conduct and support medication reviews in older persons with multimorbidity. Assessing the patient’s priorities for achieving specific health outcomes can guide the medication review process. Little is known about the impact of conducting such assessments. Aim This pilot study aimed to determine proposed and observed medication changes when using an outcome prioritisation tool (OPT) during a medication review in general practice. Design and se...

  11. The effect of traditional cupping on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain : a randomised controlled pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP) and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n = 25) or waiting list control group (WL, n = 25). TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR), pain related to movement (PM), quality of life (SF-36), Neck Disability Ind...

  12. A Pilot Study in Order to Examine the Relationship between the Degree of Visual Impairment of Patient and His Postural Stability

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    Jureczko Mariola

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the pilot study was to evaluate the relationship between degree of visual impairment of patient and his postural stability. The article contains basic explanation and requirements for stabilography research. The paper also describes statistic analysis of influence of visual impairment on postural stability opposed to control group (people perfectly sighted. These results allowed us to verify the approved research plan.

  13. Genetic influence on methadone treatment outcomes in patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment for opioid addiction: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaan Z

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Zainab Samaan,1–4 Monica Bawor,3,4 Brittany B Dennis,2,3 Carolyn Plater,5 Michael Varenbut,5 Jeffrey Daiter,5 Andrew Worster,5,6 David C Marsh,5,7 Charlie Tan,8 Dipika Desai,3 Lehana Thabane,2,9,10 Guillaume Pare11 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 3Population Genomics Program, Chanchlani Research Centre, 4MiNDS Neuroscience Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 5Ontario Addiction Treatment Centres, Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada; 6Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 7Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada; 8Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, 9Biostatistics Unit, Centre for Evaluation of Medicine, 10System Linked Research Unit, 11Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Introduction: Treatment of opioid addiction with methadone is effective; however, it is known to produce interindividual variability. This may be influenced in part by genetic variants, which can increase the initial risk of developing opioid addiction as well as explain differences in response to treatment. This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility of conducting a full-scale genetic analysis to identify genes that predict methadone treatment outcomes in this population. Methods: This was a cross-sectional observational study of patients admitted to a methadone maintenance treatment program for opioid addiction. We obtained demographic and clinical characteristics in addition to blood and urine samples, for the assessment of treatment outcomes. Results: The recruitment process yielded 252 patients, representing a 20% recruitment rate. We conducted genetic testing based on a 99.6% rate of provision of DNA samples. The average retention in treatment was 3.4 years, and >50% of the participants reported psychiatric and

  14. Long-Term Use of a Static Hand-Wrist Orthosis in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

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    Aukje Andringa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Long-term splinting, using static orthoses to prevent contractures, is widely accepted in stroke patients with paresis of the upper limb. A number of stroke patients complain about increased pain and spasticity, which leads to the nonuse of the orthosis and a risk of developing a clenched fist. Objectives. Evaluating long-term use of static hand-wrist orthoses and experienced comfort in chronic stroke patients. Methods. Eleven stroke patients who were advised to use a static orthosis for at least one year ago were included. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted to explore the long-term use and experienced comfort with the orthosis. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results. After at least one year, seven patients still wore the orthosis for the prescribed hours per day. Two patients were unable to wear the orthosis 8 hours per day, due to poor comfort. Two patients stopped using the orthosis because of an increase in spasticity or pain. Conclusions. These pilot data suggest that a number of stroke patients cannot tolerate a static orthosis over a long-term period because of discomfort. Without appropriate treatment opportunities, these patients will remain at risk of developing a clenched fist and will experience problems with daily activities and hygiene maintenance.

  15. Assessment of visuospatial neglect in stroke patients using virtual reality: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, M.J.A.; Aznar Alonso, M.A.; de Kort, Alexander Cornelis; van de Vis, Wim; Veltink, Petrus H.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2009-01-01

    One of the neuropsychological deficits that can result from a stroke is the neglect phenomenon. Neglect has traditionally been assessed with paper-and-pencil tasks, which are administered within the reaching space of a person. The purpose of this explorative study is to investigate whether it is

  16. Assessment of Visuospatial Neglect in Stroke Patients Using Virtual Reality: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannink, Michiel J. A.; Aznar, Miguel; de Kort, Alexander Cornelis; van de Vis, Wim; Veltink, Peter; van der Kooij, Herman

    2009-01-01

    One of the neuropsychological deficits that can result from a stroke is the neglect phenomenon. Neglect has traditionally been assessed with paper-and-pencil tasks, which are administered within the reaching space of a person. The purpose of this explorative study is to investigate whether it is possible to assess neglect in the extrapersonal…

  17. Assessment of visuospatial neglect in stroke patients using virtual reality: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, Michiel J.A.; Aznar, Miguel; Kort, de Alexander Cornelis; Vis, van de Wim; Veltink, Peter; Kooij, van der Herman

    2009-01-01

    One of the neuropsychological deficits that can result from a stroke is the neglect phenomenon. Neglect has traditionally been assessed with paper-and-pencil tasks, which are administered within the reaching space of a person. The purpose of this explorative study is to investigate whether it is pos

  18. Influence of inhomogeneous static magnetic field-exposure on patients with erosive gastritis: a randomized, self- and placebo-controlled, double-blind, single centre, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Márk; Nagy, Viktor L; Székely, Hajnal; Kocsis, Dorottya; Tulassay, Zsolt; László, János F

    2014-09-06

    This pilot study was devoted to the effect of static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure on erosive gastritis. The randomized, self- and placebo-controlled, double-blind, pilot study included 16 patients of the 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Semmelweis University diagnosed with erosive gastritis. The instrumental analysis followed a qualitative (pre-intervention) assessment of the symptoms by the patient: lower heartburn (in the ventricle), upper heartburn (in the oesophagus), epigastric pain, regurgitation, bloating and dry cough. Medical diagnosis included a double-line upper panendoscopy followed by 30 min local inhomogeneous SMF-exposure intervention at the lower sternal region over the stomach with peak-to-peak magnetic induction of 3 mT and 30 mT m(-1) gradient at the target site. A qualitative (post-intervention) assessment of the same symptoms closed the examination. Sham- or SMF-exposure was used in a double-blind manner. The authors succeeded in justifying the clinically and statistically significant beneficial effect of the SMF- over sham-exposure on the symptoms of erosive gastritis, the average effect of inhibition was 56% by p = 0.001, n = 42 + 96. This pilot study was aimed to encourage gastroenterologists to test local, inhomogeneous SMF-exposure on erosive gastritis patients, so this intervention may become an evidence-based alternative or complementary method in the clinical use especially in cases when conventional therapy options are contraindicated. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
.

  20. Assessment of Self-Perception of Transsexual Persons: Pilot Study of 15 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Barišić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. There have been few studies in the area of Self-Perception in transsexual persons, except for the population of transsexual adolescents. Bearing in mind its importance not only in the assessment of personality but also in predicting adaptive capacity, the goal of our research is based on the examination of Self-Perception of adult transsexual persons. Method. The study was conducted using a Rorschach test, which provides an insight into various aspects of Self-Perception. The sample consisted of 15 transsexual persons, who passed the standard diagnostic procedure. Results. The results suggest that transsexual persons manage to maintain Adequate Self-Esteem. Hypervigilance Index and Obsessive Style Index are negative, while the values showing a negative quality of Self-Regard and the capacity for introspection tend to increase. In the process of Self-Introspection, negative and painful emotional states are often perceived. Conclusion. The estimation of Self-Perception in adult transsexual persons indicates a trend of subjective perception of a personal imperfection or inadequacy. This is probably the result of experiencing discomfort for a number of years due to gender incongruence and dysphoria, in particular in persons who enter the sex reassignment procedure later in their adulthood.

  1. Salivary IgA and dental caries in HIV patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sonu; Mandal, Pradip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The interrelationship of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and dental caries, as well as Salivary IgA (S-IgA) level, appear to remain underexplored while a manual and electronic search of the literature was made. Hence, this study was undertaken to assess the relationship of S-IgA and dental caries status in HIV +ve children. The aim of this study was to find out the relationship of S-IgA antibody with dental caries by measuring the concentration of IgA in saliva of HIV +ve and HIV -ve children and to determine the dental caries status in HIV +ve and HIV -ve children, which may help in treatment planning and prevention of the same. Twenty-eight HIV +ve children aged between 6 and 14 years and 28 age matched HIV -ve children were included in this study, and both samples were randomly selected from the same nongovernmental organization (NGO). The HIV status of both these samples was confirmed from their medical records provided by the NGO. 2 cc of unstimulated saliva was collected from both groups in special tubes coded numerically using the method described by Collins and Dawes, and the samples were analyzed to measure the concentration of IgA using commercially available ELISA kit (DRG Diagnostics, Germany). Examination of dental caries was carried out according to the WHO criteria (1997) using a flat mouth mirror and Community periodontal index (CPI) probe. In HIV +ve group, mean salivary IgA level was calculated as 81.61 ± 6.20 μg/ml, mean decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) was 3.86 ± 3.37, mean decayed, extracted and filled teeth (deft) was 4.75 ± 2.86. In HIV -ve group, the mean salivary IgA level was calculated as 145.57 ±17.83 μg/ml, mean DMFT was 2.54 ± 0.69, mean deft was 2.43 ± 2.01. Strong -ve correlation between S-IgA and DMFT (r = -0.781, t = 6.38, P 0.05) between S-IgA and deft was found in HIV +ve group. Strong -ve correlation between S-IgA and DMFT (r = -0.655, t = 4.42, P IgA and deft (r = -0.942, t = 14.32, P IgA deficiency in

  2. Investigation of pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis from implant clustering failure patients: a whole-exome sequencing pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soohyung Lee

    Full Text Available Peri-implantitis is a frequently occurring gum disease linked to multi-factorial traits with various environmental and genetic causalities and no known concrete pathogenesis. The varying severity of peri-implantitis among patients with relatively similar environments suggests a genetic aspect which needs to be investigated to understand and regulate the pathogenesis of the disease. Six unrelated individuals with multiple clusterization implant failure due to severe peri-implantitis were chosen for this study. These six individuals had relatively healthy lifestyles, with minimal environmental causalities affecting peri-implantitis. Research was undertaken to investigate pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis albeit with a small number of subjects and incomplete elimination of environmental causalities. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on collected saliva samples via self DNA collection kit. Common variants with minor allele frequencies (MAF > = 0.05 from all control datasets were eliminated and variants having high and moderate impact and loss of function were used for comparison. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to reveal functional groups associated with the genetic variants. 2,022 genes were left after filtering against dbSNP, the 1000 Genomes East Asian population, and healthy Korean randomized subsample data (GSK project. 175 (p-value <0.05 out of 927 gene sets were obtained via GSEA (DAVID. The top 10 was chosen (p-value <0.05 from cluster enrichment showing significance of cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and metal ion binding. Network analysis was applied to find relationships between functional clusters. Among the functional groups, ion metal binding was located in the center of all clusters, indicating dysfunction of regulation in metal ion concentration might affect cell morphology or cell adhesion, resulting in implant failure. This result may demonstrate the feasibility of and provide pilot data for a larger research

  3. Patients' Priorities Regarding Female-to-Male Gender Affirmation Surgery of the Genitalia-A Pilot Study of 47 Patients in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Josephine; Andréasson, My; Kölby, Lars; Elander, Anna; Selvaggi, Gennaro

    2017-06-01

    their specific benefits and limitations to make an informed choice. Jacobsson J, Andréasson M, Kölby L, et al. Patients' Priorities Regarding Female-to-Male Gender Affirmation Surgery of the Genitalia-A Pilot Study of 47 Patients in Sweden. J Sex Med 2017;14:857-864. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Pilot Study of a Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety and Depression in Patients With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleo, Jessica S; Amspoker, Amber B; Sarwar, Aliya I; Kunik, Mark E; Jankovic, Joseph; Marsh, Laura; York, Michele; Stanley, Melinda A

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety and depression often remain unrecognized or inadequately treated in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective, but limited evidence supports its use for anxiety and depression in patients with PD. Sixteen patients with PD having significant anxiety and/or depressive symptoms were assigned to CBT or enhanced usual care. Assessments occurred at baseline, posttreatment, and 1-month follow-up. The CBT intervention included tools for anxiety, depression, and healthy living with PD symptoms. Individual sessions were delivered by telephone or in person, based on patient preference. Treatment was feasible with participants choosing 67% of sessions by telephone and 80% completed treatment. The between-group effect sizes for change scores from baseline to posttreatment and baseline to 1-month follow-up were large (posttreatment: d = 1.49 for depression and 1.44 for anxiety; 1-month follow-up: d = .73 for depression and 1.24 for anxiety), although only the posttreatment effect size for depression was significant. This pilot CBT program is feasible for treatment of anxiety and depression in patients with PD.

  5. Transfer Readiness Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; And Others

    The California Community Colleges (CCC) has implemented a prototype model for determining student transfer readiness as a primary means of assessing community college transfer effectiveness. This report provides definitions of transfer readiness and guidelines for colleges participating in the CCC transfer readiness study. First, a memorandum from…

  6. The MOTIV-HEART Study: A Prospective, Randomized, Single-Blind Pilot Study of Brief Strategic Therapy and Motivational Interviewing among Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrabissa, Giada; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Psychological distress, biomedical parameters, and unhealthy lifestyles contribute to a poorer prognosis for cardiac disease. Public health's challenge is to motivate patients to utilize self-care. Objective: This prospective, randomized, single-blind pilot study aimed at testing the incremental efficacy of Brief Strategic Therapy (BST) combined with Motivational Interviewing (MI) in improving selected biomedical and psychological outcomes over and beyond those of the stand-alone BST in a residential Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) program. Method: Fourty-two inpatients (17 females), enrolled in a 1-month CR program, were randomly allocated into two conditions: (a) Three sessions of BST and (b) Three sessions of BST plus MI. Data were collected at baseline, discharge, and after 3 months through phone interviews. Results: At discharge, no significant between-group difference was found in any outcome variable. Changes from pre- to post-treatment within each condition showed significant improvements only in the BST group, where the level of external regulation diminished, and both the participants' self-regulation (Relative Autonomous Motivation Index, RAI) and willingness to change improved. At the 3-month follow-up, within-group analyses on responders (BST = 9; BST + MI = 11) showed a statistically significant improvement in the level of systolic blood pressure in both groups. Discussion: Findings showed no evidence of the incremental efficacy of combining BST and MI over and beyond BST alone on either selected biomedical or psychological outcomes among CR patients. Conclusions: Ends and limitations from the present pilot study should be considered and addressed in future investigations. PMID:28223950

  7. Using Video Conferencing to Deliver a Brief Motivational Intervention for Alcohol and Sex Risk to Emergency Department Patients: A Proof-of-Concept Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celio, Mark A; Mastroleo, Nadine R; DiGuiseppi, Graham; Barnett, Nancy P; Colby, Suzanne M; Kahler, Christopher W; Operario, Don; Suffoletto, Brian; Monti, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Brief motivational intervention (MI) is an efficacious approach to reduce heavy drinking and associated sexual risk behavior among Emergency Department (ED) patients, but the intensity of demands placed on ED staff makes the implementation of in-person MIs logistically challenging. This proof-of-concept pilot study examined the acceptability and logistic feasibility of using video-conferencing technology to deliver an MI targeting heavy drinking and risky sexual behavior to patients in an ED setting. Rigorous screening procedures were employed to ensure that the pilot sample represents the target portion of ED patients who would benefit from this multi-target MI. Mixed qualitative and quantitative data from a sample of seven ED patients (57% Female; Mage = 35 years) who received MI by video conference consistently demonstrated high levels of satisfaction, engagement, and acceptability. The observed completion rate supports logistic feasibility, and patient feedback identified methods to improve the experience by using high-definition hardware, ensuring stronger network connectivity, and effectively communicating information regarding protection of privacy. Post-intervention patient ratings and independent ratings of the audio-recorded sessions (using the Motivational Interviewing Skills Coding system) were very high, suggesting that intervention fidelity and MI adherence was not compromised by delivery modality. Collectively, these data suggest video conferencing is a viable technology that can be employed to implement brief evidence-based MIs in ED settings.

  8. Coping-Infused Dialogue through Patient-Preferred Live Music: A Medical Music Therapy Protocol and Randomized Pilot Study for Hospitalized Organ Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Tyler James; Silverman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplant patients often experience a variety of psychosocial stressors that can lead to distress and may hinder successful recovery. Using coping-infused dialogue (CID) through patient- preferred live music (PPLM) music therapy sessions may improve mood and decrease pain while also imparting psychoeducational knowledge concerning the identification of local and global problems and coping skills. The purpose of this pilot study was to develop a coping-based medical music therapy protocol that combines coping-infused dialogue (CID) with patient-preferred live music (PPLM) and measure the effects of the resulting CID-PPLM protocol on mood (positive and negative affect) and pain in hospitalized transplant patients. Our study used a pre-/posttest single-session wait-list control design. Participants (N=25) were randomly assigned to experimental (CID-PPLM) or control (usual care) conditions. Participants in the CID-PPLM condition received a single 30-minute session that integrated stressor identification and knowledge of coping skills (CID) with patient-preferred live music (PPLM). Results indicated no between-group differences at pretest and significant correlations between pre- and posttest measures. Concerning posttest ANCOVA analyses, there were significant between-group differences in positive affect, negative affect, and pain, with experimental participants having more favorable posttest scores than control participants. Effect sizes were in the medium-to-large range for positive affect (η2=.198), negative affect (η2=.422), and pain (η2=.303). CID through receptive PPLM may be an effective protocol for improving mood and decreasing pain in organ transplant recipients. MT interventions can be an important tool to develop rapport and enhance outcomes with patients. As greater engagement during interventions may have stronger treatment effects, we recommend future research examining patient engagement as a potential mediator of intervention effects

  9. The add-on effect of a Chinese herbal formula for patients with resistant hypertension:study protocol for a pilot cohort study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya Yuwen; Yu-qi Liu; Yan-ping Wang; Jin-gang Dai; Da-sheng Liu; Yue-xi Wang; Xue-jie Han

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Despite a recent American Heart Association (AHA) consensus statement emphasizing the importance of resistant hypertension (RH), its control is stil a chal enge for conventional medicine. The Chinese herbal formula, Qutan Huayu Fang, has been used effectively to assist antihypertensive agents in blood pressure control, but its effect for RH patients is stil unclear. This pilot study aims to explore the effects of taking the formula in addition to antihypertensive medication in the management of RH. METHODS/DESIGN:A prospective cohort study wil be conducted in two ifrst-class hospitals of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Eligible RH patients wil be classiifed as the experimental group (n=100) and the control group (n=100) based on the interventions they receive. Participants taking antihypertensive agents and the Chinese herbal formula wil be in the experimental group and those taking antihypertensive agents alone wil be in the control group. The whole study wil last 24 weeks, including an 8-week observation and fol ow-up at 24 weeks. The primary outcomes, assessed against patient baseline conditions, wil be the reduction of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure as wel as changes in TCM symptoms and signs. These outcomes wil be assessed at weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8. The reductions of blood pressure wil also be assessed at week 24. Cardiac events and mortality rate wil be secondary outcomes and wil be assessed at weeks 8 and 24. Any adverse reactions wil be recorded during the study. The causal inference method wil be used to assess the effectiveness of the inclusion of TCM herbal medicine in the management of patients with RH. DISCUSSION:This study wil determine whether the Chinese herbal formula is helpful for RH patients treated with antihypertensive agents and the ifndings wil provide a basis for further conifrmatory studies. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER:ClinicalTrials.gov Identiifer NCT01904695.

  10. Improving communication with palliative care cancer patients at home - A pilot study of SAGE & THYME communication skills model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Jane; Wilson, Charlotte; Ewing, Gail; Connolly, Michael; Grande, Gunn

    2015-10-01

    To pilot an evidence-based communication skills model (SAGE & THYME) with UK District Nurses (DNs) who visit patients with advanced cancer early in the dying trajectory. Evidence suggests that DNs lack confidence in communication skills and in assessing cancer patients' psycho-social needs; also that they lack time. SAGE & THYME is a highly structured model for teaching patient centred interactions. It addresses concerns about confidence and time. Mixed methods. 33 DNs were trained in SAGE & THYME in a three hour workshop and interviewed in focus groups on three occasions: pre-training, immediately post-training and two months post-training. Questionnaires measuring perceived outcomes of communication, confidence in communication and motivation to use SAGE & THYME were administered at the focus groups. SAGE & THYME provided a structure for conversations and facilitated opening and closing of interactions. The main principle of patient centeredness was reportedly used by all. Knowledge about communication behaviours helpful to patients improved and was sustained two months after training. Increased confidence in communication skills was also sustained. Motivation to use SAGE & THYME was high and remained so at two months, and some said the model saved them time. Challenges with using the model included controlling the home environment and a change in style of communication which was so marked some DNs preferred to use it with new patients. Training DNs in SAGE & THYME in a three hour workshop appears to be a promising model for improving communication skills when working with cancer patients. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative multivoxel proton MR spectroscopy study of brain metabolites in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhong-Xian; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Xu, Zhi-Feng; Cao, Zhen; Xiao, Ye-Yu; You, Ke-Zeng; Liu, Yan-Yan [Medical College of Shantou University, Department of Medical Imaging, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Shantou (China); Huo, Shan-Shan [Science College of Shantou University, Department of Physics, Shantou (China); Zeng, Jie-Xia; Chen, Wei [Medical College of Shantou University, Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Shantou (China); Wu, Ren-Hua [Medical College of Shantou University, Department of Medical Imaging, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Shantou (China); Medical College of Shantou University, Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging, Guangdong, Shantou (China)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate brain metabolic changes in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) using multivoxel proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MVS). Fourteen aMCI patients and fifteen healthy control subjects participated in this experiment. All MR measurements were acquired using a 1.5-T GE scanner. {sup 1}H-MVS point resolved spectroscopy (2D PROBE-CSI PRESS) pulse sequence (TE = 35 ms; TR = 1,500 ms; phase x frequency, 18 x 18) was used for acquiring MRS data. All data were post-processed using Spectroscopy Analysis by General Electric software and linear combination of model (LCModel). The absolute concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), myoinositol (MI), creatine (Cr), and the metabolite ratios of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, MI/Cr, and NAA/MI were measured bilaterally in the posterior cingulate gyrus (PCG), inferior precuneus (Pr), paratrigonal white matter (PWM), dorsal thalamus (DT), and lentiform nucleus (LN). Patients with aMCI displayed significantly lower NAA levels in the bilateral PCG (p < 0.01), PWM (p < 0.05), and left inferior Pr (p < 0.05). The metabolite ratio of NAA/MI was decreased in the bilateral PCG (p < 0.01) and PWM (p < 0.05) and in the left DT (p < 0.01). NAA/Cr was decreased in the left PCG (p < 0.01), DT (p < 0.05), right PWM (p < 0.05), and LN (p < 0.05). However, MI/Cr was elevated in the right PCG (p < 0.01) and left PWM (p < 0.05). Significantly increased Cho level was also evident in the left PWM (p < 0.05). Our observations of decreased NAA, NAA/Cr, and NAA/MI, in parallel with increased Cho and MI/Cr might be characteristic of aMCI patients. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of striatal dopamine transporter density using ({sup 123}I)-{beta}-CIT SPECT in schizophrenic patients treated with olanzapine: pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chul Eung; Moon, Hey Won; Choe, Won Sick; Kim, Chang Ho; Chi, Dae Yoon [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    This pilot study was performed to understand the pharmacological effect of olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent, on dopamine transporter in schizophrenic patients. Six patients (3 male, 3 female) with schizophrenia, who had not taken any psychotropic drugs for at least four weeks, were studied. Nuclear imaging using ({sup 123}I)-{beta}-CIT SPECT was obtained before and after 4-week treatment with olanzapine. Analysis of ROI on the striatum, caudate nucleus, and putamen was performed. Post-treatment uptake was significantly increased in all the ROIs compared with pre-treatment uptake. This preliminary study with the small number of schizophrenic patients suggested an increase in uptake of dopamine transporter in the striatum, caudate nucleus, and putamen after 4-week treatment with olanzapine, which warrants a large-scaled controlled study to confirm the current findings.

  13. A pilot study of the use of near-patient C-Reactive Protein testing in the treatment of adult respiratory tract infections in one Irish general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Kim E

    2011-08-31

    Abstract Background New approaches are being sought to safely reduce community antibiotic prescribing. A recent study demonstrated that CRP testing resulted in decreased antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infection in primary care. There is little other published primary care data available evaluating CRP in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in routine clinical practice. This pilot study aims to describe the performance of near-patient CRP testing, in a mixed payments health system. Specific areas to be reviewed included the integrity of the study protocol, testing of data collection forma and acceptability of the intervention. Patients Patients over the age of 18 years, with acute cough and\\/or sore throat with a duration of one month or less, in routine clinical practice. Method Design: A pilot with a cross-sectional design. The first 60 recruited patients were treated with routine clinical management, and GP\\'s had no access to a CRP test. For the subsequent 60 patients, access to CRP testing was available. Participants: 3 GP\\'s in one Irish primary care practice recruited 120 patients, fulfilling the above criteria over five months, from January 1 to May 31, 2010. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was antibiotic prescription at the index consultation. Secondary outcomes were the numbers of delayed prescriptions issued, patient satisfaction immediately after consultation and re-consultations and antibiotic prescriptions during 28 days follow-up. Results The protocol and data collection forms worked well and the intervention of CRP testing appeared acceptable. Thirty-five (58%) patients in the no-test group received antibiotic prescriptions compared to 27 (45%) in the test group. Both groups demonstrated similarly high level of patient satisfaction (85%). Fourteen (23%) patients in the CRP test group re-attended within 28 days compared to 9 (15%) in the no-CRP test group. Conclusion This pilot study confirms the

  14. A pilot study of the use of near-patient C-Reactive Protein testing in the treatment of adult respiratory tract infections in one Irish general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halloran Rita

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New approaches are being sought to safely reduce community antibiotic prescribing. A recent study demonstrated that CRP testing resulted in decreased antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infection in primary care. There is little other published primary care data available evaluating CRP in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in routine clinical practice. This pilot study aims to describe the performance of near-patient CRP testing, in a mixed payments health system. Specific areas to be reviewed included the integrity of the study protocol, testing of data collection forma and acceptability of the intervention. Patients Patients over the age of 18 years, with acute cough and/or sore throat with a duration of one month or less, in routine clinical practice. Method Design: A pilot with a cross-sectional design. The first 60 recruited patients were treated with routine clinical management, and GP's had no access to a CRP test. For the subsequent 60 patients, access to CRP testing was available. Participants: 3 GP's in one Irish primary care practice recruited 120 patients, fulfilling the above criteria over five months, from January 1 to May 31, 2010. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was antibiotic prescription at the index consultation. Secondary outcomes were the numbers of delayed prescriptions issued, patient satisfaction immediately after consultation and re-consultations and antibiotic prescriptions during 28 days follow-up. Results The protocol and data collection forms worked well and the intervention of CRP testing appeared acceptable. Thirty-five (58% patients in the no-test group received antibiotic prescriptions compared to 27 (45% in the test group. Both groups demonstrated similarly high level of patient satisfaction (85%. Fourteen (23% patients in the CRP test group re-attended within 28 days compared to 9 (15% in the no-CRP test group. Conclusion This pilot study confirms

  15. A study of airline pilot morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Adrian J; Larsen, Peter D; Griffiths, Robin F; Aldington, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    It has long been believed that airline pilots are healthier than the general population. There are a number of reasons why this should be the case. However, there is very little evidence to support this belief as fact. This study investigates the health of the pilot population of an Oceanic based airline compared to the health of the general population. Pilots who conducted their medical certificate renewal at the airline's medical unit between 1 November 2009 and 31 October 2010 were included. A medical questionnaire was completed by each pilot at the time of their medical certificate renewal. Data from the questionnaire was entered into a database as well as the pilot's BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, and blood glucose level. The comparison population was the population who completed the New Zealand Health Survey (NZHS) between 2006-2007. Demographic, lifestyle characteristics, and health status data from the pilots was compared to the NZHS using a Chi-squared test. Included in the study were 595 pilots. With respect to most medical conditions, pilots had a lower prevalence when compared to the general population. Pilots had a higher prevalence of kidney disease (3.3% vs 0.6%) and melanoma skin cancer (19 per 1000 vs 0.4 per 1000). This study suggests that pilots in New Zealand are healthier than the general population with respect to most medical conditions. The two medical conditions that were identified as being overrepresented in pilots may be the result of the occupational environment.

  16. Longitudinal Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging CO2 Stress Testing in Individual Adolescent Sports-Related Concussion Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, W Alan C; Ellis, Michael J; Ryner, Lawrence N; Morissette, Marc P; Pries, Philip J; Dufault, Brenden; Essig, Marco; Mikulis, David J; Duffin, James; Fisher, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Advanced neuroimaging studies in concussion have been limited to detecting group differences between concussion patients and healthy controls. In this small pilot study, we used brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) CO2 stress testing to longitudinally assess cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR) in individual sports-related concussion (SRC) patients. Six SRC patients (three males and three females; mean age = 15.7, range = 15-17 years) underwent longitudinal brain MRI CO2 stress testing using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI and model-based prospective end-tidal CO2 targeting under isoxic conditions. First-level and second-level comparisons were undertaken using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) to score the scans and compare them to an atlas of 24 healthy control subjects. All tests were well tolerated and without any serious adverse events. Anatomical MRI was normal in all study participants. The CO2 stimulus was consistent between the SRC patients and control subjects and within SRC patients across the longitudinal study. Individual SRC patients demonstrated both quantitative and qualitative patient-specific alterations in CVR (p correlated strongly with clinical findings, and that persisted beyond clinical recovery. Standardized brain MRI CO2 stress testing is capable of providing a longitudinal assessment of CVR in individual SRC patients. Consequently, larger prospective studies are needed to examine the utility of brain MRI CO2 stress testing as a clinical tool to help guide the evaluation, classification, and longitudinal management of SRC patients.

  17. A cross-sectional study to assess the incompatible dietary behavior of patients suffering from skin diseases: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghana Kulkarni

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Scores for consumption of incompatible diet and dietary habits were found to be higher in acne and psoriasis patients compared to controls. Patients with fungal infections had higher scores for the presence of incompatible dietary habits but similar scores for the consumption of incompatible diet, whereas both scores in patients of vitiligo were similar to controls.

  18. The effect of whole body vibration therapy on bone density in patients with thalassemia: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Ellen B.; Gariepy, Catherine A.; Sawyer, Aenor J.; Higa, Annie; Vichinsky, Elliott P.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with thalassemia (Thal) have low bone mass which can lead to fracture and decreased quality of life. There are no noninvasive anabolic therapies available to improve bone health in Thal. A longitudinal cross-over pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of low magnitude whole body vibration (WBV) therapy on bone in 18 patients with Thal (9 adults, 10 male, 22.1 ± 10.7 years). Subjects were asked to stand on a vibrating platform (30 Hz, 0.3 g) for 20 min/day for 6 months. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by DXA and volumetric BMD by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was assessed at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Adherence in the first 3 months was greater when compared with the second 3 months (14 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 7 min/day, P=0.007). Intention to treat analysis revealed a significant increase in whole body BMC (2.6%; P = 0.021), BMC/Ht (2.6%, P = 0.02) and aBMD (1.3%; P = 0.036), as well as a net increase in serum markers of bone formation (Osteocalcin/CTx, P = 0.027) in the adult subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that vibration therapy may be an effective nonpharmacologic intervention in Thal. Future research is needed to confirm these findings in a larger sample for longer duration. PMID:22886910

  19. The Effect of Repetitive Rhythmic Precision Grip Task-Oriented Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispa, Delphine; Lejeune, Thierry; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic stroke patients present with difficulty in the manipulation of objects. The aim of this study was to test whether an intensive program of precision grip training could improve hand functioning of patients at more than 6 months after a stroke. This was a cross-over study; hence, at inclusion, the patients were randomly divided into two…

  20. Effects of indacaterol versus tiotropium on exercise tolerance in patients with moderate COPD: a pilot randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Danilo Cortozi; Santos, Álvaro Huber Dos; Bohn, Ivo; Lima, Rodrigo Quevedo de; Breda, Vanderléia; Teixeira, Paulo José Zimermann

    2016-01-01

    To compare a once-daily long-acting β2 agonist (indacaterol 150 µg) with a once-daily long-acting anticholinergic (tiotropium 5 µg) in terms of their effects on exercise endurance (limit of tolerance, Tlim) in patients with moderate COPD. Secondary endpoints were their effects on lung hyperinflation, exercise-related dyspnea, and daily-life dyspnea. This was a randomized, single-blind, crossover pilot study involving 20 patients (mean age, 60.9 ± 10.0 years; mean FEV1, 69 ± 7% of predicted). Spirometric parameters, Transition Dyspnea Index scores, Tlim, and exertional dyspnea were compared after three weeks of each treatment (with a one-week washout period between treatments). Nineteen patients completed the study (one having been excluded because of COPD exacerbation). Improvement in Tlim from baseline tended to be greater after treatment with tiotropium than after treatment with indacaterol (96 ± 163 s vs. 8 ± 82 s; p = 0.06). Tlim significantly improved from baseline after treatment with tiotropium (having increased from 396 ± 319 s to 493 ± 347 s; p = 0.010) but not after treatment with indacaterol (having increased from 393 ± 246 to 401 ± 254 s; p = 0.678). There were no differences between the two treatments regarding improvements in Borg dyspnea scores and lung hyperinflation at "isotime" and peak exercise. There were also no significant differences between treatments regarding Transition Dyspnea Index scores (1.5 ± 2.1 vs. 0.9 ± 2.3; p = 0.39). In patients with moderate COPD, tiotropium tends to improve Tlim in comparison with indacaterol. No significant differences were observed between the two treatments regarding their effects on lung hyperinflation, exercise-related dyspnea, and daily-life dyspnea. Future studies, including a larger number of patients, are required in order to confirm our findings and explore mechanistic explanations. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01693003 [http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/]). Comparar um β2-agonista de

  1. Feasibility of a combined aerobic and strength training program and its effects on cognitive and physical function in institutionalized dementia patients. A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem J R Bossers

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We examined the feasibility of a combined aerobic and strength training program in institutionalized dementia patients and studied the effects on cognitive and physical function. METHODS: Thirty-three patients with dementia, recruited from one nursing home, participated in this non-randomized pilot study (25 women; age = 85.2±4.9 years; Mini Mental State Examination = 16.8±4.0. In phase 1 of the study, seventeen patients in the Exercise group (EG received a combined aerobic and strength training program for six weeks, five times per week, 30 minutes per session, in an individually supervised format and successfully concluded the pre and posttests. In phase 2 of the study, sixteen patients in the Social group (SG received social visits at the same frequency, duration, and format and successfully concluded the pre and posttests. RESULTS: Indices of feasibility showed that the recruitment and adherence rate, respectively were 46.2% and 86.3%. All EG patients completed the exercise program according to protocol without adverse events. After the six-week program, no significant differences on cognitive function tests were found between the EG and SG. There was a moderate effect size in favor for the EG for the Visual Memory Span Forward; a visual attention test. There were significant differences between groups in favor for the EG with moderate to large effects for the physical tests Walking Speed (p = .003, Six-Minute Walk Test (p = .031, and isometric quadriceps strength (p = .012. CONCLUSIONS: The present pilot study showed that it is feasible to conduct a combined aerobic and strength training program in institutionalized patients with dementia. The selective cognitive visual attention improvements and more robust changes in motor function in favor of EG vs. SG could serve as a basis for large randomized clinical trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: trialregister.nl 1230.

  2. The effect of anakinra, an IL1 receptor antagonist, in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM): a small pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidis, Michalis L; Alexopoulos, Harry; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2013-11-15

    In sIBM, an inflammatory process mediated by cytotoxic T cells and cytokines in conjunction with a degenerative process, deposits of beta amyloid and misfolded proteins appear to be the main culprits in disease pathogenesis. IL-1β may play a key role because it is upregulated in sIBM myofibers, co-localizes with Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and promotes the production of APP and amyloid deposits. We performed a small, pilot study to examine whether anakinra, an IL1 receptor antagonist could benefit sIBM patients. Four patients with biopsy-proven sIBM received anakinra for a mean period of 7.7 months. No improvement in muscle strength or stabilization was noted in any of the patients based on grip strength and MRC measurements. The treatment failure may be due to insufficiency of anakinra to suppress the intramuscular IL1, the short study period, or the irrelevance of IL1 in the disease process.

  3. The Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on the Efficacy of ADP Receptor Blockers in Patients with Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Pilot Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Samoš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to validate the impact of type 2 diabetes (T2D on the platelet reactivity in patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI treated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP receptor blockers. Methods. A pilot prospective study was performed. Totally 67 patients were enrolled. 21 patients had T2D. Among all study population, 33 patients received clopidogrel and 34 patients received prasugrel. The efficacy of ADP receptor blocker therapy had been tested in two time intervals using light transmission aggregometry with specific inducer and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation (VASP-P flow cytometry assay. Results. There were no significant differences in platelet aggregability among T2D and nondiabetic (ND group. The platelet reactivity index of VASP-P did not differ significantly between T2D and ND group (59.4±30.9% versus 60.0±25.2% and 33.9±25.3% versus 38.6±29.3% in second testing. The number of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders did not differ significantly between T2D and ND patients. The time interval from ADP receptor blocker loading dosing to the blood sampling was similar in T2D and ND patients in both examinations. Conclusion. This prospective study did not confirm the higher platelet reactivity and higher prevalence of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders in T2D acute STEMI patients.

  4. Quality of Life and Neutropenia in Patients with Early Stage Breast Cancer: A Randomized Pilot Study Comparing Additional Treatment with Mistletoe Extract to Chemotherapy Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Tröger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemotherapy for breast cancer often deteriorates quality of life, augments fatigue, and induces neutropenia. Mistletoe preparations are frequently used by cancer patients in Central Europe. Physicians have reported better quality of life in breast cancer patients additionally treated with mistletoe preparations during chemotherapy. Mistletoe preparations also have immunostimulant properties and might therefore have protective effects against chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective randomized open label pilot study with 95 patients randomized into three groups. Two groups received Iscador® M special (IMS or a different mistletoe preparation, respectively, additionally to chemotherapy with six cycles of cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and 5-fluoro-uracil (CAF. A control group received CAF with no additional therapy. Here we report the comparison IMS (n = 30 vs. control (n = 31. Quality of life including fatigue was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30. Neutropenia was defined as neutrophil counts <1,000/µl and assessed at baseline and one day before each CAF cycle.Results: In the descriptive analysis all 15 scores of the EORTC-QLQ-C30 showed better quality of life in the IMS group compared to the control group. In 12 scores the differences were significant (p < 0.02 and nine scores showed a clinically relevant and significant difference of at least 5 points. Neutropenia occurred in 3/30 IMS patients and in 8/31 control patients (p = 0.182.Conclusions: This pilot study showed an improvement of quality of life by treating breast cancer patients with IMS additionally to CAF. CAF-induced neutropenia showed a trend to lower frequency in the IMS group.

  5. The effectiveness of oral appliances in elderly patients with obstructive sleep apnoea treated with lorazepam--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihacek-Sojic, L; Andjelkovic, M; Milic-Lemic, A; Milosevic, B

    2012-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is one of the most common sleep disorders in elderly and represents a special problem for elderly patients. Elderly patients use a large number of drugs that might have an influence on the upper airway structure, anxiolytics or benzodiazepines being the most common. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of mild or moderate OSA treatment with mandibular advance oral appliance in older lorazepam users compared with the age-matched lorazepam-free patients. A total of 40 functionally independent patients with the age of 65-74 were enrolled in the study. All included patients were found to suffer from at least two of the existing OSA symptoms (snoring, sleep fragmentation, daytime sleepiness) and were diagnosed with mild or moderate OSA after nocturnal polysomnography. Patients were divided into two groups. The experimental group consisted of 20 patients who used lorazepam in their daily therapy, and a control group consisted of 20 patients who did not take lorazepam. A mandibular advance appliance was made individually for each patient. Patients involved in the study were not overweight and were suggested to practise sleeping on the side and reduce alcohol consumption during the study. The study has shown that mandibular advance oral appliances were responsible for complete control of the OSA in over 37% of cases (15 patients). Patients have also reported substantial improvement in the symptoms; 80% of them reported that they had snored less, slept better (94%) and have not experienced daytime sleepiness (100%).

  6. 90% Compliance Pilot Studies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    In early 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced an opportunity for states to participate in energy code compliance evaluation pilot studies. DOE worked with five Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations (REEOs, formerly referred to as Energy Efficiency Partnerships, or EEPs) to fund pilot studies covering nine states. This report details conclusions stated in individual state reports, as well as conclusions drawn by DOE based on their oversight of the pilot studies, and based on discussions held with the REEOs and representatives from the pilot study states and their contractors.

  7. Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Internet Addiction: A Clinical Pilot Study on the Effects of a Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Wölfling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet addiction is regarded as a growing health concern in many parts of the world with prevalence rates of 1-2% in Europe and up to 7% in some Asian countries. Clinical research has demonstrated that Internet addiction is accompanied with loss of interests, decreased psychosocial functioning, social retreat, and heightened psychosocial distress. Specialized treatment programs are needed to face this problem that has recently been added to the appendix of the DSM-5. While there are numerous studies assessing clinical characteristics of patients with Internet addiction, the knowledge about the effectiveness of treatment programs is limited. Although a recent meta-analysis indicates that those programs show effects, more clinical studies are needed here. To add knowledge, we conducted a pilot study on the effects of a standardized cognitive-behavioral therapy program for IA. 42 male adults meeting criteria for Internet addiction were enrolled. Their IA-status, psychopathological symptoms, and perceived self-efficacy expectancy were assessed before and after the treatment. The results show that 70.3% of the patients finished the therapy regularly. After treatment symptoms of IA had decreased significantly. Psychopathological symptoms were reduced as well as associated psychosocial problems. The results of this pilot study emphasize findings from the only meta-analysis conducted so far.

  8. Treatment outcomes in patients with internet addiction: a clinical pilot study on the effects of a cognitive-behavioral therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfling, K; Beutel, M E; Dreier, M; Müller, K W

    2014-01-01

    Internet addiction is regarded as a growing health concern in many parts of the world with prevalence rates of 1-2% in Europe and up to 7% in some Asian countries. Clinical research has demonstrated that Internet addiction is accompanied with loss of interests, decreased psychosocial functioning, social retreat, and heightened psychosocial distress. Specialized treatment programs are needed to face this problem that has recently been added to the appendix of the DSM-5. While there are numerous studies assessing clinical characteristics of patients with Internet addiction, the knowledge about the effectiveness of treatment programs is limited. Although a recent meta-analysis indicates that those programs show effects, more clinical studies are needed here. To add knowledge, we conducted a pilot study on the effects of a standardized cognitive-behavioral therapy program for IA. 42 male adults meeting criteria for Internet addiction were enrolled. Their IA-status, psychopathological symptoms, and perceived self-efficacy expectancy were assessed before and after the treatment. The results show that 70.3% of the patients finished the therapy regularly. After treatment symptoms of IA had decreased significantly. Psychopathological symptoms were reduced as well as associated psychosocial problems. The results of this pilot study emphasize findings from the only meta-analysis conducted so far.

  9. A randomized controlled pilot study of CBT-I Coach: Feasibility, acceptability, and potential impact of a mobile phone application for patients in cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffel, Erin; Kuhn, Eric; Petsoulis, Napoleon; Erbes, Christopher R; Anders, Samantha; Hoffman, Julia E; Ruzek, Josef I; Polusny, Melissa A

    2016-06-27

    There has been growing interest in utilizing mobile phone applications (apps) to enhance traditional psychotherapy. Previous research has suggested that apps may facilitate patients' completion of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) tasks and potentially increase adherence. This randomized clinical trial pilot study (n = 18) sought to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and potential impact on adherence and sleep outcomes related to CBT-I Coach use. All participants were engaged in CBT-I, with one group receiving the app as a supplement and one non-app group. We found that patients consistently used the app as intended, particularly the sleep diary and reminder functions. They reported that it was highly acceptable to use. Importantly, the app did not compromise or undermine benefits of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia and patients in both groups had significantly improved sleep outcomes following treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Effectiveness of Acceptance-Commitment Therapy on Anxiety and Depression among Patients on Methadone Treatment: A Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saedy, Mozhgan; Kooshki, Shirin; Jamali Firouzabadi, Mahmoud; Emamipour, Susan; Rezaei Ardani, Amir

    2015-01-01

    .... This study evaluates the effectiveness of Acceptance-Commitment Therapy (ACT) to decrease anxiety and depression in patients with opioid dependencies who are undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT...

  11. Comparison of Deep Tissue Massage and Therapeutic Massage for Lower Back Pain, Disease Activity, and Functional Capacity of Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients: A Randomized Clinical Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Wojciech Romanowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aims to compare the effectiveness of deep tissue massage (DTM and therapeutic massage (TM in the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS patients. Materials and Methods. This was a small, randomized clinical pilot study. Subjects were 27 men with diagnosed AS, randomly assigned to DTM group or TM group. Subjects in each group had 10 sessions of massage. Outcomes included the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI, Modified Schober Test, Finger to Floor Test, chest expansion, and pain intensity of lower back. Results. There are no statistical significant differences between groups, except for BASDAI and pain intensity of lower back. Conclusions. This study suggests that massage may have clinical benefits for treating ankylosing spondylitis patients. Additional scientific research in this area is warranted.

  12. Comparison of Deep Tissue Massage and Therapeutic Massage for Lower Back Pain, Disease Activity, and Functional Capacity of Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients: A Randomized Clinical Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špiritović, Maja; Dudek, Adrian; Samborski, Włodzimierz; Straburzyńska-Lupa, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to compare the effectiveness of deep tissue massage (DTM) and therapeutic massage (TM) in the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Materials and Methods This was a small, randomized clinical pilot study. Subjects were 27 men with diagnosed AS, randomly assigned to DTM group or TM group. Subjects in each group had 10 sessions of massage. Outcomes included the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Modified Schober Test, Finger to Floor Test, chest expansion, and pain intensity of lower back. Results There are no statistical significant differences between groups, except for BASDAI and pain intensity of lower back. Conclusions This study suggests that massage may have clinical benefits for treating ankylosing spondylitis patients. Additional scientific research in this area is warranted. PMID:28845185

  13. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  14. Ultrasound and NICOM in the assessment of fluid responsiveness in patients with mild sepsis in the emergency department: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oord, Martha; Olgers, Tycho J; Doff-Holman, Mirjam; Harms, Mark P M; Ligtenberg, Jack J M; ter Maaten, Jan C

    2017-01-01

    Objective We investigated whether combining the caval index, assessment of the global contractility of the heart and measurement of stroke volume with Noninvasive Cardiac Output Monitoring (NICOM) can aid in fluid management in the emergency department (ED) in patients with sepsis. Setting A prospective observational single-centre pilot study in a tertiary care centre. Primary and secondary outcomes Ultrasound was used to assess the caval index, heart contractility and presence of B-lines in the lungs. Cardiac output and stroke volume were monitored with NICOM. Primary outcome was increase in stroke volume after a fluid bolus of 500 mL, while secondary outcome included signs of fluid overload. Results We included 37 patients with sepsis who received fluid resuscitation of at least 500 mL saline. The population was divided into patients with a high (>36.5%, n=24) and a low caval index (<36.5%, n=13). We observed a significant increase (p=0.022) in stroke volume after 1000 mL fluid in the high caval index group in contrast to the low caval index group but not after 500 mL of fluid. We did not find a significant association between global contractility of the left ventricle and the response on fluid therapy (p=0.086). No patient showed signs of fluid overload. Conclusions Our small pilot study suggests that at least 1000 mL saline is needed to induce a significant response in stroke volume in patients with sepsis and a high caval index. This amount seems to be safe, not leading to the development of fluid overload. Therefore, combining ultrasound and NICOM is feasible and may be valuable tools in the treatment of patients with sepsis in the ED. A larger trial is needed to confirm these results. PMID:28132006

  15. The Efficacy of Functional Electrical Stimulation of the Abdominal Muscles in the Treatment of Chronic Constipation in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Singleton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic constipation in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS is common and the current methods of treatment are ineffective in some patients. Anecdotal observations suggest that functional electrical stimulation (FES of the abdominal muscles may be effective in the management of constipation in these patients. Patients and Methods. In this exploratory investigation we studied the effects of FES on the whole gut transit time (WGTT and the colonic transit time (CTT. In addition, we evaluated the treatment effect on the patients’ constipation-related quality of life and on the use of laxatives and the use of manual bowel evacuation. FES was given for 30 minutes twice a day for a period of six weeks. Four female patients were studied. Results. The WGTT and CTT and constipation-related quality of life improved in all patients. The patients’ use of laxatives was reduced. No adverse effects of FES treatment were reported. Conclusion. The findings of this pilot study suggest that FES applied to the abdominal muscles may be an effective treatment modality for severe chronic constipation in patients with MS.

  16. Changes in distress of psychiatric in-patients after the changeover of junior psychiatric trainees as a function of attachment style: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dodwell

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Therapists, including psychiatrists, may act as attachment figures. Rotational training schemes necessitate the regular and frequent ending of therapeutic relationships. The effects on patients are rarely studied. This is a pilot prospective study to evaluate whether relative distress in adult psychiatric in-patients follows change in trainee psychiatrists; whether differences in distress are mediated by patient attachment style; and to provide data for power calculation. Methods: Twenty adult in-patients were assessed using the Mental Health Inventory 5 (MHI-5 scale before and after changeover of psychiatric trainees; attachment style was assessed prior to the changeover. Qualitative data were also collected. Results: The average MHI-5 scores improved with time (p = 0.021. Less improvement correlated with higher score on preoccupied attachment (rho = 0.41, p1-tail <0.05. A non-significantly stronger improvement was seen with secure/dismissing styles compared to preoccupied/fearful styles (p1-tail = 0.08. Based on these results, a study of at least 87 patients is likely to produce a statistically significant result. Most patients were not aware a staff change was due and would like to be informed by their clinical team. Conclusions: Relative distress following junior trainee changeover may have a link with patients' attachment styles.

  17. Effect of apple cider vinegar on delayed gastric emptying in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies on healthy people show that vinegar delays gastric emptying and lowers postprandial blood glucose and insulin levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of apple cider vinegar on delayed gastric emptying rate on diabetes mellitus patients. Methods Ten patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic gastroparesis, including one patient who had undergone vagotomy, were included and completed the investigator blinded crossover trial. The gastric e...

  18. Comparative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the oral antidiabetic drugs sitagliptin, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone in patients with type-2 diabetes: a cross-sectional, observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz Gul, Ozen; Cinkilic, Nilufer; Gul, Cuma Bulent; Cander, Soner; Vatan, Ozgur; Ersoy, Canan; Yılmaz, Dilek; Tuncel, Ercan

    2013-09-18

    This cross-sectional, observational pilot study was designed to investigate the frequency of different endpoints of genotoxicity (sister-chromatid exchange, total chromosome aberrations, and micronucleus formation) and cytotoxicity (mitotic index, replication index, and nuclear division index) in the peripheral lymphocytes of patients with type-2 diabetes treated with different oral anti-diabetic agents for 6 months. A total of 104 patients who met the American Diabetes Association criteria for type-2 diabetes were enrolled in the study. Of the 104 patients, 33 were being treated with sitagliptin (100mg/day), 25 with pioglitazone (30mg/day), 22 with rosiglitazone (4mg/day), and 24 with medical nutrition therapy (control group). The results for all the genotoxicity endpoints were significantly different across the four study groups. Post hoc analysis revealed that the genotoxicity observed in the sitagliptin group was significantly higher than that observed in the medical nutrition therapy group, but lower than that occurring in subjects who received thiazolidinediones. All of the three cytotoxicity endpoints were significantly lower in patients treated by oral anti-diabetic agents compared with those who received medical nutrition therapy. However, the three indexes did not differ significantly in the sitagliptin, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone groups. Taken together, these pilot data indicate that sitagliptin and thiazolidinediones may exert genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in patients with type-2 diabetes. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the possible long-term differences between oral anti-diabetic drugs in terms of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, and how these can modulate the risk of developing diabetic complications in general and cancer in particular.

  19. Effect of ankle-foot orthoses on the sagittal plane displacement of the center of mass in patients with stroke hemiplegia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Leung, Aaron K L; Akazawa, Yasushi; Hutchins, Stephen W

    2012-01-01

    Ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) have been reported to have positive effects on the temporal-spatial parameters and kinematics and kinetics of gait in patients with stroke. The center of mass (COM) may be used to represent whole body movement and energy cost in gait, and therefore COM movement would also be positively influenced with use of an appropriate AFO. To investigate the effect of AFOs on the sagittal plane displacement of the COM in patients with stroke hemiplegia. Five male subjects with stroke hemiplegia participated in this pilot study. The trajectory of the COM in the sagittal plane, gait speed, bilateral step length, step width, and bilateral stance time were analyzed while participants ambulated under 2 test conditions: with an AFO or with footwear only. The height of the 2 peaks of the vertical displacement of the COM in a gait cycle was subsequently measured and normalized to body height. Statistical analyses were conducted using a nonparametric Friedman test. Gait speed, bilateral step length, and the normalized peak height of the vertical COM trajectory during stance phase on the affected leg all revealed statistically significant increases (P hemiplegia. The results of this pilot study therefore suggested that vertical movement of COM could potentially serve as a useful parameter to evaluate the effect of an AFO.

  20. Biosimilar epoetin alfa increases haemoglobin levels and brings cognitive and socio-relational benefits to elderly transfusion-dependent multiple myeloma patients: results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Roberto; Sciara, Simona; Lambertenghi Deliliers, Giorgio; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    Anaemia is a complication reported in up to 70% of the multiple myeloma patients (MM), with remarkable clinical, cognitive and socio-relational consequences. Anaemia relates to the course of MM, normalizing in patients during remission and reappearing in relapsing/non-responding patients. In a pilot study with 31 patients with MM and transfusion-dependent anaemia, we evaluated the effects of Binocrit (biosimilar epoetin alfa) on transfusions, haemoglobin levels, mental status (mini-mental state evaluation) and the patients' social-relational functioning and quality of life (QoL). Within a 12-week interval, patients received 40.000 U Binocrit once a week. Binocrit significantly decreased the incidence of transfusion, regardless of the patients' transfusion history, and significantly increased haemoglobin levels (before-and-after-treatment median haemoglobin values = 8.20 vs. 9.40 g/dl, respectively; Wilcoxon Z test, p myeloma therapy, increments in haemoglobin levels clearly predicted both increments in socio-relational FACT-An scores (Spearman's rho = 0.60, p myeloma anaemia, whose documented benefits include amelioration of anaemia, reduction in transfusion, and improvements in the patients' social-relational functioning and cognitive well-being.

  1. Improving patient health engagement with mobile texting: A pilot study in the head and neck postoperative setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Alan; Heineman, Nathan; Thomas, Kimberly; Tang, Kai; Feinstein, Marie; Martin, Michelle Y; Sumer, Baran; Schwartz, David L

    2017-05-01

    Cell phone ownership is nearly universal. Messaging is one of its most widely used features. Texting-based interventions may improve patient engagement in the postoperative setting, but remain understudied. Patients were recruited before discharge from the hospital and received automated daily texts for 1 week providing information about expected recovery. Patients were encouraged to text questions to providers, which were triaged for intervention. Web-based surveys solicited patient feedback about the platform. Thirty-two patients were approached, and 23 patients (72%) were enrolled in the study. All study patients texted their providers, although frequency (median, 7 texts; range, 2-44 texts) varied. Unmarried patients and those facing surgical complications used the platform more frequently. Mean patient satisfaction with the platform was high (mean, 3.8 on a 4-point Likert scale). Text messaging seems feasible in the acute postoperative setting and potentially improves engagement of patients with head and neck cancer. Further study is warranted to confirm scalability and impact. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 988-995, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. High Spinal Anesthesia Enhances Anti-Inflammatory Responses in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery and Aortic Valve Replacement: Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Trevor W R; Kowalski, Stephen; Falk, Kelsey; Maguire, Doug; Freed, Darren H; HayGlass, Kent T

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery induces many physiologic changes including major inflammatory and sympathetic nervous system responses. Here, we conducted a single-centre pilot study to generate hypotheses on the potential immune impact of adding high spinal anaesthesia to general anaesthesia during cardiac surgery in adults. We hypothesized that this strategy, previously shown to blunt the sympathetic response and improve pain management, could reduce the undesirable systemic inflammatory responses caused by cardiac surgery. This prospective randomized unblinded pilot study was conducted on 14 patients undergoing cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass grafting and/or aortic valve replacement secondary to severe aortic stenosis. The primary outcome measures examined longitudinally were serum pro-inflammatory (IL-6, IL-1b, CCL2), anti-inflammatory (IL-10, TNF-RII, IL-1Ra), acute phase protein (CRP, PTX3) and cardiovascular risk (sST2) biomarkers. The kinetics of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarker was determined following surgery. All pro-inflammatory and acute phase reactant biomarker responses induced by surgical stress were indistinguishable in intensity and duration between control groups and those who also received high spinal anaesthesia. Conversely, IL-10 levels were markedly elevated in both intensity and duration in the group receiving high spinal anesthesia (p = 0.005). This hypothesis generating pilot study suggests that high spinal anesthesia can alter the net inflammatory response that results from cardiac surgery. In appropriately selected populations, this may add incremental benefit by dampening the net systemic inflammatory response during the week following surgery. Larger population studies, powered to assess immune, physiologic and clinical outcomes in both acute and longer term settings, will be required to better assess potential benefits of incorporating high spinal anesthesia. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00348920.

  3. Simple and Task-oriented Mirror Therapy for Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Rim Paik; Su-Kyoung Kim; Jae-Shin Lee; Byoung-Jin Jeon

    2014-01-01

    Objective/Background: To compare the effects of simple and task-oriented mirror therapies on upper extremity function in stroke patients with hemiplegia. Methods: A single-subject, reversal (applied behaviour analysis) research design was used, and the study included four patients and two treatments. Treatment 1 involved simple mirror therapy that was performed using simple upper limb movements. Treatment 2 involved task-oriented mirror therapy that required each patient to perform functio...

  4. Simple and Task-oriented Mirror Therapy for Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Rim Paik; Su-Kyoung Kim; Jae-Shin Lee; Byoung-Jin Jeon

    2014-01-01

    Objective/Background: To compare the effects of simple and task-oriented mirror therapies on upper extremity function in stroke patients with hemiplegia. Methods: A single-subject, reversal (applied behaviour analysis) research design was used, and the study included four patients and two treatments. Treatment 1 involved simple mirror therapy that was performed using simple upper limb movements. Treatment 2 involved task-oriented mirror therapy that required each patient to perform functio...

  5. A novel comprehensive set of fungal Real time PCR assays (fuPCR) for the detection of fungi in immunocompromised haematological patients-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Sebastian; Schuck, Anna; Kondakci, Mustafa; Haas, Rainer; Neuhausen, Nicole; Pfeffer, Klaus; Henrich, Birgit

    2016-12-01

    Fungal infections are recognized in an increasing number of patients with immunological deficits and are associated with high rates of mortality (Brown et al., 2012a). In this pilot-study, a rapid Real time PCR (fuPCR) was designed for the detection and differentiation of fungal pathogens in clinical specimens of haematological patients. The fuPCR, targeting the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) of rDNA region, is comprised of seven multiplex reactions, which were shown to be specific and sensitive for a comprehensive spectrum of clinically relevant fungal species. This was validated by testing respective fungal DNAs in each fuPCR reaction and 28 respiratory samples of fungal pneumonia-proven patients. Clinical sample sets of throat swab, EDTA-blood and blood sera from 50 patients with severe haematological malignancies, including haematopoietic stem cell transfer (HSCT), and samples from 30 healthy individuals were then analysed. In a first step, 198 samples of immunosuppressed patients were solely examined by fuPCR; and 50.8% (33/65) respiratory swabs, 4.8% (3/63) EDTA blood samples and 1.4% (1/70) blood serum samples were tested positive. In a second step, 56 respiratory samples of immunosuppressed patients and 30 of healthy individuals were simultaneously analysed by fuPCR and standard cultivation techniques. By both methods 30.4% (17/56) swabs of the immunocompromised patients were tested positive, 37.5% (21/56) were tested negative and 32.1% (18/56) were tested fuPCR positive and culture negative. In analysing the blood samples of the immunocompromised patients 5.4% (3/56) EDTA blood samples and 16.1% (9/56) sera samples were tested fuPCR-positive, whereas all samples of 30 healthy individuals with no signs of immunological deficits were tested negative by fuPCR. 38.9% (14/36) of the fungi detected in respiratory samples of the immunosuppressed patients, belonged to Candida spp., 47.2% (17/36) to Saccharomyces spp., 5.6% (2/36) to Cladosporium spp

  6. Cross-sectional pilot study about the health status of diabetic patients in city of Misurata, Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhwuegi, A S; Darez, A A; Langa, A M; Bashaga, N A

    2012-03-01

    Being a leading cause of death worldwide, epidemiological studies about diabetes mellitus have encouraged governments to initiate or improve local diabetes monitoring and prevention strategies. The main objective of this study was to examine the profile of diabetic patients in the city of Misurata, the third largest city in Libya. 260 diabetic cases of both gender randomly selected from the total number of patients admitted to the centre of diabetes and endocrine disorders, Misurata -Libya for the period between January to March 2008. Data collected from patients' files and by directly questioning the patients. SPSS software version 13 was used for the statistical analysis and presentation of the data. 87% of all patients were type 2 diabetics, while only 9.9% were type 1. 73% of all patients had family history of diabetes. 52% of all diabetic patients were obese, with more obesity in females (70% of females) than males (33.8% of males). Obesity was more pronounced in type 2 patients (56.8%) than in type 1 patients (11.5%). 38% of all patients were treated with insulin while 35.4% were treated with oral hypoglycemics. Meanwhile 32.6% of type 2 diabetic patients were treated with insulin. Only 9.2% of all patients had fasting blood sugar below 140 mg/dl, whereas 55% had levels in the range of 140-180 mg/dl, while 35.8% had levels above 180 mg/dl. Microvascular complications included retinopathy (16.2% of all patients), neuropathy (11.2%), nephropathy (1.5%) and combination of neuropathy and retinopathy (6.5%). High percentage of risk factors including obesity, family history of diabetes, hypertension and microvascular complications requires a Libyan national policy for the surveillance, prevention and control of diabetes and its complications.

  7. Correlation of serum MMP3 and other biomarkers with clinical outcomes in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The studies aimed to assess a set of biomarkers for their correlations with disease activity/severity of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 24 AS patients were treated with etanercept and prospectively followed for 12 weeks. Serum levels of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta, IL6, IL1...

  8. Innovation Practice Using Pervasive Mobile Technology Solutions to Improve Population Health Management: A Pilot Study of Gestational Diabetes Patient Care in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Nilmini; Gururajan, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare service delivery is moving forward from individual care to popu