WorldWideScience

Sample records for pilot field evaluation

  1. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  2. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  3. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  4. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  5. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L. [and others

    1998-08-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report.

  6. Magnetic field exposure of commercial airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood; Nicholas; Butler; Lackland; Hoel; Mohr

    2000-10-01

    PURPOSE: Airline pilots are exposed to magnetic fields generated by the aircraft's electrical and electronic systems. The purpose of this study was to directly measure the flight deck magnetic fields to which commercial airline pilots are exposed when flying on different aircraft types over a 75-hour flight-duty month.METHODS: Magentic field measurements were taken using personal dosimeters capable of measuring magnetic fields in the 40-800 Hz frequency range. Dosimeters were carried by either the Captain or the First Officer on Boeing 737/200, Boeing 747/400, Boeing 767/300ER, and Airbus 320 aircraft. The data were analyzed by aircraft type, with statistics based on block hours. Block hours begin when the aircraft departs the gate prior to take off and end when the aircraft returns to the gate after landing.RESULTS: Approximately 1008 block hours were recorded at a sampling rate of 3 seconds. Total block time exposure to the pilots ranged from a harmonic geometric mean of 6.7 milliGauss (mG) for the Boeing 767/300ER to 12.7 mG for the Boeing 737/200.CONCLUSIONS: Measured flight deck magnetic field levels were substantially above the 0.8 to 1 mG level typically found in the home or office and suggest the need for further study to evaluate potential health effects of long-term exposure.

  7. A pilot field evaluation on heat stress in sugarcane workers in Costa Rica: What to do next?

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, Jennifer; van Wendel de Joode, Berna; Wesseling, Catharina

    2009-01-01

    Background: Climate change is producing major impacts including increasing temperatures in tropical countries, like Costa Rica, where the sugarcane industry employs thousands of workers who are exposed to extreme heat. Objectives: This article outlines a pilot qualitative evaluation of working conditions and heat in the sugarcane industry. Design: A literature review, direct observations and exploratory interviews with workers were conducted to reach a preliminary understanding of the dimensi...

  8. Monitoring and toxicity evaluation of phytoplankton on lithium manganese oxide adsorbents at lithium recovery pilot plant field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H. O.; Kim, J. A.; Kim, J. C.; Chung, K. S.; Ryu, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    For recovery of rare mineral resources such as lithium or boron from seawater, the lithium adsorbent material have been made by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and pilot plant was conducted in Okgye Harbor, Gangneung, Korea. The application of lithium adsorbent in pilot plant, it is important to consider the impact on the marine environment. Especially phytoplankton communities are important marine microorganism to represent marine primary product. At the same time, phytoplankton is possible to induce the decrease of lithium recovery rate due to cause of biofouling to surfaces of lithium adsorbents. Therefore long-term and periodic monitoring of phytoplankton is necessary to understand the environmental impact and biofouling problems near the lithium pilot plant. The abundance and biomass of phytoplankton have been evaluated through monthly interval sampling from February 2013 to May 2015. Abundance and species diversity of phytoplankton went up to summer from winter. When lithium adsorbents were immersing to seawater, eco-toxicities of released substances were determined using Microtox with bioluminescence bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The adsorbents were soaked in sterilized seawater and aeration for 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14 days intervals under controlled temperature. Maximum EC50 concentration was 61.4% and this toxicity was showed in more than 10 days exposure.

  9. Pilot-wave theory and quantum fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyve, Ward

    2010-10-01

    Pilot-wave theories provide possible solutions to the measurement problem. In such theories, quantum systems are not only described by the state vector but also by some additional variables. These additional variables, also called beables, can be particle positions, field configurations, strings, etc. In this paper we focus our attention on pilot-wave theories in which the additional variables are field configurations. The first such theory was proposed by Bohm for the free electromagnetic field. Since Bohm, similar pilot-wave theories have been proposed for other quantum fields. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview and further development of these proposals. We discuss various bosonic quantum field theories such as the Schrödinger field, the free electromagnetic field, scalar quantum electrodynamics and the Abelian Higgs model. In particular, we compare the pilot-wave theories proposed by Bohm and by Valentini for the electromagnetic field, finding that they are equivalent. We further discuss the proposals for fermionic fields by Holland and Valentini. In the case of Holland's model we indicate that further work is required in order to show that the model is capable of reproducing the standard quantum predictions. We also consider a similar model, which does not seem to reproduce the standard quantum predictions. In the case of Valentini's model we point out a problem that seems hard to overcome.

  10. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  11. Water-quality monitoring for a pilot piling removal field evaluation, Coal Creek Slough, Washington, 2008-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Elena B.; Alvarez, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Significant Findings Water and sediment quality monitoring was conducted before and after the removal of a piling field located in Coal Creek Slough near Longview, Washington. Passive chemical samplers and continuous water-quality monitoring instruments were deployed at the piling removal site, Coal Creek Slough Site 1 (CCS1), and at a comparison site, Coal Creek Slough Site 2 (CCS2), before (2008) and after (2009) piling removal. Surface and subsurface (core) sediment samples were collected before and after piling removal and were analyzed for grain size, organic carbon content, and chemicals of concern. Significant findings from this study include: * Phenanthrene was the only compound detected in wood piling samples analyzed for a large suite of semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Metals potentially associated with wood treatment were detected in the wood piling samples at low concentrations. * Organic carbon was slightly lower in core samples from CCS1 in pre-removal (2008) and post-removal (2009) samples than in surface samples from both sites in both years. * Grain-size class distributions were relatively uniform between sites and years. * Thirty-four out of 110 chemicals of concern were detected in sediments. Eight of those detected were anthropogenic waste indicator (AWI) compounds, 18 were PAHs, 4 were sterols, and 4 were metals potentially associated with wood treatment. * Nearly all reported concentrations of chemicals of concern in sediments are qualified as estimates, primarily due to interferences in extracts resulting from complex sample matrices. Indole, perylene, and fluoranthene are reported without qualification for some of the samples, and the metals are reported without qualification for all samples. * The highest frequency of detection of chemicals of concern was seen in the pre-removal surface samples at both sites. * AWI compounds were detected less frequently and at lower concentrations during the post

  12. Evaluation of the Facilitated Communication Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-Martin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Office of Special Education and Student Services asked the Office of Shared Accountability to evaluate the "Facilitated Communication Pilot." In facilitated communication (FC), people with communication impairments express themselves by typing with the aid of a communication partner, called a facilitator, who provides physical (and…

  13. 78 FR 20924 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... Pilot Evaluation Program for Investigational New Drug Applications AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...) applications to participate in a pilot evaluation program for CBER's eSubmitter Program (eSubmitter). CBER's e... FDA. II. eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program Expectations The eSubmitter pilot evaluation program...

  14. 500-kW DCHX pilot-plant evaluation testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlinak, A.; Lee, T.; Loback, J.; Nichols, K.; Olander, R.; Oshmyansky, S.; Roberts, G.; Werner, D.

    1981-10-01

    Field tests with the 500 kW Direct Contact Pilot Plant were conducted utilizing brine from well Mesa 6-2. The tests were intended to develop comprehensive performance data, design criteria, and economic factors for the direct contact power plant. The tests were conducted in two phases. The first test phase was to determine specific component performance of the DCHX, turbine, condensers and pumps, and to evaluate chemical mass balances of non-condensible gases in the IC/sub 4/ loop and IC/sub 4/ in the brine stream. The second test phase was to provide a longer term run at nearly fixed operating conditions in order to evaluate plant performance and identify operating cost data for the pilot plant. During these tests the total accumulated run time on major system components exceeded 1180 hours with 777 hours on the turbine prime mover. Direct contact heat exchanger performance exceeded the design prediction.

  15. Pilot Implementation: Learning from Field Tests in IS Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a fiveelement model of pilot...... implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  16. Pilot Implementation: Learning from Field Tests in IS Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a fiveelement model of pilot...

  17. Models of Pilot Behavior and Their Use to Evaluate the State of Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirgl, Miroslav; Jalovecky, Rudolf; Bradac, Zdenek

    2016-07-01

    This article discusses the possibilities of obtaining new information related to human behavior, namely the changes or progressive development of pilots' abilities during training. The main assumption is that a pilot's ability can be evaluated based on a corresponding behavioral model whose parameters are estimated using mathematical identification procedures. The mean values of the identified parameters are obtained via statistical methods. These parameters are then monitored and their changes evaluated. In this context, the paper introduces and examines relevant mathematical models of human (pilot) behavior, the pilot-aircraft interaction, and an example of the mathematical analysis.

  18. Pasteurization of strawberry puree using a pilot plant pulsed electric fields (PEF) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The processing of strawberry puree by pulsed electric fields (PEF) in a pilot plant system has never been evaluated. In addition, a method does not exist to validate the exact number and shape of the pulses applied during PEF processing. Both buffered peptone water (BPW) and fresh strawberry puree (...

  19. GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, Margaret; Marentette, Christina; Bujosa, Robert; Taylor, Jessica; Lewis, Preston

    2016-01-01

    During the spring of 2016, from April 4 - May 27, sixteen GLOBE schools participated in the GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study. Thirteen teachers from these schools had previously participated in the NASA LEARN program (Long-term Experience in Authentic Research with NASA) where they were GLOBE trained in Atmosphere protocols, and engaged in 1-3 years of research under the mentorship of NASA scientists. Each school was loaned two aerosol instruments for the Campaign duration, either 2 GLOBE sun photometers, 2 Calitoo sun photometers, or 1 of each. This allowed for students to make measurements side-by-side and in the case of the Calitoos, to compare AOT results immediately with each other for better consistency in data collection. Additionally, as part of the Field Campaign evaluation, multiple instruments allow for an assessment of the ease of use of each instrument for grade level of students, whether in middle school or high school. Before the Campaign, all GLOBE and Calitoo instruments were 'checked out' against an AERONET, then checked again upon return after the Campaign. By examining all data, before, during and after the Campaign, this gives an indication of instrument performance and proficiency obtained by the students. Support was provided to each teacher and their students at the level requested, via email, phone or video conferencing.

  20. Evaluation of Piloted Inputs for Onboard Frequency Response Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Martos, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Frequency response estimation results are presented using piloted inputs and a real-time estimation method recently developed for multisine inputs. A nonlinear simulation of the F-16 and a Piper Saratoga research aircraft were subjected to different piloted test inputs while the short period stabilator/elevator to pitch rate frequency response was estimated. Results show that the method can produce accurate results using wide-band piloted inputs instead of multisines. A new metric is introduced for evaluating which data points to include in the analysis and recommendations are provided for applying this method with piloted inputs.

  1. Pilot-wave approaches to quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Struyve, Ward

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of recent work on pilot-wave approaches to quantum field theory. In such approaches, systems are not only described by their wave function, as in standard quantum theory, but also by some additional variables. In the non-relativistic pilot-wave theory of de Broglie and Bohm those variables are particle positions. In the context of quantum field theory, there are two natural choices, namely particle positions and fields. The incorporation of those variables makes it possible to provide an objective description of nature in which rather ambiguous notions such as `measurement' and `observer' play no fundamental role. As such, the theory is free of the conceptual difficulties, such as the measurement problem, that plague standard quantum theory.

  2. Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces: OECD/CELE Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ahlefeld, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    CELE's International Pilot Project on Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces aims to assist education authorities, schools and others to maximise the use of and investment in learning environments. This article provides an update on the pilot project, which is currently being implemented in Brazil, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal and the United…

  3. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-10-20

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low

  4. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Sarah H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chamness, Michele A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Petersen, Joseph M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Maddalena, Randy L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Destaillats, Hugo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Russell, M. L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low

  5. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunn, Amoret L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fritz, Brad G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

  6. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Assisted in vitro Electroporation: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novickij, Vitalij; Grainys, Audrius; Lastauskienė, Eglė; Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Pamedytytė, Dovilė; Kalėdienė, Lilija; Novickij, Jurij; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-09-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon occurring due to exposure of cells to Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) which leads to increase of membrane permeability. Electroporation is used in medicine, biotechnology, and food processing. Recently, as an alternative to electroporation by PEF, Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields (PEMF) application causing similar biological effects was suggested. Since induced electric field in PEMF however is 2–3 magnitudes lower than in PEF electroporation, the membrane permeabilization mechanism remains hypothetical. We have designed pilot experiments where Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida lusitaniae cells were subjected to single 100–250 μs electrical pulse of 800 V with and without concomitant delivery of magnetic pulse (3, 6 and 9 T). As expected, after the PEF pulses only the number of Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent cells has increased, indicative of membrane permeabilization. We further show that single sub-millisecond magnetic field pulse did not cause detectable poration of yeast. Concomitant exposure of cells to pulsed electric (PEF) and magnetic field (PMF) however resulted in the increased number PI fluorescent cells and reduced viability. Our results show increased membrane permeability by PEF when combined with magnetic field pulse, which can explain electroporation at considerably lower electric field strengths induced by PEMF compared to classical electroporation.

  7. Pilot evaluation in TENCompetence: a theory-driven model1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Schoonenboom; H. Sligte; A. Moghnieh; M. Specht; C. Glahn; K. Stefanov

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a theory-driven evaluation model that is used in evaluating four pilots in which an infrastructure for lifelong competence development, which is currently being developed, is validated. The model makes visible the separate implementation steps that connect the envisaged infrastr

  8. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume II: pilot state reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    Volume II of the Energy Extension Service Evaluation presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot-state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement a 19-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. Volume II provides a case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each state, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each state for more detailed study and survey research. Some survey data and analysis are presented for the emphasis programs.

  9. Pilot evaluation in TENCompetence: a theory-driven model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonenboom, Judith; Sligte, Henk; Moghnieh, Ayman; Specht, Marcus; Glahn, Christian; Stefanov, Krassen

    2007-01-01

    Schoonenboom, J., Sligte, H., Moghnieh, A., Specht, M., Glahn, C., & Stefanov, K. (2007). Pilot evaluation in TENCompetence: a theory-driven model. In T. Navarette, J. Blat & R. Koper (Eds.). Proceedings of the 3rd TENCompetence Open Workshop 'Current Research on IMS Learning Design and Lifelong Com

  10. Evaluating Reactions to Community Bridge Initiative Pilot Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldewyn, Julie; Brain, Roslynn; Stephens, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Does participating in an integrated service-learning project aimed at improving local sustainability issues result in significant professional real-world application for students? This study aimed to answer that question by evaluating student reactions to pilot classes featuring a sustainability-based service-learning program, Community Bridge…

  11. Pilot Field Demonstration of Alternative Fuels in Force Projection Petroleum and Water Distribution Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-04

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED PILOT FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS IN FORCE PROJECTION PETROLEUM AND WATER DISTRIBUTION EQUIPMENT...Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060- 6218. Disposition Instructions Destroy this report when no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator ...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED PILOT FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS IN FORCE PROJECTION PETROLEUM AND WATER DISTRIBUTION EQUIPMENT

  12. Economic evaluation of CISM : a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogt, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    air traffic controllers, critical incident stress management, CISM, critical incidents, critical incident stress, cost-benefit-analysis, economic evaluation, efficiency, return on investment......air traffic controllers, critical incident stress management, CISM, critical incidents, critical incident stress, cost-benefit-analysis, economic evaluation, efficiency, return on investment...

  13. Report of Field Test Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth.

    Reported by the Great Lakes Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center are field test evaluation of 18 auditory instructional materials for use with handicapped children who learn best through the auditory modality. Among materials evaluated are a taped program on use of the abacus and a cassette audiotape on bird habits and sounds.…

  14. A Technology for Program Documentation and Evaluation: A Pilot Meta-Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter J.

    Meta evaluation, or the evaluation of evaluations, was applied to a technology for program documentation and evaluation used in a mainstreaming project. The technology consisted of four phases: (1) planning for decision-making; (2) documenting actual program outcomes; (3) implementing decisions; and (4) instituting program renewal. This pilot meta…

  15. Technical Details on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-01-01

    The primary focus of the BDBE pilot project was the review of BDBE analysis and mitigation features at four DOE nuclear facilities representing a range of DOE sites, nuclear facility types/activities, and responsible program offices. The pilots looked at (1) how beyond design basis accidents were evaluated and documented in the facility Documented Safety Analysis, (2) potential BDBE vulnerabilities and margins to failure of facility safety features as obtained from general area and specific system walkdowns and design documents reviews, and (3) preparations made in facility and site emergency management programs to respond to severe accidents. It also evaluated whether draft BDBE guidance on safety analysis and emergency management could be used to improve the analysis of and preparations for mitigating severe and beyond design basis accidents. The details of these activities are organized in this report as described below.

  16. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Pilot Study: XRF Evaluation of Select Pre-Hanford Orchards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Gorton, Alicia M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Pino, Christian; Martinez, Dominique M.; Rana, Komal; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-20

    Prior to the acquisition of land by the U.S. Department of War in February 1943 and the creation of the Hanford Site, the land along the Columbia River was home to over 1000 people. Farming and orchard operations by both homesteaders and commercial organizations were prevalent. Orchard activities and the associated application of lead arsenate pesticide ceased in 1943, when residents were moved from the Hanford Site at the beginning of the Manhattan Project. Today, the residues from historical application of lead arsenate pesticide persist in some locations on the Hanford Site. In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology established the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The pre-Hanford orchard lands identified as the 100-OL-1 OU are located south of the Columbia River and east of the present-day Vernita Bridge, and extend southeast to the former Hanford townsite. The discontinuous orchard lands within 100-OL-1 OU are approximately 20 km2 (5000 ac). A pilot study was conducted to support the approval of the remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 OU. This pilot study evaluated the use of a field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of lead arsenate pesticide residues in the OU. The objectives of the pilot study included evaluating a field portable XRF analyzer as the analytical method for decision making, estimating the nature and extent of lead and arsenic in surface soils in four decision units, evaluating the results for the purpose of optimizing the sampling approach implemented in the remedial investigation, and collecting information to improve the cost estimate and planning the cultural resources review for sampling activities in the remedial investigation. Based on

  17. Pain assessement and management in surgical cancer patients: pilot and evaluation of a continuing education program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Huijer-Abu Saad, H.; Grypdonck, M.

    1995-01-01

    In a pilot study, a continuing education program on pain assessment and management was implemented and evaluated. Questionnaires were completed by the nurse participants at the beginning, the end, and 2 months after the end of the pilot program. After the pilot program, participants reported having

  18. Pain assessement and management in surgical cancer patients: pilot and evaluation of a continuing education program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Huijer-Abu Saad, H.; Grypdonck, M.

    1995-01-01

    In a pilot study, a continuing education program on pain assessment and management was implemented and evaluated. Questionnaires were completed by the nurse participants at the beginning, the end, and 2 months after the end of the pilot program. After the pilot program, participants reported having

  19. NHS Blood Tracking Pilot: City University Evaluation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Kate; Shabestari, Omid; Adriano, Juan; Kay, Jonathan; Roudsari, Abdul

    Automation of healthcare processes is an emergent theme in the drive to increase patient safety. The Mayday Hospital has been chosen as the pilot site for the implementation of the Electronic Clinical Transfusion Management System to track blood from the point of ordering to the final transfusion. The Centre for Health Informatics at City University is carrying out an independent evaluation of the system implementation using a variety of methodologies to both formatively inform the implementation process and summatively provide an account of the lessons learned for future implementations.

  20. An evaluation approach for research project pilot technological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino-Jesus, Elsa; Sarraipa, Joao; Jardim-Goncalves, Ricardo

    2013-10-01

    In a world increasingly more competitive and in a constantly development and growth it's important that companies have economic tools, like frameworks to help them to evaluate and validate the technology development to better fits in each company particular needs. The paper presents an evaluation approach for research project pilot applications to stimulate its implementation and deployment, increasing its adequacy and acceptance to their stakeholders and consequently providing new business profit and opportunities. Authors used the DECIDE evaluation framework as a major guide to this approach, which was tested in the iSURF project to support the implementation of an interoperability service utility for collaborative supply chain planning across multiple domains supported by RFID devices.

  1. Effects of Bluetooth device electromagnetic field on hearing: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, R; Prepageran, N; Prepagaran, N; Rahmat, O; Zulkiflee, A B; Hufaida, K S

    2012-04-01

    The Bluetooth wireless headset has been promoted as a 'hands-free' device with a low emission of electromagnetic radiation. To evaluate potential changes in hearing function as a consequence of using Bluetooth devices, by assessing changes in pure tone audiography and distortion production otoacoustic emissions. Prospective study. Thirty adult volunteers were exposed to a Bluetooth headset device (1) on 'standby' setting for 6 hours and (2) at full power for 10 minutes. Post-exposure hearing was evaluated using pure tone audiography and distortion production otoacoustic emission testing. There were no statistically significant changes in hearing, as measured above, following either exposure type. Exposure to the electromagnetic field emitted by a Bluetooth headset, as described above, did not decrease hearing thresholds or alter distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

  2. THE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN EVALUATION MODEL FOR VOCATIONAL PILOT PROGRAMS. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUCKMAN, BRUCE W.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT WERE (1) TO DEVELOP AN EVALUATION MODEL IN THE FORM OF A HOW-TO-DO-IT MANUAL WHICH OUTLINES PROCEDURES FOR OBTAINING IMMEDIATE INFORMATION REGARDING THE DEGREE TO WHICH A PILOT PROGRAM ACHIEVES ITS STATED FINAL OBJECTIVES, (2) TO EVALUATE THIS MODEL BY USING IT TO EVALUATE TWO ONGOING PILOT PROGRAMS, AND (3) TO…

  3. Pilot evaluation of the text4baby mobile health program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans William Douglas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile phone technologies for health promotion and disease prevention have evolved rapidly, but few studies have tested the efficacy of mobile health in full-fledged programs. Text4baby is an example of mobile health based on behavioral theory, and it delivers text messages to traditionally underserved pregnant women and new mothers to change their health, health care beliefs, practices, and behaviors in order to improve clinical outcomes. The purpose of this pilot evaluation study is to assess the efficacy of this text messaging campaign. Methods We conducted a randomized pilot evaluation study. All participants were pregnant women first presenting for care at the Fairfax County, Virginia Health Department. We randomized participants to enroll in text4baby and receive usual health care (intervention, or continue simply to receive usual care (control. We then conducted a 24-item survey by telephone of attitudes and behaviors related to text4baby. We surveyed participants at baseline, before text4baby was delivered to the intervention group, and at follow-up at approximately 28 weeks of baby’s gestational age. Results We completed 123 baseline interviews in English and in Spanish. Overall, the sample was predominantly of Hispanic origin (79.7% with an average age of 27.6 years. We completed 90 follow-up interviews, and achieved a 73% retention rate. We used a logistic generalized estimating equation model to evaluate intervention effects on measured outcomes. We found a significant effect of text4baby intervention exposure on increased agreement with the attitude statement “I am prepared to be a new mother” (OR = 2.73, CI = 1.04, 7.18, p = 0.042 between baseline and follow-up. For those who had attained a high school education or greater, we observed a significantly higher overall agreement to attitudes against alcohol consumption during pregnancy (OR = 2.80, CI = 1.13, 6.90, p = 0.026. We also observed a

  4. Evaluation of UK Integrated Care Pilots: research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Ling

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In response to concerns that the needs of the aging population for well-integrated care were increasing, the English National Health Service (NHS appointed 16 Integrated Care Pilots following a national competition. The pilots have a range of aims including development of new organisational structures to support integration, changes in staff roles, reducing unscheduled emergency hospital admissions, reduced length of hospital stay, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing cost. This paper describes the evaluation of the initiative which has been commissioned.Study design and data collection methods: A mixed methods approach has been adopted including interviews with staff and patients, non-participant observation of meetings, structured written feedback from sites, questionnaires to patients and staff, and analysis of routinely collected hospital utilisation data for patients/service users. The qualitative analysis aims to identify the approaches taken to integration by the sites, the benefits which result, the context in which benefits have resulted, and the mechanisms by which they occur.Methods of analysis: The quantitative analysis adopts a 'difference in differences' approach comparing health care utilisation before and after the intervention with risk-matched controls. The qualitative data analysis adopts a 'theory of change' approach in which we triangulate data from the quantitative analysis with qualitative data in order to describe causal effects (what happens when an independent variable changes and causal mechanisms (what connects causes to their effects. An economic analysis will identify what incremental resources are required to make integration succeed and how they can be combined efficiently to produce better outcomes for patients.Conclusion: This evaluation will produce a portfolio of evidence aimed at strengthening the evidence base for integrated care, and in particular identifying the context in which

  5. Evaluation of UK Integrated Care Pilots: research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Ling

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In response to concerns that the needs of the aging population for well-integrated care were increasing, the English National Health Service (NHS appointed 16 Integrated Care Pilots following a national competition. The pilots have a range of aims including development of new organisational structures to support integration, changes in staff roles, reducing unscheduled emergency hospital admissions, reduced length of hospital stay, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing cost. This paper describes the evaluation of the initiative which has been commissioned. Study design and data collection methods: A mixed methods approach has been adopted including interviews with staff and patients, non-participant observation of meetings, structured written feedback from sites, questionnaires to patients and staff, and analysis of routinely collected hospital utilisation data for patients/service users. The qualitative analysis aims to identify the approaches taken to integration by the sites, the benefits which result, the context in which benefits have resulted, and the mechanisms by which they occur. Methods of analysis: The quantitative analysis adopts a 'difference in differences' approach comparing health care utilisation before and after the intervention with risk-matched controls. The qualitative data analysis adopts a 'theory of change' approach in which we triangulate data from the quantitative analysis with qualitative data in order to describe causal effects (what happens when an independent variable changes and causal mechanisms (what connects causes to their effects. An economic analysis will identify what incremental resources are required to make integration succeed and how they can be combined efficiently to produce better outcomes for patients. Conclusion: This evaluation will produce a portfolio of evidence aimed at strengthening the evidence base for integrated care, and in particular identifying the context in which

  6. Evaluation of UK Integrated Care Pilots: research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Tom; Bardsley, Martin; Adams, John; Lewis, Richard; Roland, Martin

    2010-09-27

    In response to concerns that the needs of the aging population for well-integrated care were increasing, the English National Health Service (NHS) appointed 16 Integrated Care Pilots following a national competition. The pilots have a range of aims including development of new organisational structures to support integration, changes in staff roles, reducing unscheduled emergency hospital admissions, reduced length of hospital stay, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing cost. This paper describes the evaluation of the initiative which has been commissioned. A mixed methods approach has been adopted including interviews with staff and patients, non-participant observation of meetings, structured written feedback from sites, questionnaires to patients and staff, and analysis of routinely collected hospital utilisation data for patients/service users. The qualitative analysis aims to identify the approaches taken to integration by the sites, the benefits which result, the context in which benefits have resulted, and the mechanisms by which they occur. The quantitative analysis adopts a 'difference in differences' approach comparing health care utilisation before and after the intervention with risk-matched controls. The qualitative data analysis adopts a 'theory of change' approach in which we triangulate data from the quantitative analysis with qualitative data in order to describe causal effects (what happens when an independent variable changes) and causal mechanisms (what connects causes to their effects). An economic analysis will identify what incremental resources are required to make integration succeed and how they can be combined efficiently to produce better outcomes for patients. This evaluation will produce a portfolio of evidence aimed at strengthening the evidence base for integrated care, and in particular identifying the context in which interventions are likely to be effective. These data will support a series of evaluation judgements aimed

  7. Quantitative approach to skin field cancerization using a nanoencapsulated photodynamic therapy agent: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passos SK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Simone K Passos,1,2 Paulo EN de Souza,3 Priscila KP Soares,1,3 Danglades RM Eid,1,2 Fernando L Primo,4 Antonio Cláudio Tedesco,4 Zulmira GM Lacava,1 Paulo C Morais3,51University of Brasília, Institute of Biological Sciences, DF, Brazil; 2Foundation for Teaching and Research on Health Sciences, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 3University of Brasília, Institute of Physics, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Philosophy, Sciences and Letters of Ribeirão Preto, Laboratory of Photobiology and Photomedicine, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil; 5Department of Control Science and Engineering, Hua-Zhong University of Science and Technology, Wuham, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: This paper introduces a new nanoformulation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (nano-ALA as well as a novel quantitative approach towards evaluating field cancerization for actinic keratosis and/or skin photodamage. In this pilot study, we evaluated field cancerization using nano-ALA and methyl aminolevulinate (MAL, the latter being commercialized as Metvix®.Methods and results: Photodynamic therapy was used for the treatment of patients with selected skin lesions, whereas the fluorescence of the corresponding photosensitizer was used to evaluate the time evolution of field cancerization in a quantitative way. Field cancerization was quantified using newly developed color image segmentation software. Using photodynamic therapy as the precancer skin treatment and the approach introduced herein for evaluation of fluorescent area, we found that the half-life of field cancerization reduction was 43.3 days and 34.3 days for nano-ALA and MAL, respectively. We also found that nano-ALA targeted about 45% more skin lesion areas than MAL. Further, we found the mean reduction in area of skin field cancerization was about 10% greater for nano-ALA than for MAL.Conclusion: Although preliminary, our findings indicate that the efficacy of nano-ALA in

  8. Basic Pilot Code Development for Two-Fluid, Three-Field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Jun; Bae, S. W.; Lee, Y. J.; Chung, B. D.; Hwang, M.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, D. H

    2006-03-15

    A basic pilot code for one-dimensional, transient, two-fluid, three-field model has been developed. Using 9 conceptual problems, the basic pilot code has been verified. The results of the verification are summarized below: - It was confirmed that the basic pilot code can simulate various flow conditions (such as single-phase liquid flow, bubbly flow, slug/churn turbulent flow, annular-mist flow, and single-phase vapor flow) and transitions of the flow conditions. A mist flow was not simulated, but it seems that the basic pilot code can simulate mist flow conditions. - The pilot code was programmed so that the source terms of the governing equations and numerical solution schemes can be easily tested. - The mass and energy conservation was confirmed for single-phase liquid and single-phase vapor flows. - It was confirmed that the inlet pressure and velocity boundary conditions work properly. - It was confirmed that, for single- and two-phase flows, the velocity and temperature of non-existing phase are calculated as intended. - During the simulation of a two-phase flow, the calculation reaches a quasisteady state with small-amplitude oscillations. The oscillations seem to be induced by some numerical causes. The research items for the improvement of the basic pilot code are listed in the last section of this report.

  9. Medical Podcasting in Iran; Pilot, Implementation and Attitude Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Dehpour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Podcasting has become a popular means of transferring knowledge in higher education through making lecture contents available to students at their convenience. Accessing courses on media players provides students with enhanced learning opportunities. Development of teaching methods able to cope with ever-changing nature of medicine is crucial to train the millennium students. Pharmacology education in Tehran University of Medical Sciences has been based on lectures so far; our aim was to implement a pilot study to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of offering the course contents as podcasts as well as evaluating whether such program can be feasible in our educational program. 46% of students downloaded the podcast according to our download center. 48% favored usage of both internet and DVD-ROM concurrently. Overall 96% of students perceived that podcasting had a positive impact on their learning in pharmacology course. Our results indicate that most of attendants proposed the positive yields of podcasting despite low usage of it, mainly as a pre-class preparing tool.

  10. Energy Evaluation of a New Construction Pilot Community: Fresno, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, A.; Poerschke, A.; Rapport, A.; Wayne, M.

    2014-06-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  11. Evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Laura; Bruce, Natalie; Suh, Kathryn N; Roth, Virginia

    2014-07-01

    Environmental auditing is an important tool to ensure consistent and effective cleaning. Our pilot study compared an alcohol-based fluorescent marking product and an adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence product for use in an environmental auditing program to determine which product was more practical and acceptable to users. Both products were tested on 15 preselected high touch objects in randomly selected patient rooms, following regular daily cleaning. A room was considered a "pass" if ≥80% of surfaces were adequately cleaned as defined by manufacturers' guidelines. A qualitative survey assessed user preference and operational considerations. Using fluorescent marking, 9 of 37 patient rooms evaluated (24%) were considered a "pass" after daily cleaning. Using adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence, 21 of 37 patient rooms passed (57%). There was great variability in results between different high touch objects. Eighty percent of users preferred the alcohol-based fluorescent marking product because it provided an effective visual aid to coach staff on proper cleaning techniques and allowed simple and consistent application. Environmental auditing using translucent, alcohol-based fluorescent marking best met the requirements of our organization. Our results reinforce the importance of involving a multidisciplinary team in evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of thirteen civil infrastructure monitoring pilots in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, G.T.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Drieman, R.

    2016-01-01

    The number of monitoring pilots in Dutch civil infrastructure with sensing systems is increasing only slowly over the last decade. To identify and help understand barriers for wider implementation of moni-toring systems, SBRCURnet-committee 1992 analysed 13 monitoring pilots. The committee consisted

  13. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume I. Evaluation summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    The EES pilot program was initiated in August 1977, when 10 states were selected on a competitive basis for participation. The pilot states (Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) devoted the first 6 months to start-up activities. This document is a follow-up report to the three volume Evaluation Summary of the first year of the pilot EES program published in September 1979. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the impacts and costs of the two years of the pilot program, and to check the consistency of findings over the two year period. The analysis addresses the following: (1) were the impact findings of Year I and Year II consistent, or did Year I and Year II attitudes and behavior vary. If variation existed, could it be attributed to program changes as the EES progressed from a start-up phase (Year I) to more normal service delivery (Year II); and (2) did costs of service delivery change (again reflecting start-up and normal service delivery costs). Did cost changes affect conclusions about the relative cost effectiveness of delivering services to different target audiences.

  14. A Pilot for a Very Large Array H I Deep Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández, Ximena; van Gorkom, J. H.; Hess, Kelley M.; Pisano, D. J.; Kreckel, Kathryn; Momjian, Emmanuel; Popping, Attila; Oosterloo, Tom; Chomiuk, Laura; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Henning, Patricia A.; Schiminovich, David; Bershady, Matthew A.; Wilcots, Eric M.; Scoville, Nick

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution 21 cm H I deep fields provide spatially and kinematically resolved images of neutral hydrogen at different redshifts, which are key to understanding galaxy evolution across cosmic time and testing predictions of cosmological simulations. Here we present results from a pilot for an H

  15. Virtual field trips as physically active lessons for children: a pilot study.

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, E.; Shelton, N.; Dunsmuir, S.; Duke-Williams, O; Stamatakis, E

    2015-01-01

    The modern classroom is an inherently sedentary environment. Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) using interactive whiteboards to explore virtual scenes are a potential method of converting sedentary class-time into physically active teaching. This pilot aimed to assess the effects of a developed VFT on physical activity and learning in primary-school children.

  16. Energy Evaluation of a New Construction Pilot Community: Fresno, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Poerschke, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rapport, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wayne, M. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the Building America House Simulation Protocols developed by NREL. Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package from a single test house into multiple houses. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a measures package and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  17. Bell Creek field micellar-polymer pilot demonstration. Third annual report, October 1978-September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldburg, A.

    1980-07-01

    Gary Energy Corporation is conducting a DOE Demonstration Pilot to determine if micellar-polymer flooding is an economically feasible technique to enhance oil recovery from the Bell Creek Field, Powder River County, southeastern Montana. The pilot is a contained 40-acre 5-spot located in a representative watered-out portion of Unit A Reservoir. The pay is sandstone with an average net pay of 6.4 feet, air permeability of 1050 md, and water TDS of 4000 ppM. The current average remaining oil saturation in the 40-acre pilot area is estimated to be 28%. The pilot has four injectors (Wells MPP-1, MPP-2, MPP-3, and MPP-4) and one producer (Well 12-1). The overall micellar-polymer oil recovery is estimated at 47% of the remaining oil at the initiation of the micellar-polymer flood. In the third contract year (October 1978 to September 1979), all tasks including the initiation of soluble oil/micellar injection were completed. Test site development included completion of: (1) radioactive tracer survey and analysis, (2) core analysis, (3) pressure pulse tests and analysis, (4) reservoir description, and (5) test site facilities. Based on test site development data, soluble oil/micellar formulation was finalized and mathematical simulation work by Intercomp completed. The preflush injection phase of the demonstration program was completed, and the soluble oil/micellar injection was initiated at the end of the contract year. The pilot demonstration project has progressed as scheduled.

  18. New Manning System Field Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    our Analytic hodel (see Chapter 5, New Manning Svestem Field Evaluacion . Technical Revore No. I, RAJL-, November c t, e number or soldiers retaking...and meaningful performance measures are not only crucial to the WRAIR N Field Evaluacion but also to the Army. To know which unit does betzer than

  19. Fundamental Study of Evaluation at Berthing Training for Pilot Trainees Using a Ship Maneuvering Simulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kazuki Inoue; Tadatsugi Okazaki; Koji Murai; Yuji Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Use of the ship maneuvering simulator (SMS) is at the core of pilot trainees education and training, so it is desirable to have an evaluation method that can be completed shortly after each berthing training session...

  20. Process evaluation of the Bonneville Power Administration Residential Weatherization Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerman, D.I.; Bronfman, B.H.; Tonn, B.

    1983-10-01

    An evaluation of the BPA Residential Weatherization Pilot Program is described. Data for this report were gathered at the eleven public utilities participating in the program, at the BPA area and district offices serving these utilities, and at BPA headquarters. This process evaluation of the Pilot Program documents the history of the program, outlines the implementation strategies adopted by the Pilot utilities, describes the role of the BPA area and district offices in the program, and indicates what was learned by BPA and the utilities in the period the program operated.

  1. Design and pilot evaluation of the RAH-66 Comanche Core AFCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogler, Donald L., Jr.; Keller, James F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the design and pilot evaluation of the Core Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS) for the Reconnaissance/Attack Helicopter (RAH-66) Comanche. During the period from November 1991 through February 1992, the RAH-66 Comanche control laws were evaluated through a structured pilot acceptance test using a motion base simulator. Design requirements, descriptions of the control law design, and handling qualities data collected from ADS-33 maneuvers are presented.

  2. Pilot Evaluation Study of the Life Skills Program REBOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Jungaberle

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study is pilot evaluation of the life skills program REBOUND in a school context focusing on substance use, risk perception, and knowledge about psychoactive substances ( n IG + CG = 723 students in five schools and 46 classes, Mage = 14.8, range 14-18 for the total sample and in the subgroups gender, age, and school type. Main goal of the study is collecting evidence for program optimization. A controlled study was carried out with repeated measurement before and after the intervention (4-6 months. Multilevel analyses, ANCOVA, and logistic regression analyses were applied to measure the effects. Overall, significantly lower incidence rates of drunkenness (odds ratio [OR] = .55; p = .033, improved knowledge about psychoactive substances (p = .006, lower personal (p = .013 and general tobacco risk perception among users (p = .002, and lower general tobacco (p = .018 and cannabis (p = .000 risk perception in non-users were found in the total intervention group. In subgroups, significantly lower rates for the incidence of drunkenness can be shown for males (p = .008 and for younger participants (p = .004. Students at academic high school (German Gymnasium showed a decrease in 30-day prevalence for alcohol (p = .017 and cannabis (p = .014, and they improved in their knowledge about psychoactive substances (p = .000. In vocational high school classes (German Realschule, there was an increase in the relative alcohol risk perception of the students (p = .019. REBOUND contributes to a controlled use of alcohol and increases knowledge about psychoactive substances. REBOUND has various effects on the examined subgroups age, gender, and school type: Males, younger students, and students in academic high school benefitted more from the course regarding consumption-related criteria. We suggest a program optimization specific to school form and age, inclusion of a tobacco intervention, and the use of more gender-segregated interventions.

  3. Simulation Evaluation of Pilot Inputs for Real Time Modeling During Commercial Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Borja; Ranaudo, Richard; Oltman, Ryan; Myhre, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Aircraft dynamics characteristics can only be identified from flight data when the aircraft dynamics are excited sufficiently. A preliminary study was conducted into what types and levels of manual piloted control excitation would be required for accurate Real-Time Parameter IDentification (RTPID) results by commercial airline pilots. This includes assessing the practicality for the pilot to provide this excitation when cued, and to further understand if pilot inputs during various phases of flight provide sufficient excitation naturally. An operationally representative task was evaluated by 5 commercial airline pilots using the NASA Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD). Results showed that it is practical to use manual pilot inputs only as a means of achieving good RTPID in all phases of flight and in flight turbulence conditions. All pilots were effective in satisfying excitation requirements when cued. Much of the time, cueing was not even necessary, as just performing the required task provided enough excitation for accurate RTPID estimation. Pilot opinion surveys reported that the additional control inputs required when prompted by the excitation cueing were easy to make, quickly mastered, and required minimal training.

  4. Jamaica National Net-Billing Pilot Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, Elizabeth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stout, Sherry [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peterson, Kimberly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-12-18

    This technical report discusses the effectiveness of the Jamaica Public Service Company Limited Net-Billing Pilot Program. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed data from a wide range of stakeholders, conducted in-country research, and compared program elements to common interconnection practices to form programmatic recommendations for the Jamaica context. NREL finds that the net-billing pilot program has successfully contributed to the support of the emerging solar market in Jamaica with the interconnection of 80 systems under the program for a total of 1.38 megawatts (MW) at the time of original analysis.

  5. Development and Verification of a Pilot Code based on Two-fluid Three-field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Bae, S. W.; Lee, Y. J.; Chung, B. D.; Jeong, J. J.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, D. H

    2006-09-15

    In this study, a semi-implicit pilot code is developed for a one-dimensional channel flow as three-fields. The three fields are comprised of a gas, continuous liquid and entrained liquid fields. All the three fields are allowed to have their own velocities. The temperatures of the continuous liquid and the entrained liquid are, however, assumed to be equilibrium. The interphase phenomena include heat and mass transfer, as well as momentum transfer. The fluid/structure interaction, generally, include both heat and momentum transfer. Assuming adiabatic system, only momentum transfer is considered in this study, leaving the wall heat transfer for the future study. Using 10 conceptual problems, the basic pilot code has been verified. The results of the verification are summarized below: It was confirmed that the basic pilot code can simulate various flow conditions (such as single-phase liquid flow, bubbly flow, slug/churn turbulent flow, annular-mist flow, and single-phase vapor flow) and transitions of the flow conditions. The pilot code was programmed so that the source terms of the governing equations and numerical solution schemes can be easily tested. The mass and energy conservation was confirmed for single-phase liquid and single-phase vapor flows. It was confirmed that the inlet pressure and velocity boundary conditions work properly. It was confirmed that, for single- and two-phase flows, the velocity and temperature of non-existing phase are calculated as intended. Complete phase depletion which might occur during a phase change was found to adversely affect the code stability. A further study would be required to enhance code capability in this regard.

  6. Virtual field trips as physically active lessons for children: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Emma; Shelton, Nicola; Dunsmuir, Sandra; Duke-Williams, Oliver; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background The modern classroom is an inherently sedentary environment. Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) using interactive whiteboards to explore virtual scenes are a potential method of converting sedentary class-time into physically active teaching. This pilot aimed to assess the effects of a developed VFT on physical activity and learning in primary-school children. Methods Participants (n = 85) were randomly assigned to a) a 30-minute physically active London 2012 Olympics-themed VFT, or b) a 3...

  7. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume I: evaluation summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    The evaluation report of the Energy Extension Service in the 10 pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Wyoming, Washington, Wisconsin - contains 8 chapters. Chapter II describes the methodology and Chapter III summarizes the findings. Chapters IV, V, and VI trace the progression from program operations through client impact to energy savings. Chapter VII analyzes the factors that might contribute to making some programs work more effectively than others. The service delivery programs are divided into 3 categories according to the target audience served: residential homeowners and renters, small businesses, and public institutions. Chapter VIII discusses the implications for the National EES Program. (MCW)

  8. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2

  9. Industrial computer science. A thermolysis pilot unit has opted for the `Fieldbus` field network; Informatique industrielle. Une unite pilote de thermolyse adopte le reseau de terrain Fieldbus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, F.

    1998-03-01

    The field network from the US Fieldbus Foundation is poorly known in France. The Societe Francaise de Thermolyse company (French Society of Thermolysis, Chateaurenard, Bouches du Rhone, France) has decided to install it on a pilot-facility using equipments provided by the Smar company. This pilot-facility is devoted to the processing of industrial wastes for their conversion into storable fuels (gas, hydrocarbons, coal) using thermolysis principle. The field bus is used to supervise and control the entire process. (J.S.)

  10. Pilot workload evaluated with subjective and physiological measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.; Gaillard, A.W.K.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to validate different measures for mental workload. Ten aspirant fighter jet pilots flew several scenarios in a flight simulator. The scenarios were divided into segments with different levels of task load. During the flight, heart rate, respiration and blood pressure

  11. Pilot implementation Driven by Effects Specifications and Formative Usability Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlach, Anders; Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    . The project was conducted using effects-driven IT development: a process comprised of workshops with specification of the usage effects by management and end-users followed by an agile development process progressing through mock-ups, prototypes and finally the pilot system. Effects were iteratively refined...

  12. A PILOT FOR A VERY LARGE ARRAY H I DEEP FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Ximena; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Hess, Kelley M. [Department of Astronomy, Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Pisano, D. J. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Kreckel, Kathryn [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Momjian, Emmanuel [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Popping, Attila [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Oosterloo, Tom [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, NL-7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Chomiuk, Laura [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Verheijen, M. A. W. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Postbus 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Henning, Patricia A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A.; Wilcots, Eric M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Scoville, Nick, E-mail: ximena@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    High-resolution 21 cm H I deep fields provide spatially and kinematically resolved images of neutral hydrogen at different redshifts, which are key to understanding galaxy evolution across cosmic time and testing predictions of cosmological simulations. Here we present results from a pilot for an H I deep field done with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We take advantage of the newly expanded capabilities of the telescope to probe the redshift interval 0 < z < 0.193 in one observation. We observe the COSMOS field for 50 hr, which contains 413 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts in the imaged field of 34' Multiplication-Sign 34' and the observed redshift interval. We have detected neutral hydrogen gas in 33 galaxies in different environments spanning the probed redshift range, including three without a previously known spectroscopic redshift. The detections have a range of H I and stellar masses, indicating the diversity of galaxies we are probing. We discuss the observations, data reduction, results, and highlight interesting detections. We find that the VLA's B-array is the ideal configuration for H I deep fields since its long spacings mitigate radio frequency interference. This pilot shows that the VLA is ready to carry out such a survey, and serves as a test for future H I deep fields planned with other Square Kilometer Array pathfinders.

  13. Field Evaluation of Programmable Thermostats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, O.; Tiefenbeck, V.; Duvier, C.; Qin, A.; Cheney, K.; Akers, C.; Roth, K.

    2012-12-01

    Prior research suggests that poor programmable thermostats usability may prevent their effective use to save energy. We hypothesized that home occupants with a high-usability thermostats would be more likely to use them to save energy than people with a basic thermostat. We randomly installed a high-usability thermostat in half the 77 apartments of an affordable housing complex, installing a basic thermostat in the other half. During the heating season, we collected space temperature and furnace on-off data to evaluate occupant interaction with the thermostats, foremost nighttime setbacks. We found that thermostat usability did not influence energy-saving behaviors, finding no significant difference in temperature maintained among apartments with high- and low-usability thermostats.

  14. Search moves and tactics for image retrieval in the field of journalism: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Youn Hung

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available People engage in multiple types of information-seeking strategies within an information-seeking episode. The objective of this pilot study is to investigate search moves and tactics made by end-users when searching for visual information. The pilot study involves 5 undergraduate students from the Department of Journalism and Media Studies at Rutgers University using the AccuNet/AP Photo Archive to retrieve specific, general, and subjective photos. Data were collected through think-aloud protocols and transaction logs. The results outline an overall picture of the five searchers’ image searching behavior in the field of journalism and show that there is a connection between the types of images searched and the patterns of search moves and tactics employed by the searchers.

  15. Horizontal drilling pilot in a shallow heavy oil reservoir in the Suplac Field in Northwestern Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavelle, J.; Yaghoobi, A. [OMV Petrom S.A. (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    The Suplac field situated in north-western Romania is a shallow and heavy oil deposit lying at depths of between 40 and 200 meters. The deposit has been exploited since 1964 using different techniques but some areas of the reservoir located beneath villages and steep hills were never reached. The aim of this paper is to describe a project using horizontal alternating steam drive (HASD) to harvest oil from these areas by turning from vertical to horizontal. A pilot test was conducted over 4 months in 2010 with 3 parallel horizontal wells. The rig equipment, the well path designs and the directional difficulties are discussed herein. Results showed that horizontals could be drilled using a vertical mast rig and all the expectations were met. The success of this pilot project was highlighted herein and the company is now planning on continuing with a horizontal development program; however wellbore clean out is a remaining challenge.

  16. Smouldering Remediation (STAR) Technology: Field Pilot Tests and First Full Scale Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, J.; Kinsman, L.; Torero, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    STAR (Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation) is an innovative remediation technology based on the principles of smoldering combustion where the contaminants are the fuel. The self-sustaining aspect means that a single, local ignition event can result in many days of contaminant destruction in situ. Presented research to date has focused on bench scale experiments, numerical modelling and process understanding. Presented here is the maturation of the in situ technology, including three field pilot tests and a full-scale implementation to treat coal tar-impacted soils. The first pilot determined a Radius of Influence (ROI) for a single ignition of approximately eight feet with an average propagation rate of the reaction of approximately one foot per day. TPH concentrations in soils were reduced from 10,000 milligrams per kilogram to a few hundred milligrams per kilogram. The second pilot was conducted in an area of significant void spaces created through the anthropogenic deposition of clay bricks and tiles. The void spaces led to pre-mature termination of the combustion reaction, limiting ROI and the effectiveness of the technology in this setting. The third case study involved the pilot testing, design, and full-scale implementation of STAR at a 37-acre former chemical manufacturing facility. Three phases of pilot testing were conducted within two hydrogeologic units at the site (i.e., surficial fill and deep alluvial sand units). Pilot testing within the fill demonstrated self-sustained coal tar destruction rates in excess of 800 kg/day supported through air injection at a single well. Deep sand unit testing (twenty-five feet below the water table) resulted in the treatment of a targeted six-foot layer of impacted fine sands to a radial distance of approximately twelve feet. These results (and additional parameters) were used to develop a full-scale STAR design consisting of approximately 1500 surficial fill ignition points and 500 deep sand ignition

  17. Visual attention measures predict pedestrian detection in central field loss: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta F Alberti

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The ability of visually impaired people to deploy attention effectively to maximize use of their residual vision in dynamic situations is fundamental to safe mobility. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate whether tests of dynamic attention (multiple object tracking; MOT and static attention (Useful Field of View; UFOV were predictive of the ability of people with central field loss (CFL to detect pedestrian hazards in simulated driving. METHODS: 11 people with bilateral CFL (visual acuity 20/30-20/200 and 11 age-similar normally-sighted drivers participated. Dynamic and static attention were evaluated with brief, computer-based MOT and UFOV tasks, respectively. Dependent variables were the log speed threshold for 60% correct identification of targets (MOT and the increase in the presentation duration for 75% correct identification of a central target when a concurrent peripheral task was added (UFOV divided and selective attention subtests. Participants drove in a simulator and pressed the horn whenever they detected pedestrians that walked or ran toward the road. The dependent variable was the proportion of timely reactions (could have stopped in time to avoid a collision. RESULTS: UFOV and MOT performance of CFL participants was poorer than that of controls, and the proportion of timely reactions was also lower (worse (84% and 97%, respectively; p = 0.001. For CFL participants, higher proportions of timely reactions correlated significantly with higher (better MOT speed thresholds (r = 0.73, p = 0.01, with better performance on the UFOV divided and selective attention subtests (r = -0.66 and -0.62, respectively, p<0.04, with better contrast sensitivity scores (r = 0.54, p = 0.08 and smaller scotomas (r = -0.60, p = 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that brief laboratory-based tests of visual attention may provide useful measures of functional visual ability of individuals with CFL relevant to

  18. Piloted Simulator Evaluation Results of New Fault-Tolerant Flight Control Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombaerts, T.J.J.; Smaili, M.H.; Stroosma, O.; Chu, Q.P.; Mulder, J.A.; Joosten, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    A high fidelity aircraft simulation model, reconstructed using the Digital Flight Data Recorder (DFDR) of the 1992 Amsterdam Bijlmermeer aircraft accident (Flight 1862), has been used to evaluate a new Fault-Tolerant Flight Control Algorithm in an online piloted evaluation. This paper focuses on the

  19. 78 FR 44579 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... Program Evaluation. OMB Approval Number: 2528--New. Type of Request: New collection. Form Number: None... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Evaluation AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HUD has...

  20. Pilot Evaluation of a Web-Based Intervention Targeting Sexual Health Service Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. E.; Newby, K.; Caley, M.; Danahay, A.; Kehal, I.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual health service access is fundamental to good sexual health, yet interventions designed to address this have rarely been implemented or evaluated. In this article, pilot evaluation findings for a targeted public health behavior change intervention, delivered via a website and web-app, aiming to increase uptake of sexual health services among…

  1. A Pilot Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for Refugee Youth from Burma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah Dorothy; Emmerling, Dane; Gavarkavich, Diane; Mershon, Claire-Helene; Linton, Kristin; Rubesin, Hillary; Agnew-Brune, Christine; Eng, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Art therapy is a promising form of therapy to address mental health concerns for refugee youth. This article describes the development and implementation of a pilot evaluation of an art therapy program for refugee adolescents from Burma currently living in the United States. Evaluation activities were based on the Centers for Disease Control and…

  2. A Pilot Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for Refugee Youth from Burma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah Dorothy; Emmerling, Dane; Gavarkavich, Diane; Mershon, Claire-Helene; Linton, Kristin; Rubesin, Hillary; Agnew-Brune, Christine; Eng, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Art therapy is a promising form of therapy to address mental health concerns for refugee youth. This article describes the development and implementation of a pilot evaluation of an art therapy program for refugee adolescents from Burma currently living in the United States. Evaluation activities were based on the Centers for Disease Control and…

  3. Evaluating Research in Context: Pilot Study at Faculty of Architecture TU Delft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meulen, B.; Daemen, F.; Van Drooge, L.; De Jong, S.; Spaapen, J.; Wamelink, F.; Van den Besselaar, P.

    2010-01-01

    The vice chancellor of Delft University of Technology, Prof.dr.ir. J. Fokkema, introduced a pilot Evaluating Research in Context (ERiC) at the Faculty of Architecture. The Faculty of Architecture perceives a serious confl ict between the demands and criteria in evaluation procedures and the ambition

  4. 75 FR 54343 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program for Blood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) is announcing an invitation to participate in a pilot evaluation program for CBER's eSubmitter Program (eSubmitter). CBER's eSubmitter has been customized as an automated biologics license application (BLA) and BLA supplement (BLS) submission system for blood and blood components. Participation in the......

  5. Evaluative Practices in the Culinary Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo; Strandgaard, Jesper

    This paper is concerned with evaluative practices within the culinary field. The focus is on the evaluative practices performed by two restaurant ranking systems, respectively the Michelin Red Guide system handled by the French tire manufacturer Michelin and the San Pellegrino ’World’s 50 Best...

  6. CFD Modeling of Flow, Temperature, and Concentration Fields in a Pilot-Scale Rotary Hearth Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Su, Fu-Yong; Wen, Zhi; Li, Zhi; Yong, Hai-Quan; Feng, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional mathematical model for simulation of flow, temperature, and concentration fields in a pilot-scale rotary hearth furnace (RHF) has been developed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, FLUENT. The layer of composite pellets under the hearth is assumed to be a porous media layer with CO source and energy sink calculated by an independent mathematical model. User-defined functions are developed and linked to FLUENT to process the reduction process of the layer of composite pellets. The standard k-ɛ turbulence model in combination with standard wall functions is used for modeling of gas flow. Turbulence-chemistry interaction is taken into account through the eddy-dissipation model. The discrete ordinates model is used for modeling of radiative heat transfer. A comparison is made between the predictions of the present model and the data from a test of the pilot-scale RHF, and a reasonable agreement is found. Finally, flow field, temperature, and CO concentration fields in the furnace are investigated by the model.

  7. Pilot Field Test: Results of Tandem Walk Performance Following Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerisano, J. M.; Reschke, M. F.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Gadd, N. E.; Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Tomilovskaya, E.

    2016-01-01

    Coordinated locomotion has proven to be challenging for many astronauts following long duration spaceflight. As NASA's vision for spaceflight points toward interplanetary travel and missions to distant objects, astronauts will not have assistance once they land. Thus, it is vital to develop a knowledge base from which operational guidelines can be written that define when astronauts can be expected to safely perform certain tasks. Data obtained during the Field Test experiment will add important insight to this knowledge base. Specifically, we aim to develop a recovery timeline of functional sensorimotor performance during the first 24 hours and several days after landing. A forerunner of the full Field Test study, the Pilot Field Test (PFT) comprised a subset of the tasks and measurements to be included in the ultimate set.

  8. Fluid bed gasification pilot plant fuel feeding system evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, W.A.; Fonstad, T.; Pugsley, T.; Gerspacher, R. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)), Email: wac132@mail.usask.ca; Wang Zhiguo (Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon (Canada)), Email: zhiguo.wang@src.sk.ca

    2009-07-01

    Fluidized bed gasification (FBG) is a method for thermally converting solid biomass to a gaseous product termed syngas, which can be used as fuel for heat or electricity generation. Accurate and consistent feeding of biomass fuel into biomass FBG converters is a continuing, challenge, and was the subject of experimentation at the University of Saskatchewan biomass FBG pilot plant. The 2-conveyor feeding system for this pilot plant was tested using meat and bone meal (MBM) as feedstock, by conveying the feedstock through the system, and measuring the output rate as the fuel was discharged. The relationship between average mass-flowrate (F{sub M}) and conveyor speed (S) for the complete feeding system was characterized to be F{sub M}=0.2188S-0.42 for the tests performed. Testing of the metering conveyor coupled to the injection conveyor showed that operating these conveyors at drive synchronized speeds, air pulsed into the injection hopper, and 50 slpm injection air, produced the most consistent feed output rate. Hot fluidized bed tests followed, which showed that plugging of the injection nozzle occurred as bed temperatures increased past 700C, resulting in loss of fuel flow. The pneumatic injection nozzle was subsequently removed, and the system was found to perform adequately with it absent. (orig.)

  9. LiveWall Operational Evaluation: Seattle Law Enforcement Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Stein, Steven L.

    2013-10-01

    The LiveWall concept envisioned as an outgrowth of the Precision Information Environment (PIE) project allows communications between separate groups using interactive video, audio, and a shared desktop environment; this allows everyone to participate and collaborate in real time, regardless of location. The LiveWall concept provides a virtual window to other locations, where all parties can interact and collaboratively work with each other. This functionality is intended to improve multi-site coordination amongst emergency operations centers (EOC), field operations sites and across organizations and jurisdictions to accommodate communications during routine and emergency events. For the initial LiveWall operational evaluation PNNL partnered with the Seattle Police Department (SPD). This partnership allowed for the creation of an excellent LiveWall test bed specific to law enforcement. This partnership made it possible to test the LiveWall concept with scenarios involving the many facets of the law enforcement work done by SPD. PNNL and SPD agreed that integrating the systems into operations for a real event would be the best test of the technology and give SPD staff greater visibility into the functionality and benefits offered by the LiveWall concept.

  10. Image quality evaluation of light field photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Zhiliang; Yuan, Yan; Xiangli, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Light field photography captures 4D radiance information of a scene. Digital refocusing and digital correction of aberrations could be done after the photograph is taken. However, capturing 4D light field is costly and tradeoffs between different image quality metrics should be made and evaluated. This paper explores the effects of light field photography on image quality by quantitatively evaluating some basic criteria for an imaging system. A simulation approach was first developed by ray-tracing a designed light field camera. A standard testing chart followed by ISO 12233 was provided as the input scene. A sequence of light field raw images were acquired and processed by light field rendering methods afterwards. Through-focus visual resolution and MTF were calculated and analyzed. As a comparison, the same tests were taken for the same main lens system as the results of conventional photography. An experimental light field system was built up and its performance was tested. This work helps better understanding the pros and cons of light field photography in contrast with conventional imaging methods and perceiving the way to optimize the joint digital-optical design of the system.

  11. A pilot study to evaluate runoff quantity from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Lee, Min Jung; Han, Mooyoung

    2015-04-01

    The use of green roofs is gaining increased recognition in many countries as a solution that can be used to improve environmental quality and reduce runoff quantity. To achieve these goals, pilot-scale green roof assemblies have been constructed and operated in an urban setting. From a stormwater management perspective, green roofs are 42.8-60.8% effective in reducing runoff for 200 mm soil depth and 13.8-34.4% effective in reducing runoff for 150 mm soil depth. By using Spearman rank correlation analysis, high rainfall intensity was shown to have a negative relationship with delayed occurrence time, demonstrating that the soil media in green roofs do not efficiently retain rainwater. Increasing the number of antecedent dry days can help to improve water retention capacity and delay occurrence time. From the viewpoint of runoff water quality, green roofs are regarded as the best management practice by filtration and adsorption through growth media (soil).

  12. Evaluation of a pilot hypertension management programme for Guatemalan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Montano, Carlos; Fort, Meredith; deRamirez, Miriam; Cruz, Judith; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Corazón Sano y Feliz is a hypertension management intervention developed to address deficiencies in the management of hypertensive patients in Guatemala. From 2007 to 2009, Corazón Sano y Feliz was pilot-tested in the community of Mixco. Corazón Sano y Feliz comprises a clinical risk assessment and treatment component implemented primarily by nurses, and a health education component implemented by community health workers. To accomplish our secondary objective of determining Corazon Sano y Feliz's potential for change at the patient level, we implemented a one-group pretest-posttest study design to examine changes in clinical measures, knowledge and practices between baseline and the end of the 6-month intervention. Two nurses and one physician set up a hypertension clinic to manage patients according to risk level. Twenty-nine community health workers were trained in CVD risk reduction and health promotion and in turn led six educational sessions for patients. Comparing baseline and 6-month measures, the intervention achieved significant improvements in mean knowledge and behaviour (increase from 54.6 to 59.1 out of a possible 70 points) and significant reductions of mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure (27.2 and 7.7 mmHg), body mass index (from 26.5 to 26.2 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (89.6-88.9 cm). In this pilot study we obtained preliminary evidence that this community-oriented hypertension management and health promotion intervention model was feasible and achieved significant reduction in risk factors. If scaled up, this intervention has the potential to substantially reduce CVD burden. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Increasing Physical Activity in Preschool: A Pilot Study to Evaluate Animal Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christine L.; Carter, Betty Jean; Kibbe, Debra L.; Dennison, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This report describes a pilot study to evaluate Animal Trackers (AT), a preschool program designed to (1) increase structured physical activity (PA) during the preschool day; (2) increase practice of gross motor skills; (3) provide teachers with an easy-to-use PA program regardless of teacher experience; and (4) implement a teacher…

  14. Pilot Evaluation of a Home Visit Parent Training Program in Disadvantaged Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study reported the pilot evaluation of the Healthy Start Home Visit Program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, delivered by trained parent assistants. Home visiting was used to make services more accessible to disadvantaged families. Method: The participants included 21 parent-child dyads. Outcome measures…

  15. Evaluating a Survivors Group Pilot for Women with Significant Intellectual Disabilities Who Have Been Sexually Abused

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Nicholas Guy; Howlett, Susan; Corbett, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Sexual abuse has been associated with trauma, low self-esteem, anger, depression and challenging behaviours. This pilot study builds on a small published literature by evaluating a survivors group (SG) for women with an intellectual disability and an educational support group (ESG) for their carers. Method: The SG was delivered weekly…

  16. Pilot Evaluation of Energy Savings from Residential Energy Demand Feedback Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Danny S. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Hoak, David [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Cummings, Jamie [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This report discusses instantaneous feedback on household electrical demand has shown promise to reduce energy consumption. This report reviews past research and describes a two year pilot evaluation of a low cost residential energy feedback system installed in twenty case study homes in FL.

  17. Evaluation and use of remotely piloted aircraft systems for operations and research - RxCADRE 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Zajkowski; Matthew B. Dickinson; J. Kevin Hiers; William Holley; Brett W. Williams; Alexander Paxton; Otto Martinez; Gregory W. Walker

    2016-01-01

    Small remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), also known as unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), are expected to provide important contributions to wildland fire operations and research, but their evaluation and use have been limited. Our objectives were to leverage US Air Force-controlled airspace to (1) deploy RPAS in support of the 2012 Prescribed Fire...

  18. Evaluation of near-field earthquake effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, H.P.

    1994-11-01

    Structures and equipment, which are qualified for the design basis earthquake (DBE) and have anchorage designed for the DBE loading, do not require an evaluation of the near-field earthquake (NFE) effects. However, safety class 1 acceleration sensitive equipment such as electrical relays must be evaluated for both NFE and DBE since they are known to malfunction when excited by high frequency seismic motions.

  19. Assessment and Evaluation Report on a Pilot Project on Preventive School Maintenance in Eritrea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagnby, Bo Hellisen

    In 2002, efforts started on formulating a maintenance policy for schools and other social service facilities in Eritrea. Since then, an appropriate policy and related implementation strategies have been further developed. In 2003, a specific pilot project was designed covering a number of schools...... located in different regions of Eritrea. Management tools and evaluation guidelines were developed and the pilot project was started in 2004. Supervision, monitoring collection of experience was collected by staff of the Ministry of Education. Experiences, findings and recommendations for solidification...

  20. A pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in electronic flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindson, William S.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Eshow, Michelle M.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot rating scale was developed to describe the effects of transients in helicopter flight-control systems on safety-of-flight and on pilot recovery action. The scale was applied to the evaluation of hardovers that could potentially occur in the digital flight-control system being designed for a variable-stability UH-60A research helicopter. Tests were conducted in a large moving-base simulator and in flight. The results of the investigation were combined with existing airworthiness criteria to determine quantitative reliability design goals for the control system.

  1. Pilot Implementation and Preliminary Evaluation of START:AV Assessments in Secure Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, Sarah L; Sellers, Brian G; Viljoen, Jodi L; Cruise, Keith R; Nicholls, Tonia L; Dvoskin, Joel A

    2012-01-01

    The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability: Adolescent Version (START:AV) is a new structured professional judgment guide for assessing short-term risks in adolescents. The scheme may be distinguished from other youth risk assessment and treatment planning instruments by its inclusion of 23 dynamic factors that are each rated for both vulnerability and strength. In addition, START:AV is also unique in that it focuses on multiple adverse outcomes-namely, violence, self-harm, suicide, unauthorized leave, substance abuse, self-neglect, victimization, and general offending-over the short-term (i.e., weeks to months) rather than long-term (i.e., years). This paper describes a pilot implementation and preliminary evaluation of START:AV in three secure juvenile correctional facilities in the southern United States. Specifically, we examined the descriptive characteristics and psychometric properties of START:AV assessments completed by 21 case managers on 291 adolescent offenders (250 boys and 41 girls) at the time of admission. Results provide preliminary support for the feasibility of completing START:AV assessments as part of routine practice. Findings also highlight differences in the characteristics of START:AV assessments for boys and girls and differential associations between the eight START:AV risk domains. Though results are promising, further research is needed to establish the reliability and validity of START:AV assessments completed in the field.

  2. Day/night ANVIS/HUD-24 (day HUD) flight test and pilot evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yona, Zvi; Weiser, Ben; Hamburger, Oded

    2004-09-01

    The Day/Night ANVIS/HUD-24 gives pilots the ultimate head-out flight solution: 24-hour operational capability from a single integrated system. The basic integrated system combines the standard Night Vision Goggle (NVG) image with vital aircraft flight and navigation information, currently operational on over 4500 helicopters worldwide. Introducing the new Day HUD add-on module the same flight information is displayed for day use. The Day Head Up Display (HUD) is an add-on, complimentary to the basic night ANVIS/HUD system (AN/AVS-7). A lightweight optical module enhancing the day flight operation is designed to allow utility and reconnaissance helicopter day-mission operation by providing complete daytime head-out flight information. This add-on unit enhances flight safety, maximizes tactical survivability, and increases situational awareness during critical landing and takeoff phases. The Day HUD offers a unique 25° field-of-view, monocular, see-through flight information display. It mounts directly to the standard NVG mounting, incorporating a state of the art AMLCD flat panel display, high brightness solid-state backlight and compact optics resulting in a high contrast, high visibility display. The Day HUD test and evaluation program included extensive man-machine interface tests and numerous flight test aircraft in more than six separate countries. This paper will also address flight training, customer acceptance and expand on these findings and observations.

  3. Evaluation of the midwifery pilot projects in Quebec: an overview. L'Equipe d'Evaluation des Projets-Pilotes Sages-Femmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, R; Joubert, P

    2000-01-01

    In 1990, the province of Quebec adopted a law authorizing the evaluation of the practice of midwifery through eight pilot projects. The projects, which took the form of birth centres outside hospitals, started operating in 1994. The objectives of the evaluation were 1) to compare midwives' services to current physician services with regard to maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity, the use of obstetrical intervention, individualization and continuity of care as perceived by clients, and cost; and 2) to identify the professional and organizational factors associated with the integration of midwives into the health care system. A mixed evaluative design was used: a multiple case study with each pilot project representing a case and a cohort study where 1,000 women followed by midwives in the birth centres were matched with 1,000 women followed by physicians in the usual hospital-based services. Various quantitative and qualitative data collection instruments were used. Overall, many results were favourable to midwifery practice, while some were favourable to medical care. Following the evaluation, the Government of Quebec decided to legalize the practice of midwifery.

  4. Qualitative evaluation of the Mentors in Violence Prevention pilot in Scottish high schools

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Damien John; Neville, Fergus Gilmour

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) program originated in the US and adopts a bystander approach to gender-based violence prevention by harnessing group processes using a peer-learning model. This paper presents the first qualitative evaluation, within a European context, of a pilot application of MVP within a Scottish High School setting. Method The evaluation comprises a series of interviews and focus groups with school staff, and pupils (‘mentors’ and ‘mentees’) at three par...

  5. Char BC amendments for soil and sediment amelioration: BC quantification and field pilot trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, G.; Braendli, R. C.; Eek, E.; Henriksen, T.; Hartnik, T.; Breedveld, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    Background Activated char BC binds organic contaminants and possibly mercury so strongly that their bioaccumulation and transport to other environmental compartments are reduced. The advantages of black carbon amendment over many other remediation methods include i) it can be used as an in situ risk reduction method, ii) the price is low, and iii) it overcomes significant controversies associated with disposal of dredged and excavated materials. In this study BC amendment is used in pilot trials in the field for soil and sediment amelioration. Quantification of amended char BC Two methods for char BC quantification were tested: i) chemothermal oxidation (CTO) at a range of temperatures and ii) wet chemical oxidation with a potassium dichromate/sulfuric acid solution. The amount of BC amended to three soils was accurately determined by CTO at 375°C. For two sediments, much of the BC disappeared during combustion at 375°C, which could probably be explained by catalytic effects caused by sediment constituents such as metals, mineral oxides and salts. Attempts to avoid these effects through rinsing with acid before combustion did not result in higher char BC recoveries. CTO at lower temperatures (325-350°C) was a feasible alternative for one of the sediments. Wet oxidation with potassium dichromate/sulfuric acid proved to effectively function for BC quantification in sediments, since almost complete BC recovery (81-92 %) was observed for both sediments, while the amount of organic carbon remaining was low (5-16 %). Field pilots Earlier, we showed the effectiveness of BC amendment in the laboratory. In the laboratory it was shown that BC amendments (2 %) reduced freely dissolved porewater concentrations (factor of 10-50) and bioaccumulation (factor of 5). This presentation will describe 50 × 50 m pilot field trials in Norway (2007-2008): Trondheim Harbor (sediment) and Drammen (soil). The presentation will focus on physical monitoring (distribution of BC in the

  6. Pilot-scale field tests of high-gradient magnetic filtration. Final report, September 1977-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooding, C.H.

    1980-03-01

    The report gives results of using a 5100 cu m/hr mobile pilot plant to evaluate the effectiveness and economics of applying high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF) to particulate emission control. A 4-1/2 month test program was conducted at a Pennsylvania sintering plant to characterize the performance of the pilot plant and to demonstrate its practicality under long-term operation. Analysis of the results indicates that high-efficiency collection can be achieved economically if HGMF is applied to steel industry dusts that are more homogeneous and more strongly magnetic than the tested sinter dust. The report describes laboratory pilot-plant work that demonstrated collection efficiencies greater than 99% with basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace dusts. The development of a filter cleaning system and the design and construction of the pilot plant are discussed. Experimental data are reported.

  7. Learning the 'SMART' way... results from a pilot study evaluating an interprofessional acute care study day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of patients requiring critical care are now being managed outside of critical care facilities. There is evidence that staff looking after these patients lack the necessary knowledge and skills to care for them safely, and that effective pre-registration education can play a significant role in addressing these shortfalls in nurses' knowledge and skills. A team from Sheffield Hallam University, in collaboration with the University of Sheffield, developed a pilot one day interprofessional acute illness programme which was called SMART® (Student Management of Acute illness - Recognition and Treatment). To evaluate the pilot programme, 16 student doctors and 72 student nurses were recruited. A pre- and post-course questionnaire based on the Featherstone et al. (2005) evaluation of ALERT was used to ascertain the students' general level of knowledge of the deteriorating patient, their experiences of and confidence in caring for an acutely unwell patient, and their level of comfort with interprofessional working. The results from the pilot study indicate that the students' levels of knowledge, their levels of confidence and their comfort with interprofessional working all rose after undertaking the programme. The pilot study has a number of implications for the future teaching and learning of acute care clinical skills, within a theoretically based curriculum.

  8. Handling Qualities Evaluation of Pilot Tools for Spacecraft Docking in Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilimoria, Karl D.; Mueller, Eric; Frost, Chad

    2009-01-01

    A new generation of spacecraft is now under development by NASA to replace the Space Shuttle and return astronauts to the Moon. These spacecraft will have a manual control capability for several mission tasks, and the ease and precision with which pilots can execute these tasks will have an important effect on mission risk and training costs. This paper focuses on the handling qualities of a spacecraft based on dynamics similar to that of the Crew Exploration Vehicle, during the last segment of the docking task with a space station in low Earth orbit. A previous study established that handling qualities for this task degrade significantly as the level of translation-into-rotation coupling increases. The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of various pilot aids designed to mitigate the handling qualities degradation caused by this coupling. Four pilot tools were ev adluaetead:d-band box/indicator, flight-path marker, translation guidance cues, and feed-forward control. Each of these pilot tools improved handling qualities, generally with greater improvements resulting from using these tools in combination. A key result of this study is that feedforward control effectively counteracts coupling effects, providing solid Level 1 handling qualities for the spacecraft configuration evaluated.

  9. Integrated care pilot in north west London: a mixed methods evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Curry

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper provides the results of a year-long evaluation of a large-scale integrated care pilot in North West London. The pilot aimed to integrate care across primary, acute, community, mental health and social care for people with diabetes and those over 75 years through: care planning; multidisciplinary case reviews; information sharing; and project management support.   Methods: The evaluation team conducted qualitative studies of change at organisational, clinician, and patient levels (using interviews, focus groups and a survey; and quantitative analysis of change in service use and patient-level clinical outcomes (using patient-level data sets and a matched control study.  Results: The pilot had successfully engaged provider organisations, created a shared strategic vision and established governance structures. However, engagement of clinicians was variable and there was no evidence to date of significant reductions in emergency admissions. There was some evidence of changes in care processes. Conclusion: Although the pilot has demonstrated the beginnings of large-scale change, it remains in the early stages and faces significant challenges as it seeks to become sustainable for the longer term. It is critical that NHS managers and clinicians have realistic expectations of what can be achieved in a relatively short period of time.

  10. Skill Enhancement for Health: An Evaluation of An Online Pilot Teaching Module on Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry MURPHY

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Skill Enhancement for Health: An Evaluation of An Online Pilot Teaching Module on Epidemiology Rory McGREAL, PhD Athabasca University – Canada’s Open University Athabasca AB, CANADA Sue DAVIS, MSc. New Brunswick Community College–Saint John Saint John, CANADA Terry MURPHY, PhD Consortium for Information Technology in Education (CITE Saint John, CANADA Chris SMITH, BA Consortium for Information Technology in Education (CITE Saint John, CANADA ABSTRACT The evaluation of this pilot of an epidemiology course conducted online and delivered across Canada was based on four main criteria: design, content, process and outcomes. Data was collected through seven sources: participant online survey results, post-pilot workshop feedback, four focus groups, telephone interviews with participants, interviews with course developers, examination of online materials, and analysis of log files generated by the web server. The pilot course had the following outcomes: Findings on the delivery showed that the course took much more time than estimated; the online environment was challenging/frustrating for some; there were technical glitches; discussion boards were not regularly used; interaction with instructors was minimal; feedback from instructors was slow in coming; the short development time led to errors/mismatches between content and assessment; and the high student/teacher ratio of 1:48 made it difficult to provide timely feedback.

  11. Pilot Study Evaluating Nearshore Sediment Placement Sites, Noyo Harbor, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    services commercial and sport fishing, and a US Coast Guard Search and Rescue Station. It provides for safe and secure access for commercial and...submarine canyon , a coastal dune field, or in some cases, direct removal through sand mining. Littoral cells in California generally are ERDC/CHL

  12. Piloting a method to evaluate the implementation of integrated water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-05

    Oct 5, 2015 ... water resource management in the Inkomati River Basin. Melanie J ..... Water Act of 1967 (Zaikowski, 2007) to establish a new system of water rights. ..... are required to support water decision making, evaluation and review of ...

  13. Higher visual functions in the upper and lower visual fields: A pilot study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Giuseppe A; Muri, Rene; Mosimann, Urs P; Nyffeler, Thomas; Nef, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Visual perception is not identical in the upper and lower visual hemifields. The mechanisms behind this difference can be found at the retinal, cortical, or higher attentional level. In this study, a new visual test battery, that involves real-time comparisons of complex visual stimuli, such as shape of objects, and speed of moving dot patterns, in the upper and lower visual hemifields, is presented. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first to implement such a visual test battery in an immersive environment composed of a hemisphere, in order to present visual stimuli in precise regions of the visual field. Ten healthy volunteers were tested in this pilot study. The results showed a higher accuracy in the image matching when the visual test was performed in the lower visual hemifield.

  14. The challenges of joint working: lessons from the Supporting People Health Pilot evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailsa Cameron

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper reports the findings of the evaluation of the Supporting People Health Pilots programme which was established to demonstrate the policy links between housing support services and health and social care services by encouraging the development of integrated services. The paper highlights the challenges of working across housing, health and social care boundaries. Method: The evaluation of the 6 health pilots rested on two main sources of data collection: Quarterly Project Evaluation Reports collected process data as well as reporting progress against aims and objectives. Semi-structured interviews - conducted across all key professional stakeholder groups and agencies and with people who used services - explored their experiences of these new services. Results: The ability of pilots to work across organisational boundaries to achieve their aims and objectives was associated not only with agencies sharing an understanding of the purpose of the joint venture, a history of joint working and clear and efficient governance arrangements but on two other characteristics: the extent and nature of statutory sector participation and, whether or not the service is defined by a history of voluntary sector involvement. In particular the pilots demonstrated how voluntary sector agencies appeared to be less constrained by organisational priorities and professional agenda and more able to respond flexibly to meet the complex needs of individuals. Conclusion and discussion: The pilots demonstrate that integrating services to support people with complex needs works best when the service is determined by the characteristics of those who use the service rather than pre-existing organisational structures.

  15. The challenges of joint working: lessons from the Supporting People Health Pilot evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailsa Cameron

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper reports the findings of the evaluation of the Supporting People Health Pilots programme which was established to demonstrate the policy links between housing support services and health and social care services by encouraging the development of integrated services. The paper highlights the challenges of working across housing, health and social care boundaries. Method: The evaluation of the 6 health pilots rested on two main sources of data collection: Quarterly Project Evaluation Reports collected process data as well as reporting progress against aims and objectives. Semi-structured interviews - conducted across all key professional stakeholder groups and agencies and with people who used services - explored their experiences of these new services. Results: The ability of pilots to work across organisational boundaries to achieve their aims and objectives was associated not only with agencies sharing an understanding of the purpose of the joint venture, a history of joint working and clear and efficient governance arrangements but on two other characteristics: the extent and nature of statutory sector participation and, whether or not the service is defined by a history of voluntary sector involvement. In particular the pilots demonstrated how voluntary sector agencies appeared to be less constrained by organisational priorities and professional agenda and more able to respond flexibly to meet the complex needs of individuals. Conclusion and discussion: The pilots demonstrate that integrating services to support people with complex needs works best when the service is determined by the characteristics of those who use the service rather than pre-existing organisational structures.

  16. Raising the Achievement of Bilingual Learners in Primary Schools: Evaluation of the Pilot/Programme. Research Report RR758

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kerensa; Lewis, Karen; Fletcher-Campbell, Felicity

    2006-01-01

    The National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) carried out an evaluation of a pilot/programme that was introduced in 2004 to help raise the achievement of bilingual learners in primary schools. Within participating authorities, pilot consultants were appointed and were managed by the Primary National Strategy managers and the Ethnic…

  17. Perceived usefulness of a distributed community-based syndromic surveillance system: a pilot qualitative evaluation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Donald R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted a pilot utility evaluation and information needs assessment of the Distribute Project at the 2010 Washington State Public Health Association (WSPHA Joint Conference. Distribute is a distributed community-based syndromic surveillance system and network for detection of influenza-like illness (ILI. Using qualitative methods, we assessed the perceived usefulness of the Distribute system and explored areas for improvement. Nine state and local public health professionals participated in a focus group (n = 6 and in semi-structured interviews (n = 3. Field notes were taken, summarized and analyzed. Findings Several emergent themes that contribute to the perceived usefulness of system data and the Distribute system were identified: 1 Standardization: a common ILI syndrome definition; 2 Regional Comparability: views that support county-by-county comparisons of syndromic surveillance data; 3 Completeness: complete data for all expected data at a given time; 4 Coverage: data coverage of all jurisdictions in WA state; 5 Context: metadata incorporated into the views to provide context for graphed data; 6 Trusted Data: verification that information is valid and timely; and 7 Customization: the ability to customize views as necessary. As a result of the focus group, a new county level health jurisdiction expressed interest in contributing data to the Distribute system. Conclusion The resulting themes from this study can be used to guide future information design efforts for the Distribute system and other syndromic surveillance systems. In addition, this study demonstrates the benefits of conducting a low cost, qualitative evaluation at a professional conference.

  18. Process evaluation of a tailored mobile health intervention aiming to reduce fatigue in airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Alwin; Boot, Cécile R L; Hlobil, Hynek; Smid, Tjabe; van der Beek, Allard J

    2016-08-26

    MORE Energy is a mobile health intervention which aims to reduce fatigue and improve health in airline pilots. The primary objective of this process evaluation was to assess the reach, dose delivered, compliance, fidelity, barriers and facilitators, and satisfaction of the intervention. The second objective was to investigate the associations of adherence to the intervention with compliance and with participant satisfaction. Thirdly, we investigated differences between the subgroups within the target population. The intervention consisted of a smartphone application, supported by a website. It provided advice on optimal light exposure, sleep, nutrition, and physical activity, tailored to flight and personal characteristics. The reach of the intervention was determined by comparing the intervention group participants and the airline pilots who did not participate. The dose delivered was defined as the total number of participants that was sent an instruction email. Objective compliance was measured through the Control Management System of the application. To determine the fidelity, an extensive log was kept throughout the intervention period. Subjective compliance, satisfaction, barriers, facilitators, and adherence were assessed using online questionnaires. Associations between the extent to which the participants applied the advice in daily life (adherence), compliance, and satisfaction were analysed as well. Finally, outcomes of participants of different age groups and haul types were compared. A total of 2222 pilots were made aware of the study. From this group, 502 pilots met the inclusion criteria and did agree to participate. The reach of the study proved to be 22 % and the dose delivered was 99 %. The included pilots were randomized into the intervention group (n = 251) or the control group (n = 251). Of the intervention group participants, 81 % consulted any advice, while 17 % did this during four weeks or more. Fidelity was 67 %. The

  19. Evaluation of the finger wrinkling test: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barneveld, van S.; Palen, van der J.; Putten, van M.J.A.M

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Tilt table testing mainly evaluates the systemic cardiovascular part of the autonomic nervous system, while it is assumed that the finger wrinkling test assesses the peripheral part of the autonomic nervous system. In this study we explored whether the finger wrinkling test could be a usefu

  20. Evaluation of the finger wrinkling test : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Barneveld, S.; van der Palen, J.; van Putten, M. J. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Tilt table testing mainly evaluates the systemic cardiovascular part of the autonomic nervous system, while it is assumed that the finger wrinkling test assesses the peripheral part of the autonomic nervous system. In this study we explored whether the finger wrinkling test could be a useful test fo

  1. Piloting online WellnessRx learning modules: demonstration of developmental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs Burns, Katharina; Gramlich, Leah; Bistritz, Lana; McCargar, Linda; Olson, Karin; Avdagovska, Melita

    2015-04-01

    WellnessRx is a health initiative focusing on healthy living through education, knowledge translation, and community engagement. Stakeholders of WellnessRx identified web-based education learning modules on nutrition and physical education as a priority to be integrated into existing health sciences curricula, as well as adapted for use by health professionals. Five learning modules were created with essential knowledge, skills, attitudes and resources or tools for health professional students and practitioners. As part of the 'developmental evaluation framework' for WellnessRx, two of these modules were piloted within two health professional student programs. This paper describes the pilot-evaluation experience involving student surveys, focus groups and interviews, and faculty perspectives. For both modules, student pre-post knowledge assessments indicated some improvements in post-module knowledge. Post module evaluations by students indicated benefits with the online delivery being flexible for access, self-health, case-based assessments and useful nutrition and physical activity guides. Challenges for students included their time to do the modules and the activity expectations. Instructors felt each module could be better targeted to different years within an undergraduate program. Through developmental evaluation, the pilot results along with recommendations and lessons learned provided the direction needed to further develop the WellnessRx logic model and proposed learning modules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Operational and field test results from the 500 kw direct contact pilot plant at East Mesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlinak, A.J.; Lobach, J.L.; Nichols, K.E.

    1981-10-01

    A 500 kw geothermal powerplant utilizing direct contact heat exchange (DCHX) between geothermal brine and an isobutane (IC/sub 4/) working fluid is currently operating at the East Mesa test facility. The pilot plant program was initiated to determine the feasibility of large-scale direct contact heat exchange and associated plant operations. In addition to verifying the design performance of the DCHX itself, test efforts to date have (1) quantified the effect of dissolved gases (primarily CO/sub 2/) transferred from the brine to the IC/sub 4/ loop on the pressure elevation in the unvented power condenser and demonstrated a viable scheme to control this pressure elevation, (2) evaluated the potential of flash extraction and recovery of dissolved IC/sub 4/ from the spent brine, and (3) demonstrated control of fouling in critical components by pretreating the brine with small amounts of a chemical additive (FLOCON 247, Pfizer, Inc.).

  3. Crime prevention in the Netherlands: Pilot projects evaluated

    OpenAIRE

    Polder, W.

    1992-01-01

    In 1985, the Dutch government launched a five year crime prevention program in response to the rise of crime. Since there existed little experience with prevention programs the main goal was to set up organizational networks and provide a knowledge base regarding effective crime prevention measures. Over 200 prevention projects have been set up. A meta evaluation of the projects concludes that crime prevention can be very effective under certain conditions.

  4. Flight simulator requirements for airline transport pilot training - An evaluation of motion system design alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. T.; Bussolari, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of motion platform systems on pilot behavior is considered with emphasis placed on civil aviation applications. A dynamic model for human spatial orientation based on the physiological structure and function of the human vestibular system is presented. Motion platform alternatives were evaluated on the basis of the following motion platform conditions: motion with six degrees-of-freedom required for Phase II simulators and two limited motion conditions. Consideration was given to engine flameout, airwork, and approach and landing scenarios.

  5. Evaluating an integrated pilot model for post-treatment of RAP effluent using Spirodela Sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Yolanda Gamarra Hernández; Juan Forero Sarmiento; Oscar Quintero Higuera; Fredy Rueda Villamizar; Fernanda Aguilar Acevedo

    2007-01-01

    Integrated residual water treatment systems try to reduce organic matter and nutrients and reuse by-produets generated during the process. An integrated pilot model was constructed with Spirodela sp. to complement the Bolivariana University's current residual water treatment plant's efficieney in removing nutrients. This was evaluated for its efficieney in removing nutrients (ammoniacal nitrogen and phosphorus) and total and faecal coliforms using different depths of water. 77.07% eff...

  6. Evaluation and Justification of an RFID Implementation : Pilot at IKEA Customer Distribution Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Björn; Qviberg, Ola

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this final thesis isto develop a model for justification and evaluation of RFID technology. RFID is a new, relatively untested, technology using radio signals for automatic identification of different objects. Our theoretical frame of references focuses on research about RFID and implementation iss ues, we also conducted case studies and interviews in order to learn about RFID. Most RFID installations of today are Pilots or early adopters wanting to try new technology. A lot of...

  7. Evaluation of PV Module Field Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, John; Silverman, Timothy; Miller, David C.; McNutt, Peter; Kempe, Michael; Deceglie, Michael

    2015-06-14

    This paper describes an effort to inspect and evaluate PV modules in order to determine what failure or degradation modes are occurring in field installations. This paper will report on the results of six site visits, including the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Hedge Array, Tucson Electric Power (TEP) Springerville, Central Florida Utility, Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), the TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification. TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification. TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification.

  8. Impact of electromagnetic fields on human vestibular system and standing balance: pilot results and future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A.; Villard, S.; Corbacio, M.; Goulet, D.; Plante, M.; Souques, M.; Deschamps, F.; Ostiguy, G.; Lambrozo, J.; Thomas, A. W.; Legros, A.

    2016-03-01

    Although studies have found that extremely low-frequency (ELF, fields (MF) can modulate human standing balance, the acute effects of electromagnetic fields on standing balance have not been systematically investigated. This work aims to establish the threshold for acute standing balance modulation during ELFMF exposure. One hundred volunteers will be exposed to transcranial electric stimulations (Direct Current - DC and Alternating Current - AC, 1 mA) and ELFMF (0 to 160 Hz, 0 to 100 mT). The displacement of their center of pressure will be collected and analyzed as an indicator of vestibular performance. During pilot testing (n=6), we found increased lateral sway with DC, and to a lesser extent, AC exposure. The ELFMF exposure system still needs to be adapted to allow meaningful results. Future protocol design will test for possible effects due to exposures in the radiofrequency range (i.e. above 3 kHz). These results will contribute to the literature documenting exposure guidelines aiming to protect workers and the general public.

  9. Evaluating Boy Scout Geology Education, A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, R. S.; Thomson, B.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated geology knowledge acquisition by Boy Scouts through use of the Boy Scout Geology Merit Handbook. In this study, boys engaged in hands-on interactive learning following the requirements set forth in the Geology Merit Badge Handbook. The purposes of this study were to determine the amount of geology content knowledge engendered in adolescent males through the use of the Geology Merit Badge Handbook published by the Boy Scouts of America; to determine if single sex, activity oriented, free-choice learning programs can be effective in promoting knowledge development in young males; and to determine if boys participating in the Scouting program believed their participation helped them succeed in school. Members of a local Boy Scout Troop between the ages of 11 and 18 were invited to participate in a Geology Merit Badge program. Boys who did not already possess the badge were allowed to self-select participation. The boys' content knowledge of geology, rocks, and minerals was pre- and post-tested. Boys were interviewed about their school and Scouting experiences; whether they believed their Scouting experiences and work in Merit Badges contributed to their success in school. Contributing educational theories included single-sex education, informal education with free-choice learning, learning styles, hands-on activities, and the social cognitive theory concept of self-efficacy. Boys who completed this study seemed to possess a greater knowledge of geology than they obtained in school. If boys who complete the Boy Scout Geology Merit Badge receive additional geological training, their field experiences and knowledge acquired through this learning experience will be beneficial, and a basis for continued scaffolding of geologic knowledge.

  10. Food allergy training event for restaurant staff; a pilot evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A previous cross-sectional survey highlighted that restaurant staff in Brighton had gaps in their knowledge of food allergy, which could lead to the provision of unsafe meals to food-allergic customers. A food allergy training event was developed by a multi-disciplinary team (health service researcher, clinician, teacher and patient group representative) to equip restaurant staff with the knowledge and skills necessary to safely serve food-allergic customers. This evaluation summarises the training event’s impact on participants’ knowledge of food allergy and their satisfaction with the event. No attendee had previously attended any formal training on food allergy. The percentage of participants who answered all true-false questions correctly increased from 82% before the training event to 91% afterwards. The percentage of participants who were able to name at least three common allergens increased from 9% to 64%. Both quantitative and qualitative feedback was positive. Restaurant staff require a good understanding of food allergy to ensure that food-allergic customers are kept safe, and their restaurants operate within the law. This food allergy training event improved participants’ absolute knowledge of food allergy, and attendees changed practice. Recommendations are made which could improve the impact and uptake of future food allergy training events. PMID:25225607

  11. [Evaluation a parenting skills pilot programme from a public health perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pilar; Vázquez, Noelia; Pasarín, M Isabel; Artazcoz, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the process and the results of the pilot phase of the Parenting skills development programme for families (PSP), an evidence-based strategy to promote positive parenting skills in socio-educational and community settings. Before-after quasi-experimental design without a control group for the evaluation of the pilot phase of the PSD carried out in Barcelona (Spain) between October 2011 and June 2013. Eleven groups were established with the participation of 128 parents and 28 professionals. The intervention consisted of 10 or 11 sessions. Information was collected through questionnaires for parents and in-depth individual or group interviews for professionals. Parenting skills were identified through a questionnaire with six dimensions. The situation before the intervention (T0) and immediately after (T1) was compared. In T1 the number of participants decreased to 83 (retention=64.8%). Participants showed a high level of satisfaction with different dimensions of the program. On a maximum score of 10, the satisfaction of professionals was 8.7. Several key aspects and areas for improvement were identified for the future of the intervention. The quantitative analysis revealed improvements in all parenting skills dimensions and these improvements were consistent with the results of the qualitative analysis. The results of the pilot phase of this program suggest that a universal intervention on parenting skills can improve wellbeing among parents. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of a pilot police-led suicide early alert surveillance strategy in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeechan, Grant James; Richardson, Catherine; Weir, Kevin; Wilson, Lynn; O'Neill, Gillian; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy

    2017-07-19

    Those bereaved by suicide are at increased risk of psychological harm, which can be reduced with the provision of timely support. This paper outlines an evaluation of a pilot police-led suicide strategy, in comparison to a coroner-led suicide strategy looking at the number, and length of time it takes for deaths to be recorded for each strategy. Additionally, the police-led strategy offers timely contact from support services for bereaved individuals. We examined what impact this offer of support had on the capacity of support services. A mixed methods evaluation compared how long it took for suspected suicides to be recorded using both strategies. The number of referrals received by support services during the pilot strategy were compared with those from previous years. A feedback focus group, and interviews, were held with key stakeholders. The coroner strategy was more consistent at identifying suspected suicides; however, reports were filed quicker by the police. Bereaved individuals were willing to share contact details with police officers and consent for referral to support services which lead to increased referrals. The focus group and interviews revealed that the pilot police strategy needs better integration into routine police practice. This strategy has the potential to deliver a real benefit to those bereaved by suicide; however, there are still aspects which could be improved. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Laboratory and field based evaluation of chromatography ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) is an on-line ion-chromatography-based instrument designed for speciation of the inorganic gas and aerosol ammonium-nitrate-sulfate system. Previous work to characterize the performance of the MARGA has been primarily based on field comparison to other measurement methods to evaluate accuracy. While such studies are useful, the underlying reasons for disagreement among methods are not always clear. This study examines aspects of MARGA accuracy and precision specifically related to automated chromatography analysis. Using laboratory standards, analytical accuracy, precision, and method detection limits derived from the MARGA chromatography software are compared to an alternative software package (Chromeleon, Thermo Scientific Dionex). Field measurements are used to further evaluate instrument performance, including the MARGA’s use of an internal LiBr standard to control accuracy. Using gas/aerosol ratios and aerosol neutralization state as a case study, the impact of chromatography on measurement error is assessed. The new generation of on-line chromatography-based gas and particle measurement systems have many advantages, including simultaneous analysis of multiple pollutants. The Monitor for Aerosols and Gases in Ambient Air (MARGA) is such an instrument that is used in North America, Europe, and Asia for atmospheric process studies as well as routine monitoring. While the instrument has been evaluat

  14. The effect of antiemetics and reduced radiation fields on acute gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy in Stage I seminoma of the testis: a randomized pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, V.S.; Rainford, K.; Horwich, A.; Dearnaley, D.P. [Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for Stage I seminoma of the testis. Ten Stage I patients receiving para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodal (dog-leg) RT provided a toxicity baseline (group A). Twenty Stage I patients randomized to dog-let RT or para-aortic RT (10 per group) were further randomized to received prophylactic ondansetron or expectant therapy with metoclopramide (group B). Daily patient-completed questionnaires evaluated acute toxicity. Dog-leg RT for Stage I seminomas is associated with readily demonstrable gastrointestinal tract (GIT) toxicity. The number of patients in this study is too small to produce definitive results, but there appears to be reduced GIT toxicity with prophylactic antiemetics. The effect of reduced RT fields has been assessed further in the MRC randomized tiral of field sizes (TE10). (Author).

  15. A Pilot Evaluation of Portfolios for Quality Attestation of Clinical Ethics Consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fins, Joseph J; Kodish, Eric; Cohn, Felicia; Danis, Marion; Derse, Arthur R; Dubler, Nancy Neveloff; Goulden, Barbara; Kuczewski, Mark; Mercer, Mary Beth; Pearlman, Robert A; Smith, Martin L; Tarzian, Anita; Youngner, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    Although clinical ethics consultation is a high-stakes endeavor with an increasing prominence in health care systems, progress in developing standards for quality is challenging. In this article, we describe the results of a pilot project utilizing portfolios as an evaluation tool. We found that this approach is feasible and resulted in a reasonably wide distribution of scores among the 23 submitted portfolios that we evaluated. We discuss limitations and implications of these results, and suggest that this is a significant step on the pathway to an eventual certification process for clinical ethics consultants.

  16. Monitoring a Field-Scale Biostimulation Pilot Project Using Cross-Hole Radar and Borehole Geophysical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J. W.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical investigations in support of a field-scale biostimulation pilot project at the Anoka County Riverfront Park (ACP), located downgradient of the Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, in Fridley, Minnesota. The objective of the pilot project, conducted by the U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, is to assess the applicability of subsurface injection of vegetable-oil emulsion (VOE) to promote microbial degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Naturally occurring microbes, which use the VOE as substrate, ultimately break down chlorinated hydrocarbons into chloride, carbon dioxide, and water through oxidation-reduction reactions. To monitor movement of the VOE and changes in water chemistry resulting from VOE advection, dissolution, and (or) enhanced biological activity, the USGS acquired cross-hole zero-offset radar profiles; radar travel-time tomography data; and a suite of borehole geophysical logs, including electromagnetic (EM) induction conductivity. Data were collected during 5 site visits over 1.5 years. Preliminary results of these experiments have been reported elsewhere; this paper reports on the final analysis and combined interpretation of multiple data types, including application of petrophysical models to radar zero-offset profiles and tomograms to yield estimates of VOE saturation and changes in total-dissolved solids downgradient of the VOE injection zones. Comparison of pre- and post-injection datasets provides insight into the spatial and temporal distributions of both VOE and ground water with altered chemistry-information critical to understanding and verifying biodegradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons at the site. Cross-hole radar zero-offset slowness profiles and tomograms indicate the VOE remained close to the injection wells. Downgradient of the injection zones, radar amplitude profiles and EM logs indicate bulk formation electrical conductivity changes after VOE injection, which

  17. Evaluation of the home-energy-rating concept and the Massachusetts Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, M.L.; Duberg, J.A.

    1983-06-01

    This is a report on the results of an evaluation of a home-energy-rating concept based on a Massachusetts pilot project. The focus of the evaluation was on: (1) the compatibility of the Massachusetts rating with the RCS program, (2) who would use the rating and how, (3) qualitative estimates of benefits and costs, and (4) recommendations for further use and testing of the rating. In addition the evaluation of the rating concept also attempted to determine what if any effect the home energy rating has on the demand for energy audits, on the propensity of customers who received ratings to undertake recommended energy-efficiency home improvements, and on changes in mortgage-lending procedures for energy-efficient homes. The evaluation consisted of telephone and in-person discussions with the project developers, the various professional user groups, the recipients of the energy ratings, and control groups of audit customers that did not receive the energy rating. The evaluation was designed to determine the results of the pilot project, assess the project's effectiveness, and analyze the potential for transferring the rating procedure to other geographic locations.

  18. Fundamental Study of Evaluation at Berthing Training for Pilot Trainees Using a Ship Maneuvering Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Inoue

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Use of the ship maneuvering simulator (SMS is at the core of pilot trainees education and training, so it is desirable to have an evaluation method that can be completed shortly after each berthing training session. There are basically two methods of docking maneuvering that pilot trainees learn: one in which the ship enters from outside the port and is berthed directly at the target quay, and a second method in which the vessel carries out a turn in front of the target quay before berthing. The authors suggested an evaluation index in a previous study concerning the first docking method. In the present study, the authors propose an evaluation method for the case of berthing the vessel using the turning maneuver. Since the index obtained by this method offers a single numerical benchmark, it is an easy–to-understand result of the training exercise. The authors carried out experiments using a SMS and confirmed that the proposed evaluation method is effective and helpful to improve the effectiveness of SMS training.

  19. The visual stress model—A psycho-physiological method for the evaluation of operational reliability of pilots and cosmonauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammel, H.; Haase, H.

    An experimental psycho-physiological method is presented for the evaluation of visual-cognitive performance preconditions and operational reliability of pilots and cosmonauts. As visual-cognitive stress are used tachistoscopically presented instrument symbols under conditions of individual speed of work and time pressure. The results of the compared extreme groups consisting of pilots with good and insufficient flight performance showed that the pilots with impairments to the quality of flight activity differ already before the test in their individual habitual characteristics and actual motivation, during the stress in their operational parameters, in the dimensions of their cardiorespiratory activation as well as in their efficiency and after the stress in their subjective experience of the stress. Conclusions are drawn for the evaluation of the aptitude of pilots and cosmonauts.

  20. Military Personnel: DOD Should Develop a Plan to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Its Career Intermission Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    informed oversight, policy, and funding decisions. GAO’s commitment to good government is reflected in its core values of accountability, integrity, and...MILITARY PERSONNEL DOD Should Develop a Plan to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Its Career Intermission Pilot... Career Intermission Pilot Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  1. How could we realize a win-win strategy on irrigation price policy? Evaluation of a pilot reform project in Hebei Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinxia; Zhang, Lijuan; Huang, Jikun

    2016-08-01

    The challenge of increasing irrigation prices while increasing farmers' income exists not only in China but in other countries as well. The overall goal of this paper is to evaluate whether a win-win strategy can be realized in a pilot reform in Hebei, China. The data came from a two-round field survey in 2009 and 2012, which indicated that the key mechanism of the pilot reform was that farmers received similar returns (including reallocated, increased irrigation fees and a government subsidy), but paid different irrigation fees; the difference between the returned money and payment was treated as an incentive for farmers to reduce their use of irrigation. The econometric results showed that in pilot reformed villages, local farmers' groundwater application for irrigating wheat and cotton could decrease by 21% each. If no subsidies are granted, roughly half of the region's farmers would lose money due to the reform. However, most farmers who receive subsidies were able to earn money in the pilot reformed villages. If several issues are properly resolved (such as selecting more representative villages, increasing the subsidy value, and negatively linking the subsidy with water use), it would be possible for more regions to realize a win-win price reform strategy.

  2. Modeling and Evaluating Pilot Performance in NextGen: Review of and Recommendations Regarding Pilot Modeling Efforts, Architectures, and Validation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickens, Christopher; Sebok, Angelia; Keller, John; Peters, Steve; Small, Ronald; Hutchins, Shaun; Algarin, Liana; Gore, Brian Francis; Hooey, Becky Lee; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    NextGen operations are associated with a variety of changes to the national airspace system (NAS) including changes to the allocation of roles and responsibilities among operators and automation, the use of new technologies and automation, additional information presented on the flight deck, and the entire concept of operations (ConOps). In the transition to NextGen airspace, aviation and air operations designers need to consider the implications of design or system changes on human performance and the potential for error. To ensure continued safety of the NAS, it will be necessary for researchers to evaluate design concepts and potential NextGen scenarios well before implementation. One approach for such evaluations is through human performance modeling. Human performance models (HPMs) provide effective tools for predicting and evaluating operator performance in systems. HPMs offer significant advantages over empirical, human-in-the-loop testing in that (1) they allow detailed analyses of systems that have not yet been built, (2) they offer great flexibility for extensive data collection, (3) they do not require experimental participants, and thus can offer cost and time savings. HPMs differ in their ability to predict performance and safety with NextGen procedures, equipment and ConOps. Models also vary in terms of how they approach human performance (e.g., some focus on cognitive processing, others focus on discrete tasks performed by a human, while others consider perceptual processes), and in terms of their associated validation efforts. The objectives of this research effort were to support the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in identifying HPMs that are appropriate for predicting pilot performance in NextGen operations, to provide guidance on how to evaluate the quality of different models, and to identify gaps in pilot performance modeling research, that could guide future research opportunities. This research effort is intended to help the FAA

  3. Pilot Evaluation of Adaptive Control in Motion-Based Flight Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshige, John T.; Campbell, Stefan Forrest

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the strengths, weaknesses, and robustness characteristics of several MRAC (Model-Reference Adaptive Control) based adaptive control technologies garnering interest from the community as a whole. To facilitate this, a control study using piloted and unpiloted simulations to evaluate sensitivities and handling qualities was conducted. The adaptive control technologies under consideration were ALR (Adaptive Loop Recovery), BLS (Bounded Linear Stability), Hybrid Adaptive Control, L1, OCM (Optimal Control Modification), PMRAC (Predictor-based MRAC), and traditional MRAC

  4. Evaluation of the US Department of Energy Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (2010-2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL; Rose, Erin M. [ORNL; Hawkins, Beth A. [ORNL

    2017-05-01

    This report contains results from analysis conducted on each of the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) grants awarded to 16 organizations by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in 2010. The purpose of WIPP was to explore the potential adoptability or replicability of innovative processes or technologies for the enhancement of DOE’s Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). DOE initiated the WIPP grant to accelerate effective innovations in home energy efficiency and other WAP mission-related goals for income-qualifying households of low socioeconomic status. This study was performed alongside a broader, national evaluation of WAP conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE.

  5. Evaluating an integrated pilot model for post-treatment of RAP effluent using Spirodela Sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Gamarra Hernández

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Integrated residual water treatment systems try to reduce organic matter and nutrients and reuse by-produets generated during the process. An integrated pilot model was constructed with Spirodela sp. to complement the Bolivariana University's current residual water treatment plant's efficieney in removing nutrients. This was evaluated for its efficieney in removing nutrients (ammoniacal nitrogen and phosphorus and total and faecal coliforms using different depths of water. 77.07% efficieney was obtained for ammoniacal nitrogen, 97.10% for total phosphorus, 98.56% for faecal coliforms and 96.4% for total coliforms. Key words: biological treatment, residual water, nutrient removal.

  6. Performance evaluation model of a pilot food waste collection system in Suzhou City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zongguo; Wang, Yuanjia; De Clercq, Djavan

    2015-05-01

    This paper analyses the food waste collection and transportation (C&T) system in a pilot project in Suzhou by using a novel performance evaluation method. The method employed to conduct this analysis involves a unified performance evaluation index containing qualitative and quantitative indicators applied to data from Suzhou City. Two major inefficiencies were identified: a) low system efficiency due to insufficient processing capacity of commercial food waste facilities; and b) low waste resource utilization due to low efficiency of manual sorting. The performance evaluation indicated that the pilot project collection system's strong points included strong economics, low environmental impact and low social impact. This study also shows that Suzhou's integrated system has developed a comprehensive body of laws and clarified regulatory responsibilities for each of the various government departments to solve the problems of commercial food waste management. Based on Suzhou's experience, perspectives and lessons can be drawn for other cities and areas where food waste management systems are in the planning stage, or are encountering operational problems.

  7. Sensorimotor Results From a Joint NASA and Russian Pilot Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa B.

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the full impact of sensorimotor decrements associated with long-duration spaceflight has not been undertaken until 24 hours after landing. To overcome this limitation, both the Russian and U.S. space programs have implemented crew testing at the Soyuz landing site with additional follow-up measurements within 24 hours. Identified as the Pilot Field Test (PFT) this research on NASA’s side included: (1) a sit-to-stand test, (2) recovery from a simulated fall stand test where the crewmember begins in the prone position and then stands for 3.5 minutes while cardiovascular and postural ataxia data are acquired, and (3) a tandem heel-to-toe walk. Video, cardiovascular parameters (heart rate and blood pressure), data from body-worn inertial sensors, and severity of postflight motion sickness were collected during each test session. Russian investigators made measurements associated with: (a) obstacle avoidance, (b) muscle compliance, (c) postural adjustments to perturbations (pushes) applied to the subject’s chest area and (d) center of mass measurements made across most test objectives with insoles inserted into the subjects’ shoes. Data from 18 subjects have been obtained. Additional measurements on functional tests are now being obtained. The increased level of functional deficits not attributable to strength observed in crewmembers has been substantially greater than previously observed when compared with measurements obtained after 24 hours. Full recovery requires 6 to 16 days. Measureable performance parameters such as those associated with functional behaviors are required to provide an evidence base for characterizing programmatic risks for undertaking exploration missions where crewmembers will be unassisted after landing.

  8. Evaluation of decommissioning alternatives for the Pilot Plant Complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueda, J.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of four decommissioning alternatives for the Pilot Plant Complex (PPC), an inactive chemical weapons research, development, and production facility consisting of nine buildings located in the Edgewood Area of the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland. Decommissioning the PPC involves six steps: (1) assessing existing conditions; (2) dismantling the aboveground portions of the buildings (including the floor slabs, paved roads, and sidewalks within the PPC); (3) reducing the size of the demolition debris and sealing the debris in containers for later testing and evaluation; (4) testing and evaluating the debris; (5) conducting site operation and maintenance activities; and (6) recycling or disposing of the debris with or without prior treatment, as appropriate.

  9. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume III: supplementary reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    The appendices presented in this volume support and supplement Volume I of the Energy Extension Service Pilot Program Evaluation Report: The First Year. The appendices contain back-up data and detailed information on energy savings estimation and other analytic procedures. This volume also describes the data sources used for the evaluation. Appendix I presents the Btu estimation procedures used to calculate state-by-state energy savings. Appendix II contains details of the data sources used for the evaluation. Appendix III presents program activity data, budget, and cost per client analyses. Appendix IV, the Multivariate Analysis of EES Survey Data, provides the basis for the Integrating Statistical Analyses. Appendix V describes the rationale and exclusion rules for outlying data points. The final appendix presents program-by-program fuel costs and self-reported savings and investment.

  10. Performance Evaluation of Speech Recognition Systems as a Next-Generation Pilot-Vehicle Interface Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.

    2016-01-01

    During the flight trials known as Gulfstream-V Synthetic Vision Systems Integrated Technology Evaluation (GV-SITE), a Speech Recognition System (SRS) was used by the evaluation pilots. The SRS system was intended to be an intuitive interface for display control (rather than knobs, buttons, etc.). This paper describes the performance of the current "state of the art" Speech Recognition System (SRS). The commercially available technology was evaluated as an application for possible inclusion in commercial aircraft flight decks as a crew-to-vehicle interface. Specifically, the technology is to be used as an interface from aircrew to the onboard displays, controls, and flight management tasks. A flight test of a SRS as well as a laboratory test was conducted.

  11. Public library consumer health information pilot project: results of a National Library of Medicine evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, F B; Lyon, B; Schell, M B; Kitendaugh, P; Cid, V H; Siegel, E R

    2000-10-01

    In October 1998, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) launched a pilot project to learn about the role of public libraries in providing health information to the public and to generate information that would assist NLM and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) in learning how best to work with public libraries in the future. Three regional medical libraries (RMLs), eight resource libraries, and forty-one public libraries or library systems from nine states and the District of Columbia were selected for participation. The pilot project included an evaluation component that was carried out in parallel with project implementation. The evaluation ran through September 1999. The results of the evaluation indicated that participating public librarians were enthusiastic about the training and information materials provided as part of the project and that many public libraries used the materials and conducted their own outreach to local communities and groups. Most libraries applied the modest funds to purchase additional Internet-accessible computers and/or upgrade their health-reference materials. However, few of the participating public libraries had health information centers (although health information was perceived as a top-ten or top-five topic of interest to patrons). Also, the project generated only minimal usage of NLM's consumer health database, known as MEDLINEplus, from the premises of the monitored libraries (patron usage from home or office locations was not tracked). The evaluation results suggested a balanced follow-up by NLM and the NN/LM, with a few carefully selected national activities, complemented by a package of targeted activities that, as of January 2000, are being planned, developed, or implemented. The results also highlighted the importance of building an evaluation component into projects like this one from the outset, to assure that objectives were met and that evaluative information was available on a timely basis, as was

  12. Field-Metered Data from Portable Unit Dehumidifiers in the U.S. Residential Sector: Initial Results of a Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willem, Henry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Beraki, Bereket [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Burke, Tom [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Melody, Moya [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Nagaraju, Mythri [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Ni, Chun Chun [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Pratt, Stacy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Dominique Yang, Hung-Chia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2013-01-29

    The work described herein is intended to enrich the body of literature regarding dehumidifiers in residential settings—in particular the hours of use and energy consumption of various types of dehumidifiers. In the United States, portable unit dehumidifiers most commonly are used in basements during humid summer days in northern climates. Dehumidifier energy consumption differs among households depending on settings selected by the user, frequency of use, and conditions of operation. Although some estimates of dehumidifier use have been developed, and a few metering studies performed, there remains a paucity of metered data collected from individual households that use dehumidifiers. For this study we obtained field data on the energy consumption of dehumidifiers to supplement currently available analyses. Our goal was to obtain data from a pilot study that we could use to develop initial distributions describing the capacities and applications of dehumidifiers used in individual homes. More precisely characterizing the use of dehumidifiers in real-world applications will enable a more accurate estimate of the range of energy use in various operational modes. Our pilot field-metering exercise was aimed at compiling real-time data on the energy consumption of portable dehumidifiers in residential households in the New England and Mid-Atlantic areas. Our analysis furthers the process of developing a more precise estimate of dehumidifier energy use, which will support the evaluation of the potential energy savings and attendant costs associated with more energy efficient dehumidifiers.

  13. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a iveelement model of pilot...... implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  14. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a five-element model of pilot...... implementation, and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can...

  15. Poverty and Gender Perspective in Productive Projects for Rural Women in Mexico: Impact Evaluation of a Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquieta-Salomon, Jose E.; Tepichin-Valle, Ana Maria; Tellez-Rojo, Martha Maria

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot study that promoted productive and capacity-building activities among deprived rural women of Mexico. The evaluation design is observational; 1,278 women are interviewed, and the comparison group is estimated by propensity score matching. The results show a positive impact on the…

  16. Poverty and Gender Perspective in Productive Projects for Rural Women in Mexico: Impact Evaluation of a Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquieta-Salomon, Jose E.; Tepichin-Valle, Ana Maria; Tellez-Rojo, Martha Maria

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot study that promoted productive and capacity-building activities among deprived rural women of Mexico. The evaluation design is observational; 1,278 women are interviewed, and the comparison group is estimated by propensity score matching. The results show a positive impact on the…

  17. Breast cancer education for Navajo women: a pilot study evaluating a culturally relevant video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Priscilla R; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I; Baldwin, Julie A; Sandoval, Nellie; Robinson, Frances

    2010-06-01

    This pilot study evaluated a culturally specific video designed to teach Navajo women about breast cancer treatment options. Fourteen Navajo women diagnosed with breast cancer and 26 healthcare providers participated in a mixed-method evaluation that documented their perceptions immediately and 6 months after viewing the video. After initial viewing, women reported reduced anxiety about treatment and interest in support groups. Six months later, women said the video prompted them to seek more information from printed sources and their provider. Younger Navajo women who were 44 to 51 years old were more likely to attend support groups than women who were 55-67 years. Providers corroborated the positive effects of the video. The providers believed the video encouraged patients to seek information about breast cancer and to ask questions about treatment plans and side effects. A culturally relevant video for Navajo women can be an effective teaching tool and can enhance patient-provider communication.

  18. A pilot study evaluating the "STATSCAN" digital X-ray machine in paediatric polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Richard D; van As, Arjan B; Sanders, Virginia; Douglas, Tania S; Wieselthaler, Nicole; Vlok, Ann; Paverd, Sylvia; Kilborn, Tracy; Rode, Heinz; Potgieter, Herman; Beningfield, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    A pilot study evaluating the use in paediatric polytrauma of the STATSCAN, a low-radiation dose, fan-beam digital radiography unit (Lodox Systems, Sandton, South Africa). Over 3 months, 23 polytrauma patients treated at the Emergency Unit of the Red Cross Children's Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, were imaged on the STATSCAN. Image quality, diagnostic equivalence and clinical efficiency were compared with a computed radiography (CR) system (Fuji FCR 5000, Fuji Photo Film, Tokyo, Japan). The STATSCAN antero-posterior bodygram correlated well technically and diagnostically with CR, showing 96% of the fractures in the cohort. It allowed superior visualisation of the trachea and main bronchi and imaging was, on average, 13% faster than CR. The STATSCAN could play an important role in paediatric polytrauma. The clinical significance of its superior demonstration of the trachea and main bronchi requires further evaluation.

  19. Evaluation of a pilot promotora program for Latino forest workers in southern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Diane E; Wilmsen, Carl; Sasaki, Timothy; Barton-Antonio, Dinorah; Steege, Andrea L; Chang, Charlotte

    2014-07-01

    Forest work, an occupation with some of the highest injury and illness rates, is conducted primarily by Latino immigrant workers. This study evaluates a pilot program where promotoras (lay community health educators) provided occupational health and safety trainings for Latino forest workers. Evaluation methods included a focus group, post-tests, and qualitative feedback. Community capacity to address working conditions increased through (i) increased leadership and community access to information and resources; and (ii) increased worker awareness of workplace health and safety rights and resources. Fear of retaliation remains a barrier to workers taking action; nevertheless, the promotoras supported several workers in addressing-specific workplace issues. For working conditions to significantly improve, major structural influences need to be addressed. A long-term, organizationally supported promotora program can play a key role in linking and supporting change at the individual, interpersonal and community levels, contributing to and supporting structural change. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a five-element model of pilot...

  1. [Evaluation of the test results on hepatitis B pilot surveillance labortory in 9 provinces of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-zhen; Cui, Fu-qiang; Gong, Xiao-hong

    2010-06-01

    To assess the test quality of HBsAg, anti-HBc IgM and anti-HAV IgM in the laboratories of Hepatitis B pilot surveillance provinces. Blood serum from each of the Hepatitis B pilot surveillance provinces were collected to verify the test results. The Chemiluminescence Microparticle Immuno Assay (CMIA), ARCHITECT i2000 automatic light detector and test reagents produced by U.S.A. Abbott corporation were used in the retest. Using the Abbott reagent CMIA test results as the criteria, the domestic made ELISA reagents sensitivity, specificity, the total coincidence rate and Yoden index of HBsAg, anti-HBc IgM and anti-HAV IgM were evaluated in Hepatitis B pilot surveillance provinces. In the National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System (NNDRS) reported Hepatitis B cases, the proportion of detecting HBsAg and anti-HBc IgM was 98.53% and 39.49% respectively. Through the verification test to the reported cases in Hepatitis B pilot surveillance provinces, the original and veritication diagnosis 01 the reported eases was quite different. Among 197 acute Hepatitis B reported cases, 56 cases were agreeable with diagnosis cretirea, accounting for 28.42%. Among 1046 chronic Hepatitis B reported cases, the verification diagnosis of 602 cases was consistent with the original diagnosis, accounting for 57.55%. By using Abbott reagent and CMIA method to test again, it was found that the verification test results using domesticmade reagent and ELISA assay were low consistency compared with the test results of Abbott reagent CMIA method. The detection result of home-made reagents by ELISA compared with the Abbott reagents CMIA, the sensitivity and the total coincidence rate of HBsAg were over 95%, Kappa value was 0.439, and specificity was only 50.00%. The sensitivity, the total coincidence rate and the specificity of Anti-HBc IgM were moderate level, Kappa value was 0.516. The sensitivity of Anti-HAV IgM were 20%, and the total coincidence and specificity were higher, Kappa value was 0

  2. Piloting a Non-Invasive Genetic Sampling Method for Evaluating Population-Level Benefits of Wildlife Crossing Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Sawaya

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Intuitively, wildlife crossing structures should enhance the viability of wildlife populations. Previous research has demonstrated that a broad range of species will use crossing structures, however, questions remain as to whether these measures actually provide benefits to populations. To assess this, studies will need to determine the number of individuals using crossings, their sex, and their genetic relationships. Obtaining empirical data demonstrating population-level benefits for some species can be problematic and challenging at best. Molecular techniques now make it possible to identify species, individuals, their sex, and their genetic relatedness from hair samples collected through non-invasive genetic sampling (NGS. We describe efforts to pilot a method to assess potential population-level benefits of wildlife crossing structures. We tested the feasibility of a prototype NGS system designed to sample hair from black bears (Ursus americanus and grizzly bears (U. arctos at two wildlife underpasses. The piloted hair-sampling method did not deter animal use of the trial underpasses and was effective at sampling hair from more than 90% of the bear crossing events at the underpasses. Hair samples were also obtained from non-target carnivore species, including three out of five (60% cougar (Puma concolor crossing events. Individual identification analysis revealed that three female and two male grizzly bears used one wildlife underpass, whereas two female and three male black bears were identified as using the other underpass. Of the 36 hair samples from bears analyzed, five failed, resulting in an 87% extraction success rate, and six more were only identified to species. Overall, 70% of the hair samples from bears collected in the field had sufficient DNA for extraction purposes. Preliminary data from our NGS suggest the technique can be a reliable method to assess the population-level benefits of Banff wildlife crossings. Furthermore, NGS

  3. A pilot study on the neurometric evaluation of "effective" and "ineffective" antismoking public service announcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartocci, Giulia; Modica, Enrica; Rossi, Dario; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Venuti, Isotta; Rossi, Giulia; Corsi, Elena; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death and smoking-related illness worldwide. Research has shown that antismoking advertising may help reduce this habit. Nowadays, public service announcements (PSAs) are considered "Effective" or "Ineffective" on the base of official reports concerning behavioral/attitudinal changes toward healthier patterns and health-related savings following the exposure to the PSA. In this pilot study, we described the results of the use of three neurometric indexes for the evaluation of the efficacy of a couple of antismoking PSAs in a reduced sample of voluntary participants. The study applied the gathering of the electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms variations, as well as the heart rate (HR) and galvanic skin response (GSR). The neurometric indicators here employed were the Approach-Withdrawal (AW), the Effort (EfI) and the Emotional (EI) indexes. Results suggest a significant higher values for AW, Effort and Emotional indexes (p=0,02; p= 0,03 and p= 0,01 respectively) related to the perception of the "Effective" antismoking PSAs against the perception of the "Ineffective" one. Since this is a pilot study, the results obtained need further investigation, in terms of enlarged stimuli sample and number of participants to provide indications concerning the relevant features to be included in the realization of effective anti-smoking PSAs.

  4. "I'll never forget this": evaluating a pilot workshop in effective communication for dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucander, Henriette; Knutsson, Kerstin; Salé, Hanna; Jonsson, Anders

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated a pilot workshop for teaching communication skills to dental students. The methodology is based on an experiential learning approach, the use of realistic clinical scenarios, simulated patients, and an integrated teaching team of both educational researchers and dentists. Furthermore, the methodology was adapted for short workshops, which is thought to offer better possibilities for frequent and effective training of communication skills throughout the curriculum. The work-shop was piloted with groups of six to ten students from the sixth and tenth semesters (n=94). Results show that the majority of students found the tasks meaningful and well aligned with how they perceived their future profession as dentists. Most students also thought that they learned from the task. An interesting finding is that students not only found it instructive to practice how to communicate in authentic situations, but that they generally found the workshop to be thought-provoking while at the same time providing structure and intellectual tools for the future. A possible explanation for this finding is the sharing of explicit criteria for high-quality communication.

  5. Pilot evaluation of a media literacy program for tobacco prevention targeting early adolescents shows mixed results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestle, Christine E; Chen, Yvonnes; Estabrooks, Paul A; Zoellner, Jamie; Bigby, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the impact of media literacy for tobacco prevention for youth delivered through a community site. A randomized pretest-posttest evaluation design with matched-contact treatment and control conditions. The pilot study was delivered through the YMCA in a lower-income suburban and rural area of Southwest Virginia, a region long tied, both economically and culturally, to the tobacco industry. Children ages 8 to 14 (76% white, 58% female) participated in the study (n = 38). The intervention was an antismoking media literacy program (five 1-hour lessons) compared with a matched-contact creative writing control program. General media literacy, three domains of tobacco-specific media literacy ("authors and audiences," "messages and meanings," and "representation and reality"), tobacco attitudes, and future expectations were assessed. Multiple regression modeling assessed the impact of the intervention, controlling for pretest measures, age, and sex. General media literacy and tobacco-specific "authors and audiences" media literacy improved significantly for treatment compared with control (p media literacy measures and for tobacco attitudes were not significant. Future expectations of smoking increased significantly for treatment participants ages 10 and younger (p media literacy are accompanied by an increase in future expectations to smoke for younger children.

  6. [Primary care and mental health care collaboration in patients with depression: Evaluation of a pilot experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Carlos; Balagué, Laura; Iruin, Álvaro; Retolaza, Ander; Belaunzaran, Jon; Basterrechea, Javier; Mosquera, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    To implement and assess a collaborative experience between Primary Care (PC) and Mental Health (MH) in order to improve the care of patients with depression. Pilot collaborative project from a participatory action research approach during 2013. Basque Country. Osakidetza (Basque Health Service). Bizkaia and Gipuzkoa. The study included 207 professionals from general practice, nursing, psychiatry, psychiatric nursing, psychology and social work of 9 health centres and 6 mental health centres of Osakidetza. Shared design and development of four axes of intervention: 1) Communication and knowledge between PC and MH professionals, 2) Improvement of diagnostic coding and referral of patients, 3) Training programmes with meetings and common Clinical Practice Guidelines, and 4) Evaluation. Intervention and control questionnaires to professionals of the centres on the knowledge and satisfaction in the PC-MH relationship, joint training activities, and assessment of the experience. Osakidetza registers of prevalences, referrals and treatments. Follow-up meetings. Improvement in the 4 axes of intervention in the participant centres compared with the controls. Identification of factors to be considered in the development and sustainability of PC-MH collaborative care. The pilot experience confirms that collaborative projects promoted by PC and MH can improve depression care and the satisfaction of professionals. They are complex projects that need simultaneous interventions adjusted to the particularities of the health services. Multidisciplinary and continuous participation and management and information system support are necessary for their implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Piloted "Well Clear" Performance Evaluation of Detect-and-Avoid Systems with Suggestive Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Eric R.; Santiago, Confesor; Watza, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of four prototype unmanned aircraft detect-and-avoid (DAA) display configurations, each with different informational elements driven by alerting and guidance algorithms. Sixteen unmanned aircraft pilots flew each combination of the display configurations, with half being given zero DAA surveillance sensor uncertainty and the other half experiencing errors that were comparable, and in some cases slightly better than, errors that were measured in DAA system flight tests. The displays that showed intruder alert information in altitude and heading bands had significantly fewer losses of well clear compared with alternative displays that lacked that information. This difference was significant from a statistical and practical perspective: those losses that did occur lasted for shorter periods and did not penetrate as far into the geometric "separation cylinder" as those in the non-banded displays. A modest level of DAA surveillance sensor uncertainty did not affect the proportion of losses of well clear or their severity. It is recommended that DAA traffic displays implement a band-type display in order to improve the safety of UAS operations in the National Airspace System. Finally, this report provides pilot response time distributions for responding to DAA alerts.

  8. Loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification for asymptomatic malaria detection in challenging field settings: Technical performance and pilot implementation in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Casas, Elisa; Manrique, Paulo; Ding, Xavier C; Carrasco-Escobar, Gabriel; Alava, Freddy; Gave, Anthony; Rodriguez, Hugo; Contreras-Mancilla, Juan; Rosas-Aguirre, Angel; Speybroeck, Niko; González, Iveth J; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Gamboa, Dionicia

    2017-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP) methodology offers an opportunity for point-of-care (POC) molecular detection of asymptomatic malaria infections. However, there is still little evidence on the feasibility of implementing this technique for population screenings in isolated field settings. Overall, we recruited 1167 individuals from terrestrial ('road') and hydric ('riverine') communities of the Peruvian Amazon for a cross-sectional survey to detect asymptomatic malaria infections. The technical performance of LAMP was evaluated in a subgroup of 503 samples, using real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) as reference standard. The operational feasibility of introducing LAMP testing in the mobile screening campaigns was assessed based on field-suitability parameters, along with a pilot POC-LAMP assay in a riverine community without laboratory infrastructure. LAMP had a sensitivity of 91.8% (87.7-94.9) and specificity of 91.9% (87.8-95.0), and the overall accuracy was significantly better among samples collected during road screenings than riverine communities (p≤0.004). LAMP-based diagnostic strategy was successfully implemented within the field-team logistics and the POC-LAMP pilot in the riverine community allowed for a reduction in the turnaround time for case management, from 12-24 hours to less than 5 hours. Specimens with haemolytic appearance were regularly observed in riverine screenings and could help explaining the hindered performance/interpretation of the LAMP reaction in these communities. LAMP-based molecular malaria diagnosis can be deployed outside of reference laboratories, providing similar performance as qPCR. However, scale-up in remote field settings such as riverine communities needs to consider a number of logistical challenges (e.g. environmental conditions, labour-intensiveness in large population screenings) that can influence its optimal implementation.

  9. Piloted Well Clear Performance Evaluation of Detect and Avoid Systems with Suggestive Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Eric; Santiago, Confesor; Watza, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    Regulations to establish operational and performance requirements for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are being developed by a consortium of government, industry and academic institutions (RTCA, 2013). Those requirements will apply to the new detect-and-avoid (DAA) systems and other equipment necessary to integrate UAS with the United States (U.S) National Airspace System (NAS) and will be determined according to their contribution to the overall safety case. That safety case requires demonstration that DAA-equipped UAS collectively operating in the NAS meet an airspace safety threshold (AST). Several key gaps must be closed in order to link equipment requirements to an airspace safety case. Foremost among these is calculation of the systems risk ratio, the degree to which a particular system mitigates violation of an aircraft separation standard (FAA, 2013). The risk ratio of a DAA system, in combination with risk ratios of other collision mitigation mechanisms, will determine the overall safety of the airspace measured in terms of the number of collisions per flight hour. It is not known what the effectiveness is of a pilot-in-the-loop DAA system or even what parameters of the DAA system most improve the pilots ability to maintain separation. The relationship between the DAA system design and the overall effectiveness of the DAA system that includes the pilot, expressed as a risk ratio, must be determined before DAA operational and performance requirements can be finalized. Much research has been devoted to integrating UAS into non-segregated airspace (Dalamagkidis, 2009, Ostwald, 2007, Gillian, 2012, Hesselink, 2011, Santiago, 2015, Rorie 2015 and 2016). Several traffic displays intended for use as part of a DAA system have gone through human-in-the-loop simulation and flight-testing. Most of these evaluations were part of development programs to produce a deployable system, so it is unclear how to generalize particular aspects of those designs to general

  10. Actigraphy in human African trypanosomiasis as a tool for objective clinical evaluation and monitoring: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njamnshi, Alfred K; Seke Etet, Paul F; Perrig, Stephen; Acho, Alphonse; Funsah, Julius Y; Mumba, Dieudonné; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Kristensson, Krister; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness leads to a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome with characteristic sleep alterations. Current division into a first, hemolymphatic stage and second, meningoencephalitic stage is primarily based on the detection of white blood cells and/or trypanosomes in the cerebrospinal fluid. The validity of this criterion is, however, debated, and novel laboratory biomarkers are under study. Objective clinical HAT evaluation and monitoring is therefore needed. Polysomnography has effectively documented sleep-wake disturbances during HAT, but could be difficult to apply as routine technology in field work. The non-invasive, cost-effective technique of actigraphy has been widely validated as a tool for the ambulatory evaluation of sleep disturbances. In this pilot study, actigraphy was applied to the clinical assessment of HAT patients. Actigraphy was recorded in patients infected by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and age- and sex-matched control subjects. Simultaneous nocturnal polysomnography was also performed in the patients. Nine patients, including one child, were analyzed at admission and two of them also during specific treatment. Parameters, analyzed with user-friendly software, included sleep time evaluated from rest-activity signals, rest-activity rhythm waveform and characteristics. The findings showed sleep-wake alterations of various degrees of severity, which in some patients did not parallel white blood cell counts in the cerebrospinal fluid. Actigraphic recording also showed improvement of the analyzed parameters after treatment initiation. Nocturnal polysomnography showed alterations of sleep time closely corresponding to those derived from actigraphy. The data indicate that actigraphy can be an interesting tool for HAT evaluation, providing valuable clinical information through simple technology, well suited also for long-term follow-up. Actigraphy could therefore objectively contribute to the clinical

  11. Actigraphy in human African trypanosomiasis as a tool for objective clinical evaluation and monitoring: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred K Njamnshi

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness leads to a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome with characteristic sleep alterations. Current division into a first, hemolymphatic stage and second, meningoencephalitic stage is primarily based on the detection of white blood cells and/or trypanosomes in the cerebrospinal fluid. The validity of this criterion is, however, debated, and novel laboratory biomarkers are under study. Objective clinical HAT evaluation and monitoring is therefore needed. Polysomnography has effectively documented sleep-wake disturbances during HAT, but could be difficult to apply as routine technology in field work. The non-invasive, cost-effective technique of actigraphy has been widely validated as a tool for the ambulatory evaluation of sleep disturbances. In this pilot study, actigraphy was applied to the clinical assessment of HAT patients.Actigraphy was recorded in patients infected by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and age- and sex-matched control subjects. Simultaneous nocturnal polysomnography was also performed in the patients. Nine patients, including one child, were analyzed at admission and two of them also during specific treatment. Parameters, analyzed with user-friendly software, included sleep time evaluated from rest-activity signals, rest-activity rhythm waveform and characteristics. The findings showed sleep-wake alterations of various degrees of severity, which in some patients did not parallel white blood cell counts in the cerebrospinal fluid. Actigraphic recording also showed improvement of the analyzed parameters after treatment initiation. Nocturnal polysomnography showed alterations of sleep time closely corresponding to those derived from actigraphy.The data indicate that actigraphy can be an interesting tool for HAT evaluation, providing valuable clinical information through simple technology, well suited also for long-term follow-up. Actigraphy could therefore objectively contribute to

  12. Character Development Pilot Evaluation of Two Programs for Youth with Chronic Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Maslow

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the pilot evaluation of two Positive Youth Development (PYD programs for youth with child onset chronic illness (COCI, reporting how the programs influenced participants’ character development. College students with COCI led high school students with COCI through activities pertaining to different aspects of growing up with a chronic illness. Participants completed the Positive Youth Development Inventory-Short Form (PYDI-S, which measures seven domains of youth perceptions of the contribution to their development from the program. Participants reported that both programs helped them the most with personal standards, which corresponds well to character development on the full version of the Positive Youth Development Inventory (PYDI. They also had high scores on prosocial behavior and future orientation, both important domains for character development. We discuss the idea that interventions promoting character development for youth with COCI are critical for promoting a positive narrative for chronically-ill youth, their parents, and society.

  13. BodyWise: evaluating a pilot body image group for patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountford, Victoria A; Brown, Amy; Bamford, Bryony; Saeidi, Saeideh; Morgan, John F; Lacey, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Body image disturbance can be enduring and distressing to individuals with eating disorders and effective treatments remain limited. This pilot study evaluated a group-based treatment-BodyWise-developed for use in full and partial hospitalization with patients with anorexia nervosa at low weight. A partial crossover waitlist design was used. BodyWise (N = 50) versus treatment as usual (N = 40) were compared on standardized measures of body image disturbance. Results demonstrated significant improvement in the group compared to treatment as usual for the primary outcome measure (Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire Shape Concern subscale) and other manifestations of body image disturbance including body checking and body image quality of life. BodyWise appeared acceptable to participants, and was easy to deliver within the pragmatics of a busy eating disorder service. There is potential for its wider dissemination as a precursor to more active body image interventions.

  14. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Pilot Parenting Educational Intervention in a Pregnancy Buprenorphine Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Averie C; Ren, Dianxu; Founds, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    We developed a pilot evidence-based prenatal educational intervention to increase knowledge of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and early parenting skills for women with opiate dependency who enrolled in a pregnancy buprenorphine clinic. We developed, implemented, and tested modules regarding expectations during newborn hospitalization for observation or treatment of NAS and regarding evidence-based parenting skills in response to NAS behaviors. Testing evaluated baseline knowledge of early parenting skills with newborns at risk for NAS and change from baseline after the educational intervention. No statistically significant difference in composite knowledge scores was observed. A brief survey completed by the participants postpartum affirmed the perception of women that the educational intervention effectively prepared them for the early postpartum period while their newborns were hospitalized.

  15. Iowa CASAS Pilot Project Reports: An Initial Evaluation of CASAS Effectiveness in Iowa's Adult Basic Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Mary L.

    In fall 1992, the Iowa Department of Education began pilot tests of the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS), an assessment system evaluating reading, math, and problem solving in a life skills context for adult remedial programs. This document provides reports from the nine community colleges that served as test sites, describing…

  16. Reaching the Underserved Elderly and Working Poor in SNAP: Evaluation Findings from the Fiscal Year 2009 Pilots

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Kauff; Lisa Dragoset; Elizabeth Clary; Elizabeth Laird; Libby Makowsky; Emily Samaa-Miller

    2014-01-01

    A study conducted for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service evaluated pilot demonstrations designed to facilitate access by the elderly or working poor to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Among other key findings, two demonstrations targeting the elderly significantly increased access to nutritional assistance through SNAP.

  17. Evaluation of the "Energize Your Life!" Social Marketing Campaign Pilot Study to Increase Fruit Intake among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shive, Steven E.; Morris, Michelle Neyman

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of the "Energize Your Life!" social-marketing campaign pilot study to improve knowledge, attitudes, and fruit intake among community college students. The authors used a cross-sectional, quasi-experimental, pre- and posttest design. They randomly selected community college students…

  18. "The 1-2-3 Magic Program": Implementation Outcomes of an Australian Pilot Evaluation with School-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Erin L.; van der Zwan, Rick; Phelan, Thomas W.; Brooks, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This study served as a pilot evaluation of the efficacy of the 1-2-3 Magic Program (Phelan, 2003) as a brief parenting intervention for families with a school-aged child. Nine Australian families assigned to either a wait-listed control group (n = 4) or to one that received immediate intervention (n = 5), participated in a randomized controlled…

  19. SunSmart: Evaluation of a Pilot School-Based Sun Protection Intervention in Hispanic Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. A.; Langholz, B. M.; Ly, T.; Harris, S. C.; Richardson, J. L.; Peng, D. H.; Cockburn, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma is rising among Hispanic populations in the United States. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot sun safety educational intervention conducted from 2006 to 2012 on Hispanic early adolescents in a high ultraviolet environment. Nineteen schools with high Hispanic enrollment were recruited from urban…

  20. Improving a web-based employability intervention for work-disabled employees: results of a pilot economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noben, C.; Evers, S.; Genabeek, J.V.; Nijhuis, F.; Rijk, A. de

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to improve web-based employability interventions for employees with work-related health problems for both intervention content and study design by means of a pilot economic evaluation. Methods Uptake rate analysis for the intervention elements, cost effectiveness

  1. Classification of dual language audio-visual content: Introduction to the VideoCLEF 2008 pilot benchmark evaluation task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larson, M.; Newman, E.; Jones, G.J.F.; Köhler, J.; Larson, M.; de Jong, F.M.G.; Kraaij, W.; Ordelman, R.J.F.

    2008-01-01

    VideoCLEF is a new track for the CLEF 2008 campaign. This track aims to develop and evaluate tasks in analyzing multilingual video content. A pilot of a Vid2RSS task involving assigning thematic class labels to video kicks off the VideoCLEF track in 2008. Task participants deliver classification res

  2. Evaluation of the "Energize Your Life!" Social Marketing Campaign Pilot Study to Increase Fruit Intake among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shive, Steven E.; Morris, Michelle Neyman

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of the "Energize Your Life!" social-marketing campaign pilot study to improve knowledge, attitudes, and fruit intake among community college students. The authors used a cross-sectional, quasi-experimental, pre- and posttest design. They randomly selected community college students…

  3. The Living the Example Social Media Substance Use Prevention Program: A Pilot Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William; Andrade, Elizabeth; Goldmeer, Sandra; Smith, Michelle; Snider, Jeremy; Girardo, Gunilla

    2017-06-27

    Adolescent substance use rates in rural areas of the United States, such as upstate New York, have risen substantially in recent years, calling for new intervention approaches in response to this trend. The Mentor Foundation USA conducts the Living the Example (LTE) campaign to engage youth in prevention using an experiential approach. As part of LTE, youth create their own prevention messages following a training curriculum in techniques for effective messaging and then share them via social media. This paper reports on a pilot evaluation of the LTE program. To conduct a pilot test of LTE in two rural high schools in upstate New York. We hypothesized that positive antidrug brand representations could be promoted using social media strategies to complement the Shattering the Myths (STM) in-person, event-based approach (hypothesis 1, H1), and that youth would respond positively and engage with prevention messages disseminated by their peers. We also hypothesized that exposure to the social media prevention messages would be associated with more positive substance use avoidance attitudes and beliefs, reductions in future use intentions, and decreased substance use at posttest (hypothesis 2, H2). We adapted a previously published curriculum created by the authors that focuses on branding, messaging, and social media for prevention. The curriculum consisted of five, one-hour sessions. It was delivered to participating youth in five sequential weeks after school at the two high schools in late October and early November 2016. We designed a pre- and posttest pilot implementation study to evaluate the effects of LTE on student uptake of the intervention and short-term substance use and related outcomes. Working at two high schools in upstate New York, we conducted a pilot feasibility evaluation of LTE with 9th-grade students (ie, freshmen) at these high schools. We administered a 125-item questionnaire online to capture data on media use; attitudes toward social media

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD EVALUATION OF LIQUID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2016-02-26

    Feb 26, 2016 ... ... were evaluated. In microcosm assays, plants inoculated with these .... soil, where they will be introduced (Jardim-Freire,. 1997; Denton ..... in a study carried out in Chile, in which peanut ..... Australian Centre for International.

  5. Bell Creek Field micellar-polymer pilot demonstration. Fourth annual report, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldburg, A.

    1981-06-01

    The pilot is a contained 40-acre 5-spot located in a representative watered-out portion of the Unit A Reservoir. The pay is sandstone with an average net pay of 6.4 feet, air permeability of 1050 md, and water TDS of 2500 ppM. The average remaining oil saturation in the 40-acre pilot area was estimated to be 28% at the start of chemical injection. The Pilot has four injectors (Wells MPP-1, MPP-2, MPP-3, and MPP-4) and one producer (Well 12-1). The overall micellar-polymer oil recovery is estimated at 47% of the remaining oil at the initiation of the micellar-polymer flood. In the fourth contract year, micellar slug injection was completed and injection of the graded mobility buffer began. A second radioactive/chemical tracer test was begun at the start of the polymer phase. A delay of approximately one year was experienced during the reservoir description phase. Otherwise, the project has remained on schedule.

  6. Synthetic Vision Systems in GA Cockpit-Evaluation of Basic Maneuvers Performed by Low Time GA Pilots During Transition from VMC to IMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takallu, M. A.; Wong, D. T.; Uenking, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the effectiveness of modern flight displays in general aviation cockpits for mitigating Low Visibility Loss of Control and the Controlled Flight Into Terrain accidents. A total of 18 General Aviation (GA) pilots with private pilot, single engine land rating, with no additional instrument training beyond private pilot license requirements, were recruited to evaluate three different display concepts in a fixed-based flight simulator at the NASA Langley Research Center's General Aviation Work Station. Evaluation pilots were asked to continue flight from Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) into Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) while performing a series of 4 basic precision maneuvers. During the experiment, relevant pilot/vehicle performance variables, pilot control inputs and physiological data were recorded. Human factors questionnaires and interviews were administered after each scenario. Qualitative and quantitative data have been analyzed and the results are presented here. Pilot performance deviations from the established target values (errors) were computed and compared with the FAA Practical Test Standards. Results of the quantitative data indicate that evaluation pilots committed substantially fewer errors when using the Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) displays than when they were using conventional instruments. Results of the qualitative data indicate that evaluation pilots perceived themselves to have a much higher level of situation awareness while using the SVS display concept.

  7. Pilot evaluation of a web-based intervention targeting sexual health service access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K E; Newby, K; Caley, M; Danahay, A; Kehal, I

    2016-04-01

    Sexual health service access is fundamental to good sexual health, yet interventions designed to address this have rarely been implemented or evaluated. In this article, pilot evaluation findings for a targeted public health behavior change intervention, delivered via a website and web-app, aiming to increase uptake of sexual health services among 13-19-year olds are reported. A pre-post questionnaire-based design was used. Matched baseline and follow-up data were identified from 148 respondents aged 13-18 years. Outcome measures were self-reported service access, self-reported intention to access services and beliefs about services and service access identified through needs analysis. Objective service access data provided by local sexual health services were also analyzed. Analysis suggests the intervention had a significant positive effect on psychological barriers to and antecedents of service access among females. Males, who reported greater confidence in service access compared with females, significantly increased service access by time 2 follow-up. Available objective service access data support the assertion that the intervention may have led to increases in service access. There is real promise for this novel digital intervention. Further evaluation is planned as the model is licensed to and rolled out by other local authorities in the United Kingdom.

  8. Neurophysiological assessment for evaluating residual cognition in vegetative and minimally conscious state patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Salvo, Simona; Caminiti, Fabrizia; Bonanno, Lilla; De Cola, Maria Cristina; Corallo, Francesco; Caizzone, Antonio; Rifici, Carmela; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess residual cognitive function and perform outcome evaluation in vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) patients, using Neurowave, a system able to monitor event-related potentials (ERPs) induced by neurosensory stimulation. Eleven VS and five MCS patients underwent neurological examination and clinical evaluation performed using validated clinical and behavioral scales; they also underwent neurosensory stimulation, which consisted of administration of target images (rare stimuli), relevant to the patient's personal history and having emotional significance, alternated with nontarget images ("standard" stimuli), which had no emotional significance. All simultaneous ERP responses at baseline (T0) and at three months from T0 (T1) were recorded. At T0 we found significant differences between the VS and MCS patients for the N200 (p=0.02) and P300 (p=0.04) waves. The neurophysiological analysis at T1 showed a significant difference only for P300 (p=0.02), probably due to the improvements observed in the VS subjects for the N100 (p=0.009) and N200 (p=0.02) sensory components. Neurophysiological assessment for evaluating residual cognition in vegetative and minimally conscious state patients: a pilot study Our findings seem to show the value of ERP monitoring in VS and MCS patients as a means of investigating residual cognitive function. This approach could guide early therapeutic and rehabilitation interventions, and contribute to identifying better diagnostic and prognostic markers for use in unresponsive or low-responsive patients.

  9. Evaluation of the proposed FDA pilot dose-response methodology for topical corticosteroid bioequivalence testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, P H; Smith, E W; Walker, R B; Haigh, J M; Kanfer, I

    1997-03-01

    The American FDA has recently released a Guidance document for topical corticosteroid bioequivalence testing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the recommendations of this document for appropriateness. The new specifications require a dose-vasoconstriction response estimation by the use of a Minolta chromameter in a preliminary pilot study to determine the parameters for use in a pivotal bioequivalence study. The visually-assessed human skin balancing assay methodology routinely practiced in our laboratories was modified to comply with the requirements of the pilot study so that visual and chromameter data could be compared. Two different cream formulations, each containing 0.12% betamethasone 17-valerate, were used for this comparison. Visual data showed the expected rank order of AUC values for most dose durations whereas the chromameter data did not show similar results. The expected rank order of AUC values for both chromameter and visual data was not observed at very short dose durations. In fitting the data to pharmacodynamic models, equivalent goodness of fit criteria were obtained when several different parameter estimates were used in the model definition, however the visual data were best described by the sigmoid Emax model while the chromameter data were best described by the simple Emax model. The Emax values predicted by the models were close to the observed values for both data sets and in addition, excellent correlation between the AUC values and the maximum blanching response (Rmax) (r > 0.95) was noted for both methods of assessment. The chromameter ED50 values determined in this study were approximately 2 hours for both preparations. At this dose duration the instrument would not be sensitive enough to distinguish between weak blanching responses and normal skin for bioequivalence assessment purposes.

  10. DTS technology: evaluation in steam injection pilots in PETROBRAS; Tecnologias DTS: avaliacao em pilotos de injecao de vapor na PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triques, Adriana Lucia Cerri; Rodrigues, Renato Cunha; Souza, Carlos Francisco Sales de; Izetti, Ronaldo Goncalves [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In oil and gas industry, downhole pressure and temperature distributed sensors can provide strategic information for production optimization throughout the field. Upon the successful implementation of a pilot for optical fiber distributed temperature monitoring of observer wells in a steam injection field, two new pilots have been implemented to also monitor injectors and producers in both cyclic and continuous injection fields strongly influenced by H2S. The pilots demonstrated that this technology is suitable to monitor producers in onshore fields under the conditions above without risks to the production. The sensors did not prove to be suitable for long term monitoring of injectors under continuous steam injection if fiber is installed inside the injection tubing. For cyclic injection applications, the development of steam injection packers is needed to guarantee casing integrity during the injection cycle. The application of the technology in offshore wells is nowadays restricted to dry completion situation. The potential applicability in submarine wells is tightly linked to the development of downhole and wellhead wet mate optical fiber connectors. (author)

  11. 飞行员情境认知的综合评判%Comprehensive Evaluation on Pilot's Situation Cognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 袁修干; 吕丽娟; 柳忠起; 康卫勇; 马睿

    2008-01-01

    Objective To resolve the problems of comprehensive evaluation on pilot's situation cognition basing on studying the mission situation. Methods The model of fuzzy comprehensive evaluation on pilots' situation cognitive was established on the basis of researches on concepts and methods of environmental quality evaluation in environment science.Results On the basis of theoretical consideration and analysis of experiments, the state of pilot's situation cognition was revealed preliminarily.Conclusion It is showed that the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method on pilot's situation cognition can provide real and complete flight cognitive information. It is reliable basis for pilot's efficacy of training and flight safety.%目的 通过对任务情境的研究,解决飞行员情境认知的综合评判问题.方法 在借鉴环境科学中环境质量评价研究的基础上,建立飞行员情境认知的模糊综合评判模型.结果 在理论研究和实验分析的基础上,初步揭示了飞行员情境认知状况.结论 用模糊综合评判方法 评价飞行员的情境认知可以提供真实、全面的飞行认知信息,为飞行员的训练有效性及安全性提供可靠依据.

  12. Computational evaluation oa a neutron field facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Jose Julio de O.; Pazianotto, Mauricio T., E-mail: jjfilos@hotmail.com, E-mail: mpazianotto@gmail.com [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Federico, Claudio A.; Passaro, Angelo, E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: angelo@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a study based on computer simulation for a realistic 3D model of Ionizing Radiation Laboratory of the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv) using the MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code, in order to guide the installing a neutron generator, produced by reaction {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He. The equipment produces neutrons with energy of 14.1 MeV and 2 x 10{sup 8} n/s production rate in 4 πgeometry, which can also be used for neutron dosimetry studies. This work evaluated the spectra and neutron fluence provided on previously selected positions inside the facility, chosen due to the interest to evaluate the assessment of ambient dose equivalent so that they can be made the necessary adjustments to the installation to be consistent with the guidelines of radiation protection and radiation safety, determined by the standards of National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). (author)

  13. Piloted Simulator Evaluation of Maneuvering Envelope Information for Flight Crew Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombaerts, Thomas; Schuet, Stefan; Acosta, Diana; Kaneshige, John; Shish, Kimberlee; Martin, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    The implementation and evaluation of an efficient method for estimating safe aircraft maneuvering envelopes are discussed. A Bayesian approach is used to produce a deterministic algorithm for estimating aerodynamic system parameters from existing noisy sensor measurements, which are then used to estimate the trim envelope through efficient high- fidelity model-based computations of attainable equilibrium sets. The safe maneuverability limitations are extended beyond the trim envelope through a robust reachability analysis derived from an optimal control formulation. The trim and maneuvering envelope limits are then conveyed to pilots through three axes on the primary flight display. To evaluate the new display features, commercial airline crews flew multiple challenging approach and landing scenarios in the full motion Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center, as part of a larger research initiative to investigate the impact on the energy state awareness of the crew. Results show that the additional display features have the potential to significantly improve situational awareness of the flight crew.

  14. Evaluation of APL OTEC 10/20 MWE Pilot Plantship. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    An independent evaluation of the APL Pilot Plant Concept for an OTEC 10/20 MW/sub e/ Power Plant is presented. The object of this feasibility study has been to verify the structural feasibility of concrete hull and cold water pipe (CWP). This has been done through an evaluation of the following items: design philosophy and criteria, material specifications and testing, environmental conditions and loads, structural analyses and design, constructability and deployment, and inspection and maintenance. The study has been concerned mainly with the use of new techniques; new materials; and new applications of recognized techniques in the project. Details which can be solved easily by recognized methods have not been considered. The study is based on the documentation referenced in appendix A, on DnV's independent investigations and on a meeting with the designers. The APL proposal is found to be a feasible and sound conceptual design, meeting all the basic requirements of an OTEC plant. The application of concrete in the hull and in the CWP seems to offer great advantages, mainly related to durability, inspection and maintenance.

  15. Optical biopsy on head and neck tissue using full-field OCT: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leeuw, Frédéric; Latrive, Anne; Casiraghi, Odile; Ferchiou, Malek; Harms, Fabrice; Boccara, Claude; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2014-03-01

    Here we evaluate the clinical value of Full-Field OCT imaging in the management of patients with Head and Neck cancers by making a reliable histological diagnosis on FFOCT images produced during preoperative procedure. FFOCT performs a true "virtual extemporaneous exam" that we want to compare to the gold standard (extemporaneous and conventional histology with H and E staining). This new optical technology could be useful when diagnosing a lesion, cancerous or precancerous, or at the time of its surgical management. Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography virtually slices the tissue using white light interferometry to produce in-depth 2D images with an isotropic resolution around 1 micrometer. With such a high resolution FFOCT systems produce "optical biopsy" images that are similar to that obtained with classical histology procedures, but without any staining and in only a few minutes. We imaged freshly excised samples from patients, of mouth, tongue, epiglottis and larynx tissues, both healthy and cancerous. FFOCT images were acquired and later compared with histology of the same samples. Common features were identified and characteristics of each tissue type were matched in order to form an image atlas for pathologist training. We were able to identify indicators of tumors such as heterogeneities in cell distribution, surrounding stroma, anomalous keratinization… In conclusion, FFOCT is a fast, non-invasive, non-destructive imaging tool that can be inserted into the pathology lab workflow and can provide a quick assessment of microscopic tissue architecture and content. Furthermore we are developing a similar system with a rigid endoscopic probe in order to do in vivo and in situ high-resolution imaging. Our probe could thus guide the surgeon in real time before and during excision and ensure a more precise gesture.

  16. Field evaluation of herbal mosquito repellents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, N G; Nath, D R; Baruah, I; Talukdar, P K; Das, S C

    1999-12-01

    Repellent properties of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. Syn. Z. alatum Roxb. (Timur), Curcuma aromatica (Jungli haldi) and Azadirachta indica (Neem) oils were evaluated against mosquitoes in mustard (Brassica sp.) and coconut (Cocos sp.) oil base and compared with synthetic repellent. Dimethyl phthalate (DMP) as standard. Timur and jungli haldi afforded better protection in the both the base at all the concentrations. Tepellents in mustard oil gave longer protection time than those in coconut oil. At 0.57 mg/cm2 concentration timur oil gave significantly higher protection both in mustard (445 min) as well as coconut oil (404 min) than the other repellents and DMP.

  17. Field-Based Concerns about Fourth-Generation Evaluation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Morris K.

    Some aspects of fourth generation evaluation procedures that have been advocated by E. G. Guba and Y. S. Lincoln were examined empirically, with emphasis on areas where there have been discrepancies between theory and field-based experience. In fourth generation evaluation, the product of an evaluation is not a set of conclusions, recommendations,…

  18. Pilot-scale cooling tower to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies for cooling system makeup water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S H; Hsieh, M K; Li, H; Monnell, J; Dzombak, D; Vidic, R

    2012-02-01

    Pilot-scale cooling towers can be used to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies when using particular cooling system makeup water and particular operating conditions. To study the potential for using a number of different impaired waters as makeup water, a pilot-scale system capable of generating 27,000 kJ∕h heat load and maintaining recirculating water flow with a Reynolds number of 1.92 × 10(4) was designed to study these critical processes under conditions that are similar to full-scale systems. The pilot-scale cooling tower was equipped with an automatic makeup water control system, automatic blowdown control system, semi-automatic biocide feeding system, and corrosion, scaling, and biofouling monitoring systems. Observed operational data revealed that the major operating parameters, including temperature change (6.6 °C), cycles of concentration (N = 4.6), water flow velocity (0.66 m∕s), and air mass velocity (3660 kg∕h m(2)), were controlled quite well for an extended period of time (up to 2 months). Overall, the performance of the pilot-scale cooling towers using treated municipal wastewater was shown to be suitable to study critical processes (corrosion, scaling, biofouling) and evaluate cooling water management strategies for makeup waters of complex quality.

  19. Automated Critical PeakPricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot ProgramDescription and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-06-19

    During 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) performed a technology evaluation for the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Emerging Technologies Programs. This report summarizes the design, deployment, and results from the 2006 Automated Critical Peak Pricing Program (Auto-CPP). The program was designed to evaluate the feasibility of deploying automation systems that allow customers to participate in critical peak pricing (CPP) with a fully-automated response. The 2006 program was in operation during the entire six-month CPP period from May through October. The methodology for this field study included site recruitment, control strategy development, automation system deployment, and evaluation of sites' participation in actual CPP events through the summer of 2006. LBNL recruited sites in PG&E's territory in northern California through contacts from PG&E account managers, conferences, and industry meetings. Each site contact signed a memorandum of understanding with LBNL that outlined the activities needed to participate in the Auto-CPP program. Each facility worked with LBNL to select and implement control strategies for demand response and developed automation system designs based on existing Internet connectivity and building control systems. Once the automation systems were installed, LBNL conducted communications tests to ensure that the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS) correctly provided and logged the continuous communications of the CPP signals with the energy management and control system (EMCS) for each site. LBNL also observed and evaluated Demand Response (DR) shed strategies to ensure proper commissioning of controls. The communication system allowed sites to receive day-ahead as well as day-of signals for pre-cooling, a DR strategy used at a few sites. Measurement of demand response was conducted using two different baseline models for estimating peak load savings. One

  20. Evaluation of the Effects of Potash Mining in the Region of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, T. S.; Beauheim, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico has been developed for underground disposal of transuranic waste in halite beds of the Permian Salado Formation. Managed by the Department of Energy (DOE), the WIPP has been operational since March 1999. Regulatory requirements call for the DOE to submit a Compliance Recertification Application (CRA) every five years, the first of which is due to the Environmental Protection Agency in 2004. In support of the CRA, performance assessment (PA) analysis is being conducted. PA is a series of linked models that make probabilistic assessments of possible future states of the WIPP and its performance under each of those states. One possible future state involves human intrusion into the repository creating pathways for upward migration of radionuclides into the Culebra dolomite aquifer. The Culebra is about 200 m below ground surface and 400 m above the repository. Current and future potash mining in the upper Salado Formation, within and outside the WIPP boundary, will likely cause subsidence of the Culebra, resulting in higher transmissivities that may change regional groundwater flow patterns. This analysis evaluates the impact of potash mining on the Culebra flow patterns and the resulting influence on repository performance. The impacts are modeled by creating 100 calibrated transmissivity (T) fields through stochastic inverse modeling using the parameter estimation code, PEST. Transmissivities in each field are then scaled in areas deemed to contain extractable potash by a random mining factor between 1 and 1000. Two mining scenarios are modeled: mining in all extractable areas within the WIPP boundary and across the entire region and mining everywhere except within the WIPP boundary. Three random mining factors are applied to each calibrated T-field for both mining scenarios, creating 600 instances of modified T-fields. Steady-state flow models are run for each instance and particle tracking is used to

  1. Polyhydroxyalkanoate as a slow-release carbon source for in situ bioremediation of contaminated aquifers: From laboratory investigation to pilot-scale testing in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Lucia; Matturro, Bruna; Rossetti, Simona; Sagliaschi, Marco; Sucato, Salvatore; Alesi, Eduard; Bartsch, Ernst; Arjmand, Firoozeh; Papini, Marco Petrangeli

    2016-11-27

    A pilot-scale study aiming to evaluate the potential use of poly-3-hydroxy-butyrate (PHB) as an electron donor source for in situ bioremediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater was conducted. Compared with commercially available electron donors, PHB offers a restricted fermentation pathway (i.e., through acetic acid and molecular hydrogen) by avoiding the formation of any residual carbon that could potentially spoil groundwater quality. The pilot study was carried out at an industrial site in Italy, heavily contaminated by different chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). Prior to field testing, PHB was experimentally verified as a suitable electron donor for biological reductive dechlorination processes at the investigated site by microcosm studies carried out on site aquifer material and measuring the quantitative transformation of detected CAHs to ethene. Owing to the complex geological characteristics of the aquifer, the use of a groundwater circulation well (GCW) was identified as a potential strategy to enable effective delivery and distribution of electron donors in less permeable layers and to mobilise contaminants. A 3-screened, 30-m-deep GCW coupled with an external treatment unit was installed at the site. The effect of PHB fermentation products on the in situ reductive dechlorination processes were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results from the first 4 months of operation clearly demonstrated that the PHB fermentation products were effectively delivered to the aquifer and positively influenced the biological dechlorination activity. Indeed, an increased abundance of Dehalococcoides mccartyi (up to 6.6 fold) and reduced CAH concentrations at the installed monitoring wells were observed.

  2. Evaluation of the Field Gradient Lattice Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072983

    A novel Micro Pattern Gas Detector, named the Field Gradient Lattice Detector, has been implemented using technologies available to CERN’s Printed Circuit Workshop. Numerous prototypes based on various materials were constructed in different geometries and their gain performance has been studied using 55Fe and 109Cd X-ray sources in Argon-CO2 gas mixtures. Two axis (2D) prototype structures have been shown to provide stable gains of around 1000 while a 3D design, based on the same polyimide foils used in other MPGD elements, holds a gain of 5000 for 8.9 keV X-rays even at high rates of 22 kHz/mm2. At a gain of 3100, the device has been tested up to 1 MHz/mm2 and shows no signs of degradation in performance. The energy resolution of the 3D-in-polyimide is modest, around 40% for 5.9 keV X-rays and 30% if the source is collimated indicating a variation in gain over the 3x3 cm2 active area. Having the most promise for future applications, the 3D-in-polyimide design has been selected for testing with a custom-bu...

  3. Chemical and biological monitoring of MIOR on the pilot area of Vyngapour oil field, West Sibera, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arinbasarov, M.U.; Murygina, V.P.; Mats, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    The pilot area of the Vyngapour oil field allotted for MIOR tests contains three injection and three producing wells. These wells were treated in summer 1993 and 1994. Before, during, and after MIOR treatments on the pilot area the chemical compounds of injected and formation waters were studied, as well as the amount and species of microorganisms entering the stratum with the injected water and indigenous bacteria presented in bottomhole zones of the wells. The results of monitoring showed that the bottomhole zone of the injection well already had biocenosis of heterotrophic, hydrocarbon-oxidizing, methanogenic, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were besides permanently introduced into the reservoir during the usual waterflooding. The nutritious composition activated vital functions of all bacterial species presented in the bottomhole zone of the injection well. The formation waters from producing wells showed the increase of the content of nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, and bicarbonate ions by the end of MIOR. The amount of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria in formation waters of producing wells increased by one order. The chemical and biological monitoring revealed the activation of the formation microorganisms, but no transport of food industry waste bacteria through the formation from injection to producing wells was found.

  4. Evaluation des Performances Psychomotrices et Mnesiques des Pilotes en Fonction de l’Age (Pilots Memory and Psychomotor Performance Evaluation in Relation With Age)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    similarit6 de situation, soit it is quite valid to take into consideration the age of the l𔄀quivalent d’un apprentissage , il n’a pas 6t6 fait appel pilot...durgcnce engendrdes par un type de panne prdvu. S a Conine le montre la photo de l’cran de la plate-forme Z (figure 8), les instruments qui figurent

  5. Improving driving performance of persons with visual field defects : Results of a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, TRM; Kooijman, AC; Brouwer, WH; Cornelissen, FW; Gale, AG

    1999-01-01

    Four subjects with peripheral field defects, one subject with central field defects and one subject with normal visual fields were trained to improve driving performance by means of improving their scanning behaviour. After training, overall driving performance did not improve. Viewing behaviour, ho

  6. Evaluation of hemostatic field dressing for bacteria, mycobacteria, or fungus contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Clinton K; Brunstetter, Tyson; Beckius, Miriam; Dunne, James R; Mende, Katrin

    2013-03-01

    Infectious complications have a major impact on wounded warriors. Pathogens causing infections include multidrug-resistant bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. The potential sources for these pathogens include nosocomial transmission, the environment (e.g., dirt), or the patients (skin flora) themselves. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the possibility that hemostatic field dressings might act as an inoculation source of pathogens into wounds. To accomplish this, hemostatic field dressings were assessed for the presence of bacterial, fungal, or mycobacterial contamination. We evaluated two samples of QuikClot Combat Gauze and two samples of CELOX Gauze subjected to normal stresses associated with storage after receipt from the manufacturer. We then evaluated 16 samples of QuikClot Combat Gauze that were collected from personnel deployed in Afghanistan and had undergone routine mechanical stress. Samples underwent screening with Trypticase Soy Broth, blood agar plates, MacConkey agar plates, CHROMagar Staphylococcus aureus plates, chocolate agar plates, Potato Flake agar, Lowenstein-Jensen media, and Middlebrook 7H11 media. No bacteria, fungi, or mycobacteria were recovered from the dressings. It does not appear that hemostatic field dressings are contaminated, even after subjected to field conditions. Further research is needed to identify inoculation sources of fungi and mycobacteria, which cause infections.

  7. Credible knowledge: A pilot evaluation of a modified GRADE method using parent-implemented interventions for children with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Adrienne

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision-making in child and youth mental health (CYMH care requires recommendations that are developed through an efficient and effective method and are based on credible knowledge. Credible knowledge is informed by two sources: scientific evidence, and practice-based evidence, that reflects the "real world" experience of service providers. Current approaches to developing these recommendations in relation to CYMH will typically include evidence from one source or the other but do not have an objective method to combine the two. To this end, a modified version of the Grading Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE approach was pilot-tested, a novel method for the CYMH field. Methods GRADE has an explicit methodology that relies on input from scientific evidence as well as a panel of experts. The panel established the quality of evidence and derived detailed recommendations regarding the organization and delivery of mental health care for children and youth or their caregivers. In this study a modified GRADE method was used to provide precise recommendations based on a specific CYMH question (i.e. What is the current credible knowledge concerning the effects of parent-implemented, early intervention with their autistic children?. Results Overall, it appeared that early, parent-implemented interventions for autism result in positive effects that outweigh any undesirable effects. However, as opposed to overall recommendations, the heterogeneity of the evidence required that recommendations be specific to particular interventions, based on the questions of whether the benefits of a particular intervention outweighs its harms. Conclusions This pilot project provided evidence that a modified GRADE method may be an effective and practical approach to making recommendations in CYMH, based on credible knowledge. Key strengths of the process included separating the assessments of the quality of the evidence and

  8. A pilot study to evaluate the use of virtual lectures for undergraduate radiology teaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendra-Portero, Francisco, E-mail: sendra@uma.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Torales-Chaparro, Oscar E., E-mail: oetjft@terra.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Ruiz-Gómez, Miguel J., E-mail: mjrg@uma.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Martínez-Morillo, Manuel, E-mail: mmorillo@uma.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate that virtual lectures can substitute conventional lectures in radiology education for medical students. Methods and materials: During the course 2005–2006, 89 out from 191 (46.6%) third year students of a subject entitled “General Radiology”, participated voluntarily in a pilot study including 22 virtual lectures (Flash presentations translated from the same PowerPoint presentations of conventional lectures, adding recorded narration and navigation tools). Participants (P) studied by means of virtual lectures, while non-participants (NP) assisted to conventional lectures. The results of the final oral exam classified from 0 to 3, and a 60-questions evaluation on image interpretation were used to compare both groups after training. Finally, 34 students from the group P (38.2%) fulfilled a 10-points scale quality survey about the project. Results: Final exam qualifications were significantly higher for P than for NP (2.11 ± 0.85 versus 1.73 ± 1.04) as well as the number of correct answers of the evaluation on image interpretation (24.2 ± 6.2 versus 21.2 ± 5.4), but differences could obey to different attitudes between both groups. The usefulness of virtual lectures to learn General Radiology obtained the highest global scoring (8.82 ± 1.00). Contents were generally better evaluated than the design of the presentations. Conclusion: Virtual lectures can substitute conventional lectures in radiology education for medical students with no detriment to students’ learning. Their potential advantage is that magisterial lectures can be used to discuss contents with students in a more participative way if virtual lectures are provided before.

  9. Pilot Field Test: Performance of a Sit-to-Stand Test After Long-Duration Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, I. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Fisher, E. A.; May-Phillips, T. R.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Kitov, V. V.; Lysova, N. U.; Lee, S. M. C.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts returning from the International Space Station (ISS) are met by a team of recovery personnel who typically provide physical assistance and medical support immediately after landing. This assistance and support are provided because long-duration spaceflight greatly affects astronauts' functional abilities. Future expeditions to planets or asteroids beyond low Earth orbit, however, will require crewmembers to egress the vehicle and perform other types of physical tasks unassisted. It is therefore important to characterize the extent and longevity of functional deficits experienced by astronauts in order to design safe exploration-class missions. A joint US/Russian Pilot Field Test (PFT) study conducted with participation of crewmembers of ISS Expeditions 35-42 comprised several tasks designed to study the recovery of sensorimotor abilities of astronauts during the first 24 hours after landing and beyond. Sit-to-Stand (S2S) was the first task in the PFT battery.

  10. Pilot Field Test: The Ability to Ambulate Following Landing as Assessed with Seat Egress, Walk and Obstacle Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, E. A.; Fomina, E. V; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Gadd, N. E.; Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.

    2016-01-01

    To date, changes in functional performance have been systematically studied after short-duration space flight. As important as the postflight functional changes have been, full functional recovery has never been investigated or established for long-duration flights. The Pilot Field Test (PFT) experiment, conducted with participation of ISS crewmembers traveling on Soyuz expeditions 34S - 41S, is comprised of several tasks designed to study the recovery of sensorimotor abilities of astronauts during the first 24 hours after landing and beyond. The objective of the Seat Egress - Walk and Obstacle Test, developed by NASA's Russian collaborators at the Institute for Biomedical Problems, is to address this gap in knowledge. This will allow us to characterize the ability of crewmembers to perform critical mission requirements that they will be expected to perform after an unassisted landing following 6 to 12 months in microgravity.

  11. Pilot Field Test: Recovery from a Simulated Fall and Quiet Stance Stability After Long-Duration Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, I. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Fisher, E. A.; Phillips, T. R.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Kitov, V. V.; Lysova, N. Yu; Lee, S. M. C.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts returning from the International Space Station (ISS) are met by a team of recovery personnel typically providing physical assistance and medical support immediately upon landing. That is because long-duration spaceflight impacts astronauts' functional abilities. Future expeditions to planets or asteroids beyond the low Earth orbit, however, may require crewmembers to egress the vehicle and perform other types of physical tasks unassisted. It is therefore important to characterize the extent and longevity of functional deficits experienced by astronauts in order to design safe exploration class missions. Pilot Field Test (PFT) experiment conducted with participation of ISS crewmembers traveling on Soyuz expeditions 34S - 41S comprised several tasks designed to study the recovery of sensorimotor abilities of astronauts during the first 24 hours after landing and beyond.

  12. Laboratory evaluation of a pilot cell battery protection system for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, R. L.; Thomas, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    An energy storage method for the 3.5 kW battery power system was investigated. The Pilot Cell Battery Protection System was tested for use in photovoltaic power systems and results show that this is a viable method of storage battery control. The method of limiting battery depth of discharge has the following advantages: (1) temperature sensitivity; (2) rate sensitivity; and (3) state of charge indication. The pilot cell concept is of interest in remote stand alone photovoltaic power systems. The battery can be protected from damaging overdischarge by using the proper ratio of pilot cell capacities to main battery capacity.

  13. Pilot scale nanofiltration treatment of olive mill wastewater: a technical and economical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, S; Fraga, M C; Silva, N A; Nunes, P; Crespo, J G; Pereira, V J

    2016-11-22

    The treatment of large volumes of olive mill wastewater is presently a challenge. This study reports the technical and economical feasibility of a sequential treatment of olive mill wastewater comprising a dissolved air flotation pre-treatment and nanofiltration. Different pilot nanofiltration assays were conducted in a concentration mode up to different volume reduction factors (29, 45, 58, and 81). Data attained demonstrated that nanofiltration can be operated at considerably high volume reduction factors and still be effective towards the removal of several components. A flux decline of approximately 50% was observed at the highest volume reduction factor, mainly due to increase of the osmotic pressure. Considerably high rejections were obtained across all experiments for total suspended solids (83 to >99%), total organic carbon (64 to 99%), chemical oxygen demand (53 to 77%), and oil and grease (67 to >82%). Treated water was in compliance with European legal limits for discharge regarding total suspended solids and oil and grease. The potential recovery of phenolic compounds was evaluated and found not relevant. It was demonstrated that nanofiltration is economically feasible, involving operation costs of approximately 2.56-3.08 €/m(3), depending on the working plan schedule and volume reduction factor, and requiring a footprint of approximately 52 m(2) to treat 1000 m(3) of olive mill wastewater.

  14. TOLD LIKE IT IS! AN EVALUATION OF AN INTEGRATED ORAL DEVELOPMENT PILOT PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Barr

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Much established pedagogical and CALL (computer-assisted language learning research advocates an integrated constructivist approach to the use of technology in language learning. This paper reports on a pilot project delivered to first year undergraduate French students. The project aim was to deliver a blend of collaborative and individual learning through a combination of CALL programs and online activities alongside traditional face-to-face conversation classes. Using quantitative analysis of a pre- and posttest and a variety of questionnaires, this project assessed student progress in developing oral skills across two groups, one (the treatment group using technology and the other (the comparison group being a traditional conversation class. Each group covered the same content and underwent the same assessment procedures. In addition, through qualitative analysis measures, the project evaluated the role played by additional variables in the learning process, as well as student and staff reactions to the two approaches. The study concludes by showing that while progress was made by both groups, the progress made by those not using technology was significantly greater than that made by students using technology over a short-term study. It also highlights the need for developing pedagogy to ensure that CALL-based teaching goes beyond rehearsal activity to achieve message-orientated communication.

  15. Evaluation of a visual feedback system in gait retraining: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Daniel; Bertram, Dietrich; Fölsch, Cassandra; Schega, Lutz

    2012-06-01

    Abnormal gait pattern of the frontal plane (i.e. Duchenne gait and Trendelenburg gait) may be caused by a variety of diseases. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the instantaneous effect of a visual feedback system on frontal plane pelvis and trunk movements in order to use it in patients with THR in subsequent studies. A total of 24 women (45-65 years) were included in the study. According to acute functional impairments the subjects were assigned to the control group (CG, no gait disorders, n=15, age=59±11 years, BMI=27±4) or to the intervention group (IG, n=9, age=61±4, BMI=29±5), respectively. First, in Measurement 1 (M1) kinematic reference values were captured in a standardized clinical gait analysis (MVN, XSens). Afterwards, the influence of a visual real-time feedback on gait pattern was examined while using the feedback system (M2). While there was a significant difference of IG vs. CG in M1 in the mean inclination regarding pelvis and trunk movements, this was not detected in M2. Therefore it is concluded, especially in subjects with abnormal gait pattern, that the visualization leads to an improvement of the movement pattern of pelvis and trunk in the frontal plane while using the device.

  16. Evaluating Cultural Competence of Pediatric Oncology Nurses at a Teaching Hospital: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eche, Ijeoma Julie; Aronowitz, Teri

    2017-06-01

    This cross-sectional descriptive study evaluated registered nurses' self-ratings of cultural competence on the hematology/oncology unit at a large Northeastern urban children's hospital. The Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence among Healthcare Professionals was used to measure 5 constructs of cultural competence. The study findings show that there were significant correlations between the knowledge and skill subscales (ρ = .57, P cultural desire (mean = 15.5), indicating that nurses were motivated to engage in the process of becoming culturally competent. The lowest mean among the 5 subscales was cultural knowledge (mean = 11.2), followed by cultural skill (mean = 11.8), indicating that nurses did not perceive themselves to be well informed in these areas. The findings from this pilot study suggest that nurses on this pediatric oncology unit are most likely to possess cultural desire and cultural awareness, but there is certainly opportunity to engage and educate the staff. Targeted interventions to improve cultural competence on this inpatient unit are being explored and a larger scale study is being planned to assess the cultural competence of nurses across the hospital.

  17. Evaluation of acupuncture in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: a double-blind pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristian, Adrian; Katz, Meredith; Cutrone, Eileen; Walker, Ruth H

    2005-09-01

    As many as 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) use some form of complementary medicine during the course of their illness, and many try acupuncture. One nonblinded study of the effects of acupuncture in PD suggested that it might be helpful for some aspects of PD. We performed a double-blind, randomized, pilot study comparing acupuncture to a control nonacupuncture procedure to determine the effects of acupuncture upon a variety of PD-associated symptoms. Fourteen patients with Stage II or III PD received acupuncture or a control nonacupuncture protocol. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated using the Motor subscale of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), and the Geriatric Depression Scale. There were no statistically significant changes for the outcomes measured. In the patients who received acupuncture, nonsignificant trends toward improvement were noted in the Activities of Daily Living score of the PDQ-39, the PDQ-39 Summary Index(c) 2005 Movement Disorder Society.

  18. [Evaluation of diet and nutrient intake in children under three years old. ALSALMA pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau, J; Moráis, A; Martínez, V; Peña-Quintana, L; Varea, V; Martínez, M J; Soler, B

    2014-07-01

    The present study evaluates energy and nutrient intake in Spanish children under three years of age, and compares the results with the current recommendations in order to identify possible inadequate nutrient intake. A cross-sectional pilot study. The mothers completed a diet diary for four non-consecutive days, recording the products and amounts consumed by their children. Nutrient intake was calculated, and the results were compared with the dietary reference intakes (DRI) for each age group. A total of 188 children (93 boys and 95 girls) aged 0-6 (n=41), 7-12 (n=24), 13-24 (n=57), and 25-36 months (n=66) were included. Statistically significant differences in DRI were observed for most of the nutrients analyzed. Protein intake, in particular was 376% of DRI in children between 1-3 years of age. By age groups, 96% of the children aged 7-12 months, 88% of the children aged 13-24 months, and 97% of the children aged 25-36 months showed protein intakes more than two-fold DRI. Nutrient intake differed from the DRI, particularly as regards proteins. A new study is required to determine whether the observed study deviations could be representative of the national population of this age group, as well as the possible effects on child health. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Make Your Work Matter: development and pilot evaluation of a purpose-centered career education intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, Bryan J; Steger, Michael F; Gibson, Amanda; Peisner, William

    2011-01-01

    Developing a sense of purpose is both salient and desirable for adolescents, and purpose in people's lives and careers is associated with both general and work-related well-being. However, little is known about whether purpose can be encouraged through school-based interventions. This article reports the results of a quasi-experimental pilot study and follow-up focus group that evaluated Make Your Work Matter, a three-module, school-based intervention designed to help adolescent youth explore, discover, and enact a sense of purpose in their early career development. Participants were eighth-grade students. Compared to the control group, the intervention group reported increases in several outcomes related to purpose-centered career development, such as a clearer sense of career direction; a greater understanding of their interests, strengths, and weaknesses; and a greater sense of preparedness for the future. However, no significant differences were found on items directly related to purpose, calling, and prosocial attitudes. These results inform the ongoing development of Make Your Work Matter and other school-based career interventions and pave the way for larger-scale trials of such purpose-promoting intervention strategies.

  20. Practitioner evaluation of a novel online integrated oral health and risk assessment tool: a practice pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, M; Chapple, E; Matthews, R; Chapple, I L C

    2013-08-01

    To report the development and evaluation of an evidence-based, online, patient assessment tool, capable of measuring oral health status, future disease risk and capitation fee guidance. An online integrated oral health and risk assessment tool called DEPPA was developed, incorporating 1) PreViser(™) risk scores for periodontal disease, caries, non-carious tooth surface loss and oral cancer, 2) revised versions of Denplan Excel's Oral Health Score and 3) capitation fee guidance score. DEPPA was piloted by 25 dentists who provided quantitative and qualitative feedback. Six hundred and forty assessments were performed. There was strong agreement on the need for such a tool, that it constituted a comprehensive assessment and supported good patient communication. The validity of the system was perceived as sound and the revised capitation fee guidance broadly welcomed. While some deemed the caries risk scoring algorithm to be too sensitive, the 30% high/very high risk rating is consistent with current rates of active caries in UK adults. A viable online oral health and risk-assessment tool has been developed (DEPPA) that will allow dental teams to measure oral health status, future disease risk and receive ongoing guidance on capitation fee setting. The indications are that DEPPA could be a valuable audit, care planning and patient communication tool.

  1. Impact evaluation of a pilot web-based intervention to increase physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Melissa; Hortz, Brian; Petosa, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to conduct an impact evaluation of a 10-week Web-based physical activity intervention. Quasi-experimental, three-group pretest, posttest design. Large Midwestern university. Participants (N = 233) included college students registered for three courses. The study employed a convenience sample consisting of a Web-based group (n = 108), a physical activity group (n = 64), and a general health group (n = 61). The Web-based group received a Social Cognitive Theory behavioral skill-building intervention and exercised 3 days per week in their leisure time. The physical activity group received exercise instruction and was required to attend three physical activity labs per week. The comparison group received health instruction. Outcome variables included moderate and vigorous physical activity, self-regulation, social support, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations and expectancies. Differences between groups were assessed at pretest and posttest using multiple analyses of variance. Vigorous physical activity, self-regulation, and outcome expectancy value changed significantly in the Web-based and physical activity course groups (p lecture and activity lab interventions were superior in eliciting changes in vigorous physical activity, self-regulation, and outcome expectancy value than a traditional health course.

  2. Pilot randomized evaluation of publically available concussion education materials: evidence of a possible negative effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Baugh, Christine M; Hawrilenko, Matt; Daneshvar, Daniel H

    2015-04-01

    Many states and sports leagues are instituting concussion policies aimed at reducing risk of morbidity and mortality; many include mandates about the provision of concussion education to youth athletes. However, there is limited evidence if educational materials provided under these typically vague mandates are in fact effective in changing concussion risk-related behavior or any cognition predictive of risk-related behavior. The purpose of this pilot randomized controlled study was to conduct a theory-driven evaluation of three publically available concussion education materials: two videos and one informational handout. Participants were 256 late adolescent males from 12 teams in a single league of ice hockey competition in the United States. Randomization of educational condition occurred at the team level. Written surveys assessing postimpact symptom reporting behavior, concussion knowledge, and concussion reporting cognitions were completed by participants immediately before receiving their educational intervention, 1 day after, and 1 month after. Results indicated no change in any measure over any time interval, with the exception of perceived underreporting norms. In one of the video conditions, perceived underreporting norms increased significantly 1 day after viewing the video. Possible content and viewing environment-related reasons for this increase are discussed. Across all conditions, perceived underreporting norms increased 1 month after intervention receipt, raising the possibility that late in the competitive season underreporting may be perceived as normative. The need for the development of theory-driven concussion education materials, drawing on best practices from health behavior scholars, is discussed. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  3. Evaluation of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of dual diagnosis (Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Prodromou

    2015-03-01

    included e.g. the educational background, their occupation, their police record, their family and interpersonal relationships. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the minority of the patients admitted in (RTRP have double diagnosis, this study reports that patients with dual diagnosis live treatment earlier than patients with drug addiction only. Dual diagnosis negatively affect prognosis in patients with drug dependence. Concluding this pilot study is supporting those clients that are diagnosed with co morbid disorder should be assessed and evaluated at the beginning of their treatment in order to offer them care that is meeting their needs and encourage them to adhere with their treatment

  4. Mixed methods evaluation of a randomized control pilot trial targeting sugar-sweetened beverage behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Jamie; Cook, Emily; Chen, Yvonnes; You, Wen; Davy, Brenda; Estabrooks, Paul

    2013-02-01

    This Excessive sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and low health literacy skills have emerged as two public health concerns in the United States (US); however, there is limited research on how to effectively address these issues among adults. As guided by health literacy concepts and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), this randomized controlled pilot trial applied the RE-AIM framework and a mixed methods approach to examine a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intervention (SipSmartER), as compared to a matched-contact control intervention targeting physical activity (MoveMore). Both 5-week interventions included two interactive group sessions and three support telephone calls. Executing a patient-centered developmental process, the primary aim of this paper was to evaluate patient feedback on intervention content and structure. The secondary aim was to understand the potential reach (i.e., proportion enrolled, representativeness) and effectiveness (i.e. health behaviors, theorized mediating variables, quality of life) of SipSmartER. Twenty-five participants were randomized to SipSmartER (n=14) or MoveMore (n=11). Participants' intervention feedback was positive, ranging from 4.2-5.0 on a 5-point scale. Qualitative assessments reavealed several opportunties to improve clarity of learning materials, enhance instructions and communication, and refine research protocols. Although SSB consumption decreased more among the SipSmartER participants (-256.9 ± 622.6 kcals), there were no significant group differences when compared to control participants (-199.7 ± 404.6 kcals). Across both groups, there were significant improvements for SSB attitudes, SSB behavioral intentions, and two media literacy constructs. The value of using a patient-centered approach in the developmental phases of this intervention was apparent, and pilot findings suggest decreased SSB may be achieved through targeted health literacy and TPB strategies. Future efforts are needed to examine

  5. A descriptive evaluation of the Seattle Police Department's crisis response team officer/mental health professional partnership pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfgott, Jacqueline B; Hickman, Matthew J; Labossiere, Andre P

    2016-01-01

    The Seattle Police Department (SPD) recently enhanced their response to individuals in behavioral crisis through a pilot Crisis Response Team (CRT) consisting of dedicated Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) officers (OFC) paired with a Mental Health Professional (MHP). This study presents results of an incident-based descriptive evaluation of the SPD's CRT pilot program, implemented from 2010 to 2012. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the value-added by the MHP in cases involving individuals in behavioral crisis as well as the effectiveness of the CRT program with regard to resolution time, repeat contacts, and referral to services. Data were collected from SPD general offense and supplemental reports for a 12-month segment of the program. Key variables included incident location, case clearance, repeat contacts, linkages to services, and case disposition. Results of analyses of general offense and supplemental reports are presented and implications for future development of the OFC/MHP partnership are discussed.

  6. Pilot performance evaluation of simulated flight approach and landing manoeuvres using quantitative assessment tools

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P ARCHANA HEBBAR; ABHAY A PASHILKAR

    2017-03-01

    This research work examines the application of different statistical and empirical analysis methods to quantify pilot performance. A realistic approach and landing flight scenario is executed using the reconfigurable flight simulator at National Aerospace Laboratories and both subjective and quantitative measures are applied to the pilot performance data. Simulations were repeated for different difficult landing conditions likelanding with degraded visibility, with crosswinds, with degraded aircraft handling qualities and with emergency conditions. Relative assessment of the different applicable metrics is made and significance of task difficulties on pilot performance is investigated. Changes in the pilot’s control strategy with respect to primary and secondary tasks are also discussed in detail. Results indicate that analysing pilot’s control strategy together with his/her deviations from predetermined flight profile provides a means to quantify pilot performance.

  7. Competency-based evaluation tools for integrative medicine training in family medicine residency: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Craig

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more integrative medicine educational content is integrated into conventional family medicine teaching, the need for effective evaluation strategies grows. Through the Integrative Family Medicine program, a six site pilot program of a four year residency training model combining integrative medicine and family medicine training, we have developed and tested a set of competency-based evaluation tools to assess residents' skills in integrative medicine history-taking and treatment planning. This paper presents the results from the implementation of direct observation and treatment plan evaluation tools, as well as the results of two Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs developed for the program. Methods The direct observation (DO and treatment plan (TP evaluation tools developed for the IFM program were implemented by faculty at each of the six sites during the PGY-4 year (n = 11 on DO and n = 8 on TP. The OSCE I was implemented first in 2005 (n = 6, revised and then implemented with a second class of IFM participants in 2006 (n = 7. OSCE II was implemented in fall 2005 with only one class of IFM participants (n = 6. Data from the initial implementation of these tools are described using descriptive statistics. Results Results from the implementation of these tools at the IFM sites suggest that we need more emphasis in our curriculum on incorporating spirituality into history-taking and treatment planning, and more training for IFM residents on effective assessment of readiness for change and strategies for delivering integrative medicine treatment recommendations. Focusing our OSCE assessment more narrowly on integrative medicine history-taking skills was much more effective in delineating strengths and weaknesses in our residents' performance than using the OSCE for both integrative and more basic communication competencies. Conclusion As these tools are refined further they will be of value both in improving

  8. Parenting for Autism, Language, And Communication Evaluation Study (PALACES): protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Margiad Elen; Hastings, Richard; Charles, Joanna Mary; Evans, Sue; Hutchings, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) often have associated behavioural difficulties that can present a challenge for parents and parenting. There are several effective social learning theory-based parenting programmes for dealing with behavioural difficulties, including the Incredible Years (IY) parent programmes. However, these programmes typically do not specifically target parents of children with ASD. Recently, a new addition to the IY suite of programmes known as the IY Autistic Spectrum and Language Delays (IY-ASLD) parent programme was developed. The main aims of the present study are to examine the feasibility of delivering this programme within child health services and to provide initial evidence for effectiveness and economic costs. Methods and analysis The Parenting for Autism, Language, And Communication Evaluation Study (PALACES) trial is a pragmatic, multicentre, pilot randomised controlled trial comparing the IY-ASLD programme with a wait-list control condition. 72 parents of children with ASD (aged 3–8 years) will be randomly allocated to either the intervention or control condition. Data will be collected prior to randomisation and 6 months postrandomisation for all families. Families in the intervention condition only will also be followed up at 12 and 18 months postrandomisation. This study will provide initial evidence of effectiveness for the newly developed IY-ASLD parenting programme. It will also add to the limited economic evidence for an intervention targeting parents of children with ASD and provide longer term data, an important component for evaluations of parenting programmes. Ethics and dissemination Approval for the study was granted by the Research Ethics Committee at the School of Psychology, Bangor University (reference number: 2016–15768) and the North Wales Research Ethics Committee, UK (reference number: 16/WA/0224). The findings will be disseminated through research conferences and peer

  9. Pilot project and evaluation of delivering diabetes work-based education using video conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltinsky, W; Hall, S; Grant, L; Simpson, K; MacRury, S

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic long-term disease with an increasing incidence. There is a need to increase access to effective care and to ensure such care is delivered as locally as possible. The geographical spread of NHS Highland Scotland presents additional challenges to ensuring a skilled workforce given education is normally work-based tuition and assessment. The aim of this pilot project was to deliver teleconferenced diabetes training to healthcare and allied healthcare professionals who provide basic level care for, and management of, people with diabetes and to evaluate this training. Work-based diabetes education was designed to be delivered by a diabetes educator through videoconferencing or face to face (F2F) for healthcare professionals in peripheral settings in the Scottish Highlands region over two half-days. The education covered theoretical and practical training in diabetes. The evaluation of the project was through post-course questionnaires and assessment instruments to capture views of the content and delivery mode, as well as student performance. Feedback from participants indicated that the educational content was relevant and that the use of videoconferencing (VC) could provide accessibility to training where distance, cost and other issues may make access difficult. Student performance on the assessment instruments did not differ between those who received the training through video conferencing and those who received the training through F2F delivery. Video conferencing can counteract the difficulties of accessing training for clinical peripherally based professionals. Training through VC did not compromise student acquisition of learning outcomes. Feedback indicates that VC can reduce the interactive nature of the learning and teaching experience.

  10. Validity and Reliability of the Clinical Competency Evaluation Instrument for Use among Physiotherapy Students; Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zailani Muhamad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the content validity, internal consistency, testretest reliability and inter-rater reliability of the Clinical Competency Evaluation Instrument (CCEVI in assessing the clinical performance of physiotherapy students. Methods: This study was carried out between June and September 2013 at University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A panel of 10 experts were identified to establish content validity by evaluating and rating each of the items used in the CCEVI with regards to their relevance in measuring students’ clinical competency. A total of 50 UKM undergraduate physiotherapy students were assessed throughout their clinical placement to determine the construct validity of these items. The instrument’s reliability was determined through a cross-sectional study involving a clinical performance assessment of 14 final-year undergraduate physiotherapy students. Results: The content validity index of the entire CCEVI was 0.91, while the proportion of agreement on the content validity indices ranged from 0.83–1.00. The CCEVI construct validity was established with factor loading of ≥0.6, while internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha overall was 0.97. Test-retest reliability of the CCEVI was confirmed with a Pearson’s correlation range of 0.91–0.97 and an intraclass coefficient correlation range of 0.95–0.98. Inter-rater reliability of the CCEVI domains ranged from 0.59 to 0.97 on initial and subsequent assessments. Conclusion: This pilot study confirmed the content validity of the CCEVI. It showed high internal consistency, thereby providing evidence that the CCEVI has moderate to excellent inter-rater reliability. However, additional refinement in the wording of the CCEVI items, particularly in the domains of safety and documentation, is recommended to further improve the validity and reliability of the instrument.

  11. A pilot study evaluating alternative approaches of academic detailing in rural family practice clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartung Daniel M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Academic detailing is an interactive, convenient, and user-friendly approach to delivering non-commercial education to healthcare clinicians. While evidence suggests academic detailing is associated with improvements in prescribing behavior, uncertainty exists about generalizability and scalability in diverse settings. Our study evaluates different models of delivering academic detailing in a rural family medicine setting. Methods We conducted a pilot project to assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and satisfaction with academic detailing delivered face-to-face as compared to a modified approach using distance-learning technology. The recipients were four family medicine clinics within the Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN. Two clinics were allocated to receive face-to-face detailing and two received outreach through video conferencing or asynchronous web-based outreach. Surveys at midpoint and completion were used to assess effectiveness and satisfaction. Results Each clinic received four outreach visits over an eight month period. Topics included treatment-resistant depression, management of atypical antipsychotics, drugs for insomnia, and benzodiazepine tapering. Overall, 90% of participating clinicians were satisfied with the program. Respondents who received in person detailing reported a higher likelihood of changing their behavior compared to respondents in the distance detailing group for five of seven content areas. While 90%-100% of respondents indicated they would continue to participate if the program were continued, the likelihood of participation declined if only distance approaches were offered. Conclusions We found strong support and satisfaction for the program among participating clinicians. Participants favored in-person approaches to distance interactions. Future efforts will be directed at quantitative methods for evaluating the economic and clinical effectiveness of detailing in rural

  12. Evaluation of the 1st DIGIT field trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Mass Soldal; Bogya, Emese Lujza

    2008-01-01

    This report evaluates the 1st DIGIT field trial, a security risk analysis conducted for Santander in the autumn of 2007. The evaluation includes lessons learned from the analysis and an empirical investigation into the use of the CORAS language in the analysis.

  13. Gas monitoring during the CO2 back production field test at the Ketzin pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szizybalski, Alexandra; Zimmer, Martin; Kujawa, Christian; Erzinger, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences operates Europe's first on-shore CO2 storage site in Ketzin, a small town near Berlin. From June 2008 until August 2013 about 67 kt of CO2 were injected into Upper Triassic sandstones in 630 to 650 m depth. The injection phase ended with an experiment to evaluate the influence of additives on CO2 storage. During this experiment 32 t N2 and 613 t CO2 were co-injected into the borehole over a period of 25 days followed by the final injection of 66 t pure CO2. At the beginning of the experiment 10,000 l (10 Nm3) Kr were pumped into the borehole, to separate the previous pure CO2 and the CO2-N2 mixture. For the same reason, CO2 with a different isotopic composition (δ13C = -3.4±0.2o instead of δ13C = -30.6±0.4) was used for the first 548 t of the total 613 t. To demonstrate that the stored CO2 is retrievable a field test was carried out in October 2014 during a period of two weeks. Of interest, in this context, is the composition of the back-produced gas which delivers key information on possible interactions between the CO2, formation fluid and rocks. In total 240 t of gas were produced via the former injection well. The flow rates ranged between 800 and 3,200 kg gas/h. The gas was sampled after the gas/water separator and continuously analysed using a mass spectrometer, a gas chromatograph and a photoacoustic sensor, thus covering all gas components and concentrations. In addition, gas samples were collected for stable carbon isotopes investigations in the laboratory. Preliminary results show that the produced gas consists of > 97% CO2 plus mainly N2. The N2 was detected from the beginning, although the injection in 2013 ended with pure CO2. The N2 concentration decreased from about 3% to 1% during the two weeks of the experiment. In addition to these major components CH4, CO and H2 (up to 0.01%) as well as Kr and SF6 (up to 0.001%, both were used as tracers in 2013) were detected. The gas composition of natural

  14. A Method for Evaluating the Magnetic Field Homogeneity of a Radiofrequency Coil by Its Field Histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q. X.; Li, S. H.; Smith, M. B.

    The magnetic field homogeneity of a radiofrequency coil is very important in both magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. In this report, a method is proposed for quantitatively evaluating the RF magnetic field homogeneity from its histogram, which is obtained by either experimental measurement or theoretical calculation. The experimental histogram and theoretical histogram can be compared directly to verify the theoretical findings. The RF field homogeneities of the bird-cage coil, slotted-tube resonator, cosine wire coil, and a new radial plate coil design were evaluated using this method. The results showed that the experimental histograms and the corresponding theoretical histograms are consistent. This method provides an easy and sensitive way of evaluating the magnetic field homogeneity and facilitates the design and evaluation of new RF coil configurations.

  15. Pilot Field Test: Performance of a Sit-to-Stand Test After Long-Duration Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, I. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Fisher, E. A.; Phillips, T. R.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Kitov, V. V.; Lysova, N. Yu; Lee, S. M. C.; Stenger, M. B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Astronauts returning from the International Space Station are met by a team of recovery personnel typically providing physical assistance and medical support immediately upon landing. That is because long-duration spaceflight impacts astronauts' functional abilities. Future expeditions to planets or asteroids beyond the low Earth orbit, however, may require crewmembers to egress the vehicle and perform other types of physical tasks unassisted. It is therefore important to characterize the extent and longevity of functional deficits experienced by astronauts in order to design safe exploration class missions. Pilot Field Test (PFT) experiment conducted with participation of ISS crewmembers traveling on Soyuz expeditions 34S - 41S comprised several tasks designed to study the recovery of sensorimotor abilities of astronauts during the first 24 hours after landing and beyond. METHODS: The first test in the PFT battery sequence, and also the least demanding one from the sensorimotor perspective, was a Sit-to-Stand test. Test subjects were seated in the chair and had to stand up on command and remain standing for ten seconds. The subjects were instructed to stand up unassisted as quickly as they were able to, while maintaining postural control. Synchronized wireless inertial sensors mounted on the head, chest, lower back, wrists, and ankles were used to continuously log body kinematics. Crewmembers' blood pressure and heart rate were monitored and recorded with the Portapres and Polar systems. Each session was recorded with a digital video camera. During data collections occurring within the 24-hour postflight period, crewmembers were also asked to (1) evaluate their perceived motion sickness symptoms on a 20-point scale before and after completion of the test and (2) estimate how heavy they felt compared to their normal (preflight) body weight. Consent to participate in PFT was obtained from 18 crewmembers (11 US Orbital Segment [USOS] astronauts and 7

  16. Evaluation of pilot-scale microencapsulation of probiotics and product effect on broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Li, J; Yun, T T; Li, A K; Qi, W T; Liang, X X; Wang, Y W; Liu, S

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the pilot-scale production of microencapsulated in a 500-L fermenter using emulsion and gelation and to assess the effect of the products on the growth performance, antioxidant activity, immune function, and cecal microbiota in Arbor Acres broilers. A total of seven hundred 1-d-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly assigned to 7 dietary treatments with 5 replicate pens per treatment and 20 broilers per pen. The dietary treatments were as follows: 1) basal diet (CON), 2) basal diet containing 0.1% Aureomycin (ANT), 3) basal diet containing unencapsulated at a dose of 1 × 10 cfu/kg of feed (P1), 4) basal diet containing unencapsulated at a dose of 1 × 10 cfu/kg of feed (P2), 5) basal diet containing 0.01% empty microcapsules (CAP), 6) basal diet containing microencapsulated at a dose of 1 × 10 cfu/kg of feed (CAPP1), and 7) basal diet containing microencapsulated at a dose of 1 × 10 cfu/kg of feed (CAPP2). The feeding experiment included 2 phases: the starter phase from d 1 to 21 and the grower phase from d 22 to 42. The results showed that a 500-L fermenter could produce 20.73 ± 4.05 kg of microcapsules with an approximate diameter of 549 μm. The feeding experiment showed that ADG of broilers in CAPP1 was significantly ( microencapsulation of microbial cells can be achieved using emulsion and initial gelation and that the dietary administration of microencapsulated can significantly enhance the growth performance, immune function, cecum microbial community, and overall health of broilers.

  17. Economic evaluation of a comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention program: pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Ross, Joseph S; Bilodeau, Roseanne; Richter, Rosemary S; Palley, Jane E; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention programs that address sexual education and life skills development and provide academic support are effective in reducing births among enrolled teenagers. However, there have been limited data on the costs and cost effectiveness of such programs. The study used a community-based participatory research approach to develop estimates of the cost-benefit of the Pathways/Senderos Center, a comprehensive neighborhood-based program to prevent unintended pregnancies and promote positive development for adolescents. Using data from 1997-2003, an in-time intervention analysis was conducted to determine program cost-benefit while teenagers were enrolled; an extrapolation analysis was then used to estimate accrued economic benefits and cost-benefit up to age 30 years. The program operating costs totaled $3,228,152.59 and reduced the teenage childbearing rate from 94.10 to 40.00 per 1000 teenage girls, averting $52,297.84 in total societal costs, with an economic benefit to society from program participation of $2,673,153.11. Therefore, total costs to society exceeded economic benefits by $559,677.05, or $1599.08 per adolescent per year. In an extrapolation analysis, benefits to society exceed costs by $10,474.77 per adolescent per year by age 30 years on average, with social benefits outweighing total social costs by age 20.1 years. This comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention program is estimated to provide societal economic benefits once participants are young adults, suggesting the need to expand beyond pilot demonstrations and evaluate the long-range cost effectiveness of similarly comprehensive programs when they are implemented more widely in high-risk neighborhoods.

  18. Evaluation of a pilot school-based physical activity challenge for primary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, E; Donato-Hunt, C; Maher, L; Havrlant, R; Hennessey, K; Milat, A; Farrell, L

    2016-12-02

    Issue addressed: Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour among children are growing public health concerns. The Culture Health Communities Activity Challenge (hereafter known as the Challenge) is a school-based pedometer program in which classes compete to achieve the highest class average daily steps in an 8-week period. The Challenge aims to encourage physical activity in primary school students, with a focus on engaging Aboriginal students. The program was piloted in 15 classes in New South Wales in 2014.Methods: The evaluation aimed to explore students' and teachers' experiences of the Challenge, and assess its impact on the students' physical activity levels. Data sources were a pre- and post-intervention survey of students' physical activity levels and sedentary time (n=209), qualitative interviews with teachers (n=11) and discussions with 10 classes.Results: Fifteen Year 5 and 6 classes comprising 318 students participated. Fifty percent of participants were girls, the average age was 11 years and the majority (57%) were Aboriginal students. Participation in the Challenge was associated with a slight but statistically significant increase in students' physical activity levels (Pimpacts, including increased motivation to be physically active, and improved student attendance and engagement in class activities and teamwork.Conclusions: Participation in the Challenge was associated with increased physical activity and decreased screen time for some students. Students and teachers also reported a range of positive social and educational outcomes.So what?: The findings highlight the importance of primary schools as a setting for health promotion activities, and demonstrate that school-based physical activity programs can be engaging and appropriate for classes with high proportions of Aboriginal students.

  19. Pilot evaluation of the efficacy of shampoo treatment with ultrapure soft water for canine pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Keitaro; Tanaka, Akane; Makita, Yuka; Takai, Masaki; Yoshinari, Yuji; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    Ultrapure soft water (UPSW) is water in which calcium and magnesium ions have been replaced with sodium ions using a cation-exchange resin. We recently demonstrated that washing with soap and UPSW reduced the clinical severity of dermatitis and improved the skin barrier function in NC/NgaTnd mice, a murine model for human atopic dermatitis. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of shampoo treatment with UPSW for dogs with pruritus. Eleven dogs with pruritus were randomly assigned to two groups depending on whether they received weekly shampoo treatment with UPSW or tap water for 4 weeks. After a washout period, the treatment protocol was switched such that each dog received both treatments. The pre-treatment and post-treatment values of the following were compared: pruritus scores assessed by the owners; dermatitis scores recorded by an investigator; and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Shampoo treatment with UPSW significantly decreased pruritus and dermatitis scores in the dogs, whereas shampoo treatment with tap water did not. In addition, shampoo treatment with UPSW, but not with tap water, significantly reduced TEWL in the dogs. Adverse events due to the treatment were not observed in the dogs. Furthermore, we found that topical application of UPSW for barrier-disrupted skin caused by tape stripping in healthy dogs decreased TEWL more rapidly than topical application of tap water. Our findings suggest that shampoo treatment with UPSW promotes skin barrier recovery and thus could be considered as a possible therapeutic option in the management of pruritus and dermatitis in dogs.

  20. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of single tantalum dental implants: a prospective pilot clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE FRANCESCO, M.; GOBBATO, E.A.; NOCE, D.; CAVALLARI, F.; FIORETTI, A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective The aim of this prospective pilot clinical case series report was to evaluate, through a clinical and radiographic analysis, the peri-implant bone resorption of the tantalum dental implants (TMT) (Zimmer TMT, Parsippany, NJ, USA) one year after prosthetic rehabilitation. Methods Twenty tantalum dental implants were placed in both maxillas and mandibles of 20 patients. Patients were asked to attend a radiographic and clinical follow-up and their previous clinical records and X-rays were assessed. Bone levels were calculated by digitally measuring the distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant on periapical radiographs taken at surgery and after 6 and 12 months of functioning. The Pearson correlation analysis was performed to assess it there was a correlation between the measurement of the marginal bone loss (MBL). The Anova Test with a post-hoc analysis using Bonferroni’s test was used to compare the three group (0, 6 months and 12 months). Results The mean total MBL for the group 0 months was 0.84 mm (SD 0.21), 6 months was 0.87 mm (SD 0.22) and for 12 months was 0.89 mm (SD 0.23). The values of the Pearson’s coefficients showed that the data measurement were positively correlated. The Anova test showed a statistically significant difference between the groups. Conclusion The statistically significant difference in marginal bone loss can be considered physiological. Within the limits of this study it can be concluded that TMT implants have an excellent bone crest’s stability, however, to have most accurate information, will be necessary extend the sample. PMID:28280531

  1. Field Work Proposal: PUBLIC OUTREACH EVENT FOR ACCELERATOR STEWARDSHIP TEST FACILITY PILOT PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, Andrew [TJNAF; Areti, Hari [TJNAF

    2015-03-05

    Jefferson Lab’s outreach efforts towards the goals of Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Pilot Program consist of the lab’s efforts in three venues. The first venue, at the end of March is to meet with the members of Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center (VTCRC) (http://www.vtcrc.com/tenant-directory/) in Blacksburg, Virginia. Of the nearly 160 members, we expect that many engineering companies (including mechanical, electrical, bio, software) will be present. To this group, we will describe the capabilities of Jefferson Lab’s accelerator infrastructure. The description will include not only the facilities but also the intellectual expertise. No funding is requested for this effort. The second venue is to reach the industrial exhibitors at the 6th International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC’15). Jefferson Lab will host a booth at the conference to reach out to the >75 industrial exhibitors (https://www.jlab.org/conferences/ipac2015/SponsorsExhibitors.php) who represent a wide range of technologies. A number of these industries could benefit if they can access Jefferson Lab’s accelerator infrastructure. In addition to the booth, where written material will be available, we plan to arrange a session A/V presentation to the industry exhibitors. The booth will be hosted by Jefferson Lab’s Public Relations staff, assisted on a rotating basis by the lab’s scientists and engineers. The budget with IPAC’15 designations represents the request for funds for this effort. The third venue is the gathering of Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) university presidents. Here we plan to reach the research departments of the universities who can benefit by availing themselves to the infrastructure (material sciences, engineering, medical schools, material sciences, to name a few). Funding is requested to allow for attendance at the SURA Board Meeting. We are coordinating with DOE regarding these costs to raise the projected conference

  2. Pilot-scale field study for ammonia removal from lagoon biogas using an acid wet scrubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongjian; Wu, Xiao; Miller, Curtis; Zhu, Jun; Hadlocon, Lara Jane; Manuzon, Roderick; Zhao, Lingying

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic activities in swine slurry storage and treatment generate biogas containing gaseous ammonia component which is a chemical agent that can cause adverse environmental impacts when released to the atmosphere. The aim of this pilot plant study was to remove ammonia from biogas generated in a covered lagoon, using a sulfuric acid wet scrubber. The data showed that, on average, the biogas contained 43.7 ppm of ammonia and its concentration was found to be exponentially related to the air temperature inside the lagoon. When the air temperature rose to 35°C and the biogas ammonia concentration reached 90 ppm, the mass transfer of ammonia/ammonium from the deeper liquid body to the interface between the air and liquid became a limiting factor. The biogas velocity was critical in affecting ammonia removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. A biogas flow velocity of 8 to 12 mm s(-1) was recommended to achieve a removal efficiency of greater than 60%. Stepwise regression revealed that the biogas velocity and air temperature, not the inlet ammonia concentration in biogas, affected the ammonia removal efficiency. Overall, when 73 g L(-1) (or 0.75 M) sulfuric acid solution was used as the scrubber solution, removal efficiencies varied from 0% to 100% with an average of 55% over a 40-d measurement period. Mass balance calculation based on ammonium-nitrogen concentration in final scrubber liquid showed that about 21.3 g of ammonia was collected from a total volume of 1169 m(3) of biogas, while the scrubber solution should still maintain its ammonia absorbing ability until its concentration reaches up to 1 M. These results showed promising use of sulfuric acid wet scrubber for ammonia removal in the digester biogas.

  3. Field Work Proposal: PUBLIC OUTREACH EVENT FOR ACCELERATOR STEWARDSHIP TEST FACILITY PILOT PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, Andrew [TJNAF; Areti, Hari [TJNAF

    2015-03-05

    Jefferson Lab’s outreach efforts towards the goals of Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Pilot Program consist of the lab’s efforts in three venues. The first venue, at the end of March is to meet with the members of Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center (VTCRC) (http://www.vtcrc.com/tenant-directory/) in Blacksburg, Virginia. Of the nearly 160 members, we expect that many engineering companies (including mechanical, electrical, bio, software) will be present. To this group, we will describe the capabilities of Jefferson Lab’s accelerator infrastructure. The description will include not only the facilities but also the intellectual expertise. No funding is requested for this effort. The second venue is to reach the industrial exhibitors at the 6th International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC’15). Jefferson Lab will host a booth at the conference to reach out to the >75 industrial exhibitors (https://www.jlab.org/conferences/ipac2015/SponsorsExhibitors.php) who represent a wide range of technologies. A number of these industries could benefit if they can access Jefferson Lab’s accelerator infrastructure. In addition to the booth, where written material will be available, we plan to arrange a session A/V presentation to the industry exhibitors. The booth will be hosted by Jefferson Lab’s Public Relations staff, assisted on a rotating basis by the lab’s scientists and engineers. The budget with IPAC’15 designations represents the request for funds for this effort. The third venue is the gathering of Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) university presidents. Here we plan to reach the research departments of the universities who can benefit by availing themselves to the infrastructure (material sciences, engineering, medical schools, material sciences, to name a few). Funding is requested to allow for attendance at the SURA Board Meeting. We are coordinating with DOE regarding these costs to raise the projected conference

  4. Evaluation of flow hydrodynamics in a pilot-scale dissolved air flotation tank: a comparison between CFD and experimental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakghomi, B; Lawryshyn, Y; Hofmann, R

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of dissolved air flotation (DAF) have shown formation of stratified flow (back and forth horizontal flow layers at the top of the separation zone) and its impact on improved DAF efficiency. However, there has been a lack of experimental validation of CFD predictions, especially in the presence of solid particles. In this work, for the first time, both two-phase (air-water) and three-phase (air-water-solid particles) CFD models were evaluated at pilot scale using measurements of residence time distribution, bubble layer position and bubble-particle contact efficiency. The pilot-scale results confirmed the accuracy of the CFD model for both two-phase and three-phase flows, but showed that the accuracy of the three-phase CFD model would partly depend on the estimation of bubble-particle attachment efficiency.

  5. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume II. State reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    This report, Vol. II, presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1979. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement an 18-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. In September 1978, each State received an additional $370,000 for service-delivery programs for the extension of the pilot program, April 1979 through September 1979. A case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each State is provided here, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each State for more-detailed study and survey research. Although the thrust of this volume is descriptive, some survey data and analyses are presented for the emphasis programs. Two telephone surveys of clients and a non-client sample were conducted, one at the end of the first year of the pilot program (October 1977 - September 1978) and one at the end of the second year (October 1978 - September 1979).

  6. Evaluation of stress and geomechanical characteristics of rocks at Penn West's Pembina CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery pilot operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haug, K.M.; Bachu, S. [Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, Calgary, AB (Canada); Hawkes, C.D. [Saskatchewan Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The geologic capture and storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is gaining interest as a viable option to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. This paper presented a multidisciplinary research pilot study on CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations in Alberta. Minimizing the potential for CO{sub 2} leakage through faults or fractures has become one of the primary safety issues affecting the successful capture and geological storage of CO{sub 2}. The potential CO{sub 2} leakage paths are controlled by geomechanical parameters, such as the in-situ stress regime, rock stiffness and rock strength, and the integrity of the wellbore seal. Rock mechanical properties control the behaviour of rock when it is subjected to stresses. As such, the pilot study examined the stress and geomechanical properties of the rocks, which are important elements in evaluating the safety of CO{sub 2} injection and storage. The mechanical properties control hydraulic fracturing, induced shear failure, stresses and strains induced in reservoirs due to fluid pressure and temperature changes, and borehole stability, all of which impact CO{sub 2} storage. The pilot study involved the injection of CO{sub 2} into the Upper Cretaceous Cardium Formation sandstone at a depth of about 1650 m. Thick Colorado Group shale overlies and underlies the Cardium sandstone and conglomerate. This paper included an assessment of the stress regime of the Pembina oil field and a review of the relevant rock properties. The minimum horizontal stress in the reservoir was found to be significantly lower than the caprock. Hydraulic fractures induced in the study area would propagate in a vertical plane in a southwest-northeast direction. Available rock elastic properties suggest that conditions in the study area are favourable for fracture containment. Available data indicates that the caprock is strong, which favours the maintenance of caprock integrity as reservoir pressure and temperature

  7. Pilot Field Test: The Ability to Ambulate After Landing as Assessed with Seat Egress, Walk, and Obstacle Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, E. A.; Fomina, E. V.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Gadd, N. E.; Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience alterations in multiple physiological systems due to exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight. These changes lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial reintroduction to a gravitational environment. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the components involved in postflight ataxia. Full functional recovery has not been sufficiently investigated for long-duration crewmembers. The joint U.S./Russian Pilot Field Test (PFT) experiment (a pre-cursor to Field Test (FT)) was developed to address this gap in knowledge. The PFT was conducted on crewmembers traveling on Soyuz expeditions 34S - 41S and was comprised of several tasks designed to study the recovery of sensorimotor abilities of crewmembers during the first 24 hours after landing and for several days thereafter. Closing this gap will allow us to characterize the ability of crewmembers to perform critical mission tasks that they will be expected to perform after an unassisted landing following 6 to 12 months in microgravity. The Seat Egress, Walk and Obstacle (SEWO) Test will be discussed in this poster.

  8. Pilot Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Results from the Joint Russian/U.S. Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Kofman, I. S.; Tomilovskya, E. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Stenger, M. B.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Feiveson, A. H.; Fisher, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this research is to determine functional abilities associated with long-duration space flight crews beginning as soon after landing as possible (Russian Kentavr garment. Functional sensorimotor measurements will include, but are not limited to, assessing hand/eye coordination, standing from a seated position (sit-to-stand), walking normally without falling, measurement of dynamic visual acuity, discriminating different forces generated with both the hands and legs, recovering from a fall (standing from a prone position), coordinated walking involving tandem heel-to-toe placement, and determining postural ataxia while standing. The cardiovascular portion of the investigation includes measuring blood pressure and heart rate during a timed stand test in conjunction with postural ataxia testing (quiet stance sway) as well as cardiovascular responses during the other functional tasks. In addition to the immediate post-landing collection of data for the full FT, postflight data is being acquired twice more within the 24 hours after landing and will continue over the subsequent weeks until functional sensorimotor and cardiovascular responses have returned to preflight normative values. The PFT represents a initial evaluation of the feasibility of testing in the field, and is comprised of a jointly agreed upon subset of tests from the full FT and relies heavily on Russia's Institute of Biomedical Problems Sensory-Motor and Countermeasures Laboratories for content and implementation. The PFT has been collected on several ISS missions. Testing on the U.S. side has included: (1) a sit-to-stand test, (2) recovery from a fall where the crewmember began in the prone position on the ground and then stood for 3 minutes while cardiovascular stability was determined and postural ataxia data were acquired, and (3) a tandem heel-to-toe walk test to determine changes in the central locomotor program. Video, cardiovascular parameters (heart rate and blood pressure

  9. Post-occupancy evaluation and field studies of thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, F.; Roaf, S.

    2005-08-01

    The similarities and differences are explored in both the aims and the methods between post-occupancy evaluations and field studies of thermal comfort in buildings. The interpretations of the field study results are explored, especially the ways the results differ from laboratory experiments. Particular attention is drawn to the dynamic nature of the interaction between buildings and their occupants. Answers to questions of the type used in post-occupancy evaluations are compared with results from field studies of thermal comfort, and the implications of these findings for the evaluation of buildings and the conduct of post-occupancy evaluation are explored. Field studies of thermal comfort have shown that the way in which occupants evaluate the indoor thermal environment is context-dependent and varies with time. In using occupants as part of the means of measuring buildings, post-occupancy evaluations should be understood as reflecting the changing nature of the relationship between people, the climate and buildings. Surveys are therefore measuring a moving target, and close comparison based on such surveys need to take this in to account. (author)

  10. A PILOT STUDY COMPARING TWO FIELD TESTS WITH THE TREADMILL RUN TEST IN SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid Aziz

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the performances obtained during soccer-specific field tests of the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST and the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (YIET, with the measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max obtained in both field tests as well as that obtained in the traditional test of running to exhaustion on a treadmill (TRT, in young trained soccer players. Twenty-one National-level youth players performed, in random order, the MST and YIET to determine the relationship between the two field tests. From these, eight randomly chosen players performed their field tests as well as a TRT, equipped with an ambulatory gas exchange measurement device. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that the players' performance (i.e. distance covered in the MST and YIET was correlated (r = 0.65, p 0.05. In contrast, significant correlations were observed between the players' performance in the MST with the measured VO2max obtained in the same MST and in the YIET (both p < 0.05; and attained almost statistical significance with the measured VO2max in the TRT (p = 0.06. The lack of association between distances covered in the YIET with all the measured VO2max values suggest that measured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players' intermittent endurance performance. In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player's endurance performance

  11. In-Flight Validation of a Pilot Rating Scale for Evaluating Failure Transients in Electronic Flight Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Kevin F.; Tucker, George E.; Moralez, Ernesto, III

    2006-01-01

    Engineering development and qualification of a Research Flight Control System (RFCS) for the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) JUH-60A has motivated the development of a pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in fly-by-wire flight control systems. The RASCAL RFCS includes a highly-reliable, dual-channel Servo Control Unit (SCU) to command and monitor the performance of the fly-by-wire actuators and protect against the effects of erroneous commands from the flexible, but single-thread Flight Control Computer. During the design phase of the RFCS, two piloted simulations were conducted on the Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to help define the required performance characteristics of the safety monitoring algorithms in the SCU. Simulated failures, including hard-over and slow-over commands, were injected into the command path, and the aircraft response and safety monitor performance were evaluated. A subjective Failure/Recovery Rating (F/RR) scale was developed as a means of quantifying the effects of the injected failures on the aircraft state and the degree of pilot effort required to safely recover the aircraft. A brief evaluation of the rating scale was also conducted on the Army/NASA CH-47B variable stability helicopter to confirm that the rating scale was likely to be equally applicable to in-flight evaluations. Following the initial research flight qualification of the RFCS in 2002, a flight test effort was begun to validate the performance of the safety monitors and to validate their design for the safe conduct of research flight testing. Simulated failures were injected into the SCU, and the F/RR scale was applied to assess the results. The results validate the performance of the monitors, and indicate that the Failure/Recovery Rating scale is a very useful tool for evaluating failure transients in fly-by-wire flight control systems.

  12. MBM fuel feeding system design and evaluation for FBG pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, William A., E-mail: bill.campbell@usask.ca [Fluidization Laboratory of Saskatchewan (FLASK) (Canada) and Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Fonstad, Terry [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Pugsley, Todd [Suncor Energy Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Gerspacher, Regan [Fluidization Laboratory of Saskatchewan (FLASK) (Canada); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A 1-5 g/s fuel feeding system for pilot scale FBG was designed, built and tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple conveying stages improve pressure balancing, flow control and stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary conveyor stage reduced output irregularity from 47% to 15%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pneumatic air sparging effective in dealing with poor flow ability of MBM powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pneumatic injection port plugs with char at gasification temperature of 850 Degree-Sign C. - Abstract: A biomass fuel feeding system has been designed, constructed and evaluated for a fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) pilot plant at the University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, SK, Canada). The system was designed for meat and bone meal (MBM) to be injected into the gasifier at a mass flow-rate range of 1-5 g/s. The designed system consists of two stages of screw conveyors, including a metering stage which controlled the flow-rate of fuel, a rotary airlock and an injection conveyor stage, which delivered that fuel at a consistent rate to the FBG. The rotary airlock which was placed between these conveyors, proved unable to maintain a pressure seal, thus the entire conveying system was sealed and pressurized. A pneumatic injection nozzle was also fabricated, tested and fitted to the end of the injection conveyor for direct injection and dispersal into the fluidized bed. The 150 mm metering screw conveyor was shown to effectively control the mass output rate of the system, across a fuel output range of 1-25 g/s, while the addition of the 50 mm injection screw conveyor reduced the irregularity (error) of the system output rate from 47% to 15%. Although material plugging was found to be an issue in the inlet hopper to the injection conveyor, the addition of air sparging ports and a system to pulse air into those ports was found to successfully eliminate this issue. The addition of the pneumatic injection nozzle

  13. Pilot application of Delft3D Flexible Mesh: assisting a field campaign at the sand engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijendijk, Arjen; Braat, L.; Waagmeester, Niek; Scheel, Freek

    2015-01-01

    For the execution of field measurements around the Sand Engine during MegaPEX2014 there was a need for operational model predictions. Local river outflow causes non-uniform velocities and spatially complex current patterns near the Sand Engine. For assessing the optimal timing and location of the in

  14. Sewer Lateral Electro Scan Field Verification Pilot (WERF Report INFR4R12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract:WERF selected a proposed research project to field test an emerging technology for inspecting sanitary sewer lateral pipes. The technology is called Electro Scan and is used to find defects in laterals that allow the infiltration of groundwater into the lateral. Electro ...

  15. Biomechanical podiatric evaluation in an Italian cohort of patients with systemic sclerosis: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Ravenni, Giovanni; Ciampi, Benedetta; Del Rosso, Angela; El Aoufy, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    Objective Foot problems are often present in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) patients, however studies regarding podiatric problems related to SSc are lacking and there are no data evaluating the foot biomechanical changes. The aim of the present pilot study was to evaluate podiatric problems in an Italian cohort of SSc patients by assessing received podiatric services, foot pain and disability and biomechanical foot deformity. Material and Methods 25 consecutive SSc patients were enrolled from the Division of Rheumatology, University of Florence. All SSc patients were assessed by: Standards of Care for People with Foot Musculoskeletal Health problems: Audit Tool, Foot Function Index (FFI), Weight and non-weight bearing foot joint assessment, (Foot Posture Index (FPI) and Gait Cycle), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 (SF-36). Results Audit Tool - Only 7 (28%) out of the 25 patients with SSc had a specific podiatric assessment and treatment: no patient received a foot health assessment within the first 6 months of disease diagnosis and no patient received information about foot involvement. 1 patient (4%) received foot assessment every year; 1 patient (4%) received specific information about the disease and 5 patients (20%) received information about the benefits of using adapted footwear and insoles. FFI - Values of pain, disability and activity limitations, reported in FFI, are 4.7±5.1, 5.1±3.2 and 3.2±3.1 (M±DS), respectively. Non-weight bearing foot joint assessment shows a rearfoot varus deformity in 64% of patients, forefoot varus deformity in 42% and 6% forefoot valgus deformity. Weight bearing foot joint assessment, through FPI shows a pronated foot 20% of patients with and 34% with highly pronated overall foot posture. Gait analysis shows that 64% of patients has a contact of the calcaneus in invertion while 36% in eversion. In the midstance, 78% have the foot in pronation and 22% in supination, while in

  16. Evaluation of field dental equipment in a deployment environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, David G; Ehrlich, A Dale; Ragain, James C; Lyles, Mark B; Roberts, Howard W

    2006-03-01

    Dental officers and technicians must have reliable, durable, well-performing field dental equipment to enable them to provide dental care to deployed troops in operational environments. Unfortunately, no organized program exists to test such equipment before its purchase and use in the field. This article presents the results of a project conducted by the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research and the Air Force Dental Evaluation and Consultation Service to evaluate commercially available field dental equipment through laboratory testing and clinical-user evaluations in theater. The purpose of this 2-year project was to identify the best-performing and most cost-effective field dental equipment for possible future procurement. Initial laboratory testing was performed at the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research, and the equipment was then shipped to Kuwait for in-theater environmental and clinical-user testing. A seven-member scientific team of military dental officers and technicians was deployed for 1 month to perform in-theater testing under regional environmental conditions and to coordinate clinical-user evaluations. The testing provided beneficial results by identifying equipment that performed properly and equipment that exhibited shortcomings serious enough to render it inadequate for operational use. It is recommended that the project serve as a model for future testing and evaluation of medical/dental equipment by all of the military services.

  17. Dermatoses among paddy field workers - A descriptive, cross-sectional pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoi Shrutakirthi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paddy farming is one of the main occupations in coastal South India. Dermatological problems in paddy field workers have not received much attention. AIM : The purpose of this study was to study the dermatoses of the exposed parts of the body, viz. face, hands, and feet, in paddy field workers. METHODS: Three hundred and forty-one workers were questioned and clinical findings noted. Scrapings for bacterial and fungal examination were taken by random selection. RESULTS: Seventy-three per cent had work-related itching. Melasma was the commonest facial lesion (41.1%. The main problems on the hands were hyperkeratosis (26.4%, nail dystrophy (15.2% and paronychia (8.8%. Common feet dermatoses included nail dystrophy (57.1%, pitted keratolysis (42.5% and fissuring (23.5%. Common aerobic and anaerobic bacteria isolated from pitted keratolysis and intertrigo were Klebsiella and Clostridium species. Aspergillus species were the commonest fungus grown from intertrigo. CONCLUSIONS: Occupational dermatoses are common in paddy field workers.

  18. WIPP site and vicinity geological field trip. A report of a field trip to the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant project in Southeastern New Mexico, June 16 to 18, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, L

    1980-10-01

    The Environmental Evaluation Group is conducting an assessment of the radiological health risks to people from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. As a part of this work, EEG is making an effort to improve the understanding of those geological issues concerning the WIPP site which may affect the radiological consequences of the proposed repository. One of the important geological issues to be resolved is the timing and the nature of the dissolution processes which may have affected the WIPP site. EEG organized a two-day conference of geological scientists, on January 17-18, 1980. On the basis of the January conference and the June field trip, EEG has formed the following conclusions: (1) it has not been clearly established that the site or the surrounding area has been attacked by deep dissolution to render it unsuitable for the nuclear waste pilot repository; (2) the existence of an isolated breccia pipe at the site unaccompanied by a deep dissolution wedge, is a very remote possibility; (3) more specific information about the origin and the nature of the brine reservoirs is needed. An important question that should be resolved is whether each encounter with artesian brine represents a separate pocket or whether these occurrences are interconnected; (4) Anderson has postulated a major tectonic fault or a fracture system at the Basin margin along the San Simon Swale; (5) the area in the northern part of the WIPP site, identified from geophysical and bore hole data as the disturbed zone, should be further investigated to cleary understand the nature and significance of this structural anomaly; and (6) a major drawback encountered during the discussions of geological issues related to the WIPP site is the absence of published material that brings together all the known information related to a particular issue.

  19. Assessment and Evaluation Report on a Pilot Project on Preventive School Maintenance in Eritrea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagnby, Bo Hellisen

    In 2002, efforts started on formulating a maintenance policy for schools and other social service facilities in Eritrea. Since then, an appropriate policy and related implementation strategies have been further developed. In 2003, a specific pilot project was designed covering a number of schools...

  20. Evaluation of the IEP Costing Procedures: A Pilot Study by Six Major Research Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Jim

    The Information Exchange Procedures (IEP) cost study project of the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems is described and its applicability to six major research universities (MRU) is assessed in this pilot study. The IEP enables peer institutions to compare information about their resources, activities, and educational…

  1. Evaluation of Noise Effects in Auditory Function in Spanish Military Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    statistical significant older than transport and helicopter pilots (p=0.000 and p=0.002), Figure 2 depicted those differences. 12017082N = Tipo de... traumatismo sonoro crónico. Su incidencia en el medio aéreo. 131 Curso de Aptitud para el Ascenso a Comandante. Escuela Superior del E.A. Madrid 1991

  2. Creating Leaders: A Pilot Pre/Post Evaluation of an Ontological/Phenomenological Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Nancy; Jensen, Michael; Ballarini, Nicolas; Echeverria, Jeronima; Nettleton, Tracie; Stillwell, Molly; Erhard, Werner

    2016-01-01

    This pilot is a pre/post comparative assessment of a leadership course developed and delivered using an innovative, ontological/phenomenological model of education. Participants in the course delivered in Singapore in July of 2014 provided measures of the effectiveness of their leadership before and after the course, using a scale from 1 (least…

  3. A pilot scale electrical infrared dry-peeling system for tomatoes: design and performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot scale infrared dry-peeling system for tomatoes was designed and constructed. The system consisted of three major sections including the IR heating, vacuum, and pinch roller sections. The peeling performance of the system was examined under different operational conditions using tomatoes with...

  4. Coping in the Cyberworld: Program Implementation and Evaluation--A Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Cecilia Wing Chi; Frydenberg, Erica

    2009-01-01

    As increasing numbers of adolescents become involved in online activities, many also become victims of cyberharassment. This pilot project investigates how a program teaching coping skills (Best of Coping program, BOC) and a program teaching cybersafety (Cyber Savvy Teens program, CST) can optimise adolescents' capacity to cope online.…

  5. A Low-Intensity Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Mood Symptoms in People with Early Psychosis: Development and Pilot Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Alan Chun Yat; Lin, Jessie Jing Xia; Cheung, Veronica Yuen Ki; Lau, Nicole Ka Man; Chang, Wing Chung; Chan, Sherry Kit Wa; Hui, Christy Lai Ming; Lee, Edwin Ho Ming; Chen, Eric Yu Hai

    2016-11-01

    Depressive and anxiety symptoms are common in people suffering from early psychosis. Growing evidence shows that mindfulness-based intervention is an effective option in handling depression and anxiety disorders. Current article aims to provide documentation on the development and pilot study, before a RCT of larger scale, evaluating the acceptability and potential effects of a 7-week mindfulness-based intervention programme (MBI-p). MBI-p was developed over nine months in 2014. A total of 14 people with early psychosis were recruited to three pilot trials of MBI-p. Eleven of them completed the programme and were interviewed. Eight of them were measured quantitatively at baseline and post-intervention on clinical symptoms, depression and anxiety levels, quality of life and mindfulness. Mixed qualitative and quantitative results supported MBI-p as an acceptable and feasible intervention. Significant statistical improvements were found in depression levels, mental quality of life, general psychopathology and ability to observe emotions and act with awareness. Qualitative comments suggested that the intervention was safe, enjoyable and had a positive impact on mood symptoms. In summary, these results provide a promising pilot support for a potentially effective and cost-efficient treatment option for people with early psychosis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Depressive and anxiety symptoms are common in people with early psychosis but long received little attention. A low-intensity mindfulness-based intervention targeting depression and anxiety symptoms among people with early psychosis was developed and pilot tested. It is feasible and acceptable to use mindfulness-based intervention as a complementary treatment for psychosis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Evaluation in the Field: The Need for Site Visit Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of programs is enhanced when trained, skilled, and observant evaluators go "into the field"--the real world where programs are conducted--paying attention to what's going on, systematically documenting what they see, and reporting what they learn. The article opens by presenting and illustrating twelve reasons for…

  7. FIELD EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presents the field evaluation of a high-volume dichotomous sampler that collects coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter. The key feature of this device is the utilization of a round-nozzle virtual impactor with a 50% cutpoint at 2.5 5m to split PM10 into...

  8. Evaluation of vardenafil for the treatment of subjective tinnitus: a controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stöver Timo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vardenafil (Levitra® represents a potent and highly selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5 inhibitor, which is established for treatment of various diseases. There are several unpublished reports from patients stating that vardenafil has a considerable therapeutic effect on their concomitant tinnitus. This pilot study was conducted to specifically assess the effect of vardenafil in patients with chronic tinnitus. Methods This trial was based on a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Fourty-two consecutive subjects with mon- or binaural chronic tinnitus received 10 mg vardenafil (N = 21 or matching placebo tablets (N = 21 administered orally twice a day over a period of 12 weeks. Clinical examination and data acquisition took place at each visit: at baseline, after 4 weeks, after 12 weeks (end of treatment with study medication, and at non-medicated follow-up after 16 weeks. Assessment of clinical effectiveness was based on a standardized tinnitus questionnaire (TQ, the Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36, audiometric measurements (mode, pitch and loudness of tinnitus; auditory thresholds and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients' blood (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, homocysteine and total antioxidative status. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by comparison of subjective and objective parameters with baseline data between both treatment groups (ANCOVA. Results Vardenafil had no superior efficacy over placebo in the treatment of chronic tinnitus during this study. The primary efficacy criterion 'TQ total score' failed to demonstrate significant improvement compared to placebo. Subjective reports of TQ subscales and general quality of life areas (SF-36, objective audiometric examinations as well as investigated biomarkers for oxidative stress did not reveal any significant treatment effects. The safety profile was favorable and consistent with that in other vardenafil

  9. Evaluation of vardenafil for the treatment of subjective tinnitus: a controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Birgit; Haupt, Heidemarie; Szczepek, Agnieszka J; Sandmann, Jörg; Gross, Johann; Klapp, Burghard F; Kiesewetter, Holger; Kalus, Ulrich; Stöver, Timo; Caffier, Philipp P

    2009-01-01

    Background Vardenafil (Levitra®) represents a potent and highly selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, which is established for treatment of various diseases. There are several unpublished reports from patients stating that vardenafil has a considerable therapeutic effect on their concomitant tinnitus. This pilot study was conducted to specifically assess the effect of vardenafil in patients with chronic tinnitus. Methods This trial was based on a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Fourty-two consecutive subjects with mon- or binaural chronic tinnitus received 10 mg vardenafil (N = 21) or matching placebo tablets (N = 21) administered orally twice a day over a period of 12 weeks. Clinical examination and data acquisition took place at each visit: at baseline, after 4 weeks, after 12 weeks (end of treatment with study medication), and at non-medicated follow-up after 16 weeks. Assessment of clinical effectiveness was based on a standardized tinnitus questionnaire (TQ), the Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36), audiometric measurements (mode, pitch and loudness of tinnitus; auditory thresholds) and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients' blood (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, homocysteine and total antioxidative status). Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by comparison of subjective and objective parameters with baseline data between both treatment groups (ANCOVA). Results Vardenafil had no superior efficacy over placebo in the treatment of chronic tinnitus during this study. The primary efficacy criterion 'TQ total score' failed to demonstrate significant improvement compared to placebo. Subjective reports of TQ subscales and general quality of life areas (SF-36), objective audiometric examinations as well as investigated biomarkers for oxidative stress did not reveal any significant treatment effects. The safety profile was favorable and consistent with that in other vardenafil studies. Conclusion

  10. Biogeochemical Investigations to Evaluate the Performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillow, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy facility located in southeastern New Mexico, approximately 655 m (2150 ft.) below ground surface in a bedded salt, Permian evaporite formation. This mined geologic repository has been receiving transuranic (TRU) waste from defense-related and environmental-management activities since March 1999. TRU waste contains alpha-emitting transuranic nuclides with half-lives greater than twenty years at concentrations greater than 100 nCi/gram. These actinide-contaminated wastes were generated from nuclear-weapons production and related processing activities. They include various organics, adsorbed liquids, sludges, cellulosics, plastics, rubber, and a variety of metals and cemented materials. An extensive set of investigations were performed to establish the basis for TRU waste disposal at WIPP and to support initial certification from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A significant element of the conceptual geochemical model for WIPP is the microbiologically-driven reactions leading to biodegradation of organic constituents in TRU wastes, as well as interactions with actinides present in the waste. This presentation will discuss the biogeochemical investigations that were performed to evaluate microbiological activity at WIPP, including studies of gas generation due to biodegradation of cellulose, plastic, and rubber materials and actinide-microbe interactions leading to changes in actinide chemical speciation. Highlights of this work are discussed here. Cellulose biodegradation in salt-brine systems results in the generation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and aqueous fermentation products (low molecular weight organic acids). Hypersaline brine can limit the range of microbial metabolic pathways, due to the energetic stresses of maintaining osmotic balance compatible with metabolic processes. Methanogenesis yields the lowest free energy per mole of carbon and as such is often not detected in

  11. Construction and evaluation of simulated pilot scale landfill lysimeter in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafizul, Islam M; Howlader, Milon Kanti; Alamgir, Muhammed

    2012-11-01

    This research concentrates the design, construction and evaluation of simulated pilot scale landfill lysimeter at KUET campus, Khulna, Bangladesh. Both the aerobic and anaerobic conditions having a base liner and two different types of cap liner were simulated. After the design of a reference cell, the construction of landfill lysimeter was started in January 2008 and completed in July 2008. In all construction process locally available civil construction materials were used. The municipal solid waste (MSW) of 2800-2985 kg having the total volume of 2.80 m(3) (height 1.6 m) and moisture content of 65% was deposited in each lysimeter by applying required compaction energy. In contrast, both the composition in terms of methane (CH(4)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and oxygen (O(2)) as well as the flow rate of landfill gas (LFG) generated from MSW in landfill lysimeter were measured and varied significantly in relation to the variation of lysimeter operational condition. Moreover, anaerobic lysimeter-C shows the highest composition of LFG in compare to the anaerobic lysimeter-B due to the providing of lower compaction of cap liner in anaerobic lysimeter-C. Here, it is interesting to note that in absence of compacted clay liner (CCL) and hence percolation of rainwater that facilitates rapid degradation of MSW in aerobic lysimeter-A has resulted in the highest settlement than that of anaerobic landfill lysimeter-B and C. Moreover, in case of anaerobic lysimeter-B and C, the leachate generation was lower than that of aerobic lysimeter-A due to the providing of cap liner in anaerobic lysimeter-B and C, played an important role to reduce the percolation of rainwater. The study also reveals that the leachate pollution index (LPI) has decreased in relation to the increasing of elapsed period as well as the LPI for collection system of aerobic lysimeter-A was higher than that of the collection system of anaerobic lysimeter-B and C. Finally, it can be depicted that LPI for lysimeter

  12. MBM fuel feeding system design and evaluation for FBG pilot plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, William A; Fonstad, Terry; Pugsley, Todd; Gerspacher, Regan

    2012-06-01

    A biomass fuel feeding system has been designed, constructed and evaluated for a fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) pilot plant at the University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, SK, Canada). The system was designed for meat and bone meal (MBM) to be injected into the gasifier at a mass flow-rate range of 1-5 g/s. The designed system consists of two stages of screw conveyors, including a metering stage which controlled the flow-rate of fuel, a rotary airlock and an injection conveyor stage, which delivered that fuel at a consistent rate to the FBG. The rotary airlock which was placed between these conveyors, proved unable to maintain a pressure seal, thus the entire conveying system was sealed and pressurized. A pneumatic injection nozzle was also fabricated, tested and fitted to the end of the injection conveyor for direct injection and dispersal into the fluidized bed. The 150 mm metering screw conveyor was shown to effectively control the mass output rate of the system, across a fuel output range of 1-25 g/s, while the addition of the 50mm injection screw conveyor reduced the irregularity (error) of the system output rate from 47% to 15%. Although material plugging was found to be an issue in the inlet hopper to the injection conveyor, the addition of air sparging ports and a system to pulse air into those ports was found to successfully eliminate this issue. The addition of the pneumatic injection nozzle reduced the output irregularity further to 13%, with an air supply of 50 slpm as the minimum air supply to drive this injector. After commissioning of this final system to the FBG reactor, the injection nozzle was found to plug with char however, and was subsequently removed from the system. Final operation of the reactor continues satisfactorily with the two screw conveyors operating at matching pressure with the fluidized bed, with the output rate of the system estimated based on system characteristic equations, and confirmed by static weight measurements made before

  13. A controlled field pilot for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, Thomas; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.; Wielopolski, L.

    2009-01-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow, slotted horizontal well divided into six zones. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from 6 national labs, 2 universities, EPRI, and the USGS. Additionally, modeling of CO2 transport and concentrations in the saturated soil and in the vadose zone was conducted. An overview of these results will be presented. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Olive oil pilot-production assisted by pulsed electric field: impact on extraction yield, chemical parameters and sensory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puértolas, Eduardo; Martínez de Marañón, Iñigo

    2015-01-15

    The impact of the use of pulsed electric field (PEF) technology on Arroniz olive oil production in terms of extraction yield and chemical and sensory quality has been studied at pilot scale in an industrial oil mill. The application of a PEF treatment (2 kV/cm; 11.25 kJ/kg) to the olive paste significantly increased the extraction yield by 13.3%, with respect to a control. Furthermore, olive oil obtained by PEF showed total phenolic content, total phytosterols and total tocopherols significantly higher than control (11.5%, 9.9% and 15.0%, respectively). The use of PEF had no negative effects on general chemical and sensory characteristics of the olive oil, maintaining the highest quality according to EU legal standards (EVOO; extra virgin olive oil). Therefore, PEF could be an appropriate technology to improve olive oil yield and produce EVOO enriched in human-health-related compounds, such as polyphenols, phytosterols and tocopherols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A pilot and field investigation on mobility of PCDDs/PCDFs in landfill site with municipal solid waste incineration residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osako, Masahiro; Kim, Yong-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hoon

    2002-09-01

    A field investigation by boring was carried out in a landfill site primarily with municipal solid waste incineration residue. From the collected core samples, vertical profiles of homologous content of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) in the landfill layer were traced and the behavior of PCDDs/PCDFs was examined. In addition, a pilot-scale study was conducted on the PCDDs/PCDFs leached from incineration fly ash and the treated one using large landfill simulation columns (lysimeters) and the leaching behavior of PCDDs/PCDFs was examined. As a result, it was found that the coexistence of dissolved coloring constituents (DCCs), which might be composed of constituents like dissolved humic matters having strong affinity for hydrophobic organic pollutants, could enhance the leachability of PCDDs/PCDFs, thus contributing to the vertical movement and leaching behavior of PCDDs/PCDFs in the landfill layers of the incineration residue. Moreover, it is highly probable that DCCs derive from the unburned carbon in the bottom ash mixed and buried with the fly ash containing a high content of PCDDs/PCDFs.

  16. Masseter Muscle Activity in Track and Field Athletes: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukaga, Hideyuki; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Narimatsu, Keishiro; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi; Funato, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Teeth clenching has been shown to improve remote muscle activity (by augmentation of the Hoffmann reflex), and joint fixation (by decreased reciprocal inhibition) in the entire body. Clenching could help maintain balance, improve systemic function, and enhance safety. Teeth clenching from a sports dentistry viewpoint was thought to be important and challenging. Therefore, it is quite important to investigate mastication muscles’ activity and function during sports events for clarifying a physiological role of the mastication muscle itself and involvement of mastication muscle function in whole body movement. Running is a basic motion of a lot of sports; however, a mastication muscles activity during this motion was not clarified. Throwing and jumping operation were in a same situation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence or absence of masseter muscle activity during track and field events. In total, 28 track and field athletes took part in the study. The Multichannel Telemetry system was used to monitor muscle activity, and the electromyograms obtained were synchronized with digital video imaging. The masseter muscle activity threshold was set 15% of maximum voluntary clenching. As results, with few exceptions, masseter muscle activity were observed during all analyzed phases of the 5 activities, and that phases in which most participants showed masseter muscle activity were characterized by initial acceleration, such as in the short sprint, from the commencement of throwing to release in both the javelin throw and shot put, and at the take-off and landing phases in both jumps. PMID:27708727

  17. An observational study to evaluate three pilot programmes of retesting chlamydia-positive individuals within 6 months in the South West of England

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate 3 pilot chlamydia retesting programmes in South West England which were initiated prior to the release of new National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP) guidelines recommending retesting in 2014.METHODS: Individuals testing positive between August 2012 and July 2013 in Bristol (n=346), Cornwall (n=252) and Dorset (n=180) programmes were eligible for inclusion in the retesting pilots. The primary outcomes were retest within 6 months (yes/no) and repeat diagnosis at r...

  18. Integration and Evaluation of Nanophotonic Devices Using Optical Near Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsui, Takashi; Nomura, Wataru; Yi, Gyu-Chul; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    In this chapter, we review the optical near-field phenomena and their applications to realize the nanophotonic device. To realize the nanometer-scale controllability in size and position, we demonstrate the feasibility of nanometer-scale chemical vapor deposition using optical near-field techniques (see Sect. 15.2). In which, the probe-less fabrication method for mass production is also demonstrated. To confirm the promising optical properties of individual ZnO for realizing nanophotonic devices, we performed the near-field evaluation of the ZnO quantum structure (see Sect. 15.3). To drive the nanophotonic device with external conventional diffraction-limited photonic device, the far-/near-field conversion device is required. Section 15.4 reviews nanometer-scale waveguide to be used as such a conversion device of the nanophotonic ICs.

  19. A Controlled Field Pilot for Testing Near Surface CO2 Detection Techniques and Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L.

    2007-12-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow horizontal, well slotted over 70m of its length and divided into seven zones via packers with mass flow control in each individual zone. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects and those design parameters will be discussed. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from Los Alamos National Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, the National Energy Technology Lab, Pacific Northwest National Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab and West Virginia University. Techniques included eddy covariance, soil gas measurements, hyperspectral imaging for plant stress detection, differential absorption LIDAR (both free space atmospheric and below surface soil gas), tracer studies, water sampling, stable isotope studies, and soil flux chambers. An overview of these results will be presented.

  20. Evaluation of V/STOL research aircraft design. [landing approaches, propulsion/control, piloted moving base simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, W. H.; Holzhauser, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The evaluation and evolution of direct jet lift V/STOL transport aircraft designs are discussed. The V/STOL transport design selected as an example is a lift-fan design that was evaluated as a candidate configuration for a possible future V/STOL research transport. The paper includes discussion of potential advanced V/STOL landing approach profiles as key design requirements for V/STOL aircraft, description and experimental results of an integrated propulsion/control system designed to achieve desired advanced V/STOL near-terminal operating capabilities, and results from evaluating V/STOL designs on piloted moving-base simulators. This paper discusses use of the piloted moving-base simulator as a design tool for evolving satisfactory V/STOL stabilization and propulsion/control systems. Included are problems and solutions identified during simulation of simultaneous decelerating/descent steep curved landing approaches under instrument flight conditions. Simulation results are also compared to flight results obtained with the DO-31 V/STOL research transport.

  1. A Pilot Evaluation of On-Road Detection Performance by Drivers with Hemianopia Using Oblique Peripheral Prisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex R. Bowers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Homonymous hemianopia (HH, a severe visual consequence of stroke, causes difficulties in detecting obstacles on the nonseeing (blind side. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the effects of oblique peripheral prisms, a novel development in optical treatments for HH, on detection of unexpected hazards when driving. Methods. Twelve people with complete HH (median 49 years, range 29–68 completed road tests with sham oblique prism glasses (SP and real oblique prism glasses (RP. A masked evaluator rated driving performance along the 25 km routes on busy streets in Ghent, Belgium. Results. The proportion of satisfactory responses to unexpected hazards on the blind side was higher in the RP than the SP drive (80% versus 30%; P=0.001, but similar for unexpected hazards on the seeing side. Conclusions. These pilot data suggest that oblique peripheral prisms may improve responses of people with HH to blindside hazards when driving and provide the basis for a future, larger-sample clinical trial. Testing responses to unexpected hazards in areas of heavy vehicle and pedestrian traffic appears promising as a real-world outcome measure for future evaluations of HH rehabilitation interventions aimed at improving detection when driving.

  2. Subjective responses of mental workload during real time driving: A pilot field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, N. I. A.; Dawal, S. Z. M.; Yusoff, N.

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluated drivers’ mental workload in real time driving to identify the driving situation’s complexity influences in an attempt to further design on a complete experimental study. Three driving settings were prepared: Session A (simple situation); Session B (moderately complex situation); Session C (very complex situation). To determine the mental workload, the NASA-Task Load Index (TLX) was administered to four drivers after each experimental driving session. The results showed that the Own Performance (OP) was the highest for session A (highway), while Physical Demand (PD) recorded the highest mean workload score across the session B (rural road) and C (city road). Based on the overall results of the study, it can be concluded that the highway is less demanding compared to rural and city road. It can be highlighted in this study that in the rural and city road driving situation, the timing must be set correctly to assure the relevant traffic density. Thus, the sensitivity of the timing must be considered in the future experiment. A larger number of experience drivers must be used in evaluating the driving situations to provide results that can be used to draw more realistic experiments and conclusions.

  3. Portable pilot plant for evaluating marine biofouling growth and control in heat exchangers-condensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanueva, J F; Sánchez, J; García-Morales, J L; Casanueva-Robles, T; López, J A; Portela, J R; Nebot, E; Sales, D

    2003-01-01

    Biofouling frequently involves a serious impediment to achieving optimum operating conditions in heat exchangers-condensers. The economic coat and energy losses associated with this phenomenon are significant and the environmental impact of biocides must satisfy stringent regulations. A portable pilot plant has been designed in order to carry out in-situ experimental study as biofilm is formed under thermal and hydrodynamically controlled conditions. The pilot plant has an automatic monitoring, control and data acquisition system, which automatically processes data from indirect measure of fouling in terms of increased fluid frictional and heat transfer resistances. A particular method is used and proposed for direct measuring and biofilm characterization. Once we know the actual film thickness, we can calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the layer by using the appropriate heat transfer equations.

  4. Evaluation of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of dual diagnosis (Pilot Study)

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Prodromou; Savoula Ghobrial; Koukia Eumorfia

    2015-01-01

    Dual diagnosis can be defined as a combination of a substance use disorder and a coexistent psychiatric disorder in one patient. It constitutes a challenge for Therapeutic Rehabilitation Programme, because of its multifaceted nature. This pilot study was conducted using a naturalistic approach to study for eighteen months, Clients were admitted as inpatients in Residential Therapeutic Rehabilitation Program offered by the Mental Health Services in Cyprus. Methods: Forty-five consecutive p...

  5. Evaluation and modeling of biochemical methane potential (BMP) of landfilled solid waste: a pilot scale study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilgili, M Sinan; Demir, Ahmet; Varank, Gamze

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to present a comparison of landfill performance with respect to solids decomposition. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) test was used to determine the initial and the remaining CH(4) potentials of solid wastes during 27 months of landfilling operation in two pilot...... and R2 reactors were 0.01571 and 0.01195 1/d, respectively. The correlation between the model and the experimental parameters was more than 95%, showing the good fit of the model....

  6. Evaluating Regional Emissions Trading Pilot Schemes in China's Two Provinces and Five Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Huizhi, Wang

    2016-01-01

    With the highest energy use and greenhouse gas emissions around the world, China has begun to adopt comprehensive approaches to control its CO2 emissions and fight climate change. China has committed to reduce its carbon intensity by 40% to 45% compared to 2005 levels by 2020. In 2011, China initiated the development of seven regional carbon trading scheme (ETS) pilots in two provinces (Guangdong and Hubei) and five cities (Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Chongqing and Shenzhen) and has embarked ...

  7. INTEREXAMINER RELIABILITY OF CHIROPRACTIC EVALUATION FOR CERVICAL SPINE PROBLEMS—A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tuchin, Peter J.; Hart, Christopher J.; Johnson, Catriona; Colman, Robert; Gee, Adam; Edwards, Ian; Plucknett, Mark; Bonello, Rod

    1996-01-01

    Objective: A pilot study was conducted to determine whether untrained examiners could agree on palpatory findings in the cervical spine. Design: Fifty-three university students, (most of whom were chiropractic students), had their cervical spines examined by seven different chiropractors using their own clinical methods, of which motion palpation was a common, but not standard component. Setting: Chiropractic Centre in Macquarie University. Participants: Volunteer university students. Main Ou...

  8. Numerical evaluation of E-fields induced by body motion near high-field MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, S; Liu, F

    2004-01-01

    In modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), both patients and radiologists are exposed to strong, nonuniform static magnetic fields inside or outside of the scanner, in which the body movement may be able to induce electric currents in tissues which could be possibly harmful. This paper presents theoretical investigations into the spatial distribution of induced E-fields in the human model when moving at various positions around the magnet. The numerical calculations are based on an efficient, quasistatic, finite-difference scheme and an anatomically realistic, full-body, male model. 3D field profiles from an actively-shielded 4 T magnet system are used and the body model projected through the field profile with normalized velocity. The simulation shows that it is possible to induce E-fields/currents near the level of physiological significance under some circumstances and provides insight into the spatial characteristics of the induced fields. The results are easy to extrapolate to very high field strengths for the safety evaluation at a variety of field strengths and motion velocities.

  9. PILOT-SCALE FIELD VALIDATION OF THE LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TOMOGRAPHY METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLASER DR; RUCKER DF; CROOK N; LOKE MH

    2011-07-14

    Field validation for the long electrode electrical resistivity tomography (LE-ERT) method was attempted in order to demonstrate the performance of the technique in imaging a simple buried target. The experiment was an approximately 1/17 scale mock-up of a region encompassing a buried nuclear waste tank on the Hanford site. The target of focus was constructed by manually forming a simulated plume within the vadose zone using a tank waste simulant. The LE-ERT results were compared to ERT using conventional point electrodes on the surface and buried within the survey domain. Using a pole-pole array, both point and long electrode imaging techniques identified the lateral extents of the pre-formed plume with reasonable fidelity, but the LE-ERT was handicapped in reconstructing the vertical boundaries. The pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays were also tested with the LE-ERT method and were shown to have the least favorable target properties, including the position of the reconstructed plume relative to the known plume and the intensity of false positive targets. The poor performance of the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays was attributed to an inexhaustive and non-optimal coverage of data at key electrodes, as well as an increased noise for electrode combinations with high geometric factors. However, when comparing the model resolution matrix among the different acquisition strategies, the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays using long electrodes were shown to have significantly higher average and maximum values than any pole-pole array. The model resolution describes how well the inversion model resolves the subsurface. Given the model resolution performance of the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays, it may be worth investing in tools to understand the optimum subset of randomly distributed electrode pairs to produce maximum performance from the inversion model.

  10. Pilot and Controller Evaluations of Separation Function Allocation in Air Traffic Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, David; Prevot, Thomas; Morey, Susan; Lewis, Timothy; Martin, Lynne; Johnson, Sally; Cabrall, Christopher; Como, Sean; Homola, Jeffrey; Sheth-Chandra, Manasi; Mercer, Joey

    2013-01-01

    Two human-in-the-loop simulation experiments were conducted in coordinated fashion to investigate the allocation of separation assurance functions between ground and air and between humans and automation. The experiments modeled a mixed-operations concept in which aircraft receiving ground-based separation services shared the airspace with aircraft providing their own separation service (i.e., self-separation). Ground-based separation was provided by air traffic controllers without automation tools, with tools, or by ground-based automation with controllers in a managing role. Airborne self-separation was provided by airline pilots using self-separation automation enabled by airborne surveillance technology. The two experiments, one pilot-focused and the other controller-focused, addressed selected key issues of mixed operations, assuming the starting point of current-day operations and modeling an emergence of NextGen technologies and procedures. In the controller-focused experiment, the impact of mixed operations on controller performance was assessed at four stages of NextGen implementation. In the pilot-focused experiment, the limits to which pilots with automation tools could take full responsibility for separation from ground-controlled aircraft were tested. Results indicate that the presence of self-separating aircraft had little impact on the controllers' ability to provide separation services for ground-controlled aircraft. Overall performance was best in the most automated environment in which all aircraft were data communications equipped, ground-based separation was highly automated, and self-separating aircraft had access to trajectory intent information for all aircraft. In this environment, safe, efficient, and highly acceptable operations could be achieved for twice today's peak airspace throughput. In less automated environments, reduced trajectory intent exchange and manual air traffic control limited the safely achievable airspace throughput and

  11. The effectiveness of optical coherence tomography for evaluating peri-omplant tissue: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanda, Minoru; Shiota, Makoto; Imakita, Chiharu; Kasugai, Shohei [Dept. of Oral Implantology and Regenerative Dental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Sakuyama, Aoi [Dept. of Oral Surgery, Jichii Medical University Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Sumi, Yasunori [Div. of Oral and Dental Surgery, Dept. of Advanced Medicine, National Hospital for Geriatric Medicine, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been investigated as a novel diagnostic imaging tool. The utilisation of this equipment has been evaluated through several studies in the field of dentistry. The aim of this preliminary study was to determine through basic experiments the effectiveness of OCT in implant dentistry. To assess detection ability, we captured OCT images of implants in each of the following situations: (1) implants covered with mucosae of various thicknesses that were harvested from the mandibles of pigs; (2) implants installed in the mandibles of pigs; and (3) implants with abutments and crowns fixed with temporary cement. The OCT images were captured before cementation, after cementation, and after removing the excess submucosal cement. If the thickness of the mucosa covering the implant body was less than 1 mm, the images of the implants were clearly detected by OCT. In the implants were installed in pigs' mandibles, it was difficult to capture clear images of the implant and alveolar bone in most of the samples. Remnants of excess cement around the implants were visible in most samples that had a mucosa thickness of less than 3 mm. Currently, OCT imaging of implants is limited. Cement remnants at the submucosal area can be detected in some cases, which can be helpful in preventing peri-implant diseases. Still, though there are some restrictions to its application, OCT could have potential as an effective diagnostic instrument in the field of implant dentistry as well.

  12. Piloted Evaluation of the H-Mode, a Variable Autonomy Control System, in Motion-Based Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Schutte, Paul C.; Williams, Ralph A.

    2008-01-01

    As aircraft become able to autonomously respond to a range of situations with performance surpassing human operators, we are compelled to look for new methods that help understand their use and guide the design of new, more effective forms of automation and interaction. The "H-mode" is one such method and is based on the metaphor of a well-trained horse. The concept allows the pilot to manage a broad range of control automation functionality, from augmented manual control to FMS-like coupling and automation initiated actions, using a common interface system and easily learned set of interaction skills. The interface leverages familiar manual control interfaces (e.g., the control stick) and flight displays through the addition of contextually dependent haptic-multimodal elements. The concept is relevant to manned and remotely piloted vehicles. This paper provides an overview of the H-mode concept followed by a presentation of the results from a recent evaluation conducted in a motion-based simulator. The evaluation focused on assessing the overall usability and flying qualities of the concept with an emphasis on the effects of turbulence and cockpit motion. Because the H-mode results in interactions between traditional flying qualities and management of higher-level flight path automation, these effects are of particular interest. The results indicate that the concept may provide a useful complement or replacement to conventional interfaces, and retains the usefulness in the presence of turbulence and motion.

  13. Numerical evaluation of the tensor bispectrum in two field inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Raveendran, Rathul Nath

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the dimensionless non-Gaussianity parameter $h_{_{\\rm NL}}$, that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bispectrum, numerically for a class of two field inflationary models such as double inflation, hybrid inflation and aligned natural inflation. We compare the numerical results with the slow roll results which can be obtained analytically. In the context of double inflation, we also investigate the effects on $h_{_{\\rm NL}}$ due to curved trajectories in the field space. We explicitly examine the validity of the consistency relation governing the tensor bispectrum in the squeezed limit. Lastly, we discuss the contribution to $h_{_{\\rm NL}}$ due to the epoch of preheating in two field models.

  14. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Primary Health Care Engagement (PHCE) Scale: a pilot survey of rural and remote nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteniuk, Julie G; Wilson, Erin C; Penz, Kelly L; MacLeod, Martha L P; Stewart, Norma J; Kulig, Judith C; Karunanayake, Chandima P; Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2016-01-01

    To report the development and psychometric evaluation of a scale to measure rural and remote (rural/remote) nurses' perceptions of the engagement of their workplaces in key dimensions of primary health care (PHC). Amidst ongoing PHC reforms, a comprehensive instrument is needed to evaluate the degree to which rural/remote health care settings are involved in the key dimensions that characterize PHC delivery, particularly from the perspective of professionals delivering care. This study followed a three-phase process of instrument development and psychometric evaluation. A literature review and expert consultation informed instrument development in the first phase, followed by an iterative process of content evaluation in the second phase. In the final phase, a pilot survey was undertaken and item discrimination analysis employed to evaluate the internal consistency reliability of each subscale in the preliminary 60-item Primary Health Care Engagement (PHCE) Scale. The 60-item scale was subsequently refined to a 40-item instrument. The pilot survey sample included 89 nurses in current practice who had experience in rural/remote practice settings. Participants completed either a web-based or paper survey from September to December, 2013. Following item discrimination analysis, the 60-item instrument was refined to a 40-item PHCE Scale consisting of 10 subscales, each including three to five items. Alpha estimates of the 10 refined subscales ranged from 0.61 to 0.83, with seven of the subscales demonstrating acceptable reliability (α ⩾ 0.70). The refined 40-item instrument exhibited good internal consistency reliability (α=0.91). The 40-item PHCE Scale may be considered for use in future studies regardless of locale, to measure the extent to which health care professionals perceive their workplaces to be engaged in key dimensions of PHC.

  15. On multiplying methods in the field of research evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrick, G.; Molas-Gallart, J.; De Rijcke, S.; Meijer, I.; Van der Weijden, I.; Wouters, P.

    2016-07-01

    This special session forms part of a larger program aimed at the multiplication and integration of methodological approaches in the research evaluation and innovation policy field. The session builds on previous initiatives by Gemma Derrick and colleagues at CWTS, INGENIO, the Rathenau Instituut and SPRU, exploring the advantages of qualitative methodological tools at the STI/ENID conference in Lugano, and an international workshop in London in October 2015. The program is highly topical: the research evaluation field is currently reconsidering its methodological foundations in light of new research questions arising from policy initiatives regarding a) the move toward open science; b) a reconceptualization of research excellence to include societal relevance; c) diversification of academic careers, and d) the search for indicators showcasing responsible research behavior and innovation. This new special session at STI2016 will advance and broaden the scope of previous initiatives by building bridges between cutting edge research involving quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodological research designs. Bringing together leading experts and promising researchers with distinctive methodological skill-sets, the session will demonstrate the advantages of cross-fertilization between ‘core’ and ‘peripheral’ methodological approaches for the research evaluation and science indicators field. (Author)

  16. Development and evaluation of an intervention aiming to reduce fatigue in airline pilots: design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Alwin; van der Beek, Allard J; Hlobil, Hynek; Smid, Tjabe; Boot, Cécile R L

    2013-08-26

    A considerable percentage of flight crew reports to be fatigued regularly. This is partly caused by irregular and long working hours and the crossing of time zones. It has been shown that persistent fatigue can lead to health problems, impaired performance during work, and a decreased work-private life balance. It is hypothesized that an intervention consisting of tailored advice regarding exposure to daylight, optimising sleep, physical activity, and nutrition will lead to a reduction of fatigue in airline pilots compared to a control group, which receives a minimal intervention with standard available information. The study population will consist of pilots of a large airline company. All pilots who posses a smartphone or tablet, and who are not on sick leave for more than four weeks at the moment of recruitment, will be eligible for participation.In a two-armed randomised controlled trial, participants will be allocated to an intervention group that will receive the tailored advice to optimise exposure to daylight, sleep, physical activity and nutrition, and a control group that will receive standard available information. The intervention will be applied using a smartphone application and a website, and will be tailored on flight- and participant-specific characteristics. The primary outcome of the study is perceived fatigue. Secondary outcomes are need for recovery, duration and quality of sleep, dietary and physical activity behaviours, work-private life balance, general health, and sickness absence. A process evaluation will be conducted as well. Outcomes will be measured at baseline and at three and six months after baseline. This paper describes the development of an intervention for airline pilots, consisting of tailored advice (on exposure to daylight and sleep-, physical activity, and nutrition) applied into a smartphone application. Further, the paper describes the design of the randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of the intervention on

  17. Cystic Fibrosis and New Trends by Ophthalmological Evaluation: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Nebbioso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cystic fibrosis (CF is characterized by hypoxia that affects several organic tissues. Retinal ganglion cells may suffer from the hypoxic status, and this may lead to alterations of retinal nerve fiber. Methods. Twenty-two eyes in CF patients were analyzed. A complete ocular evaluation and visual field exams of the 30 central degrees were performed using the frequency doubling technology (FDT. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%, forced vital capacity (FVC%, oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SpO2%, and hematocrit (Ht% have been calculated. FDT analyzed parameters were mean deviation (MD and pattern standard deviation (PSD. Pearson’s correlation was chosen as statistical analysis. Results. Data showed statistically significant relationship between MD and Ht% (r value −0.18; P=0.04, MD and FEV1% (r value −0.68; P=0.001, and MD and FVC% (r value −0.45; P=0.005. Moreover, there were correlations between PSD and Ht% (r value 0.29; P=0.03, PSD and SpO2% (r value −0.31; P=0.01, PSD and FEV1% (r value 0.71; P=0.0005, and PSD and FVC% (r value 0.63; P=0.003. Conclusions. The oxygen supply alterations might determine hypoxia of the ganglion cells causing a decrease of receptive optic nerve fiber activity. This method could be also useful to evaluate indirectly pulmonary activity of the CF disease.

  18. Application of handheld devices to field research among underserved construction worker populations: a workplace health assessment pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleming Lora E

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel low-cost approaches for conducting rapid health assessments and health promotion interventions among underserved worker groups are needed. Recruitment and participation of construction workers is particularly challenging due to their often transient periods of work at any one construction site, and their limited time during work to participate in such studies. In the present methodology report, we discuss the experience, advantages and disadvantages of using touch screen handheld devices for the collection of field data from a largely underserved worker population. Methods In March 2010, a workplace-centered pilot study to examine the feasibility of using a handheld personal device for the rapid health assessment of construction workers in two South Florida Construction sites was undertaken. A 45-item survey instrument, including health-related questions on tobacco exposure, workplace safety practices, musculoskeletal disorders and health symptoms, was programmed onto Apple iPod Touch® devices. Language sensitive (English and Spanish recruitment scripts, verbal consent forms, and survey questions were all preloaded onto the handheld devices. The experience (time to survey administration and capital cost of the handheld administration method was recorded and compared to approaches available in the extant literature. Results Construction workers were very receptive to the recruitment, interview and assessment processes conducted through the handheld devices. Some workers even welcomed the opportunity to complete the questionnaire themselves using the touch screen handheld device. A list of advantages and disadvantages emerged from this experience that may be useful in the rapid health assessment of underserved populations working in a variety of environmental and occupational health settings. Conclusions Handheld devices, which are relatively inexpensive, minimize survey response error, and allow for easy storage of data

  19. Field evaluation of recycled plastic lumber (RPL) pallets. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnaswamy, P.; Miele, C.R.; Francini, R.B. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Yuracko, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yerace, P. [Dept. of Energy, Fernald, OH (United States)

    1997-10-01

    One significant component of the waste stream, discarded plastic products and packaging, continues to be a growing portion of the municipal solid waste (MSW). There has been considerable work done in characterizing the quantity and types of plastics in different waste streams, collection methods, separation, sorting as well as technologies for processing post-consumer mixed plastics. The focus in recent years has been the development of markets for recycled plastic products, which constitutes the second half of the material flow diagram cycle shown in Figure 1. One key product that holds significant promise for plastics recycling to be both technically feasible and economically viable is Recycled Plastic Lumber (RPL). The contents of this report forms the second phase of a two-phase pilot project on developing specifications and standards for a product fabricated from RPL. Such standards and specifications are needed to prepare procurement guidelines for state and federal agencies interested in purchasing products made from recycled materials. The first phase focused on establishing a procedure to evaluate RPL product,s such as pallets, in a laboratory setting while this phase focuses on field evaluation of RPL pallets in service. This effort is critical in the development of new markets for RPL products. A brief summary of the findings from Phase 1 of this effort is presented next.

  20. Evaluation of the field size in dental diagnostic radiology system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, P.S.; Potiens, M.P.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    In this work the field size of a dental X rays machine was evaluated considering the recommendation of the Brazilian Health Ministry Regulation 453 which established basic lines of radiological protection in medical and dental diagnostic radiology. The diameter of the field should not be superior to 6 cm in the localized end point, limiting the radiated area and protecting the head-neck region. The measurements were carried out in a dental X rays machine, Dabi Atlante, model Spectro 70X Seletronic. For the field size or useful beam determination, the intra-oral films were positioned on a plain surface to be exposed in four stages and two focus-film distances (FFD), 20 cm and 27.5 cm: 1) with spacer cone; 2) without spacer cone; 3) with spacer cone and film-holding device; 4) without spacer cone and film-holding device. The results show that the diameter of the field size is satisfactory only for FFD = 20 cm. When the film-holding device is used, which is recommended by the Regulation 453, item 5.8 d(ii), the diameter of the field size exceeds the maximum recommended value of 6 cm. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of a pilot peer observation of teaching scheme for chair-side tutors at Glasgow University Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, A M; Bissell, V; Bovill, C

    2013-06-01

    To introduce and examine a pilot peer observation of teaching (POT) scheme within the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at Glasgow Dental School and its associated outreach centres. All tutors teaching paediatric dentistry were invited to be involved in evaluation of the POT scheme. Participants were randomly paired with a peer, who then observed their teaching and provided constructive feedback. For those consenting to be involved in the evaluation of the scheme, semi-structured, one-to-one interviews were carried out by the principal investigator. POT was found by all participants to be a beneficial process, reassuring those of their teaching styles and giving them ideas to adapt their teaching. POT is an effective method for engaging chair-side tutors in the reflection and development of their teaching practice via observations and scholarly discussion.

  2. Stimulating utilities to promote energy efficiency: Process evaluation of Madison Gas and Electric's Competition Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, E.; De Buen, O.; Goldfman, C.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the process evaluation of the design and implementation of the Energy Conservation Competition Pilot (hereafter referred to as the Competition), ordered by the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSCW) with a conceptual framework defined by PSCW staff for the Madison Gas and Electric (MGE) Company. This process evaluation documents the history of the Competition, describing the marketing strategies adopted by MGE and its competitors, customer service and satisfaction, administrative issues, the distribution of installed measures, free riders, and the impact of the Competition on MGE, its competitors, and other Wisconsin utilities. We also suggest recommendations for a future Competition, compare the Competition with other approaches that public utility commissions (PUCs) have used to motivate utilities to promote energy efficiency, and discuss its transferability to other utilities. 48 refs., 8 figs., 40 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of a pilot-scale wood torrefcaction plant based on pellet properties and Finnish market economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapio Ranta, Jarno Föhr, Hanne Soininen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study torrefaction was demonstrated at a Torrec Ltd. pilot plant located in Mikkeli, eastern Finland. The pilot plant with a nominal capacity of 10,000 tonnes/year began operation in August 2014. The torrefaction solution was a batch type process based on a vertical reactor, where biomass material flows by gravity without drives or actuators and torrefaction happens by steam inertization and accurate process control. Steam was supplied from the local biomass combined heat and power (CHP plant next to the pilot plant. The product quality of torrefied pellets was analysed by testing alternative local woody biomass sources, such as forest chips made from coniferous trees (spruce, pine and broadleaf (birch, as well as by-products such as veneer chips. Lower heating value as dry basis varied 18.47–20.53 MJ/kg with a moisture content of 4.41-8.60% for torrefied pellets. All raw materials were suitable for torrefied pellet production without binder addition. Noteworthy was good results also with hardwood species. The potential Finnish customers are CHP plants aiming to replace coal with pellets. In 2013 coal use was 31.2 TWh, where condensing was 15.3 TWh, CHP 14.2 TWh, and separate heat 1.6 TWh in Finland. If half of the current coal use in CHP would be replaced by biocoal, then Finnish potential bio-coal markets would be 7 TWh or 1.2 million tonnes of pellets/year. Aided by the results of this demonstration study and modelling of logistics it is possible to evaluate the competitiveness of torrefied pellets based on the local circumstances.

  4. Mild desalination demo pilot: New normalization approach to effectively evaluate electrodialysis reversal technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roel Bisselink

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Key performance indicators for characterization of nanofiltration performance are well developed, similar key performance indicators for electrodialysis reversal are however underdeveloped. Under the E4Water project Dow Benelux BV and Evides Industriewater BV operate a pilot facility to compare both technologies for their application to mildly desalinate a variety of brackish water streams. Normalized pressure drop, normalized current efficiency and normalized membrane resistance proved to be a useful tool to interpret process performance and to initiate a cleaning procedure if required. The availability of these normalized key performance indicators enables optimization and process monitoring and control of electrodialysis reversal independent of the continuously changing conditions of the feed water.

  5. Evaluation of a residential Kundalini yoga lifestyle pilot program for addiction in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S; Khalsa, Gurucharan S; Khalsa, Hargopal K; Khalsa, Mukta K

    2008-01-01

    Previously reported substance abuse interventions incorporating meditation and spiritual approaches are believed to provide their benefit through modulation of both psychological and pyschosocial factors. A 90-day residential group pilot treatment program for substance abuse that incorporated a comprehensive array of yoga, meditation, spiritual and mind-body techniques was conducted in Amritsar, India. Subjects showed improvements on a number of psychological self-report questionnaires including the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale and the Quality of Recovery Index. Application of comprehensive spiritual lifestyle interventions may prove effective in treating substance abuse, particularly in populations receptive to such approaches.

  6. Pilot study for compact microbeam radiation therapy using a carbon nanotube field emission micro-CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadsell, Mike; Cao, Guohua; Zhang, Jian; Burk, Laurel; Schreiber, Torsten; Schreiber, Eric; Chang, Sha; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is defined as the use of parallel, microplanar x-ray beams with an energy spectrum between 50 and 300 keV for cancer treatment and brain radiosurgery. Up until now, the possibilities of MRT have mainly been studied using synchrotron sources due to their high flux (100s Gy/s) and approximately parallel x-ray paths. The authors have proposed a compact x-ray based MRT system capable of delivering MRT dose distributions at a high dose rate. This system would employ carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission technology to create an x-ray source array that surrounds the target of irradiation. Using such a geometry, multiple collimators would shape the irradiation from this array into multiple microbeams that would then overlap or interlace in the target region. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of attaining a high dose rate and parallel microbeam beams using such a system. The microbeam dose distribution was generated by our CNT micro-CT scanner (100 μm focal spot) and a custom-made microbeam collimator. An alignment assembly was fabricated and attached to the scanner in order to collimate and superimpose beams coming from different gantry positions. The MRT dose distribution was measured using two orthogonal radiochromic films embedded inside a cylindrical phantom. This target was irradiated with microbeams incident from 44 different gantry angles to simulate an array of x-ray sources as in the proposed compact CNT-based MRT system. Finally, phantom translation in a direction perpendicular to the microplanar beams was used to simulate the use of multiple parallel microbeams. Microbeams delivered from 44 gantry angles were superimposed to form a single microbeam dose distribution in the phantom with a FWHM of 300 μm (calculated value was 290 μm). Also, during the multiple beam simulation, a peak to valley dose ratio of ~10 was found when the phantom translation distance was roughly 4x the beam width. The first prototype CNT

  7. Evaluating non-technical skills and mission essential competencies of pilots in military aviation environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsifetakis, Emmanuel; Kontogiannis, Tom

    2017-05-25

    To develop and validate a classification of non-technical skills (NTS) in military aviation, a study was conducted, using data from real operations of F16 aircraft formations. Phase 1 developed a NTS classification based on the literature review (e.g. NOTECHS) and a workshop with pilots. The Non-TEChnical-MILitary-Skills (NOTEMILS) scheme was tested in Phase 2 in a series of Principal Component Analysis with data from After-Action-Review sessions (i.e. 900 records from a wide range of operations). The NTS were found to make a good prediction of Mission Essential Components (R(2) > 0.80) above the effect of experience. Phase 3 undertook a reliability analysis where three raters assessed the NOTEMILS scheme with good results (i.e. all rwg > 0.80). To look into the consistency of classifications, another test indicated that, at least, two out of three raters were in agreement in over 70% of the assessed flight segments. Practitioner Summary: A classification scheme of Non-Technical Skills (NTS) was developed and tested for reliability in military aviation operations. The NTS scheme is a valuable tool for assessing individual and team skills of F-16 pilots in combat. It is noteworthy that the tool had a good capability of predicting Mission Essential Competencies.

  8. Evaluation of a Pilot Nutrition Education Program Delivered by Hmong Community Health Workers (CHWs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Treiber

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many members of the Hmong population in the United States suffer from comparatively bad health. Moreover, disease prevention messaging that has traditionally been used through various media and healthcare outlets is not as successful with the Hmong as with the general population, due in part to cultural barriers. This paper explores whether community health workers (CHWs may be a potentially successful way to deliver lessons in disease prevention, especially messages on healthy eating, drinking, and exercising. In addition, it explores the potential impact of a CHW program on participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP. Following a literature review, a pilot project that used CHWs in the Hmong Community of Sacramento, California is described. It used KAP (Knowledge, Attitude, Practice measures in a pre-post test. Statistically significant improvement was achieved in knowledge and attitude, and practice, but not in SNAP participation. The program and CHWs were well received as measured by a satisfaction survey of the 131 participants. Overall the pilot project proved to be successful.

  9. A pilot evaluation of a social media literacy intervention to reduce risk factors for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Siân A; Wertheim, Eleanor H; Masters, Jennifer; Paxton, Susan J

    2017-07-01

    This pilot study investigated the effectiveness of a social media literacy intervention for adolescent girls on risk factors for eating disorders. A quasi-experimental pre- to post-test design comparing intervention and control conditions was used. Participants were 101 adolescent girls (Mage  = 13.13, SD = 0.33) who were allocated to receive three social media literacy intervention lessons (n = 64) or to receive classes as usual (n = 37). Self-report assessments of eating disorder risk factors were completed one week prior to, and one week following the intervention. Significant group by time interaction effects revealed improvements in the intervention condition relative to the control condition for body image (body esteem-weight; d = .19), disordered eating (dietary restraint; d = .26) and media literacy (realism scepticism; d = .32). The outcomes of this pilot study suggest that social media literacy is a potentially useful approach for prevention of risk for eating disorders in adolescent girls in the current social media environment of heightened vulnerability. Replication of this research with larger, randomized controlled trials, and longer follow-up is needed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Evaluation of potential particulate/colloidal TEP foulants on a pilot scale SWRO desalination study

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2016-01-21

    This pilot study investigated the variation of potential foulants and different fractions of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), along the treatment scheme under different conditions. The objectives are to provide a comprehensive understanding on which fraction of TEP is more problematic in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) fouling, and which pretreatment can better reduce the concentration of TEP. Results showed that TEP deposited on the RO membranes, and the extent of RO fouling increased with the increase of TEP concentration in RO feed water. More TEP was produced in water after chlorination, probably because of the breakdown of bacterial cells and thus the release of internal exopolymers. Moreover, the cartridge filters could behave as an incubator for the regrowth of bacteria deactivated by chlorination and a spot for potential foulant (bacterial TEP) production, and thus enhance the RO membranes fouling. The presence of residual iron and addition of phosphate based antiscalant may also contribute to the higher biofouling of RO membranes. This pilot study provided an opportunity to identify the TEP related issues under different operational conditions in RO desalination of Red Sea water.

  11. Isokinetic knee joint evaluation in track and field events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Chariklia K; Paschalis, Vassilis; Theodorou, Anastasios A; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate maximal torque of the knee flexors and extensors, flexor/extensor ratios, and maximal torque differences between the 2 lower extremities in young track and field athletes. Forty male track and field athletes 13-17 years old and 20 male nonathletes of the same age participated in the study. Athletes were divided into 4 groups according to their age and event (12 runners and 10 jumpers 13-15 years old, 12 runners and 6 jumpers 16-17 years old) and nonathletes into 2 groups of the same age. Maximal torque evaluation of knee flexors and extensors was performed on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°·s(-1). At the age of 16-17 years, jumpers exhibited higher strength values at extension than did runners and nonathletes, whereas at the age of 13-15 years, no significant differences were found between events. Younger athletes were weaker than older athletes at flexion. Runners and jumpers were stronger than nonathletes in all relative peak torque parameters. Nonathletes exhibited a higher flexor/extensor ratio compared with runners and jumpers. Strength imbalance in athletes was found between the 2 lower extremities in knee flexors and extensors and also at flexor/extensor ratio of the same extremity. Young track and field athletes exhibit strength imbalances that could reduce their athletic performance, and specific strength training for the weak extremity may be needed.

  12. Analytical evaluation and optimization of advanced oxidation process in a solar pilot power plant; Evaluacion analitica y optimizacion de procesos de oxidacion avanzada en planta piloto solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Vazquez, J.; Malato Rodriguez, S.; Rodriguez Fernandez-Alba, A.

    2003-07-01

    The technical feasibility mechanisms and performance of degradation of several pesticides (imidacloprid, methomyl and diuron) dissolved in water have been studies at pilot scale in two well-defined photocatalytic systems of special interest because natural UV light can be used: heterogeneous photocatalysis with titanium dioxide and homogeneous photocatalysis by photo-Fenton.Equivalent pilot-scale (made up of Compound Parabolic Collectors (CPCs) specially designed for solar photocatalytic applications) and field conditions used for both systems and the three pesticides allowed adequate comparison of the degree of mineralization and toxicity achieved as well as the transformation products generated en route to mineralization. Total disappearance of the parent compounds and 90% mineralisation have been attained with all pesticides tested, methomyl being the most difficult to be degraded with both treatments. First order rate constants, initial rate,time necessary for mineralizing 90% of the initial TOC and hydrogen peroxide consumption were calculated in all cases, enabling comparison both of treatments and of the selected pesticide reactivity. Complete mineralisation of TOC is not achieved even after quite a long time (more than 300 minutes). Three different bioassays (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna and a Microalga) have been used for testing the progress of toxicity during treatments. All remained toxic down to very low pesticide disappearance of the pesticide. Only if treatment is maintained throughout enough mineralisation (i. e. TOC disappearance), the toxicity is reduced to below the threshold (EC 50%). Transformation products evaluated by GC-MS/AED (after two SPE procedures), LC-IT-MS and LC-IC were the same in both phototreatments. The main differences between the two processes are in the amount of transformation products (TPs) generated, not in the TPs detected which were always the same. (Author)

  13. Evaluation of a Pilot Medication-Assisted Therapy Program in Kazakhstan: Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities for Scaleup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizbek A. Boltaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Aims. Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of the medication-assisted therapy (MAT pilot in Kazakhstan and review implementation context and related challenges. Methods. We performed a desk review of MAT policy and program documents and reviewed medical records at three MAT sites in Kazakhstan. MAT patients (n=93 were interviewed to assess their perceptions of the program and its impact on their health, criminal, drug use, and HIV risk related behaviors as well as expenditures on nonprescribed psychoactive drugs. Persons injecting drugs who are not in treatment, MAT program staff, and other stakeholders were interviewed to obtain their perspectives on MAT. Results. Legislation supports introducing MAT as a standard of care for treatment of opioid dependence; however, its progress has been hampered by active opposition. Inadequate access and coverage, insufficient supply management, scarce infrastructure of narcological facilities, limited opportunities for staff development, and restrictive methadone dispensing policies compromise the quality of the intervention and limit its potential benefits. There were significant reductions in criminal, drug use, and HIV risk related behaviors in patients receiving MAT. Conclusions. The MAT pilot in Kazakhstan demonstrated its feasibility and effectiveness in the local context and is recommended for scaleup throughout the country.

  14. [Postgraduate training for specialists in psychiatry and psychotherapy. Problem-based learning - evaluation of a pilot project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, M; Schnyder, U; Schirlo, C; Wengle, H; Gerke, W

    2011-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) emphasizes the student's individual needs, their ability to solve complex clinical problems, and a professional attitude that facilitates communication among colleagues. Thus, PBL appears to provide a perfectly suitable didactic format for postgraduate training of medical specialties. To date, it is only rarely used in this area though. In a pilot project, we implemented PBL into the curriculum of postgraduate training in psychiatry and psychotherapy, and evaluated the program over a period of 12 months, using structured questionnaires. A total of 41 PBL courses were held, with 447 residents participating. Participants as well as tutors assessed 19 of 21 aspects as good or very good (5-point Likert scale, mean value >4). Overall, PBL was rated as highly suitable for advanced training (participants: 4.5±0.8; tutors: 5.0±0.2). The results of this pilot project suggest that PBL might be a useful element of multifaceted advanced training programs, strengthening their practical component and the applicability of knowledge in the daily clinical routine.

  15. Interprofessional team building in the palliative home care setting: Use of a conceptual framework to inform a pilot evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, James; Kearney, Colleen; Glenns, Brenda; McKay, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Home-based palliative care is increasingly dependent on interprofessional teams to deliver collaborative care that more adequately meets the needs of clients and families. The purpose of this pilot evaluation was to qualitatively explore the views of an interprofessional group of home care providers (occupational therapists, nurses, personal support work supervisors, community care coordinators, and a team coordinator) regarding a pilot project encouraging teamwork in interprofessional palliative home care services. We used qualitative methods, informed by an interprofessional conceptual framework, to analyse participants' accounts and provide recommendations regarding strategies for interprofessional team building in palliative home health care. Findings suggest that encouraging practitioners to share past experiences and foster common goals for palliative care are important elements of team building in interprofessional palliative care. Also, establishing a team leader who emphasises sharing power among team members and addressing the need for mutual emotional support may help to maximise interprofessional teamwork in palliative home care. These findings may be used to develop and test more comprehensive efforts to promote stronger interprofessional teamwork in palliative home health care delivery.

  16. A pilot GIS database of active faults of Mt. Etna (Sicily): A tool for integrated hazard evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreca, Giovanni; Bonforte, Alessandro; Neri, Marco

    2013-02-01

    A pilot GIS-based system has been implemented for the assessment and analysis of hazard related to active faults affecting the eastern and southern flanks of Mt. Etna. The system structure was developed in ArcGis® environment and consists of different thematic datasets that include spatially-referenced arc-features and associated database. Arc-type features, georeferenced into WGS84 Ellipsoid UTM zone 33 Projection, represent the five main fault systems that develop in the analysed region. The backbone of the GIS-based system is constituted by the large amount of information which was collected from the literature and then stored and properly geocoded in a digital database. This consists of thirty five alpha-numeric fields which include all fault parameters available from literature such us location, kinematics, landform, slip rate, etc. Although the system has been implemented according to the most common procedures used by GIS developer, the architecture and content of the database represent a pilot backbone for digital storing of fault parameters, providing a powerful tool in modelling hazard related to the active tectonics of Mt. Etna. The database collects, organises and shares all scientific currently available information about the active faults of the volcano. Furthermore, thanks to the strong effort spent on defining the fields of the database, the structure proposed in this paper is open to the collection of further data coming from future improvements in the knowledge of the fault systems. By layering additional user-specific geographic information and managing the proposed database (topological querying) a great diversity of hazard and vulnerability maps can be produced by the user. This is a proposal of a backbone for a comprehensive geographical database of fault systems, universally applicable to other sites.

  17. Evaluation of Depth of Field for depth perception in DVR

    KAUST Repository

    Grosset, A.V.Pascal

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a user study on the use of Depth of Field for depth perception in Direct Volume Rendering. Direct Volume Rendering with Phong shading and perspective projection is used as the baseline. Depth of Field is then added to see its impact on the correct perception of ordinal depth. Accuracy and response time are used as the metrics to evaluate the usefulness of Depth of Field. The onsite user study has two parts: static and dynamic. Eye tracking is used to monitor the gaze of the subjects. From our results we see that though Depth of Field does not act as a proper depth cue in all conditions, it can be used to reinforce the perception of which feature is in front of the other. The best results (high accuracy & fast response time) for correct perception of ordinal depth occurs when the front feature (out of the two features users were to choose from) is in focus and perspective projection is used. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. The performance evaluation for passive type's pressurizer and pilot operated safety relief valve of SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun; Yoon, Ju Hyeon

    2003-11-01

    In this report, the performance for PZR of SMART has been evaluated in which the passive cold PZR and PRHRS had been installed and the FW control system that reactor power is controlled by FW flow rate had been adopted. After the present analysis of the coolant volume of PZR end cavity, it was evaluated that the results could be satisfied if the coolant volume and pressure are controlled in order to be maintained within their set points. Also after the analysis of the gas volume, it was evaluated that the results is much satisfied. Especially, it was analyzed that the peak pressure of end cavity is raised only about 50%(0.6 MPa) as contrasted with the commercial plants. Also, the relieving capacity for pilot operated safety relief valve(POSRV) of SMART was analyzed. The related requirements of 10 CFR 50.55a (c) (1), ASME Code, Sec. III, NB-7000, NUREG-0800 were applied to the analysis. After the present analysis, it was evaluated that the RCS peaking pressure is about 18.2 MPa, 107% of system design pressure, and that it has 3% margin against the design requirement. Also, after the additional analysis, it was evaluated that the open dead/stroke time of POSRV has just a little effect on the peak pressure of PZR EC and MCP discharge.

  19. The performance evaluation for passive type's pressurizer and pilot operated safety relief valve of SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun; Yoon, Ju Hyeon

    2003-11-01

    In this report, the performance for PZR of SMART has been evaluated in which the passive cold PZR and PRHRS had been installed and the FW control system that reactor power is controlled by FW flow rate had been adopted. After the present analysis of the coolant volume of PZR end cavity, it was evaluated that the results could be satisfied if the coolant volume and pressure are controlled in order to be maintained within their set points. Also after the analysis of the gas volume, it was evaluated that the results is much satisfied. Especially, it was analyzed that the peak pressure of end cavity is raised only about 50%(0.6 MPa) as contrasted with the commercial plants. Also, the relieving capacity for pilot operated safety relief valve(POSRV) of SMART was analyzed. The related requirements of 10 CFR 50.55a (c) (1), ASME Code, Sec. III, NB-7000, NUREG-0800 were applied to the analysis. After the present analysis, it was evaluated that the RCS peaking pressure is about 18.2 MPa, 107% of system design pressure, and that it has 3% margin against the design requirement. Also, after the additional analysis, it was evaluated that the open dead/stroke time of POSRV has just a little effect on the peak pressure of PZR EC and MCP discharge.

  20. Quick Evaluation of the Annual Heliostat Field Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, F. J.; Monne, C.; Garcia, M.

    2006-07-01

    The recent world wide interest in solar tower power justifies the presentation of a simplified model which allows quick evaluations of the annual energy collected by a surrounding heliostat field. The model is the combination of an analytical model of the flux density produced by a heliostat from Zaragoza University and a optimized mirror density distribution developed by Houston University. The abilities of the combined model are successfully compared against the limited open data about the project Solar Tres. However, the density model should be refined in some aspects and shadowing and blocking should be reviewed in depth using discrete distributions. (Author)

  1. Quick evaluation of the annual heliostat field efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Francisco J. [Univ. Zaragoza, CPS-B, Dpto de Ingenieria Mecanica, Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    The recent world wide interest in solar power tower justifies the presentation of a simplified model that allows quick evaluations of the annual overall energy collected by a surrounding heliostat field, which is sent to the electric power generating system (EPGS). The model is the combination of an analytical model of the flux density produced by a heliostat from Zaragoza University, an optimized mirror density distribution developed by University of Houston for the Solar One project and molten salt receiver efficiencies measured during the Solar Two project. The abilities of the model are successfully compared against the scarce open data about the next Solar Tres demonstration plant-a 15 MWe solar tower with molten salts storage. This simplified model could be valid for rather preliminary optimizations, although it should not substitute much more accurate discrete evaluations that manage thousands of individual heliostats with their actual shadowing and blockings, performed every few minutes using actual meteorological data. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Wastewater Treatment of Detergent Industry Using Coagulation Procession Pilot Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Shahmansouri

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surfactant or surface active agents are slightly soluble in water and cause foaming in waste treatment plants and also in the surface waters into which the waste effluent is discharged. During aeration of wastewater, these compounds collect on the surface of the water bubbles and create some problems in waste treatment. Methods: In this study, surfactant, turbidity and COD in the industrial wastewater of the company, Paksan was studied. Study was done at pH ranging between 2 and 13 in a pilot scale process. Results: The results showed that ferric chloride has higher efficiency in removal and it is possible to decrease the surfactant, turbidity and COD Conclusion: The efficiency of ferric chloride in coagulation process for removal of surfactant, turbidity and COD from industrial wastewater is better than ALUM, Lime and Ferric Sulfate,

  3. Pilot Study to Evaluate the Appropriate Management of Patients With Coexistent Bacterial Vaginosis and Cervicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane R. Schwebke

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A pilot study was performed to obtain preliminary data regarding the need for targeted therapy of bacterial vaginosis (BV when it accompanies clinically defined cervicitis. Specifically, women attending a sexually transmitted disease (STD clinic with clinically defined BV and cervicitis were treated in the first phase of the study with doxycycline alone. In phase II, the patients received doxycycline and concomitant intravaginal metronidazole gel. All patients were reexamined 3–4 weeks after therapy. Persistence of BV occurred in 18/19 (95% of women in phase I vs. 1/7 (14% of women in phase II (P < 0.001. We concluded that, in women with coexistent clinically defined cervicitis and BV, the treatment of cervicitis does not result in a normalization of the vaginal flora.

  4. A Pilot Study to Evaluate California's Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Using Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Fischer, M. L.; Lueker, T.; Guilderson, T.; Brophy, K. J.; Keeling, R. F.; Arnold, T.; Bambha, R.; Callahan, W.; Campbell, J. E.; Cui, X.; Frankenberg, C.; Hsu, Y.; Iraci, L. T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J.; LaFranchi, B. W.; Lehman, S.; Manning, A.; Michelsen, H. A.; Miller, J. B.; Newman, S.; Paplawsky, B.; Parazoo, N.; Sloop, C.; Walker, S.; Whelan, M.; Wunch, D.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration is influenced by human activities and by natural exchanges. Studies of CO2 fluxes using atmospheric CO2 measurements typically focus on natural exchanges and assume that CO2 emissions by fossil fuel combustion and cement production are well-known from inventory estimates. However, atmospheric observation-based or "top-down" studies could potentially provide independent methods for evaluating fossil fuel CO2 emissions, in support of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change. Observation-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 may also improve estimates of biospheric CO2 exchange, which could help to characterize carbon storage and climate change mitigation by terrestrial ecosystems. We have been developing a top-down framework for estimating fossil fuel CO2 emissions in California that uses atmospheric observations and modeling. California is implementing the "Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006" to reduce total greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, and it has a diverse array of ecosystems that may serve as CO2 sources or sinks. We performed three month-long field campaigns in different seasons in 2014-15 to collect flask samples from a state-wide network of 10 towers. Using measurements of radiocarbon in CO2, we estimate the fossil fuel-derived CO2 present in the flask samples, relative to marine background air observed at coastal sites. Radiocarbon (14C) is not present in fossil fuel-derived CO2 because of radioactive decay over millions of years, so fossil fuel emissions cause a measurable decrease in the 14C/C ratio in atmospheric CO2. We compare the observations of fossil fuel-derived CO2 to simulations based on atmospheric modeling and published fossil fuel flux estimates, and adjust the fossil fuel flux estimates in a statistical inversion that takes account of several uncertainties. We will present the results of the top-down technique to estimate fossil fuel emissions for our field

  5. Evaluation of Early Performance Results for Massachusetts Homes in the National Grid Pilot Deep Energy Retrofit Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhauser, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Gates, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This research project evaluates post-retrofit performance measurements, energy use data and construction costs for 13 projects that participated in the National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot program. The projects implemented a package of measures defined by performance targets for building enclosure components and building enclosure air tightness. Nearly all of the homes reached a post-retrofit air tightness result of 1.5 ACH 50. Homes that used the chainsaw retrofit technique along with roof insulation, and wall insulation applied to the exterior had the best air tightness results and the lowest heating and cooling source energy use. Analysis of measure costs and project objectives yielded a categorization of costs relative to energy performance objectives. On average about ½ of the energy-related measure costs correspond primarily to energy-related objectives, and 20% of energy-related measure costs relate primarily to non-energy objectives.

  6. Evaluation of Early Performance Results for Massachusetts Homes in the National Grid Pilot Deep Energy Retrofit Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Neuhauser, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This research project evaluates post-retrofit performance measurements, energy use data and construction costs for 13 projects that participated in the National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot program. The projects implemented a package of measures defined by performance targets for building enclosure components and building enclosure air tightness. Nearly all of the homes reached a post-retrofit air tightness result of 1.5 ACH 50. Homes that used the chainsaw retrofit technique along with roof insulation, and wall insulation applied to the exterior had the best air tightness results and the lowest heating and cooling source energy use. Analysis of measure costs and project objectives yielded a categorization of costs relative to energy performance objectives. On average about 1/2 of the energy-related measure costs correspond primarily to energy-related objectives, and 20% of energy-related measure costs relate primarily to non-energy objectives.

  7. Piloted Simulation Evaluation of a Model-Predictive Automatic Recovery System to Prevent Vehicle Loss of Control on Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Liu, Yuan; Sowers, Thomas S.; Owen, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a model-predictive automatic recovery system for aircraft on the verge of a loss-of-control situation. The system determines when it must intervene to prevent an imminent accident, resulting from a poor approach. It estimates the altitude loss that would result from a go-around maneuver at the current flight condition. If the loss is projected to violate a minimum altitude threshold, the maneuver is automatically triggered. The system deactivates to allow landing once several criteria are met. Piloted flight simulator evaluation showed the system to provide effective envelope protection during extremely unsafe landing attempts. The results demonstrate how flight and propulsion control can be integrated to recover control of the vehicle automatically and prevent a potential catastrophe.

  8. Evaluation of a temporary prosthetic insert in the rehabilitation of elderly ischaemic below-knee amputees: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, F M; Jull, G A

    1988-01-01

    The physiotherapy management of elderly, ischaemic below knee amputees is often compromised by delayed and/or complicated wound healing. Such patients are often unable to ambulate on a prosthesis for prolonged periods. Problems concommitant with immobilization such as weakness, contractures, and decreased morale tend to arise. This pilot study investigated the efficacy of incorporating a shaped Dunlopillo insert into a temporary prosthetic socket to allow the at risk group to ambulate as soon as the sutures were removed regardless of the state of wound healing. Two parameters were evaluated, namely wound healing and stump maturation. A total of eighteen subjects were observed in a control and an experimental group. Both wound healing (p < 0.05) and stump maturation (p < 0.05) were significantly enhanced by the inclusion of a Dunlopillo insert.

  9. Evaluating a self-directed palliative care learning package for rural aged care workers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Steven

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a self-directed learning package in increasing palliative care knowledge and confidence for aged care workers in Rural New South Wales, Australia. Participants piloted a palliative care self-directed learning package and completed pre- and post-package knowledge and confidence questionnaires with a 6-month follow-up. The data was then analysed via paired two-tailed T-tests. There was a statistically significant mean increase in knowledge and confidence after completion of the self-directed learning package. Knowledge but not confidence increases were retained after 6 months. Self-directed learning packages can play a part in increasing knowledge and confidence in palliative care for rural aged care workers. Questions remain regarding the role of ongoing support, education, and mentoring.

  10. Field study evaluation of diffuse ceiling ventilation in classroom during real operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin Heine; Jensen, Jakob Søland; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •Field experimental measurements during real operating conditions. •Evaluation of pressure chamber effect. •Evaluation of displacement effect. •Evaluation of thermal comfort.......Highlights •Field experimental measurements during real operating conditions. •Evaluation of pressure chamber effect. •Evaluation of displacement effect. •Evaluation of thermal comfort....

  11. Effects of Inboard Horizontal Field of View Display Limitations on Pilot Path Control During Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) Flight Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Parrish, Russell V.; Williams, Steven P.; Lavell, Jeffrey S.

    1999-01-01

    A flight test was conducted aboard Calspan's Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) aircraft by researchers within the External Visibility System (XVS) element of the High-Speed Research program. The purpose was to investigate the effects of inboard horizontal field of view (FOV) display limitations on pilot path control and to learn about the TIFS capabilities and limitations for possible use in future XVS flight tests. The TIFS cockpit windows were masked to represent the front XVS display area and the High-Speed Civil Transport side windows, as viewed by the pilot. Masking limited the forward FOV to 40 deg. horizontal and 50 deg. vertical for the basic flight condition, With an increase of 10 deg. horizontal in the inboard direction for the increased FOV flight condition. Two right-hand approach tasks (base-downwind-final) with a left crosswind on final were performed by three pilots using visual flight rules at Niagara Falls Airport. Each of the two tasks had three replicates for both horizontal FOV conditions, resulting in twelve approaches per test subject. Limited objective data showed that an increase of inboard FOV had no effect (deficiences in objective data measurement capabilities were noted). However, subjective results showed that a 50 deg. FOV was preferred over the 40 deg. FOV.

  12. Influence of inhomogeneous static magnetic field-exposure on patients with erosive gastritis: a randomized, self- and placebo-controlled, double-blind, single centre, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Márk; Nagy, Viktor L; Székely, Hajnal; Kocsis, Dorottya; Tulassay, Zsolt; László, János F

    2014-09-06

    This pilot study was devoted to the effect of static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure on erosive gastritis. The randomized, self- and placebo-controlled, double-blind, pilot study included 16 patients of the 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Semmelweis University diagnosed with erosive gastritis. The instrumental analysis followed a qualitative (pre-intervention) assessment of the symptoms by the patient: lower heartburn (in the ventricle), upper heartburn (in the oesophagus), epigastric pain, regurgitation, bloating and dry cough. Medical diagnosis included a double-line upper panendoscopy followed by 30 min local inhomogeneous SMF-exposure intervention at the lower sternal region over the stomach with peak-to-peak magnetic induction of 3 mT and 30 mT m(-1) gradient at the target site. A qualitative (post-intervention) assessment of the same symptoms closed the examination. Sham- or SMF-exposure was used in a double-blind manner. The authors succeeded in justifying the clinically and statistically significant beneficial effect of the SMF- over sham-exposure on the symptoms of erosive gastritis, the average effect of inhibition was 56% by p = 0.001, n = 42 + 96. This pilot study was aimed to encourage gastroenterologists to test local, inhomogeneous SMF-exposure on erosive gastritis patients, so this intervention may become an evidence-based alternative or complementary method in the clinical use especially in cases when conventional therapy options are contraindicated. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of free-field transfer functions in anomalous reverberant fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guo; He, Lin; Xu, Rongwu

    2017-01-01

    The structural-acoustic transfer functions of complex structures are often measured in anomalous reverberant environments. Aiming to eliminating the influences of these reverberant fields on structural-acoustic transfer functions, an impulse-based synchronization average evaluation method is proposed. Structures are actuated according to an impulse signal, and the response signals are synchronized in time and averaged in space. This method does not require complex data processing, and the free-field transfer functions can be obtained based on the measurements in reverberant fields and the transfer characteristics of the structures are preserved. Moreover, in combination with the principle of reciprocity, the proposed method does not require the installation of impulse actuators in structures. The proposed method is verified numerically and validated in a deep lake experiment using a cylindrical model. The results show that the structural-acoustic transfer functions in the profundal zone can be effectively evaluated using the data collected in the shallow zone, and the error is less than 3 dB at most frequencies.

  14. Pilot Field Test: Use of a Compression Garment During a Stand Test After Long-Duration Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Cerisano, J.; Kofman, I.; Reschke, M.

    2016-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a concern for astronauts returning from long-duration space flight. One countermeasure that has been used to protect against OI after short-duration bed rest and space flight is the use of lower body and abdominal compression garments. However, since the end of the Space Shuttle era we have not been able to test crewmembers during the first 24 hours after landing on Earth. NASA's Pilot Field Test provided us the opportunity to test cardiovascular responses of crewmembers wearing the Russian Kentavr compression garment during a stand test at multiple time points throughout the first 24 hours after landing. HYPOTHESIS We hypothesized that the Kentavr compression garment would prevent an increase in heart rate (HR) >15 bpm during a 3.5-min stand test. METHODS: The Pilot Field Test was conducted up to 3 times during the first 24 hours after crewmembers returned to Earth: (1) either in a tent adjacent to the Soyuz landing site in Kazakhstan (approx.1 hr) or after transportation to the Karaganda airport (approx. 4 hr); (2) during a refueling stop in Scotland (approx.12 hr); and (3) upon return to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) (approx.24 hr). We measured HR and arterial pressure (finger photoplethysmography) for 2 min while the crewmember was prone and throughout 3.5 min of quiet standing. Eleven crewmembers consented to participate; however, 2 felt too ill to start the test and 1 stopped 30 sec into the stand portion of the test. Of the remaining 8 crewmembers, 2 did not wear the Russian Kentavr compression garment. Because of inclement weather at the landing site, 5 crewmembers were flown by helicopter to the Karaganda airport before initial testing and received intravenous saline before completing the stand test. One of these crewmembers wore only the portion of the Russian Kentavr compression garment that covered the lower leg and thus lacked thigh and abdominal compression. All crewmembers continued wearing the Russian Kentavr

  15. Evaluation of the Impact of Chlorine on Mercury Oxidation in a Pilot-Scale Coal Combustor--The Effect of Coal Blending

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study has been undertaken to investigate the effect of blending PRB coal with an Eastern bituminous coal on the speciation of Hg across an SCR catalyst. In this project, a pilot-scale (1.2 MWt) coal combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for NOx control was used for evaluating ...

  16. A Web-Based Respondent Driven Sampling Pilot Targeting Young People at Risk for Chlamydia Trachomatis in Social and Sexual Networks with Testing : A Use Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, Kevin; Hoebe, Christian; Kok, Gerjo; Crutzen, Rik; Kara-Zaïtri, Chakib; de Vries, Nanne; van Bergen, Jan; Hamilton, Robert; van der Sande, Marianne; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the aim of targeting high-risk hidden heterosexual young people for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) testing, an innovative web-based screening strategy using Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) and home-based CT testing, was developed, piloted and evaluated. METHODS: Two STI clinic nurses e

  17. A pilot study to evaluate the safety and clinical performance of Leucopatch, an autologous, additive-free, platelet-rich fibrin for the treatment of recalcitrant chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny; Vogensen, Hanne;

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, uncontrolled pilot study evaluated the safety and clinical performance of Leucopatch an additive-free, autologous platelet-rich fibrin in the treatment of recalcitrant chronic wounds. Fifteen patients, with 16 lower extremity chronic wounds of varying etiologies were treated...

  18. A Web-Based Respondent Driven Sampling Pilot Targeting Young People at Risk for Chlamydia Trachomatis in Social and Sexual Networks with Testing : A Use Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, Kevin; Hoebe, Christian; Kok, Gerjo; Crutzen, Rik; Kara-Zaïtri, Chakib; de Vries, Nanne; van Bergen, Jan; Hamilton, Robert; van der Sande, Marianne; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole

    BACKGROUND: With the aim of targeting high-risk hidden heterosexual young people for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) testing, an innovative web-based screening strategy using Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) and home-based CT testing, was developed, piloted and evaluated. METHODS: Two STI clinic nurses

  19. Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

    2005-03-21

    The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

  20. 10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant, solar facilities design integration: collector-field optimization report (RADL item 2-25)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Appropriate cost and performance models and computer codes have been developed to carry out the collector field optimization, as well as additional computer codes to define the actual heliostat locations in the optimized field and to compute in detail the performance to be expected of the defined field. The range of capabilities of the available optimization and performance codes is described. The role of the optimization code in the definition of the pilot plant is specified, and a complete description of the optimization process itself is given. The detailed cost model used by the optimizer for the commercial system optimization is presented in the form of equations relating the cost element to each of the factors that determine it. The design basis for the commercial system is presented together with the rationale for its selection. The development of the individual heliostat performance code is presented. Use of the individual heliostat code in a completed study of receiver panel power under sunrise startup conditions is described. The procedure whereby performance and heliostat spacing data from the representative commercial-scale system are converted into coefficients of use in the layout processor is described, and the actual procedure used in the layout processor is described. Numerous special studies in support of the pilot plant design are described. (LEW)

  1. Influence of aggregate sizes and microstructures on bioremediation assessment of field-contaminated soils in pilot-scale biopiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W.; Akbari, A.; Frigon, D.; Ghoshal, S.

    2011-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soils and groundwater is an environmental concern. Bioremediation has been frequently considered a cost-effective, less disruptive remedial technology. Formation of soil aggregate fractions in unsaturated soils is generally believed to hinder aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation due to the slow intra-pore diffusion of nutrients and oxygen within the aggregate matrix and to the reduced bioavailability of hydrocarbons. On the other hand, soil aggregates may harbour favourable niches for indigenous bacteria, providing protective microsites against various in situ environmental stresses. The size of the soil aggregates is likely to be a critical factor for these processes and could be interpreted as a relevant marker for biodegradation assessment. There have been only limited attempts in the past to assess petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in unsaturated soils as a function of aggregate size. This study is aimed at investigating the roles of aggregate sizes and aggregate microstructures on biodegradation activity. Field-aged, contaminated, clayey soils were shipped from Norman Wells, Canada. Attempts were made to stimulate indigenous microbial activity by soil aeration and nutrient amendments in a pilot-scale biopile tank (1m L×0.65m W×0.3 m H). A control biopile was maintained without the nutrient amendment but was aerated. The initial concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in the field-contaminated soils increased with increasing aggregate sizes, which were classified in three fractions: micro- (250-2000 μm) and macro-aggregates (>2000 μm). Compared to the TPH analyses at whole-soil level, the petroleum hydrocarbon analyses based on the aggregate-size levels demonstrated more clearly the extent of biodegradation of non-volatile, heavier hydrocarbons (C16-C34) in the soil. The removal of the C16-C34 hydrocarbons was 44% in macro-aggregates, but only 13% in meso-aggregates. The increased protein concentrations in macro

  2. Pilot scale digestion of source-sorted household waste as a tool for evaluation of different pre-sorting and pre-treatment strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svärd, Å; Gruvberger, C.; Aspegren, H.

    2002-01-01

    scale digestion has been carried out in systems with a 35-litres digester connected to a 77-litres gas tank. Four rounds of digestion were performed including start-up periods, full operation periods for evaluation and post-digestion periods without feeding. Different pre-sorting and pre......Pilot scale digestion of the organic fraction of source-sorted household waste from Sweden and Denmark was performed during one year. The study includes 17 waste types with differences in originating municipality, housing type, kitchen wrapping, sack type, pre-treatment method and season. The pilot...

  3. Evaluation of a pilot healthy eating intervention in restaurants and food stores of a rural community: a randomized community trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Donate, Ana P; Riggall, Ann Josie; Meinen, Amy M; Malecki, Kristen; Escaron, Anne L; Hall, Bev; Menzies, Anne; Garske, Gary; Nieto, F Javier; Nitzke, Susan

    2015-02-12

    Research suggests that the food environment influences individual eating practices. To date, little is known about effective interventions to improve the food environment of restaurants and food stores and promote healthy eating in rural communities. We tested "Waupaca Eating Smart " (WES), a pilot intervention to improve the food environment and promote healthy eating in restaurants and supermarkets of a rural community. WES focused on labeling, promoting, and increasing the availability of healthy foods. We conducted a randomized community trial, with two Midwestern U.S. communities randomly assigned to serve as intervention or control site. We collected process and outcome data using baseline and posttest owner and customer surveys and direct observation methods. The RE-AIM framework was used to guide the evaluation and organize the results. Seven of nine restaurants and two of three food stores invited to participate in WES adopted the intervention. On a 0-4 scale, the average level of satisfaction with WES was 3.14 (SD=0.69) for restaurant managers and 3 (SD=0.0) for store managers. On average, 6.3 (SD=1.1) out of 10 possible intervention activities were implemented in restaurants and 9.0 (SD=0.0) out of 12 possible activities were implemented in food stores. One month after the end of the pilot implementation period, 5.4 (SD=1.6) and 7.5 (SD=0.7) activities were still in place at restaurants and food stores, respectively. The intervention reached 60% of customers in participating food outlets. Restaurant food environment scores improved from 13.4 to 24.1 (p customer behaviors were observed after a 10-month implementation period. The intervention achieved high levels of reach, adoption, implementation, and maintenance, suggesting the feasibility and acceptability of restaurant-and food store-based interventions in rural communities. Pilot outcome data indicated very modest levels of effectiveness, but additional research adequately powered to test the impact

  4. Media literacy as a violence-prevention strategy: a pilot evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Theresa; Martin, Kathryn; Afifi, Abdelmonem A; Kraus, Jess

    2010-09-01

    Youth violence is a major unresolved public health problem in the United States and media exposure to violence is a synergistic source of this national problem. One media literacy curriculum designed specifically to address this issue is Beyond Blame: Challenging Violence in the Media. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the curriculum's feasibility as a full-scale intervention. Intervention and control groups were similar with respect to knowledge of the Beyond Blame curriculum at baseline. Intervention students scored much higher on the posttest compared with the control students. The majority (90.2%) of the intervention students reported a significant increase in pre- to posttest score compared with only 18.8% of the control students (p < .0001). The magnitude of the score increase for intervention students was much greater than those in the control group. Several intervention students (N = 49; 19.9%) improved their score by 12 or more points compared with the control students who showed only a 1- to 7-point score increase (N = 3; 18.8%; p < .0001). The pre-and posttest scores were similar for males and females. Three of the six intervention classrooms scored higher on both the pretest and posttest compared with the other three classrooms.

  5. Evaluation of a pilot aerobic reactor with polyetilenterephtalate (PET as support material for dairy wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Muñoz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A pilot aerobic horizontal plug flow reactor filled with pieces of PET (polyethylene terephthalate, from plastic bottles was installed for treatment of a synthetic substrate prepared from lactic whey with COD values of 800 to 2100 mg/L. A bacterial inoculum previously acclimated to the substrate was used. Organic material removal efficiencies of 62.2%, 85% y 94% were obtained with retention times of 5.14, 6.01 and 8.01 hours, and with volumetric organic loads (Lv of 7.68, 6.19 and 4.61 kg/day.m3, respectively. Also, the kinetic mass transfer constant (k was calculated and it presented a value of 0.02 m/day. On the other hand, an F/M ratio of 0.4 was determined, indicating that the process had a similar performance to an extended aeration system. Finally, the biomass generated inside the reactor was analyzed, obtaining a value of 11560 mg /L, which is a higher value than those of conventional systems.

  6. A pilot evaluation of group-based programming offered at a Canadian outpatient adult eating disorders clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Neil, Brad A; Leung, Pauline; Nadkarni, Pallavi; Stubbs, Laura; Singh, Manya

    2016-10-01

    Eating disorder clinics across Canada place heavy reliance on group-based programming. However, little work has examined whether this modality of treatment is well-received by patients and results in clinical improvements. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate patient satisfaction and outcomes for group-based programming offered through an adult eating disorders clinic. Participants were 81 adults who met DSM-5 criteria for an eating disorder and participated in the study as part of the clinic's program evaluation. Participants received medical monitoring, psychiatric follow-up, adjunct nutrition and pre-psychological treatment, and participated in the clinic's core cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) group. Demographic information and weight were collected at intake. Participants also completed pre- and post-group programming measures of life satisfaction, depressive and anxiety symptoms, psychological symptoms of the eating disorder, and satisfaction with the programming. Participants' experienced a significant increase in satisfaction with life, and decreases in depressive symptoms and psychological symptoms of the eating disorder post-group. Adults endorsed feeling fairly satisfied with the group-based services provided. Results draw attention to the importance of program evaluation as an integral component of an adult outpatient eating disorder clinic by providing a voice for patients' views of the services received and program outcomes.

  7. Evaluation of the content regarding nutrition education on catering services websites: pilot study in the educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Rico-Sapena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To analyze websites quality of catering companies for schools as well as their content in nutrition food education, and to have a first experience with the assessment tool EDALCAT.Material and methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. The study population are the websites of catering companies entrusted with the management of school canteens. The sample was obtained using Google search engine and a ranking of major catering companies financial, choosing those that had websites. Ten websites were selected for a pilot test according to geographic proximity to the city of Alicante and their total revenue. A homemade questionnaire (EDALCAT was designed in order to evaluate the websites. This questionnaire is composed of a block of predictors of quality with 19 variables for reliability, design and navigation; and a second block of specific contents about food education with 19 variables for content and educational activities.Results: Positive results have been obtained in 31 out of 38 questionnaire variables, except for the items: “Search engine”, “Language” (40% and “Help” (10% in the predictors of the quality block; and in the items: “Workshops”, “Recipe book”, “Web nutrition-food” (40% and “Examples” (30% in the specific contents of the food education block. All the evaluated websites exceed 50% of compliance with the quality criteria and with the minimum contents in food education, and only one of them, fails the minimum level of activity established.Conclusions: The predictors of quality and the specific content in food education were successful in all evaluated websites. Most of them got a high score in their assessment, and in their analysis of individual blocks. After the pilot study, EDALCAT questionnaire has been amended and the final EDALCAT has been obtained. Generally speaking, EDALCAT seems appropriate for evaluating the quality of catering companies websites and their content

  8. Evaluation of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Combination with Deproteinized Bovine Bone Mineral in the Rabbit Cranium; A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Shafiee Ardestani

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Reconstruction methods are an essential prerequisite for functional rehabilitation of the stomatognathic system. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP offers a new and potentially useful adjunct to bone substitute materials (e.g. Xenografts inoral and maxillofacial bone and implant reconstructive surgery.Purpose: An animal study was carried out to investigate the influence of PRP on the regeneration of non-critical sized bony defects, treated with Deproteinized Bovine Bone Mineral (DBBM.Materials and Methods: Eight New Zealand white rabbits were included in this randomized, pilot study. Three equal cranial bone defects (3×6 mm were created and immediately grafted with DBBM and PRP+DBBM; one of them was left unfilled to serve as a control. The defects were evaluated using histologic and histomorphometricanalysis at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks.Results: The histomorphometric findings showed a significant increase in bone area and trabecular maturity in experimental defects as compared to the control at 4, 8 and 12 week intervals. A significant increase in bone formation was seen with the additionof PRP to DBBM at 2, 4 and 8 week intervals. At 12 weeks, the level of bone formation was similar between the two groups. There was also a significant increase in the rate of biodegradation of the DBBM particles with the addition of PRP at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks.No foreign body reaction and severe inflammation was seen in any of specimens.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this pilot study, it was concluded that the addition of PRP to Xenogenic bone substitute material in non-critical-sized defects of the rabbit cranium showed a histomorphometric increase in bone formation (until the 8th week ofhealing and a greater amount of biomaterial degradation throughout the study period.

  9. Evaluation of the magnetic field requirements for nanomagnetic gene transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fouriki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to examine the effects of magnet distance (and by proxy, field strength on nanomagnetic transfection efficiency. Methods: non-viral magnetic nanoparticle-based transfection was evaluated using both static and oscillating magnet arrays. Results: Fluorescence intensity (firefly luciferase of transfected H292 cells showed no increase using a 96-well NdFeB magnet array when the magnets were 5 mm from the cell culture plate or nearer. At 6 mm and higher, fluorescence intensity decreased systematically. Conclusion: In all cases, fluorescence intensity was higher when using an oscillating array compared to a static array. For distances closer than 5 mm, the oscillating system also outperformed Lipofectamine 2000™.

  10. Retraction: Evaluation of carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehic, Bakir

    2010-11-01

    The Editor-in-chief of the Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences has decided to retract the article from Bayazit V et al. [1] entitled as: "Evaluation of carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF)" published in Bosn J Basic Med Sci. 2010 Aug;10(3):245-50. After the editorial office was alerted of possible plagiarism in the article, it conducted thorough investigation and concluded that the article apparently represents plagiarized material from two World Health Organization reports, one European Commission report and other sources. Since this is considered scientific plagiarism and scientific misconduct, Editor-in-chief has decided to withdraw the article. The authors have agreed with the editorial office decision.

  11. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  12. Evaluation of an electric field sensor for nondestructive material inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundaram, Kayatri; Arunachalam, Kavitha

    2013-01-01

    An electric field sensor is fabricated on a 125 micron thick flexible dielectric substrate for electromagnetic (EM) nondestructive material inspection at 915 MHz. The sensor consists of an electrically short dipole antenna and a radio frequency (RF) diode detector connected to a pair of high impedance screen printed carbon lines. The DC component of the rectified diode voltage conveyed across the high impedance lines is measured using a data acquisition circuit. Sensor measurements are validated with simulated data for a conformal patch antenna operating at 915 MHz. Sensor performance for EM nondestructive testing (NDT) is evaluated using phantom defects in low loss dielectric slabs. Preliminary results indicate sensor utility for EM NDT and support further testing on realistic defects.

  13. Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses field evaluations of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles performed by NREL. The project provides medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) test results, aggregated data, and detailed analysis, including 3rd party unbiased data (data that would not normally be shared by industry in an aggregated and detailed manner). Over 5.6 million miles of advanced technology MD and HD truck data have been collected, documented, and analyzed on over 240 different vehicles since 2002. Data, analysis, and reports are shared within DOE, national laboratory partners, and industry for R&D planning and strategy. The results help guide R&D for new technology development, help define intelligent usage of newly developed technology, and help fleets/users understand all aspects of advanced technology.

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Implementation of Chemical Evaluation Requirements for Transuranic Waste Disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Alison [USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Washington, DC (United States); Barkley, Michelle [USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Washington, DC (United States); Poppiti, James [USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report summarizes new controls designed to ensure that transuranic waste disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) does not contain incompatible chemicals. These new controls include a Chemical Compatibility Evaluation, an evaluation of oxidizing chemicals, and a waste container assessment to ensure that waste is safe for disposal. These controls are included in the Chapter 18 of the Documented Safety Analysis for WIPP (1).

  15. Evaluation of a Prison Occupational Therapy Informal Education Program: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Jeffrey L; Ohm, David; Wall, Jarrod M; Ray, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    This pilot study explored the strengths and weaknesses of an informal education program and identified elements of the program valued by participants. Participants were men living in a minimum security prison who had been incarcerated for ten or more years. The outside researcher was joined by three former program participants as co-researchers. Together, they interviewed 27 residents who completed the informal education program. Interviews were transcribed and de-identified. Researchers used the summative content analysis approach to analyze the data. Initial content analysis yielded five concepts: doing (engaging in purposeful activities); information (program handouts and discussions that included data and descriptions of all of the topics discussed); re-entry fears (socialization; making amends with victims and/or reuniting with family and friends); technology (includes, but not limited to, using smartphones, internet and other technology in all areas of occupation); and self-worth as a person. Further interpretation per the summative content analysis method yielded three themes: doing (engaged in purposeful activities), validation of self-worth (confirmation of being a valued human being in spite of having committed a serious crime) and concerns about the future (being able to successfully engage in virtually all occupations). Whilst informal education programs may help people who are incarcerated gain information, gain a sense of self-worth and allay some reentry fears, understanding the long-term affect such programs may have such as preparing them for successful re-entry to society or reducing recidivism rates, will require long-term follow-up. Regardless of the occupational therapy intervention, the practice of occupational therapy in the criminal justice system needs to be client-centred. Because of the small number of participants and limited access to participants, one should not generalize the findings of this study to other situations or populations

  16. Evaluation of antibiotic prescription in the Lebanese community: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Saleh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotics are considered among the most commonly prescribed drug classes in developing countries. Inappropriate prescription of antibiotics is a major public health concern and is related to the development of antimicrobial resistance. Objective: This study aimed at assessing the appropriateness of antibiotic prescription by non-infectious disease physicians in a community setting in Lebanon. Methods: A pilot cross-sectional study was undertaken on community pharmacy patients presenting with antibiotic prescription. It was performed over a period of 4 months in different regions of Lebanon. Participants answered a questionnaire inquiring about socio-demographic characteristics, medical conditions, symptoms that required medical attention, the doctor's diagnosis, the prescribed antibiotic, and whether laboratory tests were ordered to identify the causative organism or not. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17. Results: We studied 270 patients (49.3% males and 50.7% females. This study showed that the most-prescribed antibiotics were the cephalosporins (82% and that almost half of the illnesses for which antibiotics were prescribed were respiratory tract infections (41%. The study also showed that the choice of the prescribed antibiotic was appropriate in 61.5% of the studied cases, while the prescribed dose and the duration of the treatment were inaccurate in 52 and 64% of the cases, respectively. In addition, fever seemed to be a factor that influenced the physician's prescriptions, since the choice of drug conformity to guidelines increased from 53.7% (1 day of fever to 88.9% (1 week of fever, and the dose prescription compliance to guidelines was higher (55.9% for patients suffering from fever compared to those with no fever (38.1%. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in Lebanon. Therefore, actions should be taken to optimize antibiotic prescription.

  17. A pilot study to evaluate multi-dimensional effects of dance for people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Maria I; Barnes, Deborah E; Ross, Jessica M; Lanni, Kimberly E; Sigvardt, Karen A; Disbrow, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with deficits in motor, cognitive, and emotion/quality of life (QOL) domains, yet most pharmacologic and behavioral interventions focus only on motor function. Our goal was to perform a pilot study of Dance for Parkinson's-a community-based program that is growing in popularity-in order to compare effect sizes across multiple outcomes and to inform selection of primary and secondary outcomes for a larger trial. Study participants were people with PD who self-enrolled in either Dance for Parkinson's classes (intervention group, N=8) or PD support groups (control group, N=7). Assessments of motor function (Timed-Up-and-Go, Gait Speed, Standing Balance Test), cognitive function (Test of Everyday Attention, Verbal Fluency, Alternate Uses, Digit Span Forward and Backward), and emotion/QOL (Geriatric Depression Scale, Falls Efficacy Scale-International, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (total score and Activities of Daily Living subscale)) were performed in both groups at baseline and follow-up. Standardized effect sizes were calculated within each group and between groups for all 12 measures. Effect sizes were positive (suggesting improvement) for all 12 measures within the intervention group and 7 of 12 measures within the control group. The largest between-group differences were observed for the Test of Everyday Attention (a measure of cognitive switching), gait speed and falls efficacy. Our findings suggest that dance has potential to improve multiple outcomes in people with PD. Future trials should consider co-primary outcomes given potential benefits in motor, cognitive and emotion/QOL domains.

  18. Pilot study to evaluate children with hearing aids through PEACH and TEACH in a rural community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingamdenne Paul Emerson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to evaluate the use of functional measures in hearing aid benefit assessment of children (n = 60 in a rural community. Children with age ranging from 6 months to 15 years with moderately severe to profound hearing loss were evaluated. They were evaluated by functional measures PEACH and TEACH which were translated into local language (Tamil. The relationship between PEACH and TEACH was calculated using SPSS and Chi-square tests. It was found that PEACH and TEACH questionnaires can be easily administered in the rural community and gives a quantitative measure of the effect of amplification. It gave caregivers a motivation to take an active part in the rehabilitation. This model of using functional evaluation tools to evaluate the suitability and effectiveness of amplification can be applied in children in developing countries.

  19. Development and pilot evaluation of literacy-adapted diabetes and CVD education in urban, diabetic African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Renosky, Ronda; Lazo, Mariana; Bone, Lee; Hill, Martha; Levine, David; Brancati, Frederick L; Peyrot, Mark

    2008-09-01

    Despite prevalent low literacy nationally, empirical research on the development and testing of literacy-adapted patient education remains limited. To describe procedures for developing and evaluating usability and acceptability of an adapted diabetes and CVD patient education. Materials adaptation for literacy demand and behavioral activation criteria, and pre-/post-test intervention evaluation design. Pilot sample of 30 urban African-American adults with type 2 diabetes with Below Average literacy (n = 15) and Average literacy (n = 15). Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT-3, Reading), assessment of diabetes and CVD knowledge, and patient rating scale. Reading grade levels were: > 12th, 30%; 10th-12th, 20%; 7th-9th, 10%; 4th-6th grade, 10%; and literacy groups, with up to a ten-fold increase, at post-education, in the number of participants responding correctly to some content items. The print materials and class received maximum usability and acceptability ratings from patients. Development of patient education meeting very low literacy criteria was feasible, effective for knowledge acquisition, and highly acceptable irrespective of literacy level.

  20. A New Index for the MMPI-2 Test for Detecting Dissimulation in Forensic Evaluations: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Vito; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Bosco, Andrea; Massaro, Ylenia; Lisi, Andrea; Campobasso, Filippo; Marchitelli, Maria Alessia; Catanesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study is the starting point of a potentially broad research project aimed at identifying new strategies for assessing malingering during forensic evaluations. The forensic group was comprised of 67 males who were seeking some sort of certification (e.g., adoption, child custody, driver's license, issuance of gun permits, etc.); the nonforensic group was comprised of 62 healthy male volunteers. Each participant was administered the MMPI-2. Statistical analyses were conducted on obtained scores of 48 MMPI-2 scales. In the first step, parametric statistics were adopted to identify the best combination of MMPI-2 scales that differentiated the two groups of participants. In the second step, frequency-based, nonparametric methods were used for diagnostic purposes. A model that utilized the best three predictors ("7-Pt", "L," and "1-Hs") was developed and used to calculate the Forensic Evaluation Dissimulation Index (FEDI), which features satisfactory diagnostic accuracy (0.9), sensitivity (0.82), specificity (0.81), and likelihood ratio indices (LR+ = 4.32; LR- = 0.22). © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. The Healthy for Life Taekwondo Pilot Study: A Preliminary Evaluation of Effects on Executive Function and BMI, Feasibility, and Acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Kimberley D; Bryars, Tracy; Sirisinahal, Swetha; Salim, Nimrah; Arastoo, Sara; Emmerson, Natasha; Kang, Daniel; Shim, Lois; Wong, Doug; Kang, Chang Jin

    2013-10-01

    There is growing consensus that exercise improves cognitive functioning, but research is needed to identify exercise interventions that optimize effects on cognition. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate Taekwondo implemented in public middle school physical education (PE). Two classes were randomly assigned to either: five sessions per week of PE or three sessions of PE and two sessions of Taekwondo. In PE sessions, evidence-based curriculum to address the Presidential Core Fitness Guidelines and California Physical Fitness Tests was implemented. Taekwondo sessions included traditional techniques and forms taught in an environment emphasizing respect and self-control. Sixty students were evaluated at baseline and during the last week of the intervention (nine months later). Differences in mean residualized change scores for parent-rated inhibitory behavioral control yielded a significant, large effect size (d =.95, p =.00), reflecting greater improvement among Taekwondo students. Results from an executive function computer-administered task revealed greater accuracy on the congruent trial (d = 2.00, p = .02) for Taekwondo students. Differences in mean residualized change scores for BMI z scores yielded a moderate, non-significant effect size (d = - .51, p = .16). The majority of Taekwondo students reported positive perceptions of Taekwondo and perceived self-improvement in self-control and physical fitness. Results suggest that Taekwondo is an exercise program that improves cognitive functioning and is both feasible and acceptable to implement in a public school setting.

  2. Assessment and improvement of the Italian healthcare system: first evidence from a pilot national performance evaluation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, Sabina; Seghieri, Chiara; Vainieri, Milena; Zett, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The Italian National Health System (NHS), established in 1978, follows a model similar to the Beveridge model developed by the British NHS (Beveridge 1942; Musgrove 2000). Like the British NHS, healthcare coverage for the Italian population is provided and financed by the government through taxes. Universal coverage provides uniform healthcare access to citizens and is the characteristic usually considered the added value of a welfare system financed by tax revenues. Nonetheless, in Italy the strong policy of decentralization, which has been taking place since the early 1990s, has gradually shifted powers from the state to the 21 Italian regions. Consequently, the state now retains limited supervisory control and continues to have overall responsibility for the NHS in order to ensure uniform and essential levels of health services across the country. In this context, it has become essential, both for the ministry and for regions, to adopt a common performance evaluation system (PES). This article reports the definition, implementation, and first evidences of a pilot PES at a national level. It shows how this PES can be viewed as a strategic tool supporting the Ministry of Health (MoH) in ensuring uniform levels of care for the population and assisting regional managers to evaluate performance in benchmarking. Finally, lessons for other health systems, based on the Italian experience, are provided.

  3. Computer-administered neurobehavioral evaluation system for occupational and environmental epidemiology. Rationale, methodology, and pilot study results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, E.L.; Letz, R.; Fidler, A.

    1985-03-01

    To facilitate the conduct of epidemiologic studies of populations at risk for or suffering from central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction due to environmental agents, a computer-administered neurobehavioral evaluation system has been developed. The system includes a set of testing programs designed to run on a microcomputer and questionnaires to facilitate interpretation of results. Standard tasks evaluating memory, psychomotor function, verbal ability, visuospatial ability, and mood were selected and adapted for computer presentation following the recommendation of an expert committee of the World Health Organization and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. In two pilot surveys, test performance was found to be influenced by age, education level, and socioeconomic status in ways consistent with prior research findings. Performance on tests of short-term memory and reaction time was negatively correlated with intensity of organic solvent exposure among industrial painters. In view of the ease of administration and data handling, high subject acceptability, and sensitivity to the effects of known neurotoxic agents, computer-based assessment of CNS function holds promise for future epidemiologic research.

  4. An Evaluation of Detect and Avoid Displays for UAS: The Effect of Information Level and Display Location on Pilot Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorie, Conrad; Fern, Lisa; Pack, Jessica; Shively, Jay; Draper, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    The pilot-in-the-loop Detect-and-Avoid (DAA) task requires the pilot to carry out three major functions: 1) detect a potential threat, 2) determine an appropriate resolution maneuver, and 3) execute that resolution maneuver via the GCS control and navigation interface(s). The purpose of the present study was to examine two main questions with respect to DAA display considerations that could impact pilots ability to maintain well clear from other aircraft. First, what is the effect of a minimum (or basic) information display compared to an advanced information display on pilot performance? Second, what is the effect of display location on UAS pilot performance? Two levels of information level (basic, advanced) were compared across two levels of display location (standalone, integrated), for a total of four displays. The results indicate that the advanced displays had faster overall response times compared to the basic displays, however, there were no significant differences between the standalone and integrated displays.

  5. Applying participatory approaches in the evaluation of surveillance systems: A pilot study on African swine fever surveillance in Corsica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calba, Clémentine; Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas; Charrier, François; Hendrikx, Pascal; Saegerman, Claude; Peyre, Marisa; Goutard, Flavie L

    2015-12-01

    The implementation of regular and relevant evaluations of surveillance systems is critical in improving their effectiveness and their relevance whilst limiting their cost. The complex nature of these systems and the variable contexts in which they are implemented call for the development of flexible evaluation tools. Within this scope, participatory tools have been developed and implemented for the African swine fever (ASF) surveillance system in Corsica (France). The objectives of this pilot study were, firstly, to assess the applicability of participatory approaches within a developed environment involving various stakeholders and, secondly, to define and test methods developed to assess evaluation attributes. Two evaluation attributes were targeted: the acceptability of the surveillance system and its the non-monetary benefits. Individual semi-structured interviews and focus groups were implemented with representatives from every level of the system. Diagramming and scoring tools were used to assess the different elements that compose the definition of acceptability. A contingent valuation method, associated with proportional piling, was used to assess the non-monetary benefits, i.e., the value of sanitary information. Sixteen stakeholders were involved in the process, through 3 focus groups and 8 individual semi-structured interviews. Stakeholders were selected according to their role in the system and to their availability. Results highlighted a moderate acceptability of the system for farmers and hunters and a high acceptability for other representatives (e.g., private veterinarians, local laboratories). Out of the 5 farmers involved in assessing the non-monetary benefits, 3 were interested in sanitary information on ASF. The data collected via participatory approaches enable relevant recommendations to be made, based on the Corsican context, to improve the current surveillance system.

  6. Evaluation of a pilot scale high pressure plasma ozonizer for use in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TUOYO

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... Key words: Ozone, ozonizer, oxidizer, plasma, high pressure, plasma system. INTRODUCTION ... the electric field which can result in a voltage breakdown. .... electric current of 10 mA, discharge gap of 0.006 m, gas pressure ...

  7. Teaching Breast and Testicular Self-Exams: Evaluation of a High School Curriculum Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Stephen L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A high school curriculum project was developed to teach students about the importance of breast and testicular self-examination. Questionnaires were used to evaluate the project. Results are discussed. (DF)

  8. Evaluating Speed Enforcement Field Set-Ups Used by Regional Police in Belgium: An Analysis of Speed Outcome Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Wilmots

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the results from a field experiment (conducted in 2012 are presented, in which 3 regional police units in the Flemish region of Belgium each tested a particular combination of a speed control (with mobile radar in an anonymous car with communicative signage. The goal of this paper was to scientifically evaluate frequently used field set-ups. The following set-ups were tested in one week: (1 police unit 1: speed control with and without a static feedback sign placed after the control; (2 police unit 2: speed control with and without a digital feedback sign placed after the control; (3 police unit 3: speed display followed by a second speed display further along the road section. During certain time frames, speed control took place in between both signs. All tested field set-ups generated significant reductions in the speed level. Studying the effect of the different variations for each set-up reveals that the effect of the speed control is generally larger in combination with the signage alongside the road. After the period during which the police activities took place, speed levels again reached their initial level. Based on the before–after analysis, only in police area 2 was a small ‘time halo-effect’ found. To generalize results from this pilot study, repetition of tested set-ups in the field is recommended as well as testing on a larger scale.

  9. Evaluation of a Pilot Project to Introduce Simulation-Based Team Training to Pediatric Surgery Trauma Room Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Lehner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Several studies in pediatric trauma care have demonstrated substantial deficits in both prehospital and emergency department management. Methods. In February 2015 the PAEDSIM collaborative conducted a one and a half day interdisciplinary, simulation based team-training course in a simulated pediatric emergency department. 14 physicians from the medical fields of pediatric surgery, pediatric intensive care and emergency medicine, and anesthesia participated, as well as four pediatric nurses. After a theoretical introduction and familiarization with the simulator, course attendees alternately participated in six simulation scenarios and debriefings. Each scenario incorporated elements of pediatric trauma management as well as Crew Resource Management (CRM educational objectives. Participants completed anonymous pre- and postcourse questionnaires and rated the course itself as well as their own medical qualification and knowledge of CRM. Results. Participants found the course very realistic and selected scenarios highly relevant to their daily work. They reported a feeling of improved medical and nontechnical skills as well as no uncomfortable feeling during scenarios or debriefings. Conclusion. To our knowledge this pilot-project represents the first successful implementation of a simulation-based team-training course focused on pediatric trauma care in German-speaking countries with good acceptance.

  10. Compact Hyperspectral Imaging System (cosi) for Small Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (rpas) - System Overview and First Performance Evaluation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sima, A. A.; Baeck, P.; Nuyts, D.; Delalieux, S.; Livens, S.; Blommaert, J.; Delauré, B.; Boonen, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper gives an overview of the new COmpact hyperSpectral Imaging (COSI) system recently developed at the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO, Belgium) and suitable for remotely piloted aircraft systems. A hyperspectral dataset captured from a multirotor platform over a strawberry field is presented and explored in order to assess spectral bands co-registration quality. Thanks to application of line based interference filters deposited directly on the detector wafer the COSI camera is compact and lightweight (total mass of 500g), and captures 72 narrow (FWHM: 5nm to 10 nm) bands in the spectral range of 600-900 nm. Covering the region of red edge (680 nm to 730 nm) allows for deriving plant chlorophyll content, biomass and hydric status indicators, making the camera suitable for agriculture purposes. Additionally to the orthorectified hypercube digital terrain model can be derived enabling various analyses requiring object height, e.g. plant height in vegetation growth monitoring. Geometric data quality assessment proves that the COSI camera and the dedicated data processing chain are capable to deliver very high resolution data (centimetre level) where spectral information can be correctly derived. Obtained results are comparable or better than results reported in similar studies for an alternative system based on the Fabry-Pérot interferometer.

  11. Conceptual OOP design of Pilot Code for Two-Fluid, Three-field Model with C++ 6.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, B. D.; Lee, Y. J

    2006-09-15

    To establish the concept of the objective oriented program (OOP) design for reactor safety analysis code, the preliminary OOP design for PILOT code, which based on one dimensional two fluid three filed model, has been attempted with C++ language feature. Microsoft C++ language has been used since it is available as groupware utilization in KAERI. The language has can be merged with Compac Visual Fortran 6.6 in Visual Studio platform. In the development platform, C++ has been used as main language and Fortran has been used as mixed language in connection with C++ main drive program. The mixed language environment is a specific feature provided in visual studio. Existing Fortran source was utilized for input routine of reading steam table from generated file and routine of steam property calculation. The calling convention and passing argument from C++ driver was corrected. The mathematical routine, such as inverse matrix conversion and tridiagonal matrix solver, has been used as PILOT Fortran routines. Simple volume and junction utilized in PILOT code can be treated as objects, since they are the basic construction elements of code system. Other routines for overall solution scheme have been realized as procedure C functions. The conceptual design which consists of hydraulic loop, component, volume, and junction class has been described in the appendix in order to give the essential OOP structure of system safety analysis code. The attempt shows that many part of system analysis code can be expressed as objects, although the overall structure should be maintained as procedure functions. The encapsulation of data and functions within an object can provide many beneficial aspects in programming of system code.

  12. Health risks of electromagnetic fields. Part I: Evaluation and assessment of electric and magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash, Riadh W Y; Brodsky, Lynn M; Leiss, William; Krewski, Daniel; Repacholi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to electric and magnetic fields (EMF) emanating from the generation, distribution, and utilization of electricity is widespread. The major debate in recent years has focused on the possibility that exposure to EMF may result in adverse health consequences, including the development of cancer. This article provides a review and evaluation of potential health risks associated with residential and occupational exposure to EMF. In addition to reviewing data from laboratory, epidemiology, and clinical studies, we examine exposure data from field measurement surveys and exposure guidelines that have been established for EMF. Currently, the evidence in support of an association between EMF and childhood cancer is limited, although this issue warrants further investigation. Evidence of an association between EMF exposure and adult cancers, derived largely from occupational settings, is inconsistent, precluding clear conclusions. There is little evidence of an association between EMF and noncancer health effects. Epidemiological studies of EMF and population health are limited by exposure measurement error and the lack of a clear dose/response relationship in studies suggesting possible health risks. Further research is needed to clarify the ambiguous findings from present studies and to determine if EMF exposure poses a health risk.

  13. Patients' Evaluations of Complete Denture Therapy and Their Association with Related Variables: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Beatriz Ferreira Oliveira; dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Santos, Jarbas Francisco Fernandes; Marchini, Leonardo

    2015-07-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important goal in complete denture therapy, and many factors influence this parameter. This study aimed to evaluate expectations before and satisfaction after therapy with complete dentures. As a secondary objective, other variables that may interfere with patient satisfaction were also evaluated. A representative sample of 99 patients assigned visual analog scale (VAS) scores to their expectations before and satisfaction after therapy regarding chewing, esthetics, comfort, and phonetics. Demographic data and answers to a questionnaire concerning the dentists' conduct were recorded. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the association among studied variables and patients' expectation and satisfaction with their dentures. The average VAS scores were high for both expectations and satisfaction, and satisfaction exceeded expectations. Patients' expectations about esthetics and comfort were associated with age and self-reported time of using complete dentures. Patient satisfaction regarding chewing was associated with the number of postdelivery adjustments. Also, patient satisfaction regarding esthetics was associated with gender and esthetic expectations. In regard to phonetic satisfaction, associations were verified among self-reported time of using complete dentures, comfort and phonetics expectations, and dentists' explanations. Comfort satisfaction was associated only with educational level. Patient satisfaction regarding complete dentures exceeded expectations and an expressive majority of positive evaluations of the dentists was noticed. Many patient-related variables seemed to influence their evaluations of their dentures. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. LANCELOT pilot report, June 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin; Meyer, Bente

    The aim of the Lancelot pilot evaluation process was to understand how teachers learn to teach and to relate to the online environment through the specific context of the Lancelot live online course. Following the Action Research in the autumn of 2006 the LANCELOT live online language course...... was revised for the piloting in the spring of 2007. A second aim of the pilot evaluation has therefore been to assess the revision of the course following the Action Research....

  15. A pilot study evaluating use of a computer-assisted neurorehabilitation platform for upper-extremity stroke assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need to develop cost-effective, sensitive stroke assessment instruments. One approach is examining kinematic measures derived from goal-directed tasks, which can potentially be sensitive to the subtle changes in the stroke rehabilitation process. This paper presents the findings from a pilot study that uses a computer-assisted neurorehabilitation platform, interfaced with a conventional force-reflecting joystick, to examine the assessment capability of the system by various types of goal-directed tasks. Methods Both stroke subjects with hemiparesis and able-bodied subjects used the force-reflecting joystick to complete a suite of goal-directed tasks under various task settings. Kinematic metrics, developed for specific types of goal-directed tasks, were used to assess various aspects of upper-extremity motor performance across subjects. Results A number of metrics based on kinematic performance were able to differentiate subjects with different impairment levels, with metrics associated with accuracy, steadiness and speed consistency showing the best capability. Significant differences were also shown on these metrics between various force field settings. Conclusion The results support the potential of using UniTherapy software with a conventional joystick system as an upper-extremity assessment instrument. We demonstrated the ability of using various types of goal-directed tasks to distinguish between subjects with different impairment levels. In addition, we were able to show that different force fields have a significant effect on the performance across subjects with different impairment levels in the trajectory tracking task. These results provide motivation for studies with a larger sample size that can more completely span the impairment space, and can use insights presented here to refine considerations of various task settings so as to generalize and extend our conclusions.

  16. A pilot study evaluating non-contact low-frequency ultrasound and underlying molecular mechanism on diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Min; Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Gu, Guosheng; Garcia-Lavin, Silvia; Fabbi, Matteo; Park, Nanjin; Hayashi, Hisae; Attala, Khaled; French, Michael A; Driver, Vickie R

    2014-12-01

    Non-contact low-frequency ultrasound (NCLF-US) devices have been increasingly used for the treatment of chronic non-healing wounds. The appropriate dose for NCLF-US is still in debate. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the relationship between dose and duration of treatment for subjects with non-healing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and to explore the correlation between wound healing and change of cytokine/proteinase/growth factor profile. This was a prospective randomised clinical study designed to evaluate subjects with non-healing DFUs for 5 weeks receiving standard of care and/or NCLF-US treatment. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: application of NCLF-US thrice per week (Group 1), NCLF-US once per week (Group 2) and the control (Group 3) that received no NCLF-US. All subjects received standard wound care plus offloading for a total of 4 weeks. Percent area reduction (PAR) of each wound compared with baseline was evaluated weekly. Profiles of cytokines/proteinase/growth factors in wound fluid and biopsied tissue were quantified to explore the correlation between wound healing and cytokines/growth factor expression. Twelve DFU patients, 2 (16·7%) type 1 and 10 (83·3%) type 2 diabetics, with an average age of 58 ± 10 years and a total of 12 foot ulcers were enrolled. Average ulcer duration was 36·44 ± 24·78 weeks and the average ABI was 0·91 ± 0·06. Group 1 showed significant wound area reduction at weeks 3, 4 and 5 compared with baseline, with the greatest PAR, 86% (P diabetic foot ulcers through, at least in part, inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines in chronic wound and improving tissue regeneration. Therapeutic application of NFLU, thrice (3) per week, renders the best wound area reduction.

  17. Technology evaluation center assessment synopsis: full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Barbara M; Ziegler, Kathleen M; Aronson, Naomi

    2006-08-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is proposed as an alternative to screen-film mammography (SFM). The ability to separate and optimize the acquisition, storage, and display of images may allow greater visualization of breast cancers at equal or lower radiation doses, especially in younger women and those with denser breasts. This is a synopsis of a systematic review by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center. This updated systematic review primarily incorporated the results of the ACR Imaging Network(R) Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST), which provided results on 42,760 asymptomatic women who underwent both FFDM and SFM and showed with reasonable certainty that there was no difference in the accuracy of the 2 modalities for asymptomatic women in general, with some advantages of FFDM in certain subgroups. There were no strong, new studies on the use of digital mammography compared with film mammography in a diagnostic population. However, the DMIST results indicated that tumors detected by FFDM, but not by SFM, were likely to be invasive carcinomas or medium-grade to high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. On the basis of the suppositions that these are the cancers of greatest interest and the ones more likely to be found in a diagnostic population and that the diagnostic population may be younger on average than the screening population, it was concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the use of FFDM for diagnostic purposes.

  18. Pilot Field Trial of the EG95 Vaccine Against Ovine Cystic Echinococcosis in Rio Negro, Argentina: Second Study of Impact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Larrieu

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is an important zoonotic disease caused by the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus. It occurs in many parts of the world where pastoral activities predominate, including the Rio Negro province of Argentina. Although CE control activities have been undertaken in the western regions of Rio Negro for more than two decades, the disease continues to remain prevalent in both the human and livestock animal populations. Vaccination of animal intermediate hosts of CE with the EG95 vaccine may provide a new opportunity to improve the effectiveness of CE control measures, although data are lacking about field application of the vaccine.Evaluate the impact of EG95 vaccination in sheep on the transmission of Echinococcus granulosus in a field environment.Two trial sites were established in western Rio Negro province within indigenous communities. Vaccination of lambs born into one trial site was introduced and continued for 6 years. Prior to initiation of the trial, and at the end of the trial, the prevalence of CE in sheep was determined by necropsy. Weaned lambs received two injections of EG95 vaccine, approximately one month apart, and a single booster injection one year later. Vaccination was not implemented at the second trial site. A total of 2725 animals were vaccinated in the first year. Animals from this cohort as well as age-matched sheep from the control area were evaluated by necropsy.Introduction of the vaccine led to a statistically significant in the number and size of hydatid cysts in comparison to the situation prior to the introduction of the vaccine, or compared to CE prevalence in the control area where the vaccine was not applied. The prevalence of infection in the vaccinated area was also significantly reduced by 62% compared to the re-intervention level, being lower than the prevalence seen in the control area, although the difference from the control area after the intervention was not significant

  19. THE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN EVALUATION MODEL FOR VOCATIONAL PILOT PROGRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUCKMAN, BRUCE W.

    A PROGRESS REPORT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF A "CURRICULUM HIERARCHY FOR THE EVALUATION OF COURSE KNOWLEDGE," THE "CHECK" TECHNIQUE, IS PRESENTED. THE TECHNIQUE IS BASED UPON A MODEL WHICH INITIALLY NECESSITATES TRANSLATING THE LEARNING PROCESSES AND OBJECTIVES INTO EASILY IDENTIFIABLE BEHAVIORAL RESPONSES. THE PROCESS OF…

  20. Pilot trial evaluating maternal docosahexaenoic acid consumption during pregnancy: Decreased postpartum depressive symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle P. Judge

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Women in the DHA intervention group had fewer symptoms of postpartum depression compared to the placebo group. These results support the notion that the consumption of DHA by pregnant women can be efficacious in preventing depressive symptoms and highlight a need for further larger-scale investigations using the PDSS in tandem with a diagnostic evaluation.

  1. Evaluating and Training Substance Abuse Counselors: A Pilot Study Assessing Standardized Patients as Authentic Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussell, Holly E.; Lewy, Colleen S.; McFarland, Bentson H.

    2009-01-01

    Clinician training and supervision are needed to transfer evidence-based practices to community-based treatment organizations. Standardized patients (SPs) are used for clinician training and evaluating. However, to be effective for substance abuse counselors, SPs must realistically portray substance abuse treatment clients. The current study…

  2. The Class Moves![R] Pilot in Scotland and Wales: An Evaluation. Research Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowden, Kevin; Powney, Janet; Davidson, Julia; James, Charlotte

    This report describes an evaluation of The Class Moves On!, a relaxation exercise program designed in the Netherlands which encourages elementary students to engage daily in various physical activities in order to increase motivation, improve concentration, raise physical awareness, enhance sensory motor development, and promote self-care and…

  3. Independent Children's Social Work Practice Pilots: Evaluating Practitioners' Job Control and Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Shereen; Manthorpe, Jill; Ridley, Julie; Austerberry, Helen; Farrelly, Nicola; Larkins, Cath; Bilson, Andy; Stanley, Nicky

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether a new model that delegates some out-of-home care services from the public to the private and not-for-profit sectors in England enhances practitioners' job control and stress levels. Methods: A 3-year longitudinal matched-control evaluation examined changes in Karasek demand-control model and Maslach burnout…

  4. Teaching E-Commerce Web Page Evaluation and Design: A Pilot Study Using Tourism Destination Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susser, Bernard; Ariga, Taeko

    2006-01-01

    This study explores a teaching method for improving business students' skills in e-commerce page evaluation and making Web design majors aware of business content issues through cooperative learning. Two groups of female students at a Japanese university studying either tourism or Web page design were assigned tasks that required cooperation to…

  5. Effects of Task and Rater Background on the Evaluation of ESL Student Writing: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigle, Sara Cushing; Boldt, Heather; Valsecchi, Maria Ines

    2003-01-01

    Investigates differences in the evaluation of text-responsible (TR) writing and non-text responsible writing by English-as-a-Second-Language instructors and instructors in other disciplines. TR writing requires students to demonstrate understanding of specific texts in their writing rather than writing from personal experience or using a source…

  6. Evaluation of the appendix during diagnostic laparoscopy, the laparoscopic appendicitis score : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamminga, Jenneke T. H.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Broens, Paul M. A.; Kluin, Philip M.; Heineman, Erik; Haveman, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic laparoscopy is the ultimate diagnostic tool to evaluate the appendix. Still, according to the literature, this strategy results in a negative appendectomy rate of approximately 12-18 % and associated morbidity. Laparoscopic criteria for determining appendicitis are lacking. The goal of th

  7. New Jersey Area Libraries: A Pilot Project Toward the Evaluation of the Reference Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Lloyd J.

    The checklist and date distribution methods are used to evaluate the reference collections of two New Jersey Area Reference Libraries, an older, traditional single unit public library and a newer unit in a system of nine libraries. Three sectors of the reference collection are tested: reference books, abstracting and indexing services and serials.…

  8. An Empirical Evaluation of Critical Factors Influencing Learner Satisfaction in Blended Learning: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Won Sun; Yao, Adrian Yong Tat

    2016-01-01

    Blended learning, a convergence of e-learning approach and face-to-face learning, has been regarded as a new paradigm in modern education. The degree of learners' satisfaction with blended learning played a crucial role in evaluating the effectiveness of blended learning adoption. Therefore, this study examined the primary factors affecting…

  9. A Pilot Study to Evaluate Development Effort for High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    speaker I am not a native speaker [Please complete the following] TOEFL Score Year My English reading comprehension skills are...implementation/ Reading and understanding the serial code o Parallelizing the serial implementation o Tuning the parallel code o Testing the code o...understand what processes people use, not evaluate them. Date Effort (hours) Reading Serial Code Thinking/ Planning Parallelizing the Code

  10. Teaching E-Commerce Web Page Evaluation and Design: A Pilot Study Using Tourism Destination Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susser, Bernard; Ariga, Taeko

    2006-01-01

    This study explores a teaching method for improving business students' skills in e-commerce page evaluation and making Web design majors aware of business content issues through cooperative learning. Two groups of female students at a Japanese university studying either tourism or Web page design were assigned tasks that required cooperation to…

  11. Game-Coding Workshops in New Zealand Public Libraries: Evaluation of a Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolstad, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This report evaluates a game coding workshop offered to young people and adults in seven public libraries round New Zealand. Participants were taken step by step through the process of creating their own simple 2D videogame, learning the basics of coding, computational thinking, and digital game design. The workshops were free and drew 426 people…

  12. Equivocality in IS/IT Project Evaluation: Model Development and Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arviansyah, A.; Spil, Antonius A.M.; van Hillegersberg, Jos

    2014-01-01

    IS/IT projects are perceived as ventures which are prone to failure and may lead to disruptive conditions. Evaluating the continuation of projects is highly important for stakeholders and decision makers. However, this event is hampered by the problem of equivocality. The main objective of this

  13. Evaluation of the appendix during diagnostic laparoscopy, the laparoscopic appendicitis score : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamminga, Jenneke T. H.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Broens, Paul M. A.; Kluin, Philip M.; Heineman, Erik; Haveman, Jan Willem

    Diagnostic laparoscopy is the ultimate diagnostic tool to evaluate the appendix. Still, according to the literature, this strategy results in a negative appendectomy rate of approximately 12-18 % and associated morbidity. Laparoscopic criteria for determining appendicitis are lacking. The goal of

  14. Pilot Evaluation of a Sexual Abuse Prevention Program for Taiwanese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chuen; Fortson, Beverly L.; Tseng, Kai-Wen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to develop and evaluate the efficacy of a school-based child sexual abuse prevention program for Taiwanese children. Forty-six Taiwanese children age 6 to 13 were divided into one of two groups based on their school grade and then randomly assigned to a skills-based child sexual abuse prevention program who…

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Pilot Filmmaking Project for Rural Youth with a Serious Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Candice

    2010-01-01

    Six young people from the Grampians region of Victoria who had serious mental illnesses took part in a creative arts project that taught them filmmaking skills and techniques over a five-week period. The project was evaluated using a mixed-method approach. Statistically significant improvements were found in quality of life and social…

  16. Evaluation of different field methods for measuring soil water infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Fonseca, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Soil infiltrability, together with rainfall characteristics, is the most important hydrological parameter for the evaluation and diagnosis of the soil water balance and soil moisture regime. Those balances and regimes are the main regulating factors of the on site water supply to plants and other soil organisms and of other important processes like runoff, surface and mass erosion, drainage, etc, affecting sedimentation, flooding, soil and water pollution, water supply for different purposes (population, agriculture, industries, hydroelectricity), etc. Therefore the direct measurement of water infiltration rates or its indirect deduction from other soil characteristics or properties has become indispensable for the evaluation and modelling of the previously mentioned processes. Indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case. In this contribution we present the results of past experiences in the measurement of soil water infiltration rates in many different soils and land conditions, and their use for deducing soil water balances under variable climates. There are also presented and discussed recent results obtained in comparing different methods, using double and single ring infiltrometers, rainfall simulators, and disc permeameters, of different sizes, in soils with very contrasting surface and profile characteristics and conditions, including stony soils and very sloping lands. It is concluded that there are not methods universally applicable to any soil and land condition, and that in many cases the results are significantly influenced by the way we use a particular method or instrument, and by the alterations in the soil conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the surface

  17. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houk, T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3{1/2} year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc{sup 99}) (activities up to 926 pCi/L).

  18. A pilot randomized control study to evaluate endoscopic resection using a ligation device for rectal carcinoid tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Sakata; Sadahiro Amemori; Kotaro Mannen; Masanobu Mizuguchi; Kazuma Fujimoto; Ryuichi Iwakiri; Akifumi Ootani; Seiji Tsunada; Shinichi Ogata; Hibiki Ootani; Ryo Shimoda; Kanako Yamaguchi; Yasuhisa Sakata

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Rectal carcinoid tumors smaller than 10 mm can be resected with local excision using endoscopy. In order to remove rectal carcinoid tumors completely, we evaluated endoscopic mucosal resection with a ligation device in this pilot control randomized study.METHODS: Fifteen patients were diagnosed with rectal carcinoid tumor (less than 10 mm) in our hospital from 1993 to 2002. There were 9 males and 6 females,with a mean age 61.5 years (range, 34-77 years).The patientshad no complaints of carcinoid syndrome symptoms. Fifteen patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: 7 carcinoid tumors were treated by conventional endoscopic resection, and 8 carcinoid tumors were treated by endoscopic resection using a ligation device.RESULTS: All rectal carcinoid tumors were located at the middle to distal rectum. The size of the tumors varied from 3 mm to 10 mm and background characteristics of the patients were not different in the two groups.The rate of complete removal of carcinoid tumors using a ligation device (100%, 8/8) was significantly higher than that of conventional endoscopic resection (57.1%,4/7). The three patients had tumor involvement of deep margin, for which additional treatment was performed.No complications occurred during or after endoscopic resection using a ligation device. All patients in the both groups were alive during the 3-year observation period.CONCLUSION: Endoscopic resection using a ligation device is a useful and safe method for resection of small rectal carcinoid tumors.

  19. Evaluating the ability of novices to identify and quantify physical demand elements following an introductory education session: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Brendan; VanderGriendt, Curtis; Fischer, Steven L

    2016-05-01

    A Physical Demands Description (PDD) is a resource that describes the physical demands of a job in a systematic way. PDD data are commonly used to make legal, medical, and monetary decisions related to work. Despite the fundamental importance of a PDD, data are often gathered by novice or early career ergonomists, where we have limited knowledge regarding their proficiency in performing PDDs. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate novices' proficiency in identifying and quantifying physical demands elements embedded within three job simulations, following a formal PDD education session. The education session was based on the revised Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers (OHCOW, 2014) PDD Handbook. Participants were able to identify physical demands elements with an average success rate of 80%, but were often unable to accurately quantify measures related to each element within a prescribed error threshold of 10%. These data suggest that practitioners should exercise caution when sending novice ergonomists out on their own to complete PDDs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of methods to relieve parental perceptions of vaccine-associated pain and anxiety in children: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthy, Karlen E; Beckstrand, Renea L; Pulsipher, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The pain and anxiety associated with vaccination is a significant reason why parents are reluctant to have their children vaccinated. Distraction methods and vapocoolant sprays may be use to modify the parent's perceptions of their child's pain and anxiety, thus encouraging parents to return for the child's next vaccination. A convenience sample of 68 parents with children ranging in age from 2 to 12 years was selected. The parents and the child were randomly assigned to three groups: a control group, a DVD distraction group, or a vapocoolant spray group. After the child was vaccinated, parents evaluated the child's pain and anxiety. No significant difference in the parents' perception of their child's pain or anxiety was found between the two treatment groups compared with the control group. Some parents expressed the desire to be able to choose the type of distraction method their child received rather than having them randomly assigned to a group. Although quantitative results were not statistically significant in this pilot study, parents commented that the DVD distraction method seemed helpful before and/or after vaccination, but not during vaccination, and parents appreciated the distraction. Parents, however, would prefer to choose the intervention rather than being randomly assigned to a group. The effectiveness of interventions with regard to parental perceptions of pain or anxiety warrants further study. Copyright © 2013 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of 5 versus 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions in steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis: A pilot, prospective, multicenter, randomized study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elena Ricart; Maria Esteve; Montserrat Andreu; Francesc Casellas; David Monfort; Miquel Sans; Natalia Oudovenko; Raúl Lafuente; Julián Panés

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of 5 compared to 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions in patients with active steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis.METHODS: In this pilot, prospective, multicenter randomized trial, 20 patients with moderately active steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis were randomized to 5 or 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions. The primary objective was clinical remission at wk 17. Secondary measures included endoscopic remission and steroid consumption.RESULTS: Nine patients were randomized to 5 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions (group 1) and L1 patients to 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions (group 2). At wk 17, 37.5% of patients in group 1 and 45.45% of patients in group 2 were in clinical remission. Clinical remission was accompanied by endoscopic remission in all cases.Eighty-six percent of patients achieving remission were steroid-free at wk 17. Daily steroid requirements were significantly lower in group 2. Eighty-nine per cent of patients remained in remission during a one year follow-up. One serious adverse event, not related to the study therapy, was reported.CONCLUSION: Granulocyteaphaeresis is safe and effective for the treatment of steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis. In this population, increasing the number of aphaeresis sessions is not associated with higher remission rates, but affords a significant steroid-sparing effect.

  2. A pilot randomized control study to evaluate endoscopic resection using a ligation device for rectal carcinoid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Hiroyuki; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Ootani, Akifumi; Tsunada, Seiji; Ogata, Shinichi; Ootani, Hibiki; Shimoda, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Kanako; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Amemori, Sadahiro; Mannen, Kotaro; Mizuguchi, Masanobu; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Rectal carcinoid tumors smaller than 10 mm can be resected with local excision using endoscopy. In order to remove rectal carcinoid tumors completely, we evaluated endoscopic mucosal resection with a ligation device in this pilot control randomized study. METHODS: Fifteen patients were diagnosed with rectal carcinoid tumor (less than 10 mm) in our hospital from 1993 to 2002. There were 9 males and 6 females, with a mean age 61.5 years (range, 34-77 years). The patients had no complaints of carcinoid syndrome symptoms. Fifteen patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: 7 carcinoid tumors were treated by conventional endoscopic resection, and 8 carcinoid tumors were treated by endoscopic resection using a ligation device. RESULTS: All rectal carcinoid tumors were located at the middle to distal rectum. The size of the tumors varied from 3 mm to 10 mm and background characteristics of the patients were not different in the two groups. The rate of complete removal of carcinoid tumors using a ligation device (100%, 8/8) was significantly higher than that of conventional endoscopic resection (57.1%, 4/7). The three patients had tumor involvement of deep margin, for which additional treatment was performed. No complications occurred during or after endoscopic resection using a ligation device. All patients in the both groups were alive during the 3-year observation period. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic resection using a ligation device is a useful and safe method for resection of small rectal carcinoid tumors. PMID:16810752

  3. Evaluation of a biofeedback-assisted meditation program as a stress management tool for hospital nurses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutshall, Susanne M; Wentworth, Laura J; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Vincent, Ann; Schmidt, John E; Loehrer, Laura L; Cha, Stephen S; Bauer, Brent A

    2011-01-01

    To assess whether a self-directed, computer-guided meditation training program is useful for stress reduction in hospital nurses. We prospectively evaluated participants before and after a month-long meditation program. The meditation program consisted of 15 computer sessions that used biofeedback to reinforce training. Participants were instructed to practice the intervention for 30 minutes per session, four times a week, for four weeks. Visual analogue scales were used to measure stress, anxiety, and quality of life (assessments were performed using Linear Analogue Self-Assessment [LASA], State Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI], and Short-Form 36 [SF-36] questionnaires). Differences in scores from baseline to the study's end were compared using the paired t test. Eleven registered nurses not previously engaged in meditation were enrolled; eight completed the study. Intent-to-treat analysis showed significant improvement in stress management, as measured by SF-36 vitality subscale (P = .04), STAI (P = .03), LASA stress (P = .01), and LASA anxiety (P = .01). Nurses were highly satisfied with the meditation program, rating it 8.6 out of 10. The results of this pilot study suggest the feasibility and efficacy of a biofeedback-assisted, self-directed, meditation training program to help hospital nurses reduce their stress and anxiety. Optimal frequency of use of the program, as well as the duration of effects, should be addressed in future studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gamification of active travel to school: A pilot evaluation of the Beat the Street physical activity intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Emma; Jones, Andy

    2016-05-01

    Beat the Street aims to get children more active by encouraging them to walk and cycle in their neighbourhood using tracking technology with a reward scheme. This pilot study evaluates the impact of Beat the Street on active travel to school in Norwich, UK. Eighty children 8-10 yrs were recruited via an intervention and control school. They wore an accelerometer for 7 days at baseline, mid-intervention and post-intervention (+20 weeks), and completed a travel diary. Physical activity overall was not higher at follow-up amongst intervention children compared to controls. However, there was a positive association between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during school commute times and the number of days on which children touched a Beat the Street sensor. This equated to 3.46min extra daily MVPA during commute times for children who touched a sensor on 14.5 days (the mean number of days), compared to those who did not engage. We also found weekly active travel increased at the intervention school (+10.0% per child) while it decreased at the control (-7.0%), p=0.056. Further work is needed to understand how improved engagement with the intervention might impact outcomes.

  5. A lecture program on complementary and alternative medicine for cancer patients--evaluation of the pilot phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, J; Ebel, M; Muenstedt, K; Micke, O; Prott, F J; Muecke, R; Hoppe, A

    2015-06-01

    About half of all patients with cancer use complementary or alternative medicine (CAM). In 2013, we started a lecture program for patients, followed by evidence-based recommendations on counseling on CAM. These recommendations have been published before by this working group. The aim of the program is to provide scientific facts on the most often used CAM methods in standardized presentations which help patients discuss the topic with their oncologists and support shared decision making. The article presents the evaluation of the pilot phase. Participants received a standardized questionnaire before the start of the lecture. The questionnaire comprises four parts: demographic data, data concerning experience with CAM, satisfaction with the lecture, and needs for further information on CAM. In 2013, seven lectures on CAM were given in cooperation with regional branches of the German Cancer Society in several German states. Four hundred sixty patients and relatives took part (75% females and 16% males). Forty-eight percent formerly had used CAM. Most often named sources of information on CAM were print media (48%) and the Internet (37%). Most participants rated additional written information valuable. About one third would like to have an individual consultation concerning CAM. A standardized presentation of evidence on CAM methods most often used, together with recommendations on the self-management of symptoms, is highly appreciated. The concept of a highly interactive lecture comprising is feasible and if presented in lay terminology, adequate. In order to give additional support on the topic, written information should be provided as the first step.

  6. A phase I pilot study evaluating the beneficial effects of black raspberries in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresty, Laura A; Fromkes, John J; Frankel, Wendy L; Hammond, Cynthia D; Seeram, Navindra P; Baird, Maureen; Stoner, Gary D

    2016-07-07

    Black raspberries inhibit a broad range of cancers in preclinical models which has led to clinical evaluations targeting premalignant lesions of the colon, oral cavity and esophagus. A phase I pilot study was conducted in twenty Barrett's esophagus (BE) patients to investigate the effect of lyophilized black raspberries (LBR) on urinary metabolites and markers of lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and tissue markers of cellular proliferation, detoxification, and inflammation. Surveys, biopsies, blood and urine samples were collected before and after 6 months of LBR treatment (32 or 45 g). LBR significantly reduced urinary excretion of 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α, a marker of lipid peroxidation linked to oxidative stress and free radical damage. Urinary levels of the ellagitannin metabolites, urolithin A-glucuronide, urolithin A-sulfate and dimethylellagic acid glucuronide were significantly increased following 12 and 26 weeks of LBR consumption and may prove useful as indicators of compliance in future clinical studies. Immunohistochemical staining of BE biopsies following LBR treatment showed significant increases in mean GST-pi levels, with 55.6% of subjects responding favorably. In summary, LBR significantly decreased urinary lipid peroxidation levels and significantly increased GST-pi, a marker of detoxification, in BE epithelium. Still, LBR may need to be formulated differently, administered at higher concentrations or multiple times a day to increase efficacy.

  7. Performance evaluation of restaurant food waste and biowaste to biogas pilot projects in China and implications for national policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Djavan; Wen, Zongguo; Fan, Fei

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this research was to conduct a performance evaluation of three food waste/biowaste-to-biogas pilot projects across 7 scenarios in China based on multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) methodology. The projects ranked included a food waste-biogas project in Beijing, a food waste-biogas project in Suzhou and a co-digestion project producing biomethane in Hainan. The projects were ranked from best to worst based on technical, economic and environmental criteria under the MCDA framework. The results demonstrated that some projects are encountering operational problems. Based on these findings, six national policy recommendations were provided: (1) shift away from capital investment subsidies to performance-based subsidies; (2) re-design feed in tariffs; (3) promote bio-methane and project clustering; (4) improve collection efficiency by incentivizing FW producers to direct waste to biogas projects; (5) incentivize biogas projects to produce multiple outputs; (6) incentivize food waste-based projects to co-digest food waste with other substrates for higher gas output. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Increasing Performance of Professional Soccer Players and Elite Track and Field Athletes with Peak Performance Training and Biofeedback: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, Noortje H; Soer, Remko; de Maar, Ewold; Prins, Hilco; Teeuw, Wouter B; Peuscher, Jan; Oosterveld, Frits G J

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an intervention consisting of mental coaching combined with either electro encephalogram (EEG) alpha power feedback or heart rate variability (HRV) feedback on HRV, EEG outcomes and self-reported factors related to stress, performance, recovery and sleep quality in elite athletes. A prospective pilot study was performed with two distinct cohorts. Soccer players were provided with four sessions of mental coaching combined with daily HRV biofeedback (Group A); track and field athletes were provided with four sessions of mental coaching in combination with daily neurofeedback (Group B). Measurements were performed at baseline, post intervention and at 5 weeks follow-up. Objective measures: EEG and ECG. Subjective measures: Numeric Rating Scale for performance, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Rest and Stress Questionnaire and Sports Improvement-60. Group characteristics were too distinct to compare the interventions. Linear mixed models were used to analyze differences within groups over time. In Group A, significant changes over time were present in alpha power at 5 of 7 EEG locations (p performance-related outcomes and stress reduction. Further research is needed to elucidate the effects of either type of feedback and to compare effects with a control group.

  9. Optimization of the recovery factor by implementing a continuous steam injection pilot in the Huyapari Field located in the Orinoco oil belt. Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.; Munckton, T.; Armas, F.; Johan, J.; Barrios, A. [PDVSA PetroPiar (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    Located in Venezuela, the Orinoco heavy oil belt (Faja) is one of the world's biggest accumulations of extra heavy crude oil. Recovery rates in the Faja are relatively low and so one of the key objectives is to increase it. The thermal recovery process could be a way to increase production as it has been proven in other heavy oil fields and PDVSA has started a pilot project to test the process on the Faja reservoirs. This paper aimed at providing an overview of the project. The different steps of the Huyapari thermal pilot project are discussed: the objectives and challenges of the project, project design, uncertainty management, site selection, modeling of the site subsurface and optimization planning in terms of well configuration and constraints. This project is under development and further steps will be required before there are results but when there are, it is expected that they will provide valuable information on the technical and economic feasibility of thermal recovery projects in the Faja area.

  10. Evaluation of the Pilot Program for Home School and ChalleNGe Program Recruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    2001, we began work on the final report on the attrition rates of homeschooled and ChalleNGe recruits. In preparation for writing the final report, we...for the final report altered the absolute attrition rates but had little effect on the relative performance of homeschooled and Chal- leNGe recruits...appen- dix of the final report.1 We regret any confusion caused by this error. 1. See appendix G of Final Analysis of Evaluation of Homeschool and Chal

  11. Evaluating innovative items for the NCLEX, part I: usability and pilot testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Anne; Harmes, J Christine

    2009-01-01

    National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) has recently conducted preliminary research on the feasibility of including various types of innovative test questions (items) on the NCLEX. This article focuses on the participants' reactions to and their strategies for interacting with various types of innovative items. Part 2 in the May/June issue will focus on the innovative item templates and evaluation of the statistical characteristics and the level of cognitive processing required to answer the examination items.

  12. A pilot study evaluating the prescribing of ceftriaxone in hospitals in Ghana: findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afriyie, Daniel Kwame; Amponsah, Seth Kwabena; Dogbey, Justice; Agyekum, Kwabena; Kesse, Samuel; Truter, Ilse; Meyer, Johanna C; Godman, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Widespread empiric use of antibiotics exists especially in developing countries. This is a concern since inappropriate use of antibiotics, including their extended inappropriate use, will increase resistance rates. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate antibiotic utilisation across healthcare sectors to improve future use. This includes ceftriaxone, widely used among hospitals including those in Ghana. A cross-sectional study to evaluate the appropriateness of ceftriaxone prescribing in a leading hospital in Ghana. Ceftriaxone prescribing in patient-record cards was assessed using a modified WHO drug-utilization evaluation criteria as well as referencing the national standard treatment guidelines in Ghana and the ceftriaxone package insert. A total of 251 patients were assessed. Ceftriaxone was most commonly prescribed for comorbid malaria with bacterial infections, urinary tract infections, sepsis and gastroenteritis. The appropriateness of the indication was 86% (n = 218). The doses most prescribed were 1g (41%) and 2g (39%). Stat dose and once-daily dosage regimen constituted 51.4% and 84.5%, respectively. The most common duration of treatment was 1 (51.4%) and 2 days (35.1%). The overall appropriateness of prescribing was 93% against a pre-set threshold of 97%. The appropriateness of ceftriaxone prescribing was high in this leading hospital in Ghana; however, there is room for improvement with targeted education initiatives, with further research planned.

  13. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF SPIROTOME® DEVICE FOR LIVER BIOPSY IN GREEN IGUANAS (IGUANA IGUANA): A PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Giordano; Origgi, Francesco C; Leopardi, Stefania; Zaghini, Anna; Saunders, Jimmy H; Vignoli, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a large-core manual biopsy device (Spirotome(®), Medinvents, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium) for liver sampling and histologic diagnosis in green iguanas (Iguana iguana). The study included eight green iguanas, and two ultrasound-guided biopsies were collected for each lizard, for 16 biopsies in total. The procedure was carried out under general anesthesia induced by intravenous injection of propofol (10 mg/kg) maintained with a mixture of 2.0% isoflurane and 0.8-1.2 L/min oxygen after tracheal intubation. Fourteen (87.5%) of the 16 biopsies were considered diagnostic. Liver biopsy quality was assessed according to sample size and tissue preservation. In particular, mean length (16.2 ± 4.5 mm), width (2.2 ± 0.5 mm), area (34.8 ± 6.9 mm(2)), and number of portal areas (9.4 ± 3.9) of each biopsy were recorded for all green iguanas. The total available surface of the sections obtained from the biopsies and their grade of preservation enabled a satisfactory evaluation of the parenchymal architecture. One of the green iguanas in the study died the day after the procedure due to severe hemocoeloma. Risk assessment evaluation suggested that small green iguanas may not be suitable for this biopsy procedure.

  14. Pilot study of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination ("the Six Pack") for evaluating clinical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzese, Christine B

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) designed to examine all six competencies and provide meaningful results to improve resident performance. A prospective, observational study. The OSCE consists of 1 hour for examination of a simulated patient, documentation, and feedback, with 30 minutes for an evidence-based medicine (EBM) test. Eight otolaryngology residents participated. Digital recordings and written documentation were evaluated on all competencies except practice-based learning. An EBM test was scored to assess practice-based learning. Overall, senior residents scored better. Seniors scored better on performing a focused history, whereas juniors scored better for thoroughness. Seniors coded better than juniors, although seniors tended to undercode and juniors tended to overcode. Two cases of "insurance fraud" were also discovered. The "Six Pack" successfully evaluated all competencies while providing valuable information. A clinical practicum was added to improve history and physical examination skills. The discussion of coding and a billing seminar also resulted. Residents believed the OSCE was valuable. Faculty members were impressed with the useful information obtained.

  15. A modified rabbit ulna defect model for evaluating periosteal substitutes in bone engineering: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M El Backly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work defines a modified critical size rabbit ulna defect model for bone regeneration in which a non-resorbable barrier membrane was used to separate the radius from the ulna to create a valid model for evaluation of tissue-engineered periosteal substitutes. Eight rabbits divided into two groups were used. Critical defects (15 mm were made in the ulna completely eliminating periosteum. For group I, defects were filled with a nanohydroxyapatite poly(ester urethane scaffold soaked in PBS and left as such (group Ia or wrapped with a tissue-engineered periosteal substitute (group Ib. For group II, an e-PTFE (GORE-TEX® membrane was inserted around the radius then the defects received either scaffold alone (group IIa or scaffold wrapped with periosteal substitute (group IIb. Animals were euthanized after 12-16 weeks, and bone regeneration was evaluated by radiography, computed microtomography (µCT, and histology. In the first group, we observed formation of radio-ulnar synostosis irrespective of the treatment. This was completely eliminated upon placement of the e-PTFE (GORE-TEX® membrane in the second group of animals. In conclusion, modification of the model using a non-resorbable e-PTFE membrane to isolate the ulna from the radius was a valuable addition allowing for objective evaluation of the tissue-engineered periosteal substitute.

  16. The pilot evaluation for the National Evaluation System in South Africa – A diagnostic review of early childhood development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Davids

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Policymaking in many instances does not follow proper diagnosis of a problem using evidence to justify why particular decisions have been taken. This article describes findings of a diagnostic review of existing challenges facing early childhood development (ECD in South Africa. The review is part of the government’s attempt to use information to drive policy in strategic areas. It is part of the role that the Presidency is seeking to play in ensuring government programmes are evaluated to ensure that money that is spent is spent on programmes that have an impact and that there is value for money. This article summarises the key findings of the diagnostic review that was conducted of policy, services and coordination.The results reveal that a broader definition of ECD programmes is needed to cover all aspects of children’s development, growth and health, from conception to the foundation phase of schooling. Many elements of comprehensive ECD support and services are already in place and some are performing well. However, there are important gaps. Key ECD strategies for the future are identified. The diagnostic evaluation used a variety of methods, including desktop analysis, interviews and data analysis. Issues emerged around how to link the evaluation with other processes in the involved departments. A particular challenge was how to handle the transition to implementation of the findings, as responsibility shifted from the steering committee to the departments. The process worked well despite past challenges with coordination across government.

  17. Pasadena City College SIGI Project Research Design. Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, John J.; Tulley, John E.

    A pilot study evaluation of SIGI (System of Interactive Guidance and Information) at Pasadena City College in 1974-75 tested the effectiveness of an experimental research design for an expanded field test of the system the following year. (SIGI is a computer based career guidance program designed by Educational Testing Service to assist community…

  18. A pilot study to evaluate the application of a generic protein standard panel for quality control of biomarker detection technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdivia Hernan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein biomarker studies are currently hampered by a lack of measurement standards to demonstrate quality, reliability and comparability across multiple assay platforms. This is especially pertinent for immunoassays where multiple formats for detecting target analytes are commonly used. Findings In this pilot study a generic panel of six non-human protein standards (50 - 10^7 pg/mL of varying abundance was prepared as a quality control (QC material. Simulated "normal" and "diseased" panels of proteins were prepared in pooled human plasma and incorporated into immunoassays using the Meso Scale Discovery® (MSD® platform to illustrate reliable detection of the component proteins. The protein panel was also evaluated as a spike-in material for a model immunoassay involving detection of ovarian cancer biomarkers within individual human plasma samples. Our selected platform could discriminate between two panels of the proteins exhibiting small differences in abundance. Across distinct experiments, all component proteins exhibited reproducible signal outputs in pooled human plasma. When individual donor samples were used, half the proteins produced signals independent of matrix effects. These proteins may serve as a generic indicator of platform reliability. Each of the remaining proteins exhibit differential signals across the distinct samples, indicative of sample matrix effects, with the three proteins following the same trend. This subset of proteins may be useful for characterising the degree of matrix effects associated with the sample which may impact on the reliability of quantifying target diagnostic biomarkers. Conclusions We have demonstrated the potential utility of this panel of standards to act as a generic QC tool for evaluating the reproducibility of the platform for protein biomarker detection independent of serum matrix effects.

  19. Comparative evaluation of two different vestibuloplasty surgical procedures in cleft patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; Pedro, Patrícia Franco; Kogawa, Evelyn Mikaela; Pereira, Tatiana; de Barros Carrilho, Guilherme Paes; Aiello, Carlos Alberto; Freitas, Patrícia Zambonato

    2005-07-01

    Patients with a cleft lip or palate often present alterations in the labial aspect of the ridge, resulting in a shallow vestibule. This study compares the results of two different surgical procedures on deepening of the labial sulcus. Ten patients with a cleft lip and palate were separated into two groups and underwent different vestibuloplasty procedures. An experimental group used a removable retention splint. Preoperative and 4-month postoperative sulcus heights were measured and analyzed statistically. No statistically significant differences could be detected between groups. The results indicated that to reach consistent results, a larger number of patients must be submitted to this evaluation.

  20. Field evaluation of a modified intervention for overhead drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, David; Star, Demetra; Barr, Alan; Blanco, Marco Mendoza; Janowitz, Ira

    2010-04-01

    Drilling holes into concrete or metal ceilings is one of the most physically demanding tasks performed in construction. The work is done overhead with rotary impact hammer drills that weigh up to 40 N. The task is associated with pain and musculoskeletal disorders at the wrist, forearm, shoulder, and back. The mechanism of injury is thought to be the high forces and non-neutral shoulder and wrist postures applied during drilling. Previously, we described a field study of a foot lever and inverted drill press intervention devices that received poor usability ratings compared with the usual method for overhead drilling based on problems with mobility and productivity. Using a participatory intervention model, feedback from construction workers (N = 13) was used to develop a new intervention design that incorporated a wheeled tripod base and a unique method of aligning the drilling column to vertical. A different group of construction workers (N = 23) evaluated usability and fatigue of the new device during their regular overhead drilling in comparison with the usual method. Four of 12 usability ratings were significantly better with the intervention device compared with the usual method. Subjective shoulder fatigue was less with the new intervention (1.1 vs. 3.3; scale 0 to 5; p drilling were 26 N with the intervention compared with 245 N with the usual method. The percentage of time with the shoulder flexed or abducted to more than 60 degrees was less with the intervention compared with the usual method (21 vs. 40%; p = 0.007). There was significantly less head extension with the intervention compared with the usual method. There were no significant differences in overall productivity between the two methods. This study demonstrates that a new intervention device for overhead drilling has improved usability and subjective fatigue ratings compared with the usual method. These improvements are most likely due to the reduced hand forces, reduced shoulder abduction and

  1. Evaluation of knee joint proprioception and balance of young female volleyball players: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Neşe; Bianco, Antonino; Patti, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Palma, Antonio; Ersöz, Gülfem

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The main purpose of our study was the evaluation of the effects of long-term volleyball practice on knee joint proprioception and balance of young female athletes. [Subjects and Methods] An observational case-control study was performed. The study enrolled 19 female volleyball players in the experimental group and 19 sedentary counterparts as controls. A Biodex balance system and dynamometer were used for the evaluations. The paired t-test was used to determine the significance of differences between the performance of athletes and controls. [Results] The knee proprioception analysis showed a significant difference at 60° joint position in active and passive tests. A similar trend, but without significance, was found for the 20° joint position. In the postural stability tests both groups showed similar results with no significant differences between them. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the results indicate a significant influence on joint proprioception is elicited by long-term exposure to a team sport like volleyball. However, the postural stability indexes showed similar trends in both groups, highlighting the analogous ontogenesis of the subjects investigated and the low influence of volleyball practice on postural stability.

  2. Tai Chi-based exercise for older adults with Parkinson's disease: a pilot-program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuzhong; Harmer, Peter; Fisher, K John; Xu, Junheng; Fitzgerald, Kathleen; Vongjaturapat, Naruepon

    2007-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to provide preliminary evaluation of the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of a newly developed Tai Chi-based exercise program for older adults with Parkinson's disease (PD). Using a one-group pretest-posttest design, 17 community-dwelling adults (mean age 71.51 years) with mild to moderate idiopathic PD (Stage I, II, or III on the Hoehn and Yahr scale) and stable medication use completed a 5-day, 90-min/day Tai Chi exercise-evaluation program. Outcome measures included face-to-face exit interviews on appropriateness and safety and physical performance (i.e., 50-ft speed walk, up-and-go, functional reach). At the end of this brief intervention, exercise adherence was 100% and the program was shown to be safe. Exit interviews indicated that the program was well received by all participants with respect to program appropriateness, participant satisfaction and enjoyment, and intentions to continue. Furthermore, a significant pretest-to-posttest change was observed at the end of the 5-day program in all three physical-performance measures (p Tai Chi is an appropriate physical activity for older adults with PD and might also be useful as a therapeutic exercise modality for improving and maintaining physical function. These preliminary findings warrant further investigation.

  3. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and evaluation of a PBL-based continuing education for clinical nurses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Soon; Hwang, Seon Young; Oh, Eui Geum; Lee, Jae Eun

    2006-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a PBL program for continuing nurse education and to evaluate the program after its implementation. The PBL program was developed in the core cardio-pulmonary nursing concepts through a collaborative approach with a nursing school and a hospital. The PBL packages with simulation on ACLS were implemented to 40 clinical nurses. The entire PBL program consisted of six 3-hour weekly classes and was evaluated by the participants' subjective responses. Two PBL packages in cardio-pulmonary system including clinical cases and tutorial guidelines were developed. The 57.5% of the participants responded positively about the use of PBL as continuing nurse education in terms of self-motivated and cooperative learning, whereas 20.0% of the participants answered that the PBL method was not suitable for clinical nurses. Some modifications were suggested in grouping participants and program contents for PBL. The PBL method could be utilized to promote nurses' clinical competencies as well as self-learning abilities. Further research is needed in the implementation strategies of PBL-based continuing education in order to improve its effectiveness.

  5. Mild separation system for olive oil: quality evaluation and pilot plant design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Genovese

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The entire process of olive oil extraction involves the breakage of olive fruits to obtain a paste, the kneading of the paste, a centrifugation, and a further cleaning, performed by a disc stack centrifuge, to separate the residual water. In this research, in order to evaluate the effect of final centrifugal separation on olive oil quality and to both define and design the settings of a innovative separation system, olive oil was separated off from water using an accelerated separation process, tested in comparison with a disc centrifuge. The laboratory plant used for the trials was constituted by a twin cylindrical separator equipped with 4 variable frequency inverters, in order to regulate the fluid flow rates in the plant. Oil samples were collected during the trials to evaluate the influence of the proposed innovative process on oil quality; measuring some parameters as free acidity, peroxides (PV, specific extinction coefficients K232 and K270, chlorophylls , carotenoids, total polyphenols (POL and turbidity. Results showed statistically significant differences (p-values<0.05 in some parameters as POL, PV, and ultraviolet absorption K232 and K270.

  6. Evaluating the use of the wilbarger intervention with schizophrenic patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withersty, David J; Stout, Janet; Mogge, Neil L; Nesland, Anita; David Allen, G

    2005-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia have difficulty processing sensory information. The authors hypothesized that the Wilbarger intervention, an occupational therapy technique successfully used to treat children with sensory integration deficits, might prove beneficial if used with schizophrenic patients. Thirty inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders voluntarily participated. Each was evaluated using the sensory integration subscale of the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES) both pre- and post-intervention. The Wilbarger was scheduled to be administered five times per day for seven days per week for four weeks. Participants averaged 19.5 days (mean) in the study (median=27.5 days) and received 80.4 (mean) (106.5 median) interventions.Those receiving 90 or more interventions improved significantly on the graphesthesia subtest (t(28)=2.498; p<0.019), the right/left confusion subtest (t(28)=2.373; p<0.025) and the post-total score (t(28)=2.184; p<0.037). Sensory subscales of the NES statistically improved after use of the Wilbarger intervention. Further studies are planned to determine the duration and clinical significance of the noted changes.

  7. Evaluation of completeness of selected poison control center data fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Jeanie E; Marchbanks, Brenda; Willis, Branch; Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-08-01

    Poison control center data are used in research and surveillance. Due to the large volume of information, these efforts are dependent on data being recorded in machine readable format. However, poison center records include non-machine readable text fields and machine readable coded fields, some of which are duplicative. Duplicating this data increases the chance of inaccurate/incomplete coding. For surveillance efforts to be effective, coding should be complete and accurate. Investigators identified a convenience sample of 964 records and reviewed the substance code determining if it matched its text field. They also reviewed the coded clinical effects and treatments determining if they matched the notes text field. The substance code matched its text field for 91.4% of the substances. The clinical effects and treatments codes matched their text field for 72.6% and 82.4% of occurrences respectively. This under-reporting of clinical effects and treatments has surveillance and public health implications.

  8. Design considerations for a steam-injection pilot with in-situ foaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, M.H.; Sanyal, S.K.; Horn, A.J.

    1982-08-01

    This report reviews the necessary aspects of the planning, operation, evaluation, environmental impact and cost to implement a field pilot of steam injection with in-situ foaming. The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI) is planning to implement such a pilot in Kern County, California. The cost of the pilot will be shared by the US Department of Energy and an oil company. Some important aspects of drilling and completion programs and their specifications, permits from regulatory bodies, and downhole tools to improve steam stimulation are discussed. The essential surface facilities which include water treatment plant, steam generator, demulsifier and dehydrator are considered. The necessary laboratory research in support of the pilot has been recommended. The formation evaluation and reservoir engineering effort for the pilot has been divided into three phases: reservoir definition, reservoir monitoring and post-pilot study. Appropriate techniques applicable to each phase of the test have been discussed. The environmental impact regulations as related to the steam injection process have been considered. In particular, the environmental problems associated with the burning of crude oil and desulfurization of flue gas have been discussed. Other environmental considerations such as solid and liquid waste disposal, health and safety are also discussed. An estimate of the cost of this field test is presented. Three scenarii (for pilots with high, medium, and low investment potentials, respectively) are presented. Since this report was prepared, a specific site for the supri pilot has been chosen. Appendices G and H present the details on this site.

  9. Pilot demonstration of enhanced oil recovery by micellar polymer waterflooding: phase A. Quarterly report for the 1st quarter 1977. [Wilmington oil field, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, J.E.; Staub, H.L.

    1977-04-15

    A micellar-polymer tertiary waterflood project is underway in the HXa sand, Fault Block VB, Wilmington Oil Field. All tasks in Phase A, with the exception of Task No. 5, have been successfully finalized. Because Task No. 5, sulfonation of a Wilmington crude feedstock, was an integral part of the subjects to be resolved under Phase A, Decision Point No. 1 must be delayed several months. Marathon was unable to schedule sulfonation of Wilmington feedstocks but is now conducting bench sulfonation of Wilmington feedstocks and has called upon Witco and Stepan to prepare Wilmington sulfonates in their pilot plants. Flood tests and polymer adsorbtion-degradation tests were performed on old core material from the Upper Terminal sand need to be repeated on fresh core samples from the well to be drilled for the mini-injectivity test. (DLC)

  10. A pilot study evaluating a support programme for parents of young people with suicidal behaviour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Lorna

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Deliberate self harm (DSH) is a major public health concern and has increased among young people in Ireland. While DSH is undoubtedly the result of interacting factors, studies have identified an association between DSH and family dysfunction as well as the protective role of positive family relationships. Following a focus group meeting held to identify the needs of parents and carers of young people with DSH, a support programme (SPACE) was developed. The aims of the current study are to evaluate the effectiveness of the SPACE programme in decreasing parental psychological distress, reducing parental report of young peoples\\' difficulties, increasing parental satisfaction and increasing parents\\' ratings of their own defined challenges and goals. METHODS: Participants were recruited from a Mental Health Service within a paediatric hospital, Community Child and Adolescent Mental Health Teams and family support services. All services were located within the greater Dublin area in Ireland. Forty-six parents of children who had engaged in or expressed thoughts of self harm attended the programme and participated in the evaluation study. The programme ran once a week over an 8-week period and included topics such as information on self harm in young people, parenting adolescents, communication and parental self-care. Seventy percent (N = 32) of the original sample at Time 1 completed measures at Time 2 (directly following the programme) and 37% (N = 17) of the original sample at Time 1 completed them at Time 3 (6 months following the programme).A repeated measures design was used to identify changes in parental wellbeing after attendance at the programme as well as changes in parental reports of their children\\'s difficulties. RESULTS: Participants had lower levels of psychological distress, increased parental satisfaction, lower ratings of their own defined challenges and higher ratings of their goals directly after the programme. These

  11. A pilot study evaluating a support programme for parents of young people with suicidal behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowley Sinead

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deliberate self harm (DSH is a major public health concern and has increased among young people in Ireland. While DSH is undoubtedly the result of interacting factors, studies have identified an association between DSH and family dysfunction as well as the protective role of positive family relationships. Following a focus group meeting held to identify the needs of parents and carers of young people with DSH, a support programme (SPACE was developed. The aims of the current study are to evaluate the effectiveness of the SPACE programme in decreasing parental psychological distress, reducing parental report of young peoples' difficulties, increasing parental satisfaction and increasing parents' ratings of their own defined challenges and goals. Methods Participants were recruited from a Mental Health Service within a paediatric hospital, Community Child and Adolescent Mental Health Teams and family support services. All services were located within the greater Dublin area in Ireland. Forty-six parents of children who had engaged in or expressed thoughts of self harm attended the programme and participated in the evaluation study. The programme ran once a week over an 8-week period and included topics such as information on self harm in young people, parenting adolescents, communication and parental self-care. Seventy percent (N = 32 of the original sample at Time 1 completed measures at Time 2 (directly following the programme and 37% (N = 17 of the original sample at Time 1 completed them at Time 3 (6 months following the programme. A repeated measures design was used to identify changes in parental wellbeing after attendance at the programme as well as changes in parental reports of their children's difficulties. Results Participants had lower levels of psychological distress, increased parental satisfaction, lower ratings of their own defined challenges and higher ratings of their goals directly after the programme. These

  12. Corrosion of metals and alloys - Corrosion and fouling in industrial cooling water systems - Part 1: Guidelines for conducting pilot-scale evaluation of corrosion and fouling control additives for open recirculating cooling water systems

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion of metals and alloys - Corrosion and fouling in industrial cooling water systems - Part 1: Guidelines for conducting pilot-scale evaluation of corrosion and fouling control additives for open recirculating cooling water systems

  13. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Spektor, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency.

  14. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors' designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550[degree]F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100[degree]F lower.

  15. A Pilot Study Evaluating the Stigma and Public Perception about the Causes of Depression and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TM Khan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: To evaluate public perceptions towards the causes of depression and schizophrenia and identifications of fac­tors resulting stigma towards mental ill."nMethod: A cross-sectional study was conducted among the inhabitants of Pulau-Pinang, Malaysia in March, 2009. A 24-item questionnaire was used to obtain respondent views. A non-probability (i.e convenient sampling method was used to ap­proach the potential respondents. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS version 13 ®, non-parametric sta­tistics (Chi-square was applied to determine the association.  Alpha value less than 0.05 were considered significant."nResults: One hundred respondents showed their willingness to participate in the study; overall response of the study was 40.0%. Majority 69% of the respondents were Malays, followed by Chinese and Indians. Public re-cognition toward depres­sion was higher than schizophrenia. Lack of social support (X2= 4.832, P= 0.049, chemical imbalance in Brian (X2=6.132, P= 0.013* and believes in supernatural factors (X2= 6.700, P= 0.050 were the commonly shared reasons for the mental dis­or­ders. Evaluation in terms of stigma revealed that majority 61 (55.0%. Individuals with mental disorders were not friendly (X2= 1.008, P= 0.050. Furthermore, one third of the population believe that they are moody, danger­ous and unpredict­able, it is better to avoid them."nConclusion: Overall findings revealed that Malaysians believe in supernatural reasons for the prevalence of mental disor­ders. Similarly the level of stigma towards mentally ill was higher among the respondents.

  16. Evaluation of annoyance from the wind turbine noise: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Pawlaczyk-Łuszczyńska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of and annoyance due to the noise from wind turbines in populated areas of Poland. Material and Methods: The study group comprised 156 subjects. All subjects were asked to fill in a questionnaire developed to enable evaluation of their living conditions, including prevalence of annoyance due to the noise from wind turbines and the self-assessment of physical health and well-being. In addition, current mental health status of the respondents was assessed using Goldberg General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12. For areas where the respondents lived, A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs were calculated as the sum of the contributions from the wind power plants in the specific area. Results: It has been shown that the wind turbine noise at the calculated A-weigh­ted SPL of 30-48 dB was noticed outdoors by 60.3% of the respondents. This noise was perceived as annoying outdoors by 33.3% of the respondents, while indoors by 20.5% of them. The odds ratio of being annoyed outdoors by the wind turbine noise increased along with increasing SPLs (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.22-3.62. The subjects' attitude to wind turbines in general and sensitivity to landscape littering was found to have significant impact on the perceived annoyance. About 63% of variance in outdoors annoyance assessment might be explained by the noise level, general attitude to wind turbines and sensitivity to landscape littering. Conclusions: Before firm conclusions can be drawn further studies are needed, including a larger number of respondents with different living environments (i.e., dissimilar terrain, different urbanization and road traffic intensity.

  17. Evaluation of annoyance from the wind turbine noise: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlaczyk-Łuszczyńska, Małgorzata; Dudarewicz, Adam; Zaborowski, Kamil; Zamojska-Daniszewska, Małgorzata; Waszkowska, Małgorzata

    2014-06-01

    The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of and annoyance due to the noise from wind turbines in populated areas of Poland. The study group comprised 156 subjects. All subjects were asked to fill in a questionnaire developed to enable evaluation of their living conditions, including prevalence of annoyance due to the noise from wind turbines and the self-assessment of physical health and well-being. In addition, current mental health status of the respondents was assessed using Goldberg General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12. For areas where the respondents lived, A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated as the sum of the contributions from the wind power plants in the specific area. It has been shown that the wind turbine noise at the calculated A-weighted SPL of 30-48 dB was noticed outdoors by 60.3% of the respondents. This noise was perceived as annoying outdoors by 33.3% of the respondents, while indoors by 20.5% of them. The odds ratio of being annoyed outdoors by the wind turbine noise increased along with increasing SPLs (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.22-3.62). The subjects' attitude to wind turbines in general and sensitivity to landscape littering was found to have significant impact on the perceived annoyance. About 63% of variance in outdoors annoyance assessment might be explained by the noise level, general attitude to wind turbines and sensitivity to landscape littering. Before firm conclusions can be drawn further studies are needed, including a larger number of respondents with different living environments (i.e., dissimilar terrain, different urbanization and road traffic intensity).

  18. Evaluation of three different methods of distance learning for postgraduate diagnostic imaging education: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Jean-Nicolas; Cooley, Jeffrey R; Wessely, Michelle; Guebert, Gary M; Petrocco-Napuli, Kristina

    2014-10-01

    Objective : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceived effectiveness and learning potential of 3 Web-based educational methods in a postgraduate radiology setting. Methods : Three chiropractic radiology faculty from diverse geographic locations led mini-courses using asynchronous discussion boards, synchronous Web conferencing, and asynchronous voice-over case presentations formatted for Web viewing. At the conclusion of each course, participants filled out a 14-question survey (using a 5-point Likert scale) designed to evaluate the effectiveness of each method in achieving specified course objectives and goals and their satisfaction when considering the learning potential of each method. The mean, standard deviation, and percentage agreements were tabulated. Results : Twenty, 15, and 10 participants completed the discussion board, Web conferencing, and case presentation surveys, respectively. All educational methods demonstrated a high level of agreement regarding the course objective (total mean rating >4.1). The case presentations had the highest overall rating for achieving the course goals; however, all but one method still had total mean ratings >4.0 and overall agreement levels of 70%-100%. The strongest potential for interactive learning was found with Web conferencing and discussion boards, while case presentations rated very low in this regard. Conclusions : The perceived effectiveness in achieving the course objective and goals was high for each method. Residency-based distance education may be a beneficial adjunct to current methods of training, allowing for international collaboration. When considering all aspects tested, there does not appear to be a clear advantage to any one method. Utilizing various methods may be most appropriate.

  19. On Ambition, Learning, and Co-Evolution: Building Evaluation as a Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Sanjeev; De Silva, Soma

    2010-01-01

    The papers in this dialogue help develop evaluation as a field (both in South Asia and other regions). What comes through in all of the papers is both humility of where evaluation is as a field and imagination and ambition of where evaluators could be in the near future. Reading the papers in this forum makes them enthusiastic about being…

  20. Experimental Evaluation of Field Trips on Instruction in Vocational Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaslin, Norval L.

    To determine the effect of field trips on student achievement in each of four subject matter areas in vocational agriculture, 12 schools offering approved programs were randomly selected and divided into a treatment group and a control group. Uniform teaching outlines and reference materials were provided to each group. While no field trips were…

  1. Field Test Evaluation Report on Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kenneth; Fleming, Janice

    1981-01-01

    After describing a continuing education course in polymer chemistry, summarizes materials, methods, and results of an extensive evaluation of the course. Includes a discussion of benefits for participants and a list of 14 recommendations based on the evaluation. (JN)

  2. Field Test Evaluation Report on Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kenneth; Fleming, Janice

    1981-01-01

    After describing a continuing education course in polymer chemistry, summarizes materials, methods, and results of an extensive evaluation of the course. Includes a discussion of benefits for participants and a list of 14 recommendations based on the evaluation. (JN)

  3. Electromagnetic Scattered Field Evaluation and Data Compression Using Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, I. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report on Project #727625 between The Ohio State University and NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. Under this project, a data compression technique for scattered field data of electrically large targets is developed. The technique was applied to the scattered fields of two targets of interest. The backscattered fields of the scale models of these targets were measured in a ra compact range. For one of the targets, the backscattered fields were also calculated using XPATCH computer code. Using the technique all scattered field data sets were compressed successfully. A compression ratio of the order 40 was achieved. In this report, the technique is described briefly and some sample results are included.

  4. Field evaluation of hazardous waste site bioassessment protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.M.; Cline, J.F.; Cushing, C.E.; McShane, M.C.; Rogers, J.E.; Rogers, L.E.; Simpson, J.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1983-04-01

    The goals were: (1) determine the variability (both within and between laboratories) for the various bioassay procedures using contaminated soil samples from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA); (2) assess variability within and between plots for several assessment techniques (for sampling small mammals, plants, insects including honeybees and microarthropods) so that field studies could be designed to detect a defined biotic change; (3) establish three field plant transects which are apparently (a) contaminated, (b) appear contaminated and (c) could serve as a control; (4) assess the feasibility (in the laboratory) of using Basin F water to contaminate RMA soil artificially, and to supply information for the design of a field plot study in 1983; (5) attempt to obtain preliminary data on any promising field or laboratory bioassessment techniques not currently mentioned in the statement of work; and (6) obtain field data to assess the ecological status of RMA lakes and compare these observations to results from bioassessment testing.

  5. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Maus, S.; Beggan, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was agreed in December 2009 by a task force appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD. New spherical harmonic main field models for epochs 2005.0 (DGRF...... coefficients is also reported. Maps of differences in the vertical field intensity at Earth’s surface between the candidates and weighted mean models are presented. Candidates with anomalous aspects are identified and efforts made to pinpoint both troublesome coefficients and geographical regions where large...... vector satellite data is demonstrated; based on internal consistency DGRF-2005 has a formal root mean square vector field error over Earth’s surface of 1.0 nT. Difficulties nevertheless remain in accurately forecasting field evolution only five years into the future....

  6. Developing, implementing and evaluating OSH interventions in SMEs: a pilot, exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Donato; Cagno, Enrico; Micheli, Guido J L

    2014-01-01

    The literature on occupational safety and health (OSH) interventions contains many debates on how interventions should work, but far less attention has been paid to how they actually do work, and to the contextual factors that influence their implementation, development and effect. The need of improving the understanding of the OSH interventions issue is particularly relevant for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), since they experience worse OSH conditions, and have fewer physical, economic and organizational resources if compared to larger enterprises; thus, SMEs strongly need to focus their few resources in the decision-making process so as to select and put in place only the most proper interventions. This exploratory study is based on interviews with safety officers of 5 SMEs, and it gives an overview of the key features of the actual intervention process in SMEs and of the contextual factors making this actual intervention process similar or dissimilar to the ideal case. The results show how much qualitative and experience driven the actual intervention process is; they should be used to direct the future research towards an increasingly applicable one, to enable practitioners from SMEs to develop, implement and evaluate their OSH interventions in an "ideal" way.

  7. The Evaluation of Bioelectrical Activity of Pelvic Floor Muscles Depending on Probe Location: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Halski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The main objective was to determine how the depth of probe placement affects functional and resting bioelectrical activity of the PFM and whether the recorded signal might be dependent on the direction in which the probe is rotated. Participants. The study comprised of healthy, nulliparous women between the ages of 21 and 25. Outcome Measures. Bioelectric activity of the PFM was recorded from four locations of the vagina by surface EMG and vaginal probe. Results. There were no statistically significant differences between the results during functional sEMG activity. During resting sEMG activity, the highest bioelectrical activity of the PFM was observed in the L1 and the lowest in the L4 and a statistically significant difference between the highest and the lowest results of resting sEMG activity was observed (P=0.0043. Conclusion. Different electrodes placement during functional contraction of PFM does not affect the obtained results in sEMG evaluation. In order to diagnose the highest resting activity of PFM the recording plates should be placed toward the anterior vaginal wall and distally from the introitus. However, all of the PFM have similar bioelectrical activity and it seems that these muscles could be treated as a single muscle.

  8. Evaluation of the surface structure of composite restorations in light of own pilot research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalas Renata

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research on the dental restorative materials employed in remedying dental cavities has been conducted on many levels and areas, both with application of clinical and laboratory methods. One of the elements that determines whether the restoration may be degraded is the condition of its surface. The aim of the study was to assess the texture surface of composite restorations using a non-contact method of teeth models scanning. In this work, ten medium size cavities on the occlusal surfaces of molars in adult patients were prepared and restored with resin composite. Before undertaking the procedure and after the finishing and polishing of the restorations, impressions were taken and sent into the laboratory so as to prepare plaster casts. Every cast was then scanned utilizing the non-contact 3D surface measurement instrument so as to assess the texture surface of the restoration. The resulting three dimensional analyses of post-restoration models showed the correct marginal adaptation of resin composite dental material to the hard tooth structures and its smooth filling occlusal surface. Additional comparison of scans done before and after restoring the cavities allowed the calculating of differences in volume, mean and maximum heights. The applied method of analysis is thought to be helpful in the detailed evaluation of restoration dental material texture. Moreover, the enabled possibility of continuous observation is expedient for assessing the usefulness of the method in standard dental practice.

  9. Child welfare caseworkers as brokers of mental health services: a pilot evaluation of Project Focus Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Monica M; Torres, Marcela M; Shipman, Kimberly; Gorrono, Jessica; Kerns, Suzanne E U; Dorsey, Shannon

    2015-02-01

    Youth in the child welfare system (CWS) have substantially higher rates of mental health needs compared to the general population, yet they rarely receive targeted, evidence-based practices (EBPs). Caseworkers play the critically important role of "service broker" for CWS youth and families. This study examines preliminary caseworker-level outcomes of Project Focus Colorado (PF-C), a training and consultation program designed to improve access to EBPs for CWS youth. PF-C evaluation occurred in four child welfare offices (two intervention [n = 16 caseworkers] vs. two practice-as-usual, wait-list control [WLC; n = 12 caseworkers]). Receipt of PF-C was associated with significantly increased caseworker knowledge of (a) EBPs, (b) child mental health problems, (c) evidence-based treatment components targeting mental health problem areas, and (d) mental health screening instruments, compared to WLC. Dose of training and consultation was associated with greater ability to correctly classify mental health problems and match them to EBPs. These preliminary results suggest that targeted training and consultation help to improve caseworker knowledge of children's mental health needs, EBPs for mental health, and mental health screening instruments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Evaluating Educational Needs of Parents at Newborn Discharge: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiman, Alanna; Crawford, Brendan D; McLain, Kyle K; Gattari, Theresa B; Mychaliska, Kerry P

    2016-05-01

    The delivery of anticipatory guidance regarding newborn care is a standard practice for pediatricians. The purpose of this prospective study was to analyze the preexisting knowledge of routine newborn care in postpartum mothers. Inclusion criteria included all postpartum mothers of live-born infants at least two hours following delivery that had not yet received formal instruction in newborn care. Each eligible mother that agreed to the voluntary survey was asked four multiple-choice questions which evaluated her knowledge of newborn care. The four questions addressed knowledge of safe sleep, car seat position, feeding behavior, and neonatal fever. A standardized template was used to ensure validity. Results were recorded in Microsoft Excel. Of the study population, 42% (55/131) of surveyed mothers were first-time mothers. Overall, results of the survey demonstrated that postpartum mothers answered the surveyed questions correctly 88% of the time previous to receiving anticipatory guidance. Postpartum mothers appear to have a high preexisting knowledge of routine newborn care in this study. Further studies are needed to determine if postpartum mothers' knowledge base increases with inpatient education. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics

  11. Proof of concept test and evaluation (pilot/mill testing) of Lasentec refining sensor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.E.

    1994-06-03

    On-line measurement of refining development is of vital concern to the papermaker since its control directly affects the uniformity of the product, drainage, drying and energy consumption. The current methods of monitoring fiber development during refining rely on secondary measures such as: Drainage rate, either measured off-line as Canadian standard freeness, or on-line with a number of commercial sample and test devices; energy consumption at the refiner; or changes in vacuum on the paper machine. To overcome these limitations of the existing technology, this project was designed to evaluate the use of a new type of sensor to monitor fiber development during refining. This sensor, a Lasentec Scanning Laser Microscope (SLM), is currently used as a particle size analyzer for slurries. The sensor will be described in more detail later. The use of this sensor had been successful in the laboratory. This project, was to establish this instrument as an in-line means to directly monitor refining.

  12. Success Evaluation of Pulpotomy in Primary Molars with Enamel Matrix Derivative: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mazhari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the effect of Emdogain gel (EMD in pulpotomized primary molars and its clinical and radiographic outcomes. Methods and Materials: In this   study, 18 lower second primary molars of nine children were treated by   pulpotomy. The teeth were randomly assigned to the EMD (experimental and Formocresol (control groups in each patient (split mouth. Following removal of the coronal pulp and haemostasis, the pulp stumps were covered with Emdogain gel in the experimental group followed by application of resin-modified glass ionomer cement over the gel. In the control group, Formocresol (FC was placed with a cotton pellet over the pulp stumps. Lastly, the teeth in both groups were restored with stainless steel crowns. Results: Nine children referred with clinical failure before/at two months follow up. The radiographic evaluation revealed furcation involvement and extensive radicular radiolucency in molars treated with Emdogain gel. Conclusion: The present study showed the failure of enamel matrix derivative in pulpotomy of primary molars; therefore, we do not recommend using Emdogain as a pulpotomy agent for treatment of cariously exposed primary teeth

  13. Evaluating students' perceptions of an interprofessional problem-based pilot learning project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccott, Lynda; Greig, Alison; Hall, Wendy; Lee, Michael; Newton, Christie; Wood, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Interprofessional teams provide the promise of effective, comprehensive and reliable care. Interprofessional education (IPE) promotes students' knowledge and attitudes to support interprofessional teamwork, and problem-based learning formats enable students to gain valuable teamwork experience. To design, implement, and evaluate an interprofessional problem-based learning module in a large Canadian university focusing on the effects of this format on students' knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions. A pre-post mixed-methods research design was used, with a convenience sample of 24 students from medicine, pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Participants in the module were divided into 5 teams composed of one member from each discipline. Pre-tests were delivered just prior to module participation and post-tests directly followed. Students also participated in focus groups to provide feedback about module content, process, outcomes, and practical considerations. Students' attitudes toward interprofessional teamwork improved from baseline to post-intervention. Mean differences were significant using paired t-tests on confidence in professional role (p <0.001), communication (p = 0.02), understanding roles of others (p = 0.002), identification with the team (p = 0.002), comfort with members (p = 0.047), cooperation with team members (p = 0.004), team perceptions (p = 0.04), decision-making (p <0.001), team efficiency (p <0.001), minimal conflict (p = 0.04), and group contributions (p = 0.03). Focus group themes indicated students were satisfied with the module, perceived increased knowledge about roles and perspectives, greater confidence to collaborate, and increased motivation to engage in intra-curricular IPE. The timing of their exposure within their respective educational programs was identified as important.

  14. Evaluation of Veterinary Student Surgical Skills Preparation for Ovariohysterectomy Using Simulators: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Emma K; Vallevand, Andrea; Farrell, Robin M

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of training intended to enhance students' performance on their first live-animal ovariohysterectomy (OVH). Cognitive task analysis informed a seven-page lab manual, 30-minute video, and 46-item OVH checklist (categorized into nine surgery components and three phases of surgery). We compared two spay simulator models (higher-fidelity silicone versus lower-fidelity cloth and foam). Third-year veterinary students were randomly assigned to a training intervention: lab manual and video only; lab manual, video, and $675 silicone-based model; lab manual, video, and $64 cloth and foam model. We then assessed transfer of training to a live-animal OVH. Chi-square analyses determined statistically significant differences between the interventions on four of nine surgery components, all three phases of surgery, and overall score. Odds ratio analyses indicated that training with a spay model improved the odds of attaining an excellent or good rating on 25 of 46 checklist items, six of nine surgery components, all three phases of surgery, and the overall score. Odds ratio analyses comparing the spay models indicated an advantage for the $675 silicon-based model on only 6 of 46 checklist items, three of nine surgery components, and one phase of surgery. Training with a spay model improved performance when compared to training with a manual and video only. Results suggested that training with a lower-fidelity/cost model might be as effective when compared to a higher-fidelity/cost model. Further research is required to investigate simulator fidelity and costs on transfer of training to the operational environment.

  15. Pilot study to evaluate the role of Mycoplasma species in cat bite abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Henderson, Camille; Hesser, Jeff; Hyatt, Doreene R; Hawley, Jennifer; Brewer, Melissa; Lappin, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    Mycoplasma species are common inhabitants of the feline oral cavity, and so likely contaminate many cat bite abscesses. The objectives of this study were to determine whether Mycoplasma species are common contaminants of cat bite abscesses and whether they are are associated with β-lactam-resistant clinical disease. Twenty-six privately owned cats with clinical evidence of an abscess suspected to be from a cat bite were included in the study. Samples from each cat were evaluated by aerobic and anaerobic culture, as well as Mycoplasma species culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All cats were initially treated with appropriate wound management and were administered an antibiotic of the β-lactam class (amoxicillin, amoxicillin clavulanate or cefovecin sodium). Mycoplasma species DNA was amplified by PCR from 4/26 samples (15.4%); one of these cases was concurrently culture positive. Adequate DNA for sequencing was present for 2/4 positive PCR samples; one was most homologous with Mycoplasma felis, and the other was most homologous with Mycoplasma equigenitalium and Mycoplasma elephantis. Of the 26 cats, 25 responded to the initial treatment by day 7. The cat that failed initial treatment was positive for M equigenitalium or M elephantis DNA on days 0 and 12, and ultimately responded to administration of enrofloxacin and clindamycin. The results suggest that while Mycoplasma species can contaminate cat bite abscesses, routine wound management and β-lactam antibiotic therapy is adequate for treatment in most cases of abscess. However, as Mycoplasma species infections do not respond to β-lactam class antibiotic therapy, these organisms should be on the differential list for cats with abscesses that fail treatment with this antibiotic class.

  16. An objective structured biostatistics examination: a pilot study based on computer-assisted evaluation for undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Sattar Khan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We designed and evaluated an objective structured biostatistics examination (OSBE on a trial basis to determine whether it was feasible for formative or summative assessment. At Ataturk University, we have a seminar system for curriculum for every cohort of all five years undergraduate education. Each seminar consists of an integrated system for different subjects, every year three to six seminars that meet for six to eight weeks, and at the end of each seminar term we conduct an examination as a formative assessment. In 2010, 201 students took the OSBE, and in 2011, 211 students took the same examination at the end of a seminar that had biostatistics as one module. The examination was conducted in four groups and we examined two groups together. Each group had to complete 5 stations in each row therefore we had two parallel lines with different instructions to be followed, thus we simultaneously examined 10 students in these two parallel lines. The students were invited after the examination to receive feedback from the examiners and provide their reflections. There was a significant (P= 0.004 difference between male and female scores in the 2010 students, but no gender difference was found in 2011. The comparison among the parallel lines and among the four groups showed that two groups, A and B, did not show a significant difference (P> 0.05 in either class. Nonetheless, among the four groups, there was a significant difference in both 2010 (P= 0.001 and 2011 (P= 0.001. The inter-rater reliability coefficient was 0.60. Overall, the students were satisfied with the testing method; however, they felt some stress. The overall experience of the OSBE was useful in terms of learning, as well as for assessment.

  17. Pilot Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Psychiatry Residents Using Standardized Patient Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Kelly, Brian; Kissane, David; Loughland, Carmel

    2016-10-01

    Mental health clinicians can experience difficulties communicating diagnostic information to patients and their families/carers, especially about distressing psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. There is evidence for the effectiveness of communication skills training (CST) for improving diagnostic discussions, particularly in specialties such as oncology, but only limited evidence exists about CST for psychiatry. This study evaluated a CST program specifically developed for psychiatry residents called ComPsych that focuses on conveying diagnostic and prognostic information about schizophrenia. The ComPsych program consists of an introductory lecture, module booklets for trainees, and exemplary skills videos, followed by small group role-plays with simulated patients (SPs) led by a trained facilitator. A standardized patient assessment (SPA) was digitally recorded pre- and post-training with a SP using a standardized scenario in a time-limited (15 min) period. Recorded SPAs were independently rated using a validated coding system (ComSkil) to identify frequency of skills used in five skills categories (agenda setting, checking, questioning, information organization, and empathic communication). Thirty trainees (15 males and 15 females; median age = 32) undertaking their vocational specialty training in psychiatry participated in ComPsych training and pre- and post-ComPsych SPAs. Skills increased post-training for agenda setting (d = -0.82), while questioning skills (d = 0.56) decreased. There were no significant differences in any other skills grouping, although checking, information organization, and empathic communication skills tended to increase post-training. A dose effect was observed for agenda setting, with trainees who attended more CST sessions outperforming those attending fewer. Findings support the generalization and translation of ComPsych CST to psychiatry.

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Lactobacillus brevis in Low-fat Milk by Pulsed Electric Field Treatment: A Pilot-scale Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gun Joon; Han, Bok Kung; Choi, Hyuk Joon; Kang, Shin Ho; Baick, Seung Chun; Lee, Dong-Un

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment on microbial inactivation and the physical properties of low-fat milk. Milk inoculated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Lactobacillus brevis was supplied to a pilot-scale PEF treatment system at a flow rate of 30 L/h. Pulses with an electric field strength of 10 kV/cm and a pulse width of 30 μs were applied to the milk with total pulse energies of 50-250 kJ/L achieved by varying the pulse frequency. The inactivation curves of the test microorganisms were biphasic with an initial lag phase (or shoulder) followed by a phase of rapid inactivation. PEF treatments with a total pulse energy of 200 kJ/L resulted in a 4.5-log reduction in E. coli, a 4.4-log reduction in L. brevis, and a 6.0-log reduction in S. cerevisiae. Total pulse energies of 200 and 250 kJ/L resulted in greater than 5-log reductions in microbial counts in stored PEF-treated milk, and the growth of surviving microorganisms was slow during storage for 15 d at 4℃. PEF treatment did not change milk physical properties such as pH, color, or particle-size distribution (pelectric-field strength of 10 kV/cm can be used to pasteurize low-fat milk.

  19. Photocatalytic mineralization of commercial herbicides in a pilot-scale solar CPC reactor: photoreactor modeling and reaction kinetics constants independent of radiation field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina-Márquez, Jose; Machuca-Martínez, Fiderman; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2009-12-01

    The six-flux absorption-scattering model (SFM) of the radiation field in the photoreactor, combined with reaction kinetics and fluid-dynamic models, has proved to be suitable to describe the degradation of water pollutants in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactors, combining simplicity and accuracy. In this study, the above approach was extended to model the photocatalytic mineralization of a commercial herbicides mixture (2,4-D, diuron, and ametryne used in Colombian sugar cane crops) in a solar, pilot-scale, compound parabolic collector (CPC) photoreactor using a slurry suspension of TiO(2). The ray-tracing technique was used jointly with the SFM to determine the direction of both the direct and diffuse solar photon fluxes and the spatial profile of the local volumetric rate of photon absorption (LVRPA) in the CPC reactor. Herbicides mineralization kinetics with explicit photon absorption effects were utilized to remove the dependence of the observed rate constants from the reactor geometry and radiation field in the photoreactor. The results showed that the overall model fitted the experimental data of herbicides mineralization in the solar CPC reactor satisfactorily for both cloudy and sunny days. Using the above approach kinetic parameters independent of the radiation field in the reactor can be estimated directly from the results of experiments carried out in a solar CPC reactor. The SFM combined with reaction kinetics and fluid-dynamic models proved to be a simple, but reliable model, for solar photocatalytic applications.

  20. Intention to quit among Indian tobacco users: Findings from International Tobacco Control Policy evaluation India pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N S Surani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tobacco users face barriers not just in quitting, but also in thinking about quitting. The aim of this study was to understand factors encouraging intention to quit from the 2006 International Tobacco Control Policy (TCP Evaluation India Pilot Study Survey. Materials and Methods: A total of 764 adult respondents from urban and rural areas of Maharashtra and Bihar were surveyed through face-to-face individual interviews, with a house-to-house approach. Dependent variable was "intention to quit tobacco." Independent variables were demographic variables, peer influence, damage perception, receiving advice to quit, and referral to cessation services by healthcare professionals and exposure to anti-tobacco messages. Logistic regression model was used with odds ratio adjusted for location, age, gender, and marital status for statistical analysis. Results: Of 493 tobacco users, 32.5% intended to quit. More numbers of users who were unaware about their friends′ tobacco use intended to quit compared to those who were aware (adjusted OR = 8.06, 95% CI = 4.58-14.19. Higher numbers of users who felt tobacco has damaged their health intended to quit compared to those who did not feel that way (adjusted OR = 5.62, 95% CI = 3.53-8.96. More numbers of users exposed to anti-tobacco messages in newspapers/magazines (adjusted OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.02-3.03, restaurants (adjusted OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.37-4.46, radio (adjusted OR=4.84, 95% CI = 3.01-7.78, cinema halls (adjusted OR = 9.22, 95% CI = 5.31-15.75, and public transportation (adjusted OR = 10.58, 95% = 5.90-18.98 intended to quit compared to unexposed users. Conclusion: Anti-tobacco messages have positive influence on user′s intentions to quit.

  1. Jumping into the deep-end: results from a pilot impact evaluation of a community-based aquatic exercise program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna L; Talevski, Jason; Morello, Renata T; Nolan, Genevieve A; De Silva, Renee D; Briggs, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    This multi-center quasi-experimental pilot study aimed to evaluate changes in pain, joint stiffness, physical function, and quality of life over 12 weeks in adults with musculoskeletal conditions attending 'Waves' aquatic exercise classes. A total of 109 adults (mean age, 65.2 years; range, 24-93 years) with musculoskeletal conditions were recruited across 18 Australian community aquatic centers. The intervention is a peer-led, 45 min, weekly aquatic exercise class including aerobic, strength, flexibility, and balance exercises (n = 67). The study also included a control group of people not participating in Waves or other formal exercise (n = 42). Outcomes were measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and EuroQoL five dimensions survey (EQ-5D) at baseline and 12 weeks. Satisfaction with Waves classes was also measured at 12 weeks. Eighty two participants (43 Waves and 39 control) completed the study protocol and were included in the analysis. High levels of satisfaction with classes were reported by Waves participants. Over 90 % of participants reported Waves classes were enjoyable and would recommend classes to others. Waves participants demonstrated improvements in WOMAC and EQ-5D scores however between-group differences did not reach statistical significance. Peer-led aquatic exercise classes appear to improve pain, joint stiffness, physical function and quality of life for people with musculoskeletal conditions. The diverse study sample is likely to have limited the power to detect significant changes in outcomes. Larger studies with an adequate follow-up period are needed to confirm effects.

  2. Clinical Evaluation of the Spermatogenic Activity of the Root Extract of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera in Oligospermic Males: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay R. Ambiye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera has been described in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine as an aphrodisiac that can be used to treat male sexual dysfunction and infertility. This pilot study was conducted to evaluate the spermatogenic activity of Ashwagandha root extract in oligospermic patients. Forty-six male patients with oligospermia (sperm count < 20 million/mL semen were enrolled and randomized either to treatment (n=21 with a full-spectrum root extract of Ashwagandha (675 mg/d in three doses for 90 days or to placebo (n=25 in the same protocol. Semen parameters and serum hormone levels were estimated at the end of 90-day treatment. There was a 167% increase in sperm count (9.59 ± 4.37 × 106/mL to 25.61 ± 8.6 × 106/mL; P<0.0001, 53% increase in semen volume (1.74 ± 0.58 mL to 2.76 ± 0.60 mL; P<0.0001, and 57% increase in sperm motility (18.62 ± 6.11% to 29.19 ± 6.31%; P<0.0001 on day 90 from baseline. The improvement in these parameters was minimal in the placebo-treated group. Furthermore, a significantly greater improvement and regulation were observed in serum hormone levels with the Ashwagandha treatment as compared to the placebo. The present study adds to the evidence on the therapeutic value of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera, as attributed in Ayurveda for the treatment of oligospermia leading to infertility.

  3. Evaluating algal growth performance and water use efficiency of pilot-scale revolving algal biofilm (RAB) culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin; Mascarenhas, Vernon; Wen, Zhiyou

    2015-10-01

    A Revolving Algal Biofilm (RAB) growth system in which algal cells are attached to a flexible material rotating between liquid and gas phases has been developed. In this work, different configurations of RAB systems were developed at pilot-scale by retrofitting the attachment materials to a raceway pond (2000-L with 8.5 m(2) footprint area) and a trough reservoir (150 L with 3.5 m(2) footprint area). The algal growth performance and chemical composition, as well as the water evaporative loss and specific water consumption were evaluated over a period of nine months in a greenhouse environment near Boone, Iowa USA. Additionally a raceway pond was run in parallel, which served as a control. On average the raceway-based RAB and the trough-based RAB outperformed the control pond by 309% and 697%, respectively. A maximum productivity of 46.8 g m(-2) day(-1) was achieved on the trough-based RAB system. The evaporative water loss of the RAB system was modeled based on an energy balance analysis and was experimentally validated. While the RAB system, particularly the trough-based RAB, had higher water evaporative loss, the specific water consumption per unit of biomass produced was only 26% (raceway-based RAB) and 7% (trough-based RAB) of that of the control pond. Collectively, this research shows that the RAB system is an efficient algal culture system and has great potential to commercially produce microalgae with high productivity and efficient water use.

  4. Evaluation of the effectiveness of postgraduate general medicine training by objective structured clinical examination---pilot study and reflection on the experiences of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jer-Chia; Liu, Keh-Min; Lee, Kun-Tai; Yen, Jo-Chu; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2008-12-01

    Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is an effective assessment method to evaluate medical students' clinical competencies performance. Postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residents have been initiated in a general medicine training program in Taiwan since 2003. However, little is known about the learning effectiveness of trainees from this program. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the clinical core competencies of PGY1 residents using OSCE, and to reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of this pilot assessment project. OSCE was conducted for five PGY1 examinees (4 men, 1 woman) with five stations covering core themes, including history taking, physical examination, clinical procedure of airway intubation, clinical reasoning, and communication skills for informing bad news. Itemized checklists and five-point Likert scale global ratings were used for evaluating performance. The results showed that the performance of our PGY1 residents on history taking was significantly better after about 2 months of postgraduate training on general internal medicine. Self-evaluation on performance by examinees revealed significantly lower global ratings on post-course OSCE (4.14 +/- 0.80 vs. 3.68 +/- 0.66; p OSCEs showed consistently favorable responses on the purposes, content, process, and environment of this assessment (4.0 +/- 0.17 vs. 4.0 +/- 0.12, nonsignificant). However, a survey of the examinees completed at pre- and post-course OSCEs showed relatively unfavorable responses to the same aspects, and to tutors and SPs (4.1 +/- 0.09 vs. 3.7 +/- 0.18; p clinical reasoning performance, communication skills (giving bad news) and self-confidence were unsatisfactory. In conclusion, this pilot study has demonstrated that OSCE is a rational and feasible assessment method for evaluating the effectiveness of our PGY general medicine training program. The quantitative data and qualitative information provide a foundation to improve the quality of the program design and evaluation

  5. Integration of midwives into the Quebec health care system. L'Equipe d'Evaluation des Projets-Pilotes Sages-Femmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, J; Blais, R; White, D; Demers, A; Desbiens, F

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on one aspect of the evaluation of the midwifery pilot projects in Quebec: the identification of the professional and organizational factors, as well as the mode of integrating midwives into the maternity care system, that would promote the best outcomes and the autonomy of midwives. The research strategy involved a multiple-case study, in which each midwifery pilot project represented a case. Based on a qualitative approach, the study employed various sources of data: individual interviews and focus groups with key informants, site observations and analyses of written documents. Results show that midwives were poorly integrated into the health care system during the evaluation. Four main reasons were identified: lack of knowledge about the practice of midwifery on the part of other health care providers; deficiencies in the legal and organizational structure of the pilot projects; competition over professional territories; and gaps between the midwives' and other providers' professional cultures. Recommendations are provided to facilitate the integration of midwives into the health care system.

  6. Towards standardized measurement of adverse events in spine surgery: conceptual model and pilot evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyo Richard A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Independent of efficacy, information on safety of surgical procedures is essential for informed choices. We seek to develop standardized methodology for describing the safety of spinal operations and apply these methods to study lumbar surgery. We present a conceptual model for evaluating the safety of spine surgery and describe development of tools to measure principal components of this model: (1 specifying outcome by explicit criteria for adverse event definition, mode of ascertainment, cause, severity, or preventability, and (2 quantitatively measuring predictors such as patient factors, comorbidity, severity of degenerative spine disease, and invasiveness of spine surgery. Methods We created operational definitions for 176 adverse occurrences and established multiple mechanisms for reporting them. We developed new methods to quantify the severity of adverse occurrences, degeneration of lumbar spine, and invasiveness of spinal procedures. Using kappa statistics and intra-class correlation coefficients, we assessed agreement for the following: four reviewers independently coding etiology, preventability, and severity for 141 adverse occurrences, two observers coding lumbar spine degenerative changes in 10 selected cases, and two researchers coding invasiveness of surgery for 50 initial cases. Results During the first six months of prospective surveillance, rigorous daily medical record reviews identified 92.6% of the adverse occurrences we recorded, and voluntary reports by providers identified 38.5% (surgeons reported 18.3%, inpatient rounding team reported 23.1%, and conferences discussed 6.1%. Trained observers had fair agreement in classifying etiology of 141 adverse occurrences into 18 categories (kappa = 0.35, but agreement was substantial (kappa ≥ 0.61 for 4 specific categories: technical error, failure in communication, systems failure, and no error. Preventability assessment had moderate agreement (mean weighted

  7. Evaluating medical students’ proficiency with a handheld ophthalmoscope: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmour G

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Gilmour,1 James McKivigan2 1Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI, 2School of Physical Therapy, Touro University, Henderson, NV, USA Introduction: Historically, testing medical students’ skills using a handheld ophthalmoscope has been difficult to do objectively. Many programs train students using plastic models of the eye which are a very limited fidelity simulator of a real human eye. This makes it difficult to be sure that actual proficiency is attained given the differences between the various models and actual patients. The purpose of this article is to introduce a method of testing where a medical student must match a patient with his/her fundus photo, ensuring objective evaluation as well as developing skills on real patients which are more likely to transfer into clinical practice directly. Presentation of case: Fundus photos from standardized patients (SPs were obtained using a retinal camera and placed into a grid using proprietary software. Medical students were then asked to examine a SP and attempt to match the patient to his/her fundus photo in the grid. Results: Of the 33 medical students tested, only 10 were able to match the SP’s eye to the correct photo in the grid. The average time to correct selection was 175 seconds, and the successful students rated their confidence level at 27.5% (average. The incorrect selection took less time, averaging 118 seconds, yet yielded a higher student-reported confidence level at 34.8% (average. The only noteworthy predictor of success (p<0.05 was the student’s age (p=0.02. Conclusion: It may be determined that there is an apparent gap in the ophthalmoscopy training of the students tested. It may also be of concern that students who selected the incorrect photo were more confident in their selections than students who chose the correct photo. More training may be necessary to close this gap, and future studies should attempt to establish

  8. Field evaluation of hazardous waste site bioassessment protocols. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.M.; Cline, J.F.; Gano, K.A.; McShane, M.C.; Rogers, J.E.; Rogers, L.E.; Simpson, J.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The overall goal of the plan was to demonstrate that honeybees could be used in detecting likely areas of chemical pollution, to demonstrate the usefulness of microbial and plant phytoassays, and to demonstrate a relationship between laboratory derived phytotoxicity results and field observations of plant community structure and diversity. Field studies were conducted through a cooperative arrangement with the US Army arsenal in Commerce City, Colorado.

  9. Evaluation of the denitrification rate of terraced paddy fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Takeo; Nakamura, Kimihito; Horino, Haruhiko; Adachi, Toru; Mitsuno, Toru

    2012-05-01

    SummaryRice is one of the most important staple foods in the world. Lowland paddy fields are well known for functioning as denitrification areas, but few studies have been conducted of paddy fields situated on hill slopes (terraced paddy fields). These terraced paddy fields have a characteristic artificial stepped shape, and this unique shape and periodic ponding from rice production may configure unique hydrological properties that might be different from lowland paddy fields. The shape and hydrological properties may also affect transport of nutrients such as nitrogen. This study is particularly focused on the denitrification rate in terraced paddy fields. To understand the hydrological properties of terraced paddy fields, a detailed water budget including the subsurface flow components was calculated. Combining the water budget components and chemical measurements of surface and subsurface water, a nitrogen budget was calculated. The results showed that about 10% of the total nitrogen input, mainly from fertilizers, was lost, suggesting the occurrence of denitrification in the area. The average denitrification rate of the study site was estimated at about 0.53-0.67 g N m-2 year-1. Spatial variations in the measured groundwater nitrate concentration suggest that denitrification is important in both the plough layer and the sloping area. The denitrification rate in the sloping area was estimated at 0.67-0.78 g N m-2 year-1, which is slightly higher than the estimates of denitrification rate in paddy lots, i.e., 0.56-0.61 g N m-2 year-1. The result indicates the importance of sloping areas for denitrification in terraced paddy fields.

  10. A magnetic field exposure facility for evaluation of animal carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruvada, P S; Harvey, S M; Jutras, P; Goulet, D; Mandeville, R

    2000-09-01

    Several animal studies have been carried out at the Institut Armand Frappier (IAF) to determine whether chronic exposure to 60 Hz linearly polarized sinusoidal magnetic fields might increase the risk of cancer development of female Fisher rats. The magnetic field exposure facility was developed to meet the requirements of the study protocol for chronic exposure of large number of animals to field intensities of sham < 0.2 microT, 2 microT, 20 microT, 200 microT, and 2000 microT. At each exposure level, including sham, the animals are distributed in a group of four exposure units. Each exposure unit contains two exposure volumes having uniform distribution of magnetic fields for the animals, while the magnetic field external to the unit falls off rapidly due to the "figure-eight" coil topography used. A program of "shake down" tests, followed by verification and calibration of the exposure facility, was carried out prior to starting the animal experiments. Continuous monitoring of the magnetic field and other environmental parameters was an important part in the overall quality assurance program adopted.

  11. "Is Your Man Stepping Out?" An Online Pilot Study to Evaluate Acceptability of a Guide-Enhanced HIV Prevention Soap Opera Video Series and Feasibility of Recruitment by Facebook Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel; Lacroix, Lorraine J; Nolte, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Love, Sex, and Choices (LSC) is a 12-episode soap opera video series developed to reduce HIV risk among at-risk Black urban women. We added a video guide commentator to offer insights at critical dramatic moments. An online pilot study evaluated acceptability of the Guide-Enhanced LSC (GELSC) and feasibility of Facebook advertising, streaming to smartphones, and retention. Facebook ads targeted high-HIV-prevalence areas. In 30 days, Facebook ads generated 230 screening interviews: 84 were high risk, 40 watched GELSC, and 39 followed up at 30 days. Recruitment of high-risk participants was 10 per week, compared to seven per week in previous field recruitment. Half the sample was Black; 12% were Latina. Findings suggest GELSC influenced sex scripts and behaviors. It was feasible to recruit young urban women from a large geographic area via Facebook and to retain the sample. We extended the reach to at-risk women by streaming to mobile devices.

  12. Nonprofits and Evaluation: Empirical Evidence from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Joanne G.; Fredericks, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors explore what evaluation looks like, in practice, among today's nonprofit organizations on the basis of their survey results. The types of evaluation activities nonprofit organizations are engaging in on a regular basis, as well as the types of data they are collecting and how they are using these data, are described. How nonprofits…

  13. Reasearch and Evaluation of Electromagnetic Fields of Refrigerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranas Baltrėnas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of refrigerators causes the occurence of electromagnetic fields that are invisible and intangible, which therefore makes difficulties in protecting ourselves from them. A refrigerator is an irreplaceable item in domestic household and thus can be hardly ignored by a modern way of human life. In order to preserve the characteristics of products, the refrigerator must operate continuously (24 hrs a day, regardless of the time of the year. This results in a huge increase in electricity consumption, which leads to energy consumption related pollution of the environment emitting CO2 gas. On these grounds, it is necessary to assess electromagnetic fields created by the refrigerator. Studies on electromagnetic fields produced by refrigerators were conducted in domestic premises where people spent a significant part of the day. For comparison purposes, five different power refrigerators were chosen (1 – 0.20 kW; 2 – 0.25 kW; 3 – 0.30 kW; 4 – 0.35 kW; 5 – 0.40 kW. The obtained results, according to the parameters of their electromagnetic fields, were presented in graphs and charts and showed that the values of electric and magnetic intensity of refrigerators depended on the distance and the power of the refrigerator. The conducted research also disclosed that none of tested refrigerators exceeded the permissible limits of electromagnetic fields.Article in Lithuanian

  14. Evaluation of environmental control technologies for magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    The peripheral magnetic fields of several energy-related technologies are calculated, and shielding options are studied for three field intensities as possible exposure levels: 200 G, 10 G, and 0.3 G. Seven fusion reactor designs are studied. For a 200-G field level, shielding is not required. For the 10- and 0.3-G levels, land is the most economical shielding method, with shield coils an acceptable alternative at 0.3 G. Nonnuclear technologies studied are superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electric generators, magnetically levitated vehicles, superconducting ac generators, and underground transmission lines. Superconducting ac generators and underground transmission lines require no shielding. The superconducting magnetic energy storage coil requires no shielding for 200 G. Both a shield coil and land are needed to meet 10 G or 0.3 G. The MHD generator needs no shielding to 200 G and 10 G. Land is the most economical means of meeting the 0.3 G level. Most of the magnetically levitated vehicles require no shielding to 200 G. The field on-board can be reduced from 200 to 25 G, depending upon the vehicle design, with shield coils. The use of iron, or another permeable material, is necessary to reduce the field to 10 G or 0.3 G. However, iron introduces too much added weight to allow efficient operation.

  15. Evaluation of the first year of a pilot program in community pharmacy: HIV/AIDS medication therapy management for Medi-Cal beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jan D; Rosenquist, Ashley; Best, Brookie M; Miller, Teresa Ann; Gilmer, Todd P

    2009-01-01

    The advent of combined antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased treatment effectiveness but created new challenges for patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and for community pharmacists managing patients' drug therapy. The ability of pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services to increase medication adherence, improve health outcomes, and reduce overall medical costs has been demonstrated in community pharmacies for chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. However, the effectiveness of pharmacist-provided MTM services in HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has not been well studied. In January 2005, a pilot program to evaluate MTM services for patients with HIV/AIDS began in California, allowing 10 HIV/AIDS specialty pharmacies to receive compensation for the MTM services that they provided to HIV/AIDS patients. To examine the first year of the HIV/AIDS pharmacy MTM compensation pilot program, which described and compared pilot and nonpilot pharmacies with respect to (a) patient characteristics; (b) intermediate outcomes including type and number of ART medication regimens used, rates of adherence and excess medication fills for ART, use of contraindicated ART regimens, and occurrence of opportunistic infections; and (c) pharmacy and medical costs. This was a cohort study examining 2005 Medi-Cal pharmacy and medical claims data for patients with HIV/AIDS who were served by pilot pharmacies versus other pharmacies. The HIV/AIDS patients were Medi-Cal beneficiaries aged 18 years or older as of January 1, 2005, who were continuously enrolled from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2005, and diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, identified by receipt of at least 1 ART prescription and at least 1 medical claim with a diagnosis (primary or secondary) of HIV/AIDS (ICD-9-CM code 042.0) during both the index period (the year before pilot program implementation, 2004) and the intervention period (the study year, 2005

  16. Evaluation of Mangosteen juice blend on biomarkers of inflammation in obese subjects: a pilot, dose finding study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Betsy B

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to reduce inflammation in overweight and obese individuals may be valuable in preventing the progression to metabolic syndrome with associated risks for heart disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of multiple dosages of a proprietary Mangosteen Juice blend on indicators of inflammation and antioxidant levels in obese patients with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP levels. Methods The study was an 8 week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with a pre-study 2 week washout period. The study included four groups including placebo and three difference doses of the test product, XanGo Juice™: 3, 6 or 9 oz twice daily. The primary outcome measure of this study was high-sensitivity (HS-CRP. Secondary outcome measures included other biochemical indicators of inflammation, anthropomorphic measures and a safety evaluation. Results One hundred twenty two (122 persons were screened for the study, 44 were randomized and 40 completed the study. HS-CRP measurements dropped after 8 weeks treatment compared to baseline in all 3 dose groups and increased in the placebo group. The changes from baseline were not significant but the comparison of change from baseline was significant for the 18 oz group when compared to placebo (p = 0.02. Other markers of inflammation (inflammatory cytokines and a marker for lipid peroxidation (F2 isoprostane did not show any significant differences when compared with placebo. There was a trend towards a decrease in BMI in the juice groups. There were no side effects reported in any of the groups and none of the laboratory or EKG safety assessments indicated clinically significant changes for any subject. Conclusion In this pilot, dose-finding study, a proprietary mangosteen juice blend (XanGo Juice™ reduced CRP levels (increased change from baseline compared to placebo for those taking the highest dose of 18 oz per day. Further studies with a

  17. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Kenneth J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Prohaska, Robert S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-11

    This presentation provides information about NREL's real-world evaluations of commercial vehicle technologies, which compare the performance of advanced medium- and heavy-duty fleet vehicles to conventional vehicles. NREL conducts these customized evaluations in partnership with commercial and government fleets across the nation. Current fleet and industry partners include UPS, Workhorse, Parker Hannifin, Proterra, Foothill Transit, Long Beach Transit, BYD, Odyne, Duke Energy, Miami-Dade, TransPower, Eaton, Cummins, Bosch, and Clean Cities/National Clean Fleet Partnership. The presentation focuses on two particular vehicle evaluation projects -- hydraulic hybrid refuse haulers operated by Miami-Dade and electric transit buses operated by Foothill Transit.

  18. Wide-field broad-band radio imaging with phased array feeds: a pilot multi-epoch continuum survey with ASKAP-BETA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, I.; Bannister, K. W.; Marvil, J.; Allison, J. R.; Ball, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Brothers, M.; Bunton, J. D.; Chippendale, A. P.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T. J.; De Boer, D.; Edwards, P.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Johnston, S.; Kimball, A. E.; Koribalski, B. S.; Lenc, E.; Macleod, A.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Mirtschin, P.; Murphy, T.; Neuhold, S.; Norris, R. P.; Pearce, S.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sadler, E. M.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Serra, P.; Shimwell, T. W.; Stevens, J.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    The Boolardy Engineering Test Array is a 6 × 12 m dish interferometer and the prototype of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), equipped with the first generation of ASKAP's phased array feed (PAF) receivers. These facilitate rapid wide-area imaging via the deployment of simultaneous multiple beams within an ˜30 deg2 field of view. By cycling the array through 12 interleaved pointing positions and using nine digitally formed beams, we effectively mimic a traditional 1 h × 108 pointing survey, covering ˜150 deg2 over 711-1015 MHz in 12 h of observing time. Three such observations were executed over the course of a week. We verify the full bandwidth continuum imaging performance and stability of the system via self-consistency checks and comparisons to existing radio data. The combined three epoch image has arcminute resolution and a 1σ thermal noise level of 375 μJy beam-1, although the effective noise is a factor of ˜3 higher due to residual sidelobe confusion. From this we derive a catalogue of 3722 discrete radio components, using the 35 per cent fractional bandwidth to measure in-band spectral indices for 1037 of them. A search for transient events reveals one significantly variable source within the survey area. The survey covers approximately two-thirds of the Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field. This pilot project demonstrates the viability and potential of using PAFs to rapidly and accurately survey the sky at radio wavelengths.

  19. The effect of music video exposure on students' perceived clinical applications of popular music in the field of music therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Lori F; Mori-Inoue, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of video exposure on music therapy students' perceptions of clinical applications of popular music in the field of music therapy. Fifty-one participants were randomly divided into two groups and exposed to a popular song in either audio-only or music video format. Participants were asked to indicate clinical applications; specifically, participants chose: (a) possible population(s), (b) most appropriate population(s), (c) possible age range(s), (d) most appropriate age ranges, (e) possible goal area(s) and (f) most appropriate goal area. Data for each of these categories were compiled and analyzed, with no significant differences found in the choices made by the audio-only and video groups. Three items, (a) selection of the bereavement population, (b) selection of bereavement as the most appropriate population and (c) selection of the age ranges of pre teen/mature adult, were additionally selected for further analysis due to their relationship to the video content. Analysis results revealed a significant difference between the video and audio-only groups for the selection of these specific items, with the video group's selections more closely aligned to the video content. Results of this pilot study suggest that music video exposure to popular music can impact how students choose to implement popular songs in the field of music therapy.

  20. Developing and evaluating rapid field methods to estimate peat carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney A. Chimner; Cassandra A. Ott; Charles H. Perry; Randall K. Kolka

    2014-01-01

    Many international protocols (e.g., REDD+) are developing inventories of ecosystem carbon stocks and fluxes at country and regional scales, which can include peatlands. As the only nationally implemented field inventory and remeasurement of forest soils in the US, the USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (FIA) samples the top 20 cm of organic soils...

  1. FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCP METHOD - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) pentachlorophenol (PCP) method uses a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a megabore capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) and electron capture detector (ECD) to identify and quantify PCP. The FASP PCP method is design...

  2. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Chris; Alken, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 12th revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was issued in December 2014 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/IAGA/vmod/igrf.html). This revision comprises new spherical...

  3. [Sphygmographic parameters in fighter and transport pilots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Y; Tian, G; Yu, Y; Zhao, Y; Liang, B

    1997-10-01

    To evaluate and discover hidden cardiovascular trouble in pilots, the cardiovascular function of 129 active male pilots was examined with a new sphygmographic method. 13 pilots (10.3%) were found to have abnormal cardiovascular function. The average arterial blood pressure and medium artery modulus of the fighter pilots aged from 30 to 34 years are inferior to those aged from 25 to 29 obviously, however, that is not the case in transport pilots. This indicates that frequent examination of cardiovascular function with convenient special method is necessary for the improvement of the quality of medical monitor on pilots.

  4. A field pilot-scale study of biological treatment of heavy oil-produced water by biological filter with airlift aeration and hydrolytic acidification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Junming; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Song, Zhaozheng; Zhang, Zhenjia; Zhang, Beiyu; Zhang, Guangqing; Wu, Wei-Min

    2016-03-01

    Heavy oil-produced water (HOPW) is a by-product during heavy oil exploitation and can cause serious environmental pollution if discharged without adequate treatment. Commercial biochemical treatment units are important parts of HOPW treatment processes, but many are not in stable operation because of the toxic and refractory substances, salt, present. Therefore, pilot-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of hydrolytic acidification-biological filter with airlift aeration (HA-BFAA), a novel HOPW treatment system. Four strains isolated from oily sludge were used for bioaugmentation to enhance the biodegradation of organic pollutants. The isolated bacteria were evaluated using 3-day biochemical oxygen demand, oil, dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals as evaluation indices. Bioaugmentation enhanced the COD removal by 43.5 mg/L under a volume load of 0.249 kg COD/m(3) day and hydraulic retention time of 33.6 h. The effluent COD was 70.9 mg/L and the corresponding COD removal was 75.0 %. The optimum volumetric air-to-water ratio was below 10. The removal ratios of the total extractable organic pollutants, alkanes, and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons were 71.1, 94.4, and 94.0 %, respectively. Results demonstrated that HA-BFAA was an excellent HOPW treatment system.

  5. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.;

    2012-01-01

    implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  6. EEG reactions of the human brain in the gradient magnetic field zone of the active geological fault (pilot study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobachenko, S. V.; Shitov, A. V.; Grigorjev, P. E.; Sokolov, M. V.; Zubrilkin, A. I.; Vypiraylo, D. N.; Solovjev, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the dynamics of the functional state of a person within the zone of an active geological fault characterized by abnormal spatial distribution of the magnetic- field vector values. It is shown that these geophysical modifications have a pronounced effect on the fluctuations of the electrical activity of the human brain. When the person gets into a zone with abnormal levels of gradient magnetic field in the absence of any subjective sensations, a nonspecific orientation activation reaction is observed, which is characterized by a significant increase in the levels of peak performance in key functional EEG frequency bands.

  7. Pilot Inter-Laboratory Studies for Evaluating Weathering-Induced Release of Carbon Nanotubes from Solid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanomaterials are increasingly being used in polymer composites to enhance the properties of these materials. Here we present results of a pilot inter-laboratory study to simulate the effects of weathering on the potential release of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) from thei...

  8. Cluster Sampling Bias in Government-Sponsored Evaluations: A Correlational Study of Employment and Welfare Pilots in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaganay, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    For pilot or experimental employment programme results to apply beyond their test bed, researchers must select 'clusters' (i.e. the job centres delivering the new intervention) that are reasonably representative of the whole territory. More specifically, this requirement must account for conditions that could artificially inflate the effect of a programme, such as the fluidity of the local labour market or the performance of the local job centre. Failure to achieve representativeness results in Cluster Sampling Bias (CSB). This paper makes three contributions to the literature. Theoretically, it approaches the notion of CSB as a human behaviour. It offers a comprehensive theory, whereby researchers with limited resources and conflicting priorities tend to oversample 'effect-enhancing' clusters when piloting a new intervention. Methodologically, it advocates for a 'narrow and deep' scope, as opposed to the 'wide and shallow' scope, which has prevailed so far. The PILOT-2 dataset was developed to test this idea. Empirically, it provides evidence on the prevalence of CSB. In conditions similar to the PILOT-2 case study, investigators (1) do not sample clusters with a view to maximise generalisability; (2) do not oversample 'effect-enhancing' clusters; (3) consistently oversample some clusters, including those with higher-than-average client caseloads; and (4) report their sampling decisions in an inconsistent and generally poor manner. In conclusion, although CSB is prevalent, it is still unclear whether it is intentional and meant to mislead stakeholders about the expected effect of the intervention or due to higher-level constraints or other considerations.

  9. Supporting Adolescent Learning and Development Using Applied Learning Pedagogies in a Regional Secondary School: An Evaluation of a Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chris; Faulkner, Michael; Pridham, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Pedagogies to develop autonomy and social responsibility in early adolescent learners persist as an ongoing agenda for schools. This paper reports on one Australian regional secondary college's pilot program to improve learner engagement in one year 8 class using applied learning principles across the curriculum. In late 2006, participating…

  10. Pilot Inter-Laboratory Studies for Evaluating Weathering-Induced Release of Carbon Nanotubes from Solid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanomaterials are increasingly being used in polymer composites to enhance the properties of these materials. Here we present results of a pilot inter-laboratory study to simulate the effects of weathering on the potential release of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) from thei...

  11. The Relationship between Self-Appraisal, Professional Training, and Diversity Awareness among Forensic Psychology Students: A Pilot Formative Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Donald S., Jr.; Chandler, Michele D.; Clark, Quelanda C.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, there is a growing need for formal training in forensic psychology. This pilot study examines the relational-behavior model (RBM) as a method of intrinsic motivational instruction, perceived academic competence, and program competency among a sample of forensic psychology students. In theory, the RBM suggests that self-appraisal,…

  12. Pilot project as enabler?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, Margit; Glimø, Helle; Holm, Catrine Granzow;

    This article deals with a systemic perspective on transition. The field of study addressed is a pilot project as enabler of transition in a highly complex polycentric context. From a Luhmannian systemic approach, a framework is created to understand and address barriers of change occurred using p...

  13. Pilot Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Maria Ie

    tensions and negotiations are fundamental characteristics of pilot implementations. Based on the analysis of a project that is pilot implementing an electronic pre-hospital patient record for emergency medical services in Danish health care, I investigate other perceptions of pilot implementations....... The analysis is conducted by means of a theoretical framework that centres on the concept infrastructure. With infrastructure I understand the relation between organised practice and the information systems supporting this practice. Thus, infrastructure is not a thing but a relational and situated concept...... understanding of pilot implementations as enacted interventions into existing infrastructures. Moreover, being embedded in the day-to-day organisation of work pilot implementations intervenes in the conventions of practice making the taken for granted visible. This allows project participants to attend...

  14. Solar photocatalitycal treatment of carbofuran at lab and pilot scale: effect of classical parameters, evaluation of the toxicity and analysis of organic by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Alvarez, Blady; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2011-07-15

    In this work the TiO(2) solar-photocatalytical degradation of the pesticide carbofuran (CBF) in water, at lab and pilot scale, was studied. At lab scale the evaluation of CBF concentration (14-282 μmol L(-1)) showed that the system followed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics type. TiO(2) concentration (0.05-2 g L(-1)) and initial pH (3-9) were also evaluated and optimized using the surface response methodology and the Pareto diagram. In the range of variables studied, initial pH 7.60 and 1.43 g L(-1) of TiO(2) favoured the efficiency of the process. Under optimal conditions the evolution of substrate, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved organic carbon, toxicity and organics by-products were evaluated. In the pilot scale tests, using direct sunlight, 55 mg L(-1) of CBF in a commercial formulation was eliminated after 420 min; while after 900 min of treatment 80% of toxicity (1/E(50) on Vibrium Fischeri), 80% of chemical oxygen demand and 60% of dissolved organic carbon were removed. The analysis and evolution of five CBF by-products, as well the evaluation of the treatment in the presence of isopropanol or using acetonitrile as a solvent suggest that the degradation is mainly carried out by OH radical attack. Finally, a schema depicting the main degradation pathway is proposed.

  15. Subjective preference evaluation of sound fields by performing singers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noson, Dennis

    2003-08-01

    A model of the auditory process is proposed for performing singers, which incorporates the added signal from bone conduction, as well as the psychological distance for subjective preference of the performer from the acoustic sound field of the stage. The explanatory power of previous scientific studies of vocal stage acoustics has been limited by a lack of an underlying theory of performer preference. Ando's theory, using the autocorrelation function (ACF) for parametrizing temporal factors, was applied to interpretation of singer sound field preference determined by the pair comparison method. Melisma style singing (no lyrics) was shown to increase the preferred delay time of reflections from a mean of 14 ms with lyrics to 23 ms without (pThesis advisor: Yoichi Ando Copies of this thesis are available from the author by inquiry at BRC Acoustics, 1741 First Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98134 USA. E-mail address: dnoson@brcacoustics.com

  16. Numerical evaluation of the bispectrum in multiple field inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Mafalda; Mulryne, David J; Seery, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a complete framework for numerical calculation of the power spectrum and bispectrum in canonical inflation with an arbitrary number of light or heavy fields. Our method includes all relevant effects at tree-level in the loop expansion, including (i) interference between growing and decaying modes near horizon exit; (ii) correlation and coupling between species near horizon exit and on superhorizon scales; (iii) contributions from mass terms; and (iv) all contributions from coupling to gravity. We track the evolution of each correlation function from the vacuum state through horizon exit and the superhorizon regime, with no need to match quantum and classical parts of the calculation; when integrated, our approach corresponds exactly with the tree-level Schwinger or 'in-in' formulation of quantum field theory. In this paper we give the equations necessary to evolve all two- and three-point correlation functions together with suitable initial conditions. The final formalism is suitable to compute the...

  17. Rotating field collector subsystem phase 1 study and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D.; Eibling, J. A.

    1982-10-01

    The rotating field collector system is an alternative concept in which all heliostats are mounted on a single large platform which rotates around a tower to track the azumuthal angle of the Sun. Each heliostat is mounted to the platform with appropriate pivots, linkage, and controls to provide the additional positioning required to properly direct the solar radiation onto the receiver. The results are presented of the first phase of a study to investigate the technical and economic merits of a particular type of rotating field collector subsystem. The large pie-shaped platform would revolve over an array of support pedestals by means of a roller at the top of each pedestal. Several heliostats were built to demonstrate their construction features, and the operation of both flat and amphitheater rotating fields was studied. Work included an analysis of the concepts, development of modifications and additions to make the system comply with design criteria, and cost estimates to be used for comparison with other heliostat subsystems. Because of considerably high cost estimates, the focus of a large part of the study was directed toward developing lower cost designs of major components.

  18. Field Evaluation of a Near Zero Energy Home in Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2008-08-01

    The authors evaluated a zero energy home built by Ideal Homes in Edmond, Oklahoma, that included an extensive package of energy-efficient technologies and a photovoltaic array for site electricity generation. The home was part of a Building America research project in partnership with the Building Science Consortium to exhibit high efficiency technologies while keeping costs within the reach of average home buyers.

  19. Evaluation of field trials of innovative practices in science education

    OpenAIRE

    Gerloff-Gasser, C; Büchel, K

    2012-01-01

    Science and technology (S&T) education is vital to increase the science literacy in modern societies and to stimulate more young people to opt for careers in S&T. Because there are considerable differences in S&T education among and sometimes within countries, it is promising to adopt an adaptive strategy to its innovation that allows a fit to the specific conditions of each of the countries. In this report, we present first results of field trials with innovative practices in S&T educatio...

  20. A pilot study to evaluate the safety and clinical performance of Leucopatch, an autologous, additive-free, platelet-rich fibrin for the treatment of recalcitrant chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny; Vogensen, Hanne;

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, uncontrolled pilot study evaluated the safety and clinical performance of Leucopatch an additive-free, autologous platelet-rich fibrin in the treatment of recalcitrant chronic wounds. Fifteen patients, with 16 lower extremity chronic wounds of varying etiologies were treated...... events. Two adverse events, one of noncompliance and one infection, were observed; neither was considered to be related to treatment. The results indicate that Leucopatch is easy to prepare and apply in the clinic, is safe, and may be a clinically effective treatment of recalcitrant chronic wounds....