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Sample records for pilot evaluation study

  1. Economic evaluation of CISM : a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogt, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    air traffic controllers, critical incident stress management, CISM, critical incidents, critical incident stress, cost-benefit-analysis, economic evaluation, efficiency, return on investment......air traffic controllers, critical incident stress management, CISM, critical incidents, critical incident stress, cost-benefit-analysis, economic evaluation, efficiency, return on investment...

  2. Evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Laura; Bruce, Natalie; Suh, Kathryn N; Roth, Virginia

    2014-07-01

    Environmental auditing is an important tool to ensure consistent and effective cleaning. Our pilot study compared an alcohol-based fluorescent marking product and an adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence product for use in an environmental auditing program to determine which product was more practical and acceptable to users. Both products were tested on 15 preselected high touch objects in randomly selected patient rooms, following regular daily cleaning. A room was considered a "pass" if ≥80% of surfaces were adequately cleaned as defined by manufacturers' guidelines. A qualitative survey assessed user preference and operational considerations. Using fluorescent marking, 9 of 37 patient rooms evaluated (24%) were considered a "pass" after daily cleaning. Using adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence, 21 of 37 patient rooms passed (57%). There was great variability in results between different high touch objects. Eighty percent of users preferred the alcohol-based fluorescent marking product because it provided an effective visual aid to coach staff on proper cleaning techniques and allowed simple and consistent application. Environmental auditing using translucent, alcohol-based fluorescent marking best met the requirements of our organization. Our results reinforce the importance of involving a multidisciplinary team in evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pilot Evaluation Study of the Life Skills Program REBOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Jungaberle

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study is pilot evaluation of the life skills program REBOUND in a school context focusing on substance use, risk perception, and knowledge about psychoactive substances ( n IG + CG = 723 students in five schools and 46 classes, Mage = 14.8, range 14-18 for the total sample and in the subgroups gender, age, and school type. Main goal of the study is collecting evidence for program optimization. A controlled study was carried out with repeated measurement before and after the intervention (4-6 months. Multilevel analyses, ANCOVA, and logistic regression analyses were applied to measure the effects. Overall, significantly lower incidence rates of drunkenness (odds ratio [OR] = .55; p = .033, improved knowledge about psychoactive substances (p = .006, lower personal (p = .013 and general tobacco risk perception among users (p = .002, and lower general tobacco (p = .018 and cannabis (p = .000 risk perception in non-users were found in the total intervention group. In subgroups, significantly lower rates for the incidence of drunkenness can be shown for males (p = .008 and for younger participants (p = .004. Students at academic high school (German Gymnasium showed a decrease in 30-day prevalence for alcohol (p = .017 and cannabis (p = .014, and they improved in their knowledge about psychoactive substances (p = .000. In vocational high school classes (German Realschule, there was an increase in the relative alcohol risk perception of the students (p = .019. REBOUND contributes to a controlled use of alcohol and increases knowledge about psychoactive substances. REBOUND has various effects on the examined subgroups age, gender, and school type: Males, younger students, and students in academic high school benefitted more from the course regarding consumption-related criteria. We suggest a program optimization specific to school form and age, inclusion of a tobacco intervention, and the use of more gender-segregated interventions.

  4. Learning the 'SMART' way... results from a pilot study evaluating an interprofessional acute care study day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of patients requiring critical care are now being managed outside of critical care facilities. There is evidence that staff looking after these patients lack the necessary knowledge and skills to care for them safely, and that effective pre-registration education can play a significant role in addressing these shortfalls in nurses' knowledge and skills. A team from Sheffield Hallam University, in collaboration with the University of Sheffield, developed a pilot one day interprofessional acute illness programme which was called SMART® (Student Management of Acute illness - Recognition and Treatment). To evaluate the pilot programme, 16 student doctors and 72 student nurses were recruited. A pre- and post-course questionnaire based on the Featherstone et al. (2005) evaluation of ALERT was used to ascertain the students' general level of knowledge of the deteriorating patient, their experiences of and confidence in caring for an acutely unwell patient, and their level of comfort with interprofessional working. The results from the pilot study indicate that the students' levels of knowledge, their levels of confidence and their comfort with interprofessional working all rose after undertaking the programme. The pilot study has a number of implications for the future teaching and learning of acute care clinical skills, within a theoretically based curriculum.

  5. Evaluation of the finger wrinkling test: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barneveld, van S.; Palen, van der J.; Putten, van M.J.A.M

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Tilt table testing mainly evaluates the systemic cardiovascular part of the autonomic nervous system, while it is assumed that the finger wrinkling test assesses the peripheral part of the autonomic nervous system. In this study we explored whether the finger wrinkling test could be a usefu

  6. Evaluation of the finger wrinkling test : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Barneveld, S.; van der Palen, J.; van Putten, M. J. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Tilt table testing mainly evaluates the systemic cardiovascular part of the autonomic nervous system, while it is assumed that the finger wrinkling test assesses the peripheral part of the autonomic nervous system. In this study we explored whether the finger wrinkling test could be a useful test fo

  7. A pilot study to evaluate runoff quantity from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Lee, Min Jung; Han, Mooyoung

    2015-04-01

    The use of green roofs is gaining increased recognition in many countries as a solution that can be used to improve environmental quality and reduce runoff quantity. To achieve these goals, pilot-scale green roof assemblies have been constructed and operated in an urban setting. From a stormwater management perspective, green roofs are 42.8-60.8% effective in reducing runoff for 200 mm soil depth and 13.8-34.4% effective in reducing runoff for 150 mm soil depth. By using Spearman rank correlation analysis, high rainfall intensity was shown to have a negative relationship with delayed occurrence time, demonstrating that the soil media in green roofs do not efficiently retain rainwater. Increasing the number of antecedent dry days can help to improve water retention capacity and delay occurrence time. From the viewpoint of runoff water quality, green roofs are regarded as the best management practice by filtration and adsorption through growth media (soil).

  8. Increasing Physical Activity in Preschool: A Pilot Study to Evaluate Animal Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christine L.; Carter, Betty Jean; Kibbe, Debra L.; Dennison, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This report describes a pilot study to evaluate Animal Trackers (AT), a preschool program designed to (1) increase structured physical activity (PA) during the preschool day; (2) increase practice of gross motor skills; (3) provide teachers with an easy-to-use PA program regardless of teacher experience; and (4) implement a teacher…

  9. Evaluating Boy Scout Geology Education, A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, R. S.; Thomson, B.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated geology knowledge acquisition by Boy Scouts through use of the Boy Scout Geology Merit Handbook. In this study, boys engaged in hands-on interactive learning following the requirements set forth in the Geology Merit Badge Handbook. The purposes of this study were to determine the amount of geology content knowledge engendered in adolescent males through the use of the Geology Merit Badge Handbook published by the Boy Scouts of America; to determine if single sex, activity oriented, free-choice learning programs can be effective in promoting knowledge development in young males; and to determine if boys participating in the Scouting program believed their participation helped them succeed in school. Members of a local Boy Scout Troop between the ages of 11 and 18 were invited to participate in a Geology Merit Badge program. Boys who did not already possess the badge were allowed to self-select participation. The boys' content knowledge of geology, rocks, and minerals was pre- and post-tested. Boys were interviewed about their school and Scouting experiences; whether they believed their Scouting experiences and work in Merit Badges contributed to their success in school. Contributing educational theories included single-sex education, informal education with free-choice learning, learning styles, hands-on activities, and the social cognitive theory concept of self-efficacy. Boys who completed this study seemed to possess a greater knowledge of geology than they obtained in school. If boys who complete the Boy Scout Geology Merit Badge receive additional geological training, their field experiences and knowledge acquired through this learning experience will be beneficial, and a basis for continued scaffolding of geologic knowledge.

  10. Evaluation of surgically retrieved temporomandibular joint alloplastic implants: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joao N A R; Ko, Ching-Chang; Myers, Sandra; Swift, James; Fricton, James R

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a retrieval analysis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) alloplastic interpositional implants and test possible correlation between implant failure features and patient clinical outcomes. In addition, we investigated the implants' surface and examined the foreign body reaction associated with different types of alloplastic materials. Twelve implants (Proplast/Teflon [Vitek, Houston, TX] and Silastic [Dow Corning, Midland, MI]) were surgically removed from the patients' TMJs. Implant surface failure features (fracture length, perforation of the implants) were observed using stereomicroscopy and recorded for description of the failure mechanisms and to statistically compare with clinical outcomes. Patients' clinical data (pain symptoms and mandibular function) were collected and examined. Clinical outcomes were obtained relative to symptom severity (Symptom Severity Index [SSI]) and jaw function (modified Mandibular Function Impairment Questionnaire [mMFIQ]). Peri-implant soft tissues and implants were analyzed with light microscopy and stereo zoom microscopy. Electron microprobe analysis of implant fragments and peri-implant tissues was performed. The statistical results showed that only the presence of implant perforation was statistically associated with the SSI, specifically with the pain tolerability dimension. No statistical association was seen between any of the other implant failure predictors and the SSI and between the predictors and the mMFIQ. Stereo zoom microscopy suggested that Proplast/Teflon implants (n = 7) were susceptible to perforation, layer tearing, fracture and fiber extrusion. The Silastic implants (n = 3) revealed a possible center perforation with fracture lines towards the periphery and fiber extrusion. Teflon implant wear debris particles appear to trigger a multinucleated giant cell foreign body reaction. Facial pain was a significant correlate to perforation and breakdown of the alloplastic TMJ

  11. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Pilot Study: XRF Evaluation of Select Pre-Hanford Orchards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Gorton, Alicia M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Pino, Christian; Martinez, Dominique M.; Rana, Komal; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-20

    Prior to the acquisition of land by the U.S. Department of War in February 1943 and the creation of the Hanford Site, the land along the Columbia River was home to over 1000 people. Farming and orchard operations by both homesteaders and commercial organizations were prevalent. Orchard activities and the associated application of lead arsenate pesticide ceased in 1943, when residents were moved from the Hanford Site at the beginning of the Manhattan Project. Today, the residues from historical application of lead arsenate pesticide persist in some locations on the Hanford Site. In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology established the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The pre-Hanford orchard lands identified as the 100-OL-1 OU are located south of the Columbia River and east of the present-day Vernita Bridge, and extend southeast to the former Hanford townsite. The discontinuous orchard lands within 100-OL-1 OU are approximately 20 km2 (5000 ac). A pilot study was conducted to support the approval of the remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 OU. This pilot study evaluated the use of a field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of lead arsenate pesticide residues in the OU. The objectives of the pilot study included evaluating a field portable XRF analyzer as the analytical method for decision making, estimating the nature and extent of lead and arsenic in surface soils in four decision units, evaluating the results for the purpose of optimizing the sampling approach implemented in the remedial investigation, and collecting information to improve the cost estimate and planning the cultural resources review for sampling activities in the remedial investigation. Based on

  12. Fundamental Study of Evaluation at Berthing Training for Pilot Trainees Using a Ship Maneuvering Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Inoue

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Use of the ship maneuvering simulator (SMS is at the core of pilot trainees education and training, so it is desirable to have an evaluation method that can be completed shortly after each berthing training session. There are basically two methods of docking maneuvering that pilot trainees learn: one in which the ship enters from outside the port and is berthed directly at the target quay, and a second method in which the vessel carries out a turn in front of the target quay before berthing. The authors suggested an evaluation index in a previous study concerning the first docking method. In the present study, the authors propose an evaluation method for the case of berthing the vessel using the turning maneuver. Since the index obtained by this method offers a single numerical benchmark, it is an easy–to-understand result of the training exercise. The authors carried out experiments using a SMS and confirmed that the proposed evaluation method is effective and helpful to improve the effectiveness of SMS training.

  13. Fundamental Study of Evaluation at Berthing Training for Pilot Trainees Using a Ship Maneuvering Simulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kazuki Inoue; Tadatsugi Okazaki; Koji Murai; Yuji Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Use of the ship maneuvering simulator (SMS) is at the core of pilot trainees education and training, so it is desirable to have an evaluation method that can be completed shortly after each berthing training session...

  14. Breast cancer education for Navajo women: a pilot study evaluating a culturally relevant video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Priscilla R; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I; Baldwin, Julie A; Sandoval, Nellie; Robinson, Frances

    2010-06-01

    This pilot study evaluated a culturally specific video designed to teach Navajo women about breast cancer treatment options. Fourteen Navajo women diagnosed with breast cancer and 26 healthcare providers participated in a mixed-method evaluation that documented their perceptions immediately and 6 months after viewing the video. After initial viewing, women reported reduced anxiety about treatment and interest in support groups. Six months later, women said the video prompted them to seek more information from printed sources and their provider. Younger Navajo women who were 44 to 51 years old were more likely to attend support groups than women who were 55-67 years. Providers corroborated the positive effects of the video. The providers believed the video encouraged patients to seek information about breast cancer and to ask questions about treatment plans and side effects. A culturally relevant video for Navajo women can be an effective teaching tool and can enhance patient-provider communication.

  15. A pilot study evaluating the "STATSCAN" digital X-ray machine in paediatric polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Richard D; van As, Arjan B; Sanders, Virginia; Douglas, Tania S; Wieselthaler, Nicole; Vlok, Ann; Paverd, Sylvia; Kilborn, Tracy; Rode, Heinz; Potgieter, Herman; Beningfield, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    A pilot study evaluating the use in paediatric polytrauma of the STATSCAN, a low-radiation dose, fan-beam digital radiography unit (Lodox Systems, Sandton, South Africa). Over 3 months, 23 polytrauma patients treated at the Emergency Unit of the Red Cross Children's Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, were imaged on the STATSCAN. Image quality, diagnostic equivalence and clinical efficiency were compared with a computed radiography (CR) system (Fuji FCR 5000, Fuji Photo Film, Tokyo, Japan). The STATSCAN antero-posterior bodygram correlated well technically and diagnostically with CR, showing 96% of the fractures in the cohort. It allowed superior visualisation of the trachea and main bronchi and imaging was, on average, 13% faster than CR. The STATSCAN could play an important role in paediatric polytrauma. The clinical significance of its superior demonstration of the trachea and main bronchi requires further evaluation.

  16. A pilot study on the neurometric evaluation of "effective" and "ineffective" antismoking public service announcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartocci, Giulia; Modica, Enrica; Rossi, Dario; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Venuti, Isotta; Rossi, Giulia; Corsi, Elena; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death and smoking-related illness worldwide. Research has shown that antismoking advertising may help reduce this habit. Nowadays, public service announcements (PSAs) are considered "Effective" or "Ineffective" on the base of official reports concerning behavioral/attitudinal changes toward healthier patterns and health-related savings following the exposure to the PSA. In this pilot study, we described the results of the use of three neurometric indexes for the evaluation of the efficacy of a couple of antismoking PSAs in a reduced sample of voluntary participants. The study applied the gathering of the electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms variations, as well as the heart rate (HR) and galvanic skin response (GSR). The neurometric indicators here employed were the Approach-Withdrawal (AW), the Effort (EfI) and the Emotional (EI) indexes. Results suggest a significant higher values for AW, Effort and Emotional indexes (p=0,02; p= 0,03 and p= 0,01 respectively) related to the perception of the "Effective" antismoking PSAs against the perception of the "Ineffective" one. Since this is a pilot study, the results obtained need further investigation, in terms of enlarged stimuli sample and number of participants to provide indications concerning the relevant features to be included in the realization of effective anti-smoking PSAs.

  17. Evaluating Research in Context: Pilot Study at Faculty of Architecture TU Delft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meulen, B.; Daemen, F.; Van Drooge, L.; De Jong, S.; Spaapen, J.; Wamelink, F.; Van den Besselaar, P.

    2010-01-01

    The vice chancellor of Delft University of Technology, Prof.dr.ir. J. Fokkema, introduced a pilot Evaluating Research in Context (ERiC) at the Faculty of Architecture. The Faculty of Architecture perceives a serious confl ict between the demands and criteria in evaluation procedures and the ambition

  18. Evaluation of the "Energize Your Life!" Social Marketing Campaign Pilot Study to Increase Fruit Intake among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shive, Steven E.; Morris, Michelle Neyman

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of the "Energize Your Life!" social-marketing campaign pilot study to improve knowledge, attitudes, and fruit intake among community college students. The authors used a cross-sectional, quasi-experimental, pre- and posttest design. They randomly selected community college students…

  19. Evaluation of the "Energize Your Life!" Social Marketing Campaign Pilot Study to Increase Fruit Intake among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shive, Steven E.; Morris, Michelle Neyman

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of the "Energize Your Life!" social-marketing campaign pilot study to improve knowledge, attitudes, and fruit intake among community college students. The authors used a cross-sectional, quasi-experimental, pre- and posttest design. They randomly selected community college students…

  20. Neurophysiological assessment for evaluating residual cognition in vegetative and minimally conscious state patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Salvo, Simona; Caminiti, Fabrizia; Bonanno, Lilla; De Cola, Maria Cristina; Corallo, Francesco; Caizzone, Antonio; Rifici, Carmela; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess residual cognitive function and perform outcome evaluation in vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) patients, using Neurowave, a system able to monitor event-related potentials (ERPs) induced by neurosensory stimulation. Eleven VS and five MCS patients underwent neurological examination and clinical evaluation performed using validated clinical and behavioral scales; they also underwent neurosensory stimulation, which consisted of administration of target images (rare stimuli), relevant to the patient's personal history and having emotional significance, alternated with nontarget images ("standard" stimuli), which had no emotional significance. All simultaneous ERP responses at baseline (T0) and at three months from T0 (T1) were recorded. At T0 we found significant differences between the VS and MCS patients for the N200 (p=0.02) and P300 (p=0.04) waves. The neurophysiological analysis at T1 showed a significant difference only for P300 (p=0.02), probably due to the improvements observed in the VS subjects for the N100 (p=0.009) and N200 (p=0.02) sensory components. Neurophysiological assessment for evaluating residual cognition in vegetative and minimally conscious state patients: a pilot study Our findings seem to show the value of ERP monitoring in VS and MCS patients as a means of investigating residual cognitive function. This approach could guide early therapeutic and rehabilitation interventions, and contribute to identifying better diagnostic and prognostic markers for use in unresponsive or low-responsive patients.

  1. Evaluation of the IEP Costing Procedures: A Pilot Study by Six Major Research Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Jim

    The Information Exchange Procedures (IEP) cost study project of the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems is described and its applicability to six major research universities (MRU) is assessed in this pilot study. The IEP enables peer institutions to compare information about their resources, activities, and educational…

  2. Evaluating Cultural Competence of Pediatric Oncology Nurses at a Teaching Hospital: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eche, Ijeoma Julie; Aronowitz, Teri

    2017-06-01

    This cross-sectional descriptive study evaluated registered nurses' self-ratings of cultural competence on the hematology/oncology unit at a large Northeastern urban children's hospital. The Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence among Healthcare Professionals was used to measure 5 constructs of cultural competence. The study findings show that there were significant correlations between the knowledge and skill subscales (ρ = .57, P cultural desire (mean = 15.5), indicating that nurses were motivated to engage in the process of becoming culturally competent. The lowest mean among the 5 subscales was cultural knowledge (mean = 11.2), followed by cultural skill (mean = 11.8), indicating that nurses did not perceive themselves to be well informed in these areas. The findings from this pilot study suggest that nurses on this pediatric oncology unit are most likely to possess cultural desire and cultural awareness, but there is certainly opportunity to engage and educate the staff. Targeted interventions to improve cultural competence on this inpatient unit are being explored and a larger scale study is being planned to assess the cultural competence of nurses across the hospital.

  3. [Evaluation of diet and nutrient intake in children under three years old. ALSALMA pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau, J; Moráis, A; Martínez, V; Peña-Quintana, L; Varea, V; Martínez, M J; Soler, B

    2014-07-01

    The present study evaluates energy and nutrient intake in Spanish children under three years of age, and compares the results with the current recommendations in order to identify possible inadequate nutrient intake. A cross-sectional pilot study. The mothers completed a diet diary for four non-consecutive days, recording the products and amounts consumed by their children. Nutrient intake was calculated, and the results were compared with the dietary reference intakes (DRI) for each age group. A total of 188 children (93 boys and 95 girls) aged 0-6 (n=41), 7-12 (n=24), 13-24 (n=57), and 25-36 months (n=66) were included. Statistically significant differences in DRI were observed for most of the nutrients analyzed. Protein intake, in particular was 376% of DRI in children between 1-3 years of age. By age groups, 96% of the children aged 7-12 months, 88% of the children aged 13-24 months, and 97% of the children aged 25-36 months showed protein intakes more than two-fold DRI. Nutrient intake differed from the DRI, particularly as regards proteins. A new study is required to determine whether the observed study deviations could be representative of the national population of this age group, as well as the possible effects on child health. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of a visual feedback system in gait retraining: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Daniel; Bertram, Dietrich; Fölsch, Cassandra; Schega, Lutz

    2012-06-01

    Abnormal gait pattern of the frontal plane (i.e. Duchenne gait and Trendelenburg gait) may be caused by a variety of diseases. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the instantaneous effect of a visual feedback system on frontal plane pelvis and trunk movements in order to use it in patients with THR in subsequent studies. A total of 24 women (45-65 years) were included in the study. According to acute functional impairments the subjects were assigned to the control group (CG, no gait disorders, n=15, age=59±11 years, BMI=27±4) or to the intervention group (IG, n=9, age=61±4, BMI=29±5), respectively. First, in Measurement 1 (M1) kinematic reference values were captured in a standardized clinical gait analysis (MVN, XSens). Afterwards, the influence of a visual real-time feedback on gait pattern was examined while using the feedback system (M2). While there was a significant difference of IG vs. CG in M1 in the mean inclination regarding pelvis and trunk movements, this was not detected in M2. Therefore it is concluded, especially in subjects with abnormal gait pattern, that the visualization leads to an improvement of the movement pattern of pelvis and trunk in the frontal plane while using the device.

  5. Evaluation of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of dual diagnosis (Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Prodromou

    2015-03-01

    included e.g. the educational background, their occupation, their police record, their family and interpersonal relationships. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the minority of the patients admitted in (RTRP have double diagnosis, this study reports that patients with dual diagnosis live treatment earlier than patients with drug addiction only. Dual diagnosis negatively affect prognosis in patients with drug dependence. Concluding this pilot study is supporting those clients that are diagnosed with co morbid disorder should be assessed and evaluated at the beginning of their treatment in order to offer them care that is meeting their needs and encourage them to adhere with their treatment

  6. A pilot study to evaluate the use of virtual lectures for undergraduate radiology teaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendra-Portero, Francisco, E-mail: sendra@uma.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Torales-Chaparro, Oscar E., E-mail: oetjft@terra.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Ruiz-Gómez, Miguel J., E-mail: mjrg@uma.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Martínez-Morillo, Manuel, E-mail: mmorillo@uma.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate that virtual lectures can substitute conventional lectures in radiology education for medical students. Methods and materials: During the course 2005–2006, 89 out from 191 (46.6%) third year students of a subject entitled “General Radiology”, participated voluntarily in a pilot study including 22 virtual lectures (Flash presentations translated from the same PowerPoint presentations of conventional lectures, adding recorded narration and navigation tools). Participants (P) studied by means of virtual lectures, while non-participants (NP) assisted to conventional lectures. The results of the final oral exam classified from 0 to 3, and a 60-questions evaluation on image interpretation were used to compare both groups after training. Finally, 34 students from the group P (38.2%) fulfilled a 10-points scale quality survey about the project. Results: Final exam qualifications were significantly higher for P than for NP (2.11 ± 0.85 versus 1.73 ± 1.04) as well as the number of correct answers of the evaluation on image interpretation (24.2 ± 6.2 versus 21.2 ± 5.4), but differences could obey to different attitudes between both groups. The usefulness of virtual lectures to learn General Radiology obtained the highest global scoring (8.82 ± 1.00). Contents were generally better evaluated than the design of the presentations. Conclusion: Virtual lectures can substitute conventional lectures in radiology education for medical students with no detriment to students’ learning. Their potential advantage is that magisterial lectures can be used to discuss contents with students in a more participative way if virtual lectures are provided before.

  7. Evaluation of acupuncture in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: a double-blind pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristian, Adrian; Katz, Meredith; Cutrone, Eileen; Walker, Ruth H

    2005-09-01

    As many as 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) use some form of complementary medicine during the course of their illness, and many try acupuncture. One nonblinded study of the effects of acupuncture in PD suggested that it might be helpful for some aspects of PD. We performed a double-blind, randomized, pilot study comparing acupuncture to a control nonacupuncture procedure to determine the effects of acupuncture upon a variety of PD-associated symptoms. Fourteen patients with Stage II or III PD received acupuncture or a control nonacupuncture protocol. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated using the Motor subscale of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), and the Geriatric Depression Scale. There were no statistically significant changes for the outcomes measured. In the patients who received acupuncture, nonsignificant trends toward improvement were noted in the Activities of Daily Living score of the PDQ-39, the PDQ-39 Summary Index(c) 2005 Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Parenting for Autism, Language, And Communication Evaluation Study (PALACES): protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Margiad Elen; Hastings, Richard; Charles, Joanna Mary; Evans, Sue; Hutchings, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) often have associated behavioural difficulties that can present a challenge for parents and parenting. There are several effective social learning theory-based parenting programmes for dealing with behavioural difficulties, including the Incredible Years (IY) parent programmes. However, these programmes typically do not specifically target parents of children with ASD. Recently, a new addition to the IY suite of programmes known as the IY Autistic Spectrum and Language Delays (IY-ASLD) parent programme was developed. The main aims of the present study are to examine the feasibility of delivering this programme within child health services and to provide initial evidence for effectiveness and economic costs. Methods and analysis The Parenting for Autism, Language, And Communication Evaluation Study (PALACES) trial is a pragmatic, multicentre, pilot randomised controlled trial comparing the IY-ASLD programme with a wait-list control condition. 72 parents of children with ASD (aged 3–8 years) will be randomly allocated to either the intervention or control condition. Data will be collected prior to randomisation and 6 months postrandomisation for all families. Families in the intervention condition only will also be followed up at 12 and 18 months postrandomisation. This study will provide initial evidence of effectiveness for the newly developed IY-ASLD parenting programme. It will also add to the limited economic evidence for an intervention targeting parents of children with ASD and provide longer term data, an important component for evaluations of parenting programmes. Ethics and dissemination Approval for the study was granted by the Research Ethics Committee at the School of Psychology, Bangor University (reference number: 2016–15768) and the North Wales Research Ethics Committee, UK (reference number: 16/WA/0224). The findings will be disseminated through research conferences and peer

  9. Validity and Reliability of the Clinical Competency Evaluation Instrument for Use among Physiotherapy Students; Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zailani Muhamad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the content validity, internal consistency, testretest reliability and inter-rater reliability of the Clinical Competency Evaluation Instrument (CCEVI in assessing the clinical performance of physiotherapy students. Methods: This study was carried out between June and September 2013 at University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A panel of 10 experts were identified to establish content validity by evaluating and rating each of the items used in the CCEVI with regards to their relevance in measuring students’ clinical competency. A total of 50 UKM undergraduate physiotherapy students were assessed throughout their clinical placement to determine the construct validity of these items. The instrument’s reliability was determined through a cross-sectional study involving a clinical performance assessment of 14 final-year undergraduate physiotherapy students. Results: The content validity index of the entire CCEVI was 0.91, while the proportion of agreement on the content validity indices ranged from 0.83–1.00. The CCEVI construct validity was established with factor loading of ≥0.6, while internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha overall was 0.97. Test-retest reliability of the CCEVI was confirmed with a Pearson’s correlation range of 0.91–0.97 and an intraclass coefficient correlation range of 0.95–0.98. Inter-rater reliability of the CCEVI domains ranged from 0.59 to 0.97 on initial and subsequent assessments. Conclusion: This pilot study confirmed the content validity of the CCEVI. It showed high internal consistency, thereby providing evidence that the CCEVI has moderate to excellent inter-rater reliability. However, additional refinement in the wording of the CCEVI items, particularly in the domains of safety and documentation, is recommended to further improve the validity and reliability of the instrument.

  10. Perceived usefulness of a distributed community-based syndromic surveillance system: a pilot qualitative evaluation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Donald R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted a pilot utility evaluation and information needs assessment of the Distribute Project at the 2010 Washington State Public Health Association (WSPHA Joint Conference. Distribute is a distributed community-based syndromic surveillance system and network for detection of influenza-like illness (ILI. Using qualitative methods, we assessed the perceived usefulness of the Distribute system and explored areas for improvement. Nine state and local public health professionals participated in a focus group (n = 6 and in semi-structured interviews (n = 3. Field notes were taken, summarized and analyzed. Findings Several emergent themes that contribute to the perceived usefulness of system data and the Distribute system were identified: 1 Standardization: a common ILI syndrome definition; 2 Regional Comparability: views that support county-by-county comparisons of syndromic surveillance data; 3 Completeness: complete data for all expected data at a given time; 4 Coverage: data coverage of all jurisdictions in WA state; 5 Context: metadata incorporated into the views to provide context for graphed data; 6 Trusted Data: verification that information is valid and timely; and 7 Customization: the ability to customize views as necessary. As a result of the focus group, a new county level health jurisdiction expressed interest in contributing data to the Distribute system. Conclusion The resulting themes from this study can be used to guide future information design efforts for the Distribute system and other syndromic surveillance systems. In addition, this study demonstrates the benefits of conducting a low cost, qualitative evaluation at a professional conference.

  11. Evaluation of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of dual diagnosis (Pilot Study)

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Prodromou; Savoula Ghobrial; Koukia Eumorfia

    2015-01-01

    Dual diagnosis can be defined as a combination of a substance use disorder and a coexistent psychiatric disorder in one patient. It constitutes a challenge for Therapeutic Rehabilitation Programme, because of its multifaceted nature. This pilot study was conducted using a naturalistic approach to study for eighteen months, Clients were admitted as inpatients in Residential Therapeutic Rehabilitation Program offered by the Mental Health Services in Cyprus. Methods: Forty-five consecutive p...

  12. A pilot study evaluating alternative approaches of academic detailing in rural family practice clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartung Daniel M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Academic detailing is an interactive, convenient, and user-friendly approach to delivering non-commercial education to healthcare clinicians. While evidence suggests academic detailing is associated with improvements in prescribing behavior, uncertainty exists about generalizability and scalability in diverse settings. Our study evaluates different models of delivering academic detailing in a rural family medicine setting. Methods We conducted a pilot project to assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and satisfaction with academic detailing delivered face-to-face as compared to a modified approach using distance-learning technology. The recipients were four family medicine clinics within the Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN. Two clinics were allocated to receive face-to-face detailing and two received outreach through video conferencing or asynchronous web-based outreach. Surveys at midpoint and completion were used to assess effectiveness and satisfaction. Results Each clinic received four outreach visits over an eight month period. Topics included treatment-resistant depression, management of atypical antipsychotics, drugs for insomnia, and benzodiazepine tapering. Overall, 90% of participating clinicians were satisfied with the program. Respondents who received in person detailing reported a higher likelihood of changing their behavior compared to respondents in the distance detailing group for five of seven content areas. While 90%-100% of respondents indicated they would continue to participate if the program were continued, the likelihood of participation declined if only distance approaches were offered. Conclusions We found strong support and satisfaction for the program among participating clinicians. Participants favored in-person approaches to distance interactions. Future efforts will be directed at quantitative methods for evaluating the economic and clinical effectiveness of detailing in rural

  13. Evaluation and modeling of biochemical methane potential (BMP) of landfilled solid waste: a pilot scale study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilgili, M Sinan; Demir, Ahmet; Varank, Gamze

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to present a comparison of landfill performance with respect to solids decomposition. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) test was used to determine the initial and the remaining CH(4) potentials of solid wastes during 27 months of landfilling operation in two pilot...... and R2 reactors were 0.01571 and 0.01195 1/d, respectively. The correlation between the model and the experimental parameters was more than 95%, showing the good fit of the model....

  14. INTEREXAMINER RELIABILITY OF CHIROPRACTIC EVALUATION FOR CERVICAL SPINE PROBLEMS—A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tuchin, Peter J.; Hart, Christopher J.; Johnson, Catriona; Colman, Robert; Gee, Adam; Edwards, Ian; Plucknett, Mark; Bonello, Rod

    1996-01-01

    Objective: A pilot study was conducted to determine whether untrained examiners could agree on palpatory findings in the cervical spine. Design: Fifty-three university students, (most of whom were chiropractic students), had their cervical spines examined by seven different chiropractors using their own clinical methods, of which motion palpation was a common, but not standard component. Setting: Chiropractic Centre in Macquarie University. Participants: Volunteer university students. Main Ou...

  15. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of single tantalum dental implants: a prospective pilot clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE FRANCESCO, M.; GOBBATO, E.A.; NOCE, D.; CAVALLARI, F.; FIORETTI, A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective The aim of this prospective pilot clinical case series report was to evaluate, through a clinical and radiographic analysis, the peri-implant bone resorption of the tantalum dental implants (TMT) (Zimmer TMT, Parsippany, NJ, USA) one year after prosthetic rehabilitation. Methods Twenty tantalum dental implants were placed in both maxillas and mandibles of 20 patients. Patients were asked to attend a radiographic and clinical follow-up and their previous clinical records and X-rays were assessed. Bone levels were calculated by digitally measuring the distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant on periapical radiographs taken at surgery and after 6 and 12 months of functioning. The Pearson correlation analysis was performed to assess it there was a correlation between the measurement of the marginal bone loss (MBL). The Anova Test with a post-hoc analysis using Bonferroni’s test was used to compare the three group (0, 6 months and 12 months). Results The mean total MBL for the group 0 months was 0.84 mm (SD 0.21), 6 months was 0.87 mm (SD 0.22) and for 12 months was 0.89 mm (SD 0.23). The values of the Pearson’s coefficients showed that the data measurement were positively correlated. The Anova test showed a statistically significant difference between the groups. Conclusion The statistically significant difference in marginal bone loss can be considered physiological. Within the limits of this study it can be concluded that TMT implants have an excellent bone crest’s stability, however, to have most accurate information, will be necessary extend the sample. PMID:28280531

  16. Biomechanical podiatric evaluation in an Italian cohort of patients with systemic sclerosis: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Ravenni, Giovanni; Ciampi, Benedetta; Del Rosso, Angela; El Aoufy, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    Objective Foot problems are often present in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) patients, however studies regarding podiatric problems related to SSc are lacking and there are no data evaluating the foot biomechanical changes. The aim of the present pilot study was to evaluate podiatric problems in an Italian cohort of SSc patients by assessing received podiatric services, foot pain and disability and biomechanical foot deformity. Material and Methods 25 consecutive SSc patients were enrolled from the Division of Rheumatology, University of Florence. All SSc patients were assessed by: Standards of Care for People with Foot Musculoskeletal Health problems: Audit Tool, Foot Function Index (FFI), Weight and non-weight bearing foot joint assessment, (Foot Posture Index (FPI) and Gait Cycle), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 (SF-36). Results Audit Tool - Only 7 (28%) out of the 25 patients with SSc had a specific podiatric assessment and treatment: no patient received a foot health assessment within the first 6 months of disease diagnosis and no patient received information about foot involvement. 1 patient (4%) received foot assessment every year; 1 patient (4%) received specific information about the disease and 5 patients (20%) received information about the benefits of using adapted footwear and insoles. FFI - Values of pain, disability and activity limitations, reported in FFI, are 4.7±5.1, 5.1±3.2 and 3.2±3.1 (M±DS), respectively. Non-weight bearing foot joint assessment shows a rearfoot varus deformity in 64% of patients, forefoot varus deformity in 42% and 6% forefoot valgus deformity. Weight bearing foot joint assessment, through FPI shows a pronated foot 20% of patients with and 34% with highly pronated overall foot posture. Gait analysis shows that 64% of patients has a contact of the calcaneus in invertion while 36% in eversion. In the midstance, 78% have the foot in pronation and 22% in supination, while in

  17. Evaluation of vardenafil for the treatment of subjective tinnitus: a controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stöver Timo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vardenafil (Levitra® represents a potent and highly selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5 inhibitor, which is established for treatment of various diseases. There are several unpublished reports from patients stating that vardenafil has a considerable therapeutic effect on their concomitant tinnitus. This pilot study was conducted to specifically assess the effect of vardenafil in patients with chronic tinnitus. Methods This trial was based on a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Fourty-two consecutive subjects with mon- or binaural chronic tinnitus received 10 mg vardenafil (N = 21 or matching placebo tablets (N = 21 administered orally twice a day over a period of 12 weeks. Clinical examination and data acquisition took place at each visit: at baseline, after 4 weeks, after 12 weeks (end of treatment with study medication, and at non-medicated follow-up after 16 weeks. Assessment of clinical effectiveness was based on a standardized tinnitus questionnaire (TQ, the Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36, audiometric measurements (mode, pitch and loudness of tinnitus; auditory thresholds and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients' blood (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, homocysteine and total antioxidative status. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by comparison of subjective and objective parameters with baseline data between both treatment groups (ANCOVA. Results Vardenafil had no superior efficacy over placebo in the treatment of chronic tinnitus during this study. The primary efficacy criterion 'TQ total score' failed to demonstrate significant improvement compared to placebo. Subjective reports of TQ subscales and general quality of life areas (SF-36, objective audiometric examinations as well as investigated biomarkers for oxidative stress did not reveal any significant treatment effects. The safety profile was favorable and consistent with that in other vardenafil

  18. Evaluation of vardenafil for the treatment of subjective tinnitus: a controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Birgit; Haupt, Heidemarie; Szczepek, Agnieszka J; Sandmann, Jörg; Gross, Johann; Klapp, Burghard F; Kiesewetter, Holger; Kalus, Ulrich; Stöver, Timo; Caffier, Philipp P

    2009-01-01

    Background Vardenafil (Levitra®) represents a potent and highly selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, which is established for treatment of various diseases. There are several unpublished reports from patients stating that vardenafil has a considerable therapeutic effect on their concomitant tinnitus. This pilot study was conducted to specifically assess the effect of vardenafil in patients with chronic tinnitus. Methods This trial was based on a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Fourty-two consecutive subjects with mon- or binaural chronic tinnitus received 10 mg vardenafil (N = 21) or matching placebo tablets (N = 21) administered orally twice a day over a period of 12 weeks. Clinical examination and data acquisition took place at each visit: at baseline, after 4 weeks, after 12 weeks (end of treatment with study medication), and at non-medicated follow-up after 16 weeks. Assessment of clinical effectiveness was based on a standardized tinnitus questionnaire (TQ), the Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36), audiometric measurements (mode, pitch and loudness of tinnitus; auditory thresholds) and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients' blood (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, homocysteine and total antioxidative status). Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by comparison of subjective and objective parameters with baseline data between both treatment groups (ANCOVA). Results Vardenafil had no superior efficacy over placebo in the treatment of chronic tinnitus during this study. The primary efficacy criterion 'TQ total score' failed to demonstrate significant improvement compared to placebo. Subjective reports of TQ subscales and general quality of life areas (SF-36), objective audiometric examinations as well as investigated biomarkers for oxidative stress did not reveal any significant treatment effects. The safety profile was favorable and consistent with that in other vardenafil studies. Conclusion

  19. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  20. Evaluation of potential particulate/colloidal TEP foulants on a pilot scale SWRO desalination study

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2016-01-21

    This pilot study investigated the variation of potential foulants and different fractions of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), along the treatment scheme under different conditions. The objectives are to provide a comprehensive understanding on which fraction of TEP is more problematic in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) fouling, and which pretreatment can better reduce the concentration of TEP. Results showed that TEP deposited on the RO membranes, and the extent of RO fouling increased with the increase of TEP concentration in RO feed water. More TEP was produced in water after chlorination, probably because of the breakdown of bacterial cells and thus the release of internal exopolymers. Moreover, the cartridge filters could behave as an incubator for the regrowth of bacteria deactivated by chlorination and a spot for potential foulant (bacterial TEP) production, and thus enhance the RO membranes fouling. The presence of residual iron and addition of phosphate based antiscalant may also contribute to the higher biofouling of RO membranes. This pilot study provided an opportunity to identify the TEP related issues under different operational conditions in RO desalination of Red Sea water.

  1. 90% Compliance Pilot Studies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    In early 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced an opportunity for states to participate in energy code compliance evaluation pilot studies. DOE worked with five Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations (REEOs, formerly referred to as Energy Efficiency Partnerships, or EEPs) to fund pilot studies covering nine states. This report details conclusions stated in individual state reports, as well as conclusions drawn by DOE based on their oversight of the pilot studies, and based on discussions held with the REEOs and representatives from the pilot study states and their contractors.

  2. Pilot Study to Evaluate the Appropriate Management of Patients With Coexistent Bacterial Vaginosis and Cervicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane R. Schwebke

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A pilot study was performed to obtain preliminary data regarding the need for targeted therapy of bacterial vaginosis (BV when it accompanies clinically defined cervicitis. Specifically, women attending a sexually transmitted disease (STD clinic with clinically defined BV and cervicitis were treated in the first phase of the study with doxycycline alone. In phase II, the patients received doxycycline and concomitant intravaginal metronidazole gel. All patients were reexamined 3–4 weeks after therapy. Persistence of BV occurred in 18/19 (95% of women in phase I vs. 1/7 (14% of women in phase II (P < 0.001. We concluded that, in women with coexistent clinically defined cervicitis and BV, the treatment of cervicitis does not result in a normalization of the vaginal flora.

  3. Competency-based evaluation tools for integrative medicine training in family medicine residency: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Craig

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more integrative medicine educational content is integrated into conventional family medicine teaching, the need for effective evaluation strategies grows. Through the Integrative Family Medicine program, a six site pilot program of a four year residency training model combining integrative medicine and family medicine training, we have developed and tested a set of competency-based evaluation tools to assess residents' skills in integrative medicine history-taking and treatment planning. This paper presents the results from the implementation of direct observation and treatment plan evaluation tools, as well as the results of two Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs developed for the program. Methods The direct observation (DO and treatment plan (TP evaluation tools developed for the IFM program were implemented by faculty at each of the six sites during the PGY-4 year (n = 11 on DO and n = 8 on TP. The OSCE I was implemented first in 2005 (n = 6, revised and then implemented with a second class of IFM participants in 2006 (n = 7. OSCE II was implemented in fall 2005 with only one class of IFM participants (n = 6. Data from the initial implementation of these tools are described using descriptive statistics. Results Results from the implementation of these tools at the IFM sites suggest that we need more emphasis in our curriculum on incorporating spirituality into history-taking and treatment planning, and more training for IFM residents on effective assessment of readiness for change and strategies for delivering integrative medicine treatment recommendations. Focusing our OSCE assessment more narrowly on integrative medicine history-taking skills was much more effective in delineating strengths and weaknesses in our residents' performance than using the OSCE for both integrative and more basic communication competencies. Conclusion As these tools are refined further they will be of value both in improving

  4. Evaluation of antibiotic prescription in the Lebanese community: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Saleh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotics are considered among the most commonly prescribed drug classes in developing countries. Inappropriate prescription of antibiotics is a major public health concern and is related to the development of antimicrobial resistance. Objective: This study aimed at assessing the appropriateness of antibiotic prescription by non-infectious disease physicians in a community setting in Lebanon. Methods: A pilot cross-sectional study was undertaken on community pharmacy patients presenting with antibiotic prescription. It was performed over a period of 4 months in different regions of Lebanon. Participants answered a questionnaire inquiring about socio-demographic characteristics, medical conditions, symptoms that required medical attention, the doctor's diagnosis, the prescribed antibiotic, and whether laboratory tests were ordered to identify the causative organism or not. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17. Results: We studied 270 patients (49.3% males and 50.7% females. This study showed that the most-prescribed antibiotics were the cephalosporins (82% and that almost half of the illnesses for which antibiotics were prescribed were respiratory tract infections (41%. The study also showed that the choice of the prescribed antibiotic was appropriate in 61.5% of the studied cases, while the prescribed dose and the duration of the treatment were inaccurate in 52 and 64% of the cases, respectively. In addition, fever seemed to be a factor that influenced the physician's prescriptions, since the choice of drug conformity to guidelines increased from 53.7% (1 day of fever to 88.9% (1 week of fever, and the dose prescription compliance to guidelines was higher (55.9% for patients suffering from fever compared to those with no fever (38.1%. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in Lebanon. Therefore, actions should be taken to optimize antibiotic prescription.

  5. Modeling and Evaluating Pilot Performance in NextGen: Review of and Recommendations Regarding Pilot Modeling Efforts, Architectures, and Validation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickens, Christopher; Sebok, Angelia; Keller, John; Peters, Steve; Small, Ronald; Hutchins, Shaun; Algarin, Liana; Gore, Brian Francis; Hooey, Becky Lee; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    NextGen operations are associated with a variety of changes to the national airspace system (NAS) including changes to the allocation of roles and responsibilities among operators and automation, the use of new technologies and automation, additional information presented on the flight deck, and the entire concept of operations (ConOps). In the transition to NextGen airspace, aviation and air operations designers need to consider the implications of design or system changes on human performance and the potential for error. To ensure continued safety of the NAS, it will be necessary for researchers to evaluate design concepts and potential NextGen scenarios well before implementation. One approach for such evaluations is through human performance modeling. Human performance models (HPMs) provide effective tools for predicting and evaluating operator performance in systems. HPMs offer significant advantages over empirical, human-in-the-loop testing in that (1) they allow detailed analyses of systems that have not yet been built, (2) they offer great flexibility for extensive data collection, (3) they do not require experimental participants, and thus can offer cost and time savings. HPMs differ in their ability to predict performance and safety with NextGen procedures, equipment and ConOps. Models also vary in terms of how they approach human performance (e.g., some focus on cognitive processing, others focus on discrete tasks performed by a human, while others consider perceptual processes), and in terms of their associated validation efforts. The objectives of this research effort were to support the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in identifying HPMs that are appropriate for predicting pilot performance in NextGen operations, to provide guidance on how to evaluate the quality of different models, and to identify gaps in pilot performance modeling research, that could guide future research opportunities. This research effort is intended to help the FAA

  6. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  7. Evaluation of a Prison Occupational Therapy Informal Education Program: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Jeffrey L; Ohm, David; Wall, Jarrod M; Ray, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    This pilot study explored the strengths and weaknesses of an informal education program and identified elements of the program valued by participants. Participants were men living in a minimum security prison who had been incarcerated for ten or more years. The outside researcher was joined by three former program participants as co-researchers. Together, they interviewed 27 residents who completed the informal education program. Interviews were transcribed and de-identified. Researchers used the summative content analysis approach to analyze the data. Initial content analysis yielded five concepts: doing (engaging in purposeful activities); information (program handouts and discussions that included data and descriptions of all of the topics discussed); re-entry fears (socialization; making amends with victims and/or reuniting with family and friends); technology (includes, but not limited to, using smartphones, internet and other technology in all areas of occupation); and self-worth as a person. Further interpretation per the summative content analysis method yielded three themes: doing (engaged in purposeful activities), validation of self-worth (confirmation of being a valued human being in spite of having committed a serious crime) and concerns about the future (being able to successfully engage in virtually all occupations). Whilst informal education programs may help people who are incarcerated gain information, gain a sense of self-worth and allay some reentry fears, understanding the long-term affect such programs may have such as preparing them for successful re-entry to society or reducing recidivism rates, will require long-term follow-up. Regardless of the occupational therapy intervention, the practice of occupational therapy in the criminal justice system needs to be client-centred. Because of the small number of participants and limited access to participants, one should not generalize the findings of this study to other situations or populations

  8. A pilot study to evaluate multi-dimensional effects of dance for people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Maria I; Barnes, Deborah E; Ross, Jessica M; Lanni, Kimberly E; Sigvardt, Karen A; Disbrow, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with deficits in motor, cognitive, and emotion/quality of life (QOL) domains, yet most pharmacologic and behavioral interventions focus only on motor function. Our goal was to perform a pilot study of Dance for Parkinson's-a community-based program that is growing in popularity-in order to compare effect sizes across multiple outcomes and to inform selection of primary and secondary outcomes for a larger trial. Study participants were people with PD who self-enrolled in either Dance for Parkinson's classes (intervention group, N=8) or PD support groups (control group, N=7). Assessments of motor function (Timed-Up-and-Go, Gait Speed, Standing Balance Test), cognitive function (Test of Everyday Attention, Verbal Fluency, Alternate Uses, Digit Span Forward and Backward), and emotion/QOL (Geriatric Depression Scale, Falls Efficacy Scale-International, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (total score and Activities of Daily Living subscale)) were performed in both groups at baseline and follow-up. Standardized effect sizes were calculated within each group and between groups for all 12 measures. Effect sizes were positive (suggesting improvement) for all 12 measures within the intervention group and 7 of 12 measures within the control group. The largest between-group differences were observed for the Test of Everyday Attention (a measure of cognitive switching), gait speed and falls efficacy. Our findings suggest that dance has potential to improve multiple outcomes in people with PD. Future trials should consider co-primary outcomes given potential benefits in motor, cognitive and emotion/QOL domains.

  9. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  10. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  11. Pilot study to evaluate children with hearing aids through PEACH and TEACH in a rural community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingamdenne Paul Emerson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to evaluate the use of functional measures in hearing aid benefit assessment of children (n = 60 in a rural community. Children with age ranging from 6 months to 15 years with moderately severe to profound hearing loss were evaluated. They were evaluated by functional measures PEACH and TEACH which were translated into local language (Tamil. The relationship between PEACH and TEACH was calculated using SPSS and Chi-square tests. It was found that PEACH and TEACH questionnaires can be easily administered in the rural community and gives a quantitative measure of the effect of amplification. It gave caregivers a motivation to take an active part in the rehabilitation. This model of using functional evaluation tools to evaluate the suitability and effectiveness of amplification can be applied in children in developing countries.

  12. Teaching E-Commerce Web Page Evaluation and Design: A Pilot Study Using Tourism Destination Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susser, Bernard; Ariga, Taeko

    2006-01-01

    This study explores a teaching method for improving business students' skills in e-commerce page evaluation and making Web design majors aware of business content issues through cooperative learning. Two groups of female students at a Japanese university studying either tourism or Web page design were assigned tasks that required cooperation to…

  13. Teaching E-Commerce Web Page Evaluation and Design: A Pilot Study Using Tourism Destination Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susser, Bernard; Ariga, Taeko

    2006-01-01

    This study explores a teaching method for improving business students' skills in e-commerce page evaluation and making Web design majors aware of business content issues through cooperative learning. Two groups of female students at a Japanese university studying either tourism or Web page design were assigned tasks that required cooperation to…

  14. An Empirical Evaluation of Critical Factors Influencing Learner Satisfaction in Blended Learning: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Won Sun; Yao, Adrian Yong Tat

    2016-01-01

    Blended learning, a convergence of e-learning approach and face-to-face learning, has been regarded as a new paradigm in modern education. The degree of learners' satisfaction with blended learning played a crucial role in evaluating the effectiveness of blended learning adoption. Therefore, this study examined the primary factors affecting…

  15. Patients' Evaluations of Complete Denture Therapy and Their Association with Related Variables: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Beatriz Ferreira Oliveira; dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Santos, Jarbas Francisco Fernandes; Marchini, Leonardo

    2015-07-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important goal in complete denture therapy, and many factors influence this parameter. This study aimed to evaluate expectations before and satisfaction after therapy with complete dentures. As a secondary objective, other variables that may interfere with patient satisfaction were also evaluated. A representative sample of 99 patients assigned visual analog scale (VAS) scores to their expectations before and satisfaction after therapy regarding chewing, esthetics, comfort, and phonetics. Demographic data and answers to a questionnaire concerning the dentists' conduct were recorded. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the association among studied variables and patients' expectation and satisfaction with their dentures. The average VAS scores were high for both expectations and satisfaction, and satisfaction exceeded expectations. Patients' expectations about esthetics and comfort were associated with age and self-reported time of using complete dentures. Patient satisfaction regarding chewing was associated with the number of postdelivery adjustments. Also, patient satisfaction regarding esthetics was associated with gender and esthetic expectations. In regard to phonetic satisfaction, associations were verified among self-reported time of using complete dentures, comfort and phonetics expectations, and dentists' explanations. Comfort satisfaction was associated only with educational level. Patient satisfaction regarding complete dentures exceeded expectations and an expressive majority of positive evaluations of the dentists was noticed. Many patient-related variables seemed to influence their evaluations of their dentures. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Evaluation of a temporary prosthetic insert in the rehabilitation of elderly ischaemic below-knee amputees: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, F M; Jull, G A

    1988-01-01

    The physiotherapy management of elderly, ischaemic below knee amputees is often compromised by delayed and/or complicated wound healing. Such patients are often unable to ambulate on a prosthesis for prolonged periods. Problems concommitant with immobilization such as weakness, contractures, and decreased morale tend to arise. This pilot study investigated the efficacy of incorporating a shaped Dunlopillo insert into a temporary prosthetic socket to allow the at risk group to ambulate as soon as the sutures were removed regardless of the state of wound healing. Two parameters were evaluated, namely wound healing and stump maturation. A total of eighteen subjects were observed in a control and an experimental group. Both wound healing (p < 0.05) and stump maturation (p < 0.05) were significantly enhanced by the inclusion of a Dunlopillo insert.

  17. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF SPIROTOME® DEVICE FOR LIVER BIOPSY IN GREEN IGUANAS (IGUANA IGUANA): A PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Giordano; Origgi, Francesco C; Leopardi, Stefania; Zaghini, Anna; Saunders, Jimmy H; Vignoli, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a large-core manual biopsy device (Spirotome(®), Medinvents, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium) for liver sampling and histologic diagnosis in green iguanas (Iguana iguana). The study included eight green iguanas, and two ultrasound-guided biopsies were collected for each lizard, for 16 biopsies in total. The procedure was carried out under general anesthesia induced by intravenous injection of propofol (10 mg/kg) maintained with a mixture of 2.0% isoflurane and 0.8-1.2 L/min oxygen after tracheal intubation. Fourteen (87.5%) of the 16 biopsies were considered diagnostic. Liver biopsy quality was assessed according to sample size and tissue preservation. In particular, mean length (16.2 ± 4.5 mm), width (2.2 ± 0.5 mm), area (34.8 ± 6.9 mm(2)), and number of portal areas (9.4 ± 3.9) of each biopsy were recorded for all green iguanas. The total available surface of the sections obtained from the biopsies and their grade of preservation enabled a satisfactory evaluation of the parenchymal architecture. One of the green iguanas in the study died the day after the procedure due to severe hemocoeloma. Risk assessment evaluation suggested that small green iguanas may not be suitable for this biopsy procedure.

  18. Evaluation of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Combination with Deproteinized Bovine Bone Mineral in the Rabbit Cranium; A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Shafiee Ardestani

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Reconstruction methods are an essential prerequisite for functional rehabilitation of the stomatognathic system. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP offers a new and potentially useful adjunct to bone substitute materials (e.g. Xenografts inoral and maxillofacial bone and implant reconstructive surgery.Purpose: An animal study was carried out to investigate the influence of PRP on the regeneration of non-critical sized bony defects, treated with Deproteinized Bovine Bone Mineral (DBBM.Materials and Methods: Eight New Zealand white rabbits were included in this randomized, pilot study. Three equal cranial bone defects (3×6 mm were created and immediately grafted with DBBM and PRP+DBBM; one of them was left unfilled to serve as a control. The defects were evaluated using histologic and histomorphometricanalysis at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks.Results: The histomorphometric findings showed a significant increase in bone area and trabecular maturity in experimental defects as compared to the control at 4, 8 and 12 week intervals. A significant increase in bone formation was seen with the additionof PRP to DBBM at 2, 4 and 8 week intervals. At 12 weeks, the level of bone formation was similar between the two groups. There was also a significant increase in the rate of biodegradation of the DBBM particles with the addition of PRP at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks.No foreign body reaction and severe inflammation was seen in any of specimens.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this pilot study, it was concluded that the addition of PRP to Xenogenic bone substitute material in non-critical-sized defects of the rabbit cranium showed a histomorphometric increase in bone formation (until the 8th week ofhealing and a greater amount of biomaterial degradation throughout the study period.

  19. Pilot study of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination ("the Six Pack") for evaluating clinical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzese, Christine B

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) designed to examine all six competencies and provide meaningful results to improve resident performance. A prospective, observational study. The OSCE consists of 1 hour for examination of a simulated patient, documentation, and feedback, with 30 minutes for an evidence-based medicine (EBM) test. Eight otolaryngology residents participated. Digital recordings and written documentation were evaluated on all competencies except practice-based learning. An EBM test was scored to assess practice-based learning. Overall, senior residents scored better. Seniors scored better on performing a focused history, whereas juniors scored better for thoroughness. Seniors coded better than juniors, although seniors tended to undercode and juniors tended to overcode. Two cases of "insurance fraud" were also discovered. The "Six Pack" successfully evaluated all competencies while providing valuable information. A clinical practicum was added to improve history and physical examination skills. The discussion of coding and a billing seminar also resulted. Residents believed the OSCE was valuable. Faculty members were impressed with the useful information obtained.

  20. Evaluation of the content regarding nutrition education on catering services websites: pilot study in the educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Rico-Sapena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To analyze websites quality of catering companies for schools as well as their content in nutrition food education, and to have a first experience with the assessment tool EDALCAT.Material and methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. The study population are the websites of catering companies entrusted with the management of school canteens. The sample was obtained using Google search engine and a ranking of major catering companies financial, choosing those that had websites. Ten websites were selected for a pilot test according to geographic proximity to the city of Alicante and their total revenue. A homemade questionnaire (EDALCAT was designed in order to evaluate the websites. This questionnaire is composed of a block of predictors of quality with 19 variables for reliability, design and navigation; and a second block of specific contents about food education with 19 variables for content and educational activities.Results: Positive results have been obtained in 31 out of 38 questionnaire variables, except for the items: “Search engine”, “Language” (40% and “Help” (10% in the predictors of the quality block; and in the items: “Workshops”, “Recipe book”, “Web nutrition-food” (40% and “Examples” (30% in the specific contents of the food education block. All the evaluated websites exceed 50% of compliance with the quality criteria and with the minimum contents in food education, and only one of them, fails the minimum level of activity established.Conclusions: The predictors of quality and the specific content in food education were successful in all evaluated websites. Most of them got a high score in their assessment, and in their analysis of individual blocks. After the pilot study, EDALCAT questionnaire has been amended and the final EDALCAT has been obtained. Generally speaking, EDALCAT seems appropriate for evaluating the quality of catering companies websites and their content

  1. A pilot study evaluating the prescribing of ceftriaxone in hospitals in Ghana: findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afriyie, Daniel Kwame; Amponsah, Seth Kwabena; Dogbey, Justice; Agyekum, Kwabena; Kesse, Samuel; Truter, Ilse; Meyer, Johanna C; Godman, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Widespread empiric use of antibiotics exists especially in developing countries. This is a concern since inappropriate use of antibiotics, including their extended inappropriate use, will increase resistance rates. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate antibiotic utilisation across healthcare sectors to improve future use. This includes ceftriaxone, widely used among hospitals including those in Ghana. A cross-sectional study to evaluate the appropriateness of ceftriaxone prescribing in a leading hospital in Ghana. Ceftriaxone prescribing in patient-record cards was assessed using a modified WHO drug-utilization evaluation criteria as well as referencing the national standard treatment guidelines in Ghana and the ceftriaxone package insert. A total of 251 patients were assessed. Ceftriaxone was most commonly prescribed for comorbid malaria with bacterial infections, urinary tract infections, sepsis and gastroenteritis. The appropriateness of the indication was 86% (n = 218). The doses most prescribed were 1g (41%) and 2g (39%). Stat dose and once-daily dosage regimen constituted 51.4% and 84.5%, respectively. The most common duration of treatment was 1 (51.4%) and 2 days (35.1%). The overall appropriateness of prescribing was 93% against a pre-set threshold of 97%. The appropriateness of ceftriaxone prescribing was high in this leading hospital in Ghana; however, there is room for improvement with targeted education initiatives, with further research planned.

  2. Evaluation of knee joint proprioception and balance of young female volleyball players: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Neşe; Bianco, Antonino; Patti, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Palma, Antonio; Ersöz, Gülfem

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The main purpose of our study was the evaluation of the effects of long-term volleyball practice on knee joint proprioception and balance of young female athletes. [Subjects and Methods] An observational case-control study was performed. The study enrolled 19 female volleyball players in the experimental group and 19 sedentary counterparts as controls. A Biodex balance system and dynamometer were used for the evaluations. The paired t-test was used to determine the significance of differences between the performance of athletes and controls. [Results] The knee proprioception analysis showed a significant difference at 60° joint position in active and passive tests. A similar trend, but without significance, was found for the 20° joint position. In the postural stability tests both groups showed similar results with no significant differences between them. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the results indicate a significant influence on joint proprioception is elicited by long-term exposure to a team sport like volleyball. However, the postural stability indexes showed similar trends in both groups, highlighting the analogous ontogenesis of the subjects investigated and the low influence of volleyball practice on postural stability.

  3. Comparative evaluation of two different vestibuloplasty surgical procedures in cleft patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; Pedro, Patrícia Franco; Kogawa, Evelyn Mikaela; Pereira, Tatiana; de Barros Carrilho, Guilherme Paes; Aiello, Carlos Alberto; Freitas, Patrícia Zambonato

    2005-07-01

    Patients with a cleft lip or palate often present alterations in the labial aspect of the ridge, resulting in a shallow vestibule. This study compares the results of two different surgical procedures on deepening of the labial sulcus. Ten patients with a cleft lip and palate were separated into two groups and underwent different vestibuloplasty procedures. An experimental group used a removable retention splint. Preoperative and 4-month postoperative sulcus heights were measured and analyzed statistically. No statistically significant differences could be detected between groups. The results indicated that to reach consistent results, a larger number of patients must be submitted to this evaluation.

  4. Evaluating the use of the wilbarger intervention with schizophrenic patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withersty, David J; Stout, Janet; Mogge, Neil L; Nesland, Anita; David Allen, G

    2005-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia have difficulty processing sensory information. The authors hypothesized that the Wilbarger intervention, an occupational therapy technique successfully used to treat children with sensory integration deficits, might prove beneficial if used with schizophrenic patients. Thirty inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders voluntarily participated. Each was evaluated using the sensory integration subscale of the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES) both pre- and post-intervention. The Wilbarger was scheduled to be administered five times per day for seven days per week for four weeks. Participants averaged 19.5 days (mean) in the study (median=27.5 days) and received 80.4 (mean) (106.5 median) interventions.Those receiving 90 or more interventions improved significantly on the graphesthesia subtest (t(28)=2.498; p<0.019), the right/left confusion subtest (t(28)=2.373; p<0.025) and the post-total score (t(28)=2.184; p<0.037). Sensory subscales of the NES statistically improved after use of the Wilbarger intervention. Further studies are planned to determine the duration and clinical significance of the noted changes.

  5. Actigraphy in human African trypanosomiasis as a tool for objective clinical evaluation and monitoring: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njamnshi, Alfred K; Seke Etet, Paul F; Perrig, Stephen; Acho, Alphonse; Funsah, Julius Y; Mumba, Dieudonné; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Kristensson, Krister; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness leads to a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome with characteristic sleep alterations. Current division into a first, hemolymphatic stage and second, meningoencephalitic stage is primarily based on the detection of white blood cells and/or trypanosomes in the cerebrospinal fluid. The validity of this criterion is, however, debated, and novel laboratory biomarkers are under study. Objective clinical HAT evaluation and monitoring is therefore needed. Polysomnography has effectively documented sleep-wake disturbances during HAT, but could be difficult to apply as routine technology in field work. The non-invasive, cost-effective technique of actigraphy has been widely validated as a tool for the ambulatory evaluation of sleep disturbances. In this pilot study, actigraphy was applied to the clinical assessment of HAT patients. Actigraphy was recorded in patients infected by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and age- and sex-matched control subjects. Simultaneous nocturnal polysomnography was also performed in the patients. Nine patients, including one child, were analyzed at admission and two of them also during specific treatment. Parameters, analyzed with user-friendly software, included sleep time evaluated from rest-activity signals, rest-activity rhythm waveform and characteristics. The findings showed sleep-wake alterations of various degrees of severity, which in some patients did not parallel white blood cell counts in the cerebrospinal fluid. Actigraphic recording also showed improvement of the analyzed parameters after treatment initiation. Nocturnal polysomnography showed alterations of sleep time closely corresponding to those derived from actigraphy. The data indicate that actigraphy can be an interesting tool for HAT evaluation, providing valuable clinical information through simple technology, well suited also for long-term follow-up. Actigraphy could therefore objectively contribute to the clinical

  6. Actigraphy in human African trypanosomiasis as a tool for objective clinical evaluation and monitoring: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred K Njamnshi

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness leads to a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome with characteristic sleep alterations. Current division into a first, hemolymphatic stage and second, meningoencephalitic stage is primarily based on the detection of white blood cells and/or trypanosomes in the cerebrospinal fluid. The validity of this criterion is, however, debated, and novel laboratory biomarkers are under study. Objective clinical HAT evaluation and monitoring is therefore needed. Polysomnography has effectively documented sleep-wake disturbances during HAT, but could be difficult to apply as routine technology in field work. The non-invasive, cost-effective technique of actigraphy has been widely validated as a tool for the ambulatory evaluation of sleep disturbances. In this pilot study, actigraphy was applied to the clinical assessment of HAT patients.Actigraphy was recorded in patients infected by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and age- and sex-matched control subjects. Simultaneous nocturnal polysomnography was also performed in the patients. Nine patients, including one child, were analyzed at admission and two of them also during specific treatment. Parameters, analyzed with user-friendly software, included sleep time evaluated from rest-activity signals, rest-activity rhythm waveform and characteristics. The findings showed sleep-wake alterations of various degrees of severity, which in some patients did not parallel white blood cell counts in the cerebrospinal fluid. Actigraphic recording also showed improvement of the analyzed parameters after treatment initiation. Nocturnal polysomnography showed alterations of sleep time closely corresponding to those derived from actigraphy.The data indicate that actigraphy can be an interesting tool for HAT evaluation, providing valuable clinical information through simple technology, well suited also for long-term follow-up. Actigraphy could therefore objectively contribute to

  7. A pilot study to evaluate the safety and clinical performance of Leucopatch, an autologous, additive-free, platelet-rich fibrin for the treatment of recalcitrant chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny; Vogensen, Hanne;

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, uncontrolled pilot study evaluated the safety and clinical performance of Leucopatch an additive-free, autologous platelet-rich fibrin in the treatment of recalcitrant chronic wounds. Fifteen patients, with 16 lower extremity chronic wounds of varying etiologies were treated...

  8. A Pilot Study Evaluating the Stigma and Public Perception about the Causes of Depression and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TM Khan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: To evaluate public perceptions towards the causes of depression and schizophrenia and identifications of fac­tors resulting stigma towards mental ill."nMethod: A cross-sectional study was conducted among the inhabitants of Pulau-Pinang, Malaysia in March, 2009. A 24-item questionnaire was used to obtain respondent views. A non-probability (i.e convenient sampling method was used to ap­proach the potential respondents. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS version 13 ®, non-parametric sta­tistics (Chi-square was applied to determine the association.  Alpha value less than 0.05 were considered significant."nResults: One hundred respondents showed their willingness to participate in the study; overall response of the study was 40.0%. Majority 69% of the respondents were Malays, followed by Chinese and Indians. Public re-cognition toward depres­sion was higher than schizophrenia. Lack of social support (X2= 4.832, P= 0.049, chemical imbalance in Brian (X2=6.132, P= 0.013* and believes in supernatural factors (X2= 6.700, P= 0.050 were the commonly shared reasons for the mental dis­or­ders. Evaluation in terms of stigma revealed that majority 61 (55.0%. Individuals with mental disorders were not friendly (X2= 1.008, P= 0.050. Furthermore, one third of the population believe that they are moody, danger­ous and unpredict­able, it is better to avoid them."nConclusion: Overall findings revealed that Malaysians believe in supernatural reasons for the prevalence of mental disor­ders. Similarly the level of stigma towards mentally ill was higher among the respondents.

  9. Evaluation of annoyance from the wind turbine noise: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Pawlaczyk-Łuszczyńska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of and annoyance due to the noise from wind turbines in populated areas of Poland. Material and Methods: The study group comprised 156 subjects. All subjects were asked to fill in a questionnaire developed to enable evaluation of their living conditions, including prevalence of annoyance due to the noise from wind turbines and the self-assessment of physical health and well-being. In addition, current mental health status of the respondents was assessed using Goldberg General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12. For areas where the respondents lived, A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs were calculated as the sum of the contributions from the wind power plants in the specific area. Results: It has been shown that the wind turbine noise at the calculated A-weigh­ted SPL of 30-48 dB was noticed outdoors by 60.3% of the respondents. This noise was perceived as annoying outdoors by 33.3% of the respondents, while indoors by 20.5% of them. The odds ratio of being annoyed outdoors by the wind turbine noise increased along with increasing SPLs (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.22-3.62. The subjects' attitude to wind turbines in general and sensitivity to landscape littering was found to have significant impact on the perceived annoyance. About 63% of variance in outdoors annoyance assessment might be explained by the noise level, general attitude to wind turbines and sensitivity to landscape littering. Conclusions: Before firm conclusions can be drawn further studies are needed, including a larger number of respondents with different living environments (i.e., dissimilar terrain, different urbanization and road traffic intensity.

  10. Evaluation of annoyance from the wind turbine noise: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlaczyk-Łuszczyńska, Małgorzata; Dudarewicz, Adam; Zaborowski, Kamil; Zamojska-Daniszewska, Małgorzata; Waszkowska, Małgorzata

    2014-06-01

    The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of and annoyance due to the noise from wind turbines in populated areas of Poland. The study group comprised 156 subjects. All subjects were asked to fill in a questionnaire developed to enable evaluation of their living conditions, including prevalence of annoyance due to the noise from wind turbines and the self-assessment of physical health and well-being. In addition, current mental health status of the respondents was assessed using Goldberg General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12. For areas where the respondents lived, A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated as the sum of the contributions from the wind power plants in the specific area. It has been shown that the wind turbine noise at the calculated A-weighted SPL of 30-48 dB was noticed outdoors by 60.3% of the respondents. This noise was perceived as annoying outdoors by 33.3% of the respondents, while indoors by 20.5% of them. The odds ratio of being annoyed outdoors by the wind turbine noise increased along with increasing SPLs (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.22-3.62). The subjects' attitude to wind turbines in general and sensitivity to landscape littering was found to have significant impact on the perceived annoyance. About 63% of variance in outdoors annoyance assessment might be explained by the noise level, general attitude to wind turbines and sensitivity to landscape littering. Before firm conclusions can be drawn further studies are needed, including a larger number of respondents with different living environments (i.e., dissimilar terrain, different urbanization and road traffic intensity).

  11. A pilot study evaluating a support programme for parents of young people with suicidal behaviour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Lorna

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Deliberate self harm (DSH) is a major public health concern and has increased among young people in Ireland. While DSH is undoubtedly the result of interacting factors, studies have identified an association between DSH and family dysfunction as well as the protective role of positive family relationships. Following a focus group meeting held to identify the needs of parents and carers of young people with DSH, a support programme (SPACE) was developed. The aims of the current study are to evaluate the effectiveness of the SPACE programme in decreasing parental psychological distress, reducing parental report of young peoples\\' difficulties, increasing parental satisfaction and increasing parents\\' ratings of their own defined challenges and goals. METHODS: Participants were recruited from a Mental Health Service within a paediatric hospital, Community Child and Adolescent Mental Health Teams and family support services. All services were located within the greater Dublin area in Ireland. Forty-six parents of children who had engaged in or expressed thoughts of self harm attended the programme and participated in the evaluation study. The programme ran once a week over an 8-week period and included topics such as information on self harm in young people, parenting adolescents, communication and parental self-care. Seventy percent (N = 32) of the original sample at Time 1 completed measures at Time 2 (directly following the programme) and 37% (N = 17) of the original sample at Time 1 completed them at Time 3 (6 months following the programme).A repeated measures design was used to identify changes in parental wellbeing after attendance at the programme as well as changes in parental reports of their children\\'s difficulties. RESULTS: Participants had lower levels of psychological distress, increased parental satisfaction, lower ratings of their own defined challenges and higher ratings of their goals directly after the programme. These

  12. A pilot study evaluating a support programme for parents of young people with suicidal behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowley Sinead

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deliberate self harm (DSH is a major public health concern and has increased among young people in Ireland. While DSH is undoubtedly the result of interacting factors, studies have identified an association between DSH and family dysfunction as well as the protective role of positive family relationships. Following a focus group meeting held to identify the needs of parents and carers of young people with DSH, a support programme (SPACE was developed. The aims of the current study are to evaluate the effectiveness of the SPACE programme in decreasing parental psychological distress, reducing parental report of young peoples' difficulties, increasing parental satisfaction and increasing parents' ratings of their own defined challenges and goals. Methods Participants were recruited from a Mental Health Service within a paediatric hospital, Community Child and Adolescent Mental Health Teams and family support services. All services were located within the greater Dublin area in Ireland. Forty-six parents of children who had engaged in or expressed thoughts of self harm attended the programme and participated in the evaluation study. The programme ran once a week over an 8-week period and included topics such as information on self harm in young people, parenting adolescents, communication and parental self-care. Seventy percent (N = 32 of the original sample at Time 1 completed measures at Time 2 (directly following the programme and 37% (N = 17 of the original sample at Time 1 completed them at Time 3 (6 months following the programme. A repeated measures design was used to identify changes in parental wellbeing after attendance at the programme as well as changes in parental reports of their children's difficulties. Results Participants had lower levels of psychological distress, increased parental satisfaction, lower ratings of their own defined challenges and higher ratings of their goals directly after the programme. These

  13. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and evaluation of a PBL-based continuing education for clinical nurses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Soon; Hwang, Seon Young; Oh, Eui Geum; Lee, Jae Eun

    2006-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a PBL program for continuing nurse education and to evaluate the program after its implementation. The PBL program was developed in the core cardio-pulmonary nursing concepts through a collaborative approach with a nursing school and a hospital. The PBL packages with simulation on ACLS were implemented to 40 clinical nurses. The entire PBL program consisted of six 3-hour weekly classes and was evaluated by the participants' subjective responses. Two PBL packages in cardio-pulmonary system including clinical cases and tutorial guidelines were developed. The 57.5% of the participants responded positively about the use of PBL as continuing nurse education in terms of self-motivated and cooperative learning, whereas 20.0% of the participants answered that the PBL method was not suitable for clinical nurses. Some modifications were suggested in grouping participants and program contents for PBL. The PBL method could be utilized to promote nurses' clinical competencies as well as self-learning abilities. Further research is needed in the implementation strategies of PBL-based continuing education in order to improve its effectiveness.

  15. Evaluating Educational Needs of Parents at Newborn Discharge: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiman, Alanna; Crawford, Brendan D; McLain, Kyle K; Gattari, Theresa B; Mychaliska, Kerry P

    2016-05-01

    The delivery of anticipatory guidance regarding newborn care is a standard practice for pediatricians. The purpose of this prospective study was to analyze the preexisting knowledge of routine newborn care in postpartum mothers. Inclusion criteria included all postpartum mothers of live-born infants at least two hours following delivery that had not yet received formal instruction in newborn care. Each eligible mother that agreed to the voluntary survey was asked four multiple-choice questions which evaluated her knowledge of newborn care. The four questions addressed knowledge of safe sleep, car seat position, feeding behavior, and neonatal fever. A standardized template was used to ensure validity. Results were recorded in Microsoft Excel. Of the study population, 42% (55/131) of surveyed mothers were first-time mothers. Overall, results of the survey demonstrated that postpartum mothers answered the surveyed questions correctly 88% of the time previous to receiving anticipatory guidance. Postpartum mothers appear to have a high preexisting knowledge of routine newborn care in this study. Further studies are needed to determine if postpartum mothers' knowledge base increases with inpatient education. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics

  16. Evaluation of three different methods of distance learning for postgraduate diagnostic imaging education: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Jean-Nicolas; Cooley, Jeffrey R; Wessely, Michelle; Guebert, Gary M; Petrocco-Napuli, Kristina

    2014-10-01

    Objective : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceived effectiveness and learning potential of 3 Web-based educational methods in a postgraduate radiology setting. Methods : Three chiropractic radiology faculty from diverse geographic locations led mini-courses using asynchronous discussion boards, synchronous Web conferencing, and asynchronous voice-over case presentations formatted for Web viewing. At the conclusion of each course, participants filled out a 14-question survey (using a 5-point Likert scale) designed to evaluate the effectiveness of each method in achieving specified course objectives and goals and their satisfaction when considering the learning potential of each method. The mean, standard deviation, and percentage agreements were tabulated. Results : Twenty, 15, and 10 participants completed the discussion board, Web conferencing, and case presentation surveys, respectively. All educational methods demonstrated a high level of agreement regarding the course objective (total mean rating >4.1). The case presentations had the highest overall rating for achieving the course goals; however, all but one method still had total mean ratings >4.0 and overall agreement levels of 70%-100%. The strongest potential for interactive learning was found with Web conferencing and discussion boards, while case presentations rated very low in this regard. Conclusions : The perceived effectiveness in achieving the course objective and goals was high for each method. Residency-based distance education may be a beneficial adjunct to current methods of training, allowing for international collaboration. When considering all aspects tested, there does not appear to be a clear advantage to any one method. Utilizing various methods may be most appropriate.

  17. The effectiveness of optical coherence tomography for evaluating peri-omplant tissue: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanda, Minoru; Shiota, Makoto; Imakita, Chiharu; Kasugai, Shohei [Dept. of Oral Implantology and Regenerative Dental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Sakuyama, Aoi [Dept. of Oral Surgery, Jichii Medical University Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Sumi, Yasunori [Div. of Oral and Dental Surgery, Dept. of Advanced Medicine, National Hospital for Geriatric Medicine, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been investigated as a novel diagnostic imaging tool. The utilisation of this equipment has been evaluated through several studies in the field of dentistry. The aim of this preliminary study was to determine through basic experiments the effectiveness of OCT in implant dentistry. To assess detection ability, we captured OCT images of implants in each of the following situations: (1) implants covered with mucosae of various thicknesses that were harvested from the mandibles of pigs; (2) implants installed in the mandibles of pigs; and (3) implants with abutments and crowns fixed with temporary cement. The OCT images were captured before cementation, after cementation, and after removing the excess submucosal cement. If the thickness of the mucosa covering the implant body was less than 1 mm, the images of the implants were clearly detected by OCT. In the implants were installed in pigs' mandibles, it was difficult to capture clear images of the implant and alveolar bone in most of the samples. Remnants of excess cement around the implants were visible in most samples that had a mucosa thickness of less than 3 mm. Currently, OCT imaging of implants is limited. Cement remnants at the submucosal area can be detected in some cases, which can be helpful in preventing peri-implant diseases. Still, though there are some restrictions to its application, OCT could have potential as an effective diagnostic instrument in the field of implant dentistry as well.

  18. Success Evaluation of Pulpotomy in Primary Molars with Enamel Matrix Derivative: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mazhari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the effect of Emdogain gel (EMD in pulpotomized primary molars and its clinical and radiographic outcomes. Methods and Materials: In this   study, 18 lower second primary molars of nine children were treated by   pulpotomy. The teeth were randomly assigned to the EMD (experimental and Formocresol (control groups in each patient (split mouth. Following removal of the coronal pulp and haemostasis, the pulp stumps were covered with Emdogain gel in the experimental group followed by application of resin-modified glass ionomer cement over the gel. In the control group, Formocresol (FC was placed with a cotton pellet over the pulp stumps. Lastly, the teeth in both groups were restored with stainless steel crowns. Results: Nine children referred with clinical failure before/at two months follow up. The radiographic evaluation revealed furcation involvement and extensive radicular radiolucency in molars treated with Emdogain gel. Conclusion: The present study showed the failure of enamel matrix derivative in pulpotomy of primary molars; therefore, we do not recommend using Emdogain as a pulpotomy agent for treatment of cariously exposed primary teeth

  19. A New Index for the MMPI-2 Test for Detecting Dissimulation in Forensic Evaluations: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Vito; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Bosco, Andrea; Massaro, Ylenia; Lisi, Andrea; Campobasso, Filippo; Marchitelli, Maria Alessia; Catanesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study is the starting point of a potentially broad research project aimed at identifying new strategies for assessing malingering during forensic evaluations. The forensic group was comprised of 67 males who were seeking some sort of certification (e.g., adoption, child custody, driver's license, issuance of gun permits, etc.); the nonforensic group was comprised of 62 healthy male volunteers. Each participant was administered the MMPI-2. Statistical analyses were conducted on obtained scores of 48 MMPI-2 scales. In the first step, parametric statistics were adopted to identify the best combination of MMPI-2 scales that differentiated the two groups of participants. In the second step, frequency-based, nonparametric methods were used for diagnostic purposes. A model that utilized the best three predictors ("7-Pt", "L," and "1-Hs") was developed and used to calculate the Forensic Evaluation Dissimulation Index (FEDI), which features satisfactory diagnostic accuracy (0.9), sensitivity (0.82), specificity (0.81), and likelihood ratio indices (LR+ = 4.32; LR- = 0.22). © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. The Healthy for Life Taekwondo Pilot Study: A Preliminary Evaluation of Effects on Executive Function and BMI, Feasibility, and Acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Kimberley D; Bryars, Tracy; Sirisinahal, Swetha; Salim, Nimrah; Arastoo, Sara; Emmerson, Natasha; Kang, Daniel; Shim, Lois; Wong, Doug; Kang, Chang Jin

    2013-10-01

    There is growing consensus that exercise improves cognitive functioning, but research is needed to identify exercise interventions that optimize effects on cognition. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate Taekwondo implemented in public middle school physical education (PE). Two classes were randomly assigned to either: five sessions per week of PE or three sessions of PE and two sessions of Taekwondo. In PE sessions, evidence-based curriculum to address the Presidential Core Fitness Guidelines and California Physical Fitness Tests was implemented. Taekwondo sessions included traditional techniques and forms taught in an environment emphasizing respect and self-control. Sixty students were evaluated at baseline and during the last week of the intervention (nine months later). Differences in mean residualized change scores for parent-rated inhibitory behavioral control yielded a significant, large effect size (d =.95, p =.00), reflecting greater improvement among Taekwondo students. Results from an executive function computer-administered task revealed greater accuracy on the congruent trial (d = 2.00, p = .02) for Taekwondo students. Differences in mean residualized change scores for BMI z scores yielded a moderate, non-significant effect size (d = - .51, p = .16). The majority of Taekwondo students reported positive perceptions of Taekwondo and perceived self-improvement in self-control and physical fitness. Results suggest that Taekwondo is an exercise program that improves cognitive functioning and is both feasible and acceptable to implement in a public school setting.

  1. Computer-administered neurobehavioral evaluation system for occupational and environmental epidemiology. Rationale, methodology, and pilot study results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, E.L.; Letz, R.; Fidler, A.

    1985-03-01

    To facilitate the conduct of epidemiologic studies of populations at risk for or suffering from central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction due to environmental agents, a computer-administered neurobehavioral evaluation system has been developed. The system includes a set of testing programs designed to run on a microcomputer and questionnaires to facilitate interpretation of results. Standard tasks evaluating memory, psychomotor function, verbal ability, visuospatial ability, and mood were selected and adapted for computer presentation following the recommendation of an expert committee of the World Health Organization and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. In two pilot surveys, test performance was found to be influenced by age, education level, and socioeconomic status in ways consistent with prior research findings. Performance on tests of short-term memory and reaction time was negatively correlated with intensity of organic solvent exposure among industrial painters. In view of the ease of administration and data handling, high subject acceptability, and sensitivity to the effects of known neurotoxic agents, computer-based assessment of CNS function holds promise for future epidemiologic research.

  2. Evaluation of a biofeedback-assisted meditation program as a stress management tool for hospital nurses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutshall, Susanne M; Wentworth, Laura J; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Vincent, Ann; Schmidt, John E; Loehrer, Laura L; Cha, Stephen S; Bauer, Brent A

    2011-01-01

    To assess whether a self-directed, computer-guided meditation training program is useful for stress reduction in hospital nurses. We prospectively evaluated participants before and after a month-long meditation program. The meditation program consisted of 15 computer sessions that used biofeedback to reinforce training. Participants were instructed to practice the intervention for 30 minutes per session, four times a week, for four weeks. Visual analogue scales were used to measure stress, anxiety, and quality of life (assessments were performed using Linear Analogue Self-Assessment [LASA], State Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI], and Short-Form 36 [SF-36] questionnaires). Differences in scores from baseline to the study's end were compared using the paired t test. Eleven registered nurses not previously engaged in meditation were enrolled; eight completed the study. Intent-to-treat analysis showed significant improvement in stress management, as measured by SF-36 vitality subscale (P = .04), STAI (P = .03), LASA stress (P = .01), and LASA anxiety (P = .01). Nurses were highly satisfied with the meditation program, rating it 8.6 out of 10. The results of this pilot study suggest the feasibility and efficacy of a biofeedback-assisted, self-directed, meditation training program to help hospital nurses reduce their stress and anxiety. Optimal frequency of use of the program, as well as the duration of effects, should be addressed in future studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing, implementing and evaluating OSH interventions in SMEs: a pilot, exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Donato; Cagno, Enrico; Micheli, Guido J L

    2014-01-01

    The literature on occupational safety and health (OSH) interventions contains many debates on how interventions should work, but far less attention has been paid to how they actually do work, and to the contextual factors that influence their implementation, development and effect. The need of improving the understanding of the OSH interventions issue is particularly relevant for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), since they experience worse OSH conditions, and have fewer physical, economic and organizational resources if compared to larger enterprises; thus, SMEs strongly need to focus their few resources in the decision-making process so as to select and put in place only the most proper interventions. This exploratory study is based on interviews with safety officers of 5 SMEs, and it gives an overview of the key features of the actual intervention process in SMEs and of the contextual factors making this actual intervention process similar or dissimilar to the ideal case. The results show how much qualitative and experience driven the actual intervention process is; they should be used to direct the future research towards an increasingly applicable one, to enable practitioners from SMEs to develop, implement and evaluate their OSH interventions in an "ideal" way.

  4. The Evaluation of Bioelectrical Activity of Pelvic Floor Muscles Depending on Probe Location: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Halski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The main objective was to determine how the depth of probe placement affects functional and resting bioelectrical activity of the PFM and whether the recorded signal might be dependent on the direction in which the probe is rotated. Participants. The study comprised of healthy, nulliparous women between the ages of 21 and 25. Outcome Measures. Bioelectric activity of the PFM was recorded from four locations of the vagina by surface EMG and vaginal probe. Results. There were no statistically significant differences between the results during functional sEMG activity. During resting sEMG activity, the highest bioelectrical activity of the PFM was observed in the L1 and the lowest in the L4 and a statistically significant difference between the highest and the lowest results of resting sEMG activity was observed (P=0.0043. Conclusion. Different electrodes placement during functional contraction of PFM does not affect the obtained results in sEMG evaluation. In order to diagnose the highest resting activity of PFM the recording plates should be placed toward the anterior vaginal wall and distally from the introitus. However, all of the PFM have similar bioelectrical activity and it seems that these muscles could be treated as a single muscle.

  5. Pilot study to evaluate the role of Mycoplasma species in cat bite abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Henderson, Camille; Hesser, Jeff; Hyatt, Doreene R; Hawley, Jennifer; Brewer, Melissa; Lappin, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    Mycoplasma species are common inhabitants of the feline oral cavity, and so likely contaminate many cat bite abscesses. The objectives of this study were to determine whether Mycoplasma species are common contaminants of cat bite abscesses and whether they are are associated with β-lactam-resistant clinical disease. Twenty-six privately owned cats with clinical evidence of an abscess suspected to be from a cat bite were included in the study. Samples from each cat were evaluated by aerobic and anaerobic culture, as well as Mycoplasma species culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All cats were initially treated with appropriate wound management and were administered an antibiotic of the β-lactam class (amoxicillin, amoxicillin clavulanate or cefovecin sodium). Mycoplasma species DNA was amplified by PCR from 4/26 samples (15.4%); one of these cases was concurrently culture positive. Adequate DNA for sequencing was present for 2/4 positive PCR samples; one was most homologous with Mycoplasma felis, and the other was most homologous with Mycoplasma equigenitalium and Mycoplasma elephantis. Of the 26 cats, 25 responded to the initial treatment by day 7. The cat that failed initial treatment was positive for M equigenitalium or M elephantis DNA on days 0 and 12, and ultimately responded to administration of enrofloxacin and clindamycin. The results suggest that while Mycoplasma species can contaminate cat bite abscesses, routine wound management and β-lactam antibiotic therapy is adequate for treatment in most cases of abscess. However, as Mycoplasma species infections do not respond to β-lactam class antibiotic therapy, these organisms should be on the differential list for cats with abscesses that fail treatment with this antibiotic class.

  6. Applying participatory approaches in the evaluation of surveillance systems: A pilot study on African swine fever surveillance in Corsica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calba, Clémentine; Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas; Charrier, François; Hendrikx, Pascal; Saegerman, Claude; Peyre, Marisa; Goutard, Flavie L

    2015-12-01

    The implementation of regular and relevant evaluations of surveillance systems is critical in improving their effectiveness and their relevance whilst limiting their cost. The complex nature of these systems and the variable contexts in which they are implemented call for the development of flexible evaluation tools. Within this scope, participatory tools have been developed and implemented for the African swine fever (ASF) surveillance system in Corsica (France). The objectives of this pilot study were, firstly, to assess the applicability of participatory approaches within a developed environment involving various stakeholders and, secondly, to define and test methods developed to assess evaluation attributes. Two evaluation attributes were targeted: the acceptability of the surveillance system and its the non-monetary benefits. Individual semi-structured interviews and focus groups were implemented with representatives from every level of the system. Diagramming and scoring tools were used to assess the different elements that compose the definition of acceptability. A contingent valuation method, associated with proportional piling, was used to assess the non-monetary benefits, i.e., the value of sanitary information. Sixteen stakeholders were involved in the process, through 3 focus groups and 8 individual semi-structured interviews. Stakeholders were selected according to their role in the system and to their availability. Results highlighted a moderate acceptability of the system for farmers and hunters and a high acceptability for other representatives (e.g., private veterinarians, local laboratories). Out of the 5 farmers involved in assessing the non-monetary benefits, 3 were interested in sanitary information on ASF. The data collected via participatory approaches enable relevant recommendations to be made, based on the Corsican context, to improve the current surveillance system.

  7. Pilot Inter-Laboratory Studies for Evaluating Weathering-Induced Release of Carbon Nanotubes from Solid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanomaterials are increasingly being used in polymer composites to enhance the properties of these materials. Here we present results of a pilot inter-laboratory study to simulate the effects of weathering on the potential release of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) from thei...

  8. Pilot Inter-Laboratory Studies for Evaluating Weathering-Induced Release of Carbon Nanotubes from Solid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanomaterials are increasingly being used in polymer composites to enhance the properties of these materials. Here we present results of a pilot inter-laboratory study to simulate the effects of weathering on the potential release of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) from thei...

  9. A pilot study evaluating non-contact low-frequency ultrasound and underlying molecular mechanism on diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Min; Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Gu, Guosheng; Garcia-Lavin, Silvia; Fabbi, Matteo; Park, Nanjin; Hayashi, Hisae; Attala, Khaled; French, Michael A; Driver, Vickie R

    2014-12-01

    Non-contact low-frequency ultrasound (NCLF-US) devices have been increasingly used for the treatment of chronic non-healing wounds. The appropriate dose for NCLF-US is still in debate. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the relationship between dose and duration of treatment for subjects with non-healing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and to explore the correlation between wound healing and change of cytokine/proteinase/growth factor profile. This was a prospective randomised clinical study designed to evaluate subjects with non-healing DFUs for 5 weeks receiving standard of care and/or NCLF-US treatment. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: application of NCLF-US thrice per week (Group 1), NCLF-US once per week (Group 2) and the control (Group 3) that received no NCLF-US. All subjects received standard wound care plus offloading for a total of 4 weeks. Percent area reduction (PAR) of each wound compared with baseline was evaluated weekly. Profiles of cytokines/proteinase/growth factors in wound fluid and biopsied tissue were quantified to explore the correlation between wound healing and cytokines/growth factor expression. Twelve DFU patients, 2 (16·7%) type 1 and 10 (83·3%) type 2 diabetics, with an average age of 58 ± 10 years and a total of 12 foot ulcers were enrolled. Average ulcer duration was 36·44 ± 24·78 weeks and the average ABI was 0·91 ± 0·06. Group 1 showed significant wound area reduction at weeks 3, 4 and 5 compared with baseline, with the greatest PAR, 86% (P diabetic foot ulcers through, at least in part, inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines in chronic wound and improving tissue regeneration. Therapeutic application of NFLU, thrice (3) per week, renders the best wound area reduction.

  10. Evaluation of methods to relieve parental perceptions of vaccine-associated pain and anxiety in children: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthy, Karlen E; Beckstrand, Renea L; Pulsipher, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The pain and anxiety associated with vaccination is a significant reason why parents are reluctant to have their children vaccinated. Distraction methods and vapocoolant sprays may be use to modify the parent's perceptions of their child's pain and anxiety, thus encouraging parents to return for the child's next vaccination. A convenience sample of 68 parents with children ranging in age from 2 to 12 years was selected. The parents and the child were randomly assigned to three groups: a control group, a DVD distraction group, or a vapocoolant spray group. After the child was vaccinated, parents evaluated the child's pain and anxiety. No significant difference in the parents' perception of their child's pain or anxiety was found between the two treatment groups compared with the control group. Some parents expressed the desire to be able to choose the type of distraction method their child received rather than having them randomly assigned to a group. Although quantitative results were not statistically significant in this pilot study, parents commented that the DVD distraction method seemed helpful before and/or after vaccination, but not during vaccination, and parents appreciated the distraction. Parents, however, would prefer to choose the intervention rather than being randomly assigned to a group. The effectiveness of interventions with regard to parental perceptions of pain or anxiety warrants further study. Copyright © 2013 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A phase I pilot study evaluating the beneficial effects of black raspberries in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresty, Laura A; Fromkes, John J; Frankel, Wendy L; Hammond, Cynthia D; Seeram, Navindra P; Baird, Maureen; Stoner, Gary D

    2016-07-07

    Black raspberries inhibit a broad range of cancers in preclinical models which has led to clinical evaluations targeting premalignant lesions of the colon, oral cavity and esophagus. A phase I pilot study was conducted in twenty Barrett's esophagus (BE) patients to investigate the effect of lyophilized black raspberries (LBR) on urinary metabolites and markers of lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and tissue markers of cellular proliferation, detoxification, and inflammation. Surveys, biopsies, blood and urine samples were collected before and after 6 months of LBR treatment (32 or 45 g). LBR significantly reduced urinary excretion of 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α, a marker of lipid peroxidation linked to oxidative stress and free radical damage. Urinary levels of the ellagitannin metabolites, urolithin A-glucuronide, urolithin A-sulfate and dimethylellagic acid glucuronide were significantly increased following 12 and 26 weeks of LBR consumption and may prove useful as indicators of compliance in future clinical studies. Immunohistochemical staining of BE biopsies following LBR treatment showed significant increases in mean GST-pi levels, with 55.6% of subjects responding favorably. In summary, LBR significantly decreased urinary lipid peroxidation levels and significantly increased GST-pi, a marker of detoxification, in BE epithelium. Still, LBR may need to be formulated differently, administered at higher concentrations or multiple times a day to increase efficacy.

  12. A Pilot Study to Evaluate California's Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Using Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Fischer, M. L.; Lueker, T.; Guilderson, T.; Brophy, K. J.; Keeling, R. F.; Arnold, T.; Bambha, R.; Callahan, W.; Campbell, J. E.; Cui, X.; Frankenberg, C.; Hsu, Y.; Iraci, L. T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J.; LaFranchi, B. W.; Lehman, S.; Manning, A.; Michelsen, H. A.; Miller, J. B.; Newman, S.; Paplawsky, B.; Parazoo, N.; Sloop, C.; Walker, S.; Whelan, M.; Wunch, D.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration is influenced by human activities and by natural exchanges. Studies of CO2 fluxes using atmospheric CO2 measurements typically focus on natural exchanges and assume that CO2 emissions by fossil fuel combustion and cement production are well-known from inventory estimates. However, atmospheric observation-based or "top-down" studies could potentially provide independent methods for evaluating fossil fuel CO2 emissions, in support of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change. Observation-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 may also improve estimates of biospheric CO2 exchange, which could help to characterize carbon storage and climate change mitigation by terrestrial ecosystems. We have been developing a top-down framework for estimating fossil fuel CO2 emissions in California that uses atmospheric observations and modeling. California is implementing the "Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006" to reduce total greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, and it has a diverse array of ecosystems that may serve as CO2 sources or sinks. We performed three month-long field campaigns in different seasons in 2014-15 to collect flask samples from a state-wide network of 10 towers. Using measurements of radiocarbon in CO2, we estimate the fossil fuel-derived CO2 present in the flask samples, relative to marine background air observed at coastal sites. Radiocarbon (14C) is not present in fossil fuel-derived CO2 because of radioactive decay over millions of years, so fossil fuel emissions cause a measurable decrease in the 14C/C ratio in atmospheric CO2. We compare the observations of fossil fuel-derived CO2 to simulations based on atmospheric modeling and published fossil fuel flux estimates, and adjust the fossil fuel flux estimates in a statistical inversion that takes account of several uncertainties. We will present the results of the top-down technique to estimate fossil fuel emissions for our field

  13. Evaluating medical students’ proficiency with a handheld ophthalmoscope: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmour G

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Gilmour,1 James McKivigan2 1Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI, 2School of Physical Therapy, Touro University, Henderson, NV, USA Introduction: Historically, testing medical students’ skills using a handheld ophthalmoscope has been difficult to do objectively. Many programs train students using plastic models of the eye which are a very limited fidelity simulator of a real human eye. This makes it difficult to be sure that actual proficiency is attained given the differences between the various models and actual patients. The purpose of this article is to introduce a method of testing where a medical student must match a patient with his/her fundus photo, ensuring objective evaluation as well as developing skills on real patients which are more likely to transfer into clinical practice directly. Presentation of case: Fundus photos from standardized patients (SPs were obtained using a retinal camera and placed into a grid using proprietary software. Medical students were then asked to examine a SP and attempt to match the patient to his/her fundus photo in the grid. Results: Of the 33 medical students tested, only 10 were able to match the SP’s eye to the correct photo in the grid. The average time to correct selection was 175 seconds, and the successful students rated their confidence level at 27.5% (average. The incorrect selection took less time, averaging 118 seconds, yet yielded a higher student-reported confidence level at 34.8% (average. The only noteworthy predictor of success (p<0.05 was the student’s age (p=0.02. Conclusion: It may be determined that there is an apparent gap in the ophthalmoscopy training of the students tested. It may also be of concern that students who selected the incorrect photo were more confident in their selections than students who chose the correct photo. More training may be necessary to close this gap, and future studies should attempt to establish

  14. Evaluating and Training Substance Abuse Counselors: A Pilot Study Assessing Standardized Patients as Authentic Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussell, Holly E.; Lewy, Colleen S.; McFarland, Bentson H.

    2009-01-01

    Clinician training and supervision are needed to transfer evidence-based practices to community-based treatment organizations. Standardized patients (SPs) are used for clinician training and evaluating. However, to be effective for substance abuse counselors, SPs must realistically portray substance abuse treatment clients. The current study…

  15. Effects of Task and Rater Background on the Evaluation of ESL Student Writing: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigle, Sara Cushing; Boldt, Heather; Valsecchi, Maria Ines

    2003-01-01

    Investigates differences in the evaluation of text-responsible (TR) writing and non-text responsible writing by English-as-a-Second-Language instructors and instructors in other disciplines. TR writing requires students to demonstrate understanding of specific texts in their writing rather than writing from personal experience or using a source…

  16. Evaluation of the appendix during diagnostic laparoscopy, the laparoscopic appendicitis score : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamminga, Jenneke T. H.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Broens, Paul M. A.; Kluin, Philip M.; Heineman, Erik; Haveman, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic laparoscopy is the ultimate diagnostic tool to evaluate the appendix. Still, according to the literature, this strategy results in a negative appendectomy rate of approximately 12-18 % and associated morbidity. Laparoscopic criteria for determining appendicitis are lacking. The goal of th

  17. A Pilot Study to Evaluate Development Effort for High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    speaker I am not a native speaker [Please complete the following] TOEFL Score Year My English reading comprehension skills are...implementation/ Reading and understanding the serial code o Parallelizing the serial implementation o Tuning the parallel code o Testing the code o...understand what processes people use, not evaluate them. Date Effort (hours) Reading Serial Code Thinking/ Planning Parallelizing the Code

  18. Equivocality in IS/IT Project Evaluation: Model Development and Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arviansyah, A.; Spil, Antonius A.M.; van Hillegersberg, Jos

    2014-01-01

    IS/IT projects are perceived as ventures which are prone to failure and may lead to disruptive conditions. Evaluating the continuation of projects is highly important for stakeholders and decision makers. However, this event is hampered by the problem of equivocality. The main objective of this

  19. Evaluation of the appendix during diagnostic laparoscopy, the laparoscopic appendicitis score : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamminga, Jenneke T. H.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Broens, Paul M. A.; Kluin, Philip M.; Heineman, Erik; Haveman, Jan Willem

    Diagnostic laparoscopy is the ultimate diagnostic tool to evaluate the appendix. Still, according to the literature, this strategy results in a negative appendectomy rate of approximately 12-18 % and associated morbidity. Laparoscopic criteria for determining appendicitis are lacking. The goal of

  20. A pilot randomized control study to evaluate endoscopic resection using a ligation device for rectal carcinoid tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Sakata; Sadahiro Amemori; Kotaro Mannen; Masanobu Mizuguchi; Kazuma Fujimoto; Ryuichi Iwakiri; Akifumi Ootani; Seiji Tsunada; Shinichi Ogata; Hibiki Ootani; Ryo Shimoda; Kanako Yamaguchi; Yasuhisa Sakata

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Rectal carcinoid tumors smaller than 10 mm can be resected with local excision using endoscopy. In order to remove rectal carcinoid tumors completely, we evaluated endoscopic mucosal resection with a ligation device in this pilot control randomized study.METHODS: Fifteen patients were diagnosed with rectal carcinoid tumor (less than 10 mm) in our hospital from 1993 to 2002. There were 9 males and 6 females,with a mean age 61.5 years (range, 34-77 years).The patientshad no complaints of carcinoid syndrome symptoms. Fifteen patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: 7 carcinoid tumors were treated by conventional endoscopic resection, and 8 carcinoid tumors were treated by endoscopic resection using a ligation device.RESULTS: All rectal carcinoid tumors were located at the middle to distal rectum. The size of the tumors varied from 3 mm to 10 mm and background characteristics of the patients were not different in the two groups.The rate of complete removal of carcinoid tumors using a ligation device (100%, 8/8) was significantly higher than that of conventional endoscopic resection (57.1%,4/7). The three patients had tumor involvement of deep margin, for which additional treatment was performed.No complications occurred during or after endoscopic resection using a ligation device. All patients in the both groups were alive during the 3-year observation period.CONCLUSION: Endoscopic resection using a ligation device is a useful and safe method for resection of small rectal carcinoid tumors.

  1. Evaluating the ability of novices to identify and quantify physical demand elements following an introductory education session: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Brendan; VanderGriendt, Curtis; Fischer, Steven L

    2016-05-01

    A Physical Demands Description (PDD) is a resource that describes the physical demands of a job in a systematic way. PDD data are commonly used to make legal, medical, and monetary decisions related to work. Despite the fundamental importance of a PDD, data are often gathered by novice or early career ergonomists, where we have limited knowledge regarding their proficiency in performing PDDs. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate novices' proficiency in identifying and quantifying physical demands elements embedded within three job simulations, following a formal PDD education session. The education session was based on the revised Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers (OHCOW, 2014) PDD Handbook. Participants were able to identify physical demands elements with an average success rate of 80%, but were often unable to accurately quantify measures related to each element within a prescribed error threshold of 10%. These data suggest that practitioners should exercise caution when sending novice ergonomists out on their own to complete PDDs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of 5 versus 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions in steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis: A pilot, prospective, multicenter, randomized study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elena Ricart; Maria Esteve; Montserrat Andreu; Francesc Casellas; David Monfort; Miquel Sans; Natalia Oudovenko; Raúl Lafuente; Julián Panés

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of 5 compared to 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions in patients with active steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis.METHODS: In this pilot, prospective, multicenter randomized trial, 20 patients with moderately active steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis were randomized to 5 or 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions. The primary objective was clinical remission at wk 17. Secondary measures included endoscopic remission and steroid consumption.RESULTS: Nine patients were randomized to 5 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions (group 1) and L1 patients to 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions (group 2). At wk 17, 37.5% of patients in group 1 and 45.45% of patients in group 2 were in clinical remission. Clinical remission was accompanied by endoscopic remission in all cases.Eighty-six percent of patients achieving remission were steroid-free at wk 17. Daily steroid requirements were significantly lower in group 2. Eighty-nine per cent of patients remained in remission during a one year follow-up. One serious adverse event, not related to the study therapy, was reported.CONCLUSION: Granulocyteaphaeresis is safe and effective for the treatment of steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis. In this population, increasing the number of aphaeresis sessions is not associated with higher remission rates, but affords a significant steroid-sparing effect.

  3. A pilot randomized control study to evaluate endoscopic resection using a ligation device for rectal carcinoid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Hiroyuki; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Ootani, Akifumi; Tsunada, Seiji; Ogata, Shinichi; Ootani, Hibiki; Shimoda, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Kanako; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Amemori, Sadahiro; Mannen, Kotaro; Mizuguchi, Masanobu; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Rectal carcinoid tumors smaller than 10 mm can be resected with local excision using endoscopy. In order to remove rectal carcinoid tumors completely, we evaluated endoscopic mucosal resection with a ligation device in this pilot control randomized study. METHODS: Fifteen patients were diagnosed with rectal carcinoid tumor (less than 10 mm) in our hospital from 1993 to 2002. There were 9 males and 6 females, with a mean age 61.5 years (range, 34-77 years). The patients had no complaints of carcinoid syndrome symptoms. Fifteen patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: 7 carcinoid tumors were treated by conventional endoscopic resection, and 8 carcinoid tumors were treated by endoscopic resection using a ligation device. RESULTS: All rectal carcinoid tumors were located at the middle to distal rectum. The size of the tumors varied from 3 mm to 10 mm and background characteristics of the patients were not different in the two groups. The rate of complete removal of carcinoid tumors using a ligation device (100%, 8/8) was significantly higher than that of conventional endoscopic resection (57.1%, 4/7). The three patients had tumor involvement of deep margin, for which additional treatment was performed. No complications occurred during or after endoscopic resection using a ligation device. All patients in the both groups were alive during the 3-year observation period. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic resection using a ligation device is a useful and safe method for resection of small rectal carcinoid tumors. PMID:16810752

  4. Cluster Sampling Bias in Government-Sponsored Evaluations: A Correlational Study of Employment and Welfare Pilots in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaganay, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    For pilot or experimental employment programme results to apply beyond their test bed, researchers must select 'clusters' (i.e. the job centres delivering the new intervention) that are reasonably representative of the whole territory. More specifically, this requirement must account for conditions that could artificially inflate the effect of a programme, such as the fluidity of the local labour market or the performance of the local job centre. Failure to achieve representativeness results in Cluster Sampling Bias (CSB). This paper makes three contributions to the literature. Theoretically, it approaches the notion of CSB as a human behaviour. It offers a comprehensive theory, whereby researchers with limited resources and conflicting priorities tend to oversample 'effect-enhancing' clusters when piloting a new intervention. Methodologically, it advocates for a 'narrow and deep' scope, as opposed to the 'wide and shallow' scope, which has prevailed so far. The PILOT-2 dataset was developed to test this idea. Empirically, it provides evidence on the prevalence of CSB. In conditions similar to the PILOT-2 case study, investigators (1) do not sample clusters with a view to maximise generalisability; (2) do not oversample 'effect-enhancing' clusters; (3) consistently oversample some clusters, including those with higher-than-average client caseloads; and (4) report their sampling decisions in an inconsistent and generally poor manner. In conclusion, although CSB is prevalent, it is still unclear whether it is intentional and meant to mislead stakeholders about the expected effect of the intervention or due to higher-level constraints or other considerations.

  5. A modified rabbit ulna defect model for evaluating periosteal substitutes in bone engineering: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M El Backly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work defines a modified critical size rabbit ulna defect model for bone regeneration in which a non-resorbable barrier membrane was used to separate the radius from the ulna to create a valid model for evaluation of tissue-engineered periosteal substitutes. Eight rabbits divided into two groups were used. Critical defects (15 mm were made in the ulna completely eliminating periosteum. For group I, defects were filled with a nanohydroxyapatite poly(ester urethane scaffold soaked in PBS and left as such (group Ia or wrapped with a tissue-engineered periosteal substitute (group Ib. For group II, an e-PTFE (GORE-TEX® membrane was inserted around the radius then the defects received either scaffold alone (group IIa or scaffold wrapped with periosteal substitute (group IIb. Animals were euthanized after 12-16 weeks, and bone regeneration was evaluated by radiography, computed microtomography (µCT, and histology. In the first group, we observed formation of radio-ulnar synostosis irrespective of the treatment. This was completely eliminated upon placement of the e-PTFE (GORE-TEX® membrane in the second group of animals. In conclusion, modification of the model using a non-resorbable e-PTFE membrane to isolate the ulna from the radius was a valuable addition allowing for objective evaluation of the tissue-engineered periosteal substitute.

  6. A pilot study to evaluate the application of a generic protein standard panel for quality control of biomarker detection technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdivia Hernan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein biomarker studies are currently hampered by a lack of measurement standards to demonstrate quality, reliability and comparability across multiple assay platforms. This is especially pertinent for immunoassays where multiple formats for detecting target analytes are commonly used. Findings In this pilot study a generic panel of six non-human protein standards (50 - 10^7 pg/mL of varying abundance was prepared as a quality control (QC material. Simulated "normal" and "diseased" panels of proteins were prepared in pooled human plasma and incorporated into immunoassays using the Meso Scale Discovery® (MSD® platform to illustrate reliable detection of the component proteins. The protein panel was also evaluated as a spike-in material for a model immunoassay involving detection of ovarian cancer biomarkers within individual human plasma samples. Our selected platform could discriminate between two panels of the proteins exhibiting small differences in abundance. Across distinct experiments, all component proteins exhibited reproducible signal outputs in pooled human plasma. When individual donor samples were used, half the proteins produced signals independent of matrix effects. These proteins may serve as a generic indicator of platform reliability. Each of the remaining proteins exhibit differential signals across the distinct samples, indicative of sample matrix effects, with the three proteins following the same trend. This subset of proteins may be useful for characterising the degree of matrix effects associated with the sample which may impact on the reliability of quantifying target diagnostic biomarkers. Conclusions We have demonstrated the potential utility of this panel of standards to act as a generic QC tool for evaluating the reproducibility of the platform for protein biomarker detection independent of serum matrix effects.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis and New Trends by Ophthalmological Evaluation: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Nebbioso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cystic fibrosis (CF is characterized by hypoxia that affects several organic tissues. Retinal ganglion cells may suffer from the hypoxic status, and this may lead to alterations of retinal nerve fiber. Methods. Twenty-two eyes in CF patients were analyzed. A complete ocular evaluation and visual field exams of the 30 central degrees were performed using the frequency doubling technology (FDT. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%, forced vital capacity (FVC%, oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SpO2%, and hematocrit (Ht% have been calculated. FDT analyzed parameters were mean deviation (MD and pattern standard deviation (PSD. Pearson’s correlation was chosen as statistical analysis. Results. Data showed statistically significant relationship between MD and Ht% (r value −0.18; P=0.04, MD and FEV1% (r value −0.68; P=0.001, and MD and FVC% (r value −0.45; P=0.005. Moreover, there were correlations between PSD and Ht% (r value 0.29; P=0.03, PSD and SpO2% (r value −0.31; P=0.01, PSD and FEV1% (r value 0.71; P=0.0005, and PSD and FVC% (r value 0.63; P=0.003. Conclusions. The oxygen supply alterations might determine hypoxia of the ganglion cells causing a decrease of receptive optic nerve fiber activity. This method could be also useful to evaluate indirectly pulmonary activity of the CF disease.

  8. Evaluation of Mangosteen juice blend on biomarkers of inflammation in obese subjects: a pilot, dose finding study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Betsy B

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to reduce inflammation in overweight and obese individuals may be valuable in preventing the progression to metabolic syndrome with associated risks for heart disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of multiple dosages of a proprietary Mangosteen Juice blend on indicators of inflammation and antioxidant levels in obese patients with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP levels. Methods The study was an 8 week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with a pre-study 2 week washout period. The study included four groups including placebo and three difference doses of the test product, XanGo Juice™: 3, 6 or 9 oz twice daily. The primary outcome measure of this study was high-sensitivity (HS-CRP. Secondary outcome measures included other biochemical indicators of inflammation, anthropomorphic measures and a safety evaluation. Results One hundred twenty two (122 persons were screened for the study, 44 were randomized and 40 completed the study. HS-CRP measurements dropped after 8 weeks treatment compared to baseline in all 3 dose groups and increased in the placebo group. The changes from baseline were not significant but the comparison of change from baseline was significant for the 18 oz group when compared to placebo (p = 0.02. Other markers of inflammation (inflammatory cytokines and a marker for lipid peroxidation (F2 isoprostane did not show any significant differences when compared with placebo. There was a trend towards a decrease in BMI in the juice groups. There were no side effects reported in any of the groups and none of the laboratory or EKG safety assessments indicated clinically significant changes for any subject. Conclusion In this pilot, dose-finding study, a proprietary mangosteen juice blend (XanGo Juice™ reduced CRP levels (increased change from baseline compared to placebo for those taking the highest dose of 18 oz per day. Further studies with a

  9. Paraguayan Education Study: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia

    A qualitative pilot study, guided by an ecological framework, illustrates the complexities involved in studying the unique linguistic situation in Paraguay between Spanish and the indigenous language of Guarani, and its relationship with education. The pilot study interviewing eight kindergarten children. Seventy five children have been…

  10. Patient-physician Communication Barrier: A Pilot Study Evaluating Patient Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tm; Hassali, Ma; Al-Haddad, Msm

    2011-07-01

    This study aims to identify the patient-physician communication barriers in the primary healthcare setting in Pulau Penang, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was designed to attain the objectives of the study. A self-developed 17-item study tool was used to explore respondent's perception about the barriers they have faced while communicating with physician. The reliability scale was applied and internal consistency of the study tool was estimated on the basis of Cronbach's alpha (α = 0.58). The data analysis was conducted using statistical package for social sciences students SPSS 13(®). Chi Square test was used to test the difference between proportions. A total of n = 69 patients responded to this survey. A higher participation was seen by the male respondents, 39 (56.5%). About 52 (76.5%) of the respondents were satisfied with the information provided by the physician. In an effort to identify the patient-physician barriers, a poor understanding among the patients and physician was revealed. 16 (23.5%) respondents disclosed lack of satisfaction from the information provided to them. Overall, it is seen that lack of physician-patient understanding was the main reason that result hindrance in the affective communication. Moreover, there is a possibility that a low level of health literacy among the patients and inability of the physician to affectively listen to patients may be the other factors that result in a deficient communication.

  11. Evaluation of Veterinary Student Surgical Skills Preparation for Ovariohysterectomy Using Simulators: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Emma K; Vallevand, Andrea; Farrell, Robin M

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of training intended to enhance students' performance on their first live-animal ovariohysterectomy (OVH). Cognitive task analysis informed a seven-page lab manual, 30-minute video, and 46-item OVH checklist (categorized into nine surgery components and three phases of surgery). We compared two spay simulator models (higher-fidelity silicone versus lower-fidelity cloth and foam). Third-year veterinary students were randomly assigned to a training intervention: lab manual and video only; lab manual, video, and $675 silicone-based model; lab manual, video, and $64 cloth and foam model. We then assessed transfer of training to a live-animal OVH. Chi-square analyses determined statistically significant differences between the interventions on four of nine surgery components, all three phases of surgery, and overall score. Odds ratio analyses indicated that training with a spay model improved the odds of attaining an excellent or good rating on 25 of 46 checklist items, six of nine surgery components, all three phases of surgery, and the overall score. Odds ratio analyses comparing the spay models indicated an advantage for the $675 silicon-based model on only 6 of 46 checklist items, three of nine surgery components, and one phase of surgery. Training with a spay model improved performance when compared to training with a manual and video only. Results suggested that training with a lower-fidelity/cost model might be as effective when compared to a higher-fidelity/cost model. Further research is required to investigate simulator fidelity and costs on transfer of training to the operational environment.

  12. An objective structured biostatistics examination: a pilot study based on computer-assisted evaluation for undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Sattar Khan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We designed and evaluated an objective structured biostatistics examination (OSBE on a trial basis to determine whether it was feasible for formative or summative assessment. At Ataturk University, we have a seminar system for curriculum for every cohort of all five years undergraduate education. Each seminar consists of an integrated system for different subjects, every year three to six seminars that meet for six to eight weeks, and at the end of each seminar term we conduct an examination as a formative assessment. In 2010, 201 students took the OSBE, and in 2011, 211 students took the same examination at the end of a seminar that had biostatistics as one module. The examination was conducted in four groups and we examined two groups together. Each group had to complete 5 stations in each row therefore we had two parallel lines with different instructions to be followed, thus we simultaneously examined 10 students in these two parallel lines. The students were invited after the examination to receive feedback from the examiners and provide their reflections. There was a significant (P= 0.004 difference between male and female scores in the 2010 students, but no gender difference was found in 2011. The comparison among the parallel lines and among the four groups showed that two groups, A and B, did not show a significant difference (P> 0.05 in either class. Nonetheless, among the four groups, there was a significant difference in both 2010 (P= 0.001 and 2011 (P= 0.001. The inter-rater reliability coefficient was 0.60. Overall, the students were satisfied with the testing method; however, they felt some stress. The overall experience of the OSBE was useful in terms of learning, as well as for assessment.

  13. A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Introduction of an Interprofessional Problem-Based Learning Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Tara; O'Donoghue, Grainne; Butler, Marie-Louise; Blake, Catherine; O'Sullivan, Cliona; Smith, Kathryn; Sheridan, Ann; O'Neill, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    Patient care is complex and demands that health professionals work together effectively. Interprofessional education (IPE) encourages collaboration by educating students from different professions together. This study examined the effectiveness of IPE in terms of changing students' perceptions of teamwork, professional identity, role, competency…

  14. Evaluation of the Bilingual Curriculum Content (BCC) Pilot Project: A Three Year Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothfarb, Sylvia H.; And Others

    A three-year longitudinal study of bilingual curriculum content (BCC) was initiated in the 1983-84 school year to assess alternative strategies for teaching curriculum content to Limited English Proficient (LEP) students in Dade County (Florida) Public Schools. The BCC strategy (in which content subjects are taught bilingually) was contrasted with…

  15. Evaluation of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) on male erectile dysfunction: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsa, Ali; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Molaei, Mahmood; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Rajabi, Omid

    2009-08-01

    In this study, the effect of Crocus sativus (saffron) was studied on male erectile dysfunction (ED). Twenty male patients with ED were followed for ten days in which each morning they took a tablet containing 200mg of saffron. Patients underwent the nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) test and the international index of erectile function questionnaire (IIEF-15) at the start of the treatment and at the end of the ten days. After the ten days of taking saffron there was a statistically significant improvement in tip rigidity and tip tumescence as well as base rigidity and base tumescence. ILEF-15 total scores were significantly higher in patients after saffron treatment (before treatment 22.15+/-1.44; after treatment 39.20+/-1.90, pSaffron showed a positive effect on sexual function with increased number and duration of erectile events seen in patients with ED even only after taking it for ten days.

  16. LEED (Trademark) for Homes - Pilot Study: Evaluation for Use in Army Family Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Outdoor Air Ventilation required to meet American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 62.2. Meets...restrictions, and from cost- benefit studies to construction alternatives. http://www.pathnet.org/sp.asp?id=1394 ToolBase recommendations - seven...www.buildinggreen.com/ ecommerce /ebn.cfm? Passive survivability The concept of passive survivability evolved from discussions on how to recreate a sustainable

  17. Surveillance of febrile patients in a district and evaluation of their spatiotemporal associations: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Lap-yip

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fever is an undifferentiated clinical feature that may enhance the sensitivity of syndromic surveillance systems. By studying the spatiotemporal associations of febrile patients, it may allow early detection of case clustering that indicates imminent threat of infectious disease outbreaks in the community. Methods We captured consecutive emergency department visits that led to hospitalization in a district hospital in Hong Kong during the period of 12 Sep 2005 to 14 Oct 2005. We recorded demographic data, provisional diagnoses, temperature on presentation and residential location for each patient-episode, and geocoded the residential addresses. We applied Geographical Information System technology to study the geographical distribution these cases, and their associations within a 50-m buffer zone spatially. A case cluster was defined by three or more spatially associated febrile patients within each three consecutive days. Results One thousand and sixty six patient-episodes were eligible for analysis; 42% of them had fever (>37°C; oral temperature on presentation. Two hundred and four patient-episodes (19.1% came from residential care homes for elderly (RCHE. We detected a total of 40 case clusters during the study period. Clustered cases were of older age; 57 (33.3% were residents of RCHE. We found a median of 3 patients (range: 3 - 8 and time span of 3 days (range: 2 - 8 days in each cluster. Twenty five clusters had 2 or more patients living in the same building block; 18 of them were from RCHE. Conclusions It is technically feasible to perform surveillance on febrile patients and studying their spatiotemporal associations. The information is potentially useful for early detection of impending infectious disease threats.

  18. Pilot Study Evaluating the Impact of Otology Surgery Videos on Otolaryngology Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Charles; Stevens, Shawn M; Golub, Justin S; Pensak, Myles L; Samy, Ravi N

    2017-03-01

    Use of videos as educational tools is not a novel concept; however, there is a paucity of high-quality video resources available to otolaryngology trainees. We hypothesized that residents would deem surgical-videos using a multimedia-style format more valuable as preparatory tools. Aims of this study: 1) develop portfolio of otology/neurotology videos overviewing key steps, anatomy, and pearls by a senior surgeon; 2) have residents rate the effectiveness of the videos as a preoperative tool. Prospective study. A video-library of procedures at (https://www.youtube.com/user/cisurgeon) was formatted via time-stamping to coincide expert level narration with closed captioning, critical procedural steps, relevant instrumentation, radiographic pictures, orientation cues, and anatomical highlights. Otolaryngology trainees of postgraduate years 2 through 5 (n = 13) watched a minimum of three videos and completed an assessment addressing: current resource identification/usefulness comparison, self-efficacy, impact on preparation time, and prioritization of resources. The videos rated as highly useful compared with current resources (p = 0.002) and capable of promoting self-efficacy. Residents reported moderate-high prioritization of our multi-media formatted resource (scores >6) among their current preoperative regimen. The varied videos were rated highly in terms of usefulness, promoting self-efficacy and as a high-priority for a resident's surgical preparation. Multimedia-formatted training videos should be further explored for this generation of electronic-learners. Future studies with a larger cohort, objective approaches, and multidisciplinary involvement are needed to determine the full impact of this education medium on surgical-training.

  19. Evaluation of the contribution of theatre attendance to medical undergraduate neuroscience teaching--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Thomas; Gormley, Gerry

    2014-10-01

    Medical students often attend the neurosurgical theatre during their clinical neurosciences attachment. However, few studies have been performed to objectively assess the value of this theatre-based learning experience. The main aim of this study was to explore student perceptions on the contribution of neurosurgical theatre attendance to clinical neuroscience teaching. Third-year medical students undergoing their 2-week clinical neurosciences rotation at the Royal Hospitals Belfast were invited to participate in this study. A multi-method strategy was employed using a survey questionnaire comprising of closed and open-ended questions followed by semi-structured interviews to gain a greater 'in-depth' analysis of the potential contribution of neurosurgical theatre attendance to neuroscience teaching. Based on the completed survey responses of 22 students, the overall experience of neurosurgical theatre-based learning was a positive one. 'In-depth' analysis from semi-structured interviews indicated that students felt that some aspects of their neurosurgical theatre attendance could be improved. Better preparation such as reading up on the case in hand and an introduction to simple theatre etiquette to put the student at ease (in particular, for students who had never attended theatre previously), would improve the learning experience. In addition, having an expectation of what students are expected to learn in theatre making it more learning outcomes-based would probably make it feel a more positive experience by the student. The vast majority of students acknowledged the positive learning outcomes of neurosurgical theatre attendance and felt that it should be made a mandatory component of the curriculum.

  20. Evaluation of a new intraoral paralleling device for creating guiding planes: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto [UNESP; Borges, Alessandra Bühler [UNESP; Uemura, Eduardo Shigueyuki [UNESP; Paes-Júnior, Tarcisio José de Arruda [UNESP; Tango,Rubens Nisie; Araújo,José Eduardo Junho de; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy of a new intraoral paralleling device for creating proximal guiding planes for removable partial dental prostheses. Methods and Materials: Thirty gypsum casts were divided into two groups in which the proximal surfaces of selected teeth were prepared using either a surveying device (Group 1) or the new ParalAB paralleling device (Group 2). In each cast guiding planes were prepared on the distal surface of the maxillary left canine (A), on t...

  1. Evaluation of mentorship programme in nursing education: a pilot study in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Hülya; Hisar, Filiz; Demir, Sevil Güler

    2010-11-01

    Mentorships increase the students' confidence, help ease the difficulties associated with their new environment and reality, increase self-esteem and help socialize students into the nursing role. The main objective of the programme was to support mentee students in facilitating their transition to the university and nursing. This descriptive, exploratory study was designed using Maslow's hierarchy of needs and a pre/post test Rotter's locus of control. Sixty-two (62) first-year students and fifty-eight (58) fourth-year students were eligible to be in the mentoring programme. Mentors and mentees contacted each other weekly as required to provide information and support. Nursing lecturers were available to support the mentors for regular contact over the 13 weeks of the programme. The data were collected by questionnaire for the first-year and fourth-year students. In addition, in order to determine the efficacy of the mentoring programme, Rotter's Locus of Control Scale was administered to first-year students both at the beginning and the end of the study. The majority of first-year students stated that they benefited from the programme. It was established that the mentoring programme influenced the locus of control positively. The mentoring programme may be used to improve the adaptation of nursing students to both the university and nursing profession. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Designing, implementing and evaluating an online problem-based learning (PBL) environment--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Manwa L; Bridges, Susan; Law, Sam Po; Whitehill, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been shown to be effective for promoting student competencies in self-directed and collaborative learning, critical thinking, self-reflection and tackling novel situations. However, the need for face-to-face interactions at the same place and time severely limits the potential of traditional PBL. The requirements of space and for meeting at a specific location at the same time create timetabling difficulties. Such limitations need to be tackled before all potentials of PBL learning can be realized. The present study aimed at designing and implementing an online PBL environment for undergraduate speech/language pathology students, and assessing the associated pedagogical effectiveness. A group of eight PBL students were randomly selected to participate in the study. They underwent 4 weeks of online PBL using Adobe Connect. Upon completion of the experiment, they were assessed via a self-reported questionnaire and quantitative comparison with traditional PBL students based on the same written assignment. The questionnaire revealed that all participating students enjoyed online PBL, without any perceived negative effects on learning. Online PBL unanimously saved the students travel time to and from school. Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference in assignment grades between the online and traditional PBL groups, indicating that online PBL learning appears to be similarly effective as traditional face-to-face PBL learning.

  3. Evaluating the addition of positive reinforcement for learning a frightening task: a pilot study with horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heleski, Camie; Bauson, Laura; Bello, Nora

    2008-01-01

    Horse training often relies upon negative reinforcement (NR). This study tested the hypothesis that adding positive reinforcement (PR) to NR would enhance learning in horses (n = 34) being taught to walk over a tarp (novel/typically frightening task). Subjects were Arabians, and the same person handled all of them. This person handled half "traditionally" (NR only)--that is, halter/lead were pulled; when horse stepped forward, pressure was released; process repeated until criterion met (horse crossed the tarp with little/no obvious anxiety). The same person handled the other half traditionally--but with addition of PR (NR + PR). Subjects "failed" the task if they refused to walk onto the tarp after 10 min. Nine horses failed; 6 of 9 failures were from NR only--no significant difference detected (p = .41). The study detected no difference in time to first crossing of the tarp (p = .30) or total time to achieve calmness criterion (p = .67). Overall, adding PR did not significantly enhance learning this task. However, there were practical implications--adding PR made the task safer/less fatiguing for the handler.

  4. Clinical Evaluation of the Spermatogenic Activity of the Root Extract of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera in Oligospermic Males: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay R. Ambiye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera has been described in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine as an aphrodisiac that can be used to treat male sexual dysfunction and infertility. This pilot study was conducted to evaluate the spermatogenic activity of Ashwagandha root extract in oligospermic patients. Forty-six male patients with oligospermia (sperm count < 20 million/mL semen were enrolled and randomized either to treatment (n=21 with a full-spectrum root extract of Ashwagandha (675 mg/d in three doses for 90 days or to placebo (n=25 in the same protocol. Semen parameters and serum hormone levels were estimated at the end of 90-day treatment. There was a 167% increase in sperm count (9.59 ± 4.37 × 106/mL to 25.61 ± 8.6 × 106/mL; P<0.0001, 53% increase in semen volume (1.74 ± 0.58 mL to 2.76 ± 0.60 mL; P<0.0001, and 57% increase in sperm motility (18.62 ± 6.11% to 29.19 ± 6.31%; P<0.0001 on day 90 from baseline. The improvement in these parameters was minimal in the placebo-treated group. Furthermore, a significantly greater improvement and regulation were observed in serum hormone levels with the Ashwagandha treatment as compared to the placebo. The present study adds to the evidence on the therapeutic value of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera, as attributed in Ayurveda for the treatment of oligospermia leading to infertility.

  5. Evaluation of clorazepate (Tranxene) as an anticonvulsant--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupin, A S; Friel, P; Wilensky, A J; Morretti-Ojemann, L; Levy, R H; Feigl, P

    1979-04-01

    Desmethyldiazepam--providing the long-term anticonvulsant effect when diazepam is given orally--is conveniently administered as clorazepate (Tranxene). In this study, clorazepate was compared to phenobarbital as a secondary anticonvulsant in eight ambulatory, adult outpatients. Stable doses of phenytoin were maintained throughout. Drowsiness was present in all on phenobarbital, but there were no clorazepate-related side effects. Seizure control did not differ for each treatment. Addition of common side effects of phenytoin and phenobarbital limited the attained serum levels of each when used together. Clorazepate doses in the 0.56-mg-per-kilogram range gave desmethyldiazepam levels in the 1.0-microgram-per-milliliter range. Induction of metabolism was suggested by falling desmethyldiazepam levels despite increasing doses. Clorazepate is an effective, nontoxic secondary anticonvulsant.

  6. Evaluating Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Sleep in Children with Autism: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim I. Williams

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found beneficial effects of aromatherapy massage for agitation in people with dementia, for pain relief and for poor sleep. Children with autism often have sleep difficulties, and it was thought that aromatherapy massage might enable more rapid sleep onset, less sleep disruption and longer sleep duration. Twelve children with autism and learning difficulties (2 girls and 10 boys aged between 12 years 2 months to 15 years 7 months in a residential school participated in a within subjects repeated measures design: 3 nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage with lavender oil were compared with 14 nights when it was not given. The children were checked every 30 min throughout the night to determine the time taken for the children to settle to sleep, the number of awakenings and the sleep duration. One boy's data were not analyzed owing to lengthy absence. Repeated measures analysis revealed no differences in any of the sleep measures between the nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage and nights when the children were not given aromatherapy massage. The results suggest that the use of aromatherapy massage with lavender oil has no beneficial effect on the sleep patterns of children with autism attending a residential school. It is possible that there are greater effects in the home environment or with longer-term interventions.

  7. Chocolate Milk Consequences: A Pilot Study Evaluating the Consequences of Banning Chocolate Milk in School Cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Andrew S.; Just, David R.; Wansink, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Currently, 68.3% of the milk available in schools is flavored, with chocolate being the most popular (61.6% of all milk). If chocolate milk is removed from a school cafeteria, what will happen to overall milk selection and consumption? Methods In a before-after study in 11 Oregon elementary schools, flavored milk–which will be referred to as chocolate milk–was banned from the cafeteria. Milk sales, school enrollment, and data for daily participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) were compared year to date. Results Total daily milk sales declined by 9.9% (pchocolate milk was also associated with 6.8% fewer students eating school lunches, and although other factors were also involved, this is consistent with the notion of psychological reactance. Conclusions Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias may reduce calorie and sugar consumption, but it may also lead students to take less milk overall, drink less (waste more) of the white milk they do take, and no longer purchase school lunch. Food service managers need to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of eliminating chocolate milk and should consider alternative options that make white milk more convenient, attractive, and normal to choose. PMID:24740451

  8. A pilot evaluation study of high resolution digital thermal imaging in the assessment of burn depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwicke, Joseph; Thomson, Richard; Bamford, Amy; Moiemen, Naiem

    2013-02-01

    Thermal imaging is a tool that can be used to determine burn depth. We have revisited the use of this technology in the assessment of burns and aim to establish if high resolution, real-time technology can be practically used in conjunction with clinical examination to determine burn depth. 11 patients with burns affecting upper and lower limbs and the anterior and posterior trunk were included in this study. Digital and thermal images were recorded at between 42 h and 5 days post burn. When compared to skin temperature, full thickness burns were significantly cooler (pburns (pburns were not significantly different in temperature than non-burnt skin (p>0.05). Typically, full thickness burns were 2.3°C cooler than non-burnt skin; deep partial thickness burns were 1.2°C cooler than non-burnt skin; whilst superficial burns were only 0.1°C cooler. Thermal imaging can correctly determine difference in burn depth. The thermal camera produces images of high resolution and is quick and easy to use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. A simple methodology for piloting and evaluating mass media interventions: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Rachele; Hanbury, Andria

    2010-03-01

    To develop effective mass media health campaigns it is important to explore the behaviour-change techniques that make campaigns more or less effective. This exploratory study observed the behaviour-change techniques employed in two current healthy eating television programmes, and mapped these techniques onto key theoretical frameworks. Interviews were then conducted with six participants who watched the programmes, to identify which techniques were perceived to be more and less effective and to identify any disjunctures between the behaviour-change techniques used in the programmes and factors perceived by the participants to be particularly influential upon their healthy eating. The two programmes were found to use similar behaviour-change techniques, with a heavy reliance on providing general health motivation. Interviews revealed that participants perceived several specific barriers to eating healthily, felt the need for more specific guidance and emphasised the importance of identifying with the role models used in the programmes. Recommendations for future mass media health campaigns include the need to educate individuals about how to overcome specific barriers that they might face when trying to eat a healthy diet and to include a wider range of role models to encourage the audience to identify with the programme participants.

  10. Chocolate milk consequences: a pilot study evaluating the consequences of banning chocolate milk in school cafeterias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Hanks

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Currently, 68.3% of the milk available in schools is flavored, with chocolate being the most popular (61.6% of all milk. If chocolate milk is removed from a school cafeteria, what will happen to overall milk selection and consumption? METHODS: In a before-after study in 11 Oregon elementary schools, flavored milk-which will be referred to as chocolate milk-was banned from the cafeteria. Milk sales, school enrollment, and data for daily participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP were compared year to date. RESULTS: Total daily milk sales declined by 9.9% (p<0.01. Although white milk increased by 161.2 cartons per day (p<0.001, 29.4% of this milk was thrown away. Eliminating chocolate milk was also associated with 6.8% fewer students eating school lunches, and although other factors were also involved, this is consistent with the notion of psychological reactance. CONCLUSIONS: Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias may reduce calorie and sugar consumption, but it may also lead students to take less milk overall, drink less (waste more of the white milk they do take, and no longer purchase school lunch. Food service managers need to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of eliminating chocolate milk and should consider alternative options that make white milk more convenient, attractive, and normal to choose.

  11. Evaluation of the Facilitated Communication Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-Martin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Office of Special Education and Student Services asked the Office of Shared Accountability to evaluate the "Facilitated Communication Pilot." In facilitated communication (FC), people with communication impairments express themselves by typing with the aid of a communication partner, called a facilitator, who provides physical (and…

  12. Pain assessement and management in surgical cancer patients: pilot and evaluation of a continuing education program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Huijer-Abu Saad, H.; Grypdonck, M.

    1995-01-01

    In a pilot study, a continuing education program on pain assessment and management was implemented and evaluated. Questionnaires were completed by the nurse participants at the beginning, the end, and 2 months after the end of the pilot program. After the pilot program, participants reported having

  13. Pain assessement and management in surgical cancer patients: pilot and evaluation of a continuing education program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Huijer-Abu Saad, H.; Grypdonck, M.

    1995-01-01

    In a pilot study, a continuing education program on pain assessment and management was implemented and evaluated. Questionnaires were completed by the nurse participants at the beginning, the end, and 2 months after the end of the pilot program. After the pilot program, participants reported having

  14. Evaluating a self-directed palliative care learning package for rural aged care workers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Steven

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a self-directed learning package in increasing palliative care knowledge and confidence for aged care workers in Rural New South Wales, Australia. Participants piloted a palliative care self-directed learning package and completed pre- and post-package knowledge and confidence questionnaires with a 6-month follow-up. The data was then analysed via paired two-tailed T-tests. There was a statistically significant mean increase in knowledge and confidence after completion of the self-directed learning package. Knowledge but not confidence increases were retained after 6 months. Self-directed learning packages can play a part in increasing knowledge and confidence in palliative care for rural aged care workers. Questions remain regarding the role of ongoing support, education, and mentoring.

  15. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
.

  16. Evaluation of the effectiveness of postgraduate general medicine training by objective structured clinical examination---pilot study and reflection on the experiences of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jer-Chia; Liu, Keh-Min; Lee, Kun-Tai; Yen, Jo-Chu; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2008-12-01

    Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is an effective assessment method to evaluate medical students' clinical competencies performance. Postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residents have been initiated in a general medicine training program in Taiwan since 2003. However, little is known about the learning effectiveness of trainees from this program. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the clinical core competencies of PGY1 residents using OSCE, and to reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of this pilot assessment project. OSCE was conducted for five PGY1 examinees (4 men, 1 woman) with five stations covering core themes, including history taking, physical examination, clinical procedure of airway intubation, clinical reasoning, and communication skills for informing bad news. Itemized checklists and five-point Likert scale global ratings were used for evaluating performance. The results showed that the performance of our PGY1 residents on history taking was significantly better after about 2 months of postgraduate training on general internal medicine. Self-evaluation on performance by examinees revealed significantly lower global ratings on post-course OSCE (4.14 +/- 0.80 vs. 3.68 +/- 0.66; p OSCEs showed consistently favorable responses on the purposes, content, process, and environment of this assessment (4.0 +/- 0.17 vs. 4.0 +/- 0.12, nonsignificant). However, a survey of the examinees completed at pre- and post-course OSCEs showed relatively unfavorable responses to the same aspects, and to tutors and SPs (4.1 +/- 0.09 vs. 3.7 +/- 0.18; p clinical reasoning performance, communication skills (giving bad news) and self-confidence were unsatisfactory. In conclusion, this pilot study has demonstrated that OSCE is a rational and feasible assessment method for evaluating the effectiveness of our PGY general medicine training program. The quantitative data and qualitative information provide a foundation to improve the quality of the program design and evaluation

  17. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume II: pilot state reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    Volume II of the Energy Extension Service Evaluation presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot-state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement a 19-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. Volume II provides a case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each state, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each state for more detailed study and survey research. Some survey data and analysis are presented for the emphasis programs.

  18. The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS prisons project pilot study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial comparing dihydrocodeine and buprenorphine for opiate detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalton Richard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United Kingdom (UK, there is an extensive market for the class 'A' drug heroin. Many heroin users spend time in prison. People addicted to heroin often require prescribed medication when attempting to cease their drug use. The most commonly used detoxification agents in UK prisons are buprenorphine, dihydrocodeine and methadone. However, national guidelines do not state a detoxification drug of choice. Indeed, there is a paucity of research evaluating the most effective treatment for opiate detoxification in prisons. This study seeks to address the paucity by evaluating routinely used interventions amongst drug using prisoners within UK prisons. Methods/Design The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS Prisons Pilot Study will use randomised controlled trial methodology to compare the open use of buprenorphine and dihydrocodeine for opiate detoxification, given in the context of routine care, within HMP Leeds. Prisoners who are eligible and give informed consent will be entered into the trial. The primary outcome measure will be abstinence status at five days post detoxification, as determined by a urine test. Secondary outcomes during the detoxification and then at one, three and six months post detoxification will be recorded.

  19. 78 FR 20924 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... Pilot Evaluation Program for Investigational New Drug Applications AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...) applications to participate in a pilot evaluation program for CBER's eSubmitter Program (eSubmitter). CBER's e... FDA. II. eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program Expectations The eSubmitter pilot evaluation program...

  20. Evaluation of anxiety, salivary cortisol and melatonin secretion following reflexology treatment: a pilot study in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicar, A J; Greenwood, C R; Fewell, F; D'Arcy, V; Chandrasekharan, S; Alldridge, L C

    2007-08-01

    This pilot study sought to identify an appropriate methodology to investigate the impact of reflexology in healthcare settings. The study involved healthy volunteers to prevent unnecessary intervention to individuals who may already be experiencing health related trauma. Thirty participants underwent either reflexology or no treatment (control), in a cross-over experimental design. Self-reported anxiety (Spielberger STAI), cardiovascular parameters (BP and pulse rate) and salivary cortisol and melatonin concentrations were assessed before and after reflexology. Control data were obtained at the same time points in identical settings. Reflexology had a powerful anxiety-reduction effect ('state'; Preflexology. Reflexology reduced 'state' anxiety and cardiovascular activity within healthy individuals, consistent with stress-reduction. Considering the connection between stress/anxiety and well being, the effects of reflexology may have beneficial outcomes for patients. These findings will be transferred to a study involving breast cancer patients where effects may be more pronounced particularly since cancer patients display disregulation of cortisol and melatonin secretion.

  1. Evaluating Reactions to Community Bridge Initiative Pilot Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldewyn, Julie; Brain, Roslynn; Stephens, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Does participating in an integrated service-learning project aimed at improving local sustainability issues result in significant professional real-world application for students? This study aimed to answer that question by evaluating student reactions to pilot classes featuring a sustainability-based service-learning program, Community Bridge…

  2. Evaluation of Intrastromal Riboflavin Concentration in Human Corneas after Three Corneal Cross-Linking Imbibition Procedures: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Franch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare stromal riboflavin concentration after three corneal cross-linking (CXL imbibition procedures: standard (EpiOff, transepithelial corneal (EpiOn, and iontophoresis-assisted technique (Ionto using 0.1% hypotonic riboflavin phosphate. Methods. Randomized open-label pilot clinical study. Twelve corneas/12 patients with advanced keratoconus were randomly divided into 4 groups for CXL (n=3. The corneas underwent imbibition with standard riboflavin EpiOff and with enhanced riboflavin solution (RICROLIN+ EpiOff, EpiOn, and iontophoresis techniques. Thereafter, deep anterior lamellar keratectomy procedure was performed and the obtained debrided corneal tissues were frozen. The maximal intrastromal riboflavin concentration was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (mcg/dg. Results. The mean stromal concentration of riboflavin was 2.02±0.72 mcg/dg in EpiOff group, 4.33±0.12 mcg/g in EpiOff-RICROLIN+ group, 0.63±0.21 mcg/dg in EpiOn-RICROLIN+ group, and 1.15±0.27 mcg/dg in iontophoresis RICROLIN+ group. A 7-fold decrease in intrastromal riboflavin concentration was observed comparing EpiOn-RICROLIN+ and EpiOff-RICROLIN+ groups. Conclusion. The present pilot study indicates that both transepithelial CXL techniques in combination with hypotonic enhanced riboflavin formulation (RICROLIN+ were still inferior to the standard CXL technique; however, larger clinical studies to further validate the results are needed and in progress.

  3. Pilot Study on Evaluation Gap between Competencies Acquired by Economic Education Graduates and Requirements of Pitesti Employers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela DIACONU

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to assess the gaps between competencies and skills ofeconomic education graduates and the requirements of employers' skillsand abilities of Pitesti, the identification of these gaps’ causes, and of viable solutions to eliminate the identified gaps. Therefore, the paper presents the results of a pilot study based on two empiricalresearch, one conducted at the level of a sample of final year students from the Faculty of Economics, from University of Pitesti andone conducted on a group sample from Pitesti based-­companies.The research results support the hypothesis from which we started, namely that there are differences of perception between prospectiveemployees and employers. It is interesting that both prospective employees and employers consider that practical training is lower thanexpected.

  4. A Pilot Study to Evaluate Haemostatic Function, following Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL) for the Treatment of Solitary Kidney Stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen Fôn; Thomas-Wright, Samantha Jayne; Banwell, Joseph; Williams, Rachel; Moyes, Alyson Jayne; Mushtaq, Sohail; Abdulmajed, Mohamed; Shergill, Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients undergoing shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) in the UK for solitary unilateral kidney stones is increasing annually. The development of postoperative complications such as haematuria and sepsis following SWL is likely to increase. Comparing a range of biological markers with the aim of monitoring or predicting postoperative complications following SWL has not been extensively researched. The main purpose of this pilot-study was to test the hypothesis that SWL results in changes to haemostatic function. Subsequently, this pilot-study would form a sound basis to undertake future investigations involving larger cohorts. Twelve patients undergoing SWL for solitary unilateral kidney stones were recruited. From patients (8 male and 4 females) aged between 31-72 years (median-43 years), venous blood samples were collected pre-operatively (baseline), at 30, 120 and 240 minutes postoperatively. Specific haemostatic biomarkers [platelet counts, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, D-dimer, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), sE-selectin and plasma viscosity (PV)] were measured. Platelet counts and fibrinogen concentration were significantly decreased following SWL (p = 0.027 and p = 0.014 respectively), while D-dimer and vWF levels significantly increased following SWL (p = 0.019 and p = 0.001 respectively). PT, APTT, sE-selectin and PV parameters were not significantly changed following SWL (p>0.05). Changes to specific biomarkers such as plasma fibrinogen and vWF suggest that these represent a more clinically relevant assessment of the extent of haemostatic involvement following SWL. Analysis of such markers, in the future, may potentially provide valuable data on "normal" response after lithotripsy, and could be expanded to identify or predict those patients at risk of coagulopathy following SWL. The validation and reliability will be assessed through the assessment of larger cohorts.

  5. A Pilot Study to Evaluate Haemostatic Function, following Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL for the Treatment of Solitary Kidney Stones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Fôn Hughes

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The number of patients undergoing shock wave lithotripsy (SWL in the UK for solitary unilateral kidney stones is increasing annually. The development of postoperative complications such as haematuria and sepsis following SWL is likely to increase. Comparing a range of biological markers with the aim of monitoring or predicting postoperative complications following SWL has not been extensively researched. The main purpose of this pilot-study was to test the hypothesis that SWL results in changes to haemostatic function. Subsequently, this pilot-study would form a sound basis to undertake future investigations involving larger cohorts. METHODS: Twelve patients undergoing SWL for solitary unilateral kidney stones were recruited. From patients (8 male and 4 females aged between 31-72 years (median-43 years, venous blood samples were collected pre-operatively (baseline, at 30, 120 and 240 minutes postoperatively. Specific haemostatic biomarkers [platelet counts, prothrombin time (PT, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, fibrinogen, D-dimer, von Willebrand Factor (vWF, sE-selectin and plasma viscosity (PV] were measured. RESULTS: Platelet counts and fibrinogen concentration were significantly decreased following SWL (p = 0.027 and p = 0.014 respectively, while D-dimer and vWF levels significantly increased following SWL (p = 0.019 and p = 0.001 respectively. PT, APTT, sE-selectin and PV parameters were not significantly changed following SWL (p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Changes to specific biomarkers such as plasma fibrinogen and vWF suggest that these represent a more clinically relevant assessment of the extent of haemostatic involvement following SWL. Analysis of such markers, in the future, may potentially provide valuable data on "normal" response after lithotripsy, and could be expanded to identify or predict those patients at risk of coagulopathy following SWL. The validation and reliability will be assessed through the assessment of

  6. Transfer Readiness Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; And Others

    The California Community Colleges (CCC) has implemented a prototype model for determining student transfer readiness as a primary means of assessing community college transfer effectiveness. This report provides definitions of transfer readiness and guidelines for colleges participating in the CCC transfer readiness study. First, a memorandum from…

  7. A pilot study to evaluate the safety and clinical performance of Leucopatch, an autologous, additive-free, platelet-rich fibrin for the treatment of recalcitrant chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny; Vogensen, Hanne;

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, uncontrolled pilot study evaluated the safety and clinical performance of Leucopatch an additive-free, autologous platelet-rich fibrin in the treatment of recalcitrant chronic wounds. Fifteen patients, with 16 lower extremity chronic wounds of varying etiologies were treated...... events. Two adverse events, one of noncompliance and one infection, were observed; neither was considered to be related to treatment. The results indicate that Leucopatch is easy to prepare and apply in the clinic, is safe, and may be a clinically effective treatment of recalcitrant chronic wounds....

  8. Single-dose safety and pharmacokinetic evaluation of fluorocoxib A: pilot study of novel cyclooxygenase-2-targeted optical imaging agent in a canine model

    OpenAIRE

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina; Bartges, Joseph W.; Callens, Amanda; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated preclinical single-dose safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and specific uptake of the new optical imaging agent fluorocoxib A in dogs. Fluorocoxib A, N-[(5-carboxy-X-rhodaminyl)but-4-yl]-2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]acetamide, selectively binds and inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in many cancers. Safety pilot studies were performed in research dogs following intravenous (i.v.) administration of 0.1 and 1  mg/kg fluo...

  9. A study of airline pilot morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Adrian J; Larsen, Peter D; Griffiths, Robin F; Aldington, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    It has long been believed that airline pilots are healthier than the general population. There are a number of reasons why this should be the case. However, there is very little evidence to support this belief as fact. This study investigates the health of the pilot population of an Oceanic based airline compared to the health of the general population. Pilots who conducted their medical certificate renewal at the airline's medical unit between 1 November 2009 and 31 October 2010 were included. A medical questionnaire was completed by each pilot at the time of their medical certificate renewal. Data from the questionnaire was entered into a database as well as the pilot's BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, and blood glucose level. The comparison population was the population who completed the New Zealand Health Survey (NZHS) between 2006-2007. Demographic, lifestyle characteristics, and health status data from the pilots was compared to the NZHS using a Chi-squared test. Included in the study were 595 pilots. With respect to most medical conditions, pilots had a lower prevalence when compared to the general population. Pilots had a higher prevalence of kidney disease (3.3% vs 0.6%) and melanoma skin cancer (19 per 1000 vs 0.4 per 1000). This study suggests that pilots in New Zealand are healthier than the general population with respect to most medical conditions. The two medical conditions that were identified as being overrepresented in pilots may be the result of the occupational environment.

  10. Comparison of MR and fluoroscopic mucous fistulography in the pre-operative evaluation of infants with anorectal malformation: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Jose C.G.; Lotz, Jan W.; Pitcher, Richard D. [Stellenbosch University, Division of Radiodiagnosis, Department of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Sidler, Daniel [Stellenbosch University, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2013-08-15

    Anorectal malformations are often associated with rectal pouch fistulas. Surgical correction requires accurate evaluation of the presence and position of such fistulas. Fluoroscopy is currently the chosen modality for the detection of fistulas. The role of MRI is unexplored. To compare the diagnostic accuracy of MR versus fluoroscopic fistulography in the pre-operative evaluation of infants with anorectal malformation. We conducted a pilot study of infants requiring defunctioning colostomy for initial management of anorectal malformation. Dynamic sagittal steady-state free-precession MRI of the pelvis was acquired during introduction of saline into the mucous fistulas. Findings were compared among MR fistulography, fluoroscopic fistulography and intraoperative inspection. Eight children were included. Median age at fistulography was 15 weeks, inter-quartile range 13-20 weeks; all were boys. There was full agreement among MR fistulography, fluoroscopic fistulography and surgical findings. The pilot data suggest that MR fistulography is promising in the pre-operative evaluation of children with anorectal malformation. (orig.)

  11. Evaluating a Non-Randomized Trial: A Case Study of a Pilot to Increase Pre-Collegiate Math Course Success Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaManque, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a case study of a two-year pilot to increase pre-collegiate math course success rates at a large community college. The EnableMath pilot involved the use of computerized software that allowed students to practice math problems in a lab during class time. Additional components of the program included the administration of the…

  12. Effect of root conditioning on periodontal wound healing with and without guided tissue regeneration: a pilot study. 1. Histologic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H L; Hamilton, R L; Castelli, W A; Chiego, D J; Smith, B A

    1993-12-01

    Closed fenestration wounds in four mongrel dogs were used to study the source of fibroblast proliferation and extracellular matrix production during healing; the arrangement and attachment of newly formed collagenous fibers; and the cementogenesis and osteogenesis at healing sites. Fenestration wounds were made through the alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, cementum, and dentin, and citric acid, tetracycline, or sterile water was applied to the dentinal walls for 3 minutes. Nonresorbable membranes were randomly placed over half of the defects. Animals were killed at 1, 3, 7, or 21 days and routine histologic examinations with hematoxylin and eosin staining followed. Results of this pilot study suggest that the periodontal ligament and/or alveolar bone are the main source of fibroblast proliferation and migration as well as extracellular matrix formation at the initial stages of healing, and that at 21 days, citric acid stimulated more cementogenesis than tetracycline or sterile water. Also, while the tetracycline influenced the maximal deposition of alveolar bone, no differences in healing were found between the citric acid, tetracycline, and sterile water with and without the use of membrane barriers.

  13. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V N; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-11-09

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair.

  14. An observational study to evaluate three pilot programmes of retesting chlamydia-positive individuals within 6 months in the South West of England

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate 3 pilot chlamydia retesting programmes in South West England which were initiated prior to the release of new National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP) guidelines recommending retesting in 2014.METHODS: Individuals testing positive between August 2012 and July 2013 in Bristol (n=346), Cornwall (n=252) and Dorset (n=180) programmes were eligible for inclusion in the retesting pilots. The primary outcomes were retest within 6 months (yes/no) and repeat diagnosis at r...

  15. Evaluation of Two Facebow/Semi-adjustable Articulator Systems for Orienting Maxillary Cast on Articulators: A Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anusha, C V; Singh, Amith A; Sam, George; Sangwan, Babita; Shilpa, M; Kamath, Akshata G

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to assess the transferability of occlusal plane (OP) orientation from the patient to the articulators with the help of two different facebow systems and evaluated with a gold standard...

  16. Models of Pilot Behavior and Their Use to Evaluate the State of Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirgl, Miroslav; Jalovecky, Rudolf; Bradac, Zdenek

    2016-07-01

    This article discusses the possibilities of obtaining new information related to human behavior, namely the changes or progressive development of pilots' abilities during training. The main assumption is that a pilot's ability can be evaluated based on a corresponding behavioral model whose parameters are estimated using mathematical identification procedures. The mean values of the identified parameters are obtained via statistical methods. These parameters are then monitored and their changes evaluated. In this context, the paper introduces and examines relevant mathematical models of human (pilot) behavior, the pilot-aircraft interaction, and an example of the mathematical analysis.

  17. Evaluating facility-based antiretroviral therapy programme effectiveness: a pilot study comparing viral load suppression and retention rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duber, Herbert C; Roberts, D Allen; Ikilezi, Gloria; Fullman, Nancy; Gasasira, Anne; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Haakenstad, Annie; J Levine, Aubrey; Achan, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Increased demand for antiretroviral therapy (ART) services combined with plateaued levels of development assistance for HIV/AIDS requires that national ART programmes monitor programme effectiveness. In this pilot study, we compared commonly utilised performance metrics of 12- and 24-month retention with rates of viral load (VL) suppression at 15 health facilities in Uganda. Retrospective chart review from which 12- and 24-month retention rates were estimated, and parallel HIV RNA VL testing on consecutive adult patients who presented to clinics and had been on ART for a minimum of six months. Rates of VL suppression were then calculated at each facility and compared to retention rates to assess the correlation between performance metrics. Multilevel logistic regression models predicting VL suppression and 12- and 24-month retention were constructed to estimate facility effects. We collected VL samples from 2961 patients and found that 88% had a VL ≤1000 copies/ml. Facility rates of VL suppression varied between 77% and 96%. When controlling for patient mix, a significant variation in facility performance persisted. Retention rates at 12 and 24 months were 91% and 79%, respectively, with a comparable facility-level variation. However, neither 12-month (ρ = 0.16) nor 24-month (ρ = -0.19) retention rates were correlated with facility rates of VL suppression. Retaining patients in care and suppressing VL are both critical outcomes. Given the lack of correlation noted in this study, the utilisation of VL monitoring may be necessary to truly assess the effectiveness of health facilities delivering ART services. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A pilot study evaluating use of a computer-assisted neurorehabilitation platform for upper-extremity stroke assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need to develop cost-effective, sensitive stroke assessment instruments. One approach is examining kinematic measures derived from goal-directed tasks, which can potentially be sensitive to the subtle changes in the stroke rehabilitation process. This paper presents the findings from a pilot study that uses a computer-assisted neurorehabilitation platform, interfaced with a conventional force-reflecting joystick, to examine the assessment capability of the system by various types of goal-directed tasks. Methods Both stroke subjects with hemiparesis and able-bodied subjects used the force-reflecting joystick to complete a suite of goal-directed tasks under various task settings. Kinematic metrics, developed for specific types of goal-directed tasks, were used to assess various aspects of upper-extremity motor performance across subjects. Results A number of metrics based on kinematic performance were able to differentiate subjects with different impairment levels, with metrics associated with accuracy, steadiness and speed consistency showing the best capability. Significant differences were also shown on these metrics between various force field settings. Conclusion The results support the potential of using UniTherapy software with a conventional joystick system as an upper-extremity assessment instrument. We demonstrated the ability of using various types of goal-directed tasks to distinguish between subjects with different impairment levels. In addition, we were able to show that different force fields have a significant effect on the performance across subjects with different impairment levels in the trajectory tracking task. These results provide motivation for studies with a larger sample size that can more completely span the impairment space, and can use insights presented here to refine considerations of various task settings so as to generalize and extend our conclusions.

  19. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  20. A Pilot Study Evaluating Steroid-Induced Diabetes after Antiemetic Dexamethasone Therapy in Chemotherapy-Treated Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yusook; Han, Hye Sook; Lee, Hyo Duk; Yang, Jiyoul; Jeong, Jiwon; Choi, Moon Ki; Kwon, Jihyun; Jeon, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Tae-Keun; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Kim, Seung Taik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dexamethasone is a mainstay antiemetic regimen for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the incidence of and factors associated with steroid-induced diabetes in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with dexamethasone as an antiemetic. Materials and Methods Non-diabetic patients with newly diagnosed gastrointestinal cancer who received at least three cycles of highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy with dexamethasone as an antiemetic were enrolled. Fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour postprandial glucose levels, and hemoglobin A1C tests for the diagnosis of diabetes were performed before chemotherapy and at 3 and 6 months after the start of chemotherapy. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as an index for measurement of insulin resistance, defined as a HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5. Results Between January 2012 and November 2013, 101 patients with no history of diabetes underwent laboratory tests for assessment of eligibility; 77 of these patients were included in the analysis. Forty-five patients (58.4%) were insulin resistant and 17 (22.1%) developed steroid-induced diabetes at 3 or 6 months after the first chemotherapy, which included dexamethasone as an antiemetic. Multivariate analysis showed significant association of the incidence of steroid-induced diabetes with the cumulative dose of dexamethasone (p=0.049). Conclusion We suggest that development of steroid-induced diabetes after antiemetic dexamethasone therapy occurs in approximately 20% of non-diabetic cancer patients; this is particularly significant for patients receiving high doses of dexamethasone. PMID:26987397

  1. Evaluating the interactive web-based program, activate your heart, for cardiac rehabilitation patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brough, Christopher; Boyce, Sally; Houchen-Wolloff, Linzy; Sewell, Louise; Singh, Sally

    2014-10-29

    Conventional cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are traditionally based on time-constrained, structured, group-based programs, usually set in hospitals or leisure centers. Uptake for CR remains poor, despite the ongoing evidence demonstrating its benefits. Additional alternative forms of CR are needed. An Internet-based approach may offer an alternative mode of delivering CR that may improve overall uptake. Activate Your Heart (AYH) is a Web-based CR program that has been designed to support individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this pilot study was to observe the outcome for participants following the AYH program. We conducted a prospective observational trial, recruiting low-risk patients with CHD. Measures of exercise, exercise capacity, using the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test (ISWT), dietary habits, and psychosocial well-being were conducted by a CR specialist at baseline and at 8 weeks following the Web-based intervention. We recruited 41 participants; 33 completed the program. We documented significant improvements in the ISWT distance (mean change 49.69 meters, SD 68.8, PLife (QOL) (mean change 0.28, SD 0.4, P<.001). Dietary habits improved with an increased proportion of patients consuming at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables per day, (22 [71%] to 29 [94%] P=.01) and an increased proportion of patients consuming at least 2 portions of oily fish per week (14 [45%] to 21 [68%], P=.01). We did not detect changes in anxiety and depression scores or exercise behavior. We observed important improvements in exercise capacity, QOL, and dietary habits in a group of participants following a Web-based CR program. The program may offer an alternative approach to CR. A mobile version has been developed and we need to conduct further trials to establish its value compared to supervised CR.

  2. Pilot study to evaluate the effect of topical dimethicone on clinical signs and skin barrier function in dogs with naturally occurring atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicoro, C; Marsella, R; Ahrens, K

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a skin protectant solution (dimethicone 2%) on clinical signs and skin barrier function in canine atopic dermatitis (AD). Eighteen dogs with AD were randomly divided into two groups, one received dimethicone and the other received the vehicle (cyclomethicone) on selected areas (pinnae, groin, and axillae) daily for 4 weeks. Owners and investigators were blinded regarding group allocation. Clinical efficacy was evaluated using a scoring system and skin barrier by measuring the transepidermal water loss. Twelve dogs completed the study (50% drop rate in the vehicle and 20% in the dimethicone). For clinical signs, analysis of variance showed an effect of time (P day 28) and region (axillae pinnae > groin). Pearson found no correlation between transepidermal water loss and clinical scores. In this pilot study dimethicone had no significant effect on clinical signs and transepidermal water loss in canine atopic dermatitis.

  3. A Pilot Study Evaluating the Effectiveness of Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy for Treating Degenerative Tendinopathies: A Randomized Control Trial with Synchronous Observational Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni Wesner

    Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to inform future research evaluating the effectiveness of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP injection for tendinopathy.Randomized control trial (RCT and synchronous observational cohort studies. For the RCT, consecutive consenting patients treated at an academic sports medicine clinic were randomly assigned to either a PRP or placebo control group.The Glen Sather Sport Medicine Clinic, Edmonton, Canada.The RCT included 9 participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The cohort study included 178 participants with a variety of tendinopathies.Patients receiving PRP were injected with 4 ml of platelets into the supraspinatus and/or infraspinatus, while patients in the placebo group were injected with 4 ml of saline. All participants undertook a 3-month standardized, home-based, daily exercise program.Participants in the RCT were re-evaluated 3, and 6 months post-injection. Change scores before and after injection on pain, disability and MRI-documented pathology outcomes were compared. In the cohort study, pain and disability were measured at 1, 2 and 3 months post-injection.For the RCT, 7 participants received PRP and 2 received placebo injections. Patients receiving PRP reported clinically important improvements in pain (>1.5/10 on VAS, disability (>15 point DASH change, and tendon pathology while those receiving placebo injections did not. In the observational cohort, statistically and clinically significant improvements in pain and disability were observed.This pilot study provides information for planning future studies of PRP effectiveness. Preliminary results indicate intratendinous, ultrasound-guided PRP injection may lead to improvements in pain, function, and MRI-documented tendon pathology.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN68341698.

  4. A Reliability and Validity of an Instrument to Evaluate the School-Based Assessment System: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Nor Hasnida Md

    2016-01-01

    A valid, reliable and practical instrument is needed to evaluate the implementation of the school-based assessment (SBA) system. The aim of this study is to develop and assess the validity and reliability of an instrument to measure the perception of teachers towards the SBA implementation in schools. The instrument is developed based on a…

  5. Evaluation of a Comprehensive Delivery Room Neonatal Resuscitation and Adaptation Score (NRAS) Compared to the Apgar Score: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdi, Shadi R; Jayaram, Archana; Sima, Adam P; Hendricks Muñoz, Karen D

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the interrater reliability and perceived importance of components of a developed neonatal adaption score, Neonatal Resuscitation Adaptation Score (NRAS), for evaluation of resuscitation need in the delivery room for extremely premature to term infants. Similar to the Apgar, the NRAS highest score was 10, but greater weight was given to respiratory and cardiovascular parameters. Evaluation of provider (N = 17) perception and scoring pattern was recorded for 5 clinical scenarios of gestational ages 23 to 40 weeks at 1 and 5 minutes and documenting NRAS and Apgar score. Providers assessed the tool twice within a 1-month interval. NRAS showed superior interrater reliability (P Apgar score. These findings identify an objective tool in resuscitation assessment of infants, especially those of smaller gestation age, allowing for greater discrimination of postbirth transition in the delivery room.

  6. A crossover pilot study evaluating the functional outcomes of two different types of robotic movement training in chronic stroke survivors using the arm exoskeleton BONES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milot, Marie-Hélène; Spencer, Steven J; Chan, Vicky; Allington, James P; Klein, Julius; Chou, Cathy; Bobrow, James E; Cramer, Steven C; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-12-19

    To date, the limited degrees of freedom (DOF) of most robotic training devices hinders them from providing functional training following stroke. We developed a 6-DOF exoskeleton ("BONES") that allows movement of the upper limb to assist in rehabilitation. The objectives of this pilot study were to evaluate the impact of training with BONES on function of the affected upper limb, and to assess whether multijoint functional robotic training would translate into greater gains in arm function than single joint robotic training also conducted with BONES. Twenty subjects with mild to moderate chronic stroke participated in this crossover study. Each subject experienced multijoint functional training and single joint training three sessions per week, for four weeks, with the order of presentation randomized. The primary outcome measure was the change in Box and Block Test (BBT). The secondary outcome measures were the changes in Fugl-Meyer Arm Motor Scale (FMA), Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), Motor Activity Log (MAL), and quantitative measures of strength and speed of reaching. These measures were assessed at baseline, after each training period, and at a 3-month follow-up evaluation session. Training with the robotic exoskeleton resulted in significant improvements in the BBT, FMA, WMFT, MAL, shoulder and elbow strength, and reaching speed (p functional and single joint robotic training programs. However, for the BBT, WMFT and MAL, inequality of carryover effects were noted; subsequent analysis on the change in score between the baseline and first period of training again revealed no difference in the gains obtained between the types of training. Training with the 6 DOF arm exoskeleton improved motor function after chronic stroke, challenging the idea that robotic therapy is only useful for impairment reduction. The pilot results presented here also suggest that multijoint functional robotic training is not decisively superior to single joint robotic training. This

  7. Liverpool Telecare Pilot: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Barnes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Telecare services use information and communications technology (ICT to support the provision of care to people in their own homes. This paper describes a pilot telecare service employed by Liverpool (UK City Council to support a sample of their frail and elderly social services users. The pilot has been running for over two years and has been deployed for 21 individuals in Liverpool. In this paper we present the pilot system and provide real example cases which help to illustrate the benefits of such a system.

  8. Evaluation of anti-plaque microbial activity of Azadirachta indica (neem oil) in vitro: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Abinaya, P; Elanchezhiyan, S; Thangakumaran; Vennila, K; Naziya, K B

    2012-08-01

    Probably microbial plaque is the main etiology for periodontal tissue inflammation. Various chemical agents have been evaluated over the years with respect to their antimicrobial effects in the oral cavity. However, all are associated with side effects that prohibit regular long-term use. Therefore, the effectiveness of Azadirachta indica (neem) against plaque formation is considered to be vital, with lesser side effects. The aim of the present study is to evaluate and prove the antimicrobial activity of neem using plaque samples. Culture was prepared using brain heart infusion broth reagent. Dental plaque samples were used for that. Kirby-Bauer antimicrobial susceptibility test procedure was carried away with the sample. Neem oil was kept in the agar plate with culture and the diameter of inhibition zones was calculated. Results showed inhibition zones on the agar plate around neem oil. Study shows definite antiplaque activity of neem oil.

  9. Sonographic Evaluation of the Splenic Length in Normal Pregnancy in a Tertiary Hospital in Southern Nigeria: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ugboma, EW; Ugboma, HAA

    2013-01-01

    Background: The spleen is affected by the changes that occur in pregnancy. Ultrasound is the commonest imaging modality used in the evaluation of the abdominal organs in pregnancy; however, there is a paucity of information on the sonographic measurement of the splenic length in normal pregnancy in our environment. Aim: To establish sonographically the range of splenic length in normal pregnant women. Subjects and Methods: A prospective descriptive cross sectional study of the sonographic mea...

  10. Pilot Study to Evaluate Compliance and Tolerability of Cranberry Capsules in Pregnancy for the Prevention of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumney, Pamela J.; Hindra, Sasha; Guzman, Lizette; Le, Jennifer; Nageotte, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the compliance with and tolerability of daily cranberry capsule ingestion for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) prevention in pregnancy. Design: A total of 49 pregnant women from two sites were randomly assigned to cranberry or matching placebo, two doses daily, at gestational ages less than 16 weeks. Patients were followed monthly for urinary tract infection until delivery. Up to seven monthly visits were scheduled for each patient. Delivery data were evaluated. Results: Of 38 evaluable patients, the mean compliance rate over the study period was 82% (range, 20%–100%). This compliance rate and the 74% of patients achieving good (≥75%) compliance were similar between those who received cranberry capsules and placebo. Compliance evaluation revealed that most patients stopped capsule consumption after 34–38 weeks of participation. Multivariate logistic regression and longitudinal analysis showed a significant interaction time effect with cranberry treatment. However, cranberry consumption was not a significant predictor of gastrointestinal intolerance or study withdrawal. Although 30% of patients withdrew for various reasons, only 1 withdrew because of intolerance to the cranberry capsules. Loss to follow-up was mostly due to provider change (9 of 49 [18%]) and therapy disinterest (4 of 49 [8%]). Seven cases of ASB occurred in 5 patients: 2 of 24 (8%) in the cranberry group and 3 of 25 (12%) in the placebo group. No cases of cystitis or pyelonephritis were observed. Conclusion: One third of pregnant women could not complete the study protocol for various reasons. Compliance with and tolerability of cranberry capsule ingestion appear good; these capsules provide a potentially effective means to prevent ASB in pregnancy. Further studies with large samples are necessary to confirm the findings. PMID:26535612

  11. Evaluation of a Bayesian Approach to Estimate Vancomycin Exposure in Obese Patients with Limited Pharmacokinetic Sampling: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreno, Joseph J; Lomaestro, Ben; Tietjan, John; Lodise, Thomas P

    2017-03-13

    This study evaluated the predictive performance of a Bayesian PK estimation method (ADAPT V) to estimate the 24-hour vancomycin area under the curve estimation (AUC) with limited PK sampling in adult obese patients receiving vancomycin for suspected or confirmed Gram-positive infections. This was an IRB-approved prospective evaluation of 12 patients. Patients had a median (95% CI) age of 61 years (39 - 71), creatinine clearance of 86 mL/min (75 - 120), and body mass index of 45 kg/m(2) (40 - 52). For each patient, five PK concentrations were measured and 4 different vancomycin population PK models were used as Bayesian priors to estimate the estimate vancomycin AUC (AUCFULL). Using each PK model as a prior, data-depleted PK subsets were used to estimate the 24-hour AUC (i.e. peak and trough data [AUCPT], midpoint and trough data [AUCMT], and trough only data [AUCT]). The 24-hour AUC derived from the full data set (AUCFULL) was compared to AUC derived from data depleted subsets (AUCPT, AUCMT, AUCT) for each model. For the 4 sets of analyses, AUCFULL estimates ranged from 437 to 489 mg-h/L. The AUCPT provided the best approximation of the AUCFULL; AUCMT and AUCT tended to overestimate AUCFULL Further prospective studies are needed to evaluate the impact of AUC monitoring in clinical practice but the findings from this study suggest the vancomycin AUC can be estimated good precision and accuracy with limited PK sampling using Bayesian PK estimation software.

  12. Ballet and stress. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, G; Casale, T; Rosati, M V; Melcarne, R; Sinibaldi, F; Capozzella, A; Di Giorgio, V; Giubilati, R; Sacco, C; Tomei, F; Sancini, A

    2015-01-01

    Work-related stress is a complex problem requiring a work environment-based assessment. Artists like dancers represent a category of atypical workers potentially at high risk for work-related stress. Aim of our pilot study is to evaluate organizational stress in a population of professional dancers, using the HSE Indicator Tool for Work Related Stress. We administered the Italian version of the HSE Indicator Tool to 38 ballet dancers, males and females. The questionnaire evaluates 7 key organizational dimensions: demand, control, managers' support, peer support, relationships, role and change. The standards required-ideal conditions are achieved in none of the above-mentioned dimensions. Change is the only dimension for which results fall between the 20th and the 50th percentile, while for other dimensions results fall below the 20th percentile suggesting the need for immediate corrective action. In male dancers an acceptable situation is highlighted for the dimension "change" compared to female dancers. In both sexes there is a high frequency of subjects complaining of verbal abuse, bullying and harassment. Despite the small sample size, our pilot study highlights the presence of heightened levels of organizational stress. Preventive measures targeted towards improving communication between managers and dancers and aimed at team building should be implemented.

  13. TGF-β1 and granulocyte elastase in the evaluation of activity of inflammatory bowel disease. A pilot study

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    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim was to assess the usefulness of TGF-β1 and elastase in the evaluation of activity of ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD.Material and Methods: 32 patients diagnosed with UC, 31 with CD and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. Diagnosis of the disease was confirmed by videocolonoscopy and histopathological evaluation of intestinal biopsies. Disease activity was assessed by use of the Mayo Scoring System for Assessment of Ulcerative Colitis Activity in UC patients and by CDAI in CD patients. hsCRP was determined by the immunonephelometric method, TGF-β1 and elastase plasma concentration by ELISA. The results of the study were analyzed using Statistica and R statistical language.Results: In UC a positive correlation between disease activity and platelet level, hsCRP and TGF-β1 concentration was noted. Elastase concentration in UC patients was significantly higher than in CD, but there was no correlation with the activity of the disease. In CD patients we observed a positive correlation between disease activity and leukocytes, platelet levels and elastase concentration, and a very low correlation with hsCRP and TGF-β1.Discussion: Determination of TGF-β1 can be used for evaluation of inflammatory activity in UC and it is connected with elevated concentrations of CRP and platelets. To a lower extent TGF-β1 can also be used for evaluation of inflammatory activity in CD. Examination of elastase concentration may be useful in the assessment of CD activity. Plasma elastase concentration may be helpful in UC and CD differentiation. The preliminary results of this investigation seem promising; nevertheless, more studies are necessary.

  14. Evaluation of Piloted Inputs for Onboard Frequency Response Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Martos, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Frequency response estimation results are presented using piloted inputs and a real-time estimation method recently developed for multisine inputs. A nonlinear simulation of the F-16 and a Piper Saratoga research aircraft were subjected to different piloted test inputs while the short period stabilator/elevator to pitch rate frequency response was estimated. Results show that the method can produce accurate results using wide-band piloted inputs instead of multisines. A new metric is introduced for evaluating which data points to include in the analysis and recommendations are provided for applying this method with piloted inputs.

  15. Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces: OECD/CELE Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ahlefeld, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    CELE's International Pilot Project on Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces aims to assist education authorities, schools and others to maximise the use of and investment in learning environments. This article provides an update on the pilot project, which is currently being implemented in Brazil, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal and the United…

  16. A novel method to evaluate salivary flow rates of head and neck cancer patients after radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Luiz Felipe; Gonnelli, Fernanda Aurora Stabile; Marcucci, Marcelo; Giordani, Adelmo José; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2017-03-25

    The procedure used to evaluate salivary flow rate is called sialometry. It can be performed through several techniques, but none appears to be really efficient for post-radiotherapy patients. To adequate sialometry tests for head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy. 22 xerostomic patients post-radiotherapy (total radiation dose ranging from 60 to 70Gy) were included in this study. Ten patients were evaluated using sialometries originally proposed by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and twelve were assessed by our modified methods. Unstimulated and stimulated sialometries were performed and the results were classified according a grading scale and compared between both groups. There was no statistically significant difference between the salivary evaluations of both groups (p=0.4487 and p=0.5615). Also, most of these rates were classified as very low and low. This novel method seems to be suitable for patients submitted to radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. A pilot study evaluating erect chest imaging in children, using the Lodox Statscan digital X-ray machine

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    Rupesh Baloo Daya

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Chest radiography accounts for a significant proportion of ionising radiation in children. The radiation dose of radiographs performed on the Lodox Statscan system has been shown to be lower than that of a computed radiography (CR system. The role of the Lodox Statscan (hereafter referred to as the Statscan in routine erect chest radiography in children has not been evaluated. Objective: To evaluate the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of erect paediatric chest radiographs obtained with the Statscan and compare this with conventional erect chest images obtained with a CR system. Materials and Methods: Thirty three children with suspected chest pathology were enrolled randomly over a period of three months. Erect chest radiographs were obtained with the Statscan, and a Shimadzu R-20J X-ray machine coupled with a Fuji FCR 5000 CR system. Image quality and diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic capability were evaluated between the two modalities. Results: The erect Statscan allowed superior visualisation of the three major airways. Statscan images however, demonstrated exposure and movement artifacts with hemidiaphragms and ribs most prone to movement. Bronchovascular clarity was also considered unsatisfactory on the Statscan images. Conclusion: The Statscan has limitations in erect chest radiography in terms of movement artefacts, exposure fluctuations, and poor definition of lung markings. Despite this, the Statscan allows better visualisation of the major airways, equivalent to a ‘high KV’ film at a fraction of the radiation dose. This supports the finding of an earlier study evaluating Statscan images in trauma cases, where the images were taken supine. Statscan has great potential in assisting in the diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis where airway narrowing occurs as a result of nodal compression.

  18. Hand-held echocardiography in the setting of pre-operative cardiac evaluation of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery: results from a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Ilaria; Mega, Simona; Goffredo, Costanza; Patti, Giuseppe; Chello, Massimo; Di Sciascio, Germano

    2015-06-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is not a routine test in the pre-operative cardiac evaluation of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery but may be considered in those with known heart failure and valvular heart disease or complaining cardiac symptoms. In this setting, hand-held echocardiography (HHE) could find a potential application as an alternative to standard echocardiography in selected patients; however, its utility in this context has not been investigated. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the conclusiveness of HHE compared to standard echocardiography in this subset of patients. 100 patients scheduled for non-cardiac surgery were randomized to receive a standard exam with a Philips Ie33 or a bedside evaluation with a pocket-size imaging device (Opti-Go, Philips Medical System). The primary endpoint was the percentage of satisfactory diagnosis at the end of the examination referred as conclusiveness. Secondary endpoints were the mean duration time and the mean waiting time to perform the exams. No significant difference in terms of conclusiveness between HHE and standard echo was found (86 vs 96%; P = 0.08). Mean duration time of the examinations was 6.1 ± 1.2 min with HHE and 13.1 ± 2.6 min with standard echocardiography (P cardiac surgery, since it provided similar information but it was faster and earlier performed compared to standard echocardiography.

  19. Pilot study to evaluate the effects of tetrahydrobiopterin on adult individuals with phenylketonuria with measurable maladaptive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Kathryn D; Ottina, Martha J; Azen, Colleen G; Yano, Shoji

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) on maladaptive behavior in patients with phenylketonuria (PKU). In an effort to determine if BH4 has any effects on the central nervous system, we studied 10 individuals with PKU and measurable maladaptive behaviors for 1 year. Behavioral assessments using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-Second Edition and a PKU Behavior Checklist were obtained at baseline, 6 months, and at the end of the study. Biochemical measures including plasma amino acids were obtained quarterly, and phenylalanine (Phe) and tyrosine (Tyr) were obtained monthly. Out of the 10 subjects, 2 were responders to BH4, as determined by a blood Phe reduction >30%. While blood Phe in the 8 nonresponders did not change significantly throughout the study, their Tyr levels were significantly higher at 6 months (p=0.012), but not at 12 months (p=0.23). By the end of the study, 8 subjects exhibited fewer maladaptive behaviors on the components of the Vineland Maladaptive Behavior Index, and all 10 had lower total scores on the PKU Behavior Checklist. These findings suggest that there may be direct effects of BH4 on the central nervous system, independent of lowering blood Phe.

  20. Efficacy & safety evaluation of Ayurvedic treatment (Ashwagandha powder & Sidh Makardhwaj in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a pilot prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: In the traditional system of medicine in India Ashwagandha powder and Sidh Makardhwaj have been used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. However, safety and efficacy of this treatment have not been evaluated. Therefore, the present study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ayurvedic treatment (Ashwagandha powder and Sidh Makardhwaj in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: One hundred and twenty five patients with joint pain were screened at an Ayurvedic hospital in New Delhi, India. Eighty six patients satisfied inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Detailed medical history and physical examination were recorded. Patients took 5g of Ashwagandha powder twice a day for three weeks with lukewarm water or milk. Sidh Makardhwaj (100 mg with honey was administered daily for the next four weeks. The follow up of patients was carried out every two weeks. The primary efficacy end point was based on American College of Rheumatology (ACR 20 response. Secondary end points were ACR50, ACR70 responses, change from baseline in disease activity score (DAS 28 score and ACR parameters. Safety assessments were hepatic function [alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, bilirubin and ß2 microglobulin], renal function (urea and creatinine and NGAL tests and urine mercury level. Results: The study was completed by 90.7 per cent (78/86 patients. Patients with moderate and high disease activity were 57.7 per cent (45/78 and 42.3 per cent (33/78, respectively. All patients were tested positive for rheumatoid factor and increased ESR level. Ashwagandha and Sidh Makardhwaj treatment decreased RA factor. A significant change in post-treatment scores of tender joint counts, swollen joint counts, physician global assessment score, patient global assessment score, pain assessment score, patient self assessed disability index score and ESR level were

  1. A pilot study to evaluate the role of the Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) in clinical decisions for pressure ulcer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Susan S; Graves, Barbara Ann; Madaris, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) was designed to assess pressure ulcer (PrU) healing in the spinal cord impaired (SCI) population. The tool contains 7 variables: wound surface area, depth, edges, tunneling, undermining, exudate type, and necrotic tissue amount. A 2-phased, quantitative pilot study based on the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior was conducted at a large SCI/Disorders Center in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In the first phase of the study, a convenience sample of 5 physicians, 3 advanced practice registered nurses, and 3 certified wound care nurses (CWCN) was surveyed using a 2-part questionnaire to assess use of the SCI-PUMT instrument, its anticipated improvement in PrU assessment, and intent to use the SCI-PUMT in clinical practice. Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral controls, and barriers related to the intent to use the SCI-PUMT were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale (range: 1= extremely likely, 5 = extremely unlikely). In the second phase of the study, the electronic health records (EHR) of 24 veterans (with 30 PrUs) who had at least 2 completed SCI-PUMT scores during a 4-week period were used to evaluate whether an association existed between magnitudes of change of total SCI-PUMT scores and ordered changes in PrU treatment. The overall mean score for intent to use SCI-PUMT was 1.80 (SD 0.75). The least favorable scores were for convenience and motivation to use the SCI-PUMT. Analysis of EHR data showed no significant difference in magnitudes of change in the SCI-PUMT score and changes in PrU treatment recommendations made by the CWCNs. The significance was not affected regardless of an increase or no change in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 1.158, P = 0.282) or for a decrease in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 0.5, P = 0.478). In this pilot study, the expressed intent to use the SCI-PUMT in making clinical decisions was generally

  2. Promising Role of Exfoliative Cytology in the Evaluation of Glycaemic Status of Type II Diabetics: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, Yasmin; Kumar, Praveen S; Singh, Navneet

    2015-06-01

    The degree of metabolic control in diabetes mellitus influences the susceptibility of patients to oral diseases. It is mandatory to regularly monitor glycaemic status, however invasive methods may be contraindicated or intolerable to diabetic individuals. Thus, cytology, being a simple, non-invasive and rapid procedure, is a promising protocol for assessing diabetic status and assisting in management. To assess the number of PAS positive glycogen containing cells and associated cellular changes in buccal smears of type II diabetics and correlate the findings with their serum glucose levels. The study was conducted at the out patient Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, KLES Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum. Fifty known cases of type II diabetes mellitus and 50 healthy individuals were included in the study. Fasting blood glucose levels were estimated and buccal smears stained with Periodic Acid Schiff stain. The observed cellular changes were correlated with the glycaemic status of each patient. Statistical evaluations such as Student's t test (P Cytological findings and clinical observations, suggest a correlation between the extent of these changes and clinical parameters like glycaemic control. Further studies in this aspect can help in improving the reliability of oral cytology as a diagnostic tool in diabetes.

  3. Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Companion-Animal Veterinarians: A Pilot Study Using RIAS Coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Michelle; Fitzgerald, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Effective veterinarian communication skills training and the related key outcomes provided the impetus for this study. We implemented a pre-experimental pre-test/post-test single-group design with a sample of 13 veterinarians and their 71 clients to evaluate the effects of a 6.5-hour communication skills intervention for veterinarians. Consultations were audiotaped and analyzed with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Clients completed the Consultation and Relational Care Measure, a global satisfaction scale, a Parent Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale, and the Adherence Intent measure. Veterinarians completed a communication confidence measure and a workshop satisfaction scale. Contrary to expectation, neither veterinarian communication skills nor their confidence improved post-training. Despite client satisfaction and perceptions of veterinarians' relational communication skills not increasing, clients nevertheless reported an increased intent to adhere to veterinarian recommendations. This result is important because client adherence is critical to managing and enhancing the health and well-being of animals. The results of the study suggest that while the workshop was highly regarded, either the duration of the training or practice opportunities were insufficient or a booster session was required to increase veterinarian confidence and integration of new skills. Future research should utilize a randomized control study design to investigate the appropriate intervention with which to achieve change in veterinarian communication skills. Such change could translate to more effective interactions in veterinarians' daily lives.

  4. Pilot prevalence evaluation of Chlamydia Trachomatis by PCR in female infertile referred to study center of infertility in Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Goshayeshi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most common diseases as sexually transferred in world. According to the World Health Organization statistics, approximately 92 million new Chlamydia trachomatis infection occur in the world. Chlamydia trachomatis (CT is the cause of tubal obstruction, ectopic pregnancy and infertility in women. The aim of this study is prevalence evaluation of Chlamydia Trachomatis by PCR in female infertile referred to Montasarieh study center of infertility in Mashhad. Materials and Methods: The cervical swab specimens were collected from 100 infertile (as case and 30 fertile (as control group women attending to the infertility center of Mash-had Medical University. DNA extraction was performed from clinical specimens using DNA extraction kit. In this study, in addition to PCR reaction by commercial kit, PCR test was performed using specific primers and probe for CTCP gene. Results: The results of PCR reaction using the kit was match with PCR test and showed that the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis is 21% in infertile women and 3.3% in normal fertile women that was statistically significant (p=0.024. Conclusion: Considering the high sensitivity of PCR method for diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis infection, this method can be useful for routine screening.

  5. Psychological Evaluation of Animal-assisted Intervention (AAI) Programs Involving Visiting Dogs and Cats for Alcohol Dependents: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Nobuyo; Narita, Shin; Yoshihara, Eiji; Ohta, Mitsuaki; Iwahashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an evaluation method for animal-assisted intervention (AAI) programs involving Mood Check List-Short form.2 (MCL-S.2) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) for psychiatric daycare of Japanese alcohol. dependents. A total of 36 alcohol dependents completed the study and questionnaires assessing their state. A single session of AAI reduced both subjective and physiological measures of state anxiety (A-State); and this program induced a significant reduction in the anxiety after an AAI program session with the dogs and cats involved in the intervention (p = 0.001). The Wilcoxon t-test showed that there were also significant differences in the "anxiety", "pleasantness", and "relaxation". scores for MCL-S.2 among the alcohol dependents, before and after AAI; a significantly decreased "anxiety" score (p = 0.006), and increased "pleasantness" (p = 0.002) and "relaxation" (p=0.012) scores for MCL-S.2 after AAI. The results of this study indicated that alcohol dependents who experienced a group AAI session-program exhibited significant improvements in their feeling; decreased anxiety, and increased pleasantness and relaxation.

  6. BIMOMASS GASIFICATION PILOT PLANT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a gasification pilot program using two biomass feedstocks: bagasse pellets and wood chips. he object of the program was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its suitability as a fuel for gas-turbine-based power generation cycles. he f...

  7. A combined approach of bedside clinical examination and flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing in poststroke dysphagia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sureshkumar Radhakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As with most neurologic conditions, stroke involves impairment of the swallowing mechanism. This could be a spectrum of issues, the worst of which is aspiration. At the same time, the prolonged presence of a naso-gastric tube (NGT has its own morbidity. Flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES is one reliable method to assess the structural and functional status of the oropharynx and larynx, during the swallowing process. Objective: To study the utility of FEES in decision-making with respect to resumption of oral intake in stroke patients. To document the findings of FEES in stroke patients, and to look for correlations between these and the site of stroke. Materials and Methods: Protocol insertion of naso-gastric tube in all stroke patients, at presentation. Initial assessment by a neurologist and swallowing therapist, depending on cognitive status of the patient. All patients underwent MRI Brain with diffusion weighted sequences. After detailed clinical examination, they underwent swallow exercises under the supervision of a trained swallowing therapist. The decision to remove NGT was taken clinically by the combined decision of neurologist and swallowing therapist. Then all patients underwent FEES by the ENT surgeon. The final decision for NGT removal was taken as per the FEES findings. Result: Sixteen stroke patients underwent the FEES procedure during a period of six months. The oropharyngeal and laryngeal findings varied depending on the area of stroke involvement. Of these, change in decision regarding swallowing rehabilitation or NGT removal was needed in four patients, following the FEES findings. Conclusions: FEES is an easy, efficient and reliable method to evaluate the swallowing status in stroke patients. In combination with good bedside clinical examination and swallow exercises, it can be a good tool in assessing patients with post- stroke dysphagia. Post-stroke rehabilitation and prevention of aspiration

  8. Nonspecific pain is a marker for hypovitaminosis D in patients undergoing evaluation for sleep disorders: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarty DE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available David E McCarty,1 Aronkumar Reddy,1 Quinton Keigley,2 Paul Y Kim,1 Stephen Cohen,2 Andrew A Marino1 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 2School of Medicine, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA, USA Background: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that serum vitamin D levels are abnormally low in sleep clinic patients admitting to chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain and to assess the associated risk factors. A secondary purpose was to identify a clinical biomarker for vitamin D deficiency. Methods: We enrolled 153 consecutive patients who admitted to the presence of chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain during a comprehensive sleep evaluation at a specialist sleep medicine clinic within an academic center. Venous blood sampling was performed for determination of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Risk factors for vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D < 20 ng/mL were identified by odds ratios. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed with 10-fold cross-validation to identify a biomarker for vitamin D deficiency calculated by linear discriminant analysis. Results: The mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was 19.8 ± 11.1, with 54% of the study population having vitamin D deficiency. This mean 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was lower than that observed historically in healthy controls, and was either similar or lower than in all but one representative historical cohort formed on the basis of chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain. Risk factors for vitamin D deficiency were black ethnicity, age < 60 years, and obesity. These risk factors were identified both in the entire cohort and separately in subgroups with and without obstructive sleep apnea. The biomarker (based on race, age, and body mass index had a sensitivity and specificity for predicting vitamin D deficiency of 0.73 and 0.74, respectively. Conclusion: Vitamin

  9. A Pilot Study for the Evaluation of PCR as a Diagnostic Tool in Patients with Suspected Dermatophytoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Robin; Gupta, Samiksha; Asati, Dinesh P; Karuna, T; Purwar, Shashank; Biswas, Debasis

    2017-01-01

    The conventional diagnostic tools for dermatophytoses suffer from several limitations including low sensitivity, specificity, and long turn-around-time. The present study was, therefore, performed to evaluate the performance of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method for the diagnosis of this condition. The study was conducted in the Dermatology outpatient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital in central India over a period of 3 months from July to September 2015. Forty participants, including 25 cases and 15 controls, were recruited in this observational study. Direct microscopy and fungal culture were performed from skin scrapings and nail clippings collected from the participants. PCR was also performed to amplify the chitin synthase 1 and internal transcribed spacer 2 genes from DNA samples extracted from the same clinical materials, using the method reported by Brillowska-Dabrowska et al. The diagnostic performance of fungal culture and PCR was compared using OpenEpi software. We observed a significant male predominance among patients with dermatophytoses. The sensitivity of fungal culture and dermatophyte PCR to diagnose dermatophytoses was 24% and 48%, respectively, whereas the specificity of the two assays was 100% and 93.3%, respectively. The likelihood ratio of a positive PCR assay was 7.2 and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.5. PCR assay also delivered a significant shortening of the time-to-diagnosis, with the mean turn-around-time being 8 hours and 14 days for PCR and culture, respectively. This study, thus, highlights the potential merits of the dermatophyte PCR assay in achieving a rapid diagnosis of dermatophytoses and underscores its utility as a complementary test to improve the sensitivity of the conventional diagnostic tools for this condition, as well as to reliably differentiate this condition from other similar skin conditions.

  10. Evaluation of Tumor Markers and Their Impact on Prognosis in Gallbladder, Bile Duct and Cholangiocellular Carcinomas - A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liska, Vaclav; Treska, Vladislav; Skalicky, Tomas; Fichtl, Jakub; Bruha, Jan; Vycital, Ondrej; Topolcan, Ondrej; Palek, Richard; Rosendorf, Jachym; Polivka, Jiri; Holubec, Lubos

    2017-04-01

    The behavior of tumor markers in biliary tract malignancies is not well-known and has been scarcely studied. Such markers could play important roles in diagnostic and prognostic schemes as well as in decision-making about the best treatment strategies. This study analyzed the preoperative serum levels of conventional tumor markers (AFP, CEA, CA 19-9, CA 72-4), proliferative marker thymidine kinase (TK) and cytokeratins (TPA, TPS and CYFRA 21.1) in patients with gallbladder carcinoma, bile duct carcinoma (Klatskin) and cholangiocellular carcinoma, in relation to the patient prognosis. The study aimed in finding the role of tumor markers in not properly investigated diseases, where their importance is often marginalized. The study included 43 patients, who underwent either radical surgical procedure (n=21) or explorative laparotomy without any surgical treatment (n=22) for gallbladder carcinoma, bile duct carcinoma (Klatskin tumor) and cholangiocellular carcinoma (24, 8 and 11 patients, respectively) between 2003 and 2010 at our Department. The association of serum tumor markers and patients' prognosis were assessed for the entire cohort and for each cancer type and also with regard to treatment (radical surgery versus explorative laparotomy). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free interval (DFI) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and statistically evaluated using the LogRank test. DFI was computed only in the subgroup of patients treated by radical surgery. The statistical analysis of tumor markers revealed TK as a poor prognostic factor for shorter DFI (HR=3.5, 95%CI=0.6-21.3, ptumor markers for assessment of prognosis (OS or DFI) in patients with gallbladder carcinoma, bile duct carcinoma, and cholangiocellular carcinoma. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Moving toward Personalized Medicine in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program: A Pilot Study on the Evaluation of Treatment Responses in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ya Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This pilot study simultaneously evaluated the effects of various factors, including genetic variations of CYP2B6, CYP2C19, and ABCB1, demographic characteristics, disease states, methadone-drug interactions (MDIs, and poly-substance use, on the treatment responses among non-HIV patients in the methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP in Taiwan. A total of 178 patients were recruited from two major hospitals that provided MMTP services in southern Taiwan, and information regarding concomitant medications and diseases was acquired from the National Health Insurance (NHI program. The results demonstrated that the methadone maintenance dose, CYP2B6 785G allele, and ABCB1 2677T allele have positive effects on the methadone plasma concentration. In contrast, patients with HCV coinfection, alcohol problems, and psychiatric diseases may have a negative response to treatment. Thus, a comprehensive evaluation of treatment responses in the MMTP should include not only genetic polymorphisms in methadone metabolism and transporter proteins, but also concomitant diseases, MDIs, and poly-substance use. The results also suggest that personalized medicine may be indispensable for a better outcome of the MMTP.

  12. Objective evaluation of acute adverse events and image quality of gadolinium-based contrast agents (gadobutrol and gadobenate dimeglumine) by blinded evaluation. Pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semelka, Richard C; Hernandes, Mateus de A; Stallings, Clifton G; Castillo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to objectively evaluate a recently FDA-approved gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) in comparison to our standard GBCA for acute adverse events and image quality by blinded evaluation. Evaluation was made of a recently FDA-approved GBCA, gadobutrol (Gadavist; Bayer), in comparison to our standard GBCA, gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance; Bracco), in an IRB- and HIPAA-compliant study. Both the imaging technologist and patient were not aware of the brand of the GBCA used. A total of 59 magnetic resonance studies were evaluated (59 patients, 31 men, 28 women, age range of 5-85 years, mean age of 52 years). Twenty-nine studies were performed with gadobutrol (22 abdominal and 7 brain studies), and 30 studies were performed with gadobenate dimeglumine (22 abdominal and 8 brain studies). Assessment was made of acute adverse events focusing on objective observations of vomiting, hives, and moderate and severe reactions. Adequacy of enhancement was rated as poor, fair and good by one of two experienced radiologists who were blinded to the type of agent evaluated. No patient experienced acute adverse events with either agent. The target minor adverse events of vomiting or hives, and moderate and severe reactions were not observed in any patient. Adequacy of enhancement was rated as good for both agents in all patients. Objective, blinded evaluation is feasible and readily performable for the evaluation of GBCAs. This proof-of-concept study showed that both GBCAs evaluated exhibited consistent good image quality and no noteworthy adverse events. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of otoscope cone cleaning and disinfection procedures commonly used in veterinary medical practices: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Heide M; Rosenkrantz, Wayne S; Muse, Russell; Griffin, Craig E

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative efficacy of otoscope cone cleaning and disinfection methods commonly used in veterinary practices. Using sterile technique, 60 new gas-sterilized 4-mm otoscope cones were inoculated with a broth culture of 1.5 billion Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria per mL then allowed to dry for 10 min. Six study groups of 10 cones each were created. Group 1 served as positive control and received no cleaning or disinfection. Group 2 cones were wiped with sterile cotton-tipped applicators and gauze then rinsed with water. Group 3 cones were wiped with 70% isopropyl alcohol. Group 4 cones were scrubbed in a speculum cleaner with Cetylcide II solution (Cetylite Industries, Inc., Pennsauken, NJ). Groups 5 and 6 cones were soaked for 20 min in Cetylcide II and chlorhexidine gluconate 2% solutions, respectively. Using sterile technique and after 10-15 min drying time, the cones were swabbed in a consistent pattern, and samples were submitted for quantitative culture. Culture results showed no growth from cones soaked in Cetylcide II or chlorhexidine solutions. Two of the 10 cones wiped with alcohol, 3/10 cones wiped then rinsed with water, and 3/10 cones scrubbed with the speculum cleaner showed growth of P. aeruginosa. All (10/10) cones in the control group showed heavy growth of P. aeruginosa. These results show that P. aeruginosa can survive on otoscope cones cleaned and disinfected by several commonly used methods. Further study is needed to determine practical and optimal cleaning and disinfection methods for otoscope cones.

  14. Pilot Study to Evaluate Hydrogen Injection for Stimulating Reduction and Immobilization of Uranium in Groundwater at an ISR Mining Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, L. W.; Cabezas, J.; Gamboa, Y.; Fernandez, W.

    2011-12-01

    State and federal regulations require that groundwater at in-situ recovery (ISR) uranium mining operations be restored to pre-mining conditions. Reverse osmosis (RO) filtration of several pore volumes of the post-leached groundwater and reinjection of the clean permeate is the most common technology currently used for restoring groundwater at uranium ISR sites. However, this approach does not revert the formation back to its initial reducing conditions, which can potentially impede timely groundwater restoration. In-situ biostimulation of indigenous iron- and sulfate reducing bacteria by injection of organic electron donors (e.g., ethanol, acetate, and lactate) to promote soluble uranium reduction and immobilization has been the subject of previous studies. However, injection of organic substrates has been observed to cause aquifer clogging near the injection point. In addition, U(VI) solubility may be enhanced through complexation with carbonate generated by organic carbon oxidation. An alternative approach that may overcome these problems involves the use of hydrogen as a reductant to promote microbial reduction and immobilization of U(VI) in situ. To test this approach, approximately 100,000 scf of compressed hydrogen gas was injected into a leached unconsolidated sand zone over two months at an ISR mining site. During this time groundwater was recirculated between injection and extraction wells (separated by 130 ft) at a rate of about 40 gpm and bromide was coinjected as a conservative tracer. A well monitoring program has been executed since June 2009 to evaluate the performance of the hydrogen injection. Current results show that U(VI) has been reduced from 4.2 to 0.05 ppm in the area surrounding the injection well and to 2.0 ± 0.3 ppm in the area surrounding the extraction well and two intermediate monitoring wells. Other water quality changes near the injection well include significant decreases in concentrations of Mo, sulfate, Fe, Mn, bicarbonate, Ca

  15. Evaluation of a Specialized Yoga Program for Persons Admitted to a Complex Continuing Care Hospital: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuluski, Kerry; Bechsgaard, Gitte; Ridgway, Jennifer; Katz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a specialized yoga intervention for inpatients in a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital. Design. Single-cohort repeated measures design. Methods. Participants (N = 10) admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital were recruited to participate in a 50–60 min Hatha Yoga class (modified for wheelchair users/seated position) once a week for eight weeks, with assigned homework practice. Questionnaires on pain (pain, pain interference, and pain catastrophizing), psychological variables (depression, anxiety, and experiences with injustice), mindfulness, self-compassion, and spiritual well-being were collected at three intervals: pre-, mid-, and post-intervention. Results. Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed a significant main effect of time indicating improvements over the course of the yoga program on the (1) anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, F(2,18) = 4.74, p Yoga program improves pain-related factors and psychological experiences in individuals admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital. PMID:28115969

  16. Evaluation of a Specialized Yoga Program for Persons Admitted to a Complex Continuing Care Hospital: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a specialized yoga intervention for inpatients in a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital. Design. Single-cohort repeated measures design. Methods. Participants (N=10 admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital were recruited to participate in a 50–60 min Hatha Yoga class (modified for wheelchair users/seated position once a week for eight weeks, with assigned homework practice. Questionnaires on pain (pain, pain interference, and pain catastrophizing, psychological variables (depression, anxiety, and experiences with injustice, mindfulness, self-compassion, and spiritual well-being were collected at three intervals: pre-, mid-, and post-intervention. Results. Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed a significant main effect of time indicating improvements over the course of the yoga program on the (1 anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, F(2,18 = 4.74, p<.05, and ηp2 = .35, (2 Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form, F(2,18 = 3.71, p<.05, and ηp2 = .29, and (3 Magnification subscale of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, F(2,18 = 3. 66, p<.05, and ηp2 = .29. Discussion. The results suggest that an 8-week Hatha Yoga program improves pain-related factors and psychological experiences in individuals admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital.

  17. Histological evaluation of the biocompatibility of polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel implants in a rat model: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouzeh Sabri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aerogels are a versatile group of nanostructured/nanoporous materials with physical and chemical properties that can be adjusted to suit the application of interest. In terms of biomedical applications, aerogels are particularly suitable for implants such as membranes, tissue growth scaffolds, and nerve regeneration and guidance inserts. The mesoporous nature of aerogels can also be used for diffusion based release of drugs that are loaded during the drying stage of the material. From the variety of aerogels polyurea crosslinked silica aerogels have the most potential for future biomedical applications and are explored here. METHODOLOGY: This study assessed the short and long term biocompatibility of polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel implants in a Sprague-Dawley rat model. Implants were inserted at two different locations a subcutaneously (SC, at the dorsum and b intramuscularly (IM, between the gluteus maximus and biceps femoris of the left hind extremity. Nearby muscle and other internal organs were evaluated histologically for inflammation, tissue damage, fibrosis and movement (travel of implant. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In general polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel (PCSA was well tolerated as a subcutaneous and an intramuscular implant in the Sprague-Dawley rat with a maximum incubation time of twenty months. In some cases a thin fibrous capsule surrounded the aerogel implant and was interpreted as a normal response to foreign material. No noticeable toxicity was found in the tissues surrounding the implants nor in distant organs. Comparison was made with control rats without any implants inserted, and animals with suture material present. No obvious or noticeable changes were sustained by the implants at either location. Careful necropsy and tissue histology showed age-related changes only. An effective sterilization technique for PCSA implants as well as staining and sectioning protocol has been established. These studies

  18. Pilot Study to Evaluate the Effect of Topical Dimethicone on Clinical Signs and Skin Barrier Function in Dogs with Naturally Occurring Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pellicoro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of a skin protectant solution (dimethicone 2% on clinical signs and skin barrier function in canine atopic dermatitis (AD. Eighteen dogs with AD were randomly divided into two groups, one received dimethicone and the other received the vehicle (cyclomethicone on selected areas (pinnae, groin, and axillae daily for 4 weeks. Owners and investigators were blinded regarding group allocation. Clinical efficacy was evaluated using a scoring system and skin barrier by measuring the transepidermal water loss. Twelve dogs completed the study (50% drop rate in the vehicle and 20% in the dimethicone. For clinical signs, analysis of variance showed an effect of time (; day 0 day 28 and region (axillae groin pinnae but no effect of group or group × time interaction. For transepidermal water loss, analysis of variance showed only a main effect of region (axillae pinnae groin. Pearson found no correlation between transepidermal water loss and clinical scores. In this pilot study dimethicone had no significant effect on clinical signs and transepidermal water loss in canine atopic dermatitis.

  19. MRI assessment of relapsed glioblastoma during treatment with bevacizumab: Volumetric measurement of enhanced and FLAIR lesions for evaluation of response and progression—A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichler, Josef, E-mail: josef.pichler@gespag.at [Wagner Jauregg Weg 15, 4020 Linz, Landesnervenklinik Linz (Austria); Pachinger, Corinna, E-mail: pachingercorinna@gmx.at [Wagner Jauregg Weg 15, 4020 Linz, Landesnervenklinik Linz (Austria); Pelz, Manuela, E-mail: mauela.pelz@gespag.at [Wagner Jauregg Weg 15, 4020 Linz, Landesnervenklinik Linz (Austria); Kleiser, Raimund, E-mail: raimund.kleiser@gespag.at [Wagner Jauregg Weg 15, 4020 Linz, Landesnervenklinik Linz (Austria)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metric that is useful for therapy monitoring in patients with relapsed glioblastoma (GBM) during treatment with the antiangiogenic monoclonal antibody bevacizumab (Bev). We evaluated the feasibility of tumour volume measurement with our software tool in clinical routine and tried to establish reproducible and quantitative parameters for surveillance of patients on treatment with antiangiogenic drugs. Materials and methods: In this retrospective institutional pilot study, 18 patients (11 men, 7 women; mean age 53.5) with recurrent GBM received bevacizumab and irinotecan every two weeks as second line therapy. Follow up scans were assessed every two to four months. Data were collected on a 1.5 T MR System (Siemens, Symphony) with the standard head coil using our standardized tumour protocol. Volumetric measurement was performed with a commercial available software stroketool in FLAIR and T1-c imaging with following procedure: Pre-processing involved cutting noise and electing a Gaussian of 3 × 3 to smooth images, selecting a ROI (region of interest) in healthy brain area of the contra lateral side with quantifying the intensity value, adding 20% to this value to define the threshold level. Only values above this threshold are left corresponding to the tumour lesion. For the volumetric measurement the detected tumour area was circuited in all slices and finally summing up all values and multiplied by slice thickness to get the whole volume. Results: With McDonalds criteria progression was indicated in 14 out of 18 patients. In contrast, volumetric measurement showed an increase of contrast enhancement of >25%, defined as threshold for progression, in 11 patients (78%) and in 12 patients (85%) in FLAIR volume, respectively. 6 patients revealed that volumes in MRI increased earlier than the last scan, which was primarily defined as the date of progression with McDonald criteria, changing PFS after re-evaluation of

  20. Evaluation of a Serious Self-Regulation Game Intervention for Overweight-Related Behaviors (“Balance It”): A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spook, J.E.; Paulussen, T.; Kok, G.; Empelen, P. van

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serious games have the potential to promote health behavior. Because overweight is still a major issue among secondary vocational education students in the Netherlands, this study piloted the effects of “Balance It,” a serious self-regulation game intervention targeting students’ overwei

  1. A pilot study evaluating erect chest imaging in children, using the Lodox Statscan digital X-ray machine

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Chest radiography accounts for a significant proportion of ionising radiation in children. The radiation dose of radiographs performed on the Lodox Statscan system has been shown to be lower than that of a computed radiography (CR) system. The role of the Lodox Statscan (hereafter referred to as the Statscan) in routine erect chest radiography in children has not been evaluated. Objective: To evaluate the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of erect paedi...

  2. Self-regulation evaluation of therapeutic yoga and walking for patients with irritable bowel syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Leila; Naliboff, Bruce D; Shapiro, David

    2016-01-01

    With limited efficacy of medications for symptom relief, non-medication treatments may play an important role in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most common functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of two self-regulation strategies for symptom relief and mood management in IBS patients. Thirty-five adult participants meeting ROME III criteria for IBS were enrolled, 27 of the 35 participants (77%) completed treatment and pre- and post-treatment visits (89% women, 11% men; M (SD) age = 36 (13)), and 20 of the 27 (74%) completed a 6-month follow-up. Participants were randomly assigned to 16 biweekly group sessions of Iyengar yoga or a walking program. Results indicated a significant group by time interaction on negative affect with the walking treatment showing improvement from pre- to post-treatment when compared to yoga (p < .05). There was no significant group by time effect on IBS severity. Exploratory analyses of secondary outcomes examined change separately for each treatment condition. From pre- to post-treatment, yoga showed significant decreases in IBS severity measures (p < .05), visceral sensitivity (p < .05), and severity of somatic symptoms (p < .05). Walking showed significant decreases in overall GI symptoms (p < .05), negative affect (p < .05), and state anxiety (p < .05). At 6-month follow-up, overall GI symptoms for walking continued to significantly decline, while for yoga, GI symptoms rebounded toward baseline levels (p < .05). When asked about self-regulated home practice at 6 months, significantly more participants in walking than in yoga practiced at least weekly (p < .05). In sum, results suggest that yoga and walking as movement-based self-regulatory behavioral treatments have some differential effects but are both beneficial for IBS patients, though maintenance of a self-regulated walking program may be more feasible and therefore more effective long term.

  3. [Pilot study on compulsory vaccination coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandolfo, M E; Lauria, L; Medda, E; Bucciarelli, M; Andreozzi, S; Salinetti, S; Sitzia, G; Bernacchia, R

    1999-01-01

    The disappearance of diphtheria and poliomyelitis is the best evidence of the efficacy of the vaccination strategies adopted in Italy. The active offer of the prophylaxis, reinforced by law, has characterised the operational aspects of the strategy. The active surveillance system is the main tool to take under control the effectiveness of health services responsible for vaccination. This system could be more easily implemented if the health services will be given a specific software aiming to handle and evaluate vaccination registers. The present pilot study, performed in the regions Marche and Sardegna, is an example of active surveillance and it is based on the ARVA software produced by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità. The results show a good level of coverage (> 95%) within the second year of life. Unsatisfactory results were obtained on the timing of vaccinations, as recommended by the vaccination schedule, mostly for the third doses.

  4. Evaluation of TSH Levels in the Program of Congenital Hypothyroidism Newborn Screening in a Pilot Study of Preterm Newborns in Bogotá, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Giraldo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preterm infants (<37 weeks of gestation have low levels of thyroid hormones due to multiple factors. Objective: To evaluate levels of thyroid-stimulation hormone (TSH in the program congenital hypothyroidism (CH newborn screening in a sample of preterm infants in the city of Bogotá, Colombia. Methods: The Secretaría de Salud Distrital screening protocol for CH (blood sample is collected from the umbilical cord in all the newborns remeasured the serum TSH and heel TSH when preterm infants completed 37 weeks of gestation. Results: A total of 59 preterm neonates were rescreened, of which 2 neonates had elevated levels of TSH and 1 neonate had transient hypothyroxinemia. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov 2-sample/bilateral statistical test was used to compare the neonatal TSH levels of preterm and full-term newborns, which do not follow the same distribution. Conclusion: In our pilot study, 2 of the rescreened infants presented high levels of TSH and 1 had transient hyperthyrotropinemia, suggesting the need for rescreening of preterm infants. Additionally, a larger study should be performed to determine the screening cutoff values for preterm newborns.

  5. Single-dose safety and pharmacokinetic evaluation of fluorocoxib A: pilot study of novel cyclooxygenase-2-targeted optical imaging agent in a canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina; Bartges, Joseph W.; Callens, Amanda; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated preclinical single-dose safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and specific uptake of the new optical imaging agent fluorocoxib A in dogs. Fluorocoxib A, N-[(5-carboxy-X-rhodaminyl)but-4-yl]-2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]acetamide, selectively binds and inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in many cancers. Safety pilot studies were performed in research dogs following intravenous (i.v.) administration of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg fluorocoxib A. Blood and urine samples collected three days after administration of each dose of fluorocoxib A revealed no evidence of toxicity, and no clinically relevant adverse events were noted on physical examination of exposed dogs over that time period. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed in additional research dogs from plasma collected at several time points after i.v. administration of fluorocoxib A using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The pharmacokinetic studies using 1 mg/kg showed a peak of fluorocoxib A (92±28 ng/ml) in plasma collected at 0.5 h. Tumor specific uptake of fluorocoxib A was demonstrated using a dog diagnosed with colorectal cancer expressing COX-2. Our data support the safe single-dose administration and in vivo efficacy of fluorocoxib A, suggesting a high potential for successful translation to clinical use as an imaging agent for improved tumor detection in humans.

  6. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  7. Pre- and post-training evaluation of dental efficacy and activation measures in carers of adults with disabilities in South Australia - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Archana; Keuskamp, Dominic; Brennan, David

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to train carers to provide oral care for adults with disabilities and to evaluate the training programme. Forty-one carers of 103 care recipients from three disability organisations in South Australia were trained in providing oral care for adults with disabilities (April 2013-April 2014). The training included an oral presentation and practical session by a special needs dentist on completing oral health assessments (OHA), developing oral healthcare plans, providing oral hygiene care and assessing the need for dental referral. Continued support was provided via home visits by dental hygienists for the first 2 months and a dentist visit at 3 months. At 6 months, agreement on OHAs between the dentist and trained carers was assessed. Pre- and post-training questionnaires (at 6 months) collected information on dental behaviours of carers and psychosocial factors: carer activation measure-knowledge (CAM-Knowledge), carer activation measure-skills (CAM-Skills), carer activation measure-confidence (CAM-Confidence) and carer dental efficacy (CDE) items (carer diligence, self-efficacy and priority). Post-training (among 16 retained carers), there were significant increases in the mean scores of CAM-Knowledge and CAM-Confidence, but not for CAM-Skills (paired-samples t-tests, α = 0.05). Per cent agreement of CDE items varied little between questionnaires. Carer-dentist agreement on OHAs was generally high with kappa values ranging from 0.63 for the assessment of gums to 1.0 for the assessment of tongue, roof of mouth, denture and dental pain. Further, carers were able to assess the need for referral of their care recipients' oral health similar to the dentist. These findings suggest that with combined theoretical and practical training and continued support, non-dental professionals like carers can improve their knowledge and confidence in providing oral care for adults with disabilities. However, the findings of this pilot study need

  8. Evaluation of a pilot study to influence medication adherence of patients with diabetes mellitus type-2 by the pharmacy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adhien, P.; Dijk, L. van; Vegter, M. de; Westein, M.; Nijpels, G.; Hugtenburg, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interventions aimed to increase adherence to drug treatment usually are not tailored to the needs of individual patients. A modular pharmacy intervention, named ‘Support for Diabetes’, was developed to improve adherence to type 2 diabetes treatment. Objective: To evaluate the implementat

  9. Evaluation of self-care skills training and solution-focused counselling for health professionals in psychiatric medicine: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mache, Stefanie; Bernburg, Monika; Baresi, Lisa; Groneberg, David A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to implement and to evaluate a self-care skills training with solution-focused counselling to support psychiatrists in handling their daily work challenges. A total of 72 psychiatrists working in a psychiatric clinic were randomised in a single-blind trial to either an intervention group or a control group. Outcomes were measured at baseline and at the end of the training (follow-up 1: after 3 months; follow-up 2: after 6 months). A validated questionnaire including the Perceived Stress Questionnaire, the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, Brief Resilient Coping Scale, Self-Efficacy Scale and the Quality of Relationship Inventory was used. Psychiatrists in the intervention group reached a significant reduction in perceived job stress (p = 0.01, d = 0.05), improvements in job satisfaction (p = 0.02, d = 0.04), resilience (p = 0.02, d = 0.04) and self-efficacy (p = 0.04, d = 0.02) from baseline to all follow-ups with no comparable results seen in the control group. Psychiatrists stated an improved quality of physician-patient relationship (e.g. support, conflict management; p stress, job satisfaction, individual protective skills and quality of relationship to patients. This training is suitable to implement as a group training program for psychiatrists.

  10. [Tuitional-based promotion of social competencies and prevention of bullying in adolescence--the fairplayer.manual: results of a pilot evaluation study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheithauer, Herbert; Bull, Heike Dele

    2010-01-01

    The fairplayer.manual (Scheithauer u. Bull, 2008), a manualized, tuitional-based preventive intervention programme to facilitate social competence and prevent school bullying consists of at least 15 to 17 consecutive, ninety-minute-lessons using cognitive-behavioural methods (e. g. role plays, model-learning, social reinforcement, behaviour-feedback) and moral dilemma discussions amongst others. We present results from a pilot evaluation study with 138 students (between 13 and 21 years of age, from comprehensive and vocational school) and their teachers. Students and teachers were administered structured questionnaires considering e. g. the occurrence of bullying, prosocial behavior and student's empathy as well as legitimation of violence. For 113 students we obtained data for the two measurement points (pre-post). Due to a high attrition rate information of an initially recruited control group could not be considered. Results indicated partially impressive positive changes concerning the total number of bullies and victims as well as prosocial behavior. Results concerning legitimation of violence and empathy differed for classes according to treatment integrity.

  11. A pilot scale study on co-capture of SO2 and NOx in O2/CO2 recycled coal combustion and techno-economic evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the study on co-capture of SO2 and NOx in O2/CO2 recycled coal combustion in a pilot scale facility with the heat input of 0.3 MW by using high-sulphur lean coal.Detailed comparison of SO2 and NOx emission indexes and desulphurization and denitration rates have been made among three working conditions of O2/CO2,O2/CO2 with limestone injection(O2/CO2+Ca) and O2/RFG(recycled flue gas) with limestone injection(O2/RFG+Ca).Combustion in air was performed as a base case.Results showed that in the O2/RFG with limestone injection,desulphurization and denitration rates could reach up to 96% and 89%,respectively.Limestone injection under the high-CO2 atmosphere caused a significant reduction on SO2 emission and NOx emission as well.This indicated O2/CO2 recycled coal combustion could reduce the investment on the flue gas purification.The techno-economic evaluation indicated that Oxy-combustion technique is not only feasible for CO2 emission control based on existing power plants but is also cost-effective.

  12. TextTB: A Mixed Method Pilot Study Evaluating Acceptance, Feasibility, and Exploring Initial Efficacy of a Text Messaging Intervention to Support TB Treatment Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Iribarren

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess a text messaging intervention to promote tuberculosis (TB treatment adherence. Methods. A mixed-methods pilot study was conducted within a public pulmonary-specialized hospital in Argentina. Patients newly diagnosed with TB who were 18 or older, and had mobile phone access were recruited and randomized to usual care plus either medication calendar (n=19 or text messaging intervention (n=18 for the first two months of treatment. Primary outcomes were feasibility and acceptability; secondary outcomes explored initial efficacy. Results. Feasibility was evidenced by high access to mobile phones, familiarity with texting, most phones limited to basic features, a low rate of participant refusal, and many describing suboptimal TB understanding. Acceptability was evidenced by participants indicating feeling cared for, supported, responsible for their treatment, and many self-reporting adherence without a reminder. Participants in the texting group self-reported adherence on average 77% of the days whereas only 53% in calendar group returned diaries. Exploring initial efficacy, microscopy testing was low and treatment outcomes were similar in both groups. Conclusion. The texting intervention was well accepted and feasible with greater reporting of adherence using text messaging than the diary. Further evaluation of the texting intervention is warranted.

  13. A Pilot Study to Evaluate Renal Hemodynamics in Cirrhosis by Simultaneous Glomerular Filtration Rate, Renal Plasma Flow, Renal Resistive Indices and Biomarkers Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindikoglu, Ayse L.; Dowling, Thomas C.; Wong-You-Cheong, Jade J.; Christenson, Robert H.; Magder, Laurence S.; Hutson, William R.; Seliger, Stephen L.; Weir, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal hemodynamic measurements are complicated to perform in patients with cirrhosis; yet they provide the best measure of risk to predict hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Currently, there are no established biomarkers of altered renal hemodynamics in cirrhosis validated by measured renal hemodynamics. Methods In this pilot study, simultaneous measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow (RPF), renal resistive indices and biomarkers were performed to evaluate renal hemodynamic alterations in 10 patients with cirrhosis (3 patients without ascites, 5 with diuretic sensitive and 2 diuretic refractory ascites). Results Patients with diuretic refractory ascites had the lowest mean GFR (36.5 ml/min/1.73m2) and RPF (133.6 ml/min/1.73m2) when compared to those without ascites (GFR=82.9 ml/min/1.73m2, RPF=229.9 ml/min/1.73m2) and with diuretic-sensitive ascites (GFR=82.3 ml/min/1.73m2, RPF=344.1 ml/min/1.73m2). A higher mean filtration fraction (FF= GFR/RPF=0.36) was noted among those without ascites compared to those with ascites. Higher FF in patients without ascites is most likely secondary to the vasoconstriction in the efferent glomerular arterioles (normal FF≃0.20). In general, renal resistive indices were inversely related to FF. While patients with ascites had lower FF and higher right kidney main and arcuate artery resistive indices, those without ascites had higher FF and lower right kidney main and arcuate artery resistive indices. While cystatin C and beta-2 microglobulin performed better compared to Cr in estimating RPF; beta-trace protein, beta-2 microglobulin, SDMA, and (SDMA+ADMA) performed better in estimating right kidney arcuate artery resistive index. Conclusion The results of this pilot study showed that identification of non-invasive biomarkers of reduced RPF and increased renal resistive indices can identify cirrhotics at risk for HRS at a stage more amenable to therapeutic intervention, and reduce mortality from kidney

  14. Randomized pilot study and qualitative evaluation of a clinical decision support system for brain tumour diagnosis based on SV ¹H MRS: evaluation as an additional information procedure for novice radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Carlos; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Alberich-Bayarri, Angel; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan M

    2014-02-01

    The results of a randomized pilot study and qualitative evaluation of the clinical decision support system Curiam BT are reported. We evaluated the system's feasibility and potential value as a radiological information procedure complementary to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to assist novice radiologists in diagnosing brain tumours using MR spectroscopy (1.5 and 3.0T). Fifty-five cases were analysed at three hospitals according to four non-exclusive diagnostic questions. Our results show that Curiam BT improved the diagnostic accuracy in all the four questions. Additionally, we discuss the findings of the users' feedback about the system, and the further work to optimize it for real environments and to conduct a large clinical trial.

  15. Evaluation of impacts and mitigation assessments for the UMTRA Project: Gunnison and Durango pilot studies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beranich, S.J. [Southwest Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-08-24

    This report evaluates the impacts assessment and proposed mitigations provided in environmental documents concerning the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The projected impacts and proposed mitigations identified in UMTRA Project environmental documents were evaluated for two UMTRA Project sites. These sites are Gunnison and Durango, which are representative of currently active and inactive UMTRA Project sites, respectively. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation was prepared for the remedial action at Durango and Gunnison as well as for the provision of an alternate water supply system at Gunnison. Additionally, environmental analysis was completed for mill site demolition Gunnison, and for a new road related to the Durango remedial action. The results in this report pertain only to the impact assessments prepared by the Regulatory Compliance staff as a part of the NEPA compliance requirements. Similarly, the mitigative measures documented are those that were identified during the NEPA process.

  16. Evaluation of a pilot study to influence medication adherence of patients with diabetes mellitus type-2 by the pharmacy.

    OpenAIRE

    Adhien, P.; Dijk, L. van; Vegter, M.; Westein, M.; Nijpels, G.; Hugtenburg, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interventions aimed to increase adherence to drug treatment usually are not tailored to the needs of individual patients. A modular pharmacy intervention, named ‘Support for Diabetes’, was developed to improve adherence to type 2 diabetes treatment. Objective: To evaluate the implementation of a new care intervention by using focus groups including pharmacy teams, and assess patient satisfaction. Setting: Community pharmacies in The Netherlands Method: The intervention comprises a...

  17. Development of a Questionnaire to Evaluate Knowledge and Attitude of Obesity and Weight Loss in Thai Overweight/Obese Medical Students: The Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsakorn Buraphat

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students who will grow up as physicians will be role models for patients in health behaviors. However, some medical students are still overweight or obese. A weight reduction program can both decrease weight and change attitude about obesity and losing weight. Unfortunately, there is no validated questionnaire to measure knowledge and attitude about obesity and weight loss for our medical students. Objective: To develop a questionnaire for evaluation of knowledge and attitude toward obesity and weight loss in Thai overweight/obese medical students. Methods: We developed the questionnaire using Health Belief Model under consultation of two experts in obe- sity, biostatistics and epidemiology. Validity of the questionnaire was evaluated by the index of item-objective congruence under supervision of five experts. This pilot study was performed to test the internal consistency and reliability using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. Twenty-seven medical students who self-reported as overweight or obese were included in this study. Results: A fifty-seven items questionnaire using five-point Likert scale was developed with the index of item- objective congruence of all items in presented questionnaire more than 60%. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients of all domains were in the range of 0.74-0.90 and overall standardized Cronbach’s coefficient of the questionnaire was 0.87. The average inter-item correlation of each domain was in acceptable range (0.21-0.62 although; those of the total scale were 0.12. Conclusion: Validity and reliability of this questionnaire were acceptable to be used for assessment of knowledge and attitude of obesity and losing weight in Thai overweight or obese medical students.

  18. Evaluation of a Web-Based E-Learning Platform for Brief Motivational Interviewing by Nurses in Cardiovascular Care: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Sylvie; Heppell, Sonia; Boyer, Louise; Mailhot, Tanya; Simard, Marie-Josée; Tanguay, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    Background Brief motivational interviewing (MI) can contribute to reductions in morbidity and mortality related to coronary artery disease, through health behavior change. Brief MI, unlike more intensive interventions, was proposed to meet the needs of clinicians with little spare time. While the provision of face-to-face brief MI training on a large scale is complicated, Web-based e-learning is promising because of the flexibility it offers. Objective The primary objective of this pilot study was to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a Web-based e-learning platform for brief MI (MOTIV@CŒUR), which was evaluated by nurses in cardiovascular care. The secondary objective was to assess the preliminary effect of the training on nurses’ perceived brief MI skills and self-reported clinical use of brief MI. Methods We conducted a single-group, pre-post pilot study involving nurses working in a coronary care unit to evaluate MOTIV@CŒUR, which is a Web-based e-learning platform for brief MI, consisting of two sessions lasting 30 and 20 minutes. MOTIV@CŒUR covers 4 real-life clinical situations through role-modeling videos showing nurse-client interactions. A brief introduction to MI is followed by role playing, during which a nurse practitioner evaluates clients’ motivation to change and intervenes according to the principles of brief MI. The clinical situations target smoking, medication adherence, physical activity, and diet. Nurses were asked to complete both Web-based training sessions asynchronously within 20 days, which allowed assessment of the feasibility of the intervention. Data regarding acceptability and preliminary effects (perceived skills in brief MI, and self-reported clinical use of conviction and confidence interventions) were self-assessed through Web-based questionnaires 30 days (±5 days) after the first session. Results We enrolled 27 women and 4 men (mean age 37, SD 9 years) in March 2016. Of the 31 participants, 24 (77%, 95% CI 63%

  19. A pilot study to test the practicality and efficiency of methods used to evaluate colon cleansing in an inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Marilee; Nardelli, Nancy; Wilson, Lori; Mirzaei, Shari; Long, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to test measurement methods in an inpatient setting for future use in a multisite study about bowel cleansing before colonoscopy. Because the multisite study used data collectors at distant geographic points who might have limited time to devote to data collection, the forms needed to be tested for practicality and efficiency. The data collection procedures worked well, but we experienced unexpected difficulties recruiting inpatients. We also found that we need to direct more efforts toward building the staff nurses' enthusiasm for the study because they help with data collection.

  20. Development of the gagging problem assessment : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvell, G. F. E. C. van Linden; Ter Pelkwijk, B. J.; Stegenga, B.

    An accepted management strategy for gagging problems appears not to exist. A reliable and valid instrument is needed to develop an evidence based treatment for this clinical problem. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a newly developed measurement tool for

  1. Development of the gagging problem assessment : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvell, G. F. E. C. van Linden; Ter Pelkwijk, B. J.; Stegenga, B.

    2008-01-01

    An accepted management strategy for gagging problems appears not to exist. A reliable and valid instrument is needed to develop an evidence based treatment for this clinical problem. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a newly developed measurement tool for de

  2. Pasadena City College SIGI Project Research Design. Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, John J.; Tulley, John E.

    A pilot study evaluation of SIGI (System of Interactive Guidance and Information) at Pasadena City College in 1974-75 tested the effectiveness of an experimental research design for an expanded field test of the system the following year. (SIGI is a computer based career guidance program designed by Educational Testing Service to assist community…

  3. Evaluation of knowledge levels amongst village AIDS committees after undergoing HIV educational sessions: results from a pilot study in rural Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epsley Elizabeth J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Village AIDS committees (VAC were formed by the Tanzanian government in 2003 to provide HIV education to their communities. However, their potential has not been realised due to their limited knowledge and misconceptions surrounding HIV, which could be addressed through training of VAC members. In an attempt to increase HIV knowledge levels and address common misconceptions amongst the VACs, an HIV curriculum was delivered to members in rural north western Tanzania. Methods An evaluation of HIV knowledge was conducted prior to and post-delivery of HIV training sessions, within members of three VACs in Kisesa ward. Quantitative surveys were used with several open-ended questions to identify local misconceptions and evaluate HIV knowledge levels. Short educational training sessions covering HIV transmission, prevention and treatment were conducted, with each VAC using quizzes, role-plays and participatory learning and action tools. Post-training surveys occurred up to seven days after the final training session. Results Before the training, "good" HIV knowledge was higher amongst men than women (p = 0.041, and among those with previous HIV education (p = 0.002. The trade-centre had a faster turn-over of VAC members, and proximity to the trade-centre was associated with a shorter time on the committee. Training improved HIV knowledge levels with more members achieving a "good" score in the post-training survey compared with the baseline survey (p = Conclusions In this setting, a series of HIV training sessions for VACs demonstrated encouraging results, with increased HIV knowledge levels following short educational sessions. Further work is required to assess the success of VAC members in disseminating this HIV education to their communities, as well as up-scaling this pilot study to other regions in Tanzania with different misconceptions.

  4. Randomized control trial evaluation of a modified Paleolithic dietary intervention in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irish AK

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amanda K Irish,1 Constance M Erickson,1 Terry L Wahls,2,3 Linda G Snetselaar,4 Warren G Darling1 1Motor Control Laboratories, Department of Health and Human Physiology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, The University of Iowa, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Carver College of Medicine, 4Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Background/objective: A Paleolithic diet may improve fatigue and quality of life in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS patients, but past research has evaluated the effects of this dietary intervention in combination with other treatments such as exercise. Thus, the purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate a modified Paleolithic dietary intervention (MPDI in the treatment of fatigue and other symptoms in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS.Methods: We measured the effects of a MPDI in 17 individuals with RRMS. Of 34 subjects randomly assigned to control (maintain usual diet and intervention (MPDI groups, nine subjects (one man completed the control group and eight subjects (one man completed the MPDI.Results: Significant improvements were seen in Fatigue Severity Scale score and also in Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 and time to complete (dominant hand 9-Hole Peg Test from baseline in MPDI subjects compared to controls. Increased vitamin K serum levels were also observed in MPDI subjects postprotocol compared to controls.Conclusion: A Paleolithic diet may be useful in the treatment and management of MS, by reducing perceived fatigue, increasing mental and physical quality of life, increasing exercise capacity, and improving hand and leg function. By increasing vitamin K serum levels, the MPDI may also reduce inflammation. Keywords: diet therapy, nutrition therapy, gluten-free, quality of life, fatigue, complementary medicine, alternative medicine

  5. A Pilot Study of Real-Time Experience Sampling Method to Evaluate Student Engagement in a Global Health Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asima Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available International experiences are increasingly popular among medical students, but few have been rigorously evaluated. We used ESM to characterize the experience of medical students participating in the one-month University of Chicago Geographic Medicine Scholars Program (GMSP in Hyderabad, India. Participants wore watches programmed to randomly beep eight times daily, during the first and third weeks. When alerted, students reported their activity and rated their level of engagement and emotion in booklets. All 11 student participants responded to 59% of 816 alerts. 41% of beeps occurred during GMSP formal structured activities (i.e., lecture, clinic. Students reported structured activities to be more interesting (6.05 versus 4.14; P<0.001, more important to their future goals (6.48 versus 5.71; P<0.001, more challenging (3.75 versus 2.48; P<0.001, and more enjoyable (6.08 versus 5.36; P<0.001 than unstructured activities. Our results show that future global health efforts should augment the use of structured activities.

  6. Evaluation of an integrated group cognitive-behavioral treatment for comorbid mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Irena; Chudzik, Susan M; Boyd, Susan; McCabe, Randi E

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the development and preliminary evaluation of an integrated group cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for comorbid mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. The 12-session, manualized treatment was developed collaboratively by a mental health program in a teaching hospital and a community-based addictions service and administered in both settings. Results from an uncontrolled effectiveness trial of 29 treatment completers suggest that integrated group CBT may reduce stress and alcohol use symptoms and improve substance refusal self-efficacy. Changes in symptoms of anxiety, depression, and drug use were not significant, although the effect size for anxiety reduction was in the medium range. Nonetheless, the clinical significance of treatment effects on mood, anxiety, and substance use symptoms was modest. Changes in coping skills and quality of life were not significant, although medium-to-large effects were observed for changes in several coping skills. Participants reported being highly satisfied with treatment, found the treatment strategies to be useful, and noted an improvement in their functioning, particularly socially. Methodological and sample size limitations warrant more rigorous follow-up investigations of this treatment. Results are considered in the context of the current literature on integrated psychological treatments for these common comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The ENIQ pilot study: current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaitre, P.; Eriksen, B.; Crutzen, S. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands); Hansch, M. [Preussische Elektrizitaets-AG (Preussenelektra), Hannover (Germany); Whittle, J. [AEA Technology, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-01

    A pilot study is currently being carried out by ENIQ (European Network for Inspection Qualification) in order to explore the issues involved in inspection qualification applied along the general principles of the European methodology. The components selected for the pilot study are austenitic pipe to pipe and pipe to elbows welds typical of those in BWR recirculation loops. A range of defect parameters has been defined. A suitable inspection procedure designed to find the designated defects will be applied to geometrically representative test pieces. The procedure/equipment will be qualified through open trials and technical justification. The personnel qualification will be done in a blind way. Once all features of the inspection system will have been qualified an in-service inspection will be simulated in order to test the feasibility of the qualification approach followed. In this paper the current status of this pilot study is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of a DVD-Based Self-Help Program in Highly Socially Anxious Individuals--Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Anna K.; Mehl, Annette; Kiko, Sonja; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Salize, Hans-Joachim; Hermann, Christiane; Hoffmann, Torsten; Bohus, Martin; Steil, Regina

    2011-01-01

    High social anxiety is a risk factor for the incidence of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Early diagnosis and intervention may prevent more severe psychiatric courses. Self-help programs may be a convenient, accessible, and effective intervention. This study examined the efficacy of a newly developed self-help program for SAD in individuals with…

  9. Evaluation of a Numeracy Intervention Program Focusing on Basic Numerical Knowledge and Conceptual Knowledge: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Liane; Handl, Pia; Thony, Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    In this study, six elementary grade children with developmental dyscalculia were trained individually and in small group settings with a one-semester program stressing basic numerical knowledge and conceptual knowledge. All the children showed considerable and partly significant performance increases on all calculation components. Results suggest…

  10. Evaluation of effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on salivary flow rate in radiation induced xerostomia patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Rangare Lakshman

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study gave us an insight about the effectiveness of TENS therapy in stimulating salivary flow in healthy subjects and it is very effective when used in conjunction with radiation therapy by reducing the side-effects of radiation therapy. Hence, TENS therapy can be used as an adjunctive method for the treatment of xerostomia along with other treatment modalities.

  11. Evaluation of the Bilingual Curriculum Content (BCC) Pilot Project: A Three-Year Study. First Interim Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothfarb, Sylvia H.; And Others

    Bilingual Curriculum Content (BCC) is an instructional component of the Transitional Bilingual Basic Skills program offered to students with limited English proficiency (LEP) in the Dade County Public Schools, Florida. In BCC instruction, students learn mathematics and combined instruction (science, social studies, and health/safety) in their…

  12. Pilot evaluation of the text4baby mobile health program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans William Douglas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile phone technologies for health promotion and disease prevention have evolved rapidly, but few studies have tested the efficacy of mobile health in full-fledged programs. Text4baby is an example of mobile health based on behavioral theory, and it delivers text messages to traditionally underserved pregnant women and new mothers to change their health, health care beliefs, practices, and behaviors in order to improve clinical outcomes. The purpose of this pilot evaluation study is to assess the efficacy of this text messaging campaign. Methods We conducted a randomized pilot evaluation study. All participants were pregnant women first presenting for care at the Fairfax County, Virginia Health Department. We randomized participants to enroll in text4baby and receive usual health care (intervention, or continue simply to receive usual care (control. We then conducted a 24-item survey by telephone of attitudes and behaviors related to text4baby. We surveyed participants at baseline, before text4baby was delivered to the intervention group, and at follow-up at approximately 28 weeks of baby’s gestational age. Results We completed 123 baseline interviews in English and in Spanish. Overall, the sample was predominantly of Hispanic origin (79.7% with an average age of 27.6 years. We completed 90 follow-up interviews, and achieved a 73% retention rate. We used a logistic generalized estimating equation model to evaluate intervention effects on measured outcomes. We found a significant effect of text4baby intervention exposure on increased agreement with the attitude statement “I am prepared to be a new mother” (OR = 2.73, CI = 1.04, 7.18, p = 0.042 between baseline and follow-up. For those who had attained a high school education or greater, we observed a significantly higher overall agreement to attitudes against alcohol consumption during pregnancy (OR = 2.80, CI = 1.13, 6.90, p = 0.026. We also observed a

  13. Evaluation of inflammation-related genes polymorphisms in Mexican with Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

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    Danira eToral-Rios

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid peptide is able to promote the activation of microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and this stimulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inflammation contributes to the process of neurodegeneration and therefore is a key factor in the development of AD. Some of the most important proteins involved in AD inflammation are: clusterin (CLU, complement receptor 1 (CR1, C reactive protein (CRP, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF- α, the interleukins 1α (IL - 1α, 6 (IL-6, 10 (IL-10 and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2. In particular, COX-2 is encoded by the prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 gene (PTGS2. Since variations in the genes that encode these proteins may modify gene expression or function, it is important to investigate whether these variations may change the developing AD. The aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of polymorphisms in the genes encoding the aforementioned proteins is associated Mexican patients with AD. Fourteen polymorphisms were genotyped in 96 subjects with AD and the differences in allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies were analyzed. Additionally, an ancestry analysis was conducted to exclude differences in genetic ancestry among groups as a confounding factor in the study. Significant differences in frequencies between AD and controls were found for the SNP rs20417 within the PTGS2 gene. Ancestry analysis revealed no significant differences in the ancestry of the compared groups, and the association was significant even after adjustment for ancestry and correction for multiple testing, which strengthens the validity of the results. We conclude that this polymorphism plays an important role in the development of the AD pathology and further studies are required, including their proteins.

  14. Evaluation of RANKL/OPG Serum Concentration Ratio as a New Biomarker for Coronary Artery Calcification: A Pilot Study

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    Amir Hooshang Mohammadpour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There is a strong need for biomarkers to identify patients at risk for future cardiovascular events related with progressive atherosclerotic disease. Osteoprotegerin (OPG protects the skeleton from excessive bone resorption by binding to receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL and preventing it from binding to its receptor, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB. However, conflicting results have been obtained about association of serum level of OPG or RANKL with coronary artery disease (CAD. Based on their role in inflammation and matrix degradation and the fact that atherosclerotic plaque formation is an inflammatory process, we hypothesized that RANKL : OPG ratio could be a better biomarker for CAD. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, the correlation between RANKL : OPG ratio serum concentration and coronary artery calcification (CAC in 50 patients with ischemic coronary disease has been investigated. We used ELISA method for measuring RANKL and OPG serum concentrations. Results. There was a significant correlation between RANKL : OPG serum concentration ratio and CAC in our study population (P=0.01. Conclusion. Our results suggested that RANKL : OPG ratio concentration has a potential of being used as a marker for coronary artery disease.

  15. The atrial fibrillation ablation pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analyse...... tachycardia, and 4 patients died (1 haemorrhagic stroke, 1 ventricular fibrillation in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, 1 cancer, and 1 of unknown cause). CONCLUSION: The AFib Ablation Pilot Study provided crucial information on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of catheter ablation of AFib...

  16. Can different occlusal positions instantaneously impact spine and body posture? : A pilot study using rasterstereography for a three-dimensional evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Karoline; Adler, Werner; Matta, Ragai-Edward; Wolf, Linda; Wichmann, Manfred; Bergauer, Bastian

    2017-05-01

    Orthodontists influence dental occlusion directly. To suggest any link between dental occlusion and body posture is highly contentious, as evidenced by the literature. Rasterstereography, an optical technique that enables three-dimensional (3D) body measurements to be collected, has not yet been used to impartially examine whether different occlusal positions could instantaneously alter spine and body posture. We therefore set out to use this technique to nonsubjectively evaluate this question under static conditions. Optical body scans were collected for 44 subjects, using the Diers formetric 4D system, for seven different mandible positions. In total, ten spinal and body posture parameters were assessed (trunk inclination, trunk imbalance, pelvic tilt, pelvic torsion, fleche cervicale, fleche lombaire, kyphotic angle, lordotic angle, surface rotation, and lateral deviation) for each mandible position and compared with scans performed with habitual intercuspation (HIC). Significant body posture deviations were found for the fleche cervicale (position of the mandible: right eccentrically), fleche lombaire (positions of the mandible: physiologic rest position, cotton rolls on both sides, bite elevation 1 mm), and the kyphotic angle (positions of the mandible: cotton rolls on both sides, right eccentrically). No other significant differences were detected. Data for the parameters that varied with different dental occlusions generated high standard deviations. Therefore, within the limitations of this pilot study, we could not conclusively associate dental occlusion to an instantaneous impact on the tested parameters. The posture changes that we detected could also have arisen from individual neuromuscular compensation; a possibility that must now be ruled-in, or out, by further research studies with a higher number of subjects.

  17. Rapid lung MRI - paradigm shift in evaluation of febrile neutropenia in children with leukemia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Bhatia, Anmol; Bansal, Deepak; Trehan, Amita; Singh, Meenu; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Immunocompromised children with hematological malignancies are at increased risk of developing potentially fatal pulmonary infections. Early detection and prompt treatment is critical to combat morbidity and mortality in these children. Twenty-six children with leukemia (age range: 5-13years) presenting with fever and neutropenia were included in this prospective study, which was approved by the institutional ethics committee. All patients underwent HRCT and MRI of the chest on the same day. The findings of HRCT and MRI were compared, with HRCT as the standard of reference. There was perfect agreement between MRI and CT examinations findings by kappa test (κ = 1). No significant difference was observed between the two modalities by the McNemar test (p > 0.05). Rapid lung MRI is technically feasible; has a high correlation, sensitivity and specificity to CT scan; and can emerge as the first line modality for the detection of pulmonary nodules in children with leukemia and persistent febrile neutropenia.

  18. Evaluation of a nurse-led telephone follow-up clinic for patients with indolent and chronic hematological malignancies: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overend, Aldyn; Khoo, Kong; Delorme, Michael; Krause, Vanessa; Avanessian, Ardashes; Saltman, David

    2008-01-01

    A physician/nurse collaborative team sought to determine whether a nurse-led telephone clinic (Teleclinic) could effectively and safely be used to follow patients with indolent and chronic hematological malignancies. Patients seen at their routine follow-up visit were assessed for eligibility for the Teleclinic, then referred to the pilot Teleclinic by their oncologist. Patients were interviewed by telephone by an oncology nurse experienced in hematologic malignancies. Fifty-three patients consented to participate in the pilot study. Following their Teleclinic interview, patients were asked to complete a "Subject Satisfaction Questionnaire" (SSQ). Overall patient satisfaction with the Teleclinic was high. It was determined that patients with low-grade and chronic hematological malignancies could be followed effectively and safely by an oncology nurse-led telephone clinic.

  19. Pilot evaluation in TENCompetence: a theory-driven model1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Schoonenboom; H. Sligte; A. Moghnieh; M. Specht; C. Glahn; K. Stefanov

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a theory-driven evaluation model that is used in evaluating four pilots in which an infrastructure for lifelong competence development, which is currently being developed, is validated. The model makes visible the separate implementation steps that connect the envisaged infrastr

  20. Development and Evaluation of an Online Fall-Risk Questionnaire for Nonfrail Community-Dwelling Elderly Persons: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seraina Obrist

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Falls are frequent in older adults and may have serious consequences but awareness of fall-risk is often low. A questionnaire might raise awareness of fall-risk; therefore we set out to construct and test such a questionnaire. Methods. Fall-risk factors and their odds ratios were extracted from meta-analyses and a questionnaire was devised to cover these risk factors. A formula to estimate the probability of future falls was set up using the extracted odds ratios. The understandability of the questionnaire and discrimination and calibration of the prediction formula were tested in a cohort study with a six-month follow-up. Community-dwelling persons over 60 years were recruited by an e-mail snowball-sampling method. Results and Discussion. We included 134 persons. Response rates for the monthly fall-related follow-up varied between the months and ranged from low 38% to high 90%. The proportion of present risk factors was low. Twenty-five participants reported falls. Discrimination was moderate (AUC: 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.81. The understandability, with the exception of five questions, was good. The wording of the questions needs to be improved and measures to increase the monthly response rates are needed before test-retest reliability and final predictive value can be assessed.

  1. A pilot study to evaluate simulated driving performance and cognitive function in healthy subjects and patients with restless legs syndrome

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    Chen D

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dan Chen,1 Paula Shaw,2 Daniel M Canafax,1,3 James Catesby Ware4 1XenoPort, Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA; 2Charles River Northwest, Tacoma, WA, USA; 3Theravance Inc., South San Francisco, CA, USA; 4Division of Sleep Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA Objective: Symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS usually occur during the evening and night time, resulting in disrupted sleep and subsequent daytime fatigue. This study compared simulated driving performance, alertness, and cognitive function between healthy subjects and patients with a diagnosis of RLS. Methods: Fifteen healthy subjects and 15 untreated RLS subjects were enrolled and completed two driving tests. The first test occurred at 4 PM followed by the second test at 8 AM the next morning. Outcome measures included lane position variability (LPV, speed variability, frequency of simulated crashes (off-road events or collision, and brake reaction time. Other assessments included visual analog scale (VAS of alertness and the Brief Assessment of Cognition (BAC. Results: Overall, RLS patients and healthy subjects performed similarly on driving assessments. Two subjects within each group experienced off-road events. RLS patients had less alertness on the VAS than healthy subjects before and after driving assessments. Both groups scored similarly on the cognitive function assessments. Conclusion: Despite reported diminished alertness, RLS patients did not demonstrate impairment in driving or cognitive performance. Keywords: restless legs syndrome, simulated driving performance, cognitive function

  2. Effect of root conditioning on periodontal wound healing with and without guided tissue regeneration: a pilot study. II. Autoradiographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, P R; Wang, H L; Chiego, D J; Castelli, W A; Smith, B A

    1994-02-01

    This investigation deals with the proliferation and migration of the progenitor cells during the healing of closed periodontal wounds. Periodontal surgical defects affecting the bone and dentin were created in four mongrel dogs. The defects were treated with topical applications of citric acid, tetracycline, or sterile water with and without the placement of nonresorbable membranes. The dogs were killed at 1, 3, 7, and 21 days after surgery. One hour before they were killed, they were intravenously injected with tritiated thymidine. Tissues were processed and routinely prepared for autoradiographic studies. Labeled cells were counted at the apical, coronal, and central areas of the defects. Results suggested that the citric acid and tetracycline treatments inhibited cellular proliferation at the initial time periods of 1 and 3 days. At 7 and 21 days, differences between citric acid and tetracycline treatments were minimal, and neither showed any advantage over the application of sterile water. The placement of the nonresorbable membrane demonstrated a trend of increased labeling at 21 days for all three treatments.

  3. Design and evaluation of a ubiquitous chest-worn cardiopulmonary monitoring system for healthcare application: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiewen; Ha, Congying; Zhang, Zhengbo

    2017-02-01

    Ambulatory recording of physiological data will provide us deep insight into the physical condition of patients and athletes, and assessing treatment effects and training performances. This study presents a miniature wearable cardiopulmonary monitoring system called "Smart Chest Strap," which consists of an elastic band worn around the user's chest with integrated sensors, a physiological signals acquisition unit, and a mobile phone. The physiological signals including electrocardiogram, respiratory inductance plethysmograph, and accelerations (ACC) are sampled, digitalized, stored, and simultaneously transmitted to a mobile phone via Bluetooth. A medical validation test with participants performing discontinuous incremental treadmill (0-12 km/h) exercise was conducted. The results indicate nearly perfect correlations (0.999, 0.996, 0.994), small mean bias (0.60 BPM, 0.51 BPM, 0.05 g), and narrow limits of agreement (±2.90 BPM, ±1.81 BPM, ±0.09 g) for heart rate (HR), breathing rate (BR), and ACC represented as vector magnitude units (VMUs). There is a general trend of decrease in accuracy, precision, and correlation for HR, BR, and VMU as velocity increases, but these validity statistics are all within acceptable error limits and clinically accepted. The findings demonstrate that the Smart Chest Strap is valid and will have wider applications in healthcare, sports, and scientific research areas.

  4. Simulation Evaluation of Pilot Inputs for Real Time Modeling During Commercial Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Borja; Ranaudo, Richard; Oltman, Ryan; Myhre, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Aircraft dynamics characteristics can only be identified from flight data when the aircraft dynamics are excited sufficiently. A preliminary study was conducted into what types and levels of manual piloted control excitation would be required for accurate Real-Time Parameter IDentification (RTPID) results by commercial airline pilots. This includes assessing the practicality for the pilot to provide this excitation when cued, and to further understand if pilot inputs during various phases of flight provide sufficient excitation naturally. An operationally representative task was evaluated by 5 commercial airline pilots using the NASA Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD). Results showed that it is practical to use manual pilot inputs only as a means of achieving good RTPID in all phases of flight and in flight turbulence conditions. All pilots were effective in satisfying excitation requirements when cued. Much of the time, cueing was not even necessary, as just performing the required task provided enough excitation for accurate RTPID estimation. Pilot opinion surveys reported that the additional control inputs required when prompted by the excitation cueing were easy to make, quickly mastered, and required minimal training.

  5. An evaluation of knowledge, attitude and practice of Indian pharmacists towards adverse drug reaction reporting: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacovigilance is a useful to assure the safety of medicines and protect consumers from their harmful effects. Healthcare professionals should consider Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR reporting as part of their professional obligation and participate in the existent pharmacovigilance programs in their countries. In India, the National PV Program was re-launched in July 2010. Objectives: This survey was conducted in order to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of Indian pharmacists with the aim of exploring the pharmacists′ participation in ADR reporting system, identifying the reasons of under reporting and determining the steps that could be adopted to increase reporting rates. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out among the pharmacists in India using a pretested questionnaire with 33 questions (10 questions on knowledge, 6 on attitude, 7 on practice, 7 on future of ADR reporting in India and 3 on benefits of reporting ADRs.. The study was conducted, over a period of 3 months from May 2012 to July 2012. Results: Out of the 600 participants to whom the survey was administered, a total of 400 were filled. The response rate of the survey was 67%. 95% responders were knowledgeable about ADRs. 90% participants had a positive attitude towards making ADRs reporting mandatory for practicing pharmacists. 87.5% participants were interested in participating in the National Pharmacovigilance program, in India. 47.5% respondents had observed ADRs in their practice, and 37% had reported it to the national pharmacovigilance center. 92% pharmacists believed reporting ADRs immensely helped in providing quality care to patients. Conclusion : The Indian pharmacists have poor knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP towards ADR reporting and pharmacovigilance. Pharmacists with higher qualifications such as the pharmacists with a PharmD have better KAP. With additional training on Pharmacovigilance, the Indian Pharmacists

  6. Evaluation of Mirasol pathogen reduction system by artificially contaminating platelet concentrates with Staphylococcus epidermidis: A pilot study from India

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    Kabita Chatterjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: This study was conducted to assess the efficacy of Mirasol pathogen reduction system for platelets aimed at preventing bacterial regrowth by spiking buffy coat pooled platelets (BCPP with clinically relevant load of Staphylococous epidermidis. Materials and Methods: BCPP units were prepared using Teruflex BP-kit with Imugard III-S-PL (Terumo BCT, Tokyo, Japan. Two BCPP units were pooled, of which 40 ml of negative control (NC was removed. The remaining volume of the platelet unit was inoculated with clinically relevant load of bacteria (total of 30 CFU of S. epidermidis in 1 ml; following this the platelet unit was split into two parts. One part served as positive control (PC and the other part was subjected to pathogen reduction technique (Mirasol PRT, CaridianBCT Biotechnologies, Lakewood, CO, USA. Bacterial detection was performed using BacT/ALERT system, controls after day 1 and day 7 following inoculation of bacteria and on day 7 for Mirasol-treated unit. Results: Of the 32 treatment cycles, 28 were valid and 4 were invalid. No regrowth was observed in 96.4% (27 of 28 after treatment with Mirasol pathogen reduction system. Of four invalid tests, on two instances the NC showed growth, whereas in other 2 no regrowth was detected in 7th day PC. Bacterial screening of PCs by BacT/ALERT after 24 h of incubation was 28.6%, whereas the effectiveness increased to 100% when incubated for 7 days. Conclusions: Mirasol system was effective in inactivating S.epidermidis when it was deliberately inoculated into BCPP at clinically relevant concentrations. Such systems may significantly improve blood safety by inactivating traditional and emerging transfusion-transmitted pathogens.

  7. Evaluation of Mirasol pathogen reduction system by artificially contaminating platelet concentrates with Staphylococcus epidermidis: A pilot study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Kabita; Zaman, Shamsuz; Chaurasia, Rahul; Singh, Surinder; Keil, Shawn D; Tewari, Shalini; Bisht, Akanksha; Agarwal, Nitin; Rout, Diptiranjan; Chand, Subhash; Saha, Kallol

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the efficacy of Mirasol pathogen reduction system for platelets aimed at preventing bacterial regrowth by spiking buffy coat pooled platelets (BCPP) with clinically relevant load of Staphylococous epidermidis. BCPP units were prepared using Teruflex BP-kit with Imugard III-S-PL (Terumo BCT, Tokyo, Japan). Two BCPP units were pooled, of which 40 ml of negative control (NC) was removed. The remaining volume of the platelet unit was inoculated with clinically relevant load of bacteria (total of 30 CFU of S. epidermidis in 1 ml); following this the platelet unit was split into two parts. One part served as positive control (PC) and the other part was subjected to pathogen reduction technique (Mirasol PRT, CaridianBCT Biotechnologies, Lakewood, CO, USA). Bacterial detection was performed using BacT/ALERT system, controls after day 1 and day 7 following inoculation of bacteria and on day 7 for Mirasol-treated unit. Of the 32 treatment cycles, 28 were valid and 4 were invalid. No regrowth was observed in 96.4% (27 of 28) after treatment with Mirasol pathogen reduction system. Of four invalid tests, on two instances the NC showed growth, whereas in other 2 no regrowth was detected in 7(th) day PC. Bacterial screening of PCs by BacT/ALERT after 24 h of incubation was 28.6%, whereas the effectiveness increased to 100% when incubated for 7 days. Mirasol system was effective in inactivating S. epidermidis when it was deliberately inoculated into BCPP at clinically relevant concentrations. Such systems may significantly improve blood safety by inactivating traditional and emerging transfusion-transmitted pathogens.

  8. Group vs. Individual Treatment for Acute Insomnia: A Pilot Study Evaluating a “One-Shot” Treatment Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Boullin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite undeniable evidence for the efficacy and effectiveness of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I, the potential for its widespread dissemination and implementation has yet to be realised. A suggested reason for this is that traditional CBT-I is considered too burdensome for deployment, in its current form, within the context of where it would be most beneficial—Primary Care. One strategy, aimed to address this, has been to develop briefer versions of CBT-I, whilst another has been to deliver CBT-I in a group format. An alternative has been to attempt to address insomnia during its acute phase with a view to circumventing its progression to chronic insomnia. The aim of the present study was to compare a brief version of CBT-I (one-shot when delivered individually or in groups to those with acute insomnia. Method: Twenty-eight individuals with acute insomnia (i.e., meeting full DSM-5 criteria for insomnia disorder for less than three months self-assigned to either a group or individual treatment arm. Treatment consisted of a single one-hour session accompanied by a self-help pamphlet. Subjects completed measures of insomnia severity, anxiety and depression pre-treatment and at one-month post-treatment. Additionally, daily sleep diaries were compared between pre-treatment and at the one-month follow up. Results: There were no significant between group differences in treatment outcome on any sleep or mood measures although those in the group treatment arm were less adherent than those who received individual treatment. Furthermore, the combined (group and individual treatment arms pre-post test effect size on insomnia symptoms, using the Insomnia Severity Index, was large (d = 2.27. Discussion: It appears that group treatment is as efficacious as individual treatment within the context of a “one shot” intervention for individuals with acute insomnia. The results are discussed with a view to integrating one-shot CBT

  9. Determination of cannabinoids in hemp nut products in Taiwan by HPLC-MS/MS coupled with chemometric analysis: quality evaluation and a pilot human study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Tung, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Wu, Yu-Tse; Hsu, Mei-Chich

    2016-09-02

    Hemp nuts are mature cannabis seeds obtained after shelling and that are commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating functional constipation. In this work, we screened hemp nut products, classified them, and verified the legality of consuming them. A total of 18 products were purchased from Taiwan, China, and Canada. Validated high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry methods were developed for analyzing the cannabinoid (i.e., Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabinol) content of the products and the concentration of urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC. Chemometric techniques, namely hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA), were applied for rapidly classifying 11 concentrated powder products in Taiwan. A pilot human study comprising single and multiple administrations of a product with 1.5 µg/g of THC was conducted to examine the urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC concentration. Through optimization of 3(2) full factorial design, using 60% isopropanol as the extraction solvent exhibited the highest yield of cannabinoids and was applied as the optimal condition in further analysis. The results of HCA and PCA on quality evaluation were in good agreement; however, the tested products possessed distinct CBD-to-THC ratios which ranged widely from 0.1:1 to 46.8:1. Particularly, the products with CBD-to-THC ratios higher than 1:1 were the majority in Taiwan. Our data suggested that all the tested hemp nut products met the Taiwan restriction criterion of 10 µg/g of THC. We propose a usual consumption amount of hemp nut products in Taiwan would unlikely to violate the cut-off point of 15 ng/mL of urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. An experimental setup to evaluate innovative therapy options for the enhancement of bone healing using BMP as a benchmark – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Preininger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Critical or delayed bone healing in rat osteotomy (OT models is mostly achieved through large defects or instability. We aimed to design a rat OT model for impaired bone healing based on age, gender and parity. The outcome should be controllable through variations of the haematoma in the OT including a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP 2 guided positive control.Using external fixation to stabilise femoral a 2 mm double OT in 12 month old, female Sprague Dawley rats after a minimum of 3 litters healing was characterised following in situ haematoma formation (ISH-group, transplantation of a BMP charged autologous blood clot (BMP-group and the artificial blood clot only (ABC-group into the OT-gap. In vivo micro-computer tomography (µCT scans were performed after 2, 4 and 6 weeks. After 6 weeks specimens underwent histological analyses.In µCT examinations and histological analyses no bony bridging was observed in all but one animal in the ISH-group. In the BMP group complete bridging was achieved in all animals. The ABC-group showed less mineralised tissue formation and smaller bridging scores during the course of healing than the ISH-group.In this pilot study we introduce a model for impaired bone healing taking the major biological risk factors into account. We could show that the in situ fracture haematoma is essential for bone regeneration. Using BMP as a positive control the presented experimental setup can serve to evaluate innovative therapeutical concepts in long bone application.

  11. A pilot study evaluating real-time shear wave ultrasound elastography of miscellaneous non-nodal neck masses in a routine head and neck ultrasound clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kunwar S S; Yuen, Edmund H Y; Cho, Carmen C M; Tong, Cina S L; Lee, Yolanda Y P; Ahuja, Anil T

    2012-06-01

    A pilot study was performed to evaluate shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWE) for miscellaneous non-nodal/salivary/thyroid neck lesions. Forty-six lesions undergoing conventional sonography also underwent SWE. Elastic moduli from the stiffest areas in lesions were correlated with diagnosis. Forty lesions were benign (9 lipomas, 8 lymphatic/venous vascular malformations, 7 thyroglossal duct cysts, 4 branchial cleft cysts, 4 abscesses/phlegmons, 3 neurogenic tumors and 1 each of paraganglioma, sebaceous cyst, pseudotumor, hypertrophic scar, ranula) and 6 were malignant (1 malignant fibrous histiocytoma, 2 primary squamous cell carcinomas and 3 intramuscular metastases [2 squamous cell carcinomas, 1 malignant melanoma]).Median stiffness of malignant lesions (226.4 kPa, range 55.6 to 300.0) was higher than benign lesions (28.3 kPa, range 4.0 to 300.0) (p < 0.001). SWE cut-off with highest accuracy (174.4 kPa) achieved 83.3% sensitivity and 97.5% specificity, and the cut-off with 100% sensitivity (55.6 kPa) achieved 75% specificity. All malignant lesions were suspected on conventional sonography. The preliminary data indicate that SWE is feasible for miscellaneous neck lesions. SWE would not have altered management in terms of detecting undisclosed malignancies, although as a quantitative technique, it may increase the diagnostic confidence of less experienced operators performing head and neck ultrasound. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of an innovative model to evaluate mobility in seniors with lower-limb amputations of vascular origin: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corriveau Hélène

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mobility of older individuals has often been only partially assessed, without considering all important aspects such as potential (available versus effective (used mobilities and the physical and psychosocial factors that modulate them. This study proposes a new model for evaluating mobility that considers all important aspects, applied here to lower-limb amputees with vascular origin. This model integrates the concepts of potential mobility (e.g. balance, speed of movement, effective mobility (e.g. life habits, movements in living areas and factors that modulate these two types of mobility (e.g. strength, sensitivity, social support, depression. The main objective was to characterize potential and effective mobility as well as mobility modulators in a small sample of people with lower-limb amputations of vascular origin with different characteristics. The second objective of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of measuring all variables in the model in a residential context. Methods An observational and transversal design was used with a heterogeneous sample of 10 participants with a lower-limb amputation of vascular origin, aged 51 to 83, assessed between eight and 18 months after discharge from an acute care hospital. A questionnaire of participant characteristics and 16 reliable and valid measurements were used. Results The results show that the potential mobility indicators do not accurately predict effective mobility, i.e., participants who perform well on traditional measures done in the laboratory or clinic are not always those who perform well in the real world. The model generated 4 different profiles (categories of participants ranging from reduced to excellent potential mobility and low to excellent effective mobility, and characterized the modulating factors. The evaluations were acceptable in terms of the time taken (three hours and the overall measurements, with a few exceptions, which were

  13. Preparation and evaluation of a multimodal minoxidil microemulsion versus minoxidil alone in the treatment of androgenic alopecia of mixed etiology: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, Farouk M; Gado, Ali Mi; Mohammed, Haseebur R; Adam, Abdel Nasser Ismail

    2013-01-01

    The variable success of topical minoxidil in the treatment of androgenic alopecia has led to the hypothesis that other pathways could mediate this form of hair loss, including infection and/or microinflammation of the hair follicles. In this study, we prepared a multimodal microemulsion comprising minoxidil (a dihydrotestosterone antagonist), diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent), and tea tree oil (an anti-infective agent). We investigated the stability and physicochemical properties of this formulation, and its therapeutic efficacy compared with a formulation containing minoxidil alone in the treatment of androgenic alopecia. We developed a multimodal oil/water (o/w) microemulsion, a formulation containing minoxidil alone, and another containing vehicle. A three-phase diagram was constructed to obtain the optimal concentrations of the selected oil, surfactant, and cosurfactant. Thirty-two men aged 18-30 years were randomized to apply 1 mL of microemulsion containing the multimodal formulation (formulation A, n = 11), minoxidil alone (formulation B, n = 11) or placebo (formulation C, n = 10) twice daily to the affected area for 32 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated by mean hair count, thickness, and weight on the targeted area of the scalp. Global photographs were taken, changes in the area of scalp coverage were assessed by patients and external investigators, and the benefits and safety of the study medications were evaluated. The physical stability of formula A was examined after a shelf storage period of 24 months. Formulation A achieved a significantly superior response than formulations B and C in terms of mean hair count (P minoxidil formulation significantly (P minoxidil alone and placebo formulations. These improvements were in agreement with the photographic assessments made by the investigators. Formula A was shown to be an o/w formulation with consistent pH, viscosity, specific gravity, and homogeneity, and was physically stable after 24 months

  14. Evaluation of abuse and dependence on drugs used for self-medication: a pharmacoepidemiological pilot study based on community pharmacies in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orriols, Ludivine; Gaillard, Julia; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Roussin, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Drugs that can be obtained without a medical prescription in community pharmacies are used to treat minor pathologies that can easily be diagnosed by the patient. Some of these drugs contain psychoactive substances with a potential for abuse and dependence. However, there is a lack of data concerning their problematic use in a wide population. To explore the feasibility of a pharmacoepidemiological method to investigate misuse, non-medical use, abuse and dependence on drugs used for self-medication. This cross-sectional pilot study, conducted during a 2-month period (from 15 January to 15 March 2007), was based on the participation of community pharmacies in the Midi-Pyrénées region of France to collect patient data. Patients requesting one drug from a list of available drugs used for self-medication and containing psychoactive substances (codeine in analgesics, pseudoephedrine, dextromethorphan and histamine H(1) receptor antagonists [antihistamines]) were included in the study. A control group was set up that consisted of patients requesting antacid drugs. The pharmacy staff proposed to the patients that they filled in an anonymous questionnaire. The questionnaire was designed to investigate patterns of drug use and the harmful consequences of overuse (abuse). In addition, questions on lack of control over drug use were adapted from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria for evaluation of dependence. Thirty-two percent (n = 74) of the solicited pharmacies participated in the survey. Only 4.8% of the solicited patients (n = 817) refused to complete the questionnaire distributed by the pharmacy staff. The questionnaire was completed inside the pharmacy by 53.3% of the patients. The other patients took the questionnaire away from the pharmacy and 31.7% of them returned it in a prepaid envelope. The patient participation rate was 64.9%, and was higher for the psychoactive substance groups than the control group

  15. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  16. A mixed methods pilot study with a cluster randomized control trial to evaluate the impact of a leadership intervention on guideline implementation in home care nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourangeau Ann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot ulcers are a significant problem for people with diabetes. Comprehensive assessments of risk factors associated with diabetic foot ulcer are recommended in clinical guidelines to decrease complications such as prolonged healing, gangrene and amputations, and to promote effective management. However, the translation of clinical guidelines into nursing practice remains fragmented and inconsistent, and a recent homecare chart audit showed less than half the recommended risk factors for diabetic foot ulcers were assessed, and peripheral neuropathy (the most significant predictor of complications was not assessed at all. Strong leadership is consistently described as significant to successfully transfer guidelines into practice. Limited research exists however regarding which leadership behaviours facilitate and support implementation in nursing. The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the impact of a leadership intervention in community nursing on implementing recommendations from a clinical guideline on the nursing assessment and management of diabetic foot ulcers. Methods Two phase mixed methods design is proposed (ISRCTN 12345678. Phase I: Descriptive qualitative to understand barriers to implementing the guideline recommendations, and to inform the intervention. Phase II: Matched pair cluster randomized controlled trial (n = 4 centers will evaluate differences in outcomes between two implementation strategies. Primary outcome: Nursing assessments of client risk factors, a composite score of 8 items based on Diabetes/Foot Ulcer guideline recommendations. Intervention: In addition to the organization's 'usual' implementation strategy, a 12 week leadership strategy will be offered to managerial and clinical leaders consisting of: a printed materials, b one day interactive workshop to develop a leadership action plan tailored to barriers to support implementation; c three post-workshop teleconferences. Discussion This

  17. Evaluation of UK Integrated Care Pilots: research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Ling

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In response to concerns that the needs of the aging population for well-integrated care were increasing, the English National Health Service (NHS appointed 16 Integrated Care Pilots following a national competition. The pilots have a range of aims including development of new organisational structures to support integration, changes in staff roles, reducing unscheduled emergency hospital admissions, reduced length of hospital stay, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing cost. This paper describes the evaluation of the initiative which has been commissioned.Study design and data collection methods: A mixed methods approach has been adopted including interviews with staff and patients, non-participant observation of meetings, structured written feedback from sites, questionnaires to patients and staff, and analysis of routinely collected hospital utilisation data for patients/service users. The qualitative analysis aims to identify the approaches taken to integration by the sites, the benefits which result, the context in which benefits have resulted, and the mechanisms by which they occur.Methods of analysis: The quantitative analysis adopts a 'difference in differences' approach comparing health care utilisation before and after the intervention with risk-matched controls. The qualitative data analysis adopts a 'theory of change' approach in which we triangulate data from the quantitative analysis with qualitative data in order to describe causal effects (what happens when an independent variable changes and causal mechanisms (what connects causes to their effects. An economic analysis will identify what incremental resources are required to make integration succeed and how they can be combined efficiently to produce better outcomes for patients.Conclusion: This evaluation will produce a portfolio of evidence aimed at strengthening the evidence base for integrated care, and in particular identifying the context in which

  18. Evaluation of UK Integrated Care Pilots: research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Ling

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In response to concerns that the needs of the aging population for well-integrated care were increasing, the English National Health Service (NHS appointed 16 Integrated Care Pilots following a national competition. The pilots have a range of aims including development of new organisational structures to support integration, changes in staff roles, reducing unscheduled emergency hospital admissions, reduced length of hospital stay, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing cost. This paper describes the evaluation of the initiative which has been commissioned. Study design and data collection methods: A mixed methods approach has been adopted including interviews with staff and patients, non-participant observation of meetings, structured written feedback from sites, questionnaires to patients and staff, and analysis of routinely collected hospital utilisation data for patients/service users. The qualitative analysis aims to identify the approaches taken to integration by the sites, the benefits which result, the context in which benefits have resulted, and the mechanisms by which they occur. Methods of analysis: The quantitative analysis adopts a 'difference in differences' approach comparing health care utilisation before and after the intervention with risk-matched controls. The qualitative data analysis adopts a 'theory of change' approach in which we triangulate data from the quantitative analysis with qualitative data in order to describe causal effects (what happens when an independent variable changes and causal mechanisms (what connects causes to their effects. An economic analysis will identify what incremental resources are required to make integration succeed and how they can be combined efficiently to produce better outcomes for patients. Conclusion: This evaluation will produce a portfolio of evidence aimed at strengthening the evidence base for integrated care, and in particular identifying the context in which

  19. Pilot evaluation in TENCompetence: a theory-driven model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonenboom, Judith; Sligte, Henk; Moghnieh, Ayman; Specht, Marcus; Glahn, Christian; Stefanov, Krassen

    2007-01-01

    Schoonenboom, J., Sligte, H., Moghnieh, A., Specht, M., Glahn, C., & Stefanov, K. (2007). Pilot evaluation in TENCompetence: a theory-driven model. In T. Navarette, J. Blat & R. Koper (Eds.). Proceedings of the 3rd TENCompetence Open Workshop 'Current Research on IMS Learning Design and Lifelong Com

  20. Development of a program model to evaluate the potential for reuse of single-use medical devices: results of a pilot test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Eduardo L; Haire, Donna M; Malchesky, Paul S; Wolf-Bloom, David F; Cornhill, J Fredrick

    2002-01-01

    Single-use medical devices (SUDs, or disposables) have become a major expense in hospital budgets. The need for cost reduction and the availability of sterilization technologies other than the autoclave have prompted hospitals worldwide to begin reusing disposables, in many cases without proper assessment of the true costs (time, personnel, etc) and ease/difficulty of implementation of an institutional reuse program. Our group has developed a rigorous program model to evaluate SUDs for reuse. The program comprises 3 sequential protocols: (1) device audit, (2) laboratory evaluation, and (3) clinical evaluation. Use of this model can produce scientific and financial data sufficient for any institution interested in reuse to reach an initial decision about its feasibility. In addition to the testing outcomes, regulatory requirements, the position of manufacturers and third-party reprocessors, and legal and ethical concerns must be considered. A successful reuse program must include ongoing evaluations to ensure that the safety levels and cost savings established during the initial audit and evaluation phases continue. Herein, we give the rationale and details of our program model and discuss results of our pilot application of the "ideal" protocol in a real-world context.

  1. Cytogenetics of jaw cysts - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Esther; Brennan, Peter A; Bodner, Lipa

    2012-07-01

    The pathogenesis of cysts that arise in the jaws is still not certain, and the underlying mechanisms of epithelial proliferation are not fully understood. Cysts of the jaw may involve a reactive, inflammatory, or neoplastic process. Cytogenetics, the study of the number and structure of chromosomes, has provided valuable information about the diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted treatment in many cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytogenetics can also provide information about the possible aetiology or neoplastic potential of a lesion, though to our knowledge no studies of this technique have been used for cysts in the jaws. In this pilot study we used cytogenetics in a series of 10 cysts (3 radicular, 4 dentigerous, 2 of the nasopalatine duct, and 1 dermoid). In all cases we found normal karyotypes. Further work and larger numbers are needed for a definitive study, but we can hypothesise from this pilot study that these cysts do not have cytogenetic aberrations and so have no neoplastic potential.

  2. 77 FR 12312 - Electronic Submission of Nonclinical Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Electronic Submission of Nonclinical Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... participate in a pilot evaluation program to test the electronic submission of nonclinical study data using...

  3. Evaluation of striatal dopamine transporter density using ({sup 123}I)-{beta}-CIT SPECT in schizophrenic patients treated with olanzapine: pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chul Eung; Moon, Hey Won; Choe, Won Sick; Kim, Chang Ho; Chi, Dae Yoon [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    This pilot study was performed to understand the pharmacological effect of olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent, on dopamine transporter in schizophrenic patients. Six patients (3 male, 3 female) with schizophrenia, who had not taken any psychotropic drugs for at least four weeks, were studied. Nuclear imaging using ({sup 123}I)-{beta}-CIT SPECT was obtained before and after 4-week treatment with olanzapine. Analysis of ROI on the striatum, caudate nucleus, and putamen was performed. Post-treatment uptake was significantly increased in all the ROIs compared with pre-treatment uptake. This preliminary study with the small number of schizophrenic patients suggested an increase in uptake of dopamine transporter in the striatum, caudate nucleus, and putamen after 4-week treatment with olanzapine, which warrants a large-scaled controlled study to confirm the current findings.

  4. Preparation and evaluation of a multimodal minoxidil microemulsion versus minoxidil alone in the treatment of androgenic alopecia of mixed etiology: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakr FM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Farouk M Sakr,1 Ali MI Gado,2 Haseebur R Mohammed,2 Abdel Nasser Ismail Adam3 1Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Departments of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 3Department of Biology, College of Pharmacy, Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: The variable success of topical minoxidil in the treatment of androgenic alopecia has led to the hypothesis that other pathways could mediate this form of hair loss, including infection and/or microinflammation of the hair follicles. In this study, we prepared a multimodal microemulsion comprising minoxidil (a dihydrotestosterone antagonist, diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, and tea tree oil (an anti-infective agent. We investigated the stability and physicochemical properties of this formulation, and its therapeutic efficacy compared with a formulation containing minoxidil alone in the treatment of androgenic alopecia. Methods: We developed a multimodal oil/water (o/w microemulsion, a formulation containing minoxidil alone, and another containing vehicle. A three-phase diagram was constructed to obtain the optimal concentrations of the selected oil, surfactant, and cosurfactant. Thirty-two men aged 18–30 years were randomized to apply 1 mL of microemulsion containing the multimodal formulation (formulation A, n = 11, minoxidil alone (formulation B, n = 11 or placebo (formulation C, n = 10 twice daily to the affected area for 32 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated by mean hair count, thickness, and weight on the targeted area of the scalp. Global photographs were taken, changes in the area of scalp coverage were assessed by patients and external investigators, and the benefits and safety of the study medications were evaluated. The physical stability of formula A was examined after a shelf storage period of 24 months. Results: Formulation A achieved a significantly superior response than formulations B and C in terms of mean hair count (P

  5. Breakthrough Listen on MWA Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S.; Siemion, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Tremblay, S.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a pilot study, using the Voltage Capture System, for Breakthrough Listen on the MWA. Breakthrough Listen (BL) is a major new project that aims to dramatically improve the coverage of parameter space in the search for intelligent life beyond Earth. BL has already deployed hardware and software to the Green Bank Telescope, and will bring a similar program with the Parkes Telescope online in the second half of 2016. The low frequency sky is however currently very poorly explored. The superb capabilities of the MWA (large field of view, low frequency of operation, and location in a very radio quiet site) provide a unique opportunity for a pilot study to obtain voltage data for a SETI (Search For Extraterrestrial Intelligence) study of the Galactic Plane. We propose commensal observations, piggybacking on the proposed pulsar search of Tremblay et al. Using existing VCS software, combined with the pipeline developed for Breakthrough Listen at GBT and Parkes, we will perform a blind search for candidate signals from extraterrestrial intelligence. Although the chances of a detection are not large, particularly for a pilot study such as that proposed here, the Breakthrough Listen team plan to perform extensive testing and analysis on the data obtained which should be useful for other users of the MWA VCS. We will make the secondary SETI data products and associated documentation available as a resource to the community via the Breakthrough Listen online archive.

  6. Hazing in the Military: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    different. It is important not to assume they are the same in policy or treatment. A policy covering hazing may enable workplace bullying to go unnoticed...while an education program to reduce workplace bullying will not likely transfer to decrease hazing. HAZING IN THE MILITARY: A PILOT STUDY 3...however, it is also found in the adult workplace . Bullying behaviors, like hazing, may be psychological or physical in nature, vary in severity, and

  7. Nerve damage in leprosy: An electrophysiological evaluation of ulnar and median nerves in patients with clinical neural deficits: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sumit; Krishnan, Ajay; Singh, Neha; Singh, Ramji; Pawar, Sachin

    2013-04-01

    Leprosy involves peripheral nerves sooner or later in the course of the disease leading to gross deformities and disabilities. Sadly, by the time it becomes clinically apparent, the nerve damage is already quite advanced. However, if the preclinical damage is detected early in the course of disease, it can be prevented to a large extent. We conducted an electrophysiological pilot study on 10 patients with clinically manifest leprosy, in the Dermatology Department of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sewagram. This study was done to assess the nerve conduction velocity, amplitude and latency of ulnar and median nerves. We found reduced conduction velocities besides changes in latency and amplitude in the affected nerves. Changes in sensory nerve conduction were more pronounced. Also, sensory latencies and amplitude changes were more severe than motor latencies and amplitude in those presenting with muscle palsies. However, further studies are going on to identify parameters to detect early nerve damage in leprosy.

  8. Certainty rating in pre-and post-tests of study modules in an online clinical pharmacy course - A pilot study to evaluate teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetsch, Karen; Burrows, Judith

    2016-10-14

    Graduate and post-graduate education for health professionals is increasingly delivered in an e-learning environment, where automated, continuous formative testing with integrated feedback can guide students' self-assessment and learning. Asking students to rate the certainty they assign to the correctness of their answers to test questions can potentially provide deeper insights into the success of teaching, with test results informing course designers whether learning outcomes have been achieved. It may also have implications for decision making in clinical practice. A study of pre-and post-tests for five study modules was designed to evaluate the teaching and learning within a pharmacotherapeutic course in an online postgraduate clinical pharmacy program. Certainty based marking of multiple choice questions (MCQ) was adapted for formative pre- and post-study module testing by asking students to rate their certainty of correctness of MCQ answers. Paired t-tests and a coding scheme were used to analyse changes in answers and certainty between pre-and post-tests. A survey evaluated students' experience with the novel formative testing design. Twenty-nine pharmacists enrolled in the postgraduate program participated in the study. Overall 1315 matched pairs of MCQ answers and certainty ratings between pre- and post-module tests were available for evaluation. Most students identified correct answers in post-tests and increased their certainty compared to pre-tests. Evaluation of certainty ratings in addition to correctness of answers identified MCQs and topic areas for revision to course designers. A survey of students showed that assigning certainty ratings to their answers assisted in structuring and focusing their learning throughout online study modules, facilitating identification of areas of uncertainty and gaps in their clinical knowledge. Adding certainty ratings to MCQ answers seems to engage students with formative testing and feedback and focus their

  9. Comparison of midwifery care to medical care in hospitals in the Quebec pilot projects study: clinical indicators. L'Equipe dEvaluation des Projets-Pilotes Sages-Femmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, W; Hatem-Asmar, M; Krauss, I; Maillard, F; Bréart, G; Blais, R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare indicators of process and outcome of midwifery services provided in the Quebec pilot projects to those associated with standard hospital-based medical services. Women receiving each type of care (961 per group) were matched on the basis of socio-demographic characteristics and level of obstetrical risk. We found midwifery care to be associated with less obstetrical intervention and a reduction in selected indicators of maternal morbidity (caesarean section and severe perineal injury). For neonatal outcome indicators, midwifery care was associated with a mixture of benefits and risks: fewer babies with preterm birth and low birthweight, but a trend toward a higher stillbirth ratio and more frequent requirement for neonatal resuscitation. The study design does not permit to conclude that the associations were causal in nature. However, the high stillbirth rate observed in the group of women who were selected for midwife care raises concerns both regarding the appropriateness of the screening procedures for admission to such care and regarding the quality of care itself.

  10. Helicopter pilot back pain: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, D F; Reading, T E

    1984-02-01

    Because of the high prevalence of back pain experienced by U.S. Army helicopter pilots, a study was conducted to ascertain the feasibility of reproducing these symptoms in the laboratory. A mock-up of a UH-1H seat and control configuration was mounted to a multi-axis vibration simulator (MAVS). Eleven subjects were tested on the apparatus for two 120-min periods. During one period, the MAVS was programmed to reproduce vibrations recorded from a UH-1H in cruise flight. The subjects received no vibration during the other test period. All subjects reported back pain which they described as identical to the pain they experience during flight, during one or more of their test periods. There was no statistical difference between the vibration and nonvibration test conditions (p greater than 0.05) in terms of time of onset of pain or intensity of pain as measured by a visual analog scale. It appears the vibration at the frequencies and amplitudes tested plays little or no role in the etiology of the back symptoms reported by these pilots. It is proposed that the primary etiological factor for these symptoms is the poor posture pilots are obliged to assume for extended periods while operating helicopters.

  11. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the nation's estuaries have been environmentally stressed since the turn of the 20th century and will continue to be impacted in the future. Tampa Bay, one the Gulf of Mexico's largest estuaries, exemplifies the threats that our estuaries face (EPA Report 2001, Tampa Bay Estuary Program-Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (TBEP-CCMP)). More than 2 million people live in the Tampa Bay watershed, and the population constitutes to grow. Demand for freshwater resources, conversion of undeveloped areas to resident and industrial uses, increases in storm-water runoff, and increased air pollution from urban and industrial sources are some of the known human activities that impact Tampa Bay. Beginning on 2001, additional anthropogenic modifications began in Tampa Bat including construction of an underwater gas pipeline and a desalinization plant, expansion of existing ports, and increased freshwater withdrawal from three major tributaries to the bay. In January of 2001, the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) and its partners identifies a critical need for participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in providing multidisciplinary expertise and a regional-scale, integrated science approach to address complex scientific research issue and critical scientific information gaps that are necessary for continued restoration and preservation of Tampa Bay. Tampa Bay stakeholders identified several critical science gaps for which USGS expertise was needed (Yates et al. 2001). These critical science gaps fall under four topical categories (or system components): 1) water and sediment quality, 2) hydrodynamics, 3) geology and geomorphology, and 4) ecosystem structure and function. Scientists and resource managers participating in Tampa Bay studies recognize that it is no longer sufficient to simply examine each of these estuarine system components individually, Rather, the interrelation among system components must be understood to develop conceptual and

  12. Medical Podcasting in Iran; Pilot, Implementation and Attitude Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Dehpour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Podcasting has become a popular means of transferring knowledge in higher education through making lecture contents available to students at their convenience. Accessing courses on media players provides students with enhanced learning opportunities. Development of teaching methods able to cope with ever-changing nature of medicine is crucial to train the millennium students. Pharmacology education in Tehran University of Medical Sciences has been based on lectures so far; our aim was to implement a pilot study to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of offering the course contents as podcasts as well as evaluating whether such program can be feasible in our educational program. 46% of students downloaded the podcast according to our download center. 48% favored usage of both internet and DVD-ROM concurrently. Overall 96% of students perceived that podcasting had a positive impact on their learning in pharmacology course. Our results indicate that most of attendants proposed the positive yields of podcasting despite low usage of it, mainly as a pre-class preparing tool.

  13. A Technology for Program Documentation and Evaluation: A Pilot Meta-Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter J.

    Meta evaluation, or the evaluation of evaluations, was applied to a technology for program documentation and evaluation used in a mainstreaming project. The technology consisted of four phases: (1) planning for decision-making; (2) documenting actual program outcomes; (3) implementing decisions; and (4) instituting program renewal. This pilot meta…

  14. 500-kW DCHX pilot-plant evaluation testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlinak, A.; Lee, T.; Loback, J.; Nichols, K.; Olander, R.; Oshmyansky, S.; Roberts, G.; Werner, D.

    1981-10-01

    Field tests with the 500 kW Direct Contact Pilot Plant were conducted utilizing brine from well Mesa 6-2. The tests were intended to develop comprehensive performance data, design criteria, and economic factors for the direct contact power plant. The tests were conducted in two phases. The first test phase was to determine specific component performance of the DCHX, turbine, condensers and pumps, and to evaluate chemical mass balances of non-condensible gases in the IC/sub 4/ loop and IC/sub 4/ in the brine stream. The second test phase was to provide a longer term run at nearly fixed operating conditions in order to evaluate plant performance and identify operating cost data for the pilot plant. During these tests the total accumulated run time on major system components exceeded 1180 hours with 777 hours on the turbine prime mover. Direct contact heat exchanger performance exceeded the design prediction.

  15. Technical Details on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-01-01

    The primary focus of the BDBE pilot project was the review of BDBE analysis and mitigation features at four DOE nuclear facilities representing a range of DOE sites, nuclear facility types/activities, and responsible program offices. The pilots looked at (1) how beyond design basis accidents were evaluated and documented in the facility Documented Safety Analysis, (2) potential BDBE vulnerabilities and margins to failure of facility safety features as obtained from general area and specific system walkdowns and design documents reviews, and (3) preparations made in facility and site emergency management programs to respond to severe accidents. It also evaluated whether draft BDBE guidance on safety analysis and emergency management could be used to improve the analysis of and preparations for mitigating severe and beyond design basis accidents. The details of these activities are organized in this report as described below.

  16. An internal pilot study for a randomized trial aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of iron interventions in children with non-anemic iron deficiency: the OptEC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Kawsari; Thorpe, Kevin E; Mamak, Eva; Maguire, Jonathon L; Birken, Catherine S; Fehlings, Darcy; Hanley, Anthony J; Macarthur, Colin; Zlotkin, Stanley H; Parkin, Patricia C

    2015-07-14

    The OptEC trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of oral iron in young children with non-anemic iron deficiency (NAID). The initial sample size calculated for the OptEC trial ranged from 112-198 subjects. Given the uncertainty regarding the parameters used to calculate the sample, an internal pilot study was conducted. The objectives of this internal pilot study were to obtain reliable estimate of parameters (standard deviation and design factor) to recalculate the sample size and to assess the adherence rate and reasons for non-adherence in children enrolled in the pilot study. The first 30 subjects enrolled into the OptEC trial constituted the internal pilot study. The primary outcome of the OptEC trial is the Early Learning Composite (ELC). For estimation of the SD of the ELC, descriptive statistics of the 4 month follow-up ELC scores were assessed within each intervention group. The observed SD within each group was then pooled to obtain an estimated SD (S2) of the ELC. Correlation (ρ) between the ELC measured at baseline and follow-up was assessed. Recalculation of the sample size was performed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) method which uses the design factor (1- ρ(2)). Adherence rate was calculated using a parent reported rate of missed doses of the study intervention. The new estimate of the SD of the ELC was found to be 17.40 (S2). The design factor was (1- ρ2) = 0.21. Using a significance level of 5%, power of 80%, S2 = 17.40 and effect estimate (Δ) ranging from 6-8 points, the new sample size based on ANCOVA method ranged from 32-56 subjects (16-28 per group). Adherence ranged between 14% and 100% with 44% of the children having an adherence rate ≥ 86%. Information generated from our internal pilot study was used to update the design of the full and definitive trial, including recalculation of sample size, determination of the adequacy of adherence, and application of strategies to improve adherence. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT

  17. Pilot workload evaluated with subjective and physiological measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.; Gaillard, A.W.K.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to validate different measures for mental workload. Ten aspirant fighter jet pilots flew several scenarios in a flight simulator. The scenarios were divided into segments with different levels of task load. During the flight, heart rate, respiration and blood pressure

  18. Observation of Autoregulation Indices During Ventricular CSF Drainage After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, Marcel J. H.; de Jong, Sytse F.; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Regtien, Joost; Depreitere, Bart; Czosnyka, Marek; Smielewski, Peter; Elting, Jan Willem J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autoregulation is increasingly recognized as a factor that requires evaluation when managing poor grade aneurysmal subarachno pilot study, we investigated whether intraventricular intracranial pressure (ICP) derived when

  19. Pilot Evaluation of a Home Visit Parent Training Program in Disadvantaged Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study reported the pilot evaluation of the Healthy Start Home Visit Program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, delivered by trained parent assistants. Home visiting was used to make services more accessible to disadvantaged families. Method: The participants included 21 parent-child dyads. Outcome measures…

  20. Evaluating a Survivors Group Pilot for Women with Significant Intellectual Disabilities Who Have Been Sexually Abused

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Nicholas Guy; Howlett, Susan; Corbett, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Sexual abuse has been associated with trauma, low self-esteem, anger, depression and challenging behaviours. This pilot study builds on a small published literature by evaluating a survivors group (SG) for women with an intellectual disability and an educational support group (ESG) for their carers. Method: The SG was delivered weekly…

  1. Pilot Evaluation of Energy Savings from Residential Energy Demand Feedback Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Danny S. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Hoak, David [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Cummings, Jamie [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This report discusses instantaneous feedback on household electrical demand has shown promise to reduce energy consumption. This report reviews past research and describes a two year pilot evaluation of a low cost residential energy feedback system installed in twenty case study homes in FL.

  2. Morpho-functional evaluation of small bowel using wireless motility capsule and video capsule endoscopy in patients with known or suspected Crohn’s disease: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Diana; Douglas, Sarah; Hobson, Anthony R.; Giannakou, Andry; Plevris, John N.; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: SmartPill® (Given Imaging Corp.,Yoqneam,Israel) is an ingestible, non-imaging capsule that records physiological data including contractions and pH throughout the gastrointestinal tract. There are scarce data looking at SmartPill® assessment of patients with known/suspected small-bowel Crohn’s Disease (CD). This pilot study aims to investigate feasibility and safety of SmartPill® to assess gut motility in this group.  Patients and methods: Over 1 year, patients with known/suspected CD, referred for small-bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE), were invited to participate and 12 were recruited (7 female, 5 male, mean age 44.2 ± 16.6 years). They underwent hydrogen breath test to exclude small-bowel bacterial overgrowth, patency capsule (Agile®), and provided stool samples for fecal calprotectin (FC). Patients ingested PillCam®SB2 and SmartPill® 4 hours apart. Using unpublished data, 33 healthy controls also were identified for the study. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Of the 12 patients enrolled, 10 underwent complete Smartpill® examination (1 stomach retention, 1 dropout). Pillcam® was complete in 10 (1 dropout, 1 stomach retention). Mean fecal calprotectin was 340 ± 307.71 mcg/g. The study group had longer transit times and lower gut motility index than did the controls. The difference in motility appears to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Longer transit times for SmartPill® (not statistically significant) may have been due to different specifications between the capsules. Limitations included transient Smartpill® signal loss (5/10 studies). Conclusions: This is the first pilot to attempt combining SBCE and SmartPill® to assess small-bowel CD. Data on motility in CD are scarce. Multimodal information can provide a clearer clinical picture. Despite concerns about capsule retention in CD patients, SmartPill® seems safe for use if a patency capsule is employed beforehand. PMID

  3. Nerve damage in leprosy: An electrophysiological evaluation of ulnar and median nerves in patients with clinical neural deficits: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Leprosy involves peripheral nerves sooner or later in the course of the disease leading to gross deformities and disabilities. Sadly, by the time it becomes clinically apparent, the nerve damage is already quite advanced. However, if the preclinical damage is detected early in the course of disease, it can be prevented to a large extent. Materials and Methods: We conducted an electrophysiological pilot study on 10 patients with clinically manifest leprosy, in the Dermatology Department of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sewagram. This study was done to assess the nerve conduction velocity, amplitude and latency of ulnar and median nerves. Results and Conclusion: We found reduced conduction velocities besides changes in latency and amplitude in the affected nerves. Changes in sensory nerve conduction were more pronounced. Also, sensory latencies and amplitude changes were more severe than motor latencies and amplitude in those presenting with muscle palsies. However, further studies are going on to identify parameters to detect early nerve damage in leprosy.

  4. Post-mortem toxicology: A pilot study to evaluate the use of a Bayesian network to assess the likelihood of fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Alan M; Bolton, Jennifer R; Carlin, Michelle G; Palmer, Ray

    2015-07-01

    The challenge of interpreting post-mortem drug concentrations is well documented and relies on appropriate sample collection, knowledge of case circumstances as well as reference to published tables of data, whilst taking into account the known issues of post-mortem drug redistribution and tolerance. Existing published data has evolved from simple data tables to those now including sample origin and single to poly drug use, but additional information tends to be specific to those reported in individual case studies. We have developed a Bayesian network framework to assign a likelihood of fatality based on the contribution of drug concentrations whilst taking into account the pathological findings. This expert system has been tested against casework within the coronial jurisdiction of Sunderland, UK. We demonstrate in this pilot study that the Bayesian network can be used to proffer a degree of confidence in how deaths may be reported in cases when drugs are implicated. It has also highlighted the potential for deaths to be reported according to the pathological states at post-mortem when drugs have a significant contribution that may have an impact on mortality statistics. The Bayesian network could be used as complementary approach to assist in the interpretation of post-mortem drug concentrations.

  5. Effectiveness of polaprezinc for low-dose aspirin-induced small-bowel mucosal injuries as evaluated by capsule endoscopy: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Ikue; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Aoyama, Taiki; Imagawa, Hiroki; Shishido, Takayoshi; Yoshida, Shigeto; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2013-07-04

    Treatment of low-dose aspirin (LDA)-induced small-bowel injury has not been established. Polaprezinc, a chelate of zinc and L-carnosine, may be efficacious for such injury. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled study to investigate whether polaprezinc is effective against LDA-induced small-bowel injuries. Consecutive patients under long-term (>3 months) LDA treatment and who agreed to participate in our study underwent initial capsule endoscopy (CE). Patients with LDA-induced small-bowel injury apparent upon initial CE (n = 20) were randomized into a polaprezinc (150 mg/day for 4 weeks) group and a control (no polaprezinc treatment) group. All underwent follow-up CE after 4 weeks. Changes in the number and characteristics of small-bowel mucosal injuries were compared within and between the two groups. The median number of reddened lesions and erosions/ulcers upon follow-up CE in the polaprezinc group significantly decreased (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the median number of reddened lesions and erosions/ulcers upon follow-up CE in the control group. Co-administration of polaprezinc may be effective against small-bowel mucosal injury associated with long-term LDA therapy.

  6. Effect of a combined continuous and intermittent transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain perception of burn patients evaluated by visual analog scale: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ruvalcaba, Irma; Sánchez-Hernández, Viridiana; Mercado-Sesma, Arieh R

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess the effect of continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation on the perception of pain in patients with burns of different types. Materials and methods A pilot study was conducted in 14 patients (age 30.9±7.5 years) with second- and third-degree burns of different types. The burn types included electrical, fire/flame, and chemical. All patients received continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation sessions three times per week for 4 weeks. Each session had a duration of 30 minutes. A pair of electrodes were placed around the burn. The primary efficacy endpoint was the perception of pain assessed by a visual analog scale at baseline and at the 30th day. Results A significant reduction of pain perception was reported (8.0±1.7 vs 1.0±0.5; P=0.027) by all patients after electrical stimulation therapy. There were no reports of adverse events during the intervention period. Conclusion Electrical stimulation could be a potential nonpharmacological therapeutic option for pain management in burn patients. PMID:26719723

  7. Human biomonitoring pilot study DEMOCOPHES in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwedler, Gerda; Seiwert, Margarete; Fiddicke, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    on a European Scale) and DEMOCOPHES (Demonstration of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale) were formed, comprising 35 partners from 27 European countries. In COPHES a research scheme and guidelines were developed to exemplarily measure in a pilot study mercury in hair......Human biomonitoring (HBM) is an effective tool to assess human exposure to environmental pollutants, but comparable HBM data in Europe are lacking. In order to expedite harmonization of HBM studies on a European scale, the twin projects COPHES (Consortium to Perform Human Biomonitoring......, cadmium, cotinine and several phthalate metabolites in urine of 6–11 year old children and their mothers in an urban and a rural region. Seventeen European countries simultaneously conducted this cross-sectional DEMOCOPHES feasibility study. The German study population was taken in the city of Bochum...

  8. Is there a role for a primary health nurse in a learning support team in a disadvantaged high school? Evaluation of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Sarah; Noon, Ted; Liaw, Siaw Teng

    2016-02-01

    Disadvantaged children experience more health problems and have poorer educational outcomes compared with students from advantaged backgrounds. This paper presents the quantitative and qualitative findings from a pilot study to determine the impact of the Healthy Learner model, where an experienced primary care nurse was embedded in a learning support team in a disadvantaged high school. Students entering high school with National Assessment Program, Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) scores in the lowest quartile for the school were assessed by the nurse and identified health issues addressed. Thirty-nine students were assessed in 2012-13 and there were up to seven health problems identified per student, ranging from serious neglect to problems such as uncorrected vision or hearing. Many of these problems were having an impact on the student and their ability to engage in learning. Families struggled to navigate the health system, they had difficulty explaining the student's problems to health professionals and costs were a barrier. Adding a nurse to the learning support team in this disadvantaged high school was feasible and identified considerable unmet health needs that affect a student's ability to learn. The families needed extensive support to access any subsequent health care they required.

  9. Evaluation of a Mindfulness-Based Mobile App Aimed at Promoting Awareness of Weight-Related Behaviors in Adolescents: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Tami; Hingle, Melanie

    2017-04-26

    Mindfulness-based interventions are reported to be highly acceptable and have positive effects on youth, yet most are clinic- or school-based aimed at emotional regulation or academic performance. To provide flexible program delivery, we developed and tested a standalone mindfulness-based app aimed at improving weight-related behaviors (eg, diet, physical activity, sleep) in adolescents. Our objective was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and utility of a mindfulness-based mobile app. In a single-arm pilot study, 15 adolescents (14-18 years) were prompted to access the app once a day, every day for 6 weeks. Outcomes were measured by in-app and poststudy surveys, and descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Time within a mindfulness state was self-reported during weekly timed practices. The app was rated highly for content and encouraging the practice of activities to promote mindfulness states. Teens reported increased awareness of eating behaviors and high adherence, particularly during physically active practices. Average self-reported time spent in a mindfulness state increased 2.5 times by week 6 (78 [SD 17] seconds) compared to week 1 (31 [SD 21] seconds). The high acceptability and utility ratings of the app, increases in reported time in mindfulness states, and high frequency of participation, including mindful eating and physical activity, suggest the mindfulness-based mobile app has the potential to improve awareness of weight-related behaviors.

  10. [Evaluation of methodological quality in published RCTs on cataract surgery : Pilot study on the degree of adherence to CONSORT statement requirements and their qualitative validity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulig, C; Krummenauer, F; Knippschild, S

    2017-01-30

    The CONSORT statement can be considered as a guideline to ensure transparency in the reporting of randomized clinical trials (RCT), in addition to specific author instructions and requirements of journals. It provides a total of 25 criteria and 12 additional subcriteria on methodological and regulatorical determinants of clinical trials. The availability of the CONSORT recommendations, however, does not necessarily imply adherence to their obligations and correct realisation of the latter from a methodological perspective, so that even in ophthalmology a lack of transparency in trial reporting cannot be excluded. The question was whether a consistent consideration of the CONSORT checklist criteria by authors actually implied transparent reporting of underlying study results. This pilot study was based on a random sample of six published RCTs on cataract surgery extracted from an existing trial publication register. Compliance with each of the 25 CONSORT criteria and its 12 subcriteria and the content accuracy of the latter were independently assessed by two parallel raters for the six trial publications. The median compliance with the 37 CONSORT criteria and subcriteria was 62% [min-max 48-81%]; the median fraction of their correct implementation was 47% [min-max 34-69%]. Promotion of transparent reporting by means of the CONSORT statement appears to be problematic in implementation. There is a discrepancy between information as required by CONSORT and the content accuracy of its actual presentation. Thus, in particular, reviewers of clinical trial publications should not only check for the presence of data to be provided according to CONSORT, but also verify the meaningfulness in the respective context, at least on a random basis.

  11. Effect of a combined continuous and intermittent transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain perception of burn patients evaluated by visual analog scale: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Ruvalcaba I

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Irma Pérez-Ruvalcaba,1 Viridiana Sánchez-Hernández,1 Arieh R Mercado-Sesma2,3 1Burn Unit, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente, Mexican Institute of Social Security, 2Health Sciences Department, Centro Universitario de Tonalá, University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico; 3Diabetes sin Complicaciones, Zapopan, Mexico Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation on the perception of pain in patients with burns of different types. Materials and methods: A pilot study was conducted in 14 patients (age 30.9±7.5 years with second- and third-degree burns of different types. The burn types included electrical, fire/flame, and chemical. All patients received continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation sessions three times per week for 4 weeks. Each session had a duration of 30 minutes. A pair of electrodes were placed around the burn. The primary efficacy endpoint was the perception of pain assessed by a visual analog scale at baseline and at the 30th day. Results: A significant reduction of pain perception was reported (8.0±1.7 vs 1.0±0.5; P=0.027 by all patients after electrical stimulation therapy. There were no reports of adverse events during the intervention period. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation could be a potential nonpharmacological therapeutic option for pain management in burn patients. Keywords: TENS, burn pain, pain management, electrotherapy

  12. NHS Blood Tracking Pilot: City University Evaluation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Kate; Shabestari, Omid; Adriano, Juan; Kay, Jonathan; Roudsari, Abdul

    Automation of healthcare processes is an emergent theme in the drive to increase patient safety. The Mayday Hospital has been chosen as the pilot site for the implementation of the Electronic Clinical Transfusion Management System to track blood from the point of ordering to the final transfusion. The Centre for Health Informatics at City University is carrying out an independent evaluation of the system implementation using a variety of methodologies to both formatively inform the implementation process and summatively provide an account of the lessons learned for future implementations.

  13. Location Independent Professional Project: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, J.A.; Long, J.P.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-02-01

    This pilot study project explored the problem of providing access to the nomadic worker who desires to connect a computer through network access points at a number of different locations within the SNL/NM campus as well as outside the campus. The design and prototype development gathered knowledge that may allow a design to be developed that could be extended to a larger number of SNL/NM network drop boxes. The focus was to provide a capability for a worker to access the SNL IRN from a network drop box (e.g. in a conference room) as easily as when accessing the computer network from the office normally used by the worker. Additional study was done on new methods to authenticate the off campus worker, and protect and control access to data.

  14. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in commercial airline pilots: a cohort study of 2630 pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, S; Venemans-Jellema, A; Cannegieter, S C; van Haften, M; Middeldorp, S; Büller, H R; Rosendaal, F R

    2014-08-01

    Airline pilots may be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) because air travel has recently been established as a risk factor for VTE. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of VTE in a cohort of Dutch airline pilots. Airline pilots who had been active members of the Dutch aviation society (VNV) were questioned for the occurrence of VTE, presence of risk factors for VTE and number of flight hours per year and rank. Incidence rates among pilots were compared with those of the general Dutch population and with a population of frequently flying employees of multinational organizations. A total of 2630 male pilots were followed-up for a total of 20420 person-years (py). Six venous thromboses were reported, yielding an incidence rate of 0.3 per 1000 py. The standardized morbidity ratio, comparing these pilots with the general Dutch population adjusted for age, was 0.8. Compared with the international employee cohort, the standardized morbidity ratio was 0.7 when all employees were included and 0.6 when only the frequently travelling employees were included. The incidence rate did not increase with number of flight hours per year and did not clearly vary by rank. We conclude that the risk of VTE is not increased amongst airline pilots. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. Handling Qualities Evaluation of Pilot Tools for Spacecraft Docking in Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilimoria, Karl D.; Mueller, Eric; Frost, Chad

    2009-01-01

    A new generation of spacecraft is now under development by NASA to replace the Space Shuttle and return astronauts to the Moon. These spacecraft will have a manual control capability for several mission tasks, and the ease and precision with which pilots can execute these tasks will have an important effect on mission risk and training costs. This paper focuses on the handling qualities of a spacecraft based on dynamics similar to that of the Crew Exploration Vehicle, during the last segment of the docking task with a space station in low Earth orbit. A previous study established that handling qualities for this task degrade significantly as the level of translation-into-rotation coupling increases. The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of various pilot aids designed to mitigate the handling qualities degradation caused by this coupling. Four pilot tools were ev adluaetead:d-band box/indicator, flight-path marker, translation guidance cues, and feed-forward control. Each of these pilot tools improved handling qualities, generally with greater improvements resulting from using these tools in combination. A key result of this study is that feedforward control effectively counteracts coupling effects, providing solid Level 1 handling qualities for the spacecraft configuration evaluated.

  16. Help-seeking in relation to signs of dementia: a pilot study to evaluate the utility of the common-sense model of illness representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton-West, Kate E; Milne, Alisoun J; Chenery, Alison; Tilbrook, Carolyn

    2010-10-01

    Despite the importance of early diagnosis of dementia, little is known about the factors underlying help-seeking in relation to signs of the condition. In this pilot study, we aimed to examine the potential utility of the common sense model (CSM) of illness representations for understanding lay perceptions of dementia and predicting intentions to seek help in relation to possible signs and symptoms. A secondary aim was to develop a measure of (dementia-related) illness representations as a tool for future research. After reading a vignette describing a "relative" with mild or moderate dementia, participants (N = 118) completed measures of illness representations and help-seeking intentions. Analyses compared perceptions of the mild and moderate vignettes and determined the extent to which illness perceptions differentiated between alternative forms of help-seeking (e.g. seeking professional help vs. help from family members). Results indicated that cognitive deficits were more readily identified as dementia than non-cognitive symptoms; these were commonly attributed to stress or depression. Participants were more likely to indicate an intention to seek professional help if they identified the problem in the vignette as dementia, perceived symptoms as severe, as having serious consequences and as likely to be permanent, but less likely to do so if they identified the problem as stress or attributed symptoms to psychological causes. Our preliminary data suggests that help-seeking may be prevented by inaccurate illness representations or misattribution of symptoms. The CSM may provide a useful framework for understanding perceptions of dementia symptoms and for informing help-seeking pathways.

  17. An evaluation approach for research project pilot technological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino-Jesus, Elsa; Sarraipa, Joao; Jardim-Goncalves, Ricardo

    2013-10-01

    In a world increasingly more competitive and in a constantly development and growth it's important that companies have economic tools, like frameworks to help them to evaluate and validate the technology development to better fits in each company particular needs. The paper presents an evaluation approach for research project pilot applications to stimulate its implementation and deployment, increasing its adequacy and acceptance to their stakeholders and consequently providing new business profit and opportunities. Authors used the DECIDE evaluation framework as a major guide to this approach, which was tested in the iSURF project to support the implementation of an interoperability service utility for collaborative supply chain planning across multiple domains supported by RFID devices.

  18. The Pilot Staffing Conundrum: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-2. School of Logistics and Acquisition Management, Air Force Institute of Technology (AU), Wright Patterson AFB, OH, June...Kafer, John H. Relationship of Airline Pilot Demand and Air Force Pilot Retention. Graduate Research Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-11. School of Logistics

  19. Evaluation of a Serious Self-Regulation Game Intervention for Overweight-Related Behaviors (“Balance It”): A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulussen, Theo; Kok, Gerjo; van Empelen, Pepijn

    2016-01-01

    Background Serious games have the potential to promote health behavior. Because overweight is still a major issue among secondary vocational education students in the Netherlands, this study piloted the effects of “Balance It,” a serious self-regulation game intervention targeting students’ overweight-related behaviors: dietary intake and physical activity (PA). Objective We aimed to pilot the effects of Balance It on secondary vocational education students’ dietary intake and PA. Methods In total, 501 secondary vocational education students participated at baseline (intervention: n=250; control: n=251) in this pre-post cluster randomized trial. After 4 weeks, at immediate posttest, 231 students filled in the posttest questionnaire (intervention: n=105; control: n=126). The sample had a mean age of 17.28 (SD 1.26, range 15-21) years, 62.8% (145/231) were female, and 26.8% (62/231) had a non-Dutch background. Body mass index (BMI kg/m2) ranged from 14.4 to 31.1 (mean 21.1, SD 3.3). The intervention and control groups were compared on the primary (behavioral) outcomes of dietary intake (fruit and vegetable consumption, snack consumption, and soft drink consumption) and PA (moderate and vigorous). Additionally, we explored (1) differences between the intervention and control groups in determinants of dietary intake and PA, including attitude, self-efficacy, intention, barrier identification, action planning, and action control, and (2) differences between active (intervention) users and the control group in dietary intake, PA, and associated determinants. Results After corrections for multiple testing, we did not find significant differences between the intervention group and control group in terms of dietary intake, PA, and determinants of dietary intake and PA. Exploratory research indicated that only 27.6% (29/105) of the intervention group reported actual intervention use (ie, active users). For exploratory reasons, we compared the active users (n=29) with

  20. Evaluation of the effect of two different occlusal splints on maximum occlusal force in patients with sleep bruxism: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The occlusal splint has been used for many years as an effective treatment of sleep bruxism. Several methods have been used to evaluate efficiency of the occlusal splints. However, the effect of the occlusal splints on occlusal force has not been clarified sufficiently. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of occlusal splints on maximum occlusal force in patients with sleep bruxism and compare two type of splints that are Bruxogard-soft splint and canine protected hard...

  1. Integrated care pilot in north west London: a mixed methods evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Curry

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper provides the results of a year-long evaluation of a large-scale integrated care pilot in North West London. The pilot aimed to integrate care across primary, acute, community, mental health and social care for people with diabetes and those over 75 years through: care planning; multidisciplinary case reviews; information sharing; and project management support.   Methods: The evaluation team conducted qualitative studies of change at organisational, clinician, and patient levels (using interviews, focus groups and a survey; and quantitative analysis of change in service use and patient-level clinical outcomes (using patient-level data sets and a matched control study.  Results: The pilot had successfully engaged provider organisations, created a shared strategic vision and established governance structures. However, engagement of clinicians was variable and there was no evidence to date of significant reductions in emergency admissions. There was some evidence of changes in care processes. Conclusion: Although the pilot has demonstrated the beginnings of large-scale change, it remains in the early stages and faces significant challenges as it seeks to become sustainable for the longer term. It is critical that NHS managers and clinicians have realistic expectations of what can be achieved in a relatively short period of time.

  2. THE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN EVALUATION MODEL FOR VOCATIONAL PILOT PROGRAMS. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUCKMAN, BRUCE W.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT WERE (1) TO DEVELOP AN EVALUATION MODEL IN THE FORM OF A HOW-TO-DO-IT MANUAL WHICH OUTLINES PROCEDURES FOR OBTAINING IMMEDIATE INFORMATION REGARDING THE DEGREE TO WHICH A PILOT PROGRAM ACHIEVES ITS STATED FINAL OBJECTIVES, (2) TO EVALUATE THIS MODEL BY USING IT TO EVALUATE TWO ONGOING PILOT PROGRAMS, AND (3) TO…

  3. Pharmacogenetics of Ketamine-Induced Emergence Phenomena: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroke, Edwin N; Crawford, Sybil L; Dungan, Jennifer R

    Up to 55% of patients who are administered ketamine experience an emergence phenomena (EP) that closely mimics schizophrenia and increases their risk of injury; however, to date, no studies have investigated genetic association of ketamine-induced EP in healthy patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the feasibility and sample sizes required to explore the relationship between CYP2B6*6 and GRIN2B single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ketamine-induced EP. This cross-sectional, pharmacogenetic candidate, gene pilot study recruited 75 patients having minor elective outpatient surgeries. EP was measured with the Clinician Administered Dissociative State Scale. Genetic association of CYP2B6*6 and GRIN2B (rs1019385 and rs1806191) single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ketamine-induced EP occurrence and severity were tested using logistic and linear regression. Forty-seven patients (63%) received ketamine and were genotyped, and 40% of them experienced EP. Occurrence and severity of EP were not associated with CYP2B6*6 or GRIN2B (p > .10). Exploratory analysis of nongenotype models containing age, ketamine dose, duration of anesthesia, and time from ketamine administration to assessment for EP significantly predicted EP occurrence (p = .001) and severity (p = .007). This pilot study demonstrates feasibility for implementing a pharmacogenetic study in a clinical setting, and we estimate that between 380 and 570 cases will be needed to adequately power future genetic association studies. Younger age, higher dose, and longer duration of anesthesia significantly predicted EP occurrence and severity among our pilot sample. Although the small sample size limited our ability to demonstrate significant genotype differences, we generated effect sizes, sample size estimates, and nongenetic covariates information in order to support future pharmacogenetic study design for evaluating this adverse event.

  4. 75 FR 80827 - Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ...; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs; Notice To Extend Expiration Date...) Sec. 400.210 entitled ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs... ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs.'' Previous extensions...

  5. Evaluating the prevention of premature cessation of exclusive breastfeeding in the general practice setting during the scheduled child immunisation consultation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayton, Jennifer; Howes, Faline; Hansen, Emily; Nelson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test and evaluate the feasibility and clinical acceptability of the use of an infant feeding data collection tool during the scheduled childhood immunisation consultation, and to explore the appropriateness of this consultation as a site for a future intervention aiming to increase exclusive breastfeeding through the provision of advice and support to mothers. This descriptive exploratory (quantitative and qualitative) study used purposeful sampling to enrol five general practices in Hobart, Tasmania. General practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses (PNs) trialled and evaluated a paper-based data collection tool over a 6-week period from May through to June 2011. Twenty-two (13 GPs; 2 GP registrars and 7 PNs) participants trialled and evaluated the data collection tool (n = 54). From the evaluation questionnaire, field notes and informal interviews (n = 7), six conceptual headings emerged: setting; time pressures; resources and collaboration; mothers need to talk; professional exclusion; and lack of collaboration. The scheduled childhood immunisation consultation provides an opportunity for mothers and primary health practitioners to talk briefly about infant feeding and for the collection of infant feeding data. However, the immunisation consultation is not well suited to a breastfeeding support intervention as it is already very busy focusing on immunisation issues. Consideration should be given to the evaluation of a dedicated general practice/primary health 'infant feeding' consultation.

  6. Evaluation of the performance of diagnosis monitors in use in Salvador city: pilot study; Avaliacao do desempenho de monitores diagnostico em uso na cidade de Salvador: estudo piloto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Igor; Geambastiani, Paulo; Ferreira, Mario; Macedo, Eric; Navarro, Marcus; Navarro, Valeria; Pereira, Lara; Jesus, Evandro de; Leite, Handerson Jorge Dourado, E-mail: lem.labprosaud@ifba.edu.br [Instituto Federal da Bahia (LABPROSAUD/IFBA), Salvador , BA (Brazil). Lab. de Produtos para Saude; Lins, Carolina [Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saude Publica, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Radiologically, the image quality is the accuracy of the representation of the patient's anatomy. Considering the importance of the performance of the monitors to the overall effectiveness of a practice of diagnostic imaging, the objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of diagnostic monitors in use, using the method described in the report 03 of the AAPA and Spanish protocol, using calibrated instrumentation traceable to NIST and to RBC. The results of the monitors evaluated to date show 100% compliance for geometric distortion tests and internal reflection and 0% compliance to the dependence of luminance test. (author)

  7. Study of occupational stress among railway engine pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traffic volume and speed is going to be increased in Indian Railways successively, leading to higher stress in staff connected with train operations. The jobs of railway engine pilots come under the category of high-strain jobs, necessitating a need to conduct multicentric study to unfold the factors associated with occupational stress and organizational strategies. Materials and Methods: Present study covered 185 railway engine pilots and office clerks working in various railway zones by incidental method. Occupational Stress Index (OSI test developed by Srivastva and Singh, questionnaire of specific stressors constructed by authors and laboratory test battery for psychological screening of high-speed train pilots were used as tools. Results: Means of OSI and all the 12 occupational stressors of railway engine pilots were found significantly higher to that of office clerks. Means of OSI and occupational stressors of goods train pilots were significantly higher in comparison to high-speed train pilots and passenger train pilots. Study revealed positive correlation of speed perception and complex reaction time tests and negative correlation of other constituent tests of laboratory test battery to OSI test. Highest subgroup of stressor observedwas role overload followed by role conflict. Conclusions: These findings provide a prima facie evidence of higher occupational stress among railway engine pilots because of identified specific stressors prevalent in their job and explore the possible intervention strategies for its reduction. Significant correlation is noticed between OSI and laboratory test results, indicating its relevant utility in preliminary psychological screening.

  8. Study of occupational stress among railway engine pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Devesh; Singh, Jai Vir; Kharwar, Poonam S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traffic volume and speed is going to be increased in Indian Railways successively, leading to higher stress in staff connected with train operations. The jobs of railway engine pilots come under the category of high-strain jobs, necessitating a need to conduct multicentric study to unfold the factors associated with occupational stress and organizational strategies. Materials and Methods: Present study covered 185 railway engine pilots and office clerks working in various railway zones by incidental method. Occupational Stress Index (OSI) test developed by Srivastva and Singh, questionnaire of specific stressors constructed by authors and laboratory test battery for psychological screening of high-speed train pilots were used as tools. Results: Means of OSI and all the 12 occupational stressors of railway engine pilots were found significantly higher to that of office clerks. Means of OSI and occupational stressors of goods train pilots were significantly higher in comparison to high-speed train pilots and passenger train pilots. Study revealed positive correlation of speed perception and complex reaction time tests and negative correlation of other constituent tests of laboratory test battery to OSI test. Highest subgroup of stressor observedwas role overload followed by role conflict. Conclusions: These findings provide a prima facie evidence of higher occupational stress among railway engine pilots because of identified specific stressors prevalent in their job and explore the possible intervention strategies for its reduction. Significant correlation is noticed between OSI and laboratory test results, indicating its relevant utility in preliminary psychological screening. PMID:21808497

  9. "Is Your Man Stepping Out?" An Online Pilot Study to Evaluate Acceptability of a Guide-Enhanced HIV Prevention Soap Opera Video Series and Feasibility of Recruitment by Facebook Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel; Lacroix, Lorraine J; Nolte, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Love, Sex, and Choices (LSC) is a 12-episode soap opera video series developed to reduce HIV risk among at-risk Black urban women. We added a video guide commentator to offer insights at critical dramatic moments. An online pilot study evaluated acceptability of the Guide-Enhanced LSC (GELSC) and feasibility of Facebook advertising, streaming to smartphones, and retention. Facebook ads targeted high-HIV-prevalence areas. In 30 days, Facebook ads generated 230 screening interviews: 84 were high risk, 40 watched GELSC, and 39 followed up at 30 days. Recruitment of high-risk participants was 10 per week, compared to seven per week in previous field recruitment. Half the sample was Black; 12% were Latina. Findings suggest GELSC influenced sex scripts and behaviors. It was feasible to recruit young urban women from a large geographic area via Facebook and to retain the sample. We extended the reach to at-risk women by streaming to mobile devices.

  10. Evaluation of the midwifery pilot projects in Quebec: an overview. L'Equipe d'Evaluation des Projets-Pilotes Sages-Femmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, R; Joubert, P

    2000-01-01

    In 1990, the province of Quebec adopted a law authorizing the evaluation of the practice of midwifery through eight pilot projects. The projects, which took the form of birth centres outside hospitals, started operating in 1994. The objectives of the evaluation were 1) to compare midwives' services to current physician services with regard to maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity, the use of obstetrical intervention, individualization and continuity of care as perceived by clients, and cost; and 2) to identify the professional and organizational factors associated with the integration of midwives into the health care system. A mixed evaluative design was used: a multiple case study with each pilot project representing a case and a cohort study where 1,000 women followed by midwives in the birth centres were matched with 1,000 women followed by physicians in the usual hospital-based services. Various quantitative and qualitative data collection instruments were used. Overall, many results were favourable to midwifery practice, while some were favourable to medical care. Following the evaluation, the Government of Quebec decided to legalize the practice of midwifery.

  11. Poverty and Gender Perspective in Productive Projects for Rural Women in Mexico: Impact Evaluation of a Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquieta-Salomon, Jose E.; Tepichin-Valle, Ana Maria; Tellez-Rojo, Martha Maria

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot study that promoted productive and capacity-building activities among deprived rural women of Mexico. The evaluation design is observational; 1,278 women are interviewed, and the comparison group is estimated by propensity score matching. The results show a positive impact on the…

  12. Poverty and Gender Perspective in Productive Projects for Rural Women in Mexico: Impact Evaluation of a Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquieta-Salomon, Jose E.; Tepichin-Valle, Ana Maria; Tellez-Rojo, Martha Maria

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot study that promoted productive and capacity-building activities among deprived rural women of Mexico. The evaluation design is observational; 1,278 women are interviewed, and the comparison group is estimated by propensity score matching. The results show a positive impact on the…

  13. A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVocht, James W; Goertz, Christine M; Hondras, Maria

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular pain has multiple etiologies and a range of therapeutic options. In this pilot study, the authors assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to evaluate chiropractic treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). METHODS: The authors assigned 80...... the study design and methodology to be manageable. They gained substantial knowledge to aid in conducting a larger study. AMCT, RIST and self-care should be evaluated in a future comparative effectiveness study. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: This pilot study was a necessary step to prepare for a larger study...

  14. [Evaluation of eight Clinical Protocols and Therapeutic Guidelines under the Brazilian Ministry of Health using the AGREE II instrument: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsoni, Ricardo De March; Pereira, Claudia Cristina de Aguiar; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Osanai, Mário Henrique; Machado, Carla Jorge

    2015-06-01

    The number of clinical guidelines is increasing worldwide, while there are concerns regarding their quality. In 2000, the Brazilian Ministry of Health began its process of creating clinical guidelines, called Clinical Protocols and Therapeutic Guidelines (PCDT). The goal of this study was to assess the quality of Brazilian guidelines approved since 2009 using the AGREE II instrument (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation). We identified 59 PCDT from 2009 to 2012, of which eight were randomly selected and evaluated by three independent evaluators. For the item "recommends the guidelines", two evaluators recommended the use of all eight, but with modifications, and one did not recommend any to the guidelines. Regarding the item "global quality of the guidelines" (varying from 1 to 7), the mean was 4.25 (SD = 0.46). The results showed the need for adjustments in the PCDT in relation to AGREE II domains. However, due to the instrument's limitations, further studies are needed, including the quality of evidence used in the PCDT.

  15. Evaluation and Justification of an RFID Implementation : Pilot at IKEA Customer Distribution Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Björn; Qviberg, Ola

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this final thesis isto develop a model for justification and evaluation of RFID technology. RFID is a new, relatively untested, technology using radio signals for automatic identification of different objects. Our theoretical frame of references focuses on research about RFID and implementation iss ues, we also conducted case studies and interviews in order to learn about RFID. Most RFID installations of today are Pilots or early adopters wanting to try new technology. A lot of...

  16. Evaluation of UK Integrated Care Pilots: research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Tom; Bardsley, Martin; Adams, John; Lewis, Richard; Roland, Martin

    2010-09-27

    In response to concerns that the needs of the aging population for well-integrated care were increasing, the English National Health Service (NHS) appointed 16 Integrated Care Pilots following a national competition. The pilots have a range of aims including development of new organisational structures to support integration, changes in staff roles, reducing unscheduled emergency hospital admissions, reduced length of hospital stay, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing cost. This paper describes the evaluation of the initiative which has been commissioned. A mixed methods approach has been adopted including interviews with staff and patients, non-participant observation of meetings, structured written feedback from sites, questionnaires to patients and staff, and analysis of routinely collected hospital utilisation data for patients/service users. The qualitative analysis aims to identify the approaches taken to integration by the sites, the benefits which result, the context in which benefits have resulted, and the mechanisms by which they occur. The quantitative analysis adopts a 'difference in differences' approach comparing health care utilisation before and after the intervention with risk-matched controls. The qualitative data analysis adopts a 'theory of change' approach in which we triangulate data from the quantitative analysis with qualitative data in order to describe causal effects (what happens when an independent variable changes) and causal mechanisms (what connects causes to their effects). An economic analysis will identify what incremental resources are required to make integration succeed and how they can be combined efficiently to produce better outcomes for patients. This evaluation will produce a portfolio of evidence aimed at strengthening the evidence base for integrated care, and in particular identifying the context in which interventions are likely to be effective. These data will support a series of evaluation judgements aimed

  17. Process evaluation of a tailored mobile health intervention aiming to reduce fatigue in airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Alwin; Boot, Cécile R L; Hlobil, Hynek; Smid, Tjabe; van der Beek, Allard J

    2016-08-26

    MORE Energy is a mobile health intervention which aims to reduce fatigue and improve health in airline pilots. The primary objective of this process evaluation was to assess the reach, dose delivered, compliance, fidelity, barriers and facilitators, and satisfaction of the intervention. The second objective was to investigate the associations of adherence to the intervention with compliance and with participant satisfaction. Thirdly, we investigated differences between the subgroups within the target population. The intervention consisted of a smartphone application, supported by a website. It provided advice on optimal light exposure, sleep, nutrition, and physical activity, tailored to flight and personal characteristics. The reach of the intervention was determined by comparing the intervention group participants and the airline pilots who did not participate. The dose delivered was defined as the total number of participants that was sent an instruction email. Objective compliance was measured through the Control Management System of the application. To determine the fidelity, an extensive log was kept throughout the intervention period. Subjective compliance, satisfaction, barriers, facilitators, and adherence were assessed using online questionnaires. Associations between the extent to which the participants applied the advice in daily life (adherence), compliance, and satisfaction were analysed as well. Finally, outcomes of participants of different age groups and haul types were compared. A total of 2222 pilots were made aware of the study. From this group, 502 pilots met the inclusion criteria and did agree to participate. The reach of the study proved to be 22 % and the dose delivered was 99 %. The included pilots were randomized into the intervention group (n = 251) or the control group (n = 251). Of the intervention group participants, 81 % consulted any advice, while 17 % did this during four weeks or more. Fidelity was 67 %. The

  18. Pilot Study to Evaluate the Effect of Topical Dimethicone on Clinical Signs and Skin Barrier Function in Dogs with Naturally Occurring Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Pellicoro, C.; R. Marsella; Ahrens, K

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a skin protectant solution (dimethicone 2%) on clinical signs and skin barrier function in canine atopic dermatitis (AD). Eighteen dogs with AD were randomly divided into two groups, one received dimethicone and the other received the vehicle (cyclomethicone) on selected areas (pinnae, groin, and axillae) daily for 4 weeks. Owners and investigators were blinded regarding group allocation. Clinical efficacy was evaluated using a scoring system and skin ba...

  19. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

    2003-09-20

    A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

  20. Pilot plant study for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.S. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-02-01

    Most of domestic alcohol fermentation factory adopt batch process of which productivity is lower than continuous fermentation process. They have made great effort to increase productivity by means of partial unit process automatization and process improvement with their accumulated experience but there is technical limitation in productivity of batch fermentation process. To produce and supply fuel alcohol, economic aspects must be considered first of all. Therefore, development of continuous fermentation process, of which productivity is high, is prerequisite to produce and use fuel alcohol but only a few foreign company possess continuous fermentation technic and use it in practical industrial scale fermentation. We constructed pilot plant (5 Stage CSTR 1 kl 99.5 v/v% ethanol/Day scale) to study some aspects stated below and our ultimate aims are production of industrial scale fuel alcohol and construction of the plant by ourselves. Some study concerned with energy saving separation and contamination control technic were entrusted to KAIST, A-ju university and KIST respectively. (author) 67 refs., 100 figs., 58 tabs.

  1. Climatotherapy in Japan: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Hitomi; Kusaka, Yukinori; Hirai, Takayoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko; Schuh, Angela

    2017-08-01

    Twenty-nine urban inhabitants participated in a half-day climatotherapy programme at the moderate mountain area and lowland area in the northwest part of the main island of Japan. The current study was aimed to investigate physically and mentally the objective and subjective influence of our short programme, which was a prospective pilot study of single intervention. Blood pressure was significantly descended during terrain cure at the uphill mountain path and returned after fresh-air rest cure, while there was no significant change throughout the programme at lowland flat path. Heart rate was significantly ascended and descended at both area, and more clearly changed at the mountain path. Profile of Mood Status brief form Japanese version administered before and after our half-day programme. Age adjusted T score of negative subscales, `tension-anxiety', `depression', `anger-hostility', `fatigue' and `confusion' were significantly lower after climatotherapy at both sites. Whereas, there was no significant change concerning `vigour' score. This short-version climatotherapy programme has been designed for people without enough time for long stay at health resort. It turned out our half-day climatotherapy programme contribute to mood status improvement. In addition, repeated practice of our short-version programme including endurance exercise with cool body shell using uphill path can be expected that blood pressure will go toward the normal range and heart rate will decrease both in usual time and during exercise. Therefore, health benefits can be expected of this climatotherapy programme.

  2. Comparison of dual-source CT angiography and MR angiography in preoperative evaluation of intra- and extracranial vessels: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlenbruch, Georg; Das, Marco; Mahnken, Andreas Horst; Guenther, Rolf W. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Mommertz, Gottfried; Langer, Stefan [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Vascular Surgery, Aachen (Germany); Schaaf, Meike; Thron, A.; Krings, Timo [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Wildberger, Joachim Ernst [University Hospital Maastricht, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    Besides the assessment of carotid artery stenosis, evaluation of the vascular anatomy and lesions within both the extra- and intracranial arteries is crucial for proper clinical evaluation, treatment choice and planning. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the potential of dual-source CTA and 3T-MRA. In 16 symptomatic CAS patients, contrast-enhanced DSCT and 3T-MRA examinations were performed. For DSCT a dual-energy protocol with a 64 x 0.6-mm collimation was applied. In 3T-MRA intracranial high-resolution unenhanced TOF and extracranial contrast-enhanced MRA were performed. All examinations were analyzed for relevant morphologic and pathologic features or anomalies, and a total of 624 vessel segments were scored. All examinations were of diagnostic image quality with good to excellent vessel visibility. Almost all intracranial arteries were significantly better visualized by MRA compared to CTA (five of six vessels, p < 0.05). DSCT however allowed for further morphological carotid stenosis description, especially with respect to calcification. Although MRA proved to be superior in visualization of smaller intracranial arteries, all pre-interventionally relevant information could be perceived from DSCT. DSCT and MRA may both be regarded as a reliable, fast, pre-interventional imaging investigation in patients with carotid artery stenosis. (orig.)

  3. Comparative evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and bioaggregate as apical barrier material in traumatized nonvital, immature teeth: A clinical pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuloglu, N; Bayrak, S

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research examining the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as an apical barrier material are limited, and no studies have so far examined the clinical performance of BioAggregate as apical barrier material in nonvital immature teeth. This study was aimed to provide a comparative evaluation of the clinical and radiographic success of MTA and BioAggregate as an apical barrier material in children with traumatized nonvital, immature permanent maxillary incisors. A total of 26 maxillary incisor teeth in 20 children aged 7-11 were chosen for this study. Teeth were randomly divided into two groups according to the material to be applied, and the apical barrier was performed. Following treatment, for 24-month, teeth were clinically and radiographically evaluated once every 3- and 6-month, respectively. All teeth treated with MTA and BioAggregate were clinically and radiographically successful throughout the 24-month follow-up period. Similar success was achieved in the apical barrier that using BioAggregate and MTA. BioAggregate would be considered suitable materials for apical barrier technique and can be used as an alternative to MTA.

  4. Post-operative rounds by anaesthesiologists after hip fracture surgery: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Christensen, Dorte Stig; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    conditions. CONCLUSION: This pilot study, with insufficient power to show significant differences in outcome, supports further evaluation of the concept of intensified orthopaedic-anaesthesiological co-operation after hip fracture surgery. Such a randomized trial should evaluate economic and clinical outcome...

  5. LAM Pilot Study with Imatinib Mesylate (LAMP-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0132 TITLE: LAM Pilot Study with Imatinib Mesylate ( LAMP -1) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Charlie...AND SUBTITLE LAM Pilot Study with Imatinib Mesylate ( LAMP -1) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0132 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The LAMP -1 study is

  6. PILOT-SCALE STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF BROMINE ADDITION ON THE EMISSIONS OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper reports on a study to evaluate organic combustion by-product emissions while feeding varying amounts of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) into a pilot-scale incinerator burning surrogate waste materials. (NOTE: Adding brominated organic compounds to a pilot-scale incinerat...

  7. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS as a useful tool to evaluate the treatment efficacy of positive airways pressure therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxing Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA the periodic reduction or cessation of breathing due to narrowing or occlusion of the upper airway during sleep leads to an impaired cerebral vascular autoregulation that is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk, including stroke. Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP therapy at night is the most effective treatment for OSA and has been shown to reduce the cardiovascular risk in OSA patients. However, there is no suitable bedside monitoring method evaluating the recovery of cerebral hemodynamics during CPAP therapy. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is ideally suited for non-invasive monitoring the cerebral hemodynamics during sleep due to its properties of local measurement, totally safe application and good tolerance to motion. In this pilot study, we monitored cerebral hemodynamics during standard CPAP therapy at night in three patients with severe OSA using NIRS. We found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, tissue oxygenation index (TOI and blood volume (BV associated with periodic apnea events without CPAP in all OSA patients. These oscillations were eliminated under the optimal CPAP pressures in all patients. These results suggested that the recovery of cerebral hemodynamics impaired by apnea events can be evaluated by bedside NIRS measurements in real time during all night CPAP therapy. NIRS is a useful bedside monitoring tool to evaluate the treatment efficacy of CPAP therapy in patients with OSA.

  8. [Dental caries and early childhood development: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, F Loreto; Sanz, B Javier; Mejía, L Gloria

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between dental caries and early childhood development in 3-year-olds from Talca, Chile. A pilot study with a convenience sample of 3-year-olds from Talca (n = 39) who attend public healthcare centers. Child development was measured by the Psychomotor Development Index (PDI), a screening tool used nationally among pre-school children to assess language development, fine motor skills and coordination areas. Dental caries prevalence was evaluated by decayed, missing, filled teeth (DFMT) and decayed, missing, filled tooth surfaces (DFMS) ceo-d and ceo-s indexes. The children were divided into two groups according to the PDIscore: those with a score of 40 or more were considered developmentally normal (n = 32), and those with a score below 40 were considered as having impaired development (n = 7). The severity of caries (DMFT) was negatively correlated with PDI (r = -0.82), and children with the lowest TEPSI score had the highest DFMT values. The average DMFT in children with normal development was 1.31, and 3.57 for those with impaired development. This pilot study indicates that the severity of dental caries is correlated with early childhood development. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. Noninvasive evaluation of collagen and hemoglobin contents and scattering property of in vivo keloid scars and normal skin using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Sheng-Hao; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Yu-Yun Lee, Julia; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Chen, Wan-Rung; Liaw, Yu-Kai

    2012-07-01

    Collagen is a rich component in skin that provides skin structure integrity; however, its contribution to the absorption and scattering properties of various types of skin has not been extensively studied. We considered the contribution of the collagen to the absorption spectrum of in vivo normal skin and keloids of 12 subjects derived from our diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system in the wavelength range from 550 to 860 nm. It was found that the collagen concentration, the hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and the reduced scattering coefficient of keloids were remarkably different from that of normal skin. Our results suggest that our DRS system could assist clinicians in understanding the functional and structural condition of keloid scars. In the future, we will evaluate the accuracy of our system in the keloid diagnosis and investigate the applicability of our system for other skin-collagen-related studies.

  10. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study. ... of microbes that cause infections are helpful to determine proper antibiotic therapy. ... including extended spectrum beta lactamase producing strains of Proteus ...

  11. 1999 ANNUAL REPORT NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This annual report present the proceedings of the second annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Belfast, UK in March 1999. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the research arena of clean products, clean processes, and pollution prevention tools.

  12. Synthetic Vision Systems in GA Cockpit-Evaluation of Basic Maneuvers Performed by Low Time GA Pilots During Transition from VMC to IMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takallu, M. A.; Wong, D. T.; Uenking, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the effectiveness of modern flight displays in general aviation cockpits for mitigating Low Visibility Loss of Control and the Controlled Flight Into Terrain accidents. A total of 18 General Aviation (GA) pilots with private pilot, single engine land rating, with no additional instrument training beyond private pilot license requirements, were recruited to evaluate three different display concepts in a fixed-based flight simulator at the NASA Langley Research Center's General Aviation Work Station. Evaluation pilots were asked to continue flight from Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) into Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) while performing a series of 4 basic precision maneuvers. During the experiment, relevant pilot/vehicle performance variables, pilot control inputs and physiological data were recorded. Human factors questionnaires and interviews were administered after each scenario. Qualitative and quantitative data have been analyzed and the results are presented here. Pilot performance deviations from the established target values (errors) were computed and compared with the FAA Practical Test Standards. Results of the quantitative data indicate that evaluation pilots committed substantially fewer errors when using the Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) displays than when they were using conventional instruments. Results of the qualitative data indicate that evaluation pilots perceived themselves to have a much higher level of situation awareness while using the SVS display concept.

  13. Clinical evaluation of XaraColl®, a bupivacaine-collagen implant, for postoperative analgesia in two multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cusack SL

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan L Cusack,1 Mark Jaros,2 Michael Kuss,3 Harold S Minkowitz,4 Peter Winkle,5 Lisa Hemsen61Cusack Pharmaceutical Consulting, Burlington, NJ, 2Summit Analytical, Denver, CO, USA; 3Premier Research Group, Austin, TX, USA; 4Memorial Hermann Memorial City Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA; 5Advanced Clinical Research Institute, Anaheim, CA, USA; 6Innocoll Technologies, Athlone, IrelandBackground: XaraColl®, a collagen-based implant that delivers bupivacaine to the site of surgical trauma, is under development for postoperative analgesia. Because of differing patient attitudes to postoperative pain control and the inability to assess baseline pain, standard clinical methods for evaluating analgesic efficacy are compromised and justify application of novel integrated approaches.Methods: We conducted two independent, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in men undergoing unilateral inguinal hernioplasty by open laparotomy to evaluate the safety and efficacy of XaraColl at different doses (100 mg and 200 mg of bupivacaine hydrochloride; study 1 and 2, respectively. Enrolled patients (50 in study 1 and 53 in study 2 were randomized to receive active or placebo implants in a 1:1 ratio. Postoperative pain intensity and use of supplementary opioid medication were recorded through 72 hours. Safety was assessed through 30 days. The principal efficacy variables were the summed pain intensity (SPI, total use of opioid analgesia (TOpA, and an integrated endpoint (I-SPI-TOpA. Each variable was analyzed at 24, 48, and 72 hours after implantation. A pooled analysis of both studies was also performed retrospectively.Results: Through 24 and 48 hours, XaraColl-treated patients experienced significantly less pain in study 1 (P < 0.001 and P = 0.012, respectively whereas they took significantly less opioid analgesia in study 2 (P = 0.004 and P = 0.042, respectively. Over the same time intervals in the pooled analysis, treated patients experienced

  14. Ayurvedic versus conventional dietary and lifestyle counseling for mothers with burnout-syndrome: A randomized controlled pilot study including a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Christian S; Eisenmann, Clemens; Oberzaucher, Frank; Forster, Martin; Steckhan, Nico; Meier, Larissa; Stapelfeldt, Elmar; Michalsen, Andreas; Jeitler, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Ayurveda claims to be effective in the treatment of psychosomatic disorders by means of lifestyle and nutritional counseling. In a randomized controlled study mothers with burnout were randomized into two groups: Ayurvedic nutritional counseling (according to tradition), and conventional nutritional counseling (following the recommendations of a family doctor). Patients received five counseling sessions over twelve weeks. Outcomes included levels of burnout, quality of life, sleep, stress, depression/anxiety, and spirituality at three and six months. It also included a qualitative evaluation of the communication processes. We randomized thirty four patients; twenty three participants were included in the per protocol analysis. No significant differences were observed between the groups. However, significant and clinically relevant intra-group mean changes for the primary outcome burnout, and secondary outcomes sleep, stress, depression and mental health were only found in the Ayurveda group. The qualitative part of the study identified different conversational styles and counseling techniques between the two study groups. In conventional consultations questions tended to be category bound, while counseling-advice was predominantly admonitory. The Ayurvedic practitioner used open-ended interrogative forms, devices for displaying understanding, and positive re-evaluation more frequently, leading to an overall less asymmetrical interaction. We found positive effects for both groups, which however were more pronounced in the Ayurvedic group. The conversational and counseling techniques in the Ayurvedic group offered more opportunities for problem description by patients as well as patient-centered practice and resource-oriented recommendations by the physician. NCT01797887. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A human rights-focused HIV intervention for sex workers in Metro Manila, Philippines: evaluation of effects in a quantitative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urada, Lianne A; Simmons, Janie; Wong, Betty; Tsuyuki, Kiyomi; Condino-Enrera, Gerlita; Hernandez, Laufred I; Simbulan, Nymia Pimentel; Raj, Anita

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated a brief human rights-focused HIV community mobilization intervention for sex workers in the Philippines, a country with one of the fastest rising number of HIV cases worldwide. Five single-session group interventions to reduce sexual risk and increase HIV testing among 86 sex workers in Manila were evaluated with pre-post-test data via Wilcoxon's signed-ranks and Mann-Whitney tests. The 4-h intervention, Kapihan (August-November, 2013), integrated human rights with HIV skill-building. Demographic data, violence/trafficking victimization, human rights knowledge, and intentions to HIV test and treat were collected. Participants were median aged 23; female (69 %); had children (55; 22 % had 3+ children); used drugs (past 3 months: 16 %); sexually/physically abused by clients (66 %); 20 % street sex workers ever took an HIV test. Pre-post-test scores significantly improved in knowledge of HIV (z = -8.895, p human rights (z = -4.391, p rights of research participants (z = -5.081, p human rights into HIV interventions may empower sex workers to address their health and human rights and test for HIV.

  16. Evaluation of anti-microbial activity of spore powder of Ganoderma lucidum on clinical isolates of Prevotella intermedia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganath N Nayak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed at evaluating the anti-microbial activity of spore powder of Ganoderma lucidum on Prevotella intermedia isolated from subgingival plaque from chronic periodontitis patients. Settings and Design: Written informed consent was obtained from each subject enrolled in the study. The Institutional Ethics Committee granted the ethical clearance for the study. Materials and Methods: This study included 20 patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Pooled subgingival plaque samples were collected using sterile curettes from the deepest sites of periodontal pockets. The collected samples were then transported in 1 mL of reduced transport fluid. The organisms were cultured and confirmed. These organisms were then used for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC procedure. Statistical Analysis: Mean of the MIC value obtained was calculated. Results: Thirteen out of the 20 clinical samples were tested that showed sensitivity at various concentrations. Five samples showed sensitivity at all concentrations. Twelve samples showed sensitivity at 8 mcg/ml. Eleven samples showed sensitivity at 4 mcg/ml, 8 samples showed sensitivity at 2 mcg/ml, and 5 samples showed sensitivity even at 1 mcg/ml. Mean MIC value of G. lucidum spore powder for P. intermedia obtained was 3.62 mcg/ml. Conclusion: G. lucidum with its multipotential bioactivity could be used as an anti-microbial, in conjunction with conventional therapy in periodontal disease.

  17. CHASE assessment of the North Sea – a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, N.; Andersen, Jesper; Høgåsen, T.;

    In this pilot study, hazardous substances in the North Sea were assessed and classified using the HELCOM Chemical Substances Status Assessment Tool (CHASE). The study was based on monitoring by Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Together, 1350...... assessment and classification of “hazardous substances status”. This can be in particular advantageous for use in remedial action plan and, in particular, for the sciencebased evaluation of whether the North Sea is undisturbed by hazardous substances....... locations (1155 for sediment and 195 for biota) were used resulting in 966 matrices sampled in the open-sea and 506 in coastal areas. CHASE is a multi-metric indicator-based tool developed for the HELCOM integrated thematic assessment of hazardous substances in the Baltic Sea. CHASE produces an integrated...

  18. PILOT STUDY: CCQM-P32 pilot study. Anion calibration solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michael; Wüthrich, Jürg

    2003-01-01

    In the CCQM-P32 pilot study two gravimetrically prepared anion calibration solutions of chloride and phosphate each of about 1 g/kg mass fraction were investigated. The comparison was an activity of the Inorganic Analysis Working Group of CCQM in 2002 and was piloted by the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA). The following institutes participated in this study (in alphabetical order): BAM (Germany), CENAM (Mexico), EMPA (Switzerland), GUM (Poland), KRISS (South Korea), LNE (France), NIST (United States of America), NMIJ (Japan), NRCCRM (China), PTB (Germany), SMU (Slovakia). For the chloride calibration solution 11 participants provided 16 results by the following analytical techniques: coulometry (7), titrimetry (5) and ion chromatography (4). The phosphate amount content was determined by 9 NMIs and 11 results were reported. Phosphate ion chromatography was the most applied technique (4), followed by titrimetry (2), ICP-OES (2), gravimetry (1) and ion-exchange coulometry (1). All results were found within a range of +/-0.5% with respect to the gravimetric value. The variability (RSD) of the results is 0.13% for chloride and 0.26% for phosphate. The reported results of all participants are also graphically displayed in this report. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM Working Group on Inorganic Analysis, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  19. Evaluation of a Web-Based Training Program for Professional Carers Working With People With Learning Disabilities and Challenging Behavior: A Pilot Study with SSED-Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsson, Helena; Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren; Isaksson, Ulf; Åström, Sture; Lundström, Mats O

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between people with intellectual disabilities and professional carers is often influenced by communicative difficulties contributing challenging behaviours. The aims of this study were to evaluate to a web-based training program aimed at improving carers' abilities to interact with people with learning disabilities who exhibit challenging behaviours and to explore carers' experiences of participating in such a program. A single-subject experimental design and mixed methods were used to integrate qualitative and quantitative data. Triangulation of questionnaires, interviews with carers, and assessments of one woman's behaviour was performed. The participants were professional carers aged 20 to 55 years. The web-based training program increased carers' abilities to handle challenging behaviours and decreased challenging behaviours in daily care. The program improved the opportunities to offer training to carers who work in community-based accommodations with limited time to receive training.

  20. Development and evaluation of an optical fibre-based helium–neon laser irradiation system for tissue regeneration: A pilot study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijendra Prabhu; B S Satish Rao; B Nageshwara Rao; B Kiran Aithal; B Satish Shenoy; K K Mahato

    2010-12-01

    Low level laser therapy is being extensively used to treat various medical ailments including wound healing. In the present study, an optical fibre-based helium–neon (He–Ne) laser irradiation system was designed, developed and evaluated for optimum tissue repair on mice excision wounds. Circular wounds of 15 mm diameter were created on the dorsum of animals and single exposure of uniformly distributed laser beam was administered at 1, 2 and 3 J/cm2 to the respective test groups with suitable controls. Progression of healing was monitored by measuring wound contraction and mean healing time. Significant reduction in wound size and mean healing time ( < 0.001) were observed in the test groups for the laser dose of 2 J/cm2 compared to the unilluminated controls, suggesting the suitability of this dose.

  1. The evaluation of the clinical effect of topical St Johns wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) in plaque type psoriasis vulgaris: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafizadeh, Parvaneh; Hashemian, Farshad; Mansouri, Parvin; Farshi, Susan; Surmaghi, Mohammadhossein Salehi; Chalangari, Reza

    2012-05-01

    In this case series, ten patients with plaque-type psoriasis were treated with Hypericum perforatum ointment. The hypericum ointment was applied to one side of each patient's body and the vehicle to the opposite side twice daily for 4 weeks in a single blinded manner. Modified psoriasis area severity index (PASI) scores were significantly lowered where the formulated ointment had been applied. In determining PASI scores, three factors, erythema, scaling and thickness, were evaluated; all were significantly lower where the formulated ointment had been applied (P = 0.01, P = 0.004, P = 0.04). Hypericum perforatum ointment applied twice daily may be effective in reducing PASI scores in mild plaque-type psoriasis, however, further larger studies need be conducted to achieve a more conclusive result.

  2. Evaluation of psycho-social training for speech therapists in oncology. Impact on general communication skills and empathy. A qualitative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Peter; Wollbrück, Dorit; Danker, Helge; Singer, Susanne

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a psychosocial training programme for speech therapists on their performance skills in patient-therapist communication in general and empathy in particular. Twenty-three speech therapists were interviewed in a pseudo-randomised controlled trial. Communication skills were tested using questionnaires with open questions. Respondents were asked to find adequate replies to clinical vignettes. The vignettes briefly described a patient's physical state and contained a statement from the patient expressing some distress. Answers were coded with qualitative content analysis. Communication skills improved considerably in terms of frequency of conducive communication (especially empathy) and width of conducive communicative repertoire. Negative communication preferences were reduced. Psychosocial training for speech therapists can improve communication skills manifestly and is therefore recommended for further use.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of two different occlusal splints on maximum occlusal force in patients with sleep bruxism: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Arife; Bek, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The occlusal splint has been used for many years as an effective treatment of sleep bruxism. Several methods have been used to evaluate efficiency of the occlusal splints. However, the effect of the occlusal splints on occlusal force has not been clarified sufficiently. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of occlusal splints on maximum occlusal force in patients with sleep bruxism and compare two type of splints that are Bruxogard-soft splint and canine protected hard stabilization splint. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twelve students with sleep bruxism were participated in the present study. All participants used two different occlusal splints during sleep for 6 weeks. Maximum occlusal force was measured with two miniature strain-gage transducers before, 3 and 6 weeks after insertion of occlusal splints. Clinical examination of temporomandibular disorders was performed for all individuals according to the Craniomandibular Index (CMI) before and 6 weeks after the insertion of splints. The changes in mean occlusal force before, 3 and 6 weeks after insertion of both splints were analysed with paired sample t-test. The Wilcoxon test was used for the comparison of the CMI values before and 6 weeks after the insertion of splints. RESULTS Participants using stabilization splints showed no statistically significant changes in occlusal force before, 3, and 6 weeks after insertion of splint (P>.05) and participants using Bruxogard-soft splint had statistically significant decreased occlusal force 6 weeks after insertion of splint (P<.05). There was statistically significant improvement in the CMI value of the participants in both of the splint groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION Participants who used Bruxogard-soft splint showed decreases in occlusal force 6 weeks after insertion of splint. The use of both splints led to a significant reduction in the clinical symptoms. PMID:24843394

  4. Evaluating the effects of diffused lavender in an adult day care center for patients with dementia in an effort to decrease behavioral issues: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman Li, Robin; Gilbert, Brian; Orman, Anna; Aldridge, Petra; Leger-Krall, Sue; Anderson, Clare; Hincapie Castillo, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the effects of diffused lavender on the frequency of behavioral issues [BIs], defined as a composite of restlessness/wandering [RW], agitation [AGT], anger [ANG], and anxiety [ANX] in an adult day care center. Secondary objectives evaluate systematic differences on the frequency of BIs between age cohorts, gender, and individual behaviors. Design: Pre-post quasi-experimental study. Setting: Private nonprofit adult day care center for patients with dementia. Participants: Elderly patients older than 65 years of age with a clinical diagnosis of dementia, who require daytime monitoring. Intervention: Lavender aromatherapy twice a day for 20 min during a two-month period during active clinic days. Measurements: Behavioral issues were recorded using the behavior/intervention monthly flow record during the pre- and post-intervention periods. Results: There was no significant difference on frequency of BIs between pre-intervention and post-intervention periods (p = .06). There was a significant difference between pre-intervention and post-intervention total number of AGT occurrences (129 vs. 25; p value < .01). There was no significant difference between age cohorts for computed difference of RW, ANG, and ANX issues. There was a significant difference between age cohorts for computed difference of AGT (p value = .04) as the 70–85 age cohort showed less agitation compared to the 85–100 age cohort. Conclusion: The use of diffused lavender twice daily has shown to reduce the frequency of agitation in elderly patients with dementia, especially in the 70–85 age cohort. Though diffused lavender did not show statistical differences in the frequency of other behaviors (restlessness/wander, anger, anxiety), the study population may have been too small to find a difference.

  5. Skeletal Muscle in Healthy Subjects versus Those with GNE-Related Myopathy: Evaluation with Shear-Wave US--A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Elizabeth L; Lau, Heather A; Kolodny, Edwin H; Adler, Ronald S

    2015-11-01

    To determine whether quantitative differences in shear-wave velocity (SWV) exist between normal skeletal muscle and those affected by GNE-related myopathy and to examine the effects of muscle anisotropy, depth, and axial preload on SWV in a healthy control group. This study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. Informed consent was obtained from all study volunteers. Eight patients (four women and four men aged 30-50 years) with genetically and biopsy-proved GNE-related myopathy and five healthy volunteers (three women and two men aged 27-33 years) underwent SWV imaging with use of a 9-MHz linear transducer. The gastrocnemius muscles were evaluated in the patients with GNE-related myopathy, and the gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles were evaluated in the healthy cohort. The effect of muscle anisotropy, axial preload, and sample volume depth were examined in the healthy cohort. The effect of anisotropy at a fixed depth and preload were examined in the patients with GNE-related myopathy. Irrespective of the muscle, the mean SWV was significantly higher with the transverse orientation than with the longitudinal orientation (P < .001). In the healthy cohort, the mean SWV for superficial measurements was significantly lower than that for deep measurements (P < .02). The mean SWV with preload was significantly higher with compression (P < .001) for the rectus femoris only. The mean SWV was significantly lower in patients with GNE-related myopathy than in control subjects (P < .02). SWV parametric imaging may provide a useful quantitative adjunct in the assessment of disease activity in patients with GNE-related myopathy. There is diminished SWV and muscle anisotropy in GNE-related myopathy. © RSNA, 2015

  6. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of Biotène Oral Balance in patients with secondary Sjögren's syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliko, Ardita; Alushi, Adem; Tafaj, Argjend; Isufi, Ramazan

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of Oral Balance saliva substitute in alleviating dry mouth symptoms in a sample of patients with secondary Sjögren's syndrome. Twenty-one consecutive secondary Sjögren's syndrome patients with dry mouth complaints and hyposalivation were included in this study. Patients used a lactoperoxidase-system-containing gel (Biotène Oral Balance) for 4 weeks. The effects on subjective oral symptoms were recorded by means of a 7-items questionnaire which contained questions regarding dry mouth sensation and its effect on chewing, swallowing, taste, speech, burning sensation and denture retention. The severity of symptoms was assessed using a visual analogical scale. Oral symptom scores and unstimulated whole salivary flow were recorded at baseline and after 4 weeks' use of the product. Two patients withdrew from the study, because of nausea and unpleasant taste caused by the product. Nineteen patients (all women, mean age 52.7 years) participated throughout the entire study. Wilcoxon signed-ranked tests indicated significant improvements in visual analogical scale scores posttreatment for 5 of the 7 items on the oral dryness questionnaire, although no increase in salivary flow was found. However, the improvement in certain variables did not take a positive course in all cases. Patients with lower salivary flow at baseline tended to have greater improvement in oral symptoms. The study suggests that the use of Oral Balance gel is effective in alleviating the dry mouth symptoms in secondary Sjögren's syndrome patients, but a randomized controlled trial is needed to assess the placebo effect.

  7. Evaluation of blood levels of nitric oxide as a means of differentiation between neonatal hepatitis and extrahepatic biliary atresia: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Prabudh; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar; Das, Nibhriti; Kalaivani, Mani

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The differentiation between neonatal hepatitis (NH) and extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA) is not always possible despite all the currently available diagnostic modalities. In this study, an attempt has been made to evaluate the role of nitric oxide (NO) levels in the peripheral blood to differentiate between the two conditions, one requiring early surgical intervention (EHBA) and the other amenable to conservative medical management (NH). Patients and Methods: Twenty patients who presented to the pediatric surgical service, over a 2 years period, with features of neonatal cholestasis were enrolled in the study. The diagnostic workup included documentation of history and clinical examination, biochemical liver function tests, ultrasonography, hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HS), and magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreaticography (MRCP). These patients did not show excretion on HS and intrahepatic ducts on MRCP. Hence, they were subjected to mini-laparotomy and operative cholangiography (OC). The EHBA patients were treated with the Kasai's portoenterostomy procedure, and the extrahepatic ducts were flushed with normal saline in NH patients. All patients were evaluated preoperatively for levels of NO in the peripheral blood by the Greiss reaction spectrophotometrically at 540 nm. Normal values were determined from a cohort of controls. The median (range) levels of NO in patients with EHBA and NH were compared, and the statistical significance of the difference was calculated by applying the Wilcox Rank Sum test. A P = 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Of the 20 patients enrolled in the study, 17 patients were treated for EHBA (Group I) and the remaining 3 patients had patent ducts on OC and were thus diagnosed as NH (Group II). The mean age of the patients in Groups I and II was comparable: 2.79 ± 0.75 and 2.67 ± 0.58 months, respectively (P = 0.866). The median NO levels were significantly elevated in each of the two groups as compared to the controls

  8. Energy Evaluation of a New Construction Pilot Community: Fresno, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, A.; Poerschke, A.; Rapport, A.; Wayne, M.

    2014-06-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  9. Evaluation of thirteen civil infrastructure monitoring pilots in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, G.T.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Drieman, R.

    2016-01-01

    The number of monitoring pilots in Dutch civil infrastructure with sensing systems is increasing only slowly over the last decade. To identify and help understand barriers for wider implementation of moni-toring systems, SBRCURnet-committee 1992 analysed 13 monitoring pilots. The committee consisted

  10. Informing efficient randomised controlled trials: exploration of challenges in developing progression criteria for internal pilot studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Paula R; Gamble, Carrol; O'Connell Francischetto, Elaine; Metcalfe, Chris; Davidson, Peter; Williams, Hywel; Blazeby, Jane M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Designing studies with an internal pilot phase may optimise the use of pilot work to inform more efficient randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Careful selection of preagreed decision or ‘progression’ criteria at the juncture between the internal pilot and main trial phases provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the likely success of the main trial and optimise its design or, if necessary, to make the decision not to proceed with the main trial. Guidance on the appropriate selection and application of progression criteria is, however, lacking. This paper outlines the key issues to consider in the optimal development and review of operational progression criteria for RCTs with an internal pilot phase. Design A structured literature review and exploration of stakeholders' opinions at a Medical Research Council (MRC) Hubs for Trials Methodology Research workshop. Key stakeholders included triallists, methodologists, statisticians and funders. Results There is considerable variation in the use of progression criteria for RCTs with an internal pilot phase, although 3 common issues predominate: trial recruitment, protocol adherence and outcome data. Detailed and systematic reporting around the decision-making process for stopping, amending or proceeding to a main trial is uncommon, which may hamper understanding in the research community about the appropriate and optimal use of RCTs with an internal pilot phase. 10 top tips for the development, use and reporting of progression criteria for internal pilot studies are presented. Conclusions Systematic and transparent reporting of the design, results and evaluation of internal pilot trials in the literature should be encouraged in order to facilitate understanding in the research community and to inform future trials. PMID:28213598

  11. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume I. Evaluation summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    The EES pilot program was initiated in August 1977, when 10 states were selected on a competitive basis for participation. The pilot states (Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) devoted the first 6 months to start-up activities. This document is a follow-up report to the three volume Evaluation Summary of the first year of the pilot EES program published in September 1979. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the impacts and costs of the two years of the pilot program, and to check the consistency of findings over the two year period. The analysis addresses the following: (1) were the impact findings of Year I and Year II consistent, or did Year I and Year II attitudes and behavior vary. If variation existed, could it be attributed to program changes as the EES progressed from a start-up phase (Year I) to more normal service delivery (Year II); and (2) did costs of service delivery change (again reflecting start-up and normal service delivery costs). Did cost changes affect conclusions about the relative cost effectiveness of delivering services to different target audiences.

  12. Child voice and noise: a pilot study of noise in day cares and the effects on 10 children's voice quality according to perceptual evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Anita M; Granqvist, Svante; Sjölander, Peta; Sundberg, Johan

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study children's exposure to background noise at the ears during a normal day at the day care center and also to relate this to a perceptual evaluation of voice quality. Ten children, from three day care centers, with no history of hearing and speech problems or frequent infections were selected as subjects. A binaural recording technique was used with two microphones placed on both sides of the subject's head, at equal distance from the mouth. A portable digital audio tape (DAT) recorder (Sony TCD-D 100, Stockholm, Sweden) was attached to the subject's waist. Three recordings were made for each child during the day. Each recording was calibrated and started with three repetitions of three sentences containing only sonorants. The recording technique allowed separate analyses of the background noise level and of the sound pressure level (SPL) of each subjects' own voice. Results showed a mean background noise level for the three day care centers at 82.6dBA Leq, ranging from 81.5 to 83.6dBA Leq. Day care center no. 2 had the highest mean value and also the highest value at any separate recording session with a mean background noise level of 85.4dBA Leq during the noontime recordings. Perceptual evaluation showed that the children attending this day care center also received higher values on the following voice characteristics: hoarseness, breathiness, and hyperfunction. Girls increased their loudness level during the day, whereas for boys no such change could be observed.

  13. EVALUATION OF CYSTICLEAN® CAPSULES, A CRANBERRY EXTRACT WITH HIGH ANTI-ADHESION ACTIVITY, AS MONOTHERAPY IN UNCOMPLICATED CYSTITIS: AN OBSERVATIONAL PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risco E

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Cysticlean® is a cranberry extract product with a high quantity of proanthocyanidins (240 mg/capsule with a significant dose-dependent anti-adhesion activity of Escherichia coli (EC adhered to uroepithelial cells. Previous clinical assays showed that Cysticlean® is a product highly recommended in the prophylaxis and treatment of UTIs. The aim of this study is the evaluation of Cysticlean as an alternative to antibiotics to treat uncomplicated cystitis. Material and Methods This observational study included 30 consecutive ambulatory patients (17 women and 13 men, who were diagnosed of uncomplicated cystitis (UC and agreed to participate in this observational study. Patients were informed to come to visit the doctor again after 15 days after Cysticlean® treatment was started (1 capsule of Cysticlean® every 12 h daily and immediately if signs/symptoms did not disappear. In this case, Cysticlean® was stopped and patients treated with antibiotic. Results: 21 patients were successfully cured with Cysticlean® treatment only (70% and 9 patients needed antibiotic to cure their UC. 82.35% of women and 53.,85% of men did not need antibiotic to be cured. No significant differences at baseline were found regarding signs/symptoms severity between those patients cured with extract alone and those who needed antibiotic. No side effects/adverse reactions were reported. Conclusions: These preliminary data strongly suggest that Cysticlean® could be considered as an alternative to antibiotics for a 1st line treatment of UC. Further clinical studies to confirm whether Cysticlean® could be an alternative to antibiotic treatment for UC and this approach could contribute to reduce world-wide growing antibiotic resistance.

  14. Can evaluation of a dental procedure at the outset of learning predict later performance at the preclinical level? A pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Polyzois, Ioannis

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of conventional pre-clinical training in dentistry and to determine if evaluation of a dental procedure at the beginning of dental training can be a predictor for future performance. A group of second year dental students with no previous experience in operative dentistry were asked to prepare a conventional class I cavity on a lower first molar typodont. Their first preparation was carried out after an introductory lecture and a demonstration and their second at the end of conventional training. The prepared typodonts were coded and blindly scored for the traditional assessment criteria of outline form, retention form, smoothness, cavity depth and cavity margin angulation. Once the codes were broken, a paired t-test was used to compare the difference between the means of before and after scores (P<0.0001) and a Pearson\\'s linear correlation to test the association (r=0.4). From the results of this study, we could conclude that conventional preclinical training results in a significant improvement in the manual skills of the dental students and that the dental procedure used had only a limited predictive value for later performance at the preclinical level.

  15. Modeling and testing maternal and newborn care mHealth interventions: a pilot impact evaluation and follow-up qualitative study in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, José Tomás; Zuleta, Clara; Rodríguez, Jorge Tulio

    2017-03-01

    To develop a descriptive model of structural characteristics of mHealth in the context of newborn nutrition, and to assess the effects of illustrative interventions through a mixed-methods study consisting of an impact evaluation and a qualitative assessment. We conducted a 23-week intervention with 100 mothers in rural Guatemala in 2013 and 2014. In group 1 ( n  = 24), participants received health-promoting text messages. In group 2 ( n  = 32), peer-to-peer groups were formed. In group 3 ( n  = 30), peer-to-peer groups were formed, a health professional participated in the discussions, and participants received health-promoting messages. In the control group ( n  = 14), participants were simply given a mobile phone. We measured changes in knowledge and self-reported behavior. Four focus groups in 2015 showed the perceptions of 44 additional women and the potential of the previously tested interventions in other marginalized areas. Significant relationships were found between group membership and changes in knowledge ( P  mHealth interventions can play an important role in helping to encourage recommended breastfeeding attitudes along with providing rich information about challenges in rural areas. A mixed-methods study was appropriate to compare the effects and assess the potential of mHealth strategies in a complex rural setting.

  16. Evaluation of a pilot hypertension management programme for Guatemalan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Montano, Carlos; Fort, Meredith; deRamirez, Miriam; Cruz, Judith; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Corazón Sano y Feliz is a hypertension management intervention developed to address deficiencies in the management of hypertensive patients in Guatemala. From 2007 to 2009, Corazón Sano y Feliz was pilot-tested in the community of Mixco. Corazón Sano y Feliz comprises a clinical risk assessment and treatment component implemented primarily by nurses, and a health education component implemented by community health workers. To accomplish our secondary objective of determining Corazon Sano y Feliz's potential for change at the patient level, we implemented a one-group pretest-posttest study design to examine changes in clinical measures, knowledge and practices between baseline and the end of the 6-month intervention. Two nurses and one physician set up a hypertension clinic to manage patients according to risk level. Twenty-nine community health workers were trained in CVD risk reduction and health promotion and in turn led six educational sessions for patients. Comparing baseline and 6-month measures, the intervention achieved significant improvements in mean knowledge and behaviour (increase from 54.6 to 59.1 out of a possible 70 points) and significant reductions of mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure (27.2 and 7.7 mmHg), body mass index (from 26.5 to 26.2 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (89.6-88.9 cm). In this pilot study we obtained preliminary evidence that this community-oriented hypertension management and health promotion intervention model was feasible and achieved significant reduction in risk factors. If scaled up, this intervention has the potential to substantially reduce CVD burden. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Novel computer vision algorithm for the reliable analysis of organelle morphology in whole cell 3D images--A pilot study for the quantitative evaluation of mitochondrial fragmentation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschläger, Janin; Lautenschläger, Christian; Tadic, Vedrana; Süße, Herbert; Ortmann, Wolfgang; Denzler, Joachim; Stallmach, Andreas; Witte, Otto W; Grosskreutz, Julian

    2015-11-01

    The function of intact organelles, whether mitochondria, Golgi apparatus or endoplasmic reticulum (ER), relies on their proper morphological organization. It is recognized that disturbances of organelle morphology are early events in disease manifestation, but reliable and quantitative detection of organelle morphology is difficult and time-consuming. Here we present a novel computer vision algorithm for the assessment of organelle morphology in whole cell 3D images. The algorithm allows the numerical and quantitative description of organelle structures, including total number and length of segments, cell and nucleus area/volume as well as novel texture parameters like lacunarity and fractal dimension. Applying the algorithm we performed a pilot study in cultured motor neurons from transgenic G93A hSOD1 mice, a model of human familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In the presence of the mutated SOD1 and upon excitotoxic treatment with kainate we demonstrate a clear fragmentation of the mitochondrial network, with an increase in the number of mitochondrial segments and a reduction in the length of mitochondria. Histogram analyses show a reduced number of tubular mitochondria and an increased number of small mitochondrial segments. The computer vision algorithm for the evaluation of organelle morphology allows an objective assessment of disease-related organelle phenotypes with greatly reduced examiner bias and will aid the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies on a cellular level.

  18. Development of a Korean family attitude scale: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heeyoung; Schepp, Karen G; Jung, Young-Mi

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop and pilot test a Korean version of the Family Attitude Scale (FAS). We developed the Korean FAS using the translation/back-translation method. Two English monolinguals assessed its translation validity by comparing the original with a back-translated English version. Translation equivalence of the FAS and the refined Korean FAS was evaluated in a convenience sample of 56 bilingual Korean college students. The internal consistency of the Korean FAS and the FAS was 0.96 and 0.76, respectively. Mean scores on the two versions did not differ (t = -0.14, p = 0.89). The test-retest correlation coefficient was 0.37 (p < .001). Although the Korean FAS needs further refinement and psychometric testing, it was translated to reflect the original version and was a reliable instrument for the Korean population.

  19. Early caries detection: comparison of two procedures. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Guerra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Caries is one of the most common chronic diseases and the main cause of tooth loss. Early detection provides a better evaluation of the disease and improves the chances to succeed of prevention strategies. This pilot study aims to compare the effectiveness of ICDAS-II system (International Caries Detection and Assessment System and the fluorescence terminal (Proof of VistaCam iX intraoral camera, in the early diagnosis and assessment of caries in permanent teeth. Results shows a fair correlation between ICDAS II and VistaCam iX Proof; intraoral camera proved to be a useful support to the ICDAS II visual / tactile monitoring of carious lesions in occlusal surfaces.

  20. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Junichi; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Seki, Noriko; Hongo, Atsushi; Mizutani, Yasushi; Miyagi, Yasunari; Yoshinouchi, Mitsuo; Kudo, Takafumi [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-03-01

    Recently, attempts have made to use radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy in various solid tumors including cervical cancer. Twenty-four patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were treated with concurrent Carboplatin (16-24 mg/m{sup 2}/day) or Nedaplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/week) and conventional radiotherapy. Of 13 evaluable patients, there were nine complete responders and four partial responders. There was no renal damage or grade 4 hematological toxicity. Gastrointestinal adverse reactions were mild. One patient had grade 3 dermatologic toxicity after delayed radiation therapy. This pilot study suggests that daily Carboplatin or weekly Nedaplatin administered with standard radiation therapy is safe, well-tolerated, and thus may be useful as a radiation sensitizer in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. (author)

  1. Improving a web-based employability intervention for work-disabled employees: results of a pilot economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noben, C.; Evers, S.; Genabeek, J.V.; Nijhuis, F.; Rijk, A. de

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to improve web-based employability interventions for employees with work-related health problems for both intervention content and study design by means of a pilot economic evaluation. Methods Uptake rate analysis for the intervention elements, cost effectiveness

  2. Ecological study of sleep disruption in PTSD: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica; Katherine Shear, M; Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J

    2006-07-01

    Laboratory-based sleep studies have yielded inconsistent results regarding the presence and nature of objective sleep anomalies in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This pilot study aimed at assessing sleep in adult crime victims with PTSD by using in-home polysomnography. Compared to healthy archival subjects, PTSD subjects showed longer sleep latency, reduced total sleep time, and increased duration of nocturnal awakening. Quantitative electroencephalography (EEG) measures of delta and beta activity also differed in PTSD and healthy subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that ambulatory methods can capture objective signs of sleep disruption, and corroborate subjective complaints of disrupted sleep in PTSD.

  3. In Vitro Comparative Evaluation of Different Types of Impression Trays and Impression Materials on the Accuracy of Open Tray Implant Impressions: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sonam; Narayan, Aparna Ichalangod; Balakrishnan, Dhanasekar

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. For a precise fit of multiple implant framework, having an accurate definitive cast is imperative. The present study evaluated dimensional accuracy of master casts obtained using different impression trays and materials with open tray impression technique. Materials and Methods. A machined aluminum reference model with four parallel implant analogues was fabricated. Forty implant level impressions were made. Eight groups (n = 5) were tested using impression materials (polyether and vinylsiloxanether) and four types of impression trays, two being custom (self-cure acrylic and light cure acrylic) and two being stock (plastic and metal). The interimplant distances were measured on master casts using a coordinate measuring machine. The collected data was compared with a standard reference model and was statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. Statistically significant difference (p materials. However, the difference seen was small (36 μm) irrespective of the tray type used. No significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed between varied stock and custom trays. Conclusions. The polyether impression material proved to be more accurate than vinylsiloxanether impression material. The rigid nonperforated stock trays, both plastic and metal, could be an alternative for custom trays for multi-implant impressions when used with medium viscosity impression materials.

  4. Developing Emotional Literacy through Individual Dance Movement Therapy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekums, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports a pragmatic mixed methods pilot study of teacher perceptions regarding a school-based Dance Movement therapy (DMT) service for six children aged four to seven in a North of England primary school. No previous studies have systematically evaluated DMT in terms of the development of Emotional Literacy (EL), though theoretical…

  5. Pilot study of a multimodal intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, Mary Ellen; Hovgaard, Doris; Boesen, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Substantial physical and functional deconditioning and diminished psychological wellbeing are all potential adverse effects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and benefits (physical and functional capacity) of a 4-6 w...

  6. A Comparative Pilot Study to Evaluate the Adjunctive Role of Levosulpride with Trigger Point Injection Therapy in the Management of Myofascial Pain Syndrome of Orofacial Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pranav; Singh, Virendra; Sethi, Sujata; Kumar, Arun

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of therapy with levosulpride combined with conventional trigger point injection therapy in terms of pain and depression in the chronic myofascial pain syndrome patients. This was a comparative prospective study in which subjects with at least one trigger point and symptom duration of at least 3 months were recruited and randomized into two groups. Group A subjects received trigger point injections with 0.5 % bupivacaine and tablet levosulpride and group B received trigger point injections and a placebo. Subjects were assessed for pain with visual analog scale (VAS) and depression with Beck's depression inventory (BDI) at the follow-up periods of 1, 4, 6 and 12 weeks. The treatment effect was measured in terms of mean difference of BDI and VAS scores at various studied intervals from the baseline values. The sample was composed of 15 subjects with 8 in group A (6 females and 2 males, with a mean age of 41.88 ± 15.13 years, disease duration of 12.37 ± 16.11 months) and 7 in group B (6 females and 1 male, with a mean age of 43.86 ± 12.34 years, disease duration of 9.64 ± 9.34 months). The mean baseline VAS score and BDI score was 6.75 ± 1.03 in group A and 6.86 ± 1.06 in group B and 24.25 ± 10.20 in group A and 24.43 ± 11.16 in group B respectively. The mean difference of VAS scores at 12th week interval from the baseline values was highly significant. Although the mean difference of VAS scores at all the other intervals and mean difference of BDI scores at all the intervals was statistically nonsignificant, there was improvement in the mean differences at all the follow-up intervals in terms of both pain as well as depression. The combined therapy with conventional trigger point injection and levosulpride as antidepressant significantly reduce pain and depression in the study subjects suffering from chronic myofascial pain with moderate to severe depression in the orofacial region.

  7. Evaluation of Cyclosporine A with β-TCP in the Treatment of Human Infra bony Defects – A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishnajaneya; Avula, Haritha; Mishra, Ashank; Kalakonda, Butchibabu; Pandey, Ruchi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Cyclosporine A (CsA), an immunosuppressant, is considered a life saver drug in organ transplant cases. It has also been tested in animal and human studies for periodontal applications as it selectively inhibits T lymphocyte proliferation, Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokine production, without any effect on T suppressor cells, thereby suppressing the cell mediated immunity and suppressing the inflammation. Inflammatory and immunological responses have been found to be decreased and bone formation is found to be increased in immunosuppressed animals. CsA is also supposed to potentiate osseous regeneration due to increase in the bone alkaline phosphatase levels and a direct activating effect on osteoblasts. Aim The present study was aimed at evaluating locally administered low dose of CsA which is potent immunosuppressant along with β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) in comparison with β TCP alone, in the treatment of human infrabony defects, over a period of six months. Materials and Methods Thirty two systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients with infrabony defects were included in the randomized, controlled, parallel arm study and were allocated into either Group A (n =16), patients treated with β-TCP + CsA (2 mg) or Group B (n =16), patients treated with β-TCP. Clinical parameters [Relative Attachment Level (RAL), Probing Depth (PD), Gingival Recession (GR)] and radiographic parameters were measured at baseline and six months postoperatively. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 16 software. Student’s paired and independent t-test were used for intra and inter-group analysis. Results Both Group A and Group B showed statistically significant improvements in clinical and radiographic parameters from base line to six months post-operatively. The Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) gain, Linear Bone Growth (LBG) and Percentage Bone Fill (% BF) were 2.38±1.12 mm, 1.90±1.48 mm and 49.83±29.23 mm in Group A and 2.57±1

  8. A Pilot Study to Validate a Standardized One-Week Salt Estimation Method Evaluating Salt Intake and Its Sources for Family Members in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop a new method named the “one-week salt estimation method” that could estimate an individual’s salt intake and the sources of salt in the diet, and to evaluate this new method with a 24-h urine collection. The new method estimates salt intake from: (1 household cooking by weighing the family salt container and other high-salt condiments or sauces at the beginning and end of a week; (2 processed food according to established China food composition figures; and (3 cafeteria or restaurant meals using the results of previous studies. Consumption of salt additives and major salt contained foods and salt intake related eating habits were collected using a structured simple seven-day questionnaire. In order to validate the method, we studied 37 individuals from 11 families using the new method and 26 of these participants collected seven concurrent 24-h urine samples. The average salt intake for the 26 participants was 15.6 ± 5.5 g/person/day (mean ± standard deviation by the 24-h urine collection and 13.7 ± 6.5 g/person/day by the new method. The difference was 1.8 ± 4.2 g/day/person (p = 0.037. The Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.762 (p < 0.001 and the partial correlation coefficient was 0.771 (p < 0.001 when adjusted for family code. Bland-Altman Plot showed the average of the difference between the two methods was −1.83, with 95% limits of −10.1 to 6.5 g/person/day. The new method showed that 43.7% of salt intake came from household cooking (33.5% from cooking salt, 10.2% from other condiments and sauces, 12.9% from processed food, and 43.4% from eating out. In conclusion, despite its limitations of underestimating salt intake, the “one-week salt estimation method” is easier for people to implement and is likely to provide useful information that highlights the excessively high intake of salt and its sources, and in turn is helpful in guiding dietary salt reduction.

  9. A pilot plant study using conventional and advanced water treatment processes: Evaluating removal efficiency of indicator compounds representative of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangyi; Gitungo, Stephen; Axe, Lisa; Dyksen, John E; Raczko, Robert F

    2016-11-15

    With widespread occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the water cycle, their presence in source water has led to the need to better understand their treatability and removal efficiency in treatment processes. Fifteen indicator compounds were identified to represent the large number of PPCPs reported worldwide. Criteria applied to determine the indicator compounds included PPCPs widely used, observed at great frequency in aqueous systems, resistant to treatment, persistent in the environment, and representative of classes of organics. Through a pilot plant investigation to understand the optimal combination of unit process for treating PPCPs, 12 treatment trains with their additive and synergistic contributions were investigated; processes included dissolved air flotation (DAF), pre- and intermediate-ozonation with and without H2O2, intermediate chlorination, dual media filtration, granular activated carbon (GAC), and UV/H2O2. Treatment trains that achieved the greatest removals involved 1. DAF followed by intermediate ozonation, dual media filtration, and virgin GAC; 2. pre-ozonation followed by DAF, dual media filtration, and virgin GAC; and, 3. DAF (with either pre- or intermediate oxidation) followed by dual media filtration and UV/H2O2. Results revealed significant removal efficiencies for virgin GAC (preceded by DAF and intermediate ozonation) and UV/H2O2 with an intensity of 700 mJ/cm(2), where more than 12 of the compounds were removed by greater than 90%. Reduced PPCP removals were observed with virgin GAC preceded by pre-ozonation and DAF. Intermediate ozonation was more effective than using pre-ozonation, demonstrating the importance of this process targeting PPCPs after treatment of natural organic matter. Removal efficiencies of indicator compounds through ozonation were found to be a function of the O3 rate constants (kO3). For compounds with low O3 rate constants (kO3 < 10 M(-1)s(-1)), H2O2 addition in the O3 reactor

  10. Energy Evaluation of a New Construction Pilot Community: Fresno, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Poerschke, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rapport, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wayne, M. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the Building America House Simulation Protocols developed by NREL. Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package from a single test house into multiple houses. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a measures package and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  11. Research Note-Testing for Gerontological Competencies: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, Colleen; Curl, Angela L.; Woodbury, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the pilot delivery of an evaluation method to gauge student learning of gerontological competencies. Using a pretest and posttest design, data were collected on 46 students over 3 classes. Results indicated significant improvement in how students rated or perceived their competencies skill level between pretest and posttest…

  12. Evaluation of a novel technique in airway clearance therapy – Specific Cough Technique (SCT) in cystic fibrosis: A pilot study of a series of N-of-1 randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursli, Sandra; Sandvik, Leiv; Bakkeheim, Egil; Skrede, Bjørn; Stuge, Britt

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety and participants’ perception of a novel technique in airway clearance therapy – specific cough technique in cystic fibrosis. Methods: We conducted randomised controlled individual trials (N-of-1 randomised controlled trials) in six adults. Each trial included 8 weeks of treatment with two interventions each week, one with specific cough technique and one with forced expiration technique. The efficacy was investigated by a blinded assessor measuring wet weight of sputum (g) after each session. Perceived usefulness and preference was self-reported at the end of study. Additional measurements included oxygen saturation and heart rate before and after each session and lung function (week 2). Results: Three of six participants produced significantly higher mean sputum weight when using specific cough technique, differences being 21%, 38% and 23%, respectively. In three of the six participants, mean sputum weight was lower after forced expiration technique than after specific cough technique in each of the eight treatment pairs. Participant-reported outcomes were completed in all participants. Specific cough technique was reported to be easier to use in daily treatments and more normalising in everyday life. Conclusion: Specific cough technique was well tolerated and accepted by the participants with cystic fibrosis. Specific cough technique was non-inferior to forced expiration technique in terms of sputum production, thus specific cough technique appears to represent a promising alternative for clearing sputum in airway clearance therapy. PMID:28540046

  13. Evaluation of the efficacy of animal-assisted therapy based on the reality orientation therapy protocol in Alzheimer's disease patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, Lucia Francesca; Santaniello, Antonio; Gerardi, Federica; Di Maggio, Annamaria; Milan, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) in elderly patients affected by Alzheimer's disease based on the formal reality orientation therapy (ROT) protocol. Our study was carried out at an Alzheimer's centre for 6 months. A homogeneous sample (age, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)) of 50 patients was selected at random and successively. Patients were divided into three groups: (i) 20 patients received a course of AAT (AAT group) based on the ROT protocol; (ii) 20 patients were engaged exclusively in activities based on the ROT group; and (iii) 10 patients (control group) participated in no stimulations. MMSE and GDS were administered at time 0 (T0 ) and time 1 (T1 ) to all three groups. Differences within groups between T0 and T1 for GDS and MMSE scores were analyzed by Student's t-test. Differences between group means were analyzed using an anova test with the Bonferroni-Dunn test for post-hoc comparisons. Both the AAT group and ROT group had improved GDS scores and showed a slight improvement in terms of mood. On the GDS, the AAT group improved from 11.5 (T0 ) to 9.5 (T1 ), and the ROT group improved from 11.6 (T0 ) to 10.5 (T1 ). At the same time, a slight improvement in cognitive function, as measured by the MMSE, was observed. In the AAT group, mean MMSE was 20.2 at T0 and 21.5 at T1 , and in the ROT group, it was 19.9 at T0 and 20.0 at T1 . In the control group, the average values of both the GDS and MMSE remained unchanged. The Bonferroni-Dunn results showed statistically significant differences between groups, particularly between the AAT group and the other two (P therapy interventions based on the formal ROT protocol were effective and, compared to the ROT, provided encouraging and statistically significant results. © 2015 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2015 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  14. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of cervical cancer and evaluation of response of uterine cervical cancer to radiochemotherapy:A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanchun Wang; Daoyu Hu; Shan Hu; Xuemei Hu; Jianjun Li; Yaqi Shen; Xiaoyu Liu; Zhi Wang; Xiaoyan Meng; Zhen Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) dif usion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to diagnose cervical cancer and to evaluate the response of uterine cervical cancer to radiochemotherapy (CRT). Methods This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from al patients. A total of 23 patients with primary cervical cancer who were undergoing CRT and 16 age-matched healthy subjects were prospectively recruited for IVIM (b = 0–800 s/mm2) and stan-dard pelvic MRI. Bi-exponential analysis was performed to derive f (perfusion fraction), D* (pseudo-dif usion coef icient), and D (true molecular dif usion coef icient) in cervical cancer (n = 23) and the normal cervix (n= 16). The apparent dif usion coef icient (standard ADC) was calculated. The independent-samples t-test and paired-samples t-test were used for comparisons. Results Pre-treatment cervical cancer had the lowest standard ADC (1.15 ± 0.13 × 10-3 mm2/s) and D (0.89 ± 0.10 × 10-3 mm2/s) values, and these were significantly dif erent from the normal cervix and post-treatment cervical cancer (P = 0.00). The f (16.67 ± 5.85%) was lowest in pre-treatment cervical cancer and was significantly dif erent from the normal cervix and post-treatment cervical cancer (p = 0.012 and 0.00, respectively). No dif erence was observed in D*. Conclusion IVIM is potential y promising for dif erentiating between the normal cervix and cervical can-cer because pre-treated cervical cancer has low perfusion and dif usion IVIM characteristics. Further, the standard ADC, D, and f of cervical cancer showed a tendency to normalize after CRT; thus, IVIM may be useful for monitoring the response to CRT in cervical cancer.

  15. Evaluation of a computer-assisted errorless learning-based memory training program for patients with early Alzheimer’s disease in Hong Kong: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee GY

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Grace Y Lee,1 Calvin CK Yip,2 Edwin CS Yu,3 David WK Man4 1Occupational Therapy Department, Kwai Chung Hospital, 2CY Functional Recovery Services, 3Psychogeriatric Team, Kwai Chung Hospital, 4Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China Background: Improving the situation in older adults with cognitive decline and evidence of cognitive rehabilitation is considered crucial in long-term care of the elderly. The objective of this study was to implement a computerized errorless learning-based memory training program (CELP for persons with early Alzheimer’s disease, and to compare the training outcomes of a CELP group with those of a therapist-led errorless learning program (TELP group and a waiting-list control group. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with a single-blind research design was used in the study. Chinese patients with early Alzheimer’s disease screened by the Clinical Dementia Rating (score of 1 were recruited. The subjects were randomly assigned to CELP (n = 6, TELP (n = 6, and waiting-list control (n = 7 groups. Evaluation of subjects before and after testing, and at three-month follow-up was achieved using primary outcomes on the Chinese Mini-Mental State Examination, Chinese Dementia Rating Scale, Hong Kong List Learning Test, and the Brief Assessment of Prospective Memory-Short Form. Secondary outcomes were the Modified Barthel Index, Hong Kong Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale, and Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form. The data were analyzed using Friedman's test for time effect and the Kruskal-Wallis test for treatment effect. Results: Positive treatment effects on cognition were found in two errorless learning-based memory groups (ie, computer-assisted and therapist-led. Remarkable changes were shown in cognitive function for subjects receiving CELP and emotional/daily functions in those receiving TELP. Conclusion: Positive

  16. 基于主成分分析法的飞行员培养质量评价研究%Study on Evaluating the Quality of Training Pilots Based on the Principal Component Analysis Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱志航; 阎雷

    2012-01-01

    基于中国民航飞行员需求旺盛,培养评价指标单一和方法不够科学的现状,借助南京航空航天大学的飞行员招生和培养完整的数据,本文将主成分分析方法引用到飞行员培养质量评价研究之中.基于多元统计方法定量评价的思想,本文介绍了主成分分析法的原理,并应用该方法对飞行员培养质量进行了综合评价.结果表明,该评价方法是科学有效的,其中的主要影响因子可以帮助飞行院校解决飞行员培养过程的主要问题,从而有助于为我国民航运输业培养高素质的、优秀的飞行人员.%Based on the current fact that the great demand of pilots in Chinese civil aviation is prospective while the evaluation system is single and its corresponding method is also not scientific enough, principal component analysis method will be applied into evaluating the training quality of pilot students using the complete data on the recruitment and training of pilot students from Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics. The idea of quantitative evaluation of multi-element statistical method is established in the paper, the principle of principal component analysis is also introduced, and then this method is applied to comprehensively evaluating the training of pilot students. It is shown that these evaluation methods are scientific and effective, and the main affecting factors from those can help flight schools to solve the main problem during the training, and develop the high qualitative and excellent pilots for Chinese civil aviation transportation.

  17. Development of a Piglet Grimace Scale to Evaluate Piglet Pain Using Facial Expressions Following Castration and Tail Docking: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscardi, Abbie V.; Hunniford, Michelle; Lawlis, Penny; Leach, Matthew; Turner, Patricia V.

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions are increasingly being used to assess pain in non-human species, including rodents, horses, and lambs. The development of these species-specific grimace scales has allowed for more rapid pain detection, which can lead to better animal welfare if intervention promptly occurs. For grimace scales to ever be used as a stand-alone measure of pain, it is important they correlate with established pain assessment tools, such as behavioral analysis. This preliminary study aimed to determine whether piglets exhibit pain grimacing and if these facial expressions correlate with their behavior. It also assessed and compared the behavior of boar piglets given an analgesic and topical anesthetic prior to surgical castration and tail docking to piglets that did not receive anything for pain relief. Five-day-old male Yorkshire piglets (n = 19) from four pens were randomly assigned, within their pen, to one of five possible treatments: meloxicam (0.4 mg/kg, intramuscularly) + EMLA® cream, meloxicam (0.4 mg/kg, intramuscularly) + non-medicated cream, saline (intramuscularly) + EMLA® cream, saline (intramuscularly) + non-medicated cream, or no treatment prior to surgical castration and tail docking. Piglet behaviors were video recorded for 8 h immediately after castration, as well as for 1 h at 24 h pre- and post-castration. Their individual behaviors were scored continuously for the first 15 min of every hour of video collected. Facial images were also captured across all time points. A Piglet Grimace Scale (PGS) was developed and used by two observers blinded to treatment, time, and procedure to score over 600 piglet faces. All piglets displayed significant behavioral changes up to 7 h post-castration when compared to baseline, and the use of meloxicam and EMLA® cream was not associated with a reduction in painful behaviors. Significantly higher PGS scores were noted at 0, 3, 4, and 5 h post-castration when compared to PGS

  18. A pilot study to evaluate the magnitude of association of the use of electronic personal health records with patient activation and empowerment in HIV-infected veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Cédric B. Crouch

    2015-03-01

    two groups differed by race and computer access. There was no difference in the current CD4, provider satisfaction, Health Care Empowerment Inventory score, satisfaction with provider-patient communication, satisfaction with courteous and helpful staff, knowledge of ART, or ART adherence. The use of electronic personal health records is associated with positive clinical and behavioral characteristics. The use of these systems may play a role in improving the health of people with HIV. Larger studies are needed to further evaluate these associations.

  19. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S; Vilhelmsen, Jeanet R; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2017-02-20

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient's self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists' and occupational therapists' evaluation of the patients' achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals. The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals, and found it worth the time spent using it. However, no clear advantage in relation to their quality of life (WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score) was reported.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  20. Use of piloted simulation for studies of fighter departure/spin susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, W. P.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1978-01-01

    The NASA-Langley Research Center has incorporated into its stall/spin research program on military airplanes the use of piloted, fixed-base simulation to complement the existing matrix of unique research testing techniques. The piloted simulations of fighter stall/departure flight dynamics are conducted on the Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS). The objectives of the simulation research are reviewed. The rationale underlying the simulation methods and procedures used in the evaluation of airplane characteristics is presented. The evaluation steps used to assess fighter stall/departure characteristics are discussed. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the flight dynamics phenomena dealt with. The considerable experience accumulated in the conduct of piloted stall/departure simulation indicates that simulation provides a realistic evaluation of an airplane's maneuverability at high angles of attack and an assessment of the departure and spin susceptibility of the airplane. This realism is obtained by providing the pilot a complete simulation of the airplane and control system which can be flown using a realistic cockpit and visual display in simulations of demanding air combat maneuvering tasks. The use of the piloted simulation methods and procedures described were found very effective in identifying stability and control problem areas and in developing automatic control concepts to alleviate many of these problems. A good level of correlation between simulated flight dynamics and flight test results were obtained over the many fighter configurations studied in the simulator.

  1. Social media in adolescent health literacy education: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Carrie Kw; Bridges, Susan M; Srinivasan, Divya Parthasarathy; Cheng, Brenda Ss

    2015-03-09

    While health literacy has gained notice on a global stage, the initial focus on seeking associations with medical conditions may have overlooked its impact across generations. Adolescent health literacy, specifically in dentistry, is an underexplored area despite the significance of this formative stage on an individual's approach to healthy lifestyles and behaviors. The aim is to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of three major social media outlets - Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube - in supporting adolescents' oral health literacy (OHL) education. A random sample of 22 adolescents (aged 14-16 years) from an English-medium international school in Hong Kong provided informed consent. Sociodemographic information, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience were collected via a questionnaire. A pre- and post-test of OHL (REALD-30) was administered by two trained, calibrated examiners. Following pre-test, participants were randomly assigned to one of three social media outlets: Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube. Participants received alerts posted daily for 5 consecutive days requiring online accessing of modified and original OHL education materials. One-way ANOVA ( analysis of variance) was used to compare the mean difference between the pre- and the post-test results among the three social media. No associations were found between the social media allocated and participants' sociodemographics, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience. Of the three social media, significant differences in literacy assessment scores were evident for participants who received oral health education messages via Facebook (P=.02) and YouTube (P=.005). Based on the results of the pilot study, Facebook and YouTube may be more efficient media outlets for OHL promotion and education among adolescent school children when compared to Twitter. Further analyses with a larger study group is warranted.

  2. A Pilot Study on the Noninvasive Evaluation of Intestinal Damage in Celiac Disease Using I-FABP and L-FABP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, Joep P. M.; Vreugdenhil, Atita C. E.; Van den Neucker, Anita M.; Grootjans, Joep; van Bijnen, Annemarie A.; Damoiseaux, Jan G. M. C.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest; Heineman, Erik; Buurman, Wim A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Goals: In the clinical management of celiac disease, new noninvasive tools for evaluation of intestinal damage are needed for diagnosis and for follow-up of diet effects. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are potentially useful for this purpose as these arc small cytosolic proteins p

  3. Reaching the Underserved Elderly and Working Poor in SNAP: Evaluation Findings from the Fiscal Year 2009 Pilots

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Kauff; Lisa Dragoset; Elizabeth Clary; Elizabeth Laird; Libby Makowsky; Emily Samaa-Miller

    2014-01-01

    A study conducted for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service evaluated pilot demonstrations designed to facilitate access by the elderly or working poor to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Among other key findings, two demonstrations targeting the elderly significantly increased access to nutritional assistance through SNAP.

  4. "The 1-2-3 Magic Program": Implementation Outcomes of an Australian Pilot Evaluation with School-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Erin L.; van der Zwan, Rick; Phelan, Thomas W.; Brooks, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This study served as a pilot evaluation of the efficacy of the 1-2-3 Magic Program (Phelan, 2003) as a brief parenting intervention for families with a school-aged child. Nine Australian families assigned to either a wait-listed control group (n = 4) or to one that received immediate intervention (n = 5), participated in a randomized controlled…

  5. SunSmart: Evaluation of a Pilot School-Based Sun Protection Intervention in Hispanic Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. A.; Langholz, B. M.; Ly, T.; Harris, S. C.; Richardson, J. L.; Peng, D. H.; Cockburn, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma is rising among Hispanic populations in the United States. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot sun safety educational intervention conducted from 2006 to 2012 on Hispanic early adolescents in a high ultraviolet environment. Nineteen schools with high Hispanic enrollment were recruited from urban…

  6. “Is Your Man Stepping Out?” An online pilot study to evaluate acceptability of a guide-enhanced HIV prevention soap opera video series and feasibility of recruitment by Facebook© advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel; Lacroix, Lorraine J.; Nolte, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Love, Sex, and Choices (LSC) is a 12-episode soap opera video series developed to reduce HIV risk among at-risk Black urban women. We added a video guide commentator to offer insights at critical dramatic moments. An online pilot study evaluated acceptability of the Guide Enhanced LSC (GELSC) and feasibility of Facebook© advertising, streaming to smartphones, and retention. Facebook© ads targeted high HIV-prevalence areas. In 30 days, Facebook© ads generated 230 screening interviews; 84 were high risk, 40 watched GELSC, and 39 followed up at 30 days. Recruitment of high-risk participants was 10 per week compared to 7 per week in previous field recruitment. Half the sample was Black; 12% were Latina. Findings suggest GELSC influenced sex scripts and behaviors. It was feasible to recruit young urban women from a large geographic area via Facebook© and to retain the sample. We extended the reach to at-risk women by streaming to mobile devices. PMID:26066692

  7. Working on asymmetry in Parkinson's disease: randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Ricciardi, Diego; Lena, Francesco; Plotnik, Meir; Petracca, Martina; Barricella, Simona; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Modugno, Nicola; Bernabei, Roberto; Fasano, Alfonso

    2015-08-01

    Posture, gait and balance problems are very disabling symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). An increased stride-to-stri de variability, reduction of automaticity and asymmetry of lower limbs function characterize parkinsonian gait. These features predispose to freezing of gait (FOG), which often leads to falls. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the modulation of asymmetry through physiotherapy might improve gait and reduce FOG, thus preventing falls. Twenty-eight PD patients entered a double-blind pilot feasibility controlled study and were evaluated at baseline and after 3 months of a rehabilitative program (performed twice a week) by means of the motor part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III), Gait and Falls Questionnaire, Tinetti balance and gait scale, Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), European Quality of Life questionnaire. Patients were randomly assigned to three treatment arms: (1) worst side improvement; (2) best side improvement; (3) standard therapy. All study arms showed a significant improvement of the Tinetti and SPPB scores. BSI led to a greater improvement than ST in terms of UPDRS-III (p = 0.01); Tinetti total score (p = 0.05) and Tinetti gait subscore (p = 0.01). Our study confirms the efficacy of physical therapy in the treatment of PD and, more importantly, suggests that specific intervention tailored on individual feature (e.g., asymmetry of motor condition) might be even more effective than standard rehabilitative programs.

  8. Process evaluation of the Bonneville Power Administration Residential Weatherization Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerman, D.I.; Bronfman, B.H.; Tonn, B.

    1983-10-01

    An evaluation of the BPA Residential Weatherization Pilot Program is described. Data for this report were gathered at the eleven public utilities participating in the program, at the BPA area and district offices serving these utilities, and at BPA headquarters. This process evaluation of the Pilot Program documents the history of the program, outlines the implementation strategies adopted by the Pilot utilities, describes the role of the BPA area and district offices in the program, and indicates what was learned by BPA and the utilities in the period the program operated.

  9. 3D-Ultrasonography for evaluation of facial muscles in patients with chronic facial palsy or defective healing: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Volk, Gerd Fabian; Pohlmann, Martin; Finkensieper, Mira; Chalmers, Heather J.; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Background While standardized methods are established to examine the pathway from motorcortex to the peripheral nerve in patients with facial palsy, a reliable method to evaluate the facial muscles in patients with long-term palsy for therapy planning is lacking. Methods A 3D ultrasonographic (US) acquisition system driven by a motorized linear mover combined with conventional US probe was used to acquire 3D data sets of several facial muscles on both sides of the face in a healthy subject an...

  10. Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment for Men with Intellectual Disabilities and Sexually Abusive Behaviour: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Glynis; Powell, Simon; Guzman, Ana-Maria; Hays, Sarah-Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background: Cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) seems to be becoming the treatment of choice for non-disabled sex offenders. Nevertheless, there have been relatively few evaluations of such treatment for men with intellectual disabilities (ID) and sexually abusive behaviour. Method: A pilot study providing CBT for two groups of men with ID is…

  11. Etanercept in the treatment of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbelt, M.; Wilde, P.C.M. de; Damme, P.A. van; Hoyng, C.B.; Putte, L.B.A. van de; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This pilot study evaluated the effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor-a antiinflammatory treatment with etanercept (Enbrel(R)) on sicca, systemic, and histological signs in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS). METHODS: Fifteen patients with well defined primary SS were treated wit

  12. Piloted simulation study of an ILS approach of a twin-pusher business/commuter turboprop aircraft configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Donald R.; Brandon, Jay M.; Glaab, Louis J.

    1994-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear simulation of a twin-pusher, turboprop business/commuter aircraft configuration representative of the Cessna ATPTB (Advanced turboprop test bed) was developed for use in piloted studies with the Langley General Aviation Simulator. The math models developed are provided, simulation predictions are compared with with Cessna flight-test data for validation purposes, and results of a handling quality study during simulated ILS (instrument landing system) approaches and missed approaches are presented. Simulated flight trajectories, task performance measures, and pilot evaluations are presented for the ILS approach and missed-approach tasks conducted with the vehicle in the presence of moderate turbulence, varying horizontal winds and engine-out conditions. Six test subjects consisting of two research pilots, a Cessna test pilot, and three general aviation pilots participated in the study. This effort was undertaken in cooperation with the Cessna Aircraft Company.

  13. Flight simulation using a Brain-Computer Interface: A pilot, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryger, Michael; Wester, Brock; Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Rich, Matthew; John, Brendan; Beaty, James; McLoughlin, Michael; Boninger, Michael; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C

    2017-01-01

    As Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems advance for uses such as robotic arm control it is postulated that the control paradigms could apply to other scenarios, such as control of video games, wheelchair movement or even flight. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether our BCI system, which involves decoding the signals of two 96-microelectrode arrays implanted into the motor cortex of a subject, could also be used to control an aircraft in a flight simulator environment. The study involved six sessions in which various parameters were modified in order to achieve the best flight control, including plane type, view, control paradigm, gains, and limits. Successful flight was determined qualitatively by evaluating the subject's ability to perform requested maneuvers, maintain flight paths, and avoid control losses such as dives, spins and crashes. By the end of the study, it was found that the subject could successfully control an aircraft. The subject could use both the jet and propeller plane with different views, adopting an intuitive control paradigm. From the subject's perspective, this was one of the most exciting and entertaining experiments she had performed in two years of research. In conclusion, this study provides a proof-of-concept that traditional motor cortex signals combined with a decoding paradigm can be used to control systems besides a robotic arm for which the decoder was developed. Aside from possible functional benefits, it also shows the potential for a new recreational activity for individuals with disabilities who are able to master BCI control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Design and pilot evaluation of the RAH-66 Comanche Core AFCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogler, Donald L., Jr.; Keller, James F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the design and pilot evaluation of the Core Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS) for the Reconnaissance/Attack Helicopter (RAH-66) Comanche. During the period from November 1991 through February 1992, the RAH-66 Comanche control laws were evaluated through a structured pilot acceptance test using a motion base simulator. Design requirements, descriptions of the control law design, and handling qualities data collected from ADS-33 maneuvers are presented.

  15. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  16. Case studies of energy efficiency financing in the original five pilot states, 1993-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, B C; Collins, N E; Walsh, R W

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to document progress in state-level programs in energy efficiency financing programs that are linked with home energy rating systems. Case studies are presented of programs in five states using a federal pilot program to amortize the costs of home energy improvements. The case studies present background information, describe the states` program, list preliminary evaluation data and findings, and discuss problems and solution encountered in the programs. A comparison of experiences in pilot states will be used to provide guidelines for program implementers, federal agencies, and Congress. 5 refs.

  17. Resource Allocation Support System (RASS): Summary report of the 1992 pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehring, W.A.; Whitfield, R.G.; Wolsko, T.D.; Kier, P.H.; Absil, M.J.G.; Jusko, M.J.; Sapinski, P.F.

    1993-02-01

    The Resource Allocation Support System (RASS) is a decision-aiding system being developed to assist the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Waste Management in program and budget decision making. Four pilot studies were conducted at DOE field offices in summer 1992 to evaluate and improve the RASS design. This report summarizes the combined results of the individual field office pilot studies. Results are presented from different perspectives to illustrate the type of information that would be available from RASS. Lessons learned and directions for future RASS developments are also presented.

  18. Pilot Evaluation of Adaptive Control in Motion-Based Flight Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshige, John T.; Campbell, Stefan Forrest

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the strengths, weaknesses, and robustness characteristics of several MRAC (Model-Reference Adaptive Control) based adaptive control technologies garnering interest from the community as a whole. To facilitate this, a control study using piloted and unpiloted simulations to evaluate sensitivities and handling qualities was conducted. The adaptive control technologies under consideration were ALR (Adaptive Loop Recovery), BLS (Bounded Linear Stability), Hybrid Adaptive Control, L1, OCM (Optimal Control Modification), PMRAC (Predictor-based MRAC), and traditional MRAC

  19. Evaluation of the US Department of Energy Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (2010-2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL; Rose, Erin M. [ORNL; Hawkins, Beth A. [ORNL

    2017-05-01

    This report contains results from analysis conducted on each of the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) grants awarded to 16 organizations by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in 2010. The purpose of WIPP was to explore the potential adoptability or replicability of innovative processes or technologies for the enhancement of DOE’s Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). DOE initiated the WIPP grant to accelerate effective innovations in home energy efficiency and other WAP mission-related goals for income-qualifying households of low socioeconomic status. This study was performed alongside a broader, national evaluation of WAP conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE.

  20. The role of 3-D ultrasonography in the evaluation of menstrual cycle-related vascular modifications of the clitoris. A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Cesare; Nappi, Rossella Elena; Sisti, Giovanni; Persico, Nicola; Busacchi, Paolo; Venturoli, Stefano

    2009-10-01

    Clitoral functional modifications occur during the menstrual cycle. To prospectively evaluate, by the three-dimensional (3-D) Doppler flow analysis, the hemodynamic clitoral blood flow variations during the menstrual cycle. METHODS. Fourteen young (18-35 years), eumenorrheic (menstrual cycle of >25 and 1 year) and without any sexual dysfunction (as resulted from the two-factor Italian McCoy female sexuality questionnaire > or =35) were submitted, in the early follicular (day 3-5) and in the periovulatory (day 12-14) phases of the menstrual cycle, to bi- and tridimensional ultrasonographic and color Doppler analyses of the clitoral structures. On the same days, the circulating estradiol values were assayed. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES. Two-dimensional ultrasonographic evaluation of follicular diameter and color Doppler evaluation of the dorsal clitoral arteries; 3-D power Doppler analysis of the clitoral body volume and of the indices of clitoral vascularization and blood flow; estradiol assay. The mean virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL) volume of the clitoral body was lower in the follicular (0.79 +/- 0.19 mL) phase with respect to the periovulatory phase (0.98 +/- 0.22 mL; P < 0.001); the clitoral arteries demonstrated a significant decrease of the pulsatility index (PI) from the follicular (1.75 +/- 0.18) to the periovulatory phase (1.26 +/- 0.21; P = 0.002); the 3-D power Doppler histogram analysis showed significant changes of the indices of vascularization and blood flow (vascularization index [VI] = 2.239 +/- 1.201 vs. 3.302 +/- 1.305, P = 0.001; flow index = 27.290 +/- 2.454 vs. 33.620 +/- 1.712, P < 0.001; vascularization flow index = 0.578 +/- 0.573 vs. 1.091 +/- 0.461; P = 0.001) between the follicular and the periovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle. The relationship between the different parameters evidenced that estradiol is positively correlated with the VOCAL clitoral body volume (r = 0.512; P = 0.033) and inversely correlated with the dorsal

  1. Functional evaluation before lung resection: searching for a low technology test in a safer environment for the patient: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria M; Esteban, Pedro; Rodriguez, Maria; Gomez, Maria Teresa; Varela, Gonzalo

    2017-05-01

    Stair climbing is considered the first step for functional evaluation of patients requiring anatomical lung resection who have low-predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration (FEV1) or diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO) values. Nevertheless, stair climbing is not performed in many centres because of structural issues or patient safety concerns. We hypothesized that comparable exercise can be obtained on an ergometric bicycle in a safer environment where any adverse event can be treated. We tried to correlate the amount of exercise performed by stair climbing and by using an ergometric bicycle in a series of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) evaluated prospectively. Thirty-four consecutive patients with NSCLC who were scheduled for lung resection were prospectively enrolled to complete two low-technology exercise tests: The first one was stair climbing, and the second was a ramp test on an ergometric bicycle. For most patients (85%), both tests were performed on the same day, separated with at least 2 h of rest. The amount of exercise on the stair-climbing test (in watts: Watt 1) was calculated per patient weight, height reached on stairs and time spent. The bicycle test was performed on a Lode Corival ergometer with automatic calculation of the total work load (Watt 2). No estimation of VO 2 max was attempted. The bicycle test was conducted in an ad-hoc room fully equipped with oxygen, cardiac and blood pressure and PO 2 monitoring and resuscitation equipment. The Bland-Altman plot was used to evaluate the agreement between both tests. A linear regression model was constructed in which the power developed on the stairs was the dependent variable and the watts generated on the bicycle and patient age were the covariates. All patients (median age: 65.5 years; range: 41-84), completed both tests without any adverse events. The number of watts was greater on the stairs tests (mean 227 vs 64

  2. Study of a pilot photovoltaic-electrolyser-fuel cell power system for a geothermal heat pump heated greenhouse and evaluation of the electrolyser efficiency and operational mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Blanco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic factor of variability of renewable energy sources often limits their broader use. The photovoltaic solar systems can be provided with a power back up based on a combination of an electrolyser and a fuel cell stack. The integration of solar hydrogen power systems with greenhouse heating equipment can provide a possible option for powering stand-alone greenhouses. The aim of the research under development at the experimental farm of Department of Agro-Environmental Sciences of the University of Bari Aldo Moro is to investigate on the suitable solutions of a power system based on photovoltaic energy and on the use of hydrogen as energy vector, integrated with a ground source heat pump for greenhouse heating in a self sustained way. The excess energy produced by a purpose-built array of solar photovoltaic modules supplies an alkaline electrolyser; the produced hydrogen gas is stored in pressured storage tank. When the solar radiation level is insufficient to meet the heat pump power demand, the fuel cell starts converting the chemical energy stored by the hydrogen fuel into electricity. This paper reports on the description of the realised system. Furthermore the efficiency and the operational mode of the electrolyser were evaluated during a trial period characterised by mutable solar radiant energy. Anyway the electrolyser worked continuously in a transient state producing fluctuations of the hydrogen production and without ever reaching the steady-state conditions. The Faradic efficiency, evaluated by means of an empirical mathematic model, highlights that the suitable working range of the electrolyser was 1.5÷2.5 kW and then for hydrogen production more than 0.21 Nm3h–1.

  3. Pilot study of a multimodal intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, Mary Ellen; Hovgaard, Doris; Boesen, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Substantial physical and functional deconditioning and diminished psychological wellbeing are all potential adverse effects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and benefits (physical and functional capacity) of a 4......-6 week supervised and structured mixed-type exercise, progressive relaxation and psychoeducation programme in patients undergoing allo-HSCT. Nineteen patients were randomized to an intervention or a conventional care group (CC) and were tested for physical and functional capacity before admission...

  4. Pilot Study Evaluating the Impact of Dialogic Reading and Shared Reading at Transition to Primary School: Early Literacy Skills and Parental Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillinger, Claire; Wood, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the positive impact of shared reading (SR) and dialogic reading (DR) on young children's language and literacy development. This exploratory study compared the relative impact of parental DR and shared reading interventions on 4-year-old children's early literacy skills and parental attitudes to reading…

  5. Plantar focal idiopathic hyperhidrosis and botulinum toxin: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanati, Anna; Bernardini, Maria Luisa; Gesuita, Rosaria; Offidani, Annamaria

    2007-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective treatment for idiopatic focal axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis, but very few data are reported in the literature on its effect on plantar idiopatic hyperhidrosis. The current study was undertaken to investigate the impact of BTX-A administration on sweat production and quality of life in patients suffering from plantar hyperhidrosis. Ten patients with idiopathic, recalcitrant plantar hyperhidrosis were included in a pilot study and underwent intradermal injections with 100 MU of BTX-A in the plantar skin, bilaterally. All the patients were followed for 16 weeks after treatment with objective (Minor's test) and subjective (DLQI test) evaluation. Patients experienced an improvement of symptoms with a significant decrease of Minor's test and DLQI levels for 12 weeks. No significant side effects occurred in any treated patient. BTX-A seems to be a promising treatment for plantar hyperhidrosis. However, clinical trials on larger patient series are needed in order to evaluate its safety and effectiveness for this application.

  6. Including health economic analysis in pilot studies: lessons learned from a cost-utility analysis within the PROSPECTIV pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richéal M. Burns

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available PurposeTo assess feasibility and health economic benefits and costs as part of a pilot study for a nurse-led, psychoeducational intervention (NPLI for prostate cancer in order to understand the potential for cost effectiveness as well as contribute to the design of a larger scale trial.MethodsMen with stable prostate cancer post-treatment were recruited from two cancer centres in the UK. Eighty-three men were randomised to the NLPI plus usual care or usual care alone (UCA (42 NLPI and 41 UCA; the NLPI plus usual care was delivered in the primary-care setting (the intervention and included an initial face-to-face consultation with a trained nurse, with follow-up tailored to individual needs. The study afforded the opportunity to undertake a short-term within pilot analysis. The primary outcome measure for the economic evaluation was quality of life, as measured by the EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D (EQ-5D-5L instrument. Costs (£2014 assessed included health-service resource use, out-of-pocket expenses and losses from inability to undertake usual activities.ResultsTotal and incremental costs varied across the different scenarios assessed, with mean cost differences ranging from £173 to £346; incremental effect, as measured by the change in utility scores over the duration of follow-up, exhibited wide confidence intervals highlighting inconclusive effectiveness (95% CI: -0.0226; 0.0438. The cost per patient of delivery of the intervention would be reduced if rolled out to a larger patient cohort.ConclusionsThe NLPI is potentially cost saving depending on the scale of delivery; however, the results presented are not considered generalisable.

  7. First Breath prenatal smoking cessation pilot study: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehn, Lisette; Lokker, Nicole; Matitz, Debra; Christiansen, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Despite the many dangers associated with smoking during pregnancy, it remains a salient public health problem for Wisconsin women. The First Breath pilot program was developed in an attempt to reduce rates of smoking during pregnancy among low-income women. Preliminary results suggest that the First Breath counseling-based approach is effective, with a quit rate of 43.8% among First Breath enrollees at 1 month postpartum. Women receiving First Breath cessation counseling also had higher quit rates at every measurement period versus women in a comparison group who were receiving whatever cessation care was available in their county in the absence of First Breath. The First Breath pilot study has demonstrated success in helping pregnant women quit smoking and in creating a model for integration of cessation services into prenatal health care service provision. It is through this success that First Breath is expanding beyond the pilot study stage to a statewide program in 2003.

  8. The Evaluation of Diastolic Dysfunction with Tissue Doppler Echocardiography in Women with Subclinical Hypothyroidism and the Effect of L-Thyroxine Treatment on Diastolic Dysfunction: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulbanu Erkan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SH predominantly affects women. The necessity of treatment in SH is controversial. Objective. We aimed to investigate the response of diastolic dysfunction to thyroid hormone replacement therapy (THRT in women. Methods and Results. Twenty-two female subjects with SH and 20 euthyroid female controls were enrolled. Baseline and follow-up biochemical, hormonal, and echocardiographic evaluations were performed. Repeat echocardiograms were performed three months after the achievement of a euthyroid status with THRT. Mean baseline myocardial performance index (MPI was 0.27±0.08 in the SH group, and 0.22±0.06 in the control group (P=0.03. MPI did not change significantly after THRT. Pulsed-wave Doppler findings were not different among the groups. However, tissue Doppler-derived mitral annular E’ velocities were significantly lower in the SH group. A moderate but significant improvement was observed in E’ velocities after THRT (13.2±3.87 versus 14.53±2.75, P=0.04. We also observed left ventricular concentric remodeling in SH patients which was reversible with THRT. Conclusions. Tissue Doppler echocardiography may be a useful tool for monitoring the response of diastolic dysfunction to thyroid hormone replacement therapy in patients with SH. Our findings suggest that THRT may reverse diastolic dysfunction in women with SH.

  9. The evaluation of diastolic dysfunction with tissue Doppler echocardiography in women with subclinical hypothyroidism and the effect of L-thyroxine treatment on diastolic dysfunction: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, Gulbanu; Erkan, Aycan Fahri; Cemri, Mustafa; Karaahmetoglu, Selma; Cesur, Mustafa; Cengel, Atiye

    2011-01-01

    Background. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) predominantly affects women. The necessity of treatment in SH is controversial. Objective. We aimed to investigate the response of diastolic dysfunction to thyroid hormone replacement therapy (THRT) in women. Methods and Results. Twenty-two female subjects with SH and 20 euthyroid female controls were enrolled. Baseline and follow-up biochemical, hormonal, and echocardiographic evaluations were performed. Repeat echocardiograms were performed three months after the achievement of a euthyroid status with THRT. Mean baseline myocardial performance index (MPI) was 0.27 ± 0.08 in the SH group, and 0.22 ± 0.06 in the control group (P = 0.03). MPI did not change significantly after THRT. Pulsed-wave Doppler findings were not different among the groups. However, tissue Doppler-derived mitral annular E' velocities were significantly lower in the SH group. A moderate but significant improvement was observed in E' velocities after THRT (13.2 ± 3.87 versus 14.53 ± 2.75, P = 0.04). We also observed left ventricular concentric remodeling in SH patients which was reversible with THRT. Conclusions. Tissue Doppler echocardiography may be a useful tool for monitoring the response of diastolic dysfunction to thyroid hormone replacement therapy in patients with SH. Our findings suggest that THRT may reverse diastolic dysfunction in women with SH.

  10. Jamaica National Net-Billing Pilot Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, Elizabeth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stout, Sherry [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peterson, Kimberly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-12-18

    This technical report discusses the effectiveness of the Jamaica Public Service Company Limited Net-Billing Pilot Program. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed data from a wide range of stakeholders, conducted in-country research, and compared program elements to common interconnection practices to form programmatic recommendations for the Jamaica context. NREL finds that the net-billing pilot program has successfully contributed to the support of the emerging solar market in Jamaica with the interconnection of 80 systems under the program for a total of 1.38 megawatts (MW) at the time of original analysis.

  11. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume I: evaluation summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    The evaluation report of the Energy Extension Service in the 10 pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Wyoming, Washington, Wisconsin - contains 8 chapters. Chapter II describes the methodology and Chapter III summarizes the findings. Chapters IV, V, and VI trace the progression from program operations through client impact to energy savings. Chapter VII analyzes the factors that might contribute to making some programs work more effectively than others. The service delivery programs are divided into 3 categories according to the target audience served: residential homeowners and renters, small businesses, and public institutions. Chapter VIII discusses the implications for the National EES Program. (MCW)

  12. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-10-20

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low

  13. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Sarah H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chamness, Michele A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Petersen, Joseph M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Maddalena, Randy L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Destaillats, Hugo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Russell, M. L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low

  14. OnlineTED.com − a novel web-based audience response system for higher education. A pilot study to evaluate user acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühbeck, Felizian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background and aim: Audience response (AR systems are increasingly used in undergraduate medical education. However, high costs and complexity of conventional AR systems often limit their use. Here we present a novel AR system that is platform independent and does not require hardware clickers or additional software to be installed.Methods and results: “OnlineTED” was developed at Technische Universität München (TUM based on Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP with a My Structured Query Language (MySQL-database as server- and Javascript as client-side programming languages. “OnlineTED” enables lecturers to create and manage question sets online and start polls in-class via a web-browser. Students can participate in the polls with any internet-enabled device (smartphones, tablet-PCs or laptops. A paper-based survey was conducted with undergraduate medical students and lecturers at TUM to compare "OnlineTED" with conventional AR systems using clickers. "OnlineTED" received above-average evaluation results by both students and lecturers at TUM and was seen on par or superior to conventional AR systems. The survey results indicated that up to 80% of students at TUM own an internet-enabled device (smartphone or tablet-PC for participation in web-based AR technologies.Summary and Conclusion: “OnlineTED” is a novel web-based and platform-independent AR system for higher education that was well received by students and lecturers. As a non-commercial alternative to conventional AR systems it may foster interactive teaching in undergraduate education, in particular with large audiences.

  15. Pilot study to evaluate 3 hygiene protocols on the reduction of bacterial load on the hands of veterinary staff performing routine equine physical examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Josie L Traub-Dargatz; Weese, J Scott; Rousseau, Joyce D.; Dunowska, Magdalena; Morley, Paul S.; Dargatz, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Reduction factors (RFs) for bacterial counts on examiners’ hands were compared when performing a standardized equine physical examination, followed by the use of one of 3 hand-hygiene protocols (washing with soap, ethanol gel application, and chlorohexidine-ethanol application). The mean RFs were 1.29 log10 and 1.44 log10 at 2 study sites for the alcohol-gel (62% ethyl alcohol active ingredient) protocols and 1.47 log10 and 1.94 log10 at 2 study sites for the chlorhexidine-alcohol (61% ethyl ...

  16. Understanding the impacts of care farms on health and well-being of disadvantaged populations: a protocol of the Evaluating Community Orders (ECO) pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsey, H.; Bragg, R.; Elings, M.; Cade, J.E.; Brennan, C.; Farragher, T.; Tubeuf, S.; Gold, R.; Shickle, D.; Wickramasekera, N.; Richardson, Z.; Murray, J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Care farms, where all or part of the farm is used for therapeutic purposes, show much potential for improving the health and well-being of a range of disadvantaged groups. Studies to date have been qualitative or observational, with limited empirical evidence of the effectiveness of ca

  17. Self moving patients to the operation theatre - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvarfordh, Anna Pernilla; Rovsing, Marie Louise; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate patients' satisfaction with walking to the operation theatre instead of being driven in a bed or wheel chair, and to identify the need for information. In total, 75 patients (aged 15-83 years) participated in the study. A questionnaire...

  18. Attitudes Toward Guarani and Spanish: A Pilot Study in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Nancy C.

    This study analyzes the language attitudes of the Paraguayan people toward their two languages, Guarani and Spanish. To study the bilingual situation in the South American country, a pilot survey was carried out in the capital city addressing the major topics of language attitudes, language usage, and language varieties. The goals of the survey…

  19. CHASE assessment of the North Sea – a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, N.; Andersen, Jesper; Høgåsen, T.

    In this pilot study, hazardous substances in the North Sea were assessed and classified using the HELCOM Chemical Substances Status Assessment Tool (CHASE). The study was based on monitoring by Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Together, 1350...

  20. Performance evaluation model of a pilot food waste collection system in Suzhou City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zongguo; Wang, Yuanjia; De Clercq, Djavan

    2015-05-01

    This paper analyses the food waste collection and transportation (C&T) system in a pilot project in Suzhou by using a novel performance evaluation method. The method employed to conduct this analysis involves a unified performance evaluation index containing qualitative and quantitative indicators applied to data from Suzhou City. Two major inefficiencies were identified: a) low system efficiency due to insufficient processing capacity of commercial food waste facilities; and b) low waste resource utilization due to low efficiency of manual sorting. The performance evaluation indicated that the pilot project collection system's strong points included strong economics, low environmental impact and low social impact. This study also shows that Suzhou's integrated system has developed a comprehensive body of laws and clarified regulatory responsibilities for each of the various government departments to solve the problems of commercial food waste management. Based on Suzhou's experience, perspectives and lessons can be drawn for other cities and areas where food waste management systems are in the planning stage, or are encountering operational problems.

  1. Pilot study to evaluate 3 hygiene protocols on the reduction of bacterial load on the hands of veterinary staff performing routine equine physical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub-Dargatz, Josie L; Weese, J Scott; Rousseau, Joyce D; Dunowska, Magdalena; Morley, Paul S; Dargatz, David A

    2006-07-01

    Reduction factors (RFs) for bacterial counts on examiners' hands were compared when performing a standardized equine physical examination, followed by the use of one of 3 hand-hygiene protocols (washing with soap, ethanol gel application, and chlorohexidine-ethanol application). The mean RFs were 1.29 log10 and 1.44 log10 at 2 study sites for the alcohol-gel (62% ethyl alcohol active ingredient) protocols and 1.47 log10 and 1.94 log10 at 2 study sites for the chlorhexidine-alcohol (61% ethyl alcohol plus 1% chlorhexidine active ingredients) protocols, respectively. The RFs were significantly different (P bacterial load on the hands of people after they perform routine physical examinations.

  2. Molecular and genetic characterization, clinical evaluation and pilot study to assess the feasibility of a carrier screening for Crisponi syndrome in Sardinia

    OpenAIRE

    Piras, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    Crisponi syndrome (CS) and cold-induced sweating syndrome type 1 (CISS1) share clinical characteristics, such as dysmorphic features, muscle contractions, scoliosis and cold-induced sweating, with CS patients showing a severe clinical course in infancy involving hyperthermia, associated with death in most cases in the first years of life. Functional and clinical studies supported the fact that they represent manifestations of the same autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the...

  3. Evaluation of transfusion-related complications along with estimation of inhibitors in patients with hemophilia: A pilot study from a single center

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: Apart from inhibitor development in patients with hemophilia (PWH) the old problems of blood borne viral infections and red cell alloimmunization still persist in PWH from developing countries. This study was planned to detect the presence of inhibitors in our PWH and to determine the presence of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI) markers and clinically significant red cell alloantibodies in these patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred fourteen PWH were screened for va...

  4. A pilot cross-over study to evaluate human oral bioavailability of BCM-95 ® CG (BiocurcumaxTM, a novel bioenhanced preparation of curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony B

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the bioactive component of turmeric, Curcuma longa has an exceptionally wide spectrum of activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, and is currently under different phases of clinical trials for various types of soft tissue cancers. However, although in vitro and animal studies have shown anticancer activities of curcumin for virtually all types of human cancers, its poor bioavailability in the human body has severely limited its application to these diseases. Methods to increase its oral bioavailability are a subject of intense current research. Reconstituting curcumin with the non-curcuminoid components of turmeric has been found to increase the bioavailability substantially. In the present clinical study to determine the bioavailability of curcuminoids, a patented formulation, BCM-95 ® CG was tested on human volunteer group. Normal curcumin was used in the control group. Curcumin content in blood was estimated at periodical intervals. After a washout period of two weeks the control group and drug group were crossed over BCM-95 ® CG and curcumin, respectively. It was also compared with a combination of curcumin-lecithin-piperine which was earlier shown to provide enhanced bioavailability. The results of the study indicate that the relative bioavailability of BCM-95 ® CG (Biocurcumax TM was about 6.93-fold compared to normal curcumin and about 6.3-fold compared to curcumin-lecithin-piperine formula. BCM-95 ® CG thus, has potential for widespread application for various chronic diseases.

  5. Comparative evaluation of soft and hard tissue dimensions in the anterior maxilla using radiovisiography and cone beam computed tomography: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Mallikarjun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To assess and compare the thickness of gingiva in the anterior maxilla using radiovisiography (RVG and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and its correlation with the thickness of underlying alveolar bone. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study included 10 male subjects in the age group of 20–45 years. Materials and Methods: After analyzing the width of keratinized gingiva of the maxillary right central incisor, the radiographic assessment was done using a modified technique for RVG and CBCT, to measure the thickness of both the labial gingiva and labial plate of alveolar bone at 4 predetermined locations along the length of the root in each case. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation test, with the help of statistical software (SPSS V13. Results: No statistically significant differences were obtained in the measurement made using RVG and CBCT. The results of the present study also failed to reveal any significant correlation between the width of gingiva and the alveolar bone in the maxillary anterior region. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that both CBCT and RVG can be used as valuable tools in the assessment of the soft and hard tissue dimensions.

  6. Feasibility of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Nispen Ruth MA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demographic ageing will lead to increasing pressure on visual rehabilitation services, which need to be efficiently organised in the near future. The Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI was developed to assess the rehabilitation needs of visually impaired persons. This pilot study tests the feasibility of the D-AI using a computer-assisted telephone interview. Methods In addition to the regular intake, the first version of the D-AI was assessed in 20 patients. Subsequently, patients and intake assessors were asked to fill in an evaluation form. Based on these evaluations, a new version of the D-AI was developed. Results Mean administration time of the D-AI was 88.8 (± 41.0 minutes. Overall, patients and assessors were positive about the D-AI assessment. However, professionals and 60% of the patients found the administration time to be too long. All included items were considered relevant and only minor adjustments were recommended. Conclusion The systematic character of the revised D-AI will prevent topics from being overlooked and indicate which needs have the highest priority from a patient-centred perspective. Moreover, ongoing assessment of the D-AI will enhance evaluation of the rehabilitation process. To decrease administration time, in the revised D-AI only the top priority goals will be fully assessed. Using the D-AI, a rehabilitation plan based on individual needs can be developed for each patient. Moreover, it enables better evaluation of the effects of rehabilitation. A larger validation study is planned.

  7. Evaluating the feasibility and impact of interactive telephone technology and incentives when combined with a behavioral intervention for weight loss: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ard JD

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mary Annette Hess,1 David E Vance,1,2 Peggy R McKie,1 Laura S Burton,3 Jamy D Ard,4 Josh Klapow5,61School of Nursing, 2Edward R Roybal Center for Translational Research in Aging and Mobility, 3Department of Nutrition Sciences, 4UAB EatRight Weight Management Services, Department of Nutrition Sciences, 5School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA; 6ChipRewards, Inc, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of delivering the ‘EatRight Lifestyle’ program as an educational weight loss program when combined with a system for behavior-based incentives (ie, ChipRewards. Participants (N = 70 were randomly assigned to one of two interventions over a 12-week period: (1 ‘EatRight Lifestyle’ only (control, and (2 ‘EatRight Lifestyle plus ChipRewards’. From baseline to the 12-week visit, the overall attrition rate was 27.14% (n = 19. A completers only and an intent-to-treat repeated measures analysis of covariance was conducted on the outcome measures (ie, weight loss, change in blood glucose for the baseline and 12-week visit. It was found that waist circumference decreased slightly for those in the ‘EatRight Lifestyle plus ChipRewards’ program; however, BMI and weight was slightly more reduced for those who were more compliant to the study protocol in general, regardless of group assignment. No other time or group differences were detected. This study showed that these two weight loss programs did not produce drastically differential effects on these outcome measures.Keywords: behavior, obesity, diet, physical activity, education, token economy, online intervention, phone counseling

  8. Clinical evaluation of the role of tulsi and turmeric in the management of oral submucous fibrosis: A pilot, prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adit Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of herbal medicines (1 gm tulsi and 1 gm turmeric mixed in glycerine base for the treatment of oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF. Forty-one patients in the age group of 17- 56 years without any systemic complications were included in the study. The patients were treated with medicines, which were to be applied 3-4 times a day. Blood samples were collected before and after treatment to screen for any systemic changes due to these medications. Burning sensation and mouth opening were recorded before and after treatment. Patients were followed up on monthly subsequent visits for three months. Changes in the burning sensation on visual analogue scale (VAS scale and difference in the mouth opening were analyzed statistically. A statistically significant improvement was seen in both burning sensation and mouth opening. Tulsi and turmeric offers a safe and efficacious combination of natural products available for symptomatic treatment of OSMF.

  9. Pilot implementation Driven by Effects Specifications and Formative Usability Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlach, Anders; Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    . The project was conducted using effects-driven IT development: a process comprised of workshops with specification of the usage effects by management and end-users followed by an agile development process progressing through mock-ups, prototypes and finally the pilot system. Effects were iteratively refined...

  10. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique.

  11. Intrinsic Wave Propagation of Myocardial Stretch, A New Tool to Evaluate Myocardial Stiffness: A Pilot Study in Patients with Aortic Stenosis and Mitral Regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pislaru, Cristina; Alashry, Mahmoud M; Thaden, Jeremy J; Pellikka, Patricia A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Pislaru, Sorin V

    2017-08-16

    Left ventricular (LV) filling following atrial contraction generates LV myocardial stretch that propagates from base to apex with a speed proportional to myocardial elasticity. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intrinsic velocity propagation of myocardial stretch (iVP) would be altered in patients with valvular disease and chronic LV pressure overload or volume overload, which may adversely affect mechanical properties of the LV tissue. A second aim was to compare iVP with flow propagation velocity in the chamber. Sixty subjects were prospectively recruited: 20 with severe aortic stenosis (AS), 20 with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR), and 20 normal control subjects. LV iVP was measured using ultrahigh-frame rate tissue Doppler (350-460 frames/sec) and flow propagation velocity by color flow M-mode imaging. Follow-up data (up to 2 years) were retrieved from medical records. iVP was highest in patients with AS (2.2 ± 0.7 m/sec), intermediate in those with MR (1.6 ± 0.5 m/sec), and lowest in control subjects (1.4 ± 0.2 m/sec; P  1.8 m/sec. Overall, iVP correlated with age, LV morphology, severity of aortic valve obstruction, and measures of LV preload and afterload. At follow-up, patients with high iVP had lower survival free of major adverse cardiac events (P = .002). Flow propagation velocity was similar between groups and correlated poorly with iVP (r = 0.26, P = .10). A significant number of patients with severe AS and severe MR had rapid transmission of myocardial stretch, indicating increased myocardial stiffness. This information was not conveyed by measurement of flow propagation. Larger studies are needed to investigate the clinical utility of this novel measurement. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 78 FR 23941 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational... the Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Applications pilot program to May 8... ``Investigational Device Exemptions (IDE) for Early Feasibility Medical Device Clinical Studies, Including...

  13. A pilot interventional study to evaluate the impact of cholecalciferol treatment on HbA1c in type 1 diabetes (T1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Perchard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Higher 25(OHD3 levels are associated with lower HbA1c, but there are limited UK interventional trials assessing the effect of cholecalciferol on HbA1c. Aims: (1 To assess the baseline 25(OHD3 status in a Manchester cohort of children with type 1 diabetes (T1D. (2 To determine the effect of cholecalciferol administration on HbA1c. Methods: Children with T1D attending routine clinic appointments over three months in late winter/early spring had blood samples taken with consent. Participants with a 25(OHD3 level 10 years units. HbA1c levels before and after treatment were recorded. Results: Vitamin D levels were obtained from 51 children. 35 were Caucasian, 11 South Asian and 5 from other ethnic groups. 42 were vitamin D deficient, but 2 were excluded from the analysis. All South Asian children were vitamin D deficient, with mean 25(OHD3 of 28 nmol/L. In Caucasians, there was a negative relationship between baseline 25(OHD3 level and HbA1c (r = −0.484, P < 0.01. In treated participants, there was no significant difference in mean HbA1c at 3 months (t = 1.010, P = 0.328 or at 1 year (t = −1.173, P = 0.248 before and after treatment. One-way ANCOVA, controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, BMI and diabetes duration showed no difference in Δ HbA1c level. Conclusion: We report important findings at baseline, but in children treated with a stat dose of cholecalciferol, there was no effect on HbA1c. Further studies with larger sample sizes and using maintenance therapy are required.

  14. A pilot study on mindfulness based stress reduction for smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Timothy B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mindfulness means paying attention in the present moment, non-judgmentally, without commentary or decision-making. We report results of a pilot study designed to test the feasibility of using Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR (with minor modifications as a smoking intervention. Methods MBSR instructors provided instructions in mindfulness in eight weekly group sessions. Subjects attempted smoking cessation during week seven without pharmacotherapy. Smoking abstinence was tested six weeks after the smoking quit day with carbon monoxide breath test and 7-day smoking calendars. Questionnaires were administered to evaluate changes in stress and affective distress. Results 18 subjects enrolled in the intervention with an average smoking history of 19.9 cigarettes per day for 26.4 years. At the 6-week post-quit visit, 10 of 18 subjects (56% achieved biologically confirmed 7-day point-prevalent smoking abstinence. Compliance with meditation was positively associated with smoking abstinence and decreases in stress and affective distress. Discussions and conclusion The results of this study suggest that mindfulness training may show promise for smoking cessation and warrants additional study in a larger comparative trial.

  15. Microcirculation and atherothrombotic parameters in prolactinoma patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuwer, Anne Q; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M; Battjes, Suzanne; van Zijderveld, Rogier; Stuijver, Danka J F; Bisschop, Peter H; Twickler, Marcel Th B; Meijers, Joost C M; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Stroes, Erik S

    2012-12-01

    Atherothrombosis is a multifactorial process, governed by an interaction between the vessel wall, hemodynamic factors and systemic atherothrombotic risk factors. Recent in vitro, human ex vivo and animal studies have implicated the hormone prolactin as an atherothrombotic mediator. To address this issue, we evaluated the anatomy and function of various microvascular beds as well as plasma atherothrombosis markers in patients with elevated prolactin levels. In this pilot study, involving 10 prolactinoma patients and 10 control subjects, sidestream dark field (SDF) imaging revealed a marked perturbation of the sublingual microcirculation in prolactinoma patients compared to control subjects, as attested to by significant changes in microvascular flow index (2.74 ± 0.12 vs. 2.91 ± 0.05, respectively; P = 0.0006), in heterogeneity index (0.28 [IQR 0.18-0.31] vs. 0.09 [IQR 0.08-0.17], respectively; P = 0.002) and lower proportion of perfused vessels (90 ± 4.0% vs. 95 ± 3.0%, respectively; P = 0.016). In the retina, fluorescein angiography (FAG) confirmed these data, since prolactinoma patients more often have dilatated perifoveal capillaries. In plasma, prolactinoma patients displayed several pro-atherogenic disturbances, including a higher endogenous thrombin potential and prothrombin levels as well as decreased HDL-cholesterol levels. Prolactinoma patients are characterized by microvascular dysfunction as well as plasma markers indicating a pro-atherothrombotic state. Further studies are required to assess if prolactin is causally involved in atherothrombotic disease.

  16. Tai Chi for People with Visual Impairments: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszko, Tanya A.; Ramsey, Vincent K.; Blasch, Bruce B.

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the physical and psychological outcomes of a tai chi exercise program for eight adults with visual impairments. It found that after eight weeks of orientation and mobility training and tai chi practice, the participants' single leg-stance time and total knee flexion work and power improved, as did their frequency of,…

  17. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  18. Consumer Understanding of Nutrition Marketing Terms: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroldson, Amber; Yen, Chih-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the validity of a questionnaire developed to assess adult consumer understanding of nutrition marketing terms and the resulting impact on consumer behavior. Participants (n = 40) completed an electronic questionnaire. Efforts to establish validity and reliability suggest that the questionnaire is a…

  19. Physical activity in Georgia state parks: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln R. Larson; Jason W. Whiting; Gary T. Green

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the role of Georgia State Parks in the promotion of physical activity among different racial/ethnic and age groups. Data were collected at three state parks in north Georgia during the summer of 2009 using two research methods: behavior observations (N=2281) and intercept surveys (N=473).

  20. Mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GYGAX, MARINE JEQUIER; SCHNEIDER, PATRICK; NEWMAN, CHRISTOPHER JOHN

    2011-01-01

    ...‐paretic arm, is used in the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke in adults. We tested the effectiveness and feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia by performing a pilot crossover study in ten participants (aged 6–14y...

  1. Elderly Homosexual Women and Men: Report on a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnigerode, Fred A.; Adelman, Marcy R.

    1978-01-01

    A pilot study is described in which four- to five-hour tape-recorded interviews were conducted with 11 homosexual women and men, 60-77 years of age. Areas examined included: physical change and physical health; work, retirement and leisure time; social behavior; psychological functioning; sexual behavior; and personal perspectives on the life…

  2. Assessing the Flipped Classroom in Operations Management: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The author delved into the results of a flipped classroom pilot conducted for an operations management course module. It assessed students' perception of a flipped learning environment after making them experience it in real time. The classroom environment was construed using a case research approach and students' perceptions were studied using…

  3. Emission studies from a CO2 capture pilot plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, E.F. da; Kolderup, H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Hjarbo, K.W.; Huizinga, A.; Khakharia, P.M.; Tuinman, I.L.; Mejdell, T.; Zahlsen, K.; Vernstad, K.; Hyldbakk, A.; Holten, T.; Kvamsdal, H.M.; Os, P.J. van; Einbu, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of emissions from a pilot-plant for CO2 capture at Maasvlakte (in the Netherlands). Three contributions to emissions were identified and analyzed: Gas phase emission, aerosols (also referred to as mist or fog) and droplets of entrained solvents. For the emission campaig

  4. Teaching Speech Communication with a Foreign Accent: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Ming; Chung, Jensen

    A pilot study examined problems encountered by foreign instructors teaching in American colleges. Fourteen Chinese-born instructors teaching in Speech Communication answered a questionnaire containing 12 open-ended questions. Recurring themes were coded from the answers, and then organized into three categories: cultural differences; linguistic…

  5. Consumer Understanding of Nutrition Marketing Terms: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroldson, Amber; Yen, Chih-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the validity of a questionnaire developed to assess adult consumer understanding of nutrition marketing terms and the resulting impact on consumer behavior. Participants (n = 40) completed an electronic questionnaire. Efforts to establish validity and reliability suggest that the questionnaire is a…

  6. Skin and Plasma Autofluorescence During Hemodialysis : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, Reindert; Arsov, Stefan; Ramsauer, Bernd; Koetsier, Marten; Sundvall, Nils; Engels, Gerwin E.; Sikole, Aleksandar; Lundberg, Lennart; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) is related to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and is one of the strongest prognostic markers of mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether changes in skin AF appear after a single HD session an

  7. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  8. Effects of aquajogging in obese adults: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PhD Ad Vingerhoets; PhD Rinie Geenen; MD E.J.M. Wouters; PhD Ronette Kolotkin; MSc Annemieke van Nunen

    2009-01-01

    Aim and method: To examine in obese people the potential effectiveness of a six-week, two times weekly aquajogging program on body composition, fitness, health-related quality of life and exercise beliefs. Fifteen otherwise healthy obese persons participated in a pilot study. Results: Total fat mass

  9. Facial recognition and laser surface scan: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Kristoffersen, Agnethe May

    2009-01-01

    Surface scanning of the face of a suspect is presented as a way to better match the facial features with those of a perpetrator from CCTV footage. We performed a simple pilot study where we obtained facial surface scans of volunteers and then in blind trials tried to match these scans with 2D...

  10. A novel assessment of adolescent mobility: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Tom; Duncan, Scott; Chaix, Basile

    2015-01-01

    . The recent development of VERITAS - a web-based application nested within a computer-assisted personal interview - allows researchers to assess daily mobility, travel to regular destinations, and perceived neighbourhood boundaries using interactive mapping technology. The aims of this pilot study were to (1...

  11. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunn, Amoret L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fritz, Brad G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

  12. Patterns of federal Internet offenders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ann W; Carretta, Carrie M; Burgess, Allen G

    2012-09-01

    Internet-facilitated sexual offending is receiving increased forensic and clinical attention. Two issues confront this field. First, studies are equivocal as to whether (or not) the possession of Internet pornography can escalate to contact sexual offenses against a child, and second, federal judges have been questioning the length of sentences for users only of child pornography. The findings of this pilot study of 101 federal Internet offenders revealed over half of the men at the time of arrest were employed, educated, were in (or had been in) a relationship, had children, and did not have a prior criminal offense, suggesting a changing profile of a convicted sex offender. Forensic and psychiatric nurses who evaluate users of child pornography contraband need to be knowledgeable of Internet file transfer technology and the various types of contraband viewed specifically for the age of the preferred child, extreme acts to the child (e.g., bondage, S&M), and whether the user prefers images of adults with children or images of children only.

  13. [Telerehabilitation to treat stress urinary incontinence. Pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión Pérez, Francisca; Rodríguez Moreno, María Sofía; Carnerero Córdoba, Lidia; Romero Garrido, Marina C; Quintana Tirado, Laura; García Montes, Inmaculada

    2015-05-21

    We aimed to test a new telerehabilitation device for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in order to make an initial assessment of its effectiveness. Randomized, controlled pilot study. experimental group (10 patients): pelvic floor muscle training, device training and home treatment with it; control group (9 patients): conventional rehabilitation treatment. Outcome measures (baseline and 3 months) overall and specific quality of life: International Consultation Incontinence Questionnaire and King's Health Questionnaire, bladder diary, perineometry, satisfaction with the program and degree of compliance. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. There was no statistically significant difference for any outcome measures between groups at the end of the follow-up. The change in perineometry values at baseline and after the intervention was significant in the experimental group (23.06 to 32.00, P=.011). No group in this study had any serious adverse effects. The tested device is safe and well accepted. Although there is some evidence of its efficacy in the rehabilitation treatment of SUI, larger trials are needed to appropriately evaluate the potential advantages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Moving mammogram-reluctant women to screening: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, Mary E; Luckmann, Roger; White, Mary Jo; Rosal, Milagros C; LaPelle, Nancy; Cranos, Caroline

    2009-06-01

    Effective interventions are needed for women long overdue for screening mammography. The purpose of this study is to pilot test an intervention for motivating overdue women to receive a mammogram. Subjects aged 45-79 without a mammogram in > or =27 months and enrolled in study practices were identified from claims data. The intervention included a mailed, educational booklet, computer-assisted barrier-specific tailored counseling and motivational interviewing, and facilitated, short-interval mammography scheduling. Of 127 eligible women, 45 (35.4%) agreed to counseling and data collection. Most were > or =3 years overdue. Twenty-six (57.8%) of the counseled women got a mammogram within 12 months. Thirty-one (72.1%) of 43 counseled women moved > or =1 stage closer to screening, based on a modified Precaution Adoption Process Model. It is feasible to reach and counsel women who are long overdue for a mammogram and to advance their stage of adoption. The intervention should be formally evaluated in a prospective trial comparing it to control or to proven interventions.

  15. Mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gygax, Marine Jequier; Schneider, Patrick; Newman, Christopher John

    2011-05-01

    Mirror therapy, which provides the visual illusion of a functional paretic limb by using the mirror reflection of the non-paretic arm, is used in the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke in adults. We tested the effectiveness and feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia by performing a pilot crossover study in ten participants (aged 6-14 y; five males, five females; Manual Ability Classification System levels: one at level I, two at level II, four at level III, three at level IV) randomly assigned to 15 minutes of daily bimanual training with and without a mirror for 3 weeks. Assessments of maximal grasp and pinch strengths, and upper limb function measured by the Shriner's Hospital Upper Extremity Evaluation were performed at weeks 0 (baseline), 3, 6 (intervention), and 9 (wash-out). Testing of grasp strength behind the mirror improved performance by 15% (p=0.004). Training with the mirror significantly improved grasp strength (with mirror +20.4%, p=0.033; without +5.9%, p>0.1) and upper limb dynamic position (with mirror +4.6%, p=0.044; without +1.2%, p>0.1), while training without a mirror significantly improved pinch strength (with mirror +6.9%, p>0.1; without +21.9%, p=0.026). This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia and that it may improve strength and dynamic function of the paretic arm.

  16. Social dysfunction in bipolar disorder: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Rocca, Cristiana Castanho; de Macedo-Soares, Marcia Britto; Gorenstein, Clarice; Tamada, Renata Sayuri; Issler, Cilly Kluger; Dias, Rodrigo Silva; Schwartzmann, Angela Maria; Lafer, Beny

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the social skills of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder. A group of 25 outpatients with bipolar disorder type I were evaluated in comparison with a group of 31 healthy volunteers who were matched in terms of level of education, age, sex and intelligence. Both groups were assessed using a self-report questionnaire, the Brazilian Inventario de Habilidades Sociais (IHS, Social Skills Inventory). Two Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale subtests (Picture Arrangement and Comprehension) were also used in order to assess subject ability to analyse social situations and to make judgements, respectively. Patients with bipolar disorder had lower IHS scores for the domains that assessed conversational skills/social self-confidence and social openness to new people/situations. Patients with anxiety disorders had high scores for the domain that assessed self-confidence in the expression of positive emotions. No differences were found between patients and controls in performance on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Picture Arrangement and Comprehension subtests. Euthymic patients with bipolar disorder present inhibited and overattentive behaviour in relation to other people and their environment. This behaviour might have a negative impact on their level of social functioning and quality of life.

  17. Pilot-scale cooling tower to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies for cooling system makeup water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S H; Hsieh, M K; Li, H; Monnell, J; Dzombak, D; Vidic, R

    2012-02-01

    Pilot-scale cooling towers can be used to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies when using particular cooling system makeup water and particular operating conditions. To study the potential for using a number of different impaired waters as makeup water, a pilot-scale system capable of generating 27,000 kJ∕h heat load and maintaining recirculating water flow with a Reynolds number of 1.92 × 10(4) was designed to study these critical processes under conditions that are similar to full-scale systems. The pilot-scale cooling tower was equipped with an automatic makeup water control system, automatic blowdown control system, semi-automatic biocide feeding system, and corrosion, scaling, and biofouling monitoring systems. Observed operational data revealed that the major operating parameters, including temperature change (6.6 °C), cycles of concentration (N = 4.6), water flow velocity (0.66 m∕s), and air mass velocity (3660 kg∕h m(2)), were controlled quite well for an extended period of time (up to 2 months). Overall, the performance of the pilot-scale cooling towers using treated municipal wastewater was shown to be suitable to study critical processes (corrosion, scaling, biofouling) and evaluate cooling water management strategies for makeup waters of complex quality.

  18. Evaluation of a pilot promotora program for Latino forest workers in southern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Diane E; Wilmsen, Carl; Sasaki, Timothy; Barton-Antonio, Dinorah; Steege, Andrea L; Chang, Charlotte

    2014-07-01

    Forest work, an occupation with some of the highest injury and illness rates, is conducted primarily by Latino immigrant workers. This study evaluates a pilot program where promotoras (lay community health educators) provided occupational health and safety trainings for Latino forest workers. Evaluation methods included a focus group, post-tests, and qualitative feedback. Community capacity to address working conditions increased through (i) increased leadership and community access to information and resources; and (ii) increased worker awareness of workplace health and safety rights and resources. Fear of retaliation remains a barrier to workers taking action; nevertheless, the promotoras supported several workers in addressing-specific workplace issues. For working conditions to significantly improve, major structural influences need to be addressed. A long-term, organizationally supported promotora program can play a key role in linking and supporting change at the individual, interpersonal and community levels, contributing to and supporting structural change. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pilot evaluation of a media literacy program for tobacco prevention targeting early adolescents shows mixed results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestle, Christine E; Chen, Yvonnes; Estabrooks, Paul A; Zoellner, Jamie; Bigby, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the impact of media literacy for tobacco prevention for youth delivered through a community site. A randomized pretest-posttest evaluation design with matched-contact treatment and control conditions. The pilot study was delivered through the YMCA in a lower-income suburban and rural area of Southwest Virginia, a region long tied, both economically and culturally, to the tobacco industry. Children ages 8 to 14 (76% white, 58% female) participated in the study (n = 38). The intervention was an antismoking media literacy program (five 1-hour lessons) compared with a matched-contact creative writing control program. General media literacy, three domains of tobacco-specific media literacy ("authors and audiences," "messages and meanings," and "representation and reality"), tobacco attitudes, and future expectations were assessed. Multiple regression modeling assessed the impact of the intervention, controlling for pretest measures, age, and sex. General media literacy and tobacco-specific "authors and audiences" media literacy improved significantly for treatment compared with control (p media literacy measures and for tobacco attitudes were not significant. Future expectations of smoking increased significantly for treatment participants ages 10 and younger (p media literacy are accompanied by an increase in future expectations to smoke for younger children.

  20. A Study of the Characteristics of Human-Pilot Control Response to Simulated Aircraft Lateral Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Donald C

    1954-01-01

    Report presents the results of studies made in an attempt to provide information on the control operations of the human pilot. These studies included an investigation of the ability of pilots to control simulated unstable yawing oscillations, a study of the basic characteristics of human-pilot control response, and a study to determine whether and to what extent pilot control response can be represented in an analytical form.

  1. GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, Margaret; Marentette, Christina; Bujosa, Robert; Taylor, Jessica; Lewis, Preston

    2016-01-01

    During the spring of 2016, from April 4 - May 27, sixteen GLOBE schools participated in the GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study. Thirteen teachers from these schools had previously participated in the NASA LEARN program (Long-term Experience in Authentic Research with NASA) where they were GLOBE trained in Atmosphere protocols, and engaged in 1-3 years of research under the mentorship of NASA scientists. Each school was loaned two aerosol instruments for the Campaign duration, either 2 GLOBE sun photometers, 2 Calitoo sun photometers, or 1 of each. This allowed for students to make measurements side-by-side and in the case of the Calitoos, to compare AOT results immediately with each other for better consistency in data collection. Additionally, as part of the Field Campaign evaluation, multiple instruments allow for an assessment of the ease of use of each instrument for grade level of students, whether in middle school or high school. Before the Campaign, all GLOBE and Calitoo instruments were 'checked out' against an AERONET, then checked again upon return after the Campaign. By examining all data, before, during and after the Campaign, this gives an indication of instrument performance and proficiency obtained by the students. Support was provided to each teacher and their students at the level requested, via email, phone or video conferencing.

  2. Lucid dreaming treatment for nightmares: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoormaker, Victor I; van den Bout, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of the cognitive-restructuring technique 'lucid dreaming treatment' (LDT) on chronic nightmares. Becoming lucid (realizing that one is dreaming) during a nightmare allows one to alter the nightmare storyline during the nightmare itself. After having filled out a sleep and a posttraumatic stress disorder questionnaire, 23 nightmare sufferers were randomly divided into 3 groups; 8 participants received one 2-hour individual LDT session, 8 participants received one 2-hour group LDT session, and 7 participants were placed on the waiting list. LDT consisted of exposure, mastery, and lucidity exercises. Participants filled out the same questionnaires 12 weeks after the intervention (follow-up). At follow-up the nightmare frequency of both treatment groups had decreased. There were no significant changes in sleep quality and posttraumatic stress disorder symptom severity. Lucidity was not necessary for a reduction in nightmare frequency. LDT seems effective in reducing nightmare frequency, although the primary therapeutic component (i.e. exposure, mastery, or lucidity) remains unclear.

  3. 飞行员情境认知的综合评判%Comprehensive Evaluation on Pilot's Situation Cognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 袁修干; 吕丽娟; 柳忠起; 康卫勇; 马睿

    2008-01-01

    Objective To resolve the problems of comprehensive evaluation on pilot's situation cognition basing on studying the mission situation. Methods The model of fuzzy comprehensive evaluation on pilots' situation cognitive was established on the basis of researches on concepts and methods of environmental quality evaluation in environment science.Results On the basis of theoretical consideration and analysis of experiments, the state of pilot's situation cognition was revealed preliminarily.Conclusion It is showed that the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method on pilot's situation cognition can provide real and complete flight cognitive information. It is reliable basis for pilot's efficacy of training and flight safety.%目的 通过对任务情境的研究,解决飞行员情境认知的综合评判问题.方法 在借鉴环境科学中环境质量评价研究的基础上,建立飞行员情境认知的模糊综合评判模型.结果 在理论研究和实验分析的基础上,初步揭示了飞行员情境认知状况.结论 用模糊综合评判方法 评价飞行员的情境认知可以提供真实、全面的飞行认知信息,为飞行员的训练有效性及安全性提供可靠依据.

  4. Indonesian EFL Students’ Perspective on Writing Process: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Imelda Hermilinda Abas; Noor Hashima Abd. Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at understanding the EFL Indonesian students’ perspective on the writing process. The pilot study involved two male Indonesian postgraduate students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. The Indonesian students were selected based on the following criteria: (1) had enough knowledge in English writing, indicated by the completion of Academic Writing and Research Methodology courses taken in UUM; (2) had written an unpublished thesis during their undergraduate studies in Indonesia a...

  5. 77 FR 74668 - Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs; Notice To Extend Expiration Date AGENCY: Food and Drug... ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs'' to December 31, 2014. FOR... (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs.'' Previous extensions of the expiration date...

  6. Piloted Simulator Evaluation Results of New Fault-Tolerant Flight Control Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombaerts, T.J.J.; Smaili, M.H.; Stroosma, O.; Chu, Q.P.; Mulder, J.A.; Joosten, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    A high fidelity aircraft simulation model, reconstructed using the Digital Flight Data Recorder (DFDR) of the 1992 Amsterdam Bijlmermeer aircraft accident (Flight 1862), has been used to evaluate a new Fault-Tolerant Flight Control Algorithm in an online piloted evaluation. This paper focuses on the

  7. 78 FR 44579 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... Program Evaluation. OMB Approval Number: 2528--New. Type of Request: New collection. Form Number: None... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Evaluation AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HUD has...

  8. Pilot Evaluation of a Web-Based Intervention Targeting Sexual Health Service Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. E.; Newby, K.; Caley, M.; Danahay, A.; Kehal, I.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual health service access is fundamental to good sexual health, yet interventions designed to address this have rarely been implemented or evaluated. In this article, pilot evaluation findings for a targeted public health behavior change intervention, delivered via a website and web-app, aiming to increase uptake of sexual health services among…

  9. A Pilot Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for Refugee Youth from Burma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah Dorothy; Emmerling, Dane; Gavarkavich, Diane; Mershon, Claire-Helene; Linton, Kristin; Rubesin, Hillary; Agnew-Brune, Christine; Eng, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Art therapy is a promising form of therapy to address mental health concerns for refugee youth. This article describes the development and implementation of a pilot evaluation of an art therapy program for refugee adolescents from Burma currently living in the United States. Evaluation activities were based on the Centers for Disease Control and…

  10. A Pilot Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for Refugee Youth from Burma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah Dorothy; Emmerling, Dane; Gavarkavich, Diane; Mershon, Claire-Helene; Linton, Kristin; Rubesin, Hillary; Agnew-Brune, Christine; Eng, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Art therapy is a promising form of therapy to address mental health concerns for refugee youth. This article describes the development and implementation of a pilot evaluation of an art therapy program for refugee adolescents from Burma currently living in the United States. Evaluation activities were based on the Centers for Disease Control and…

  11. The Incidence and Temporal Patterning of Insomnia: a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Michael; Phillips, Cindy; Gehrman, Philip R.; Pigeon, Wilfred; Matteson, Sara; Jungquist, Carla

    2014-01-01

    To date very little research has been conducted on night-to-night variability in the incidence of insomnia. Unclear from prior research is whether subjects with Primary Insomnia (PI) exhibit good sleep (or better than average sleep) on some interval basis. In the present study, pilot data are provided on 1) the frequency with which “good sleep” occurs in subjects with PI and 2) whether these events occur in a non-random manner. 10 PI subjects participated in this “naturalistic” study. All subjects completed daily sleep diaries for a minimum of 20 days. None of the subjects received treatment for their insomnia during the monitoring period. The night-tonight data were evaluated by typing each night’s sleep as “Good” or “Bad” and then by determining the number of bad nights that occurred prior to a good night for each subject. Good and bad nights were typed in two ways: 1. using a ≥ 85% cutoff and 2. using a better than the individual’s mean sleep efficiency (idiographic cutoff). Subjects exhibited good sleep on between 29% (> 85% criteria) and 55% (idiographic criteria) of the nights evaluated. The temporal patterning analysis (based on a idiographic cutoff) revealed that better than average sleep most frequently occurred (> 89% of instances) following one to three night’s of poor sleep. These data suggests that insomnia severity may be mediated/moderated by sleep homeostasis and that the homeostat, or input to the homeostat, may be abnormal in patients with Primary Insomnia. PMID:19912510

  12. Rare variants in ischemic stroke: an exome pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Cole

    Full Text Available The genetic architecture of ischemic stroke is complex and is likely to include rare or low frequency variants with high penetrance and large effect sizes. Such variants are likely to provide important insights into disease pathogenesis compared to common variants with small effect sizes. Because a significant portion of human functional variation may derive from the protein-coding portion of genes we undertook a pilot study to identify variation across the human exome (i.e., the coding exons across the entire human genome in 10 ischemic stroke cases. Our efforts focused on evaluating the feasibility and identifying the difficulties in this type of research as it applies to ischemic stroke. The cases included 8 African-Americans and 2 Caucasians selected on the basis of similar stroke subtypes and by implementing a case selection algorithm that emphasized the genetic contribution of stroke risk. Following construction of paired-end sequencing libraries, all predicted human exons in each sample were captured and sequenced. Sequencing generated an average of 25.5 million read pairs (75 bp×2 and 3.8 Gbp per sample. After passing quality filters, screening the exomes against dbSNP demonstrated an average of 2839 novel SNPs among African-Americans and 1105 among Caucasians. In an aggregate analysis, 48 genes were identified to have at least one rare variant across all stroke cases. One gene, CSN3, identified by screening our prior GWAS results in conjunction with our exome results, was found to contain an interesting coding polymorphism as well as containing excess rare variation as compared with the other genes evaluated. In conclusion, while rare coding variants may predispose to the risk of ischemic stroke, this fact has yet to be definitively proven. Our study demonstrates the complexities of such research and highlights that while exome data can be obtained, the optimal analytical methods have yet to be determined.

  13. 75 FR 54343 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program for Blood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) is announcing an invitation to participate in a pilot evaluation program for CBER's eSubmitter Program (eSubmitter). CBER's eSubmitter has been customized as an automated biologics license application (BLA) and BLA supplement (BLS) submission system for blood and blood components. Participation in the......

  14. Pilot study of a targeted dance class for physical rehabilitation in children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Citlali López-Ortiz; Tara Egan; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This pilot study evaluates the effects of a targeted dance class utilizing classical ballet principles for rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy on balance and upper extremity control. Methods: Twelve children with cerebral palsy (ages 7–15 years) with Gross Motor Function Classification scores II–IV participated in this study and were assigned to either a control group or targeted dance class group. Targeted dance class group participated in 1-h classes three times per...

  15. Randomized Controlled Pilot Study Testing Use of Smartphone Technology for Obesity Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Jerilyn K.; Janna Stephens; Dennison Himmelfarb, Cheryl R.; Stewart, Kerry J.; Sara Hauck

    2013-01-01

    Background. The established interventions for weight loss are resource intensive which can create barriers for full participation and ultimate translation. The major goal of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of theoretically based behavioral interventions delivered by smartphone technology. Methods. The study randomized 68 obese adults to receive one of four interventions for six months: (1) intensive counseling intervention, (2) intensi...

  16. Transcranial direct current stimulation in the recovery of postural control after stroke : a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Saeys, Wim; Vereeck, Luc; Lafosse, Christophe; Truijen, Steven; Wuyts, Floris L.; de Heyning, van, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose: This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of multiple sessions of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) during 4 weeks on balance and gait parameters after stroke. Method: Thirty-one stroke patients were included in this randomised, double-blind, sham-controlled crossover study. The Tinetti test was used to assess functional balance and gait after stroke. Secondary measures, Rivermead Motor Assessment (RMA) and Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS), were register...

  17. Structural differences in gray matter between glider pilots and non-pilots. A voxel based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosif eAhamed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full body rotations. In the present study we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry (VBM. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction and oculomotor control.

  18. Evaluation of a nurse mentoring intervention to family caregivers in the management of delirium after cardiac surgery (MENTOR_D): a study protocol for a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailhot, Tanya; Cossette, Sylvie; Bourbonnais, Anne; Côté, José; Denault, André; Côté, Marie-Claude; Lamarche, Yoan; Guertin, Marie-Claude

    2014-07-30

    Despite the use of evidence-based preventive measures, delirium affects about 40% of patients following cardiac surgery with the potential for serious clinical complications and anxiety for caregivers. There is some evidence that family involvement as a core component of delirium management may be beneficial since familiarity helps patients stay in contact with reality, however, this merits further investigation. There is also currently a gap in the scientific literature regarding objective indicators that could enhance early detection and monitoring of delirium. Therefore, this randomized pilot trial examines the acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary efficacy of an experimental nursing intervention to help family caregivers manage post-cardiac surgery delirium in their relatives. It also explores the validity of a new and innovative measure that has potential as an indicator for delirium. In this two-group randomized pilot study (n = 30), the control group will receive usual care and the intervention group will receive the experimental intervention aimed at reducing delirium severity. The intervention nurse's objective will be to foster the family caregiver's self-efficacy in behaving in a supportive manner during delirium episodes. Data will be collected from standard delirium assessment scales and a novel measure of delirium, i.e., cerebral oximetry obtained using near infrared spectroscopy, as well as medical records and participants' responses to questionnaires. New strategies for early detection, monitoring, and management of delirium are needed in order to improve outcomes for both patients and families. The present article exposes feasibility issues based on the first few months of the empirical phase of the study that may be useful to the scientific community interested in improving the care of patients with delirium. Another potentially important contribution is in the exploration of cerebral oximetry, a promising measure as an objective

  19. A remotely piloted aircraft system in major incident management: concept and pilot, feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsen, Håkon B

    2015-06-10

    Major incidents are complex, dynamic and bewildering task environments characterised by simultaneous, rapidly changing events, uncertainty and ill-structured problems. Efficient management, communication, decision-making and allocation of scarce medical resources at the chaotic scene of a major incident is challenging and often relies on sparse information and data. Communication and information sharing is primarily voice-to-voice through phone or radio on specified radio frequencies. Visual cues are abundant and difficult to communicate between teams and team members that are not co-located. The aim was to assess the concept and feasibility of using a remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) system to support remote sensing in simulated major incident exercises. We carried out an experimental, pilot feasibility study. A custom-made, remotely controlled, multirotor unmanned aerial vehicle with vertical take-off and landing was equipped with digital colour- and thermal imaging cameras, a laser beam, a mechanical gripper arm and an avalanche transceiver. We collected data in five simulated exercises: 1) mass casualty traffic accident, 2) mountain rescue, 3) avalanche with buried victims, 4) fisherman through thin ice and 5) search for casualties in the dark. The unmanned aerial vehicle was remotely controlled, with high precision, in close proximity to air space obstacles at very low levels without compromising work on the ground. Payload capacity and tolerance to wind and turbulence were limited. Aerial video, shot from different altitudes, and remote aerial avalanche beacon search were streamed wirelessly in real time to a monitor at a ground base. Electromagnetic interference disturbed signal reception in the ground monitor. A small remotely piloted aircraft can be used as an effective tool carrier, although limited by its payload capacity, wind speed and flight endurance. Remote sensing using already existing remotely piloted aircraft technology in pre

  20. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Greenbelt Homes, Inc. Pilot Retrofit Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    In the fall of 2010, a multiyear pilot energy efficiency retrofit project was undertaken by Greenbelt Homes, Inc., (GHI) a 1,566 home cooperative of circa 1930 and 1940 homes in Greenbelt, Maryland. GHI established this pilot project to serve as a basis for decision making for the rollout of a community-wide upgrade program that will incorporate energy efficiency improvements to the building envelope and mechanical equipment. With the community upgrade fully funded by the cooperative through their membership without outside subsidies, this project presents a unique opportunity to evaluate and prioritize the wide range of benefits of high-performance retrofits based on member experience with and acceptance of the retrofit measures implemented during the pilot project. Addressing the complex interactions between benefits, trade-offs, construction methods, project management implications, realistic upfront costs, financing, and other considerations, serves as a case study for energy retrofit projects that include high-performance technologies based on the long-term value to the homeowner. The pilot project focused on identifying the added costs and energy-savings benefits of improvements. Phase 1—baseline evaluation for a representative set of 28 homes sited in seven buildings; Phase 2—installation of the building envelope improvements and continued monitoring of the energy consumption for the heating season; Phase 3—energy simulations supporting recommendations for HVAC and water heating upgrades.

  1. "I'll never forget this": evaluating a pilot workshop in effective communication for dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucander, Henriette; Knutsson, Kerstin; Salé, Hanna; Jonsson, Anders

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated a pilot workshop for teaching communication skills to dental students. The methodology is based on an experiential learning approach, the use of realistic clinical scenarios, simulated patients, and an integrated teaching team of both educational researchers and dentists. Furthermore, the methodology was adapted for short workshops, which is thought to offer better possibilities for frequent and effective training of communication skills throughout the curriculum. The work-shop was piloted with groups of six to ten students from the sixth and tenth semesters (n=94). Results show that the majority of students found the tasks meaningful and well aligned with how they perceived their future profession as dentists. Most students also thought that they learned from the task. An interesting finding is that students not only found it instructive to practice how to communicate in authentic situations, but that they generally found the workshop to be thought-provoking while at the same time providing structure and intellectual tools for the future. A possible explanation for this finding is the sharing of explicit criteria for high-quality communication.

  2. [Primary care and mental health care collaboration in patients with depression: Evaluation of a pilot experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Carlos; Balagué, Laura; Iruin, Álvaro; Retolaza, Ander; Belaunzaran, Jon; Basterrechea, Javier; Mosquera, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    To implement and assess a collaborative experience between Primary Care (PC) and Mental Health (MH) in order to improve the care of patients with depression. Pilot collaborative project from a participatory action research approach during 2013. Basque Country. Osakidetza (Basque Health Service). Bizkaia and Gipuzkoa. The study included 207 professionals from general practice, nursing, psychiatry, psychiatric nursing, psychology and social work of 9 health centres and 6 mental health centres of Osakidetza. Shared design and development of four axes of intervention: 1) Communication and knowledge between PC and MH professionals, 2) Improvement of diagnostic coding and referral of patients, 3) Training programmes with meetings and common Clinical Practice Guidelines, and 4) Evaluation. Intervention and control questionnaires to professionals of the centres on the knowledge and satisfaction in the PC-MH relationship, joint training activities, and assessment of the experience. Osakidetza registers of prevalences, referrals and treatments. Follow-up meetings. Improvement in the 4 axes of intervention in the participant centres compared with the controls. Identification of factors to be considered in the development and sustainability of PC-MH collaborative care. The pilot experience confirms that collaborative projects promoted by PC and MH can improve depression care and the satisfaction of professionals. They are complex projects that need simultaneous interventions adjusted to the particularities of the health services. Multidisciplinary and continuous participation and management and information system support are necessary for their implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Piloted "Well Clear" Performance Evaluation of Detect-and-Avoid Systems with Suggestive Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Eric R.; Santiago, Confesor; Watza, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of four prototype unmanned aircraft detect-and-avoid (DAA) display configurations, each with different informational elements driven by alerting and guidance algorithms. Sixteen unmanned aircraft pilots flew each combination of the display configurations, with half being given zero DAA surveillance sensor uncertainty and the other half experiencing errors that were comparable, and in some cases slightly better than, errors that were measured in DAA system flight tests. The displays that showed intruder alert information in altitude and heading bands had significantly fewer losses of well clear compared with alternative displays that lacked that information. This difference was significant from a statistical and practical perspective: those losses that did occur lasted for shorter periods and did not penetrate as far into the geometric "separation cylinder" as those in the non-banded displays. A modest level of DAA surveillance sensor uncertainty did not affect the proportion of losses of well clear or their severity. It is recommended that DAA traffic displays implement a band-type display in order to improve the safety of UAS operations in the National Airspace System. Finally, this report provides pilot response time distributions for responding to DAA alerts.

  4. Fluid bed gasification pilot plant fuel feeding system evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, W.A.; Fonstad, T.; Pugsley, T.; Gerspacher, R. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)), Email: wac132@mail.usask.ca; Wang Zhiguo (Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon (Canada)), Email: zhiguo.wang@src.sk.ca

    2009-07-01

    Fluidized bed gasification (FBG) is a method for thermally converting solid biomass to a gaseous product termed syngas, which can be used as fuel for heat or electricity generation. Accurate and consistent feeding of biomass fuel into biomass FBG converters is a continuing, challenge, and was the subject of experimentation at the University of Saskatchewan biomass FBG pilot plant. The 2-conveyor feeding system for this pilot plant was tested using meat and bone meal (MBM) as feedstock, by conveying the feedstock through the system, and measuring the output rate as the fuel was discharged. The relationship between average mass-flowrate (F{sub M}) and conveyor speed (S) for the complete feeding system was characterized to be F{sub M}=0.2188S-0.42 for the tests performed. Testing of the metering conveyor coupled to the injection conveyor showed that operating these conveyors at drive synchronized speeds, air pulsed into the injection hopper, and 50 slpm injection air, produced the most consistent feed output rate. Hot fluidized bed tests followed, which showed that plugging of the injection nozzle occurred as bed temperatures increased past 700C, resulting in loss of fuel flow. The pneumatic injection nozzle was subsequently removed, and the system was found to perform adequately with it absent. (orig.)

  5. LER Data Mining Pilot Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Jonathan; Zentner, Michael D.; McQuerry, Dennis L.

    2004-10-15

    LERs consist of a one page standard form with a standard header and free text data, followed by additional continuation pages of free text data. Currently this LER data is analyzed by first inputting the heading and text data manually into a categorical relational database. The data is then evaluated by enumeration of data in various categories and supplemented by review of individual LERs. This is labor intensive and makes it difficult to relate specific descriptive text to enumerated results. State of the art data mining and visualization technology exists that can eliminate the need for manual categorization, maintain the text relationships within each report, produce the same enumerated results currently available, and provide a tool to support potentially useful additional analysis of the informational content of LERs in a more timely and cost effective manner.

  6. Hijama (wet cupping) for female infertility treatment: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Abduljabbar; Anhar Gazzaz; Samiha Mourad; Ayman Oraif

    2016-01-01

    Background: To assess the effectiveness of wet cupping (Hijama) as a treatment of female factor infertility. The primary outcome measured was pregnancy rates after Hijama. The secondary outcome measured was the effect on the reproductive hormonal profile before and after Hijama. Methods: A pilot clinical study was conducted for the use of Hijama as treatment for female infertility at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from September 2013 to May 2015. Inclusion criteria included: patients w...

  7. A Pilot Study on EFL Reading Teaching through Linguistic Landscape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The public displays of languages have been described as “linguistic landscape”. Nowadays, most globalized cities have worked hard at creating English-friendly environments by including bilingual signs to facilitate communication. The domain of linguistic landscape, therefore, has drawn the interests of English educators. This paper serves as a pilot study to exploit every possibility in the linguistic landscape as EFL teaching material, and optimize pedagogic activities in reading classes by adopting this linguistic resource.

  8. Pilot study of smoking, alcohol and drug abuse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, A; Perry, C; Killen, J; Slinkard, L A; Maccoby, N

    1980-07-01

    A longitudinal pilot study gathered data on the onset and prevention of smoking, alcohol, and drug abuse among 526 students from two junior-high-schools in California. Over two school years, students who were trained to resist social pressures toward tobacco, alcohol, and drug use began smoking at less than one-half the rate of those who did not receive special training. Frequent alcohol and marijuana use was also less prevalent among the students who received such training.

  9. Childhood maltreatment and amygdala connectivity in methamphetamine dependence: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Andy C.; Kohno, Milky; Hellemann, Gerhard; London, Edythe D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Childhood maltreatment, a well-known risk factor for the development of substance abuse disorders, is associated with functional and structural abnormalities in the adult brain, particularly in the limbic system. However, almost no research has examined the relationship between childhood maltreatment and brain function in individuals with drug abuse disorders. Methods We conducted a pilot study of the relationship between childhood maltreatment (evaluated with the Childhood Traum...

  10. CE: Defining and Understanding Pilot and Other Feasibility Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Nancy S; Rosenbloom, Deborah A

    2017-03-01

    : Nurses are becoming increasingly involved in conducting clinical research in which feasibility studies are often the first steps. Understanding why and how these studies are conducted may encourage clinical nurses to engage with researchers and take advantage of opportunities to participate in advancing nursing science. This article provides an overview of feasibility studies, including pilot studies, and explains the type of preliminary data they seek to provide in order to make larger, future studies more efficient and successful. By way of example, the authors discuss a feasibility study they conducted that illustrates the key components and necessary steps involved in such work.

  11. Effect of Piroxicam on ART Outcome: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Sohrabvand

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most important factors affecting success rates in assisted reproductive techniques (ART besides the number of oocytes retrieved and high quality embryos derived from them is the technical aspects of embryo transfer. It seems that pretreatement with uterine relaxants can be helpful in preventing unpleasant cramps which can have an adverse effect on ART outcome. In this respect, some drugs such as prostaglandin inhibitors or sedatives have been evaluated but not confirmed yet remain controversial. This study was performed in order to assess the effect of administrating Piroxicam prior to embryo transfer on pregnancy rates in ART cycles. Materials and Methods: This pilot study was performed from August 2010 through December 2011 on 50 infertile women in ART cycles. Recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH with a long gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH analogue protocol were used for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. The subjects were randomly allocated into two groups of 25 patients after obtaining written consent. Group A received a 10 mg Piroxicam capsule 30 minutes before embryo transfer and group B was the control group with no treatment. Data were analyzed by Chi-square and analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: Pregnancy rate was 34% (n=17 totally, with 32% (n=8 in group A and 36% (n=9 in group B (p=0.75. Uterine cramps were experienced by 4 women (16% in group B, while none were reported by women in group A (p=0.037. Conclusion: It seems that Piroxicam administration 30 minutes prior to embryo transfer cannot increase pregnancy rates, but can prevent or reduce uterine cramps after the procedure.

  12. Strategies to promote healthier food purchases: a pilot supermarket intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Blakely, Tony; Wall, Joanne; Rodgers, Anthony; Jiang, Yannan; Wilton, Jenny

    2007-06-01

    To pilot the design and methodology for a large randomised controlled trial (RCT) of two interventions to promote healthier food purchasing: culturally appropriate nutrition education and price discounts. A 12-week, single-blind, pilot RCT. Effects on food purchases were measured using individualised electronic shopping data ('Shop 'N Go' system). Partial data were also collected on food expenditure at other (non-supermarket) retail outlets. A supermarket in Wellington, New Zealand. Eligible customers were those who were the main household shoppers, shopped mainly at the participating store, and were registered to use the Shop 'N Go system. Ninety-seven supermarket customers (72% women; age 40 +/- 9.6 years, mean +/- standard deviation) were randomised to one of four intervention groups: price discounts, nutrition education, a combination of price discounts and nutrition education, or control (no intervention). There was a 98% follow-up rate of participants, with 85% of all reported supermarket purchases being captured via the electronic data collection system. The pilot did, however, demonstrate difficulty recruiting Maori, Pacific and low-income shoppers using the electronic register and mail-out. This pilot study showed that electronic sales data capture is a viable way to measure effects of study interventions on food purchases in supermarkets, and points to the feasibility of conducting a large-scale RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of price discounts and nutrition education. Recruitment strategies will, however, need to be modified for the main trial in order to ensure inclusion of all ethnic and socio-economic groups.

  13. BodyWise: evaluating a pilot body image group for patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountford, Victoria A; Brown, Amy; Bamford, Bryony; Saeidi, Saeideh; Morgan, John F; Lacey, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Body image disturbance can be enduring and distressing to individuals with eating disorders and effective treatments remain limited. This pilot study evaluated a group-based treatment-BodyWise-developed for use in full and partial hospitalization with patients with anorexia nervosa at low weight. A partial crossover waitlist design was used. BodyWise (N = 50) versus treatment as usual (N = 40) were compared on standardized measures of body image disturbance. Results demonstrated significant improvement in the group compared to treatment as usual for the primary outcome measure (Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire Shape Concern subscale) and other manifestations of body image disturbance including body checking and body image quality of life. BodyWise appeared acceptable to participants, and was easy to deliver within the pragmatics of a busy eating disorder service. There is potential for its wider dissemination as a precursor to more active body image interventions.

  14. Pilot study of a budget-tailored culinary nutrition education program for undergraduate food science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrison, Dorothy Adair

    The primary objective of this pilot study is to provide evidence that a budget-tailored culinary nutrition program is both appropriate and applicable to undergraduate food science students both in everyday life as well as their future health careers. Two validated programs were combined into one program in order to evaluate their combined effects: Cooking With a Chef and Cooking Matters at the Store. The secondary objective of this pilot study is to evaluate the components and reliability of a questionnaire created specifically for this pilot study. A review of past literature was written, which included culinary nutrition as a source of primary prevention, the importance of incorporating cost with culinary nutrition, and the importance of incorporating cost with culinary nutrition. Based on the literature review, it was determined that a budget-tailored culinary nutrition program was appropriate and applicable to undergraduate food science students interested in p