WorldWideScience

Sample records for picture dissimilatory metal

  1. Dissimilatory metal reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D R

    1993-01-01

    Microorganisms can enzymatically reduce a variety of metals in metabolic processes that are not related to metal assimilation. Some microorganisms can conserve energy to support growth by coupling the oxidation of simple organic acids and alcohols, H2, or aromatic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV). This dissimilatory Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction influences the organic as well as the inorganic geochemistry of anaerobic aquatic sediments and ground water. Microorganisms that use U(VI) as a terminal electron acceptor play an important role in uranium geochemistry and may be a useful tool for removing uranium from contaminated environments. Se(VI) serves as a terminal electron acceptor to support anaerobic growth of some microorganisms. Reduction of Se(VI) to Se(O) is an important mechanism for the precipitation of selenium from contaminated waters. Enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) to the less mobile and less toxic Cr(III), and reduction of soluble Hg(II) to volatile Hg(O) may affect the fate of these compounds in the environment and might be used as a remediation strategy. Microorganisms can also enzymatically reduce other metals such as technetium, vanadium, molybdenum, gold, silver, and copper, but reduction of these metals has not been studied extensively.

  2. Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qingzhong Wu; Cornell Gayle; Frank Löffler; Sanford, Robert

    2004-03-17

    Recent findings suggest that Anaeromyxobacter populations play relevant roles in metal and radionuclide reduction and immobilization at contaminated DOE sites. This research effort will characterize Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C as well as other Anaeromyxobacter isolates in hand, and assess their contribution towards metal detoxification and plume stabilization under environmentally relevant conditions.

  3. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated.

  4. Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

    Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to destroy organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing them to carbon dioxide. Some Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can also reductively dechlorinate chlorinated contaminants. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can reduce a variety of contaminant metals and convert them from soluble forms to forms that are likely to be immobilized in the subsurface. Studies in petroleum-contaminated aquifers have demonstrated that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be effective agents in removing aromatic hydrocarbons from groundwater under anaerobic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential for Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to remove uranium from contaminated groundwaters. The activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be stimulated in several ways to enhance organic contaminant oxidation and metal reduction. Molecular analyses in both field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that microorganisms of the genus Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination. Des micro-organismes simulant la réduction du fer ont la capacité de détruire des polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies en les oxydant en dioxyde de carbone. Certains micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent aussi dé-chlorer par réduction des polluants chlorés. Des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent réduire tout un ensemble de métaux polluants et les faire passer de formes solubles à des formes qui sont susceptibles d'être immobilisées dans le milieu

  5. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  6. Structural and functional studies of multiheme cytochromes C involved in extracellular electron transport in bacterial dissimilatory metal reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonova, T V; Popov, V O

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria utilizing insoluble mineral forms of metal oxides as electron acceptors in respiratory processes are widespread in the nature. The electron transfer from a pool of reduced quinones in the cytoplasmic membrane across the periplasm to the bacterial outer membrane and then to an extracellular acceptor is a key step in bacterial dissimilatory metal reduction. Multiheme cytochromes c play a crucial role in the extracellular electron transfer. The bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used as a model organism to study the mechanism of extracellular electron transport. In this review, we discuss recent data on the composition, structures, and functions of multiheme cytochromes c and their functional complexes responsible for extracellular electron transport in Shewanella oneidensis.

  7. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens: Implications for dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, H. K.; Iavarone, A. T.; Gorur, A.; Yeo, B. S.; Tran, R.; Melnyk, R. A.; Mathies, R. A.; Auer, M.; Coates, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they have been shown to be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or the humic substances analog, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface of T. potens. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results are the first direct evidence for cell-wall associated cytochromes and MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium.

  8. Dissimilatory reduction of FeIII (EDTA) with microorganisms in the system of nitric oxide removal from the flue gas by metal chelate absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Bi-yao; LI Wei; JING Guo-hua; SHI Yao

    2004-01-01

    In the system of nitric oxide removal from the flue gas by metal chelate absorption, it is an obstacle that ferrous absorbents are easily oxidized by oxygen in the flue gas to ferric counterparts, which are not capable of binding NO. By adding iron metal or electrochemical method, FeIII (EDTA) can be reduced to FeII (EDTA). However, there are various drawbacks associated with these techniques. The dissimilatory reduction of FeIII (EDTA) with microorganisms in the system of nitric oxide removal by metal chelate absorption was investigated. Ammonium salt instead of nitrate was used as the nitrogen source, as nitrates inhibited the reduction of FeIII due to the competition between the two electron acceptors. Supplemental glucose and lactate stimulated the formation of FeII more than ethanol as the carbon sources. The microorganisms cultured at 50℃ were not very sensitive to the other experimental temperature, the reduction percentage of FeIII varied little with the temperature range of 30~50℃. Concentrated Na2CO3 solution was added to adjust the solution pH to an optimal pH range of 6~7. The overall results revealed that the dissimilatory ferric reducing microorganisms present in the mix-culture are probably neutrophilic, moderately thermophilic FeIII reducers.

  9. An alternative picture of alkali-metal-mediated metallation: cleave and capture chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Robert E

    2013-05-21

    This perspective article takes an alternative look at alkali-metal-mediated chemistry (exchange of a relatively inert C-H bond for a more reactive C-metal bond by a multicomponent reagent usually containing an alkali metal and a less electropositive metal such as magnesium or zinc). It pictures that the cleavage of selected C-H bonds can be accompanied by the capturing of the generated anion by the multi (Lewis acid)-(Lewis base) character of the residue of the bimetallic base. In this way small atoms or molecules (hydrides, oxygen-based anions) as well as sensitive organic anions (of substituted aromatic compounds, ethers or alkenes) can be captured. Cleave and capture reactions which occur in special positions on the organic substrate are also included.

  10. A unified picture of the crystal structures of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlind, Per; Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Wills, J. M.; Boring, A. M.

    1995-04-01

    THE crystal structures of the light actinides have intrigued physicists and chemists for several decades1. Simple metals and transition metals have close-packed, high-symmetry structures, such as body-centred cubic, face-centred cubic and hexagonal close packing. In contrast, the structures of the light actinides are very loosely packed and of low symmetry-tetragonal, orthorhombic and monoclinic. To understand these differences, we have performed total-energy calculations, as a function of volume, for both high-and low-symmetry structures of a simple metal (aluminium), a non-magnetic transition metal (niobium), a ferromagnetic transition metal (iron) and a light actinide (uranium). We find that the crystal structure of all of these metals is determined by the balance between electrostatic (Madelung) interactions, which favour high symmetry, and a Peierls distortion of the crystal lattice, which favours low symmetry. We show that simple metals and transition metals can adopt low-symmetry structures on expansion of the lattice; and we predict that, conversely, the light actinides will undergo transitions to structures of higher symmetry on compression.

  11. Biochemistry of Dissimilatory Sulfur Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake II, R.

    2003-05-30

    The long term goals of this research were to define the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during the dissimilatory oxidation of sulfur practiced by various species of the thiobacilli. Specific adhesion of the thiobacilli to elemental sulfur was studied by electrical impedance, dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry, and optical trapping methods. The conclusion is that the thiobacilli appear to express specific receptors that enable the bacteria to recognize and adhere to insoluble sulfur. The enzyme tetrathionate oxidase was purified from two species of the thiobacilli. Extensive structural and functional studies were conducted on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase purified from cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus denitrificans. The kinetic mechanism of rhodanese was studied.

  12. Utilization of DNA as a Sole Source of Phosphorus, Carbon, and Energy by Shewanella spp.: Ecological and Physiological Implications for Dissimilatory Metal Reduction▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Ammons, Christine; Culley, David E.; Li, Shu-Mei W.; McLean, Jeff S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    The solubility of orthophosphate (PO43−) in iron-rich sediments can be exceedingly low, limiting the bioavailability of this essential nutrient to microbial populations that catalyze critical biogeochemical reactions. Here we demonstrate that dissolved extracellular DNA can serve as a sole source of phosphorus, as well as carbon and energy, for metal-reducing bacteria of the genus Shewanella. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and Shewanella sp. strain W3-18-1 all grew with DNA but displayed different growth rates. W3-18-1 exhibited the highest growth rate with DNA. While strain W3-18-1 displayed Ca2+-independent DNA utilization, both CN32 and MR-1 required millimolar concentrations of Ca2+ for growth with DNA. For S. oneidensis MR-1, the utilization of DNA as a sole source of phosphorus is linked to the activities of extracellular phosphatase(s) and a Ca2+-dependent nuclease(s), which are regulated by phosphorus availability. Mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular proteome of MR-1 identified one putative endonuclease (SO1844), a predicted UshA (bifunctional UDP-sugar hydrolase/5′ nucleotidase), a predicted PhoX (calcium-activated alkaline phosphatase), and a predicted CpdB (bifunctional 2′,3′ cyclic nucleotide 2′ phosphodiesterase/3′ nucleotidase), all of which could play important roles in the extracellular degradation of DNA under phosphorus-limiting conditions. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the ability to use exogenous DNA as the sole source of phosphorus is widespread among the shewanellae, and perhaps among all prokaryotes, and may be especially important for nutrient cycling in metal-reducing environments. PMID:18156329

  13. Dislocation creation and void nucleation in FCC ductile metals under tensile loading: a general microscopic picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-11-10

    Numerous theoretical and experimental efforts have been paid to describe and understand the dislocation and void nucleation processes that are fundamental for dynamic fracture modeling of strained metals. To date an essential physical picture on the self-organized atomic collective motions during dislocation creation, as well as the essential mechanisms for the void nucleation obscured by the extreme diversity in structural configurations around the void nucleation core, is still severely lacking in literature. Here, we depict the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation during uniaxial high strain rate tensile processes in face-centered-cubic (FCC) ductile metals. We find that the dislocations are created through three distinguished stages: (i) Flattened octahedral structures (FOSs) are randomly activated by thermal fluctuations; (ii) The double-layer defect clusters are formed by self-organized stacking of FOSs on the close-packed plane; (iii) The stacking faults are formed and the Shockley partial dislocations are created from the double-layer defect clusters. Whereas, the void nucleation is shown to follow a two-stage description. We demonstrate that our findings on the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation are universal for a variety of FCC ductile metals with low stacking fault energies.

  14. Looking at the aquatic contamination through fish eyes--a faithful picture based on metals burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia; Raimundo, Joana; Canário, João; Almeida, Armando; Pacheco, Mário

    2013-12-15

    This study describes for the first time metal accumulation in the eyes of native golden grey mullet (Liza aurata) coupled with water/sediment quality assessment. Sampling was performed in the Tagus estuary (Portugal) where a confined area (Barreiro) is severely contaminated by metal/loids. Levels of As, Cu, Pb, Hg and Cd in sediments from Barreiro were one order of magnitude higher than those from the reference site. Data on water column pointed also to a higher availability of Cu, Pb, Cd and Hg (including MeHg) at Barreiro. Accordingly, fish eyes accumulated higher levels of metal/loids at Barreiro than at the reference site. These findings support the use of fish eyes as a target organ in environmental health assessment since they reflect sediment and water contamination. It points also to the importance of evaluate eye changes at structural/functional levels in order to examine in what extent accumulated metals could compromise this perceptive system.

  15. Altering petrology through microbial dissimilatory phosphite oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H.; Figueroa, I.; Coates, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) takes advantage of various microbial metabolisms to increase hydrocarbon and energy yield by improving oil flow and flood water sweep in a reservoir during tertiary recovery. Wormholing at the injection well is believed to be the result of the large drop in pressure when water exits the injection well and enters the unconsolidated reservoir matrix. One possible means of prevent this event is to consolidate the rock matrix immediately around the injection well to create a permeable zone of stable petrology. Many microbial processes are known to result in the precipitation of ionic components into their environment creating solid-phase minerals. Such processes could be judiciously applied to bind unconsolidated matrices in order to form a permeable concreted rock matrix, which would minimize wormholing events and thus improve floodwater sweep. However, to date, apart from the application of urea oxidation creating calcium carbonate precipitation, there has been little investigation of the applicability of these precipitated bioconcretions to MEOR strategies and none to control wormholing events. Here we present a novel approach to altering rock petrology to concrete unconsolidated matrices in the near well environment by the biogenesis of authigenic minerals through microbial dissimilatory phosphite oxidation. Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans, strain FiPS-3 is currently the only isolated organism capable of using phosphite (HPO32-) as an electron donor for growth. This process, known as dissimilatory phosphite oxidation (DPO), can be coupled to either sulfate reduction or homoacetogenesis and leads to the accumulation of inorganic phosphate in the medium. The resulting insoluble mineral phases can coat the rock environment resulting in a concretion binding the unconsolidated matrix particles into a single phase. In this study we demonstrate that DPO can effectively produce calcium or magnesium phosphate minerals in packed glass

  16. Linking dust emission to fundamental properties in galaxies: The low-metallicity picture

    CERN Document Server

    Rémy-Ruyer, A; Galliano, F; Lebouteiller, V; Baes, M; Bendo, G J; Boselli, A; Ciesla, L; Cormier, D; Cooray, A; Cortese, L; De Looze, I; Doublier-Pritchard, V; Galametz, M; Jones, A P; Karczewski, O Ł; Lu, N; Spinoglio, L

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we aim at providing a consistent analysis of the dust properties from metal-poor to metal-rich environments by linking them to fundamental galactic parameters. We consider two samples of galaxies: the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS) and KINGFISH, totalling 109 galaxies, spanning almost 2 dex in metallicity. We collect infrared (IR) to submillimetre (submm) data for both samples and present the complete data set for the DGS sample. We model the observed spectral energy distributions (SED) with a physically-motivated dust model to access the dust properties. Using a different SED model (modified blackbody), dust composition (amorphous carbon), or wavelength coverage at submm wavelengths results in differences in the dust mass estimate of a factor two to three, showing that this parameter is subject to non-negligible systematic modelling uncertainties. For eight galaxies in our sample, we find a rather small excess at 500 microns (< 1.5 sigma). We find that the dust SED of low-metallicity galaxies is ...

  17. A more complete picture of metal hyperaccumulation through next-generation sequencing technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eVerbruggen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic understanding of metal hyperaccumulation has benefitted immensely from the use of molecular genetics tools developed for Arabidopsis thaliana. The revolution in DNA sequencing will enable even greater strides in the near future, this time not restricted to the family Brassicaceae. Reference genomes are within reach for many ecologically interesting species including heterozygous outbreeders. They will allow deep RNA-seq transcriptome studies and the re-sequencing of contrasting individuals to unravel the genetic basis of phenotypic variation. Cell-type specific transcriptome analyses, which will be essential for the dissection of metal translocation pathways in hyperaccumulators, can be achieved through the combination of RNA-seq and translatome approaches. Affordable high-resolution genotyping of many individuals enables the elucidation of quantitative trait loci in intra- and interspecific crosses as well as through genome-wide association mapping across large panels of accessions. Furthermore, genome-wide scans have the power to detect loci under recent selection. Together these approaches will lead to a detailed understanding of the evolutionary path towards the emergence of hyperaccumulation traits.

  18. A more complete picture of metal hyperaccumulation through next-generation sequencing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Nathalie; Hanikenne, Marc; Clemens, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic understanding of metal hyperaccumulation has benefitted immensely from the use of molecular genetics tools developed for Arabidopsis thaliana. The revolution in DNA sequencing will enable even greater strides in the near future, this time not restricted to the family Brassicaceae. Reference genomes are within reach for many ecologically interesting species including heterozygous outbreeders. They will allow deep RNA-seq transcriptome studies and the re-sequencing of contrasting individuals to unravel the genetic basis of phenotypic variation. Cell-type specific transcriptome analyses, which will be essential for the dissection of metal translocation pathways in hyperaccumulators, can be achieved through the combination of RNA-seq and translatome approaches. Affordable high-resolution genotyping of many individuals enables the elucidation of quantitative trait loci in intra- and interspecific crosses as well as through genome-wide association mapping across large panels of accessions. Furthermore, genome-wide scans have the power to detect loci under recent selection. Together these approaches will lead to a detailed understanding of the evolutionary path towards the emergence of hyperaccumulation traits. PMID:24098304

  19. Surface plasmons in quantum-sized noble-metal clusters: TDDFT quantum calculations and the classical picture of charge oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissker, Hans-Christian; López-Lozano, Xóchitl

    2015-11-14

    The localized surface-plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticles corresponds to a classical charge oscillation of the quasi-free conduction electrons. In the case of noble-metal nanoparticles, interband transitions from the d electrons influence the spectra strongly. In addition, the inhomogeneity of the nanoparticles at the atomistic level becomes important for small sizes. Using the time-evolution formulation of time-dependent density-functional theory, we show that in spherical 147-atom silver clusters, the localized surface-plasmon resonance corresponds indeed to a collective charge oscillation resembling the schematic picture, while the dynamics in a comparable gold cluster shows multiple modes which correspond to the spectra without strong resonance. Short nanorods show the same difference between Au and Ag. However, nanorods of high aspect ratio develop a silver-like charge oscillation. Monatomic silver chains behave similarly to the nanorods and show a clear transverse charge oscillation mode. The role of the d electrons in the screening of the localized surface-plasmon resonance is demonstrated.

  20. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils;

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly...... and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate...... storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described...

  1. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate....... A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings...

  2. Dissimilatory Reduction of Elemental Selenium to Selenide in Sediments and Anaerobic Cultures of Selenium Respiring Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, M. J.; Switzer-Blum, J.; Oremland, R. S.

    2001-12-01

    Selenium contaminated environments often contain elemental Se (Se0) in their sediments that originates from dissimilatory reduction of Se oxyanions. The forms of Se in sedimentary rocks similarly contain high proportions of Se0, but much of the Se is also in the form of metal selenides, Se-2. It is not clear if the occurrence of these selenides is due to microbial reduction of Se0, or some other biological or chemical process. In this investigation we examined the possibility that bacterial respiratory reduction of Se0 to Se-2 could explain the presence of the latter species in sedimentary rocks. We conducted incubations of anoxic sediment slurries amended with different forms of Se0. High levels of Se0 (mM) were added to San Francisco Bay sediments in order to enhance the detection of soluble HSe-, which was precipitated with Cu2+ then redissolved and quantified by ICP-MS. Concentrations of HSe- were highest in live samples amended with red amorphous Se0 formed by either microbial reduction of Se+4 ("biogenic Se0") or by chemical oxidation of H2Se(g) ("chem. Se0"); very little HSe- was formed in those amended with black crystalline Se0, indicating the general lack of reactivity of this allotrope. Controls poisoned with 10% formalin did not produce HSe- from additions of chem. Se0. Reduction of both forms of red amorphous Se0 to HSe- occurred vigorously in growing cultures of Bacillus selenitireducens, an anaerobic halophile previously isolated from sediments of Mono Lake, CA. Up to 73% and 68% of red amorphous, biogenic Se0 or chem. Se0, respectively, was reduced to HSe- during growth of B. selenitireducens, (incubation time ~ 200 hrs): oxidation of lactate to acetate as well as cell density increases indicated that a dissimilatory reduction pathway was likely. Reduction was most enhanced when cells were previously grown on elemental sulfur or Se+4. In contrast to the growth experiments, washed cell suspensions of B. selenitireducens exhibited no HSe- production

  3. The octaheme SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors that include thiosulfate, polysulfide, and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyzes six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones and c cytochromes but appeared to be independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octaheme c cytochrome with an atypical heme binding site that represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The sirA locus was identified in the genomes of several sequenced Shewanella genomes, and its presence appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

  4. Picture perfect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Mette; Sørensen, Niels Ulrik

    Picture perfect’ – when perfection becomes the new normal This paper draws on perspectives from three different studies. One study, which focuses on youth life and lack of well-being (Sørensen et al 2011), one study on youth life on the margins of society (Katznelson et al 2015) and one study on...

  5. Dissimilatory Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, Derek R; Holmes, Dawn E; Nevin, Kelly P

    2004-01-01

    Dissimilatory Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction has an important influence on the geochemistry of modern environments, and Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms, most notably those in the Geobacteraceae family, can play an important role in the bioremediation of subsurface environments contaminated with organic or metal contaminants. Microorganisms with the capacity to conserve energy from Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction are phylogenetically dispersed throughout the Bacteria and Archaea. The ability to oxidize hydrogen with the reduction of Fe(III) is a highly conserved characteristic of hyperthermophilic microorganisms and one Fe(III)-reducing Archaea grows at the highest temperature yet recorded for any organism. Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to oxidize a wide variety of organic compounds, often completely to carbon dioxide. Typical alternative electron acceptors for Fe(III) reducers include oxygen, nitrate, U(VI) and electrodes. Unlike other commonly considered electron acceptors, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, the most prevalent form of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) in most environments, are insoluble. Thus, Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganisms face the dilemma of how to transfer electrons derived from central metabolism onto an insoluble, extracellular electron acceptor. Although microbiological and geochemical evidence suggests that Fe(III) reduction may have been the first form of microbial respiration, the capacity for Fe(III) reduction appears to have evolved several times as phylogenetically distinct Fe(III) reducers have different mechanisms for Fe(III) reduction. Geobacter species, which are representative of the family of Fe(III) reducers that predominate in a wide diversity of sedimentary environments, require direct contact with Fe(III) oxides in order to reduce them. In contrast, Shewanella and Geothrix species produce chelators that solubilize Fe(III) and release electron-shuttling compounds that transfer electrons from the cell surface to

  6. Cover Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuning; Ruben; Lehn; Renz; Garcia; Ksenofontov; Gütlich; Wegelius; Rissanen

    2000-07-17

    The cover picture shows how both, fine arts and science, avail themselves of a system of intertwined symbolic and iconic languages. They make use of a common set of abstracted signs to report on their results. Thus, already in 1925, Wassily Kandinsky painted a masterpiece (bottom), which now, 75 years later, might be regarded as a blueprint for a scientific project. In his painting, Kandinsky pictured a grid-shaped sign that resembles in effect an actual molecular switch. Apparently following an enigmatic protocol, the groups of Lehn and Gütlich (see p. 2504 ff. for more details) constructed a grid-type inorganic architecture that operates as a three-level magnetic switch (center) triggered by three external perturbations (p, T, hnu). The switching principle is based on the spin-crossover phenomenon of Fe(II) ions and can be monitored by Mössbauer spectroscopy (left) and magnetic measurements (rear). Maybe not by chance, the English translation of the title of the painting "signs" is a homonym of "science", since both presented works are a product of the insatiable curiosity of man and his untiring desire to recognize his existence.

  7. The octahaem SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha; Romine, Margie; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors including thiosulfate, polysulfide and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyses six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones but was independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octahaem c cytochrome with an atypical haem binding site. The sulfite reductase of S. oneidensis MR-1 does not appear to be a sirohaem enzyme, but represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The gene that encodes SirA is located within a 10-gene locus that is predicted to encode a component of a specialized haem lyase, a menaquinone oxidase and copper transport proteins. This locus was identified in the genomes of several Shewanella species and appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

  8. Mechanism of H2S Oxidation by the Dissimilatory Perchlorate-Reducing Microorganism Azospira suillum PS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.; Loutey, Dana; Wang, Ouwei; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Hubbard, Christopher G.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Conrad, Mark E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic and biochemical basis of perchlorate-dependent H2S oxidation (PSOX) was investigated in the dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing microorganism (DPRM) Azospira suillum PS (PS). Previously, it was shown that all known DPRMs innately oxidize H2S, producing elemental sulfur (So). Although the process involving PSOX is thermodynamically favorable (ΔG°′ = −206 kJ ⋅ mol−1 H2S), the underlying biochemical and genetic mechanisms are currently unknown. Interestingly, H2S is preferentially utilized over physiological electron donors such as lactate or acetate although no growth benefit is obtained from the metabolism. Here, we determined that PSOX is due to a combination of enzymatic and abiotic interactions involving reactive intermediates of perchlorate respiration. Using various approaches, including barcode analysis by sequencing (Bar-seq), transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), and proteomics, along with targeted mutagenesis and biochemical characterization, we identified all facets of PSOX in PS. In support of our proposed model, deletion of identified upregulated PS genes traditionally known to be involved in sulfur redox cycling (e.g., Sox, sulfide:quinone reductase [SQR]) showed no defect in PSOX activity. Proteomic analysis revealed differential abundances of a variety of stress response metal efflux pumps and divalent heavy-metal transporter proteins, suggesting a general toxicity response. Furthermore, in vitro biochemical studies demonstrated direct PSOX mediated by purified perchlorate reductase (PcrAB) in the absence of other electron transfer proteins. The results of these studies support a model in which H2S oxidation is mediated by electron transport chain short-circuiting in the periplasmic space where the PcrAB directly oxidizes H2S to So. The biogenically formed reactive intermediates (ClO2− and O2) subsequently react with additional H2S, producing polysulfide and So as end products. PMID:28223460

  9. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Aspergillus terreus isolated from the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Fuchs-Ocklenburg, Silvia; Kamp, Anja

    2014-01-01

    of oxygen and nitrate revealed that this fungal isolate is capable of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium under anoxic conditions. A 15N-labeling experiment proved that An-4 produced and excreted ammonium through nitrate reduction at a rate of up to 175 nmol 15NH4 + g-1 protein h-1. The products...... of dissimilatory nitrate reduction were ammonium (83%), nitrous oxide (15.5%), and nitrite (1.5%), while dinitrogen production was not observed. The process led to substantial cellular ATP production and biomass growth and also occurred when ammonium was added to suppress nitrate assimilation, stressing...... the dissimilatory nature of nitrate reduction. Interestingly, An-4 used intracellular nitrate stores (up to 6-8 μmol NO3 - g-1 protein) for dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Conclusions: Our findings expand the short list of microbial eukaryotes that store nitrate intracellularly and carry out dissimilatory nitrate...

  10. The Power of Pictures : Vertical Picture Angles in Power Pictures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giessner, Steffen R.; Ryan, Michelle K.; Schubert, Thomas W.; van Quaquebeke, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that variations in vertical picture angle cause the subject to appear more powerful when depicted from below and less powerful when depicted from above. However, do the media actually use such associations to represent individual differences in power? We argue that the d

  11. Dust-depletion sequences in damped Lyman-{\\alpha} absorbers: a unified picture from low-metallicity systems to the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    De Cia, Annalisa; Mattsson, Lars; Petitjean, Patrick; Srianand, Raghunathan; Gavignaud, Isabelle; Jenkins, Edward B

    2016-01-01

    We study metal depletion due to dust in the interstellar medium (ISM) to infer the properties of dust grains and characterize the metal and dust content of galaxies, down to low metallicity and intermediate redshift z. We provide metal column densities and abundances of a sample of 70 damped Lyman-{\\alpha} absorbers (DLAs) towards quasars, observed at high spectral resolution with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). This is the largest sample of phosphorus abundances measured in DLAs so far. We use literature measurements for Galactic clouds to cover the high-metallicity end. We discover tight (scatter <= 0.2 dex) correlations between [Zn/Fe] and the observed relative abundances, which are due to dust depletion. This implies that grain-growth in the ISM is an important process of dust production. These sequences are continuous in [Zn/Fe] from dust-free to dusty DLAs, and to Galactic clouds, suggesting that the availability of refractory metals in the ISM is cr...

  12. Vertical activity distribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction in coastal marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, A.; de Beer, D.; Stief, P.

    2013-01-01

    The relative importance of two dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways, denitrification (DEN) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), was investigated in intact sediment cores from five different coastal marine field sites (Dorum, Aarhus Bight, Mississippi Delta, Limfjord...... reduction was clearly dominated by DEN (59-131% of the total NO3- reduced) rather than by DNRA, irrespective of the sedimentary inventories of electron donors such as organic carbon, sulfide, and iron. Highest ammonium production via DNRA, accounting for up to 8.9% of the total NO3- reduced, was found...... at a site with very high concentrations of total sulfide and NH4+ within and below the layer in which NO3- reduction occurred. Sediment from two field sites, one with low and one with high DNRA activity in the core incubations, was also used for slurry incubations. Now, in both sediments high DNRA activity...

  13. Dissimilatory nitrate reductions in N2O producing Bacillus azotoformans LMG 9581T

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yi-Hua; de Vos, Paul; Heylen, Kim; Willems, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Denitrificaion, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are two N2O producing microbial processes that were previously thought to be mutually exclusive. Recently it’s proved that bacteria can contain both gene inventories, e.g. Shewanella loihica and Bacillus azotoformans. Detailed studies of these microorganisms could shed light on the differentiating environmental drivers of both processes without interference of organism-specific variation. In our study, Bacillus azotoformans sh...

  14. Multidimensional radar picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waz, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    In marine navigation systems, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization is often and often used. Echosonders and sonars working in hydroacustic systems can present pictures in three dimensions. Currently, vector maps also offer 3D presentation. This presentation is used in aviation and underwater navigation. In the nearest future three-dimensional presentation may be obligatory presentation in displays of navigation systems. A part of these systems work with radar and communicates with it transmitting data in a digital form. 3D presentation of radar picture require a new technology to develop. In the first step it is necessary to compile digital form of radar signal. The modern navigation radar do not present data in three-dimensional form. Progress in technology of digital signal processing make it possible to create multidimensional radar pictures. For instance, the RSC (Radar Scan Converter) - digital radar picture recording and transforming tool can be used to create new picture online. Using RSC and techniques of modern computer graphics multidimensional radar pictures can be generated. The radar pictures mentioned should be readable for ECDIS. The paper presents a method for generating multidimensional radar picture from original signal coming from radar receiver.

  15. Space perception in pictures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Doorn, A.J.; Wagemans, J.; De Ridder, H.; Koenderink, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    A "picture" is a at object covered with pigments in a certain pattern. Human observers, when looking "into" a picture (photograph, painting, drawing, . . . say) often report to experience a three dimensional "pictorial space." This space is a mental entity, apparently triggered by so called pictori

  16. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Pseudomonas alcaliphila with an electrode as the sole electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wentao; Zhang, Lixia; Li, Daping; Zhan, Guoqiang; Qian, Junwei; Tao, Yong

    2012-11-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were considered two alternative pathways of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. In this study, we firstly reported that both denitrification and DNRA occurred in Pseudomonas alcaliphila strain MBR with an electrode as the sole electron donor in a double chamber bio-electrochemical system (BES). The initial concentration of nitrate appeared as a factor determining the type of nitrate reduction with electrode as the sole electron donor at the same potential (-500 mV). As the initial concentration of nitrate increased, the fraction of nitrate reduced through denitrification also increased. While nitrite (1.38 ± 0.04 mM) was used as electron acceptor instead of nitrate, the electrons recovery via DNRA and denitrification were 43.06 ± 1.02% and 50.51 ± 1.37%, respectively. The electrochemical activities and surface topography of the working electrode catalyzed by strain MBR were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy. The results suggested that cells of strain MBR were adhered to the electrode, playing the role of electron transfer media for nitrate and nitrite reduction. Thus, for the first time, the results that DNRA and denitrification occurred simultaneously were confirmed by powering the strain with electricity. The study further expanded the range of metabolic reactions and had potential value for the recognization of dissimilatory nitrate reduction in various ecosystems.

  17. Mechanism of H2S Oxidation by the Dissimilatory Perchlorate-Reducing Microorganism Azospira suillum PS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta-Kolte, Misha G; Loutey, Dana; Wang, Ouwei; Youngblut, Matthew D; Hubbard, Christopher G; Wetmore, Kelly M; Conrad, Mark E; Coates, John D

    2017-02-21

    The genetic and biochemical basis of perchlorate-dependent H2S oxidation (PSOX) was investigated in the dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing microorganism (DPRM) Azospira suillum PS (PS). Previously, it was shown that all known DPRMs innately oxidize H2S, producing elemental sulfur (S(o)). Although the process involving PSOX is thermodynamically favorable (ΔG°' = -206 kJ ⋅ mol(-1) H2S), the underlying biochemical and genetic mechanisms are currently unknown. Interestingly, H2S is preferentially utilized over physiological electron donors such as lactate or acetate although no growth benefit is obtained from the metabolism. Here, we determined that PSOX is due to a combination of enzymatic and abiotic interactions involving reactive intermediates of perchlorate respiration. Using various approaches, including barcode analysis by sequencing (Bar-seq), transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), and proteomics, along with targeted mutagenesis and biochemical characterization, we identified all facets of PSOX in PS. In support of our proposed model, deletion of identified upregulated PS genes traditionally known to be involved in sulfur redox cycling (e.g., Sox, sulfide:quinone reductase [SQR]) showed no defect in PSOX activity. Proteomic analysis revealed differential abundances of a variety of stress response metal efflux pumps and divalent heavy-metal transporter proteins, suggesting a general toxicity response. Furthermore, in vitro biochemical studies demonstrated direct PSOX mediated by purified perchlorate reductase (PcrAB) in the absence of other electron transfer proteins. The results of these studies support a model in which H2S oxidation is mediated by electron transport chain short-circuiting in the periplasmic space where the PcrAB directly oxidizes H2S to S(o) The biogenically formed reactive intermediates (ClO2(-) and O2) subsequently react with additional H2S, producing polysulfide and S(o) as end products.IMPORTANCE Inorganic sulfur compounds are

  18. Picturing the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links for Students Glossary Picturing the Heart SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource Links for Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Government Resources Kids.gov – Science Information and services on the web ...

  19. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  20. Yangliuqing New Year Pictures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    HANGING up New Yearpictures during khe SpringFestival to symbolize goodluck in the coming year has longbeen a tradition in China,The pic-tures are both colorful and jubilantin theme and composition so as toattract everything good in the com-ing year and drive away evil.Four main“schools” of folk artdealing with New Year pictures ex-ist.Among the best known is thewoodblocK print from Yangliuqing,

  1. Phylogenetic diversity of dissimilatory ferric iron reducers in paddy soil of Hunan, South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xin-Jun [State Key Lab. of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, BJ (China); Graduate Univ., Chinese Academy of Sciences, BJ (China); Yang Jing; Chen Xue-Ping; Sun Guo-Xin [State Key Lab. of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, BJ (China); Zhu Yong-Guan [State Key Lab. of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, BJ (China); Key Lab. of Urban Environment and Health, Inst. of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria have been described by both culture-dependent and -independent methods in various environments, including freshwater, marine sediments, natural wetlands, and contaminated aquifers. However, little is known about iron-reducing microbial communities in paddy soils. The goal of this study was to characterize iron-reducing microbial communities in paddy soil. Moreover, the effect of dissolved and solid-phase iron (III) species on the iron-reducing microbial communities was also investigated by enrichment cultures. Methods: Ferric citrate and ferrihydrite were used respectively to set up enrichment cultures of dissimilatory ironreducing microorganisms using 1% inoculum of soil samples, and the iron reduction was measured. Moreover, bacterial DNA was extracted and 16S rRNA genes were PCR-amplified, and subsequently analyzed by the clone library and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Results: Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences extracted from the enrichment cultures revealed that Bradyrhizobium, Bacteroides, Clostridium and Ralstonia species were the dominant bacteria in the ferric citrate enrichment. However, members of the genera Clostridium, Bacteroides, and Geobacter were the dominant micro-organisms in the ferrihydrite enrichment. Analysis of enrichment cultures by T-RFLP strongly supported the cloning and sequencing results. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that dissimilatory iron-reducing consortia in As-contaminated paddy soil are phylogenetically diverse. Moreover, iron (III) sources as a key factor have a strong effect on the iron (III)-reducing microbial community structure and relative abundance in the enrichments. In addition, Geobacter species are selectively enriched by ferrihydrite enrichment cultures. (orig.)

  2. Dissimilatory Fe(III) Reduction by the Marine Microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Roden, Eric E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the marine microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans to reduce Fe(III) was investigated because of its close phylogenetic relationship with the freshwater dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Washed cell suspensions of the type strain of D. acetoxidans reduced soluble Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III) complexed with nitriloacetic acid. The c-type cytochrome(s) of D. acetoxidans was oxidized by Fe(III)-citrate and Mn(IV)-oxalate, as well as by two electron acceptors...

  3. Sulfur globule oxidation in green sulfur bacteria is dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holkenbrink, Carina; Ocón Barbas, Santiago; Mellerup, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with extracellular globules of elemental sulfur as intermediate. Here we investigated which genes are involved in the formation and consumption of these sulfur globules in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. We show...... that sulfur globule oxidation is strictly dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) system. Deletion of dsrM/CT2244 or dsrT/CT2245 or the two dsrCABL clusters (CT0851-CT0854, CT2247-2250) abolished sulfur globule oxidation and prevented formation of sulfate from sulfide, whereas deletion of dsr...

  4. Effect of Electron Donor and Solution Chemistry on Products of Dissimilatory Reduction of Technetium by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildung, R. E.; Gorby, Y. A.; Krupka, K. M.; Hess, N. J.; Li, S. W.; Plymale, A. E.; McKinley, J. P.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2000-01-01

    To help provide a fundamental basis for use of microbial dissimilatory reduction processes in separating or immobilizing 99Tc in waste or groundwaters, the effects of electron donor and the presence of the bicarbonate ion on the rate and extent of pertechnetate ion [Tc(VII)O4−] enzymatic reduction by the subsurface metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 were determined, and the forms of aqueous and solid-phase reduction products were evaluated through a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and thermodynamic calculations. When H2 served as the electron donor, dissolved Tc(VII) was rapidly reduced to amorphous Tc(IV) hydrous oxide, which was largely associated with the cell in unbuffered 0.85% NaCl and with extracellular particulates (0.2 to 0.001 μm) in bicarbonate buffer. Cell-associated Tc was present principally in the periplasm and outside the outer membrane. The reduction rate was much lower when lactate was the electron donor, with extracellular Tc(IV) hydrous oxide the dominant solid-phase reduction product, but in bicarbonate systems much less Tc(IV) was associated directly with the cell and solid-phase Tc(IV) carbonate may have been present. In the presence of carbonate, soluble (<0.001 μm) electronegative, Tc(IV) carbonate complexes were also formed that exceeded Tc(VII)O4− in electrophoretic mobility. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the dominant reduced Tc species identified in the experiments would be stable over a range of Eh and pH conditions typical of natural waters. Thus, carbonate complexes may represent an important pathway for Tc transport in anaerobic subsurface environments, where it has generally been assumed that Tc mobility is controlled by low-solubility Tc(IV) hydrous oxide and adsorptive, aqueous Tc(IV) hydrolysis products. PMID:10831424

  5. The Proteome of Dissimilatory Metal-reducing Microorganism Geobacter Sulfurreducens under Various Growth Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Giometti, Carol S.; Stanley, A; Esteve-Nunez, A; Khare, Tripti; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Zhu, Wenhong; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Mester, Tunde; Lovley, Derek R.

    2006-05-16

    The global protein analysis of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a model for the Geobacter species that predominate in many Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments, was characterized with ultra high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry using accurate mass and time (AMT) tags as well as with more traditional two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). Cells were grown under eight different growth conditions in order to enhance the potential that genes would be expressed. Over 3,187 gene products, representing about 92% of the total predicted gene products in the genome, were detected. The AMT approach was able to identify a much higher number of proteins than could be detected with the 2-D PAGE approach. A high proportion of predicted proteins in most protein role categories were detected with the highest number of proteins identified in the hypothetical protein role category. Furthermore, 91 c-type cytochromes of 111 predicted genes in the G. sulfurreducens genome were identified. Localization studies indicated that computational predictions of cytochrome location were limited. Differences in the abundance of cytochromes and other proteins under different growth conditions provided information for future functional analysis of these proteins. These results demonstrate that a high percentage of the predicted proteins in the G. sulfurreducens genome are produced and that the AMT approach provides a rapid method for comparing differential expression of proteins under different growth conditions in this organism.

  6. The proteome of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism Geobacter sulfurreducens under various growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan-Huai R; Hixson, Kim K; Giometti, Carol S; Stanley, Ann; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Khare, Tripti; Tollaksen, Sandra L; Zhu, Wenhong; Adkins, Joshua N; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R

    2006-07-01

    The proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a model for the Geobacter species that predominate in many Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments, was characterized with ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry using accurate mass and time (AMT) tags as well as with more traditional two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). Cells were grown under six different growth conditions in order to enhance the potential that a wide range of genes would be expressed. The AMT tag approach was able to identify a much greater number of proteins than could be detected with the 2-D PAGE approach. With the AMT approach over 3,000 gene products were identified, representing about 90% of the total predicted gene products in the genome. A high proportion of predicted proteins in most protein role categories were detected; the highest number of proteins was identified in the hypothetical protein role category. Furthermore, 91 c-type cytochromes of 111 predicted genes in the G. sulfurreducens genome were identified. Differences in the abundance of cytochromes and other proteins under different growth conditions provided information for future functional analysis of these proteins. These results demonstrate that a high percentage of the predicted proteins in the G. sulfurreducens genome are produced and that the AMT tag approach provides a rapid method for comparing differential expression of proteins under different growth conditions in this organism.

  7. Effect of high electron donor supply on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways in a bioreactor for nitrate removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Anna; Tarre, Sheldon; Beliavski, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    The possible shift of a bioreactor for NO3- removal from predominantly denitrification (DEN) to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by elevated electron donor supply was investigated. By increasing the C/NO3- ratio in one of two initially identical reactors, the production of high...... sulfide concentrations was induced. The response of the dissimilatory NO3- reduction processes to the increased availability of organic carbon and sulfide was monitored in a batch incubation system. The expected shift from a DEN- towards a DNRA-dominated bioreactor was not observed, also not under...

  8. Effect of high electron donor supply on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways in a bioreactor for nitrate removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Anna; Tarre, Sheldon; Beliavski, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The possible shift of a bioreactor for NO3- removal from predominantly denitrification (DEN) to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by elevated electron donor supply was investigated. By increasing the C/NO3- ratio in one of two initially identical reactors, the production of high...... sulfide concentrations was induced. The response of the dissimilatory NO3- reduction processes to the increased availability of organic carbon and sulfide was monitored in a batch incubation system. The expected shift from a DEN- towards a DNRA-dominated bioreactor was not observed, also not under...

  9. Voyager picture of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Voyager 1 took this picture of the planet Jupiter on Saturday, Jan. 6, the first in its three-month-long, close-up investigation of the largest planet. The spacecraft, flying toward a March 5 closest approach, was 35.8 million miles (57.6 million kilometers) from Jupiter and 371.7 million miles (598.2 million kilometers) from Earth when the picture was taken. As the Voyager cameras begin their meteorological surveillance of Jupiter, they reveal a dynamic atmosphere with more convective structure than had previously been thought. While the smallest atmospheric features seen in this picture are still as large as 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) across, Voyager will be able to detect individual storm systems as small as 3 miles (5 kilometers) at closest approach. The Great Red Spot can be seen near the limb at the far right. Most of the other features are too small to be seen in terrestrial telescopes. This picture was transmitted to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory through the Deep Space Network's tracking station at Madrid, Spain. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venceslau, Sofia S. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin S. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dahl, Christiane [Institut für Mikrobiologie and Biotechnologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Meckenheimer Allee 168, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Saraiva, Lígia M. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Pereira, Inês A.C., E-mail: ipereira@itqb.unl.pt [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •DsrC is known to interact with the dissimilatory sulfite reductase enzyme (DsrAB). •We show that, however, most cellular DsrC is not associated with DsrAB. •A gel-shift assay was developed that allows monitoring of the DsrC redox state. •The DsrC intramolecularly oxidized state could only be produced by arginine treatment. -- Abstract: Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC, which has two conserved redox-active cysteines. DsrC was initially believed to be a third subunit of DsrAB. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts to show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we developed a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor the DsrC redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. The oxidized state of DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond, which is proposed to be a key metabolic intermediate, could be successfully produced for the first time by treatment with arginine.

  11. Stoichiometric modelling of assimilatory and dissimilatory biomass utilisation in a microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kristopher A.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Inskeep, William P.; Carlson, Ross P.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Assimilatory and dissimilatory utilisation of autotroph biomass by heterotrophs is a fundamental mechanism for the transfer of nutrients and energy across trophic levels. Metagenome data from a tractable, thermoacidophilic microbial community in Yellowstone National Park was used to build an in silico model to study heterotrophic utilisation of autotroph biomass using elementary flux mode analysis and flux balance analysis. Assimilatory and dissimilatory biomass utilisation was investigated using 29 forms of biomass-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) including individual monomer pools, individual macromolecular pools and aggregate biomass. The simulations identified ecologically competitive strategies for utilizing DOC under conditions of varying electron donor, electron acceptor or enzyme limitation. The simulated growth environment affected which form of DOC was the most competitive use of nutrients; for instance, oxygen limitation favoured utilisation of less reduced and fermentable DOC while carbon-limited environments favoured more reduced DOC. Additionally, metabolism was studied considering two encompassing metabolic strategies: simultaneous versus sequential use of DOC. Results of this study bound the transfer of nutrients and energy through microbial food webs, providing a quantitative foundation relevant to most microbial ecosystems. PMID:27387069

  12. Knowledge From Pictures (KFP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Paterra, Frank; Bailin, Sidney

    1993-01-01

    The old maxim goes: 'A picture is worth a thousand words'. The objective of the research reported in this paper is to demonstrate this idea as it relates to the knowledge acquisition process and the automated development of an expert system's rule base. A prototype tool, the Knowledge From Pictures (KFP) tool, has been developed which configures an expert system's rule base by an automated analysis of and reasoning about a 'picture', i.e., a graphical representation of some target system to be supported by the diagnostic capabilities of the expert system under development. This rule base, when refined, could then be used by the expert system for target system monitoring and fault analysis in an operational setting. Most people, when faced with the problem of understanding the behavior of a complicated system, resort to the use of some picture or graphical representation of the system as an aid in thinking about it. This depiction provides a means of helping the individual to visualize the bahavior and dynamics of the system under study. An analysis of the picture augmented with the individual's background information, allows the problem solver to codify knowledge about the system. This knowledge can, in turn, be used to develop computer programs to automatically monitor the system's performance. The approach taken is this research was to mimic this knowledge acquisition paradigm. A prototype tool was developed which provides the user: (1) a mechanism for graphically representing sample system-configurations appropriate for the domain, and (2) a linguistic device for annotating the graphical representation with the behaviors and mutual influences of the components depicted in the graphic. The KFP tool, reasoning from the graphical depiction along with user-supplied annotations of component behaviors and inter-component influences, generates a rule base that could be used in automating the fault detection, isolation, and repair of the system.

  13. Characterization of extracellular minerals produced during dissimilatory Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction at 100 degrees C by Pyrobaculum islandicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashefi, K; Moskowitz, B M; Lovley, D R

    2008-03-01

    In order to gain insight into the significance of biotic metal reduction and mineral formation in hyperthermophilic environments, metal mineralization as a result of the dissimilatory reduction of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide, and U(VI) reduction at 100 degrees C by Pyrobaculum islandicum was investigated. When P. islandicum was grown in a medium with poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide as an electron acceptor and hydrogen as an electron donor, the Fe(III) oxide was reduced to an extracellular, ultrafine-grained magnetite with characteristics similar to that found in some hot environments and that was previously thought to be of abiotic origin. Furthermore, cell suspensions of P. islandicum rapidly reduced the soluble and oxidized form of uranium, U(VI), to extracellular precipitates of the highly insoluble U(IV) mineral, uraninite (UO(2)). The reduction of U(VI) was dependent on the presence of hydrogen as the electron donor. These findings suggest that microbes may play a key role in metal deposition in hyperthermophilic environments and provide a plausible explanation for such phenomena as magnetite accumulation and formation of uranium deposits at ca. 100 degrees C.

  14. Teaching Grammar Using Pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henny Uswatun Hasanah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching is a process of communication. It has to be created through the way ofteaching and exchanging the message or information by every teacher and student. The message can be knowledge, skills, ideas, experiences, and manyothers. Through the process of communication, the people can receive the message or information. To avoid misunderstanding in the process ofcommunication, media are needed in the process of teaching. Using pictures can make exercises and activities more interesting and more interactive. We canconstantly improve our activities by looking at what went well and what fell flat. These 5 unique ways to practice grammar using pictures are a jumping offpoint, and can be expanded in lots of interesting ways. 

  15. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Aspergillus terreus isolated from the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Fuchs-Ocklenburg, Silvia; Kamp, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Background: A wealth of microbial eukaryotes is adapted to life in oxygen-deficient marine environments. Evidence is accumulating that some of these eukaryotes survive anoxia by employing dissimilatory nitrate reduction, a strategy that otherwise is widespread in prokaryotes. Here, we report on t...

  16. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Aspergillus terreus isolated from the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stief, Peter; Fuchs-Ocklenburg, Silvia; Kamp, Anja; Manohar, Cathrine-Sumathi; Houbraken, Jos; Boekhout, Teun; de Beer, Dirk; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A wealth of microbial eukaryotes is adapted to life in oxygen-deficient marine environments. Evidence is accumulating that some of these eukaryotes survive anoxia by employing dissimilatory nitrate reduction, a strategy that otherwise is widespread in prokaryotes. Here, we report on the

  17. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Aspergillus terreus isolated from the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stief, Peter; Fuchs-Ocklenburg, Silvia; Kamp, Anja; Manohar, Cathrine-Sumathi; Houbraken, Jos; Boekhout, Teun; de Beer, Dirk; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A wealth of microbial eukaryotes is adapted to life in oxygen-deficient marine environments. Evidence is accumulating that some of these eukaryotes survive anoxia by employing dissimilatory nitrate reduction, a strategy that otherwise is widespread in prokaryotes. Here, we report on the

  18. My Favorite Picture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵阳

    2007-01-01

    <正>I have many pictures.But one of them is my favortie.Now,I introduce it to everyone.The picture has three people.They are mother,father and I.Look! This is me.I am in middle of them.I have long,black hair.I have black eyes and red mouth.I like drawing pictures.My favorite food is noodle,and I don’t like to eat dumplings.Look! On the right is my father,my father is tall and he has black hair and black eyes.He likes to play ping-pong.My mother is on the left.She has black,curly hair.Her mouth is big.We have the same big mouths.She likes to go for a walk in the park.I am very pretty.My father is handsome and my mother is beautiful.I love my family very much.

  19. Getting a Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Daniel A; Stacey, Dawn; Momtahan, Kathryn; Gifford, Wendy; Doucet, Shelley; Etowa, Josephine B

    2017-03-01

    Delivery of care by nurses in virtual environments is rapidly increasing with uptake of digitally mediated technologies, such as remote patient monitoring (RPM). Knowing the person is a phenomenon in nursing practice deemed requisite to building relationships and informing clinical decisions, but it has not been studied in virtual environments. The intent of this study was to explicate the processes of how nurses come to know the person using RPM, one form of telehealth technology used in a virtual environment. The study was informed by Charmaz's constructivist grounded theory and included 33 interviews and 5 observational experiences of nurses using RPM in 7 different settings. Getting a Picture evolved as the core category to a theoretical conceptualization of nurses knowing the person through use of RPM and other technologies, such as telephone and electronic medical records. Getting a Picture reflected a dynamic flow and integration of seven processes, such as Connecting With the Person and Recording and Reflecting, to describe how nurses strove to attain a visualization of the person. While navigating disparate and disconnected information and communication technologies, Getting a Picture was important for providing safe, holistic, person-centered care.

  20. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars is controversial yet the evidence has aroused scientific interest, as CH4 could be a harbinger of extant or extinct microbial life. There are various oxidized compounds present on the surface of Mars that could serve as electron acceptors for the anaerobic oxidation of CH4, including perchlorate (ClO4-). We examined the role of perchlorate, chlorate (ClO3-) and chlorite (ClO2-) as oxidants linked to CH4 oxidation. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction begins with reduction of ClO4- to ClO2- and ends with dismutation of chlorite to yield chloride (Cl-) and molecular oxygen (O2). We explored the potential for aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria to couple with oxygen derived from chlorite dismutation during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the N2-flushed headspace above cell suspensions of methanotrophs (Methylobacter albus strain BG8) and perchlorate reducing bacteria (Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB) in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. Similar rates of CH4 consumption were observed for these mixed cultures whether they were co-mingled or segregated under a common headspace, indicating that direct contact of cells was not required for methane consumption to occur. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing dried soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and D. agitata CKB and in the presence of 10 mM ClO2-. This soil (seasonally exposed sediment) collected from the shoreline of a freshwater lake (Searsville Lake, CA) demonstrated endogenous CH4 uptake as well as perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite reduction/dismutation. However, these experiments required physical separation of soil from the aqueous bacterial culture to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the

  1. Microbial removal of Fe(III) impurities from clay using dissimilatory iron reducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E Y; Cho, K S; Ryu, H W; Chang, Y K

    1999-01-01

    Fe(III) impurities, which detract refractoriness and whiteness from porcelain and pottery, could be biologically removed from low-quality clay by indigenous dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms. Insoluble Fe(III) in clay particles was leached out as soluble Fe(II), and the Fe(III) reduction reaction was coupled to the oxidation of sugars such as glucose, maltose and sucrose. A maximum removal of 44-45% was obtained when the relative amount of sugar was 5% (w/w; sugar/clay). By the microbial treatment, the whiteness of the clay was increased from 63.20 to 79.64, whereas the redness was clearly decreased from 13.47 to 3.55.

  2. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in sediments of urban river networks: Spatiotemporal variations and environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lv; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Li, Ye; Liu, Sai; Hu, Xiaoting

    2016-12-01

    Urbanizations have increased the loadings of reactive nitrogen in urban riverine environments. However, limited information about dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes and associated contributions to nitrogen removal is available for urban riverine environments. In this study, sediment slurry experiments were conducted with nitrogen isotope-tracing technique to investigate the potential rates of denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and their contributions to nitrate reduction in sediments of urban river networks, Shanghai. The potential rates of denitrification, anammox and DNRA measured in the study area ranged from 0.193 to 98.7 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) dry weight (dw), 0.0387-23.7 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) dw and 0-10.3 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) dw, respectively. Denitrification and DNRA rates were higher in summer than in winter, while anammox rates were greater in winter than in summer for most sites. Dissolved oxygen, total organic carbon, nitrate, ammonium, sulfide, Fe(II) and Fe(III) were found to have significant influence on these nitrate reduction processes. Denitrification contributed 11.5-99.5%% to total nitrate reduction, as compared to 0.343-81.6% for anammox and 0-52.3% for DNRA. It is estimated that nitrogen loss of approximately 1.33 × 10(5) t N year(-1) was linked to both denitrification and anammox processes, which accounted for about 20.1% of total inorganic nitrogen transported annually into the urban river networks of Shanghai. Overall, these results show the potential importance of denitrification and anammox in nitrogen removal and provide new insight into the mechanisms of nitrogen cycles in urban riverine environments.

  3. Interference in Joint Picture Naming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambi, Chiara; Van de Cavey, Joris; Pickering, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    In 4 experiments we showed that picture naming latencies are affected by beliefs about the task concurrently performed by another speaker. Participants took longer to name pictures when they believed that their partner concurrently named pictures than when they believed their partner was silent (Experiments 1 and 4) or concurrently categorized the…

  4. The polycentric picture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg, Ingelise

    2008-01-01

    The polycentric picture The presentation introduces a dynamic view on children's drawings inspired by J.J.Gibson's ecological approach to visual perception. Empirical research in children's drawings will be the basis for the documentation of the fact that children's drawings contain several...... strategies of vision, which can be activated, re-established and differentiated in relation to dynamic media productions. The significance of spatial orientation to our ability to see and to the way we are seeing is focused and a concept of the ex-centric observer is introduced....

  5. Pictures of the month

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    Starting with this issue, we will publish special pictures illustrating the ongoing construction and commissioning efforts. If you wish to have a professionnal photographer immortalize your detector before it disappears in the heart of ATLAS or for a special event, don't hesitate to contact Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira (16-3687) from the CERN photo service. Members of the pixel team preparing to insert the outermost layer (the outer of the three barrel pixel layers) into the Global Support Frame for the Pixel Detector in SR1. Ongoing work on the first Big Wheel on the C side. Exploded view of the side-C Big Wheel and the barrel cryostat. The TRT Barrel services (HV, LV, cooling liquid, active gas, flushing gas) are now completely connected and tested. Hats off to Kirill Egorov, Mike Reilly, Ben Legeyt and Godwin Mayers who managed to fit everything within the small clearance margin!

  6. Nation's water picture mixed

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nation's water picture for April showed mixed trends: More than half of the index gaging stations reported normal streamflow conditions during the month, while the spring snowmelt boosted streamflow in the Northeast and Northwest to well above normal levels. Parts of the Southeast, however, from West Virginia south to the Carolinas, reported well-below normal streamflow conditions, according to a month-end check on water resources conditions by the U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior.After nearly 2 years of drought conditions the three major reservoirs supplying New York City reached full storage capacity and were spilling during April. Combined contents of the three reservoirs on May 1, 1982, was 272 billion gallons, 101% of their full usable capacity. The full reservoirs and the generally good surface and groundwater conditions throughout the Delaware River basin allowed the Delaware River Basin Commission to lift its drought emergency warning on April 27.

  7. Landscape as World Picture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wamberg, Jacob

    Age, among the powers-that-be. The topic of Volume II is the breakthrough of the modern landscape image and its new perspectival vistas, transient time and cultivated - or completely deserted - terrains. This post-medieval paradigm shift is construed as the mature stage in the evolution of self......-consciousness, with an urban individual contemplating nature at an aesthetic distance. Apart from being structurally equivalent with the new Copernican cosmos and the colonial expansion of Western culture, the new territorial landscape image is shown to develop in close interaction with the early modern work ethic...... from Palaeolithic cave paintings through to 19th-century modernity. A structuralist comparison between this pattern and three additional fields of analysis - self-consciousness, socially-determined perception of nature, and world picture - reveals a fascinating insight into culture's macrohistorical...

  8. Landscape as World Picture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wamberg, Jacob

    -consciousness, with an urban individual contemplating nature at an aesthetic distance. Apart from being structurally equivalent with the new Copernican cosmos and the colonial expansion of Western culture, the new territorial landscape image is shown to develop in close interaction with the early modern work ethic......This book presents a new and comprehensive theory concerning the manner in which landscapes in Western pictorial art may be interpreted in relation to the cultures that created them. Its point of departure is a hitherto unexplored developmental pattern that characterises landscape representation...... from Palaeolithic cave paintings through to 19th-century modernity. A structuralist comparison between this pattern and three additional fields of analysis - self-consciousness, socially-determined perception of nature, and world picture - reveals a fascinating insight into culture's macrohistorical...

  9. Dissolution of Arsenic Minerals Mediated by Dissimilatory Arsenate Reducing Bacteria: Estimation of the Physiological Potential for Arsenic Mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drewniak Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was characterization of the isolated dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the context of their potential for arsenic removal from primary arsenic minerals through reductive dissolution. Four strains, Shewanella sp. OM1, Pseudomonas sp. OM2, Aeromonas sp. OM4, and Serratia sp. OM17, capable of anaerobic growth with As (V reduction, were isolated from microbial mats from an ancient gold mine. All of the isolated strains: (i produced siderophores that promote dissolution of minerals, (ii were resistant to dissolved arsenic compounds, (iii were able to use the dissolved arsenates as the terminal electron acceptor, and (iii were able to use copper minerals containing arsenic minerals (e.g., enargite as a respiratory substrate. Based on the results obtained in this study, we postulate that arsenic can be released from some As-bearing polymetallic minerals (such as copper ore concentrates or middlings under reductive conditions by dissimilatory arsenate reducers in indirect processes.

  10. Effect of high electron donor supply on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways in a bioreactor for nitrate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Anna; Tarre, Sheldon; Beliavski, Michael; Green, Michal; Klatt, Judith; de Beer, Dirk; Stief, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The possible shift of a bioreactor for NO3(-) removal from predominantly denitrification (DEN) to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by elevated electron donor supply was investigated. By increasing the C/NO3(-) ratio in one of two initially identical reactors, the production of high sulfide concentrations was induced. The response of the dissimilatory NO3(-) reduction processes to the increased availability of organic carbon and sulfide was monitored in a batch incubation system. The expected shift from a DEN- towards a DNRA-dominated bioreactor was not observed, also not under conditions where DNRA would be thermodynamically favorable. Remarkably, the microbial community exposed to a high C/NO3(-) ratio and sulfide concentration did not use the most energy-gaining process.

  11. Dissolution of arsenic minerals mediated by dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria: estimation of the physiological potential for arsenic mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasz, Drewniak; Liwia, Rajpert; Aleksandra, Mantur; Aleksandra, Sklodowska

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was characterization of the isolated dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the context of their potential for arsenic removal from primary arsenic minerals through reductive dissolution. Four strains, Shewanella sp. OM1, Pseudomonas sp. OM2, Aeromonas sp. OM4, and Serratia sp. OM17, capable of anaerobic growth with As (V) reduction, were isolated from microbial mats from an ancient gold mine. All of the isolated strains: (i) produced siderophores that promote dissolution of minerals, (ii) were resistant to dissolved arsenic compounds, (iii) were able to use the dissolved arsenates as the terminal electron acceptor, and (iii) were able to use copper minerals containing arsenic minerals (e.g., enargite) as a respiratory substrate. Based on the results obtained in this study, we postulate that arsenic can be released from some As-bearing polymetallic minerals (such as copper ore concentrates or middlings) under reductive conditions by dissimilatory arsenate reducers in indirect processes.

  12. Painting Pictures with Whisky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoungsoo; Boulogne, François; Um, Eujin; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Have you ever looked at the dried mark of whisky on the glass? While the whisky evaporates, various solid components inside the whisky are deposited with a peculiar pattern, which creates a beautiful picture. This particle patterning is induced by the solutal Marangoni effect. We investigate this effect on both the flow behavior and the particle deposition patterns in binary-mixture droplet evaporation by varying the concentration ratio between ethanol and water. To visualize the particle and fluid motion, we perform Particle Image Velocimetry. We observe that at the beginning stage complex circulating flow patterns occurred, which are triggered by the surface tension gradient, i.e. Marangoni effect. Ethanol first evaporates due to the lower vapor pressure compared to water. When the ethanol has vanished, a radial flow pattern is observed. Furthermore, we find that as the initial ethanol concentration increases, the mobility of the receding contact line increased. At high ethanol concentrations, the contact line kept receding so as to draw groups of particles that deposited in an annular pattern. We thank Ernie Button for sharing with us many beautiful images of whisky after it had dried.

  13. Structural insights into dissimilatory sulfite reductases: Structure of desulforubidin from Desulfomicrobium norvegicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania F. Oliveira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilatory sulfite reductases (dSiRs are crucial enzymes in bacterial sulfur-based energy metabolism, which is likely to have been present in some of the earliest life forms on Earth. Several classes of dSiRs have been proposed on the basis of different biochemical and spectroscopic properties. Here, we describe the first structure of a dSiR from the desulforubidin (Drub class isolated from Desulfomicrobium (Dm. norvegicum. The desulforubidin structure is assembled as a2b2c2, in which two DsrC proteins are bound to the core [DsrA]2[DsrB]2 unit, as reported for the desulfoviridin (Dvir structure from Desulfovibrio (D. vulgaris. Unlike desulfoviridin, four sirohemes and eight [4Fe-4S] clusters are present in desulforubidin, but only two of the coupled siroheme-[4Fe-4S] cofactors are likely to be catalytically active. Mass spectrometry studies of purified desulforubidin and desulfoviridin show that both proteins may present different oligomeric complex forms that bind two, one or no DsrC proteins, providing an explanation for conflicting spectroscopic and biochemical results in the literature.

  14. Nitric Oxide Production by the Human Intestinal Microbiota by Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Vermeiren

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The free radical nitric oxide (NO is an important signaling molecule in the gastrointestinal tract. Besides eukaryotic cells, gut microorganisms are also capable of producing NO. However, the exact mechanism of NO production by the gut microorganisms is unknown. Microbial NO production was examined under in vitro conditions simulating the gastrointestinal ecosystem using L-arginine or nitrate as substrates. L-arginine did not influence the microbial NO production. However, NO concentrations in the order of 90 ng NO-N per L feed medium were produced by the fecal microbiota from nitrate. N15 tracer experiments showed that nitrate was mainly reduced to ammonium by the dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that gastrointestinal microbiota can generate substantial amounts of NO by DNRA and not by the generally accepted denitrification or L-arginine pathway. Further work is needed to elucidate the exact role between NO produced by the gastrointestinal microbiota and host cells.

  15. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium conserves nitrogen in anthropogenically affected subtropical mangrove sediments in Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenzhi; Yang, Jingxin; Li, Ying; Liu, Baoli; Wang, Feifei; Chang, Changtang

    2016-09-15

    In this study, basic sediment properties, nutrient flux, and nitrogen cycle (including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation [anammox], nitrification, and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium [DNRA]) were investigated at two sampling sites with different tree ages in the mangrove region of the Jiulong River Estuary, China. The results show that sediments at mangrove flat area have relatively strong capability to reduce NO3(-), in which the DNRA rate is relatively high (204.53±48.32μmolNm(-2)h(-1)), which is approximately 75.7-85.9% of the total NO3(-) reduction, while the denitrification and anammox rates are relatively low - only approximately 5.6-9.5% and 8.5-14.8% of the total NO3(-) reduction, respectively. Thus, in the nitrogen-enriched subtropical mangrove system, DNRA is the main pathway to reduce NO3(-), and most of the input nitrogen is conserved as NH4(+) in the system, which assures high productivity of the mangrove system.

  16. Structural, biochemical and genetic characterization of dissimilatory ATP sulfurylase from Allochromatium vinosum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Parey

    Full Text Available ATP sulfurylase (ATPS catalyzes a key reaction in the global sulfur cycle by reversibly converting inorganic sulfate (SO4 (2- with ATP to adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS and pyrophosphate (PPi. In this work we report on the sat encoded dissimilatory ATP sulfurylase from the sulfur-oxidizing purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum. In this organism, the sat gene is located in one operon and co-transcribed with the aprMBA genes for membrane-bound APS reductase. Like APS reductase, Sat is dispensible for growth on reduced sulfur compounds due to the presence of an alternate, so far unidentified sulfite-oxidizing pathway in A. vinosum. Sulfate assimilation also proceeds independently of Sat by a separate pathway involving a cysDN-encoded assimilatory ATP sulfurylase. We produced the purple bacterial sat-encoded ATP sulfurylase as a recombinant protein in E. coli, determined crucial kinetic parameters and obtained a crystal structure in an open state with a ligand-free active site. By comparison with several known structures of the ATPS-APS complex in the closed state a scenario about substrate-induced conformational changes was worked out. Despite different kinetic properties ATPS involved in sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing processes are not distinguishable on a structural level presumably due to the interference between functional and evolutionary processes.

  17. The interactive biotic and abiotic processes of DDT transformation under dissimilatory iron-reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Wang, Fang; Gu, Chenggang; Yang, Xinglun; Kengara, Fredrick O; Bian, Yongrong; Song, Yang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study was to elucidate the biotic and abiotic processes under dissimilatory iron reducing conditions involved in reductive dechlorination and iron reduction. DDT transformation was investigated in cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 with/without α-FeOOH. A modified first-order kinetics model was developed and described DDT transformation well. Both the α-FeOOH reduction rate and the dechlorination rate of DDT were positively correlated to the biomass. Addition of α-FeOOH enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT by favoring the cell survival and generating Fe(II) which was absorbed on the surface of bacteria and iron oxide. 92% of the absorbed Fe(II) was Na-acetate (1M) extractable. However, α-FeOOH also played a negative role of competing for electrons as reflected by the dechlorination rate of DDT was inhibited when increasing the α-FeOOH from 1 g L(-1) to 5 g L(-1). DDT was measured to be toxic to S. putrefaciens 200. The metabolites DDD, DDE and DDMU were recalcitrant to S. putrefaciens 200. The results suggested that iron oxide was not the key factor to promote the dissipation of DDX (DDT and the metabolites), whereas the one-electron reduction potential (E1) of certain organochlorines is the main factor and that the E1 higher than the threshold of the reductive driving forces of DIRB probably ensures the occur of reductive dechlorination.

  18. Sulfur Isotopic Fractionation During Dissimilatory Sulfate Reduction from the Perspective of an Entire Microbial Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, B.; Lau, L.; Wing, B.

    2009-05-01

    Whether in the investigation of the most ancient life on Earth, examination of surface oxidation properties across geological timescales, or the estimation of microbial metabolism in inaccessible environments, dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) constrains biogeochemical processes in a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Pioneering work in the 1970s established the importance of DSR to biogeochemical processes and its potential as a geochemical tracer, and models for biological controls of DSR were published from empirical results of in vitro microbial cultures. Recent efforts have expanded upon this body of work and further extended toward multiple sulfur isotopes and through the more precise definition of the biological processes themselves. Resulting from these recent efforts is an rigorous description of DSR of the sulfur metabolism of sulfate-reducing bacteria. However, despite these efforts, the exact mechanisms of DSR within the scope of a complex system such as microbial metabolism remain incomplete and obscure. We will be presenting ongoing work coupling together recent mathematical models of isotopic fractionation with a flux-oriented, genomically-derived software model of the metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, a patent sulfate-reducing bacterium. Our presentation will explore the effects on isotopic fractionation throughout the sulfate reduction pathway of D. vulgaris by a multitude of separate and distinct biological pathways within the bacterial metabolism. Further, we will be discussing both the pitfalls and promise of such an approach and its implications for future research.

  19. USING PICTURES IN ENGLISH CLASSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction In China, some English teachers go to class with only a textbook and a teaching plan, nothing else. After a while, the students complain that their classes are becoming more and more boring. Teachers have tried many ways to make their classes more interesting, motivating and effective, but using pictures in the classroom to do this has not been a popular method. The world provides us with all kinds of beautiful pictures. There is no reason why we should not make better use of them in language learning and teaching. This article will discuss the reasons for using pictures, suggest ways of collecting pictures and ways of using pictures in reading, writing, listening and speaking classes.

  20. Pictures in Pictures: Art History and Art Museums in Children's Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohlin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Children's picture books that recreate, parody, or fictionalize famous artworks and introduce the art museum experience, a genre to which I will refer as "children's art books," have become increasingly popular over the past decade. This essay explores the pedagogical implications of this trend through the family program "Picture Books and Picture…

  1. Phylogeny of the alpha and beta subunits of the dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase from sulfate-reducing prokaryotes--origin and evolution of the dissimilatory sulfate-reduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2007-07-01

    Newly developed PCR assays were used to PCR-amplify and sequence fragments of the dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase genes (aprBA) comprising nearly the entire gene locus (2.2-2.4 kb, equal to 92-94 % of the protein coding sequence) from 75 sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) of a taxonomically wide range. Comparative phylogenetic analysis included all determined and publicly available AprBA sequences from SRP and selected homologous sequences of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). The almost identical AprB and AprA tree topologies indicated a shared evolutionary path for the aprBA among the investigated SRP by vertical inheritance and concomitant lateral gene transfer (LGT). The topological comparison of AprB/A- and 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic trees revealed novel LGT events across the SRP divisions. Compositional gene analysis confirmed Thermacetogenium phaeum to be the first validated strain affected by a recent lateral transfer of aprBA as a putative effect of long-term co-cultivation with a Thermodesulfovibrio species. Interestingly, the Apr proteins of SRP and SOB diverged into two phylogenetic lineages, with the SRP affiliated with the green sulfur bacteria, e.g. Chlorobaculum tepidum, while the Allochromatium vinosum-related sequences formed a distinct group. Analysis of genome data indicated that this phylogenetic separation is also reflected in the differing presence of the putative proteins functionally associated with Apr, QmoABC complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) and AprM (transmembrane protein). Scenarios for the origin and evolution of the dissimilatory APS reductase are discussed within the context of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB) phylogeny, the appearance of QmoABC and AprM in the SRP and SOB genomes, and the geochemical setting of Archean Earth.

  2. Quantification and isotopic analysis of intracellular sulfur metabolites in the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Min Sub; Paris, Guillaume; Adkins, Jess F.; Orphan, Victoria J.; Sessions, Alex L.

    2017-06-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction exhibits a normal isotope effect, leaving unreacted sulfate enriched in 34S and producing sulfide that is depleted in 34S. However, the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation is quite variable. The resulting changes in sulfur isotope abundance have been used to trace microbial sulfate reduction in modern and ancient ecosystems, but the intracellular mechanism(s) underlying the wide range of fractionations remains unclear. Here we report the concentrations and isotopic ratios of sulfur metabolites in the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway of Desulfovibrio alaskensis. Intracellular sulfate and APS levels change depending on the growth phase, peaking at the end of exponential phase, while sulfite accumulates in the cell during stationary phase. During exponential growth, intracellular sulfate and APS are strongly enriched in 34S. The fractionation between internal and external sulfate is up to 49‰, while at the same time that between external sulfate and sulfide is just a few permil. We interpret this pattern to indicate that enzymatic fractionations remain large but the net fractionation between sulfate and sulfide is muted by the closed-system limitation of intracellular sulfate. This 'reservoir effect' diminishes upon cessation of exponential phase growth, allowing the expression of larger net sulfur isotope fractionations. Thus, the relative rates of sulfate exchange across the membrane versus intracellular sulfate reduction should govern the overall (net) fractionation that is expressed. A strong reservoir effect due to vigorous sulfate reduction might be responsible for the well-established inverse correlation between sulfur isotope fractionation and the cell-specific rate of sulfate reduction, while at the same time intraspecies differences in sulfate uptake and/or exchange rates could account for the significant scatter in this relationship. Our approach, together with ongoing investigations of the kinetic isotope

  3. In Situ Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium in a Paddy Soil Fertilized with Liquid Cattle Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wei-Wei; S.RIYA; ZHOU Sheng; M.HOSOMI; ZHANG Hai-Lin; SHI Wei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Most studies on dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in paddy soils were conducted in the laboratory and in situ studies are in need for better understanding of the DNRA process.In this study,in situ incubations of soil DNRA using 15N tracer were carried out in paddy fields under conventional water (CW) and low water (LW) managements to explore the potential of soil DNRA after liquid cattle waste (LCW) application and to investigate the impacts of soil redox potential (Eh) and labile carbon on DNRA.DNRA rates ranged from 3.06 to 10.40 mg N kg -1 dry soil d-1,which accounted for 8.55%-12.36% and 3.88%-25.44% of consunption of added NO3-15N when Eh at 5 cm soil depth ranged from 230 to 414 mV and -225 to -65 mV,respectively.DNRA rates showed no significant difference in paddy soils under two water managements although soil Eh and/or dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were more favorable for DNRA in the paddy soil under CW management 1 d before,or 5 and 7 d after LCW application.Soil DNRA rates were negatively correlated with soil Eh (P < 0.05,n =5) but positively correlated with soil DOC (P < 0.05,n =5) in the paddy soil under LW management,while no significant correlations were shown in the paddy soil under CW management.The potential of DNRA measured in situ was consistent with previous laboratory studies; and the controlling factors of DNRA in paddy soils might be different under different water managements,probably due to the presence of different microfloras of DNRA.

  4. Iron isotope fractionation during microbial dissimilatory iron oxide reduction in simulated Archaean seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percak-Dennett, E M; Beard, B L; Xu, H; Konishi, H; Johnson, C M; Roden, E E

    2011-05-01

    The largest Fe isotope excursion yet measured in marine sedimentary rocks occurs in shales, carbonates, and banded iron formations of Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic age. The results of field and laboratory studies suggest a potential role for microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in producing this excursion. However, most experimental studies of Fe isotope fractionation during DIR have been conducted in simple geochemical systems, using pure Fe(III) oxide substrates that are not direct analogues to phases likely to have been present in Precambrian marine environments. In this study, Fe isotope fractionation was investigated during microbial reduction of an amorphous Fe(III) oxide-silica coprecipitate in anoxic, high-silica, low-sulphate artificial Archaean seawater at 30 °C to determine if such conditions alter the extent of reduction or isotopic fractionations relative to those observed in simple systems. The Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate was highly reducible (c. 80% reduction) in the presence of excess acetate. The coprecipitate did not undergo phase conversion (e.g. to green rust, magnetite or siderite) during reduction. Iron isotope fractionations suggest that rapid and near-complete isotope exchange took place among all Fe(II) and Fe(III) components, in contrast to previous work on goethite and hematite, where exchange was limited to the outer few atom layers of the substrate. Large quantities of low-δ(56)Fe Fe(II) (aqueous and solid phase) were produced during reduction of the Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate. These findings shed new light on DIR as a mechanism for producing Fe isotope variations observed in Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic marine sedimentary rocks.

  5. Dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction by the marine microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, E.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the marine microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans to reduce Fe(III) was investigated because of its close phylogenetic relationship with the freshwater dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Washed cell suspensions of the type strain of D. acetoxidans reduced soluble Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III) complexed with nitriloacetic acid. The c-type cytochrome(s) of D. acetoxidans was oxidized by Fe(III)- citrate and Mn(IV)-oxalate, as well as by two electron acceptors known to support growth, colloidal sulfur and malate. D. acetoxidans grew in defined anoxic, bicarbonate-buffered medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and poorly crystalline Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor. Magnetite (Fe3O4) and siderite (FeCO3) were the major end products of Fe(III) reduction, whereas rhodochrosite (MnCO3) was the end product of Mn(IV) reduction. Ethanol, propanol, pyruvate, and butanol also served as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. In contrast to D. acetoxidans, G. metallireducens could only grow in freshwater medium and it did not conserve energy to support growth from colloidal S0 reduction. D. acetoxidans is the first marine microorganism shown to conserve energy to support growth by coupling the complete oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV). Thus, D. acetoxidans provides a model enzymatic mechanism for Fe(III) or Mn(IV) oxidation of organic compounds in marine and estuarine sediments. These findings demonstrate that 16S rRNA phylogenetic analyses can suggest previously unrecognized metabolic capabilities of microorganisms.

  6. Characterisation of the dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide at the microbe-mineral interface: the application of STXM-XMCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, V S; Byrne, J M; Telling, N D; VAN DER Laan, G; Lloyd, J R; Hitchcock, A P; Wang, J; Pattrick, R A D

    2012-07-01

    A combination of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism was used to spatially resolve the distribution of different carbon and iron species associated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 couples the reduction of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides to the oxidation of organic matter in order to conserve energy for growth. Several potential mechanisms may be used by S. oneidensis MR-1 to facilitate Fe(III)-reduction. These include direct contact between the cell and mineral surface, secretion of either exogenous electron shuttles or Fe-chelating agents and the production of conductive 'nanowires'. In this study, the protein/lipid signature of the bacterial cells was associated with areas of magnetite (Fe₃O₄), the product of dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction, which was oversaturated with Fe(II) (compared to stoichiometric magnetite). However, areas of the sample rich in polysaccharides, most likely associated with extracellular polymeric matrix and not in direct contact with the cell surface, were undersaturated with Fe(II), forming maghemite-like (γ-Fe₂O₃) phases compared to stoichiometric magnetite. The reduced form of magnetite will be much more effective in environmental remediation such as the immobilisation of toxic metals. These findings suggest a dominant role for surface contact-mediated electron transfer in this study and also the inhomogeneity of magnetite species on the submicron scale present in microbial reactions. This study also illustrates the applicability of this new synchrotron-based technique for high-resolution characterisation of the microbe-mineral interface, which is pivotal in controlling the chemistry of the Earth's critical zone.

  7. Dissimilatory metabolism of nitrogen oxides in bacteria: comparative reconstruction of transcriptional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR, and NnrR; two-component systems NarXL and NarQP; NO-responsive activator NorR; and nitrite-sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches, we predict DNA-binding motifs for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA recognition motif. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria, including Clostridia, Thermotogales, and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides' metabolism, not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species such as Escherichia coli, but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding motif. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon also includes two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr and nipC (dnrN, thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e. nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include

  8. Electrical Signatures Associated with Abiotic and In Vitro Dissimilatory Iron Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regberg, A. B.; Brantley, S. L.; Singha, K.; Tien, M.

    2007-05-01

    Several researchers have described anomalous electrical signatures associated with bacterial activity in anoxic zones in aquifers containing organic contaminants. It is thought that these signals can be attributed to (bio)geochemical changes caused by the oxidation of organic contaminants and the reduction of associated species like iron oxides. We report laboratory observations of changes in electrical conductivity (EC) that can be attributed to specific (bio)geochemical reactions involving reductive dissolution of iron oxides enzymatically and nonenzymatically. Abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite by ascorbic acid in batch experiments causes a cumulative 20- 40% increase in measured conductivity, (EC increases by ~300 μ S/cm). This change can be attributed to a decrease in conductivity (Δ EC) from increasing proton activity (Δ pH = 3.25 --> 5.07, Δ EC = -200 μ S/cm) and an increase in dissolved Fe(II) (Δ [Fe] = 2.2 - 3.3 mM, Δ EC = 400 -700 μ S/cm). Conductivity is presumably unaffected by Fe(II) sorbed to the ferrihydrite. Rates calculated from this method are comparable to literature rates for similar experiments. In a similar in vitro system, total membrane fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used to reduce ferrihydrite in the presence of formate and HEPES buffer. A 10 - 15% increase in conductivity was observed in the batch experiment (Δ EC = ~280 μ S/cm). This Δ EC is attributed to an increase in the concentration of de-protonated HEPES as well as carbonate ion as formate is oxidized. Fe(II) released in this system is quickly sorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface and is not thought to change conductivity. Despite the sorption of iron in these in vitro experiments, conductivity changes measurably and documents the rate of the reaction. Accessory changes like buffer de- protonation play an important role in interpreting the electrical signals caused by dissimilatory iron reduction. In order to accurately interpret field data it is necessary

  9. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in the East China Sea sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Song

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Benthic nitrogen transformation pathways were investigated in the sediment of the East China Sea in June of 2010 using the 15N isotope pairing technique. Slurry incubations indicated that denitrification, anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA as well as nitrate release by nitrate storing organisms occurred in the East China Sea sediments. These four processes did not exist independently, the nitrate release therefore diluted the 15N labeling fraction of NO3−, a part of the 15NH4+ derived from DNRA also formed 30N2 via anammox. Therefore current methods of rate calculations led to over and underestimations of anammox and denitrification respectively. Following the procedure outlined in Thampdrup and Dalsgaard (2002, denitrification rates were slightly underestimated by on average 6% without regard to the effect of nitrate release, while this underestimation could be counteracted by the presence of DNRA. On the contrary, anammox rates calculated from 15NO3− experiment were significantly overestimated by 42% without considering nitrate release. In our study this overestimation could only be compensated 14% by taking DNRA into consideration. In a parallel experiment amended with 15NH4+ + 14NO3−, anammox rates were not significantly influenced by DNRA due to the high background of 15NH4+ addition. Excluding measurements in which bioirrigation was present, integrated denitrification rates decreased from 10 to 4 mmol N m−2 d−1 with water depth, while integrated anammox rates increased from 1.5 to 4.0 mmol N m−2 d−1. Consequently, the relative contribution of anammox to the total N-loss increased from 13% at the shallowest site near the Changjiang estuary to 50% at the deepest site on the outer shelf. This study represents the first time in which anammox has been demonstrated to play a significant role in benthic nitrogen cycling in the East China Sea sediment, especially on the outer shelf. N

  10. Dissimilatory metabolism of nitrogen oxides in bacteria: comparative reconstruction of transcriptional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A Rodionov

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR, and NnrR; two-component systems NarXL and NarQP; NO-responsive activator NorR; and nitrite-sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches, we predict DNA-binding motifs for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA recognition motif. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria, including Clostridia, Thermotogales, and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides' metabolism, not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species such as Escherichia coli, but also in gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding motif. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon also includes two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr and nipC (dnrN, thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e. nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include

  11. Dissimilatory Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Bacteria:Comparative Reconstruction of Transcriptional Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, EricJ.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2005-09-01

    Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO) is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR and NnrR, two-component systems NarXL and NarQP, NO-responsive activator NorR, and nitrite sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches we predict DNA-binding signals for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA signal. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria including Clostridia, Thermotogales and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides metabolism not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species like Escherichia coli), but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding signal. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon includes also two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr) and nipC(dnrN), thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e., nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include denitrification genes. As the

  12. Arsenic dissolution from Japanese paddy soil by a dissimilatory arsenate-reducing bacterium Geobacter sp. OR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Makino, Tomoyuki; Sakurai, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Kenta; Kudo, Keitaro; Homma, Eri; Dong, Dian Tao; Amachi, Seigo

    2013-06-18

    Dissimilatory As(V) (arsenate)-reducing bacteria may play an important role in arsenic release from anoxic sediments in the form of As(III) (arsenite). Although respiratory arsenate reductase genes (arrA) closely related to Geobacter species have been frequently detected in arsenic-rich sediments, it is still unclear whether they directly participate in arsenic release, mainly due to lack of pure cultures capable of arsenate reduction. In this study, we isolated a novel dissimilatory arsenate-reducing bacterium, strain OR-1, from Japanese paddy soil, and found that it was phylogenetically closely related to Geobacter pelophilus. OR-1 also utilized soluble Fe(III), ferrihydrite, nitrate, and fumarate as electron acceptors. OR-1 catalyzed dissolution of arsenic from arsenate-adsorbed ferrihydrite, while Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 did not. Furthermore, inoculation of washed cells of OR-1 into sterilized paddy soil successfully restored arsenic release. Arsenic K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis revealed that strain OR-1 reduced arsenate directly on the soil solid phase. Analysis of putative ArrA sequences from paddy soils suggested that Geobacter-related bacteria, including those closely related to OR-1, play an important role in arsenic release from paddy soils. Our results provide direct evidence for arsenic dissolution by Geobacter species and support the hypothesis that Geobacter species play a significant role in reduction and mobilization of arsenic in flooded soils and anoxic sediments.

  13. 异化Fe(Ⅲ)还原菌及其还原机制的环境意义%Dissimilatory Fe( Ⅲ)-reducing Bacteria and the Environmental Significance of Its Reduction Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾洪学; 杨玉泉; 屈兴红; 黄灿

    2012-01-01

    Dissimilatory Fe( IE)-reducing bacteria with the powerful metabolism function, the ability to adapt to the harsh environment and strong reduction function have great importance to the biological remediation of environment and play a decisive role in the eco-eycle of earth. They were capable of using Fe( HI) as the terminal electron acceptor coupled with many kinds of inorganic and organic matter transformation to gain energy under anoxic conditions. Microbial dissimilatory iron reduction has several significant environmental impacts. It can greatly influence the biogeochemical cycles of many metals and plays an important role in the flux of phosphate into water supplies. In addition, it has been proven to have a good application perspective in microbiology fuel batteries, odor control and protecting steel from corrosion. However, whether it is the basic study, or application study, research related to micmbial dissimilatory iron reduction is still close to the blank in China. According to the latest research advances both at home and abroad, the environmental significance of microbial dissimilatory iron reduction is reviewed to attract more attention of the researchers and accelerate this field study in our country.%异化Fe(Ⅲ)还原菌具有强大的代谢功能和适应恶劣环境的能力,其所具有的还原功能对于环境的生物修复具有重要的意义,在地球生态循环过程中具有举足轻重的作用.厌氧条件下,它可以Fe(Ⅲ)为末端电子受体,还原许多有毒重金属,降解利用有机和无机污染物,对土壤中痕量金属元素和磷的释放产生重要影响,在微生物燃料电池、环境除臭、防止钢铁腐蚀等方面有较好的应用前景和研究价值.当前无论是基础还是应用研究方面,国内微生物异化Fe(Ⅲ)还原菌的相关工作仍近空白.结合国外的最新研究进展,介绍了微生物异化Fe(Ⅲ)还原菌特性、还原机制及其还原的环境意义,旨在引起国内相

  14. [Radiologic picture of maxillary sinus aspergilloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, I; Bilska, J; Osmola, K; Nowaczyk, M T

    2010-06-01

    Mycotic infection of paranasal sinus could be the etiological factor of chronic sinusitis. The increase in number of fungal sinusitis cases have been reported recently among nonimmunocompromised patient after endodontic treatment of maxillary teeth. Nonspecific clinical signs and incorrect radiologic pictures interpretation as well as loss of therapeutic standards seems to be the cause of false negative diagnosis and difficulties in treatment of fungal sinusitis. Clinical and radiological picture of maxillary sinus aspergillosis was described in this paper. In the period of 2006-2009 in the Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery 19 patient with fungal maxillary sinusitis was treated. The endodontic treatment of maxillary teeth of the related side was performed previously in 80% examined cases. In 2 cases there were immunocompromised patients with immunosuppressive treatment. In 16 cases patients were referred to our Department due to metallic foreign body of the maxillary sinus. Routine diagnostic radiological imaging was performed in each case: paranasal sinus view--Water's view and panoramic radiograph (orthopantomograph). In 4 cases imaging was extended with computer tomography (CT) visualization. The surgical treatment was performed in each case. The final diagnosis was puted on histopathological examination and fungal culture. In 16 cases of analysed group histopathological examination and fungal culture revealed aspergilosis. In 2 cases fungal culture was negative, but histopathology slices confirm presence of hyphae of Aspergillus. In 1 case the root canal sealer was found in the maxillary sinus. In none case invasive form of aspergillosis was confirmed. In all cases Water's view of paranasal sinuses and ortopantomograph showed partially or totally clouded sinus with well-defined, single or multifocal radiopaque object similar to metallic foreign body. Characteristic finding in CT imaging was well-defined radiodence concretions that have been attributed to

  15. SOFTWARE SUPPORT FOR RICH PICTURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2010-01-01

    Rich pictures (RP) are common in object-oriented analysis and design courses, but students seem to have problems in integrating them in their projects' workflow. A new software tool is being developed, specific for RP authoring. To better understand students' issues and working practice with RP...

  16. The Picture of Dorian Gray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    On its first publication The Picture of Dorian Gray was regarded as dangerously modern in its depiction of fin-de-sicle decadence. In this updated version of the Faust story, the tempter is Lord Henry Wotton, who lives selfishly for amoral pleasure; Dorian's good angel is the portrait painter Basil

  17. On the Color Dipole Picture

    CERN Document Server

    Schildknecht, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    We give a brief representation of the theoretical results from the color dipole picture, covering the total photoabsorption cross section, high-energy $J/\\psi$ photoproduction with respect to recent experimental data from the LHCb Collaboration at CERN, and ultra-high energy neutrino scattering, relevant for the ICE-CUBE experiment.

  18. The Picture of Dorian Gray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    On its first publication The Picture of Dorian Gray was regarded as dangerously modern in its depiction of fin-de-sicle decadence. In this updated version of the Faust story, the tempter is Lord Henry Wotton, who lives selfishly for amoral pleasure; Dorian's good angel is the portrait painter Basil

  19. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or without

  20. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or without

  1. Quantification of dissimilatory (bi)sulphite reductase gene expression in Desulfobacterium autotrophicum using real-time RT-PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neretin, LN; Schippers, A.; Pernthaler, A.

    2003-01-01

    We developed a real-time RT-PCR method for the quantification of dissimilatory (bi)sulphite reductase (DSR) mRNA in Desulfobacterium autotrophicum cells. The amount of DSR mRNA was determined relative to the amount of 16S rRNA at different growth conditions during transition from exponential...... changed significantly during growth (up to 310-fold from the early to the late exponential phase during respiration with thiosulphate). The maximum DSR mRNA per-cell contents correlated with cell-specific sulphate reduction rates for all experiments. Environmental applications for the quantification...... to stationary phase: sulphate respiration with lactate, thiosulphate respiration with lactate, sulphate respiration with H-2 and pyruvate fermentation. The dsr gene was expressed constitutively, although DSR mRNA content per-cell varied under different growth conditions. The maximum DSR mRNA per-cell content...

  2. A Picture of My Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳习周

    2008-01-01

    My name is Yang Xizhou.I’m a Chinese boy.I am thirteen.This isa picture of my family at home.It’s an old photo of my family.You cansee my father,my mother,my sister and I.We all look young because wetake①it five years ago.I was eight years old that year.

  3. Statistical Inference: The Big Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Robert E

    2011-02-01

    Statistics has moved beyond the frequentist-Bayesian controversies of the past. Where does this leave our ability to interpret results? I suggest that a philosophy compatible with statistical practice, labelled here statistical pragmatism, serves as a foundation for inference. Statistical pragmatism is inclusive and emphasizes the assumptions that connect statistical models with observed data. I argue that introductory courses often mis-characterize the process of statistical inference and I propose an alternative "big picture" depiction.

  4. Teaching beginner ELLs using picture books tellability

    CERN Document Server

    Lado, Ana L (Luisa)

    2012-01-01

    Picture your beginning ELLs reading their way to success! For beginning ELLs, a picture really is worth a thousand words! Picture books are useful tools for building important language and social foundations that students may miss through traditional instruction. Ana Lado provides all the tools you'll need to engage ELLs of any age with picture books, including how to: Design lessons around picture books Select appropriate titles using specific criteria Incorporate fun and engaging strategies like singing and reenacting Access the book's searchable online database to find the right book Integrate picture-book learning to facilitate development of English Language Proficiency.

  5. A Picture of Subsidized Households 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Picture of Subsidized Households describes the nearly 5 million households living in HUD-subsidized housing in the United States for the year 2009. Picture 2009...

  6. A Picture of Subsidized Housholds 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Picture of Subsidized Households describes the nearly 5 million households living in HUD-subsidized housing in the United States for the year 2008. Picture 2008...

  7. Text-Picture Relations in Cooking Instructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Ielka; Leito, Shadira; Redeker, Gisela; Bunt, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Like many other instructions, recipes on packages with ready-to-use ingredients for a dish combine a series of pictures with short text paragraphs. The information presentation in such multimodal instructions can be compact (either text or picture) and/or cohesive (text and picture). In an explorato

  8. 32 CFR 705.8 - Motion pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motion pictures. 705.8 Section 705.8 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.8 Motion pictures. (a) The rules and procedures given in the preceding for TV will also apply to cooperation with commercial motion picture producers. (b)...

  9. Liquid Crystal Motion Picture Projector①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIYongji

    1997-01-01

    A liquid crystal moving picture projector and method are described.Light incident on a liquid crystal display-type device is selectively scattered or transmitted by respective portions of liquid crystal display,and a projection mechanism projects an image formed by either such scattered light or such transmitted light.A liquid cystal moving picture projector includes a liquid crystal display for creating characteristics of an image,and projecttion optics for projecting images sequentially created by the display.The display includes a liquid crystal material capable of temporary storing information at respective areas.The temporary storage may be a function of charge storing directly on liquid crystal material.A method of projecting plural images in sequence includes:creating an image or characteristics of an image in a liquid crystal material,storing such image in such liquid crystal material,directing light at such liquid crystal material,projecting such image as a function of light transmitted through or scattered by such liquid crystal material,and creating a further image in such liquid crystal material for subsequent projection.

  10. Effect of dissimilatory iron and sulfate reduction on arsenic dynamics in the wetland rhizosphere and its bioaccumulation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Zhang, Z.; Moon, H. S.; Myneni, S.

    2015-12-01

    The mobility of arsenic in soils is linked to biogeochemical redox processes. The presence of wetland plants in riparian wetlands has a significant impact on the biogeochemical dynamics of the soil/sediment-redoxcline due to the release of root exudates and root turnover and oxygen transfer from the roots into the surrounding sediment. Micro-environmental redox conditions in the rhizosphere affect As, Fe, and S speciation as well as Fe(III) plaque deposition, which affects arsenic transport and uptake by plants. To investigate the dynamics of As coupled to S and Fe cycling in wetlands, mesocosms were operated in a greenhouse under various conditions (high and low Fe, high and low sulfate, with plant and without plants) for four months. Results show that the presence of plants, high Fe, and high SO42- levels enhanced As sequestration in these soils. We hypothesize that this compounding effect is because plants release biodegradable organic carbon, which is used by microorganism to reduce ferrihydrite and SO42- to generate FeS, FeS2, and/or orpiment (As2S3). Over the concentration range studied, As immobilization in soil and uptake by Scirpus actus was mainly controlled by SO42- rather than Fe levels. Under high sulfate levels, As immobilization in soil increased by 50% and As concentrations in plant roots increased by 97%, whereas no significant changes in plant As levels were seen for varying Fe concentrations. More than 80% of As was sequestrated in soils rather than plant uptake. Pore water As speciation analyses indicate that 20% more As(V) was reduced to As(III) under high sulfate as than low sulfate levels and that low Fe was more favorable to the As dissimilatory reduction. More dissimilatory arsenate-respiring bacteria (DARB) under high sulfate were confirmed by quantitative PCR. Arsenic distribution in plant leafs and roots after 30 days of exposure to As was analyzed via Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analyses. The uptake of As by plants was distributed

  11. Homology modeling of dissimilatory APS reductases (AprBA of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birte Meyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS reductase (cofactors flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD, and two [4Fe-4S] centers catalyzes the transformation of APS to sulfite and AMP in sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP; in sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB it has been suggested to operate in the reverse direction. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus enzyme has been determined in different catalytically relevant states providing insights into its reaction cycle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Full-length AprBA sequences from 20 phylogenetically distinct SRP and SOB species were used for homology modeling. In general, the average accuracy of the calculated models was sufficiently good to allow a structural and functional comparison between the beta- and alpha-subunit structures (78.8-99.3% and 89.5-96.8% of the AprB and AprA main chain atoms, respectively, had root mean square deviations below 1 A with respect to the template structures. Besides their overall conformity, the SRP- and SOB-derived models revealed the existence of individual adaptations at the electron-transferring AprB protein surface presumably resulting from docking to different electron donor/acceptor proteins. These structural alterations correlated with the protein phylogeny (three major phylogenetic lineages: (1 SRP including LGT-affected Archaeoglobi and SOB of Apr lineage II, (2 crenarchaeal SRP Caldivirga and Pyrobaculum, and (3 SOB of the distinct Apr lineage I and the presence of potential APS reductase-interacting redox complexes. The almost identical protein matrices surrounding both [4Fe-4S] clusters, the FAD cofactor, the active site channel and center within the AprB/A models of SRP and SOB point to a highly similar catalytic process of APS reduction/sulfite oxidation independent of the metabolism type the APS reductase is involved in and the species it has been originated from. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the comparative

  12. Homology modeling of dissimilatory APS reductases (AprBA) of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2008-01-30

    The dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (cofactors flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD, and two [4Fe-4S] centers) catalyzes the transformation of APS to sulfite and AMP in sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP); in sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) it has been suggested to operate in the reverse direction. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus enzyme has been determined in different catalytically relevant states providing insights into its reaction cycle. Full-length AprBA sequences from 20 phylogenetically distinct SRP and SOB species were used for homology modeling. In general, the average accuracy of the calculated models was sufficiently good to allow a structural and functional comparison between the beta- and alpha-subunit structures (78.8-99.3% and 89.5-96.8% of the AprB and AprA main chain atoms, respectively, had root mean square deviations below 1 A with respect to the template structures). Besides their overall conformity, the SRP- and SOB-derived models revealed the existence of individual adaptations at the electron-transferring AprB protein surface presumably resulting from docking to different electron donor/acceptor proteins. These structural alterations correlated with the protein phylogeny (three major phylogenetic lineages: (1) SRP including LGT-affected Archaeoglobi and SOB of Apr lineage II, (2) crenarchaeal SRP Caldivirga and Pyrobaculum, and (3) SOB of the distinct Apr lineage I) and the presence of potential APS reductase-interacting redox complexes. The almost identical protein matrices surrounding both [4Fe-4S] clusters, the FAD cofactor, the active site channel and center within the AprB/A models of SRP and SOB point to a highly similar catalytic process of APS reduction/sulfite oxidation independent of the metabolism type the APS reductase is involved in and the species it has been originated from. Based on the comparative models, there are no significant structural differences between

  13. Physiological and genetic description of dissimilatory perchlorate reduction by the novel marine bacterium Arcobacter sp. strain CAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlström, Charlotte I; Wang, Ouwei; Melnyk, Ryan A; Bauer, Stefan; Lee, Joyce; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D

    2013-05-21

    A novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacterium (DPRB), Arcobacter sp. strain CAB, was isolated from a marina in Berkeley, CA. Phylogenetically, this halophile was most closely related to Arcobacter defluvii strain SW30-2 and Arcobacter ellisii. With acetate as the electron donor, strain CAB completely reduced perchlorate (ClO4(-)) or chlorate (ClO3(-)) [collectively designated (per)chlorate] to innocuous chloride (Cl(-)), likely using the perchlorate reductase (Pcr) and chlorite dismutase (Cld) enzymes. When grown with perchlorate, optimum growth was observed at 25 to 30°C, pH 7, and 3% NaCl. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations were dominated by free-swimming straight rods with 1 to 2 polar flagella per cell. Strain CAB utilized a variety of organic acids, fructose, and hydrogen as electron donors coupled to (per)chlorate reduction. Further, under anoxic growth conditions strain CAB utilized the biogenic oxygen produced as a result of chlorite dismutation to oxidize catechol via the meta-cleavage pathway of aerobic catechol degradation and the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme. In addition to (per)chlorate, oxygen and nitrate were alternatively used as electron acceptors. The 3.48-Mb draft genome encoded a distinct perchlorate reduction island (PRI) containing several transposases. The genome lacks the pcrC gene, which was previously thought to be essential for (per)chlorate reduction, and appears to use an unrelated Arcobacter c-type cytochrome to perform the same function. IMPORTANCE The study of dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria (DPRB) has largely focused on freshwater, mesophilic, neutral-pH environments. This study identifies a novel marine DPRB in the genus Arcobacter that represents the first description of a DPRB associated with the Campylobacteraceae. Strain CAB is currently the only epsilonproteobacterial DPRB in pure culture. The genome of strain CAB lacks the pcrC gene found in all

  14. Respiratory and dissimilatory nitrate-reducing communities from an extreme saline alkaline soil of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of the dissimilatory and respiratory nitrate-reducing communities was studied in two soils of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico). Genes encoding the membrane-bound nitrate reductase (narG) and the periplasmic nitrate reductase (napA) were used as functional markers. To investigate bacterial communities containing napA and narG in saline alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, libraries of the two sites were constructed (soil T3 with pH 11 and electrolytic conductivity in saturated extract (EC(SE)) 160 dS m(-1) and soil T1 with pH 8.5 and EC(SE) 0.8 dS m(-1)). Phylogenetic analysis of napA sequences separated the clone families into two main groups: dependent or independent of NapB. Most of napA sequences from site T1 were grouped in the NapB-dependent clade, meanwhile most of the napA sequences from the extreme soil T3 were affiliated to the NapB-independent group. For both sites, partial narG sequences were associated with representatives of the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla, but the proportions of the clones were different. Our results support the concept of a specific and complex nitrate-reducing community for each soil of the former lake Texcoco.

  15. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, N. H. C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Lovley, D. R.; Jannasch, H. W.; Frankel, R. B.

    1990-04-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 × 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of 110 faces which are capped and truncated by 111 end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization.

  16. Slurry bioreactor modeling using a dissimilatory arsenate-reducing bacterium for remediation of arsenic-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Satoshi; Kanzaki, Masaya; Yamamuara, Shigeki; Kashiwa, Masami; Fujita, Masanori; Ike, Michihiko

    2009-02-01

    A slurry bioreactor using a dissimilatory arsenate (As(V))-reducing bacterium is proposed for remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils. Bacterial As(V) reduction can cause arsenic extraction from the solid to the liquid phase because arsenite, As(III), is much less adsorptive than As(V). A mathematical model was developed incorporating the reversible sorption process of arsenic as well as bacterial growth and decay via As(V) reduction. A linear isotherm equation expressed the sorption process. The model included Haldane kinetics with high As(V) concentrations and cell inactivation by toxicity due to As(III). Extraction experiments used synthetic contaminated soils (forest soil, Soil SF, 1100 mg kg(-1); paddy soil, Soil SP, 1100 mg kg(-1)) and actual contaminated soils (Soil AH 2200 mg kg(-1) and Soil AL, 220 mg kg(-1)) at 5% w/v slurry concentration. Simulation results matched the observed changes of arsenic concentrations in the liquid phase. The respective extraction efficiencies of arsenic were 63%, 41%, 20%, and 55% for SF, SP, AH, and AL soils. Sensitivity analyses showed that the rate-limiting step was the desorption rate of As(V) from the solid to the liquid phase, rather than the As(V)-reducing rate. The proposed model provides a useful framework for understanding and predicting the extraction of arsenic from soil.

  17. Selected pictures of the month

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    View of a single MDT Big Wheel (on side A in UX15 cavern) taken during its last movement immediately after being assembled and just before being connected to the neighbouring TGC1 wheel. Assembly work on the Cathode Strip Chambers on Small Wheel C in building 190. Connecting the services for the Cathode Strip Chambers. The installation of the optical fibers for the readout of the Cathode Strip Chambers on Small Weel C by the Irvine group. Best from our archives: View of the End Cap Calorimeter and TGC big wheel from the Cryostat side A of ATLAS cavern taken on 22 May 2007. The picture above was taken from the platform in the middle, between the Cryostat and the End-Cap. Muriel hopes you all had a great vacation. She herself had a wonderful time sailing in Galicia (North Western Spain). She can be seen here wearing the traditional dress offered to her by "Los Amigos de las Dornas" (Friends of the Dornas -traditional sailing boats used for fishing) - when she became ...

  18. Magazine Picture Collage in Group Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Blythe C.; Guenette, Francis L.

    2010-01-01

    A magazine picture collage activity was used with three female counsellor education students as a vehicle to support them in processing their experience as counsellors in training. The use of magazine picture collage in group supervision is described, and the benefits and challenges are presented. The collages served as jumping-off points for…

  19. Picture-Word Interference Is Semantically Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Richard R.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of the performance of second-, fourth-, sixth-grade, and college-level subjects on picture-word interference tasks indicated that distractor words belonging to the same semantic category as pictures produced more interference than either unrelated words or nonsense trigrams. (Author/JMB)

  20. Wigner method dynamics in the interaction picture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Dahl, Jens Peder; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of introducing an interaction picture in the semiclassical Wigner method is investigated. This is done with an interaction Picture description of the density operator dynamics as starting point. We show that the dynamics of the density operator dynamics as starting point. We show ...... integration of the Schrodinger equation....

  1. An MEG study of picture naming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levelt, W.J.M.; Praamstra, P.; Meyer, A.S.; Helenius, P.I.; Salmelin, R.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to relate a psycholinguistic processing model of picture naming to the dynamics of cortical activation during picture naming. The activation was recorded from eight Dutch subjects with a whole-head neuromagnetometer. The processing model, based on extensive naming

  2. The Untapped Potential of Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the role picture books play in helping young writers. Third-grade students were read engaging picture books for the sole purpose of noticing and naming different features they encountered during the read-alouds. Students were able to recognize the tools many authors and illustrators use such as onomatopoeia, varied font…

  3. USING PICTURES IN THE LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Visuals are advantageous to language teaching and learning.Effective use of pictures in the lan-guage classroom contributes to stimulate the students’ imagination and creativity,enhance their basic lan-guage skills and heighten their communicative competence.This Paper will present some techniques andactivities with pictures for use in the language class.

  4. The Functions of Pictures in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Iliada; Philippou, George

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we assert that pictures serve four functions in problem solving: decorative, representational, organizational and informational. We, therefore, investigate the effects of pictures based on their functions in mathematical problem solving (MPS), by high achievement students of Grade 6 in Cyprus, in a communication setting. A…

  5. Attitudes toward Motion Pictures among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Bruce A.

    Several reasons for studying motion pictures and patrons' attitudes toward them include the following: (1) current data show that motion pictures account for 53% of the total United States spectator amusement expenditures; (2) the average weekly United States movie attendance has plummeted by more than half since 1930; (3) despite this decline,…

  6. Parallel processing for digital picture comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H. D.; Kou, L. T.

    1987-01-01

    In picture processing an important problem is to identify two digital pictures of the same scene taken under different lighting conditions. This kind of problem can be found in remote sensing, satellite signal processing and the related areas. The identification can be done by transforming the gray levels so that the gray level histograms of the two pictures are closely matched. The transformation problem can be solved by using the packing method. Researchers propose a VLSI architecture consisting of m x n processing elements with extensive parallel and pipelining computation capabilities to speed up the transformation with the time complexity 0(max(m,n)), where m and n are the numbers of the gray levels of the input picture and the reference picture respectively. If using uniprocessor and a dynamic programming algorithm, the time complexity will be 0(m(3)xn). The algorithm partition problem, as an important issue in VLSI design, is discussed. Verification of the proposed architecture is also given.

  7. Rapid induction of false memory for pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Yana; Shanks, David R

    2010-07-01

    Recognition of pictures is typically extremely accurate, and it is thus unclear whether the reconstructive nature of memory can yield substantial false recognition of highly individuated stimuli. A procedure for the rapid induction of false memories for distinctive colour photographs is proposed. Participants studied a set of object pictures followed by a list of words naming those objects, but embedded in the list were names of unseen objects. When subsequently shown full colour pictures of these unseen objects, participants consistently claimed that they had seen them, while discriminating with high accuracy between studied pictures and new pictures whose names did not appear in the misleading word list. These false memories can be reported with high confidence as well as the feeling of recollection. This new procedure allows the investigation of factors that influence false memory reports with ecologically valid stimuli and of the similarities and differences between true and false memories.

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by the dissimilatory iron-reducing organism, GS-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Lonergan, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer, GS-15, is the first microorganism known to couple the oxidation of aromatic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) and the first example of a pure culture of any kind known to anaerobically oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene. In this study, the metabolism of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by GS-15 was investigated in more detail. GS-15 grew in an anaerobic medium with toluene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. Growth coincided with Fe(III) reduction. [ring-14C]toluene was oxidized to 14CO2, and the stoichiometry of 14CO2 production and Fe(III) reduction indicated that GS-15 completely oxidized toluene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Magnetite was the primary iron end product during toluene oxidation. Phenol and p-cresol were also completely oxidized to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, and GS-15 could obtain energy to support growth by oxidizing either of these compounds as the sole electron donor. p-Hydroxybenzoate was a transitory extracellular intermediate of phenol and p-cresol metabolism but not of toluene metabolism. GS-15 oxidized potential aromatic intermediates in the oxidation of toluene (benzylalcohol and benzaldehyde) and p-cresol (p-hydroxybenzylalcohol and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). The metabolism described here provides a model for how aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols may be oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III) in contaminated aquifers and petroleum-containing sediments.

  9. Dissimilatory Sb(V) reduction by microorganisms isolated from Sb-contaminated sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovick, M. A.; Kulp, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mining and smelting are major sources of trace metal contamination in freshwater systems. Arsenic (As) is a common contaminant derived from certain mining operations and is a known toxic metalloid and carcinogen. Antimony (Sb) is listed as a pollutant of priority interest by the EPA and is presumed to share similar geochemical and toxicological properties with arsenic. Both elements can occur in four different oxidation states (V, III, 0, and -III) under naturally occurring conditions. In aqueous solutions As(V) and Sb(V) predominate in oxygenated surface waters whereas As(III) and Sb(III) are stable in anoxic settings. Numerous studies have examined microbiological redox pathways that utilize As(V) as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, however there have been few studies on microbial mechanisms that may affect the biogeochemical cycling of Sb in the environment. Here we report bacterial reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) in anoxic enrichment cultures and bacterial isolates grown from sediment collected from an Sb contaminated pond at a mine tailings site in Idaho (total pond water Sb concentration = 235.2 +/- 136.3 ug/L). Anaerobic sediment microcosms (40 mL) were established in artificial freshwater mineral salt medium, amended with millimolar concentrations of Sb(V), acetate or lactate, and incubated at 27°C for several days. Antimony(V), lactate, and acetate concentrations were monitored during incubation by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Ion Chromatography (IC). Live sediment microcosms reduced millimolar amendments of Sb(V) to Sb(III) coupled to the oxidation of acetate and lactate, while no activity occurred in killed controls. Enrichment cultures were established by serially diluting Sb(V)-reducing microcosms in mineral salt medium with Sb(V) and acetate, and a Sb(V)-reducing bacterial strain was isolated by plating on anaerobic agar plates amended with millimolar Sb(V) and acetate. Direct cell counting demonstrated that

  10. An Introduction to Recording, Editing, and Streaming Picture-in-Picture Ultrasound Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Hall, Mederic M; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the process by which high-definition resolution (up to 1920 × 1080 pixels) ultrasound video can be captured in conjunction with high-definition video of the transducer position (picture-in-picture). In addition, we describe how to edit the recorded video feeds to combine both feeds, and to crop, resize, split, stitch, cut, annotate videos, and also change the frame rate, insert pictures, edit the audio feed, and use chroma keying. We also describe how to stream a picture-in-picture ultrasound feed during a videoconference. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular analysis of the distribution and phylogeny of dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase-encoding genes (aprBA) among sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2007-10-01

    Dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (AprBA) is a key enzyme of the dissimilatory sulfate-reduction pathway. Homologues have been found in photo- and chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes (SOP), in which they are postulated to operate in the reverse direction, oxidizing sulfite to APS. Newly developed PCR assays allowed the amplification of 92-93 % (2.1-2.3 kb) of the APS reductase locus aprBA. PCR-based screening of 116 taxonomically divergent SOP reference strains revealed a distribution of aprBA restricted to photo- and chemotrophs with strict anaerobic or at least facultative anaerobic lifestyles, including Chlorobiaceae, Chromatiaceae, Thiobacillus, Thiothrix and invertebrate symbionts. In the AprBA-based tree, the SOP diverge into two distantly related phylogenetic lineages, Apr lineages I and II, with the proteins of lineage II (Chlorobiaceae and others) in closer affiliation to the enzymes of the sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP). This clustering is discordant with the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB) phylogeny and indicates putative lateral aprBA gene transfer from SRP to the respective SOB lineages. In support of lateral gene transfer (LGT), several beta- and gammaproteobacterial species harbour both aprBA homologues, the DsrAB-congruent 'authentic' and the SRP-related, LGT-derived gene loci, while some relatives possess exclusively the SRP-related apr genes as a possible result of resident gene displacement by the xenologue. The two-gene state might be an intermediate in the replacement of the resident essential gene. Collected genome data demonstrate the correlation between the AprBA tree topology and the composition/arrangement of the apr gene loci (occurrence of qmoABC or aprM genes) from SRP and SOP of lineages I and II. The putative functional role of the SRP-related APS reductases in photo- and chemotrophic SOP is discussed.

  12. Picturing perturbative parton cascades in QCD matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksi Kurkela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on parametric reasoning, we provide a simple dynamical picture of how a perturbative parton cascade, in interaction with a QCD medium, fills phase space as a function of time.

  13. Pattern Perception and Pictures for the Blind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa McCarthy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent research on perception of tangible pictures in sighted and blind people. Haptic picture naming accuracy is dependent upon familiarity and access to semantic memory, just as in visual recognition. Performance is high when haptic picture recognition tasks do not depend upon semantic memory. Viewpoint matters for the ease or difficulty of interpreting haptic pictures of solid objects. Top views were easiest for sighted and blind persons when geometrical solids had constant crosssections in the vertical axis. The presence or absence of viewpoint effects depends upon the nature of the solids that are represented. Congenitally blind people do not spontaneously produce perspective drawings, but recent data suggests that depictions including linear perspective can be understood after minimal experience. The results suggest that two-dimensional configurations are not necessarily problematic for touch.

  14. Dementia in the movies: The clinical picture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, D.L.; Kuin, Y.; Nijboer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Visual media influence the general public's perceptions and attitudes regarding people with mental conditions. This qualitative study investigates the depiction accuracy of dementia's clinical features in motion pictures.Method: Using the search terms 'dementia', 'Alzheimer's disease' an

  15. Dementia in the movies: the clinical picture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, D.; Kuin, Y.; Nijboer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Visual media influence the general public's perceptions and attitudes regarding people with mental conditions. This qualitative study investigates the depiction accuracy of dementia's clinical features in motion pictures.Method: Using the search terms dementia', Alzheimer's disease' and

  16. NIH Abroad: Pictures Are Crowd Pullers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pictures Are Crowd Pullers …" Art, culture, and the Internet combine to intervene against malaria in Uganda NLM's ... Services Division collaborated on the project through the Internet. "We wanted to see if such a 'health ...

  17. Lambliasis in Children. Epidemiology, Clinical Picture, Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Konyushevskaya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the lambliasis — one of most common protozoan diseases in children. This article gives a review of literature on epidemiology, clinical picture and diagnosis of lambliasis in children as well as own observations.

  18. Descriptive complexity for pictures languages (extended abstract)

    CERN Document Server

    Grandjean, Etienne; richard, Gaétan

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with descriptive complexity of picture languages of any dimension by syntactical fragments of existential second-order logic. - We uniformly generalize to any dimension the characterization by Giammarresi et al. \\cite{GRST96} of the class of \\emph{recognizable} picture languages in existential monadic second-order logic. - We state several logical characterizations of the class of picture languages recognized in linear time on nondeterministic cellular automata of any dimension. They are the first machine-independent characterizations of complexity classes of cellular automata. Our characterizations are essentially deduced from normalization results we prove for first-order and existential second-order logics over pictures. They are obtained in a general and uniform framework that allows to extend them to other "regular" structures. Finally, we describe some hierarchy results that show the optimality of our logical characterizations and delineate their limits.

  19. Two Comments on Predictive Picture Coding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Two comments on predictive picture coding are given in this paper. 1) In lossy coding, the reconstructed values of picture samples, not its original values, should be used in the prediction formula. 2) In the design of optimum predictors, the minimum entropy or subjective assessment or other criterions, could be used, depending on the applications of the prediction encoder, instead of the minimum mean square error (MMSE) criterion.

  20. Influence of organic carbon and nitrate loading on partitioning between dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and N2 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, Amber K.; Algar, Christopher K.; Giblin, Anne E.; Rich, Jeremy J.

    2015-09-01

    Biologically available nitrogen is removed from ecosystems through the microbial processes of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or denitrification, while dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) retains it. A mechanistic understanding of controls on partitioning among these pathways is currently lacking. The objective of this study was to conduct a manipulative experiment to determine the influence of organic C and NO3- loading on partitioning. Sediment was collected from a location on the southern New England shelf (78 m water depth) and sieved. Half of the sediment was mixed with freeze-dried phytoplankton and the other half was not. Sediment was then spread into 1.5 mm, "thin discs" closed at the bottom and placed in large aquarium tanks with filtered, N2/CO2 sparged seawater to maintain O2 limited conditions. Half of the discs received high NO3- loading, while the other half received low NO3- loading, resulting in a multifactorial design with four treatments: no C addition, low NO3- (-C-N); C addition, low NO3- (+C-N); no C addition, high NO3- (-C+N); and C addition, high NO3- (+C+N). Sediment discs were incubated in the tanks for 7 weeks, during which time inorganic N (NH4+, NO3-, and NO2-) was monitored, and sediment discs were periodically removed from the tanks to conduct 15N isotope labeling experiments in vials to measure potential rates of anammox, denitrification, and DNRA. Temporal dynamics of inorganic N concentrations in the tanks were indicative of anoxic N metabolism, with strong response of the build up or consumption of the intermediate NO2-, depending on treatments. Vial incubation experiments with added 15NO2- + 14NH4+ indicated significant denitrification and DNRA activity in sediment thin discs, but incubations with added 15NH4+ + 14NO2- indicated anammox was not at all significant. Inorganic N concentrations in the tanks were fit to a reactive transport model assuming different N transformations. Organic C decomposition rates

  1. Experimental constraints on Fe isotope fractionation during magnetite and Fe carbonate formation coupled to dissimilatory hydrous ferric oxide reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Clark M.; Roden, Eric E.; Welch, Susan A.; Beard, Brian L.

    2005-02-01

    , magnetite from BIFs that has δ 56Fe ≤0‰ apparently requires formation from aqueous Fe(II) that had very low δ 56Fe values. Based on this experimental study, formation of low-δ 56Fe Fe(II) aq in nonsulfidic systems seems most likely to have been produced by dissimilatory reduction of ferric oxides by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  2. Role of Siderophores in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Arctic Soils : Effect of Direct Amendment of Siderophores to Arctic Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, A. J.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Lipson, D.

    2014-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR), where ferric iron (Fe3+) is reduced to ferrous iron (Fe2+) anaerobically, is an important respiratory pathway used by soil bacteria. DIR contributes to carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the wet sedge tundra biome in the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) in Alaska, and could competitively inhibit the production of methane, a stronger greenhouse gas than CO2, from arctic soils. The occurrence of DIR as a dominant anaerobic process depends on the availability of substantial levels of Fe3+ in soils. Siderophores are metabolites made by microbes to dissolve Fe3+ from soil minerals in iron deficient systems, making Fe3+ soluble for micronutrient uptake. However, as the ACP is not iron deficient, siderophores in arctic soils may play a vital role in anaerobic respiration by dissolving Fe3+ for DIR. We studied the effects of direct siderophore addition to arctic soils through a field study conducted in Barrow, Alaska, and a laboratory incubation study conducted at San Diego State University. In the field experiment, 50μM deferroxamine mesylate (a siderophore), 50μM trisodium nitrilotriacetate (an organic chelator) or an equal volume of water was added to isolated experimental plots, replicated in clusters across the landscape. Fe2+ concentrations were measured in soil pore water samples collected periodically to measure DIR over time in each. In the laboratory experiment, frozen soil samples obtained from drained thaw lake basins in the ACP, were cut into cores and treated with the above-mentioned compounds to the same final concentrations. Along with measuring Fe2+ concentrations, CO2 output was also measured to monitor DIR over time in each core. Experimental addition of siderophores to soils in both the field and laboratory resulted in increased concentrations of soluble Fe3+ and a sustained increase in Fe2+concentrations over time, along with increased respiration rates in siderophore-amended cores. These results show increased DIR in

  3. Crossmodal interactions during affective picture processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Ferrari

    Full Text Available "Natural" crossmodal correspondences, such as the spontaneous tendency to associate high pitches with high spatial locations, are often hypothesized to occur preattentively and independently of task instructions (top-down attention. Here, we investigate bottom-up attentional engagement by using emotional scenes that are known to naturally and reflexively engage attentional resources. We presented emotional (pleasant and unpleasant or neutral pictures either below or above a fixation cross, while participants were required to discriminate between a high or a low pitch tone (experiment 1. Results showed that despite a robust crossmodal attentional capture of task-irrelevant emotional pictures, the general advantage in classifying the tones for congruent over incongruent visual-auditory stimuli was similar for emotional and neutral pictures. On the other hand, when picture position was task-relevant (experiment 2, task-irrelevant tones did not interact with pictures with regard to their combination of pitch and visual vertical spatial position, but instead they were effective in minimizing the interference effect of emotional picture processing on the ongoing task. These results provide constraints on our current understanding of natural crossmodal correspondences.

  4. [Metal poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, A

    2003-01-01

    Metals are amongst the oldest toxic substances known to man. In today's industrialized world the sources of exposure to metals are ubiquitous both in the field of work and from polluted water, foodstuffs and the environment. Their toxicity is characterized by the metallic element in question, but this is modified by the type of compound, whether organic or inorganic, and its characteristics of hydrosolubility and liposolubility, which determines its toxicokinetics and thus the possibilities of it reaching its targets. The biomolecules most affected by metals are the proteins with enzymatic activity, which is why their pathology is multisystemic. The principal systems affected are the gastrointestinal, central and peripheral neurological, haematic and renal. Some metallic compounds are carcinogenic. Metals's treatment is conditioned by their chemical reactivity. They can be deactivated and eliminated by the administering of chelating agents that produce complex molecules, which are non-toxic and can be excreted. The principal chelating agents are: BAL (British Anti-Lewisite or dimercaprol) DMPS (2,3-Dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic Acid) and DMSA (meso-2,3-Dimercaptosuccinic or Succimer), EDTA, Penicilamine (b,b-dimethylcysteine) and Deferoxamine. Toxicokinetic characteristics, mechanism of action, clinical picture and treatment of some of the most relevant metals and metalloids: lead, mercury and arsenic, are considered.

  5. Digital Picture Production and Picture aesthetic Competency in It-didactic Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle

    In my presentation at the InSEA Conference 2015 I want to introduce my ongoing Ph.D. project with the title ‘Digital Picture Production and Picture aesthetic Competency in It-didactic Design’. The objective of the project is to provide a basis for upgrading and renewal of lessons in the school...... subject Visual Arts – and crosswise of subjects in school. The overall research question has been: How can IT-didactic designs support lessons in production of complex meaning in digital pictures and increase the development of pupil’s picture aesthetic competences? By using the expression ‘complex...... potential in digital picture productions will tend to be distinctly complex, such as also Mie Buhl has pointed with reference to Paul Duncum. (Buhl 2005, Duncum 2014). To handle production of such distinctly complex meaning in digital pictures seems to be a didactic challenge in school. It also seems like...

  6. Enrichment of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria from groundwater of the Siklós BTEX-contaminated site (Hungary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Milán; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Benedek, Tibor; Révész, Fruzsina; Veres, Péter Gábor; Kriszt, Balázs; Táncsics, András

    2017-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria are commonly found in microbial communities of aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface environments where they often play key role in the degradation of the contaminants. The Siklós benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX)-contaminated area is one of the best characterized petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of Hungary. Continuous monitoring of the microbial community in the center of the contaminant plume indicated the presence of an emerging Geobacter population and a Rhodoferax phylotype highly associated with aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface environments. The aim of the present study was to make an initial effort to enrich Rhodoferax-related and other dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria from this environment. Accordingly, four slightly different freshwater media were used to enrich Fe(III) reducers, differing only in the form of nitrogen source (organic, inorganic nitrogen or gaseous headspace nitrogen). Although enrichment of the desired Rhodoferax phylotype was not succeeded, Geobacter-related bacteria were readily enriched. Moreover, the different nitrogen sources caused the enrichment of different Geobacter species. Investigation of the diversity of benzylsuccinate synthase gene both in the enrichments and in the initial groundwater sample indicated that the Geobacter population in the center of the contaminant plume may not play a significant role in the anaerobic degradation of toluene.

  7. Water quality, fate of metals and predictive model validation of a constructed wetland treating acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsch, W.J.; Wise, K.M. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). School of Natural Resources

    1998-06-01

    The paper describes how 0.39 ha constructed wetland designed with 9 cells, including two anaerobic cells that were to stimulate dissimilatory sulfate reduction, was evaluated for its effect on water quality of a low-order acid mine drainage (AMD) stream in southeastern Ohio, USA. Emphasis was on the uptake and fate of selected metals and the accuracy of a simulation model that predicted this specific wetland`s behavior before it was built.

  8. Consideration of vision and picture quality: psychological effects induced by picture sharpness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, Hideo

    1989-08-01

    A psychological hierarchy model of human vision(1)(2) suggests that the visual signals are processed in a serial manner from lower to higher stages: that is "sensation" - "perception" - "emotion." For designing a future television system, it is important to find out what kinds of physical factors affect the "emotion" experienced by an observer in front of the display. This paper describes the psychological effects induced by the sharpness of the picture. The subjective picture quality was evaluated for the same pictures with five different levels of sharpness. The experiment was performed on two kinds of printed pictures: (A) a woman's face, and (B) a town corner. From these experiments, it was found that the amount of high-frequency peaking (physical value of the sharpness) which psychologically gives the best picture quality, differs between pictures (A) and (B). That is, the optimum picture sharpness differs depending on the picture content. From these results, we have concluded that the psychophysical sharpness of the picture is not only determined at the stage of "perception" (e.g., resolution or signal to noise ratio, which everyone can judge immediately), but also at the stage of "emotion" (e.g., sensation of reality or beauty).

  9. Hierarchical Picture Coding Using Quadtree Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Yves; Fortier, Michel

    1987-10-01

    A new hierarchical encoding scheme for grey-level pictures is presented here. The picture field is split by a modified quadtree algorithm into blocks of size 32 x 32, 16 x 16, 8 x 8 and 4 x 4 pels, according to their subjective importance in the picture. The larger cells, of size 32 x 32, 16 x 16 and 8 x 8 pels, corresponding to uniform or low-detailed areas, are coded at a very low rates by block truncation in the Discrete Cosine Transform field. The smallest blocks, representing mainly high-detailed areas of the like edges or textures are coded with a multi-codebook vector quantization scheme. Due to its structure, such an encoding scheme is especially well adapted for coding "head and shoulders" pictures, mostly encountered in videophone or videoconference application, where large areas of background may appear. Concerning the vector quantization, several techniques were investigated in order to improve the subjective quality and to reduce the search time through the codebooks. This permits a faster elaboration of the codebooks. Results are presented with bit-rates ranging from 0.4 to 0.8 bits/pel depending on the picture complexity.

  10. Different Loci of Semantic Interference in Picture Naming vs. Word-Picture Matching Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Denise Y; Schnur, Tatiana T

    2016-01-01

    Naming pictures and matching words to pictures belonging to the same semantic category impairs performance relative to when stimuli come from different semantic categories (i.e., semantic interference). Despite similar semantic interference phenomena in both picture naming and word-picture matching tasks, the locus of interference has been attributed to different levels of the language system - lexical in naming and semantic in word-picture matching. Although both tasks involve access to shared semantic representations, the extent to which interference originates and/or has its locus at a shared level remains unclear, as these effects are often investigated in isolation. We manipulated semantic context in cyclical picture naming and word-picture matching tasks, and tested whether factors tapping semantic-level (generalization of interference to novel category items) and lexical-level processes (interactions with lexical frequency) affected the magnitude of interference, while also assessing whether interference occurs at a shared processing level(s) (transfer of interference across tasks). We found that semantic interference in naming was sensitive to both semantic- and lexical-level processes (i.e., larger interference for novel vs. old and low- vs. high-frequency stimuli), consistent with a semantically mediated lexical locus. Interference in word-picture matching exhibited stable interference for old and novel stimuli and did not interact with lexical frequency. Further, interference transferred from word-picture matching to naming. Together, these experiments provide evidence to suggest that semantic interference in both tasks originates at a shared processing stage (presumably at the semantic level), but that it exerts its effect at different loci when naming pictures vs. matching words to pictures.

  11. Development of a Rich Picture editor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2010-01-01

    rich picture practice into software proved difficult, therefore, we decided to follow a user-centered approach: design and implement a prototype with basic functionalities, then run a usability test with a few students and professionals. The feedback collected in the test validated our hypothesis circa...... the need of software support for the authoring rich pictures, but also forced us to re-consider the design of our prototype. To gain a deeper understanding of the students' working practice, we also reviewed rich pictures from past student projects. All the information gathered through our study is guiding...... us in the design of the tool next version. At a more general level we realized that modern object-oriented development methodologies, such as agile methods, are informed by design, hence they sometimes assume design skills that programmers do not have or do not value....

  12. Cosmic Inflation from Emergent Spacetime Picture

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2016-01-01

    We argue that the emergent spacetime picture admits a background-independent formulation of cosmic inflation. The inflation in this picture corresponds to the dynamical emergence of spacetime while the conventional inflation is simply an (exponential) expansion of a preexisting spacetime owing to the vacuum energy carried by an inflaton field. We show that the cosmic inflation arises as a time-dependent solution of the matrix quantum mechanics describing the dynamical process of Planck energy condensate in vacuum without introducing any inflaton field as well as an {\\it ad hoc} inflation potential. Thus the emergent spacetime picture realizes a background-independent description of the inflationary universe which has a sufficiently elegant and explanatory power to defend the integrity of physics against the multiverse hypothesis.

  13. The Role of Pictures in Picture Books on Children's Cognitive Engagement with Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Iliada; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Georgiou, Alexia

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the cognitive activity that is evoked in young children when they are read a picture book that is written for the purpose of teaching mathematics. The focus of this study is to explore the effects of pictures on children's spontaneous mathematical cognitive engagement. The study is based on the assumption that the…

  14. Picture or Text First? Explaining Sequence Effects When Learning with Pictures and Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Alexander; Scheiter, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    The present article reviews 42 studies investigating the role of sequencing of text and pictures for learning outcomes. Whereas several of the reviewed studies revealed better learning outcomes from presenting the picture before the text rather than after it, other studies demonstrated the opposite effect. Against the backdrop of theories on…

  15. The Role of Pictures in Picture Books on Children's Cognitive Engagement with Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Iliada; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Georgiou, Alexia

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the cognitive activity that is evoked in young children when they are read a picture book that is written for the purpose of teaching mathematics. The focus of this study is to explore the effects of pictures on children's spontaneous mathematical cognitive engagement. The study is based on the assumption that the…

  16. Ubiquitous picture-rich content representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wiley; Dean, Jennifer; Muzzolini, Russ

    2010-02-01

    The amount of digital images taken by the average consumer is consistently increasing. People enjoy the convenience of storing and sharing their pictures through online (digital) and offline (traditional) media. A set of pictures can be uploaded to: online photo services, web blogs and social network websites. Alternatively, these images can be used to generate: prints, cards, photo books or other photo products. Through uploading and sharing, images are easily transferred from one format to another. And often, a different set of associated content (text, tags) is created across formats. For example, on his web blog, a user may journal his experiences of his recent travel; on his social network website, his friends tag and comment on the pictures; in his online photo album, some pictures are titled and keyword-tagged. When the user wants to tell a complete story, perhaps in a photo book, he must collect, across all formats: the pictures, writings and comments, etc. and organize them in a book format. The user has to arrange the content of his trip in each format. The arrangement, the associations between the images, tags, keywords and text, cannot be shared with other formats. In this paper, we propose a system that allows the content to be easily created and shared across various digital media formats. We define a uniformed data association structure to connect: images, documents, comments, tags, keywords and other data. This content structure allows the user to switch representation formats without reediting. The framework under each format can emphasize (display or hide) content elements based on preference. For example, a slide show view will emphasize the display of pictures with limited text; a blog view will display highlighted images and journal text; and the photo book will try to fit in all images and text content. In this paper, we will discuss the strategy to associate pictures with text content, so that it can naturally tell a story. We will also list

  17. Neural correlates of processing negative and sexually arousing pictures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Bailey

    Full Text Available Recent work has questioned whether the negativity bias is a distinct component of affective picture processing. The current study was designed to determine whether there are different neural correlates of processing positive and negative pictures using event-related brain potentials. The early posterior negativity and late positive potential were greatest in amplitude for erotic pictures. Partial Least Squares analysis revealed one latent variable that distinguished erotic pictures from neutral and positive pictures and another that differentiated negative pictures from neutral and positive pictures. The effects of orienting task on the neural correlates of processing negative and erotic pictures indicate that affective picture processing is sensitive to both stimulus-driven, and attentional or decision processes. The current data, together with other recent findings from our laboratory, lead to the suggestion that there are distinct neural correlates of processing negative and positive stimuli during affective picture processing.

  18. Neural Correlates of Processing Negative and Sexually Arousing Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kira; West, Robert; Mullaney, Kellie M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work has questioned whether the negativity bias is a distinct component of affective picture processing. The current study was designed to determine whether there are different neural correlates of processing positive and negative pictures using event-related brain potentials. The early posterior negativity and late positive potential were greatest in amplitude for erotic pictures. Partial Least Squares analysis revealed one latent variable that distinguished erotic pictures from neutral and positive pictures and another that differentiated negative pictures from neutral and positive pictures. The effects of orienting task on the neural correlates of processing negative and erotic pictures indicate that affective picture processing is sensitive to both stimulus-driven, and attentional or decision processes. The current data, together with other recent findings from our laboratory, lead to the suggestion that there are distinct neural correlates of processing negative and positive stimuli during affective picture processing. PMID:23029071

  19. The Work of the Motion Picture Cameraman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Freddie; Petzold, Paul

    Meant to serve as an authoritative source of information on camera work in large scale feature productions, this book attempts to give some basic understanding of the problems of motion picture photography, the working conditions and artistry of lighting for mood and dramatic effect, budget problems for making films, and facts about working with a…

  20. The Last Great American Picture Show

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, Thomas; King, Noel; Horwath, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The Last Great American Picture Show brings together essays by scholars and writers who chart the changing evaluations of the American cinema of the 1970s, sometimes referred to as the decade of the lost generation, but now more and more recognized as the first New Hollywood, without which the cinem

  1. Learning about Environmental Print through Picture Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, Patricia; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes picture books that contain environmental print (print found in the natural environment of a child, such as logos, billboards, and road signs) and how they can be used in the classroom. Includes "ABC Drive!" by Naomi Howland (1994), "The Signmaker's Assistant" by Tedd Arnold (1992), and four others. Also provides a…

  2. Behavioral modulation by mutilation pictures in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira M.G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that women are more emotionally expressive than men. It is unclear, however, if women are also more susceptible to the emotional modulation of behavior imposed by an affective stimulus. To investigate this issue, we devised a task in which female subjects performed six sequential trials of visual target detection following the presentation of emotional (mutilation and erotic or neutral pictures (domestic utensils and objects and compared the data obtained in the present study with those described in a previous study with male subjects. The experiment consisted of three blocks of 24 pictures and each block had an approximate duration of 4 min. Our sample consisted of 36 subjects (age range: 18 to 26 years and each subject performed all blocks. Trials following the presentation of mutilation pictures (283 ms had significantly slower reaction times than those following neutral (270 ms pictures. None of the trials in the "pleasant block" (271 ms was significantly different from those in the "neutral block". The increase in reaction time observed in the unpleasant block may be related in part to the activation of motivational systems leading to an avoidance behavior. The interference effect observed in this study was similar to the pattern previously described for men. Thus, although women may be more emotionally expressive, they were not more reactive to aversive stimuli than men, as measured by emotional interference in a simple reaction time task.

  3. North America - The Energy Picture II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Servicio Público de Energía Eléctrica or LSPEE) was amended to allow private participation in generation activities. Article 3 of this Act lists...Desarrollo Urbano ), of the National Urban System (Sistema Urbano Nacional), and of the specific urban North America – The Energy Picture II

  4. Bilingual Picture Books: Libros Para Todos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, Denise

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of including bilingual English/Spanish picture books in library collections, introduces some recent titles, and describes some programming ideas. Topics include second language study, children teaching English to Spanish-speaking parents, cultural studies, and bilingual presentations. (LRW)

  5. Perseverant Responding in Children's Picture Naming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Josephine; Vitkovitch, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    Two groups of children were given pictures of animals to name as quickly as they could. The groups comprised 40 nursery aged children (mean age 3 ; 11) and 40 Year 2 children (mean age 6 ; 9) attending primary school in London. The 30 animals were presented one by one, on cards, and any errors made by the children were noted. Consistent with a…

  6. Bilingual Picture Books: Libros Para Todos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, Denise

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of including bilingual English/Spanish picture books in library collections, introduces some recent titles, and describes some programming ideas. Topics include second language study, children teaching English to Spanish-speaking parents, cultural studies, and bilingual presentations. (LRW)

  7. Princess Picture Books: Content and Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Lourdes P.; Higgins, Brittany E.; Pinkerton, Nick; Couto, Michelle; Mansolillo, Victoria; Weisinger, Nica; Flores, Marci

    2016-01-01

    Because many girls develop their understanding of what it means to be a girl from books about princesses, the researchers coded the messages and content in 58 princess books (picture, fairy tales, and fractured fairy tales). Results indicate that gender stereotypes are present in the books--the princesses were more likely to be nurturing, in…

  8. Young Children, National Tragedy, and Picture Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMath, Joan S.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that, rather than exposing young children to media coverage of national tragedies and disasters, caregivers should read aloud to children from picture books that convey stability, calmness, and reassurance. Includes tips for helping children cope with tragedy, guidelines for selecting books, and an annotated list of 25 books that can help…

  9. Motion Picture and Videotape Analysis of Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Geoffrey C.; Duvall, David

    1983-01-01

    Use of motion pictures and videotape recordings to analyze animal behavior is described. Indicates that accuracy/amount of data available is greatly increased and that simultaneous behaviors of different animals can be studied or individual behavior patterns increased/decreased, providing observers with temporal perceptions similar to the animals…

  10. Learning about Environmental Print through Picture Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, Patricia; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes picture books that contain environmental print (print found in the natural environment of a child, such as logos, billboards, and road signs) and how they can be used in the classroom. Includes "ABC Drive!" by Naomi Howland (1994), "The Signmaker's Assistant" by Tedd Arnold (1992), and four others. Also provides a bibliography of other…

  11. Do Natural Pictures Mean Natural Tastes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Viktor; Barratt, Daniel; Sørensen, Henrik Selsøe

    2015-01-01

    A widespread assumption in Danish consumer law is that if the package of a food product carries a picture of a potentially taste-giving ingredient (say, a strawberry), then consumers will expect the corresponding taste to stem primarily from that ingredient rather than from artificial flavouring...

  12. Multiple sulfur isotope signatures of sulfite and thiosulfate reduction by the model dissimilatory sulfate-reducer, Desulfovibrio alaskensis str. G20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Leavitt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilatory sulfate reduction serves as a key metabolic carbon remineralization process in anoxic marine environments. Sulfate reducing microorganisms can impart a wide range in mass-dependent sulfur isotopic fractionation. As such, the presence and relative activity of these organisms is identifiable from geological materials. By extension, sulfur isotope records are used to infer the redox balance of marine sedimentary environments, and the oxidation state of Earth’s oceans and atmosphere. However, recent work suggests that our understanding of microbial sulfate reducers (MSRs may be missing complexity associated with the presence and role of key chemical intermediates in the reductive process. This study provides a test of proposed metabolic models of sulfate reduction by growing an axenic culture of the well-studied MSRs, Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20, under electron donor limited conditions on the terminal electron acceptors sulfate, sulfite or thiosulfate, and tracking the multiple S isotopic consequences of each condition set. The dissimilatory reduction of thiosulfate and sulfite produce unique minor isotope effects, as compared to the reduction of sulfate. Further, these experiments reveal a complex biochemistry associated with sulfite reduction. That is, under high sulfite concentrations, sulfur is shuttled to an intermediate pool of thiosulfate. Site-specific isotope fractionation (within thiosulfate is very large (34ε ~ 30‰ while terminal product sulfide carries only a small fractionation from the initial sulfite (34ε < 10‰: a signature similar in magnitude to sulfate and thiosulfate reduction. Together these findings show that microbial sulfate reduction (MSR is highly sensitive to the concentration of environmentally important sulfur-cycle intermediates (sulfite and thiosulfate, especially when thiosulfate and the large site-specific isotope effects are involved.

  13. Positive erotic picture stimuli for emotion research in heterosexual females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Gitta Anne; Arntz, Arnoud; Domes, Gregor; Reiss, Neele; Siep, Nicolette

    2011-12-30

    In most experimental studies, emotional pictures are widely used as stimulus material. However, there is still a lack of standardization of picture stimuli displaying erotic relationships, despite the association between a number of psychological problems and severe impairments and problems in intimate relationships. The aim of the study was to test a set of erotic stimuli, with the potential to be used in experimental studies, with heterosexual female subjects. Twenty International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pictures and an additional 100 pictures showing romantic but not explicitly sexual scenes and/or attractive single males were selected. All pictures were rated with respect to valence, arousal, and dominance by 41 heterosexual women and compared to pictures with negative, positive, and neutral emotional valence. Erotic IAPS pictures and our additional erotic pictures did not differ in any of the evaluation dimensions. Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) for valence, arousal, and dominance comparing different picture valence categories showed strong effects for category. However, valence was not significantly different between erotic and positive pictures, while arousal and control were not significantly different between positive and neutral pictures. The pictures of our new set are as positive for heterosexual women as highly positive IAPS pictures, but higher in arousal and dominance. The picture set can be used in experimental psychiatric studies requiring high numbers of stimuli per category. Limitations are the restriction of stimuli application to heterosexual females only and to self-report data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Wings of Stretched Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelken, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a lesson that allows students to make bird ornaments using a metal tooling as it can be textured, cut, and colored. In this lesson, students choose a bird and sketch it on a piece of paper. Once the sketches are complete, students copy their pictures on a second piece of paper by taping the sketch over a sheet of blank paper…

  15. Wings of Stretched Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelken, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a lesson that allows students to make bird ornaments using a metal tooling as it can be textured, cut, and colored. In this lesson, students choose a bird and sketch it on a piece of paper. Once the sketches are complete, students copy their pictures on a second piece of paper by taping the sketch over a sheet of blank paper…

  16. A general approach to mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Zhao

    2012-04-26

    Catalytic microspheres: A general approach is demonstrated for the facile preparation of mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles (see TEM image in the picture). Among 18 oxide/noble metal catalysts, TiO 2/0.1 mol Pd microspheres showed the highest turnover frequency in NaBH 4 reduction of 4-nitrophenol (see picture). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Get the picture? The effects of iconicity on toddlers' reenactment from picture books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcock, Gabrielle; DeLoache, Judy

    2006-11-01

    What do toddlers learn from everyday picture-book reading interactions? To date, there has been scant research exploring this question. In this study, the authors adapted a standard imitation procedure to examine 18- to 30-month-olds' ability to learn how to reenact a novel action sequence from a picture book. The results provide evidence that toddlers can imitate specific target actions on novel real-world objects on the basis of a picture-book interaction. Children's imitative performance after the reading interaction varied both as a function of age and the level of iconicity of the pictures in the book. These findings are discussed in terms of children's emerging symbolic capacity and the flexibility of the cognitive representation.

  18. Reprint of "Affective picture processing as a function of preceding picture valence: an ERP analysis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Harald T; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Weike, Almut I; Hamm, Alfons O

    2013-03-01

    Event-related brain potential (ERP) studies consistently revealed that a relatively early (early posterior negativity; EPN) and a late (late positive potential; LPP) ERP component differentiate between emotional and neutral picture stimuli. Two studies examined the processing of emotional stimuli when preceded either by pleasant, neutral, or unpleasant context images. In both studies, distinct streams of six pictures were shown. In Study 1, hedonic context was alternated randomly across the 180 picture streams. In Study 2, hedonic context sequences were blocked, resulting in 60 preceding sequences of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant context valence, respectively. The main finding was that the valence of the preceding picture sequence had no significant effect on the emotional modulation of the EPN and LPP components. However, previous results were replicated in that emotional stimulus processing was associated with larger EPN and LPP components as compared to neutral pictures. These findings suggest that the prioritized processing of emotional stimuli is primarily driven by the valence of the current picture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Complex Picture Test in Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gustaw Rothenberg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed Complex Picture Test (CPT examines main cognitive domains, especially perceptual and visual-spatial abilities. The potential usefulness of the CPT in the assessment of dementia was evaluated. Patients with different forms of dementia [14 vascular dementia (VaD, 30 Alzheimer’s disease (AD, 6 Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD], 12 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and 30 matched controls were examined by the CPT, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, the WAIS-R Digit Span subtest, and the Clock Drawing Test (CDT. The CPT consists of 10 complex pictures, each presenting characteristics paradoxically in opposition to each other. The subjects scored points for naming the object and noticing the paradox. One point was added for commenting on the paradox without prompting (3 points each picture/maximum of 30. CPT scores were significantly higher in the control group (mean ± SD, 29.46 ± 1.43 than in the AD, VaD, MCI, and PDD groups (13.1 ± 2.3, 16.9 ± 3.5, 23.2 ± 1.4, and 23.6 ± 3.4, respectively; p < 0.05. Significant positive correlations between MMSE, Digit Span, CDT, and CPT scores were observed (rho 0.76, 0.35, and 0.56, respectively. These data show perception of complex pictures being compromised in dementia. The correlation between CPT scores and MMSE scores suggests that tests may be used as a brief screening tool for dementia.

  20. Aestheticism in the Picture of Dorian Gray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康妮芝

    2009-01-01

    Aestheticism or aestheticism movement Was an impomuat phenomenon during the hter nineteenth century.Aestheticism advocated the phrase"art for art's sake".Oscar Wildewas the most famous aestheticism writer during the later nineteenth century in Enghnd.His novel the Picture of Dorian Gray was the representative show of his aestheticism thought.The passage mainly shows Wilde's aestheticism thought of the novel in three aspects.

  1. Phenomenology on the QCD dipole picture revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Lengyel, A I

    2003-01-01

    We perform an adjust to the most recent structure function data, considering the QCD dipole picture applied to ep scattering. The structure function F2 at small x and intermediate Q2 can be described by the model containing an economical number of free-parameters, which encodes the hard Pomeron physics. The longitudinal structure function and the gluon distribution are predicted without further adjustments. The data description is effective, whereas a resummed next-to-leading level analysis is deserved.

  2. The ideal subject distance for passport pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoff, Marcel A; Witzel, Carsten; Kreutz, Kerstin; Ramsthaler, Frank

    2008-07-04

    In an age of global combat against terrorism, the recognition and identification of people on document images is of increasing significance. Experiments and calculations have shown that the camera-to-subject distance - not the focal length of the lens - can have a significant effect on facial proportions. Modern passport pictures should be able to function as a reference image for automatic and manual picture comparisons. This requires a defined subject distance. It is completely unclear which subject distance, in the taking of passport photographs, is ideal for the recognition of the actual person. We show here that the camera-to-subject distance that is perceived as ideal is dependent on the face being photographed, even if the distance of 2m was most frequently preferred. So far the problem of the ideal camera-to-subject distance for faces has only been approached through technical calculations. We have, for the first time, answered this question experimentally with a double-blind experiment. Even if there is apparently no ideal camera-to-subject distance valid for every face, 2m can be proposed as ideal for the taking of passport pictures. The first step would actually be the determination of a camera-to-subject distance for the taking of passport pictures within the standards. From an anthropological point of view it would be interesting to find out which facial features allow the preference of a shorter camera-to-subject distance and which allow the preference of a longer camera-to-subject distance.

  3. A motion picture presentation of magnetic pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A.; Kim, J. S.; Sugura, M.; Nagano, H.

    1981-01-01

    Using the data obtained from the IMS North American magnetometer network stations at high latitudes, a motion picture was made by a computer technique, describing time changes of Pc5 and Pi3 magnetic pulsation vectors. Examples of pulsation characteristics derived from this presentation are regional polarization changes including shifts of polarization demarcation lines, changes in the extent of an active region and its movement with time.

  4. A Spectrum is Worth a Thousand Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Richard F.

    2006-12-01

    A wise astronomer once pointed out that if a picture is worth a thousand words, then a spectrum is worth a thousand pictures. Unfortunately, spectra are rarely emphasized in the introductory astronomy courses and few students exit such a course with any meaningful understanding or appreciation of spectroscopy. Part of the problem is lack of background knowledge; the typical introductory astronomy student has little experience with spectroscopy or atomic physics. Another issue is that spectra are not pretty pictures and are not intuitively understandable. We present and discuss a series of “minds-on” exercises and activities built into a college-level “stars, galaxies, and cosmology” intro astronomy course. The lessons are structured to help students improve their ability to recognize patterns and improve their ability to really see the details in front of them. Another goal is for students to realize there is “more than meets the eye” to learn how to discover “hidden” diagnostics, such as different sources of light their eyes see as white light. A curriculum that emphasizes spectroscopy also provides the opportunity to stress the story of the “Harvard Women,” a tale that bridges gender gaps and often humanizes scientists in the eyes of non-science majors. Finally, with a solid foundation in spectroscopy, students are better prepared to understand exciting topics such as Hubble’s Law and the importance of primordial nucleosynthesis.

  5. Cut and paste pictures in surrealism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todić Milanka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Proceeding from the idea of the readymade, Marko Ristić’s, Vane Bor’s and Dušan Matić’s collages regroup readymade pictorial and textual matrices according to the rules of free associative syntax. Everything that they collected cut out and pasted bears the hallmark of personal choice, i.e. objective chance, as the Surrealists would say. In the new structure of the collage, picture and text were of equal importance. However, we should not forget that both picture and text were only fragments, of different origin so that they could not function as autonomous elements in their own right nor could they establish logical interlinks. Cut and paste picture in Surrealism are primarily registered as visual wholes, in which the former principle of harmony has been substituted by the principle of discontinuity. In fact, they do not aspire to establish closed and unambiguous semantic structures either on a single paper or within a cycle, disregarding as they do conventional narrative and illustrative order in representing reality.

  6. 'Reading' bubble chamber pictures with the Spiral Reader eyes.

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Interactive techniques were widely used to study bubble chamber pictures. After a visual scanning of the pictures and a vertex measurement on a Shivamatic, the Spiral Reader allowed the track polar coordinates to be easily measured. See photo 7408137X

  7. Identification of Metal Reductases using Proteomic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipton, Mary

    2006-06-01

    Central to the NABIR goal to develop the scientific basis for in situ remediation of radioactive contaminants is the fundamental understanding of microorganisms with dissimilatory metal reducing activity. In order to effectively exploit these bacteria, it is necessary to know which enzymes and pathways are involved. Additionally, it would be advantageous to understand the similarities and differences of these pathways across different bacteria for effective deployment in bioremediation, as well as to identify new microbes capable of such activities. Most approaches to identify these enzymes or enzyme complexes rely on biochemical purification to homogeneity with subsequent Nterminal sequencing of digested peptides. However, loss of activity before achieving purity often necessitates repetition of the entire process. Newly developed proteomics capabilities at PNNL allow for the identification of many proteins from a single sample through mass spectrometry analysis.

  8. PPG: online generation of protein pictures and animations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binisti, Cédric; Salim, Ahmed Ali; Tufféry, Pierre

    2005-07-01

    The protein picture generator (PPG) is an online service to generate pictures of a protein structure. Its design was conceived as an answer to the need expressed by a part of the community to have some means to produce simply complex pictures to insert in publications or in presentations. PPG can produce static or animated pictures. It can be accessed at http://bioserv.rpbs.jussieu.fr/cgi-bin/PPG.

  9. Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer ...

  10. Mechanism and Application of Microbial Dissimilatory Reduction Metal Oxide%微生物异化还原金属氧化物的机理及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李浩然; 冯雅丽; 周良; 祝学远; 杜竹玮

    2007-01-01

    为考查异化还原微生物在浸出金属氧化物中的行为,提高微生物浸出深海多金属结核的效率.从深海沉积物中分离能异化还原金属氧化矿的金属还原菌,应用于还原浸出深海多金属结核中锰、镍、钴等金属,锰的浸出率可达97%,其它金属达80%以上.蒽醌类的电子传递中间体复合物加速了异化还原浸出的速率,5 d可以提高2.0 mmol/L.利用Geobacter metallireducens构建了微生物燃料电池,研究了微生物异化还原金属氧化物的机理,结果表明,微生物以直接吸附接触方式还原金属氧化物,在氧化物颗粒表面形成的生物膜在异化还原过程中起关键作用.

  11. 21 CFR 892.2050 - Picture archiving and communications system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Group (JPEG) Std., Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) Test Pattern). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Picture archiving and communications system. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2050 Picture archiving...

  12. Problems Brought about by "Reading" a Sequence of Pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornens, Marie-Therese

    1990-01-01

    A study investigated 4 problems of children between 3 and 7.5 years of age: difficulty in seeing the same character in different representations; the process of linking several pictures into 1 story; the correlation between the temporal order and spatial disposition of pictures; and the tendency to consider the setting of pictures as a puzzle to…

  13. 78 FR 51064 - Safety Zone; Motion Picture Production; Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Motion Picture Production; Chicago, IL... from portions of Chicago waterways due to the filming of a motion picture. These temporary safety zones... work, low-flying helicopter, and other hazards involved in the filming of a motion picture. DATES:...

  14. 29 CFR 541.709 - Motion picture producing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motion picture producing industry. 541.709 Section 541.709... SALES EMPLOYEES Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.709 Motion picture producing industry... motion picture producing industry who is compensated at a base rate of at least $695 a week (exclusive...

  15. 50 CFR 27.71 - Motion or sound pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motion or sound pictures. 27.71 Section 27.71 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Equipment § 27.71 Motion or sound pictures. The taking or filming of any motion or sound pictures on...

  16. 78 FR 57570 - Safety Zone; Motion Picture Production; Chicago, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Motion Picture Production; Chicago... will enforce the temporary safety zone for motion picture filming in Calumet Harbor, Chicago, IL from 9... intended to ensure safety of life on navigable waters during nighttime filming of a motion picture...

  17. MISTY PICTURE EVENT, Test Execution Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-30

    Prather, oD ()Civ Photo Technologist MSgt Michael Yoas. USAF TRS NCO SSgt Danny Burns, USAF Administration NCO SSgt Ernesto Tagle , USAF Administration...I1 ARMTE J. Briones Evaluateý and cover 1365 E. Dunlap and 1371’. LANL J. Ylverton S-12 ARMTE R. Gomez Evaluate 1315, 1325 and 0. Melton secure SF3 1...PICTURE Observation Point. SITE TRAILER AGENCY FUNCTION NAME Admin Park Test Control DNA Test Control MAJ Walls CPT(P) Sauer SSgt Tagle SSgt Burns CDR Lund

  18. Java EE 7 the big picture

    CERN Document Server

    Coward, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Java EE 7: The Big Picture uniquely explores the entire Java EE 7 platform in an all-encompassing style while examining each tier of the platform in enough detail so that you can select the right technologies for specific project needs. In this authoritative guide, Java expert Danny Coward walks you through the code, applications, and frameworks that power the platform. Take full advantage of the robust capabilities of Java EE 7, increase your productivity, and meet enterprise demands with help from this Oracle Press resource.

  19. Picturing diversity in the ATLAS collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Biondi, Silvia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    With over 3000 members from 178 institutes, the ATLAS Collaboration is naturally diverse. However, capturing this diversity through pictures can be a challenge. Photography is a powerful tool, allowing us to reveal the faces behind a story and give the public the unique opportunity to understand and appreciate the human aspects of ATLAS's scientific research. The role of photographs in portraying the diversity of the ATLAS Collaboration and on various communication platforms will be described. Their impact will be examined, with focus on engagement of new audiences.

  20. Picturing diversity in the ATLAS experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    Biondi, Silvia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    With over 3,000 members from 178 institutes, the ATLAS Collaboration is naturally diverse. However, capturing this diversity through pictures can be a challenge. Photography is a powerful tool, allowing us to reveal the faces behind a story and give the public the unique opportunity to understand and appreciate the human aspects of ATLAS’s scientific research. The role of photographs in portraying the diversity of the ATLAS Collaboration will be described. Their role on various communication platforms will be described and their impact examined, with focus on engagement of new audiences.

  1. Dwarfism and gigantism in historical picture postcards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderle, A

    1998-05-01

    A collection of 893 historical picture postcards from 1900 to 1935, depicting dwarfs and giants, was analysed from medical and psychosocial viewpoints. In conditions such as 'bird headed dwarfism', achondroplasia, cretinism, so-called Aztecs or pinheads, Grebe chondrodysplasia, and acromegalic gigantism, the disorder could be diagnosed easily. In hypopituitary dwarfism, exact diagnosis was more difficult because of heterogeneity. The most common conditions depicted were pituitary dwarfism and achondroplasia. Most of those with gigantism had pituitary gigantism and acromegaly. Brothers and sisters or parents and their children provided evidence of mendelian inheritance of some of these disorders. The cards suggest that being put on show provided, at least in some cases, social benefits.

  2. Principles for a Unified Picture of Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, Kimihide

    2012-01-01

    The principles and conceptual foundations required for a unified picture of fermions are clarified, which in turn suggest that the standard theory may be reducible in a far simpler form. The resultant three generation model describes quarks and leptons as quasi excitations of a single chiral doublet, while electromagnetic and strong interactions as secondary interactions mediated by Nambu-Goldstone bosons originated from spontaneous violations of global SU(2) and Lorentz symmetries. The model also provides an alternative scenario for baryon and lepton asymmetries of the Universe.

  3. Brassinosteroid signal transduction: An emerging picture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiaomei; MA Ligeng

    2003-01-01

    Steroid hormones play essential roles in animal growth and development. Steroid signaling in animal system is focused on the direct gene regulation response mediated by its nuclear receptors. Recently, steroid hormones are also found in plants. Identification of BRI1 - a critical component of the plasma-membrane steroid receptor complex, and the related signal transduction pathway mediated by the membrane receptor have revealed an elementary picture of BR signaling from the cell surface perception to the activation of BR-responsive nuclear genes.

  4. Venus in motion. [Mariner 10 television pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. L.; Danielson, G. E.; Evans, N.; Soha, J. M.; Belton, M. J. S.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive set of television pictures of Venus taken by the Mariner 10 spacecraft is presented. Included is a chronological sequence of television images illustrating the development, variety, and circulation of Venus upper-atmospheric phenomena as viewed in the near-ultraviolet. The higher-resolution images have been assembled into global mosaics to facilitate comparison. Figures and tables describing the imaging sequences have been included to provide a guide to the more complete set of 3400 Venus images on file at the National Space Science Data Center.

  5. Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K

    2007-07-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane quinone/quinol pool through the periplasm to the outer membrane. The type II secretion system of S. oneidensis MR-1 has been implicated in the reduction of metal (hydr)oxides, most likely by translocating decahaem c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane to the surface of bacterial cells where they form a protein complex. The extracellular MtrC and OmcA can directly reduce solid metal (hydr)oxides. Likewise, outer membrane multihaem c-Cyts OmcE and OmcS of G. sulfurreducens are suggested to transfer electrons from outer membrane to type IV pili that are hypothesized to relay the electrons to solid metal (hydr)oxides. Thus, multihaem c-Cyts play critical roles in S. oneidensis MR-1- and G. sulfurreducens-mediated dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides by facilitating ET across the bacterial cell envelope.

  6. Decreased pain perception by unconscious emotional pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Peláez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pain perception arises from a complex interaction between a nociceptive stimulus and different emotional and cognitive factors, which appear to be mediated by both automatic and controlled systems. Previous evidence has shown that whereas conscious processing of unpleasant stimuli enhances pain perception, emotional influences on pain under unaware conditions are much less known. The aim of the present study was to investigate the modulation of pain perception by unconscious emotional pictures through an emotional masking paradigm. Two kinds of both somatosensory (painful and non-painful and emotional stimulation (negative and neutral pictures were employed. Fifty pain-free participants were asked to rate the perception of pain they were feeling in response to laser-induced somatosensory stimuli as faster as they can. Data from pain intensity and reaction times were measured. Statistical analyses revealed a significant effect for the interaction between pain and emotional stimulation, but surprisingly this relationship was opposite to expected. In particular, lower pain intensity scores and longer reaction times were found in response to negative images being strengthened this effect for painful stimulation. Present findings suggest a clear pain perception modulation by unconscious emotional contexts. Attentional capture mechanisms triggered by unaware negative stimulation could explain this phenomenon leading to a withdrawal of processing resources from pain.

  7. A bilocal picture of quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, L. P., Jr.; Narducci, F. A.

    2015-04-01

    A new, bilocal picture of quantum mechanics is developed. We show that Born’s rule supports a virtual probability for a particle to arrive, as a wave, at any two locations (but no more). We discuss two ways to implement twin detectors suitable for detecting bilocal arrivals. The bilocal picture sheds light on currents in quantum mechanics. We find there are two types of bilocal current density, whose polar form and related mean velocities are given. In the bilocal context, the definitions of both current types simplify. In the unilocal case, the two types become the usual current and a fluctuation current. Their respective mean velocity fields are the usual de Broglie-Madelung-Bohm velocity and the imaginary (osmotic) velocity. We obtain a new, probabilistic Schrödinger equation for the bilocal probability by itself, solve the example of a free particle, develop the dyadic stationary states, and find that the von Neumann equation for time-varying density of states follows directly from the new equation. We also show how to include the electromagnetic potentials in this probabilistic Schrödinger equation.

  8. Picture models for 2-scene comics creating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki UENO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, computer understanding pictures and stories becomes one of the most important research topics in computer science. However, there are few researches about human like understanding by computers because pictures have not certain format and contain more lyric aspect than that of natural laguage. For picture understanding, a comic is the suitable target because it is consisted by clear and simple plot of stories and separated scenes.In this paper, we propose 2 different types of picture models for 2-scene comics creating system. We also show the method of the application of 2-scene comics creating system by means of proposed picture model.

  9. Enhanced recognition of memorable pictures in ultra-fast RSVP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broers, Nico; Potter, Mary C; Nieuwenstein, Mark R

    2017-05-08

    Long-term recognition memory for some pictures is consistently better than for others (Isola, Xiao, Parikh, Torralba, & Oliva, IEEE Transaction on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (PAMI), 36(7), 1469-1482, 2014). Here, we investigated whether pictures found to be memorable in a long-term memory test are also perceived more easily when presented in ultra-rapid RSVP. Participants viewed 6 pictures they had never seen before that were presented for 13 to 360 ms per picture in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) sequence. In half the trials, one of the pictures was a memorable or a nonmemorable picture and perception of this picture was probed by a visual recognition test at the end of the sequence. Recognition for pictures from the memorable set was higher than for those from the nonmemorable set, and this difference increased with increasing duration. Nonmemorable picture recognition was low initially, did not increase until 120 ms, and never caught up with memorable picture recognition performance. Thus, the long-term memorability of an image is associated with initial perceptibility: A picture that is hard to grasp quickly is hard to remember later.

  10. Pictures from Year Two CNEC and CVT Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, Jesson D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bahran, Rian Mustafa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McKenzie, George Espy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cutler, Theresa Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Below are all of the pictures for the CNEC and CVT measurements performed at the DAF in July 2016. In total there are 165 pictures. The photos on pages 2-105 were taken during the first week of measurements and the photos on pages 106-165 were taken during the second week of measurements. Many photos are applicable to both sets, which is why it is best to keep the entire set together. For most configurations, a description of the configuration was written on a white board; photos of the measurement setup were taken, then a photo of the white board was taken. For example, the pictures on pages 6-19 (which precede a white board picture on page 20) are of the configuration with Rocky Flats Shells 1-2 surrounded by 4 AmLi sources, which is listed on the white board picture on page 20. In some cases, the white board picture precedes the configuration pictures.

  11. Error resilient video coding using virtual reference picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanjun; Stevenson, Robert L.

    2005-03-01

    Due to widely used motion-compensated prediction coding, errors propagate along decoded video sequence and may result in severe quality degradation. Various methods have been reported to address this problem based on the common idea of diversifying prediction references. In this paper, we present an alternative way of concealing the references pictures errors. A generated virtual picture is used as a reference instead of an actual sequence picture in the temporal prediction. The virtual reference picture is generated in a way to filter damaged parts of previously decoded pictures so that the decoder can still get a clean reference picture in case of errors. Coding efficiency is effected due to the fact that the virtual reference is less correlated to the currently encoded picture. The simulations on H.264 codec have shown quality improvement of the proposed method over intra-coded macroblock refreshment. It can be used on any motion-compensated video codec to combat channel errors.

  12. Decolorization of textile azo dye and Congo red by an isolated strain of the dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, I-Son; Chen, Tingting; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Xia; Ni, Chao; Sun, Dongzhe

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis BC01 (SXM) was isolated from sediment collected off Xiamen, China and was identified based on the phylogenetic tree of 16S rRNA sequences and the gyrB gene. This strain showed high activity in the decolorization of textile azo dyes, especially methyl orange, reactive red 198, and recalcitrant dye Congo red, decolorizing at rates of 96.2, 93.0, and 87.5%, respectively. SXM had the best performance for the specific decolorization rate (SDR) of azo dyes compared to Proteus hauseri ZMd44 and Aeromonas hydrophila NIU01 strains and had an SDR similar to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Congo red decolorization. Luria-Bertani medium was the optimal culture medium for SXM, as it reached a density of 4.69 g-DCW L(-1) at 16 h. A mediator (manganese) significantly enhanced the biodegradation and flocculation of Congo red. Further analysis with UV-VIS, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated that Congo red was cleaved at the azo bond, producing 4,4'-diamino-1,1'-biphenyl and 1,2'-diamino naphthalene 4-sulfonic acid. Finally, SEM results revealed that nanowires exist between the bacteria, indicating that SXM degradation of the azo dyes was coupled with electron transfer through the nanowires. The purpose of this work is to explore the utilization of a novel, dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium in the treatment of wastewater containing azo dyes.

  13. Seasonal variation in denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia process rates and corresponding key functional genes along an estuarine nitrate gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy J Smith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated spatial-temporal variation in benthic bacterial community structure, rates of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA processes and abundances of corresponding genes and transcripts at three sites – the estuary-head, mid-estuary and the estuary mouth along the nitrate gradient of the Colne estuary over an annual cycle. Denitrification rates declined down the estuary, while DNRA rates were higher at the estuary head and middle than the estuary mouth. In four out of the six two-monthly time-points, rates of DNRA were greater than denitrification at each site. Abundance of gene markers for nitrate-reduction (nitrate reductase narG and napA, denitrification (nitrite reductase nirS and DNRA (DNRA nitrite reductase nrfA declined along the estuary with significant relationships between denitrification and nirS abundance, and DNRA and nrfA abundance. Spatially, rates of denitrification, DNRA and corresponding functional gene abundances decreased along the estuary. However, temporal correlations between rate processes and functional gene and transcript abundances were not observed.

  14. Motion Pictures and Motion-Picture Equipment: A Handbook of General Information. Bulletin, 1919, No. 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, F. W.; Anderson, Carl

    1920-01-01

    Motion-picture films have come to be recognized quite generally as a valuable and practical means of instruction in schools, college, and universities and for clubs and societies organized for educational purposes. The number of persons making such use of them is now very large and constantly becoming larger. To all these, a handbook of general…

  15. Enhanced UK teletext moves towards still pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. P.

    1980-06-01

    Methods are proposed for the enhancement of the UK teletext system leading towards a high-definition still picture capability in addition to row of text and mozaic graphics. A teletext system is described wherein binary code groups are formed into data-lines for inclusion in the television field blanking interval. The control and address information carried on each dataline, together with the special page-header data-lines and the sequence of transmission of the data-lines, allow the data-lines corresponding to the rows of a selected page to be identified. The page structure can be used to send information other than pages of text. Certain data-lines can be used for functions unrelated to teletext. In addition, techniques utilizing a multipage store are examined for improving access; and teh extension of the character repertoire to enhance multilanguage capabilities is addressed.

  16. Picture analysing method of slag foaming behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhart, M.; Peter, M.; Koch, K. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Metallurgy; Lamut, J. [Faculty of Natural Science and Technology, Univ. Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2001-03-01

    Hot tests of foaming behaviour of steelmaking slags were conducted on a laboratory scale up to 1760 C using a Tammann furnace. The foaming behaviour of the slags was quantified on the basis of a new measuring method. The volume increase and the progress of the foaming process can be continuously observed and calculated by means of picture analysis. The gas content of foaming slags was compared with the results of the measurements performed in steel plants. The influence of the magnesia content on the foaming behaviour is investigated. The chemical composition of the slag is beside the CO evolution the decisive factor influencing slag foaming behaviour. The highest volume increase values observed lie in the region of 2500% in relation to the initial volume. (orig.)

  17. The Picture Book of Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Siegmund

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to explain the basic concepts and phenomena of quantum mechanics by means of visualization. Computer-generated illustrations in color are used extensively throughout the text, helping to establish the relation between quantum mechanics—wave functions, interference, atomic structure, and so forth—and classical physics—point mechanics, statistical mechanics, and wave optics. Even more important, by studying the pictures in parallel with the text, readers develop an intuition for such notoriously abstract phenomena as • the tunnel effect • excitation and decay of metastable states • wave-packet motion within a well • systems of distinguishable and indistinguishable particles • free wave packets and scattering in 3 dimensions • angular-momentum decomposition • stationary bound states in various 3-dimensional potentials • hybrid states • Kepler motion of wave packets in the Coulomb field • spin and magnetic resonance Illustrations from experiments in a variety of f...

  18. Random Walk Picture of Basketball Scoring

    CERN Document Server

    Gabel, Alan

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence, based on play-by-play data from all 6087 games from the 2006/07--2009/10 seasons of the National Basketball Association (NBA), that basketball scoring is well described by a weakly-biased continuous-time random walk. The time between successive scoring events follows an exponential distribution, with little memory between different scoring intervals. Using this random-walk picture that is augmented by features idiosyncratic to basketball, we account for a wide variety of statistical properties of scoring, such as the distribution of the score difference between opponents and the fraction of game time that one team is in the lead. By further including the heterogeneity of team strengths, we build a computational model that accounts for essentially all statistical features of game scoring data and season win/loss records of each team.

  19. Hard diffraction in the QCD dipole picture

    CERN Document Server

    Bialas, A

    1995-01-01

    Using the QCD dipole picture of the BFKL pomeron, the gluon contribution to the cross-section for single diffractive dissociation in deep-inelastic high-energy scattering is calculated. The resulting contribution to the proton diffractive structure function integrated over t is given in terms of relevant variables, x_{\\cal P}, Q^2, and \\beta = x_{Bj}/x_{\\cal P}. It factorizes into an explicit x_{\\cal P}-dependent Hard Pomeron flux factor and structure function. The flux factor is found to have substantial logarithmic corrections which may account for the recent measurements of the Pomeron intercept in this process. The triple Pomeron coupling is shown to be strongly enhanced by the resummation of leading logs. The obtained pattern of scaling violation at small \\beta is similar to that for F_2 at small x_{Bj}.

  20. Dwarfism and gigantism in historical picture postcards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderle, A

    1998-01-01

    A collection of 893 historical picture postcards from 1900 to 1935, depicting dwarfs and giants, was analysed from medical and psychosocial viewpoints. In conditions such as 'bird headed dwarfism', achondroplasia, cretinism, so-called Aztecs or pinheads, Grebe chondrodysplasia, and acromegalic gigantism, the disorder could be diagnosed easily. In hypopituitary dwarfism, exact diagnosis was more difficult because of heterogeneity. The most common conditions depicted were pituitary dwarfism and achondroplasia. Most of those with gigantism had pituitary gigantism and acromegaly. Brothers and sisters or parents and their children provided evidence of mendelian inheritance of some of these disorders. The cards suggest that being put on show provided, at least in some cases, social benefits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9764085

  1. Picture-books: first structured reading materials for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Martinović

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Early literacy has recently become a current topic, and there’s a widespread belief that literacy startsdeveloping almost as soon as the child is born, if the child is surrounded with adequate materials and persons who will motivate the development of literacy. The first structured reading materials that a child interacts with are picture-books. It is usually the first contact a child has with literature and a written word in general, and it happens during childhood, the child's most sensitive period, which is why it is important to pay special attention to the quality of picture-books. Croatian picture-books published till the early 80ies of the past century have been investigated to a some extent. However, the picture-books found on the Croatian market and in the libraries in the past 30 years have been the subject of research only sporadically. There's little data on the quality and features of this multifunctional material that is of such great importance for children. The aim of the paper is to give an overview of the relevant data found in literature on the historical development of picture-book publishing, their features, functions they help develop, their age-appropriateness, and quality. The paper presents research results stemming from the analysis of the Croatian Children's Book Centre documentation on contemporary picture-book publishing and data on the language of picture-books that are the result of a picture-book corpus study made as part of the PhD research by the author. The data on contemporary authors and illustrators was obtained by analysing the documentation of the Croatian Library Association, Commission for library services for children and youth. The language of the picture-book corpus was analysed using a computer programme, i.e. the analysis was conducted of the lexical diversity of picture-books for three-year olds. The picture-books have not been investigated from the linguistic perspective before, which makes this

  2. Diverse metal reduction and nano- mineral formation by metal-reducing bacteria enriched from inter-tidal flat sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Park, B.; Seo, H.; Roh, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria utilize diverse metal oxides as electron acceptors and couple this microbial metal reduciton to growth. However, the microbe-metal interactions playing important roles in the metal geochemistry and organic matter degradation in the tidal flat sediments have not been uncovered enough to employ in various environmental and industrial applications. The objective of this study was to examine biomineralization and bioremediation by the facultative metal-reducing bacteria isolated from the inter-tidal flat sediments in southwestern of Korea. 16S-rRNA analysis showed bacterial consortium mainly consists of genus of Clostridium sp. The enriched bacteria were capable of reducing diverse metals such as iron oxide, maganese oxide, Cr(VI) and Se(VI) during glucose fermentation process at room temperature. The bacteria reduced highly toxic and reactive elements such as Cr(VI) and Se(VI) to Cr(III) and Se(0). The results showed that microbial processes induced transformation from toxic states of heavy metals to less toxic and mobile states in natural environments. Andthe bacteria also reduced iron oxyhydroxide such as ferrihydrite and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) and formed nanometer-sized magnetite (Fe3O4). This study indicates microbial processes not only can be used for bioremediation of inorganic contaminants existing in the marine environments, but also form the magnetite nanoparticles which are exhibit superparamagnetic properties that can be useful for relevant medical and industrial applications.

  3. Effects of picture size reduction and blurring on emotional engagement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Cesarei

    Full Text Available The activity of basic motivational systems is reflected in emotional responses to arousing stimuli, such as natural pictures. The manipulation of picture properties such as size or detail allows for investigation into the extent to which separate emotional reactions are similarly modulated by perceptual changes, or, rather, may subserve different functions. Pursuing this line of research, the present study examined the effects of two types of perceptual degradation, namely picture size reduction and blurring, on emotional responses. Both manipulations reduced picture relevance and dampened affective modulation of skin conductance, possibly because of a reduced action preparation in response to degraded or remote pictures. However, the affective modulation of the startle reflex did not vary with picture degradation, suggesting that the identification of these degraded affective cues activated the neural circuits mediating appetitive or defensive motivation.

  4. An Evaluation of Extended Validation and Picture-in-Picture Phishing Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Collin; Simon, Daniel R.; Tan, Desney S.; Barth, Adam

    In this usability study of phishing attacks and browser anti-phishing defenses, 27 users each classified 12 web sites as fraudulent or legitimate. By dividing these users into three groups, our controlled study measured both the effect of extended validation certificates that appear only at legitimate sites and the effect of reading a help file about security features in Internet Explorer 7. Across all groups, we found that picture-in-picture attacks showing a fake browser window were as effective as the best other phishing technique, the homograph attack. Extended validation did not help users identify either attack. Additionally, reading the help file made users more likely to classify both real and fake web sites as legitimate when the phishing warning did not appear.

  5. Fashion pictures and women pictures in French women magazine. Normatives parades or strategic masquerade?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine MARILLONNET

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes to study the fashion pictures within a representative sample of French women magazines. Based on the method of “sémiologie des indices”, used to analyze a corpus of woman’s body and fashion staged, this paper addresses the issue of new functions granted to the stereotyping process. Starting to the assumption of a contract between audience and media, this analysis shows that the gender stereotype may be prescribed, up to a caricature of the womanhood, to the female readers identified as co-producers of the media discourse. Demonstrating both the co-existence of a plurality of gender representations in its pictures and their variability, this work proposes the concept of strategic masquerade to apprehend the possible new functions for the process of gender stereotyping in media.

  6. A Story Told by a Picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeshayahu Shen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract (E: We investigate whether people use a narrative/story schema to organize visual information in figurative isolated pictures representing a "pregnant moment", and, if so, how they do this.  The participants in our study were asked to freely describe pictures that depict some event. Their descriptions were analyzed according to a system of categories developed especially for examining the use of an elaborated narrative organization. The findings support the hypothesis that observers use elaborated narrative organization that goes beyond mere temporal and causal organization (including, e.g., exposition, complication, resolution. Furthermore, the findings suggest that this elaborative narrative organization sometimes dominates the visual organization of the pictures.

     

    Abstract (F: Cet article tente de répondre à la question suivante: est-ce que les spectateurs se servent d’un schéma base sur l

  7. Enhanced Choice for Viewing Cocaine Pictures in Cocaine Addiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, S.J.; Goldstein, R.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T. Parvaz, M.A.; Dunning, J.P.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Hajcak, G.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2009-02-01

    Individuals with cocaine use disorder (CUD) chose cocaine over nondrug rewards. In two newly designed laboratory tasks with pictures, we document this modified choice outside of a cocaine administration paradigm. Choice for viewing cocaine, pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral pictures-under explicit contingencies (choice made between two fully visible side-by-side images) and under more implicit contingencies (selections made between pictures hidden under flipped-over cards)-was examined in 20 CUD and 20 matched healthy control subjects. Subjects also provided self-reported ratings of each picture's pleasantness and arousal. Under both contingencies, CUD subjects chose to view more cocaine pictures than control subjects, group differences that were not fully explained by the self-reported picture ratings. Furthermore, whereas CUD subjects choice for viewing cocaine pictures exceeded choice for viewing unpleasant pictures (but did not exceed choice for viewing pleasant pictures, in contrast to their self-reported ratings), healthy control subjects avoided viewing cocaine pictures as frequently as, or even more than, unpleasant pictures. Finally, CUD subjects with the most cocaine viewing selections, even when directly compared with selections of the pleasant pictures, also reported the most frequent recent cocaine use. Enhanced drug-related choice in cocaine addiction can be demonstrated even for nonpharmacologic (pictorial) stimuli. This choice, which is modulated by alternative stimuli, partly transcends self-reports (possibly indicative of a disconnect in cocaine addiction between self-reports and objective behavior) to provide an objective marker of addiction severity. Neuroimaging studies are needed to establish the neural underpinnings of such enhanced cocaine-related choice.

  8. “Surprised!” Telling the pictures. Can the illustrations in picture books promote language acquisition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandie Mourão

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo procura apresentar os resultados da re-análise dos dados recolhidos em dois projectos de investigaçãoacçãosobre a utilização de álbuns em língua inglesa nas aulas de Inglês da Educação Pré-Escolar em Portugal.Dois álbums forum usados, demonstrando diferentes interacções entre texto e imagem, ‘paralela’ e ‘interdependente’. Transcrições de gravações de horas do conto com estes livros foram categorizadas de acordo com asfalas em Inglês a que o texto ou imagem deram origem. Os resultados indicam que a linguagem que as criançasaprendem de facto, com os livros ‘inter-dependentes’ (onde a história escrita é diferente da história ilustrada émais rica e as próprias crianças tomam um papel mais activo na criação de um significado. As implicações destesresultados são discutidas.The following article presents the findings of a re-analysis of data from two action research projects investigatingthe use of English picture books in Pre-school English classes in Portugal. Two picture books were used, eachrepresenting parallel and interdependent storytelling models. Audio tapescripts of the picture book read aloudswere categorised according to the utterances prompted by the verbal and visual texts. Results show that foreignlanguage acquisition is extended when both the verbal and visual texts of a picture book are used for languageinput and that children are more actively involved in meaning making. Implications are discussed.

  9. Picture change error in quasirelativistic electron/spin density, Laplacian and bond critical points

    KAUST Repository

    Bučinský, Lukáš

    2014-06-01

    The change of picture of the quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock wave functions is considered for electron/spin densities, the negative Laplacian of electron density and the appropriate bond critical point characteristics from the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). [OsCl5(Hpz)]- and [RuCl5(NO)]2- transition metal complexes are considered. Both, scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effects have been accounted for using the Infinite Order Two Component (IOTC) Hamiltonian. Picture change error (PCE) correction in the electron and spin densities and the Laplacian of electron density are treated analytically. Generally, PCE is found significant only in the core region of the atoms for the electron/spin density as well as Laplacian.©2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Phase space picture of quantum mechanics group theoretical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the theory and applications of the Wigner phase space distribution function and its symmetry properties. The book explains why the phase space picture of quantum mechanics is needed, in addition to the conventional Schrödinger or Heisenberg picture. It is shown that the uncertainty relation can be represented more accurately in this picture. In addition, the phase space picture is shown to be the natural representation of quantum mechanics for modern optics and relativistic quantum mechanics of extended objects.

  11. Identifying the role of cytochromes upon the attachment, growth and detachment of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on hematite during dissimilatory iron reduction under natural- flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A. C.; Geesey, G. G.

    2006-12-01

    Current understanding of bacterial respiration by dissimilatory iron (Fe) reduction is based primarily on studies of closed systems using soluble Fe(III). However, natural environments likely to support Fe reduction are typically open systems and contain Fe(III) primarily in the form of crystalline (hydr)oxides. Mechanisms by which electrons are transported between bacteria and mineral terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) under open system conditions are still poorly understood. However, a number of cytochromes have been identified as potentially playing a critical role in the electron transport system of some Fe reducing bacteria. Experiments were performed using (i) omcA, (ii) mtrC, or (iii) omcA and mtrC cytochrome deficient mutants of the Fe-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, in transparent-window flow- reactors containing hematite as the only TEA. These were operated under defined hydrodynamic and anaerobic conditions. Cells expressed green fluorescent protein (gfp), allowing real time measurement of cells at the mineral surface by epifluorescence microscopy. Cytochromes which play a critical role in the anaerobic growth of S. Oneidensis by Fe reduction under open system natural-flow conditions could then be identified. Differences in the accumulation, maximum density, detachment and total production of surface-associated cells growing on hematite surfaces were apparent between the mutants, and between the mutants and the wild-type. Mutants deficient in cytochromes grew to a lower max density by up to 2 orders of magnitude than the wild-type, and exhibited no reduced Fe in the reactor effluent or at the surface of the hematite at the conclusion of the experiment, as revealed by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Therefore omcA and / or mtrC cytochromes appear critical for electron shuttling and anaerobic growth of S. Oneidensis on hematite under natural-flow conditions.

  12. Understanding the hydrologic control of N cycle: Effect of water filled pore space on heterotrophic nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium mechanisms in unsaturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekala, C.; Nambi, Indumathi M.

    2017-07-01

    Irrigation practice will be effective if it supplies optimal water and nutrients to crops and act as a filter for contaminants leaching to ground water. There is always a scope for improving the fertilizer use efficiency and scheduling of wastewater irrigation if the fate and transport of nutrients particularly nitrogenous compounds in the soil are well understood. In the present study, nitrogen transport experiments for two different agricultural soils are performed under varying saturation 33, 57, 78% water filled pore space for sandy soil 1 and 52, 81 and 96% for loam soil 2. A HYDRUS 2D model with constructed wetland (CW2D) module could simulate aerobic nitrification and anoxic denitrification well for both soils and estimated the reaction kinetics. A hot spot of Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium (DNRA) pathway has been observed at 81% moisture content for a loamy sand soil. The presence of high organic content and reductive soil environment (5.53 C/NO3- ratio; ORP = - 125 mV) results in ammonium accumulation of 16.85 mg in the soil. The overall observation from this study is nitrification occurs in a wide range of saturations 33-78% with highest at 57% whereas denitrification is significant at higher water saturations 57-78% for sandy soil texture. For a loamy sand soil, denitrification is dominant at 96% saturation with least nitrification at all saturation studies. The greatest nitrogen losses (> 90%) was observed for soil 2 while 30-70% for soil1. The slow dispersive subsurface transport with varying oxygen dynamics enhanced nitrogen losses from soil2 due to lesser soil permeability. This in turn, prevents NO3- leaching and groundwater contamination. This type of modeling study should be used before planning field experiments for designing optimal irrigation and fertigation schedules.

  13. The membrane QmoABC complex interacts directly with the dissimilatory adenosine 5´-phosphosulfate reductase in sulfate reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raquel Ramos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The adenosine 5’-phosphosulfate reductase (AprAB is the enzyme responsible for the reduction of adenosine 5’-phosphosulfate (APS to sulfite in the biological process of dissimilatory sulfate reduction, which is carried out by a ubiquitous group of sulfate reducing prokaryotes. The electron donor for AprAB has not been clearly identified, but was proposed to be the QmoABC membrane complex, since an aprBA-qmoABC gene cluster is found in many sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidising bacteria. The QmoABC complex is essential for sulfate reduction, but electron transfer between QmoABC and AprAB has not been reported. In this work we provide the first direct evidence that QmoABC and AprAB interact in Desulfovibrio spp., using co-immunoprecipitation, cross-linking Far-Western blot, tag-affinity purification and surface plasmon resonance studies. This showed that the QmoABC-AprAB complex has a strong steady-state affinity (KD = 90 ± 3 nM, but has a transient character due to a fast dissociation rate. Far-Western blot identified QmoA as the Qmo subunit most involved in the interaction. Nevertheless, electron transfer from menaquinol analogues to APS through anaerobically purified QmoABC and AprAB could not be detected. We propose that this reaction requires the involvement of a third partner to allow electron flow driven by a reverse electron bifurcation process i.e. electron confurcation. This process is deemed essential to allow coupling of APS reduction to chemiosmotic energy conservation.

  14. Ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in two US Great Basin hot springs with abundant ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Hungate, Bruce A; Hedlund, Brian P

    2011-08-01

    Many thermophiles catalyse free energy-yielding redox reactions involving nitrogenous compounds; however, little is known about these processes in natural thermal environments. Rates of ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were measured in source water and sediments of two ≈ 80°C springs in the US Great Basin. Ammonia oxidation and denitrification occurred mainly in sediments. Ammonia oxidation rates measured using (15)N-NO(3)(-) pool dilution ranged from 5.5 ± 0.8 to 8.6 ± 0.9 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were unaffected or only mildly stimulated by amendment with NH(4) Cl. Denitrification rates measured using acetylene block ranged from 15.8 ± 0.7 to 51 ± 12 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were stimulated by amendment with NO(3)(-) and complex organic compounds. The DNRA rate in one spring sediment measured using an (15)N-NO(3)(-) tracer was 315 ± 48 nmol N g(-1) h(-1). Both springs harboured distinct planktonic and sediment microbial communities. Close relatives of the autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' represented the most abundant OTU in both spring sediments by 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that 'Ca. N. yellowstonii'amoA and 16S rRNA genes were present at 3.5-3.9 × 10(8) and 6.4-9.0 × 10(8) copies g(-1) sediment. Potential denitrifiers included members of the Aquificales and Thermales. Thermus spp. comprised springs and suggest that ammonia oxidation may be a major source of energy fuelling primary production.

  15. A Pedagogical Experiment Using Bubble Chamber Pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We have taken, in October 1981, 20.000 pictures of proton-proton interactions at 5 GeV/c in order to get some clean elastic events which can be easily studied by high school students. The purpose is to illustrate, by actual measurements of these real events, some basic concepts of relativistic mechanisms. This experiment will be an extension of our previous one, performed with HBC 2m events taken at 2 GeV/c. In 1980, all french lycees were provided with large size reproduction of HBC 2m events. Before distribution they were carefully selected and severe kinematical cuts were made. The students measured track curvatures by template, and checked the necessity and the validity of relativistic mechanics by computing the energy balance using non-relativistic and relativistic formulae. No practical problems have been encountered during this experiment and the pedagogical results are encouraging. This new sample of events will be interesting because they are relativistic than the old ones although with the same curv...

  16. Development of NATO's recognized environmental picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufert, John F.; Trabelsi, Mourad

    2006-05-01

    An important element for the fielding of a viable, effective NATO Response Force (NRF) is access to meteorological, oceanographic, geospatial data (GEOMETOC) and imagery. Currently, the available GEOMETOC information suffers from being very fragmented. NATO defines the Recognised Environmental Picture as controlled information base for GEOMETOC data. The NATO REP proposes an architecture that is both flexible and open. The focus lies on enabling a network-centric approach. The key into achieving this is relying on using open, well recognized standards that apply to both the data exchange protocols and the data formats. Communication and information exchange based on open standards enables system interoperability. Diverse systems, each with unique, specialized contributions to an increased understanding of the battlespace, can now cooperate to a manageable information sphere. By clearly defining responsibilities in the generation of information, a reduction in data transfer overhead is achieved . REP identifies three main stages in the dissemination of GEOMETOC data. These are Collection, Fusion (and Analysis) and Publication. A REP architecture has been successfully deployed during the NATO Coalition Warrior Interoperability Demonstration (CWID) in Lillehammer, Norway during June 2005. CWID is an annual event to validate and improve the interoperability of NATO and national Consultation and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems. With a test case success rate of 84%, it was able to provide relevant GEOMETOC support to the main NRF component headquarters. In 2006, the REP architecture will be deployed and validated during the NATO NRF Steadfast live exercises.

  17. Blue diffuse dwarf galaxies: a clearer picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Bethan L.; Koposov, Sergey E.; Stark, Daniel P.; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.

    2017-03-01

    The search for chemically unevolved galaxies remains prevalent in the nearby Universe, mostly because these systems provide excellent proxies for exploring in detail the physics of high-z systems. The most promising candidates are extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs), i.e. galaxies with population. In 2014, we reoriented this search using only morphological properties and uncovered a population of ∼150 'blue diffuse dwarf (BDD) galaxies', and published a sub-sample of 12 BDD spectra. Here, we present optical spectroscopic observations of a larger sample of 51 BDDs, along with their Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric properties. With our improved statistics, we use direct-method abundances to confirm that BDDs are chemically unevolved (7.43 population synthesis models and estimated to be in the range log (M*/M⊙) ≃ 5-9. Unlike other low-metallicity star-forming galaxies, BDDs are in agreement with the mass-metallicity relation at low masses, suggesting that they are not accreting large amounts of pristine gas relative to their stellar mass. BDD galaxies appear to be a population of actively star-forming dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies which fall within the class of low-surface-brightness dIrr galaxies. Their ongoing star formation and irregular morphology make them excellent analogues for galaxies in the early Universe.

  18. Working through Children's Developmental and Existential Stress in Picture Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Joseph H.

    The aesthetic quality and psychological subtlety of contemporary picture books give genuine expression to a child's conscious and unconscious thoughts and emotions. Increasingly, themes of existential and developmental stress are appearing in picture books. Typical reactions aroused by such stress factors--and also by themes treated in picture…

  19. Using Picture Books as Paired Texts to Teach Educational Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Bintz, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Picture books, when used thoughtfully and artfully, can teach theories to graduate students in literacy and foreign language education. In this article, the authors described how a pair of picture books is used to teach Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development" and Krashen's "Input Hypothesis" in the fields of literacy…

  20. Early Understanding of the Representational Function of Pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoache, Judy S.; Burns, Nancy M.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-four- and 30-month-old children were presented with a picture that showed the location of a hidden toy and were then asked to find the toy. The 30-month olds, but not the 24-month-olds, were successful in retrieving the toy. Concludes that 24-month olds did not interpret the pictures as representations of reality. (BC)

  1. The Picture of Reading: Deriving Meaning in Literacy through Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    Presents speculations on broadening the concept of literacy and using pictures to teach. Discusses the importance and value of training students to "read" a painting and, by extension, a visual image and how this fits into promoting a culture of literacy. Considers the application of reader-response theory to pictures as text. (SG)

  2. Familiar Fairy Tale Picture Books Transformed into Teen Novels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Rosemary

    2003-01-01

    Describes characteristics of fairy tales. Discusses use of fairy tales and novels for teens in the classroom. Presents annotations of 31 titles including both picture books and young adult novels grouped by nine popular tales. Concludes that through comparing picture books and teen novels, there is one last chance to introduce fairy tales to older…

  3. The Motion Picture and the Teaching of English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Marion C.; And Others

    Written to help a viewer watch a motion picture perceptively, this book explains the characteristics of the film as an art form and examines the role of motion pictures in the English curriculum. Specific topics covered include (1) the technical aspects of the production of films (the order of "shots," camera angle, and point of view), (2) the…

  4. Creating Science Picture Books for an Authentic Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFauw, Danielle L.; Saad, Klodia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an authentic writing opportunity to help ninth-grade students use the writing process in a science classroom to write and illustrate picture books for fourth-grade students to demonstrate and share their understanding of a biology unit on cells. By creating a picture book, students experience the writing process, understand…

  5. Child Readers and the Worlds of the Picture Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Adela; Laugharne, Janet; Maagerø, Eva; Tønnessen, Elise Seip

    2016-01-01

    Children as readers of picture books and the ways they respond to, and make meaning from, such texts are the focus of this article, which reports on a small-scale study undertaken in Norway and Wales, UK. The theoretical framing of the research draws on concepts of the multimodal ensemble in picture books and of the reading event as part of a…

  6. Picture Book Exposure Elicits Positive Visual Preferences in Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston-Price, Carmel; Burton, Eliza; Hickinson, Rachel; Inett, Jade; Moore, Emma; Salmon, Katherine; Shiba, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Although the relationship between "mere exposure" and attitude enhancement is well established in the adult domain, there has been little similar work with children. This article examines whether toddlers' visual attention toward pictures of foods can be enhanced by repeated visual exposure to pictures of foods in a parent-administered picture…

  7. Radical Visions: Five Picture Books by Peter Sis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Don

    2000-01-01

    Examines five picture books by author/illustrator Peter Sis, and how they deal explicitly with people who through extraordinary journeys develop extraordinary ways of seeing the world. Discusses use of paratextual elements, multiple formats, multiple layers of narrative, and a merging of texts and pictures. Suggests ways these books might be used…

  8. Effectiveness of Picture Books for Italian Instruction at Japanese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomo, Minoru; Uni, Kazuhito; Moore, Danièle; Kiyose, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the use of children's picture books to teach English has been increasing in Japan. An advantage of these books is the high proportion of basic vocabulary they include. Can picture books also be useful for teaching Japanese students Italian and increasing their motivation? The present study analyses the effectiveness of employing a…

  9. Reading pictures for story comprehension requires mental imagery skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, I.E.; Mol, S.E.; Jolles, J.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of mental imagery skills on story comprehension in 150 fifth graders (10- to 12-year-olds), when reading a narrative book chapter with alternating words and pictures (i.e., text blocks were alternated by one- or two-page picture spreads). A parallel group design was used, in whi

  10. Task choice and semantic interference in picture naming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piai, V.; Roelofs, A.P.A.; Schriefers, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from dual-task performance indicates that speakers prefer not to select simultaneous responses in picture naming and another unrelated task, suggesting a response selection bottleneck in naming. In particular, when participants respond to tones with a manual response and name pictures with

  11. Task choice and semantic interference in picture naming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piai, V.; Roelofs, A.P.A.; Schriefers, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from dual-task performance indicates that speakers prefer not to select simultaneous responses in picture naming and another unrelated task, suggesting a response selection bottleneck in naming. In particular, when participants respond to tones with a manual response and name pictures with

  12. Multilingual Children's Interaction with Metafiction in a Postmodern Picture Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugaard, Line Møller; Johansen, Martin Blok

    2014-01-01

    When teachers and school librarians choose picture books for multilingual children, they often base their choice on an evaluation of linguistic comprehensibility, content familiarity and cultural appropriateness. This means that postmodern picture books may be excluded. This paper presents a case study of multilingual children's encounter with a…

  13. The Motion Picture in Science Education: "One Hundred Percent Efficiency."

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kenneth P.

    1999-01-01

    Provides an historical overview of the development of the motion picture as a tool within the context of science education. Examines the use of technology as a teaching tool in terms of scientific literacy and the means by which the motion picture helped to accomplish scientific literacy goals. (Author/CCM)

  14. The Motion Picture and the Teaching of English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Marion C.; And Others

    Written to help a viewer watch a motion picture perceptively, this book explains the characteristics of the film as an art form and examines the role of motion pictures in the English curriculum. Specific topics covered include (1) the technical aspects of the production of films (the order of "shots," camera angle, and point of view), (2) the…

  15. Public Library Subject Headings for 16mm Motion Pictures. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Library Association, Sacramento.

    Suggested subject headings for 16mm motion pictures are listed. The intent of the list is to provide audiovisual librarians with a tool which will aid them in making subject indexes for their printed catalogs. It is also intended as an authority for professional catalogers who may be called upon to catalog 16mm motion pictures. (Author/KKC)

  16. In Search of Bibliographic Control for Instructional Motion Picture Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coover, Robert W.

    This historical study report describes phases in the development of applicable standards for cataloging instructional motion picture films. Steps leading to the present state of the art are objectively presented, focusing on standards developed to establish bibliographic control of instructional motion picture films, contemporary reaction to such…

  17. Holographic picture of heavy vector meson melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Nelson R.F.; Diles, Saulo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Martin Contreras, Miguel Angel [Universidad de los Andes, High Energy Group, Department of Physics, Bogota (Colombia)

    2016-11-15

    The fraction of heavy vector mesons produced in a heavy ion collision, as compared to a proton-proton collision, serves as an important indication of the formation of a thermal medium, the quark-gluon plasma. This sort of analysis strongly depends on understanding the thermal effects of a medium like the plasma on the states of heavy mesons. In particular, it is crucial to know the temperature ranges where they undergo a thermal dissociation, or melting. AdS/QCD models are know to provide an important tool for the calculation of hadronic masses, but in general are not consistent with the observation that decay constants of heavy vector mesons decrease with excitation level. It has recently been shown that this problem can be overcome using a soft wall background and introducing an extra energy parameter, through the calculation of correlation functions at a finite position of anti-de Sitter space. This approach leads to the evaluation of masses and decay constants of S wave quarkonium states with just one flavor dependent and one flavor independent parameter. Here we extend this more realistic model to finite temperatures and analyze the thermal behavior of the states 1S, 2S and 3S of bottomonium and charmonium. The corresponding spectral function exhibits a consistent picture for the melting of the states where, for each flavor, the higher excitations melt at lower temperatures. We estimate for these six states the energy ranges in which the heavy vector mesons undergo a transition from a well-defined peak in the spectral function to complete melting in the thermal medium. A very clear distinction between the heavy flavors emerges, with the bottomonium state Υ(1S) surviving a deconfinement transition at temperatures much larger than the critical deconfinement temperature of the medium. (orig.)

  18. The early atmosphere: a new picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J S

    1986-01-01

    Over the last several years, many of the fundamental ideas concerning the composition and chemical evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere have changed. While many aspects of this subject are clouded--either uncertain or unknown, a new picture is emerging. We are just beginning to understand how astronomical, geochemical, and atmospheric processes each contributed to the development of the gaseous envelope around the third planet from the sun some 4.6 billion years ago and how that envelope chemically evolved over the history of our planet. Simple compounds in that gaseous envelope, energized by atmospheric lightning and/or solar ultraviolet radiation, formed molecules of increasing complexity that eventually evolved into the first living systems on our planet. This process is called "chemical evolution" and immediately preceded biological evolution; once life developed and evolved, it began to alter the chemical composition of the atmosphere that provided the very essence of its creation. Photosynthetic organisms which have the ability to biochemically transform carbon dioxide and water to carbohydrates, which they use for food, produce large amounts of molecular oxygen (O2) as a by-product of the reaction. Atmospheric oxygen photochemically formed ozone, which absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun and shields the Earth's surface from this biologically lethal radiation. Once atmospheric ozone levels increased sufficiently, life could leave the safety of the oceans and go ashore for the first time. Throughout the history of our planet, there has been strong interaction between life and the atmosphere. Understanding our cosmic roots is particularly relevant as we embark on a search for life outside the Earth. At this very moment, several radio telescopes around the world are searching for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI).

  19. Visualizing common operating picture of critical infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummukainen, Lauri; Oksama, Lauri; Timonen, Jussi; Vankka, Jouko

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a solution for visualizing the common operating picture (COP) of the critical infrastructure (CI). The purpose is to improve the situational awareness (SA) of the strategic-level actor and the source system operator in order to support decision making. The information is obtained through the Situational Awareness of Critical Infrastructure and Networks (SACIN) framework. The system consists of an agent-based solution for gathering, storing, and analyzing the information, and a user interface (UI) is presented in this paper. The UI consists of multiple views visualizing information from the CI in different ways. Different CI actors are categorized in 11 separate sectors, and events are used to present meaningful incidents. Past and current states, together with geographical distribution and logical dependencies, are presented to the user. The current states are visualized as segmented circles to represent event categories. Geographical distribution of assets is displayed with a well-known map tool. Logical dependencies are presented in a simple directed graph, and users also have a timeline to review past events. The objective of the UI is to provide an easily understandable overview of the CI status. Therefore, testing methods, such as a walkthrough, an informal walkthrough, and the Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique (SAGAT), were used in the evaluation of the UI. Results showed that users were able to obtain an understanding of the current state of CI, and the usability of the UI was rated as good. In particular, the designated display for the CI overview and the timeline were found to be efficient.

  20. Emotional sounds modulate early neural processing of emotional pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje B M Gerdes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In our natural environment, emotional information is conveyed by converging visual and auditory information; multimodal integration is of utmost importance. In the laboratory, however, emotion researchers have mostly focused on the examination of unimodal stimuli. Few existing studies on multimodal emotion processing have focused on human communication such as the integration of facial and vocal expressions. Extending the concept of multimodality, the current study examines how the neural processing of emotional pictures is influenced by simultaneously presented sounds. Twenty pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral pictures of complex scenes were presented to 22 healthy participants. On the critical trials these pictures were paired with pleasant, unpleasant and neutral sounds. Sound presentation started 500 ms before picture onset and each stimulus presentation lasted for 2s. EEG was recorded from 64 channels and ERP analyses focused on the picture onset. In addition, valence, and arousal ratings were obtained. Previous findings for the neural processing of emotional pictures were replicated. Specifically, unpleasant compared to neutral pictures were associated with an increased parietal P200 and a more pronounced centroparietal late positive potential (LPP, independent of the accompanying sound valence. For audiovisual stimulation, increased parietal P100 and P200 were found in response to all pictures which were accompanied by unpleasant or pleasant sounds compared to pictures with neutral sounds. Most importantly, incongruent audiovisual pairs of unpleasant pictures and pleasant sounds enhanced parietal P100 and P200 compared to pairings with congruent sounds. Taken together, the present findings indicate that emotional sounds modulate early stages of visual processing and, therefore, provide an avenue by which multimodal experience may enhance perception.

  1. Blue diffuse dwarf galaxies: a clearer picture

    CERN Document Server

    James, Bethan L; Stark, Daniel P; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W; McQuinn, Kristen B W

    2016-01-01

    The search for chemically unevolved galaxies remains prevalent in the nearby Universe, mostly because these systems provide excellent proxies for exploring in detail the physics of high-z systems. The most promising candidates are extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs), i.e., galaxies with <1/10 solar metallicity. However, due to the bright emission line based search criteria traditionally used to find XMPs, we may not be sampling the full XMP population. In 2014 we reoriented this search using only morphological properties and uncovered a population of ~150 `blue diffuse dwarf (BDD) galaxies', and published a sub-sample of 12 BDD spectra. Here we present optical spectroscopic observations of a larger sample of 51 BDDs, along with their SDSS photometric properties. With our improved statistics, we use direct-method abundances to confirm that BDDs are chemically unevolved (7.43<12+log(O/H)<8.01), with ~20% of our sample classified as being XMP galaxies, and find they are actively forming stars at rates ...

  2. Picture Books Are for Little Kids, Aren't They? Using Picture Books with Adolescent Readers to Enhance Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senokossoff, Gwyn W.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of using picture books with adolescent readers, describes strategies that can be taught with picture books, and provides examples of books the author has used. Some of the topics discussed include: reading comprehension, visual literacy, interactive read-aloud with facilitative talk, literary elements, and…

  3. Picture Books Are for Little Kids, Aren't They? Using Picture Books with Adolescent Readers to Enhance Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senokossoff, Gwyn W.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of using picture books with adolescent readers, describes strategies that can be taught with picture books, and provides examples of books the author has used. Some of the topics discussed include: reading comprehension, visual literacy, interactive read-aloud with facilitative talk, literary elements, and…

  4. MIP- MULTIMISSION INTERACTIVE PICTURE PLANNING PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Multimission Interactive Picture Planner, MIP, is a scientifically accurate and fast, 3D animation program for deep space. MIP is also versatile, reasonably comprehensive, portable, and will run on microcomputers. New techniques were developed to rapidly perform the calculations and transformations necessary to animate scientifically accurate 3D space. At the same time, portability is maintained, as the transformations and clipping have been written in FORTRAN 77 code. MIP was primarily designed to handle Voyager, Galileo, and the Space Telescope. It can, however, be adapted to handle other missions. The space simulation consists of a rotating body (usually a planet), any natural satellites, a spacecraft, the sun, stars, descriptive labelling, and field of view boxes. The central body and natural satellites are tri-axial wireframe representations with terminators, limbs, and landmarks. Hidden lines are removed for the central body and natural satellites, but not for the scene as a whole so that bodies may be seen behind one another. The program has considerable flexibility in its step time, observer position, viewed object, field of view, etc. Most parameters may be changed from the keyboard while the simulation is running. When MIP is executed it will ask the user for a control file, which should be prepared before execution. The control file identifies which mission MIP should simulate, the star catalog files, the ephemerides files to be used, the central body, planets, asteroids, and comets, and solar system landmarks and constants such as planets, asteroids, and comets. The control file also describes the fields of view. Control files are included to simulate the Voyager 1 encounter at Jupiter and the Giotto spacecraft's flyby of Halley's comet. Data is included for Voyager 1 and 2 (all 6 planetary encounters) and Giotto. MIP was written for an IBM PC or compatibles. It requires 512K of RAM, a CGA or compatible graphics adapter, and DOS 2.0 or higher. Users

  5. Phvlogenetic diversity of dissimilatory Fe (Ⅲ) -reducing bacteria in paddy soil%水稻土中铁还原菌多样性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎慧娟; 彭静静

    2011-01-01

    Microorganism-mediated dissimilatory Fe (III) reduction is recognized as the dominant mechanism for Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II) in non-sulfidogenic anaerobic environments, but the microorganisms involved, especially in paddy soil, are still poorly understood. In this paper, an enrichment culture was conducted to study the phylogenetic diversity of Fe (III) -reducing bacteria in paddy soil, with acetate or hydrogen as the electron donor and with ferrihydrite or goethite as the electron acceptor, and by the methods of terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism ( T-RFLP) technology and 16S rRNA genes cloning and sequencing. No matter what the electron donor and electron acceptor were supplemented, the most abundant microorganisms were Geobacter and Clostridiales, and Rhodocyclaceae were also abundant, when acetate was supplemented as electron donor, which suggested that besides Geobacter, Clostridiales and Rhodocyclaceae could be also the important Fe (III)-reducing bacteria in paddy soil.%微生物介导的异化Fe(Ⅲ)还原是非硫厌氧环境中Fe (Ⅲ)还原生成Fe(Ⅱ)的主要途径,然而相关的铁还原菌还不是很清楚,特别是在水稻土中.本文采用富集培养的方法,以乙酸和氢气作为电子供体,水铁矿和针铁矿作为电子受体,通过末端限制性片段长度多态性(T-RFLP)技术和16S rRNA基因克隆测序相结合的分子生物学方法研究了水稻土中铁还原菌的多样性.结果表明:无论是以乙酸或氢气为电子供体,水铁矿或针铁矿为电子受体,地杆菌(Geobacter)和梭茵(Clostridiales)是富集到的主要微生物群落;乙酸为电子供体时,富集到的主要微生物群落还包括红环菌(Rhodocyclaceae);因此,除地杆菌外,梭菌和红环菌很可能也是水稻土中重要的铁还原菌.

  6. Picture Collage with Genetic Algorithm and Stereo vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Ekhtiyar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a salient region extraction method for creating picture collage based on stereo vision is proposed. Picture collage is a kind of visual image summary to arrange all input images on a given canvas, allowing overlay, to maximize visible visual information. The salient regions of each image are firstly extracted and represented as a depth map. The output picture collage shows as many visible salient regions (without being overlaid by others from all images as possible. A very efficient Genetic algorithm is used here for the optimization. The experimental results showed the superior performance of the proposed method.

  7. High frequency dynamics of BMG determined by synchrotron radiation: A microscopic picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Jorge, E-mail: jserrano@fa.upc.ed [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. del Canal Olimpic 15, Castelldefels (Spain); Dept. de Fisica Aplicada, EPSC, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. del Canal Olimpic 15, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Pineda, Eloi [Dept. de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, ESAB, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. del Canal Olimpic 15, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Bruna, Pere [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada, EPSC, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. del Canal Olimpic 15, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Labrador, Ana [LLS, BM16-ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Le Tacon, Mathieu; Krisch, Michael; Monaco, Giulio [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Crespo, Daniel [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada, EPSC, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. del Canal Olimpic 15, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain)

    2010-04-16

    Mechanical properties are becoming the focus in research on bulk metallic glasses (BMG), as they are the limiting factor for structural applications. A wide range of experimental techniques gives complementary macroscopic data that are often difficult to correlate with the microscopic structural knowledge of the same materials. Recently, high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) was applied to determine the high frequency dynamics of BMG [T. Scopigno, J.-B. Suck, R. Angelini, F. Albergamo, G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 135501]. This technique offers a new approach to the mechanic properties helping to bridge the gap between the microscopic and the macroscopic picture. Here we will present results of IXS experiments on bulk metallic glasses with different fragility values, obtained at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble (France).

  8. Reasons for Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reasons for Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) data security ... breaches are nonintentionally committed by well-meaning employees during ... Methods: A closed-ended questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data ...

  9. Verifying Visual Properties in Sentence Verification Facilitates Picture Recognition Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Pecher (Diane); K. Zanolie (Kiki); R. Zeelenberg (René)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAccording to the perceptual symbols theory (Barsalou, 1999), sensorimotor simulations underlie the representation of concepts. We investigated whether recognition memory for pictures of concepts was facilitated by earlier representation of visual properties of those concepts. During stud

  10. Multilingual children's interaction with metafiction in a postmodern picture book

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Line Møller; Johansen, Martin Blok

    2014-01-01

    When teachers and school librarians choose picture books for multilingual children, they often base their choice on an evaluation of linguistic comprehensibility, content familiarity and cultural appropriateness. This means that postmodern picture books may be excluded. This paper presents a case...... study of multilingual children's encounter with a postmodern picture book with distinct metafictional features. In the page-by-page walkthroughs of the book, many of the multilingual children demonstrate a high level of literary competence. They deal with the book's metafictional features with great...... confidence and explicitly call for books which challenge them and break with their expectations as readers. Consequently, it is argued that postmodern picture books should be part of the range of books presented to multilingual children....

  11. Astronaut Robert Gibson prepares to use motion picture camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Astronaut Robert L. Gibson, STS 61-C mission commander, partially floats on the aft flight deck of the Shuttle Columbia while preparing to use a motion picture camera. The windows overlooking the cargo bay are visible in the background.

  12. Directory of the Florida Motion Picture and Television Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Commerce, Tallahassee. Div. of Economic Development.

    Designed to assist the motion picture or television producer, this directory lists organizations (producers, distributors, talent agencies, laboratories, etc.) by geographical section in Florida. Each entry includes the company address, telephone, services available, a contact person, and credits. (DAG)

  13. THE EXPLORATION OF THE SELF IN PICTURES. PHOTO-THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELENA NEDELCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We are living in a world surrounded by images; everywhere we go we are overwhelmed by commercials, plasma screens, posters etc. We get lost in these “perfect” pictures, we dream about that perfect body, that perfect sunny holiday and that perfectly happy family. We spend time consuming those pictures, but we don’t spend time to see ourselves as we are, to discover our inner self. But, can we discover ourselves in pictures? I believe so, but only when the pictures are created and not consumed. When pictures are created, creation becomes therapy and the result of the work becomes a means of self discovery and exploration. There are many examples of artists using different media like: sculpture, painting, installation, video that create pictures making use of their own body/face, of their own lives, of their own dreams, hallucinations or obsessions. This is a good way to bring their problems out of the subconscious, to use them in a creative and playful way, to visualize them and to share them with the world. The paper intends to explore the possibilities of self discovery through creating pictures, and in what proportion this activity can become therapy, art or both. The analysis will focus on the possibilities of accepting and comprehending oneself by taking pictures of oneself; on how genuine self-portraits can overcome the individual conflict between who one actually is, what one believes people’s perceptions of oneself are and who one thinks people want one to be in order to be accepted or even successful.

  14. Bianisotropy Picture of Higher Permeability at Higher Frequencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE De-Sheng; LI Fa-Shen; FAN Xiao-Long; WEN Fu-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    With an effective bianisotropy picture, high-frequency behaviours of different magnetic materials can be reconciled, and the higher permeability and higher resonance frequencies are achieved even in the GHz range. The validity of the bianisotropy picture is quantitatively refilled by the in-plane anisotropic Fe34Co55Zr11 thin films.A prolate elliptical precession of the magnetization about its equilibrium direction is the key point, which can be induced by an artificial or an intrinsic bianisotropy system.

  15. The picture test of separation and individuation - preliminary research

    OpenAIRE

    Gregor Žvelc; Maša Žvelc

    2000-01-01

    Authors introduce a new instrument, which they developed for measuring separation and individuation process and attachment in adolescence and adulthood. The Picture Test of Separation and Individuation (PTSI) is a semi–projective test. It consists of various pictures, which represent relationships with significant others. PTSI is divided into three subtests: Relationship with Mother, Relationship with Father and Attachment. In a preliminary research on a sample of college and university...

  16. Stochastic Market Structure: Concentration Measures and Motion Picture Antitrust

    OpenAIRE

    De Vany, Arthur; Kim, Cassey Lee Hong

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the usefulness of concentration indices in characterizing the degree of competition in the motion picture industry. It shows that concentration ratios and the Herfindahl-Hirschman index give a misleading picture of the degree of competition in the industry. All these indices exhibit large fluctuations that make the common practice of calculating a static measure erroneous. Market shares are shown to follow a stochastic Pareto- Lévy motion in which the market shares of the ...

  17. Teacher in Space trainees work with Arriflex motion picture camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Teacher in Space trainees work with Arriflex motion picture camera. Photos include view of Sharon Christa McAuliffe (left) and Barbara Morgan having hands-on experience with an Arriflex motion picture camera following a briefing on space photography (40668); Morgan adjusts a lens as a studious McAuliffe looks on (40669); McAuliffe zeroes in on a test subject during a practice session with the Arriflex (40670); Morgan focuses on a subject (40671).

  18. Brain Potentials During Affective Picture Processing in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajcak, Greg; Dennis, Tracy A.

    2008-01-01

    In adults, emotional (e.g., both unpleasant and pleasant) compared to neutral pictures elicit an increase in the early posterior negativity (EPN) and the late positive potential (LPP); modulation of these ERP components are thought to reflect the facilitated processing of, and increased attention to, motivationally salient stimuli. To determine whether the EPN and LPP are sensitive to emotional content in children, high-density EEG was recorded from 18 children who were 5 to 8 years of age (mean age = 77 months, SD = 11 months) while they viewed developmentally appropriate pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System. Self-reported ratings of valence and arousal were also obtained. An EPN was not evident following emotional compared to neutral pictures; however, a positivity maximal at occipital-parietal recording sites was increased from 500 to 1,000 ms following pleasant pictures and from 500 to 1,500 ms following unpleasant pictures. Comparisons between the EPN and LPP observed in children and adults, and implications for developmental studies of emotion, are discussed. PMID:19103249

  19. Learning from picture books: Infants’ use of naming information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eKhu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether naming would facilitate infants’ transfer of information from picture books to the real world. Eighteen- and 21-month-olds learned a novel label for a novel object depicted in a picture book. Infants then saw a second picture book in which an adult demonstrated how to elicit the object’s nonobvious property. Accompanying narration described the pictures using the object’s newly learnt label. Infants were subsequently tested with the real-world object depicted in the book, as well as a different-colour exemplar. Infants’ performance on the test trials was compared with that of infants in a no label condition. When presented with the exact object depicted in the picture book, 21-month-olds were significantly more likely to elicit the object’s nonobvious property than were 18-month-olds. Learning the object’s label before learning about the object’s hidden property did not improve 18-month-olds’ performance. At 21-months, the number of infants in the label condition who attempted to elicit the real-world object’s nonobvious property was greater than would be predicted by chance, but the number of infants in the no label condition was not. Neither age group nor label condition predicted test performance for the different-colour exemplar. The findings are discussed in relation to infants’ learning and transfer from picture books.

  20. Reading Pictures for Story Comprehension Requires Mental Imagery Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inouk E. Boerma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined the role of mental imagery skills on story comprehension in 150 fifth graders (10-12-year-olds, when reading a narrative book chapter with alternating words and pictures (i.e., text blocks were alternated by one- or two-page picture spreads. A parallel group design was used, in which we compared our experimental book version, in which pictures were used to replace parts of the corresponding text, to two control versions, i.e., a text-only version and a version with the full story text and all pictures. Analyses showed an interaction between mental imagery and book version: children with higher mental imagery skills outperformed children with lower mental imagery skills on story comprehension after reading the experimental narrative. This was not the case for both control conditions. This suggests that children’s mental imagery skills significantly contributed to the mental representation of the story that they created, by successfully integrating information from both words and pictures. The results emphasize the importance of mental imagery skills for explaining individual variability in reading development. Implications for educational practice are that we should find effective ways to instruct children how to read pictures and how to develop and use their mental imagery skills. This will probably contribute to their mental models and therefore their story comprehension.

  1. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella sp. Strain PV-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Yul; Gao, Haichun; Vali, Hojatollah; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Zamin; Gao, Weimin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stapleton, Raymond D.; Moon, Ji-Won; Phelps, T. J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-05-01

    A marine psychrotolerant, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron biomineralization. The strain is able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Co(III), Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and U(VI) as electron acceptors while using lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen as an electron donor. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.0 to 8.9, a sodium chloride range of 0.05 to 5%, and a temperature range of 0 to 37°C, with an optimum growth temperature of 18°C. Unlike mesophilic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, which produce mostly superparamagnetic magnetite (<35 nm), this psychrotolerant bacterium produces well-formed single-domain magnetite (>35 nm) at temperatures from 18 to 37°C. The genome size of this strain is about 4.5 Mb. Strain PV-4 is sensitive to a variety of commonly used antibiotics except ampicillin and can acquire exogenous DNA (plasmid pCM157) through conjugation.

  2. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella sp. Strain PV-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Yul; Gao, Haichun; Vali, Hojatollah; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Zamin; Gao, Weimin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stapleton, Raymond D.; Moon, Ji-Won; Phelps, Tommy J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-09-01

    A marine psychrotolerant, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron biomineralization. The strain is able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Co(III), Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and U(VI) as electron acceptors while using lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen as an electron donor. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.0 to 8.9, a sodium chloride range of 0.05 to 5%, and a temperature range of 0 to 37 C, with an optimum growth temperature of 18 C. Unlike mesophilic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, which produce mostly superparamagnetic magnetite (<35 nm), this psychrotolerant bacterium produces well-formed single-domain magnetite (>35 nm) at temperatures from 18 to 37 C. The genome size of this strain is about 4.5 Mb. Strain PV-4 is sensitive to a variety of commonly used antibiotics except ampicillin and can acquire exogenous DNA (plasmid pCM157) through conjugation.

  3. Selective and nonselective inhibition of competitors in picture naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zeshu; Meyer, Antje S; Roelofs, Ardi

    2013-11-01

    The present study examined the relation between nonselective inhibition and selective inhibition in picture naming performance. Nonselective inhibition refers to the ability to suppress any unwanted response, whereas selective inhibition refers to the ability to suppress specific competing responses. The degree of competition in picture naming was manipulated by presenting targets along with distractor words that could be semantically related (e.g., a picture of a dog combined with the word cat) or unrelated (tree) to the picture name. The mean naming response time (RT) was longer in the related than in the unrelated condition, reflecting semantic interference. Delta plot analyses showed that participants with small mean semantic interference effects employed selective inhibition more effectively than did participants with larger semantic interference effects. The participants were also tested on the stop-signal task, which taps nonselective inhibition. Their performance on this task was correlated with their mean naming RT but, importantly, not with the selective inhibition indexed by the delta plot analyses and the magnitude of the semantic interference effect. These results indicate that nonselective inhibition ability and selective inhibition of competitors in picture naming are separable to some extent.

  4. Picture Books Featuring Literary Characters with Special Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batič Janja

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a selection of picture books that feature a person with special needs as the main literary character. The selection of the books to be showcased was based on three crucial aspects: the form of the (picture book, as we wanted to underline the visual importance of a literary character with special needs; the age limit of the readers the books are intended for (preschool and early primary school; and undisputable quality of the literary and artistic components of the picture books. The picture books we have selected based on the above criteria are Veveriček posebne sorte by Svetlana Makarovič and Marjan Manček, Mrožek dobi očala by Peter Svetina and Mojca Osojnik, and Zakaj je babica jezna by Lela B. Njatin and Alenka Sottler. Picture books about literary characters with special needs can help highly sensitive children accepting people that are different, while children with special needs can build a better self-image based on such books. Quality literary books which foster a positive attitude towards a character with special needs promote tolerance and can thus play an important role in the early childhood, with regard to awareness of an inclusive society.

  5. Picture priming in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Soledad; Reales, José M; Mayas, Julia

    2007-05-01

    The present study investigated age invariance for naming pictures and whether implicit memory is spared in Alzheimer's disease (AD). During the study phase, young adults, AD patients, and older controls were shown outlines of familiar pictures. After a distracter task, implicit memory was assessed incidentally. The results showed similar visual priming for the three groups, although young adults responded faster than the two older groups. Moreover, the number of errors was smaller for studied than for non-studied pictures. This pattern of results was repeated across the three groups, although AD patients produced more errors than young adults and older controls, and there were no differences between these latter groups. These results confirmed previous visual and haptic findings showing unimpaired perceptual priming in normal aging and AD patients when implicit memory is assessed using identification tasks. These results are interpreted from a cognitive neuroscience perspective.

  6. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PICTURE CHART MEDIA ON STUDENTS’ ENGLISH VOCABULARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novanie Sulastri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed at investigating the effectiveness of using picture chart media on students’ English vocabulary. The study belonged to pre-experimental study by applying counterbalance procedure to collect the data. The study was conducted at the class VII-5 at the SMPN 1 Palangka Raya. The number of the sample was 40 students. This study was restricted to focus on teaching vocabulary especially in classification of vocabulary. To answer the research problem, the t test for correlated was applied. The research findings showed that teaching vocabulary by using picture chart media gives effect toward the seventh grade students’ English vocabulary. The mean score of posttest reached higher score than the mean score of pretest (X=57.105 t table =2.021. Keywords: picture chart media, effectiveness, English vocabulary

  7. Extracting modal parameters of a cable on shaky motion pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa Kim, Byeong

    2014-12-01

    A set of modal parameters of a cable are extracted from a motion picture captured by a digital camera operated with shaking hands. It is difficult to identify the center of the targets attached to the cable surface from the blurred motion image of the cable, because of the high-speed motion of the cable, low sampling frequency of the camera, and the effect of shaking hands on the motion pictures. This paper proposes a multi-template matching algorithm to solve these difficulties. In addition, a sensitivity-based system identification algorithm is proposed for extracting the natural frequencies and the damping ratios from ambient cable vibration data. Three sets of vibration tests are performed to examine the validity of the proposed algorithms. The results show that the proposed approach of using these two algorithms is fairly feasible for extracting modal parameters from severely blurred motion pictures.

  8. Representations of deaf characters in children's picture books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B; Moses, Annie M

    2011-01-01

    Picture books can influence how children perceive people of different backgrounds, including people with disabilities whose cultures differ from their own. Researchers have examined the portrayal of multicultural characters with disabilities in children's literature. However, few have specifically considered the portrayal of deaf characters, despite increased inclusion of deaf characters in children's literature over the past two decades. The present study analyzed the portrayal of deaf characters in picture books for children ages 4-8 years. A content analysis of 20 children's picture books was conducted in which the books were analyzed for messages linked to pathological and cultural categories. Results indicated that these books did not portray Deaf characters from a cultural perspective but, rather, highlighted aspects of deafness as a medical condition, one that requires fixing and that perpetuates stereotypes of deafness as a disability.

  9. The picture test of separation and individuation - preliminary research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Žvelc

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Authors introduce a new instrument, which they developed for measuring separation and individuation process and attachment in adolescence and adulthood. The Picture Test of Separation and Individuation (PTSI is a semi–projective test. It consists of various pictures, which represent relationships with significant others. PTSI is divided into three subtests: Relationship with Mother, Relationship with Father and Attachment. In a preliminary research on a sample of college and university students authors studied basic properties of the test. The results of the research indicate that PTSI is consistent with theoretical background, has good sensitivity and is economical. The Picture Test of Separation and Individuation enables quick but complex insight into individual's relationships with significant others as well as into his/her stage of separation and individuation process. Considering satisfying results of pilot study, authors suggest further research for validation of the test.

  10. Effects of reading picture books on kindergartners’ mathematics performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Elia, Iliada; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a field experiment with a pretest–posttest control group design which investigated the potential of reading picture books to children for supporting their mathematical understanding. The study involved 384 children from 18 kindergarten classes in 18 schools in the Netherlands. During three months, the children in the nine experimental classes were read picture books. Data analysis revealed that, when controlled for relevant covariates, the picture book reading programme had a positive effect (d = .13) on kindergartners’ mathematics performance as measured by a project test containing items on number, measurement and geometry. Compared to the increase from pretest to posttest in the control group, the increase in the experimental group was 22% larger. No significant differential intervention effects were found between subgroups based on kindergarten year, age, home language, socio-economic status and mathematics and language ability, but a significant intervention effect was found for girls and not for boys. PMID:26855457

  11. Modulation of the initial light reflex during affective picture viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Robert R; Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    An initial reflexive constriction of the pupil to stimulation-the light reflex-is primarily modulated by brightness, but is attenuated when participants are under threat of shock (i.e., fear-inhibited light reflex). The present study assessed whether the light reflex is similarly attenuated when viewing emotional pictures. Pupil diameter was recorded while participants viewed erotic, violent, and neutral scenes that were matched in brightness; scrambled versions identical in brightness were also presented as an additional control. Compared to viewing neutral scenes, the light reflex was reliably modulated by hedonic content, with significant attenuation both when viewing unpleasant as well as pleasant pictures. No differences in the light reflex were found among scrambled versions. Thus, emotional modulation of the initial light reflex is not confined to a context of fear and is not indicative of brightness differences when viewing pictures of natural scenes. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  12. Same Exposure, Various Clinical Pictures: The Carbon Monoxide Enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Salmanoglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available -Children and adolescents exposed to the same source of carbon monoxide have been shown to demonstrate different clinical pictures (1,2. The same condition probably may be extrapolated between children with varying ages and hence lung surface areas. Smaller children will receive larger doses of carbon monoxide, because they have greater lung surface area/body weight ratios and increased minute volumes/weight ratios. As carbon monoxide accumulation is expected to be more significant nearer to the ground, another explanation for varying clinical pictures in poisoning events may be the different level of sleeping positions of the casualties. Herein, we report a cluster poisoning of carbon monoxide affecting 5 children from the same family at the same time but in different clinical pictures. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(1.000: 118-118

  13. Snake pictures draw more early attention than spider pictures in non-phobic women: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Strien, J W; Eijlers, R; Franken, I H A; Huijding, J

    2014-02-01

    Snakes were probably the first predators of mammals and may have been important agents of evolutionary changes in the primate visual system allowing rapid visual detection of fearful stimuli (Isbell, 2006). By means of early and late attention-related brain potentials, we examined the hypothesis that more early visual attention is automatically allocated to snakes than to spiders. To measure the early posterior negativity (EPN), 24 healthy, non-phobic women watched the random rapid serial presentation of 600 snake pictures, 600 spider pictures, and 600 bird pictures (three pictures per second). To measure the late positive potential (LPP), they also watched similar pictures (30 pictures per stimulus category) in a non-speeded presentation. The EPN amplitude was largest for snake pictures, intermediate for spider pictures and smallest for bird pictures. The LPP was significantly larger for both snake and spider pictures when compared to bird pictures. Interestingly, spider fear (as measured by a questionnaire) was associated with EPN amplitude for spider pictures, whereas snake fear was not associated with EPN amplitude for snake pictures. The results suggest that ancestral priorities modulate the early capture of visual attention and that early attention to snakes is more innate and independent of reported fear. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  15. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  16. The Influence of Teaching Vocabulary by Using Picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanik Nuzulimah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to explore whether there is significant difference of achievement in vocabulary between students taught by using pictures and those are not. The subject of this study is the first year students of SLTP Muhammadiyah Simo Susukan, Semarang where the sample contains 50 students that is divided into experimental group (with treatment and control group (without treatment. The data is gathered from participants’ score obtained from pre test and post test. Using t test as technique of data analysis, result shows that students taught by using pictures perform better than those are not. It means that there is significant difference between the two groups.

  17. Space-Time, Phenomenology, and the Picture Theory of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelland, Hans Herlof

    To estimate Minkowski's introduction of space-time in relativity, the case is made for the view that abstract language and mathematics carries meaning not only by its connections with observation but as pictures of facts. This view is contrasted to the more traditional intuitionism of Hume, Mach, and Husserl. Einstein's attempt at a conceptual reconstruction of space and time as well as Husserl's analysis of the loss of meaning in science through increasing abstraction is analysed. Wittgenstein's picture theory of language is used to explain how meaning is conveyed by abstract expressions, with the Minkowski space as a case.

  18. The Advantages of Using Pictures in English Language Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马立化

    2015-01-01

    Visuals play an important role in the language classroom.Teachers can explore the potentials of using pictures to the full.As we know,the four skills---listening,speaking,reading and writing are closely interrelated to one another,they are often better to be “approached in an integrated manner,so that work in one skill area will help work in another”(Wright and Haleem,1991).As long as the teacher using pictures creatively,they can undoubtedly make language teaching and learning more enjoyable,communicative and effective.

  19. On the Range of Validity of the Dipole Picture

    CERN Document Server

    Ewerz, Carlo; Nachtmann, Otto

    2007-01-01

    We derive correlated bounds on ratios of deep inelastic structure functions from the dipole picture of photon-hadron scattering at high energies. In particular we consider ratios of the longitudinal structure function, the total structure function and the charm part of the latter. We also consider ratios of total structure functions taken at the same energy but at three different photon virtualities. It is shown that by confronting these bounds with experimental data we can significantly constrain the range of validity of the dipole picture.

  20. The SELEX Measurements in the Unified Picture for Hadron Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Arkhipov, A A

    2004-01-01

    We give an analysis of the experimental material presented by the SELEX Collaboration to find the true place for the SELEX state $D_{sJ}^+$(2632) in the unified picture for hadron spectra developed early. It is found that the SELEX measurements are excellently incorporated in the unified picture for hadron spectra. Our analysis shows that the measured values for the masses of the SELEX state exactly coincide with the calculated masses of the states living in the corresponding KK towers. We also found quite a natural but rather model dependent explanation of the decay pattern for the SELEX state being dominated by the $D_s^+\\eta$ decay mode.

  1. Vegetarianism and food perception. Selective visual attention to meat pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, Jessica; Renner, Britta; Weike, Almut I; Hamm, Alfons O; Schupp, Harald T

    2009-04-01

    Vegetarianism provides a model system to examine the impact of negative affect towards meat, based on ideational reasoning. It was hypothesized that meat stimuli are efficient attention catchers in vegetarians. Event-related brain potential recordings served to index selective attention processes at the level of initial stimulus perception. Consistent with the hypothesis, late positive potentials to meat pictures were enlarged in vegetarians compared to omnivores. This effect was specific for meat pictures and obtained during passive viewing and an explicit attention task condition. These findings demonstrate the attention capture of food stimuli, deriving affective salience from ideational reasoning and symbolic meaning.

  2. The Advantages of Using Pictures in English Language Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马立化

    2015-01-01

    Visuals play an important role in the language classroom.Teachers can explore the potentials of using pictures to the full.As we know,the four skills--listening,speaking,reading and writing are closely interrelated to one another,they are often better to be"approached in an integrated manner,so that work in one skill area will help work in another"(Wright and Haleem,1991).As long as the teacher using pictures creatively,they can undoubtedly make language teaching and learning more enjoyable,communicative and effective.

  3. Development of Pupils Picture Aesthetic Competences on the Basis of IT-didactic Designs of Digital Picture Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle

    of subjects in school. The project is due to different facts: Digital pictures are increased factors in the development of culture, in socializing and in bildung. (Tholle 2007). Furthermore new genres and ways of using digital pictures and medias continuously develop. (Sørensen 2002). This ought......EEAR Network: 29. Research on Arts Education Alternative EEAR Network: Emerging Researchers’ Group Format of presentation: Paper Author: Helle Rasmussen…… Organazation: Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark Student Contribution: X Title of proposal: Development of Pupils Picture Aesthetic...... to that, results of recent research in IT-didactics make challenges to the didactics of visual arts. Results show, that use of IT and digital medias facilitates learning processes in those subjects, where such investigations have taken place. (Levinsen og Sørensen 2008). Until now most didactic research...

  4. 32 CFR 705.9 - Availability of motion pictures to external audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of motion pictures to external... motion pictures to external audiences. (a) Public access. Navy and Marine Corps general motion pictures and motion picture projects not previously cleared for public exhibition will require clearance by...

  5. Environmental challenges of anthropogenic metals flows and cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Voet, Ester; Salminen, Reijo; Eckelman, Matthew;

    This report from the UNEP-hosted International Resource Panel, Environmental Risk and Challenges of Anthropogenic Metals Flows and Cycles, gives a clear picture of the potential environmental impacts of metals at different stages of the life-cycle while linking with other areas of resource use...... such as water, food production and energy....

  6. Instructional Animation versus Static Pictures: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffler, Tim N.; Leutner, Detlev

    2007-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 26 primary studies, yielding 76 pair-wise comparisons of dynamic and static visualizations, reveals a medium-sized overall advantage of instructional animations over static pictures. The mean weighted effect size on learning outcome is d = 0.37 (95% CI 0.25-0.49). Moderator analyses indicate even more substantial effect sizes…

  7. Kodak Picture Exchange--Online Access to Photographs and Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valauskas, Edward J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Kodak Picture Exchange that includes a database of over 200,000 photographic images collected from 28 stock photography companies in the United States that allows the user to search for images by topic. Highlights include installing the software, alternative search strategies, costs, manipulating images, and rules governing the use…

  8. Images of Poverty in Picture Books with International Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamme, Linda Leonard

    2000-01-01

    Explores how authors and illustrators of 21 children's picture books with international settings portray children of poverty. Discusses causes and representations of poverty in the books: fathers who leave home to find work; child laborers; modes of transportation; housing; children who lack material goods; and the barter system. Finds…

  9. Picture Books for Children: Fiction, Folktales, and Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Providing descriptive annotations of the best children's picture books published in the last decade, this comprehensive overview is perfect for librarians, teachers, parents, daycare providers, and anyone who works with young children. It is both an excellent tool for collection development and an abundant resource for planning storytimes and…

  10. "Talking Pictures Therapy" as Brief Therapy in a School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, Del

    2013-01-01

    This article presents "talking pictures therapy" as an approach to brief therapy, in which photographs are used in brief psychotherapy and counseling with the purpose of enabling clients to express and explore through photographs aspects of their lives they would like to talk about. The author presents case examples using "talking pictures…

  11. Missing!: Picture Books Reflecting Gay and Lesbian Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Elizabeth H.

    2007-01-01

    Early childhood educators carefully reflect on the messages conveyed about family diversity in the materials they select to use. Picture books depicting gay and lesbian families can enhance the curriculum and make an important contribution to young children's development. Families comprised of same-sex parents or those who have gay and lesbian…

  12. Effects of Reading Picture Books on Kindergartners' Mathematics Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Elia, Iliada; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a field experiment with a pretest-posttest control group design which investigated the potential of reading picture books to children for supporting their mathematical understanding. The study involved 384 children from 18 kindergarten classes in 18 schools in the Netherlands. During three months, the children in the nine…

  13. Picture Books about Blacks: An Interview with Opal Moore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Donnarae; Richard, Olga

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview with Opal Moore, who discusses Black imagery in picture books published in the last four years and the institutions that circulate that imagery. Topics discussed include the issue of race pride; interracial themes; appropriate illustrations; African versus African-American books; and the roles of publishers, books reviewers,…

  14. Timed written picture naming in 14 European languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Mark; Nottbusch, Guido; Alves, Rui A; Arfé, Barbara; Chanquoy, Lucile; Chukharev-Hudilainen, Evgeny; Dimakos, Ioannis; Fidalgo, Raquel; Hyönä, Jukka; Jóhannesson, Ómar I; Madjarov, George; Pauly, Dennis N; Uppstad, Per Henning; van Waes, Luuk; Vernon, Michael; Wengelin, Åsa

    2017-05-24

    We describe the Multilanguage Written Picture Naming Dataset. This gives trial-level data and time and agreement norms for written naming of the 260 pictures of everyday objects that compose the colorized Snodgrass and Vanderwart picture set (Rossion & Pourtois in Perception, 33, 217-236, 2004). Adult participants gave keyboarded responses in their first language under controlled experimental conditions (N = 1,274, with subsamples responding in Bulgarian, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Icelandic, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish). We measured the time to initiate a response (RT) and interkeypress intervals, and calculated measures of name and spelling agreement. There was a tendency across all languages for quicker RTs to pictures with higher familiarity, image agreement, and name frequency, and with higher name agreement. Effects of spelling agreement and effects on output rates after writing onset were present in some, but not all, languages. Written naming therefore shows name retrieval effects that are similar to those found in speech, but our findings suggest the need for cross-language comparisons as we seek to understand the orthographic retrieval and/or assembly processes that are specific to written output.

  15. Child Illustrators: Making Meaning through Visual Art in Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Alicia; Minton, Sylvia; Martinez, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    In picture books, illustrations often play a critical role in helping authors tell stories. Instruction in the elements of composition including visual, textual, and peritextual features enhances meaning for children when they are given the opportunity to become authors of their own picturebooks. This study was conducted in a fourth grade…

  16. Picture Books and the Digital World: Educators Making Informed Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Junko; Teale, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The book publishing industry in general and picture book materials for children in particular have undergone rapid and profound changes in recent years with the developments in the digital realm. As a result, teachers, school librarians, and literacy researchers have been largely left to their own devices to figure out basic questions related to…

  17. Reducing the Familiarity of Conjunction Lures with Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Marianne E.

    2013-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to test whether conjunction errors were reduced after pictorial encoding and whether the semantic overlap between study and conjunction items would impact error rates. Across 4 experiments, compound words studied with a single-picture had lower conjunction error rates during a recognition test than those words…

  18. Automatic Semantic Processing in a Picture-Word Interference Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Richard R.; And Others

    While semantic development has been alleged to proceed slowly, reading instruction begins early in the child's school career. Yet, little research has been addressed toward understanding how beginning readers extract meaning from the printed word. This paper reports two experiments that measured latencies in a picture-word interference task to…

  19. Using Picture Books To Turn a Critical Lens on Injustice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sarah; Foss, Abigail

    2000-01-01

    Describes teaching tolerance with 125 eighth-grade language arts students. Discusses how, through a critical examination of two picture books on the internment of Japanese Americans by the United States government during World War II, students were able to shed light on this historical event, while also learning for themselves how the truth is…

  20. Picture Compilation in Multi-Platform Sensor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theil, A.; Bergmans, J.; Broek, S.P. van den; Huizing, A.G.; Kester, L.J.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    The traditional approach to maritime operations in open ocean conditions (‘blue waters’) is platform centric. In this approach, an environmental picture is generated on each platform separately. High quality tracks can be made available to other platforms through classic data links, e.g. Link 11 and

  1. Paradox of the Characters in The Picture of Dorian Gray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张东博

    2014-01-01

    Oscar Wilde is a brilliant Irish dramatist, novelist and critic. His only novel - The Picture of Dorian Gray- is one of the most influential works by Wilde. This paper aims to study the paradox of the three main characters’ life in this novel through close reading in order to achieve a better understanding of this controversial book.

  2. The semantics of locative information in pictures and mental images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, M A; Carpenter, P A

    1975-11-01

    Three experiments examined how people compare sentences about spatial location to pictures and images. Previous investigations have found that people are faster at judging relative location when the description contains the word above or right than when it contains the word below or left. Expt I showed that this asymmetry persisted when the words were replaced by arrows, indicating that the effect is not specific to particular lexical items. Expt. II showed the asymmetry persisted even when the response latency did not iclude the time to encode the description, indicating that the asymmetry does not lie in the description-encoding stage. Finally, Expt. III investigated how people compare sentences to information from a previously memorized picture. In this situation, the usual asymmetry was not present. The three studies suggest that the asymmetry arises from the way descriptions influence the encoding of perceptual events. The results also show that the information encoded in a mental representation of a picture is ordered such that certain features can be access-d more quickly than others. However, the same features are equally quickly accessed in a picture that is physically present.

  3. U.S. Children's Picture Books and the Homonormative Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The author examines the role U.S. lesbian- and gay-themed children's picture books play in the deployment of a homonormative subject, how that deployment occurs, and what the consequences are of such a deployment for children; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI) communities; and the larger society. The author, through…

  4. The Picture of Nobody: Shakespeare’s anti-authorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Wilson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available "The Picture of Nobody" posits that Shakespeare's birth as an author in print was “aborted” by strategies of absence that avoided institutionalized forms of authorial representation. Wilson argues that these possibly deliberate acts of evasion and self-concealment are linked to early modern problems of social class and to Shakespeare's ambition to become "a subject without an identity".

  5. Modern Air Situation Picture Display for Air Surveillance Radar Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stamatović

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a modern air situation picture display applicable in air surveillance radars. The display is based on commercial of-the-shelf hardware and custom software. This paper is focused on the details of the development process. Comparison with a similar commercially available product is given too.

  6. Test of Picture-Text Amalgams in Procedural Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David Edey

    Designed to assess how people read and comprehend information presented in picture-text amalgams in procedural texts, this instrument presents various combinations of text information and illustrative information on slides. Subjects are assigned to one of four conditions and directed to follow the instructions presented on the slides. Videotapes…

  7. Phonological code retrieval during picture naming: Influence of consonant class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Alycia; Seddoh, Amebu; Jallo, Brianna

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the time course of various stages of lexical processing have indicated either early or late onset of brain activation for phonological code retrieval. The basis of the differential findings is unclear, but factors related to segmental phonology appear to be part of it. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether phonological encoding is influenced by consonant type. Undergraduate students were presented pictures of common and familiar objects to name. Each picture label had an initial liquid (/l/, /ɹ /) or a stop (/b/, /d/) consonant. Accuracy of picture naming was high and comparable for the two stimulus sets. However, words beginning with liquids elicited larger N2 ERP responses than did those with initial stops. Cluster permutation analysis indicated that the ERP responses elicited by words in the two stimulus sets differed between 293 ms and 371 ms post picture onset. These findings point to a late onset of phonological code retrieval. They have implications for segmental phonology and/or motor planning and execution of speech. PMID:26801830

  8. Single Integrated Air Picture (SIAP) Block 1 Candidate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    to produce joint warfighting capability. Since there was no process for the Single Integrated Air Picture System Engineering Task Force ( SIAP SE TF...to inherit or leverage, the SIAP SE TF had to build a process to identify candidate systems that will be impacted by the SIAP Block I upgrade.

  9. Small wormholes change our picture of the big bang

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    Matt Visser has studied tiny wormholes, which may be produced on a subatomic scale by quantum fluctuations in the energy of the vacuum. He believes these quantum wormholes could change our picture of the origin of the Universe in the big bang (1/2 p)

  10. "Talking Pictures Therapy" as Brief Therapy in a School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, Del

    2013-01-01

    This article presents "talking pictures therapy" as an approach to brief therapy, in which photographs are used in brief psychotherapy and counseling with the purpose of enabling clients to express and explore through photographs aspects of their lives they would like to talk about. The author presents case examples using "talking…

  11. Measuring the reliability of picture story exercises like the TAT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Gruber

    Full Text Available As frequently reported, psychometric assessments on Picture Story Exercises, especially variations of the Thematic Apperception Test, mostly reveal inadequate scores for internal consistency. We demonstrate that the reason for this apparent shortcoming is not caused by the coding system itself but from the incorrect use of internal consistency coefficients, especially Cronbach's α. This problem could be eliminated by using the category-scores as items instead of the picture-scores. In addition to a theoretical explanation we prove mathematically why the use of category-scores produces an adequate internal consistency estimation and examine our idea empirically with the origin data set of the Thematic Apperception Test by Heckhausen and two additional data sets. We found generally higher values when using the category-scores as items instead of picture-scores. From an empirical and theoretical point of view, the estimated reliability is also superior to each category within a picture as item measuring. When comparing our suggestion with a multifaceted Rasch-model we provide evidence that our procedure better fits the underlying principles of PSE.

  12. Making Pictures as a Method of Teaching Art History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martikainen, Jari

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the affective and sensory turns in the paradigm of art history, this article discusses making pictures as a method of teaching art history in Finnish Upper Secondary Vocational Education and Training (Qualification in Visual Expression, Study Programmes in Visual and Media Arts and Photography). A total of 25 students majoring in…

  13. Immigration in Childhood: Using Picture Books to Cope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghban, Marcia

    2007-01-01

    The United States is currently experiencing the largest wave of immigration in its history. This contemporary immigration is unprecedented in its diversity of ethnicity, class, and countries of origin, and large urban areas are no longer alone in absorbing arrivals. The author reviews children's picture books about dilemmas that immigrant children…

  14. Boy Troubles? Male Literacy Depictions in Children's Choices Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritter, Kristine; Van Duinen, Deborah Vriend; Montgomery, Kimberly; Blowers, Devony; Bishop, Dan

    2017-01-01

    This article is a critical content analysis of Children's Choice award-winning picture books from 2000 to 2014. The "critical" part of the analysis consists of selecting archetypes for males presented in these texts based on applying feminist poststructuralist literacy theory that situates literacy and language at the center of gender…

  15. Parent-Child Conversations about Letters and Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Sarah; Treiman, Rebecca; Rosales, Nicole; Otake, Shoko

    2012-01-01

    Learning about letters, and how they differ from pictures, is one important aspect of a young child's print awareness. To test the hypothesis that parent speech provides children with information about these differences, we studied parent-child conversations in CHILDES (MacWhinney, 2000). We found that parents talk to their young children about…

  16. Parent–Child Conversations About Letters and Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Sarah; Treiman, Rebecca; Rosales, Nicole; Otake, Shoko

    2014-01-01

    Learning about letters, and how they differ from pictures, is one important aspect of a young child’s print awareness. To test the hypothesis that parent speech provides children with information about these differences, we studied parent–child conversations in CHILDES (MacWhinney, 2000). We found that parents talk to their young children about letters, differentiating them from pictures, by 1–2 years of age and that some of these conversational patterns change across the preschool years in ways that emphasize important features of letters, such as their shape. We also found that children talk about letters and pictures in distinct ways, suggesting an implicit understanding of some of the differences between letters and pictures at an early age. Some differences in parent–child conversations about letters were found as a function of socioeconomic status: Lower SES families appeared to focus more on alphabetic order than higher SES families. The general letter knowledge expressed in these conversations suggests that everyday interactions are an important component of the home literacy environment and that they differ, in some respects, as a function of child age and family background. PMID:25525295

  17. Effects of Reading Picture Books on Kindergartners' Mathematics Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Elia, Iliada; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a field experiment with a pretest-posttest control group design which investigated the potential of reading picture books to children for supporting their mathematical understanding. The study involved 384 children from 18 kindergarten classes in 18 schools in the Netherlands. During three months, the children in the nine…

  18. Holographic motion picture camera with Doppler shift compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, R. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A holographic motion picture camera is reported for producing three dimensional images by employing an elliptical optical system. There is provided in one of the beam paths (the object or reference beam path) a motion compensator which enables the camera to photograph faster moving objects.

  19. BRST symmetry in the Schrödinger picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk-Jae; Yee, Jae Hyung

    1993-05-01

    We show that the effective Lagrangian including the gauge-fixing and ghost terms of the non-Abelian gauge theories can be derived in the functional Schrödinger picture by using the residual symmetry of the gauge-fixed Lagrangian. This residual gauge symmetry is shown to be equivalent to the well-known Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin symmetry.

  20. Grand Images: Exploring Images of Grandparents in Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Patricia A.; Bhattacharya, Sharika

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examined children's picture books as a source of socialization messages, specifically regarding ageism. Thus, the appearances, cultural backgrounds, and roles of grandparent characters were examined in a sample of 220 books published over a 20-year span. Findings indicate that grandparent characters have come to…

  1. Eye movements characteristics of Chinese dyslexic children in picture searching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xu; JING Jin; ZOU Xiao-bing; WANG Meng-long; LI Xiu-hong; LIN Ai-hua

    2008-01-01

    Background Reading Chinese,a kind of ideogram,relies more on visual cognition.The visuospatial cognitive deficit of Chinese dyslexia is an interesting topic that has received much attention.The purpose of current research was to explore the visuopatial cognitive characteristics of Chinese dyslexic children by studying their eye movements via a picture searching test.Methods According to the diagnostic criteria defined by ICD-10,twenty-eight dyslexic children (mean age (10.12+1.42)years) were enrolled from the Clinic of Children Behavioral Disorder in the third affiliated hospital of Sun Yat-sen University.And 28 normally reading children (mean age (10.06±1.29) years),1:1 matched by age,sex,grade and family condition were chosen from an elementary school in Guangzhou as a control group.Four groups of pictures (cock,accident,canyon,meditate) from Picture Vocabulary Test were chosen as eye movement experiment targets.All the subjects carried out the picture searching task and their eye movement data were recorded by an Eyelink Ⅱ High-Speed Eye Tracker.The duration time,average fixation duration,average saccade amplitude,fixation counts and saccade counts were compared between the two groups of children.Results The dyslexic children had longer total fixation duration and average fixation duration (F=7.711,P<0.01;F=4.520,P<0.05),more fixation counts and saccade counts (F=7.498,P<0.01;F=11.040,P<0.01),and a smaller average saccade amplitude (F=29.743,P<0.01) compared with controls.But their performance in the picture vocabulary test was the same as those of the control group.The eye movement indexes were affected by the difficulty of the pictures and words,all eye movement indexes,except saccade amplitude,had a significant difference within groups (P<0.05).Conclusions Chinese dyslexic children have abnormal eye movements in picture searching,applying slow fixations,more fixations and small and frequent saccades.Their abnormal eye movement mode reflects the

  2. Impaired picture sequencing ability in children with premature birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuthapisith, Jariya; Jantarapagdee, Kakanang; Roongpraiwan, Rawiwan; Nunnarumit, Pracha

    2014-07-01

    Children born preterm are at increased risk for executive dysfunction, which affects learning outcomes. Picture sequencing ability is considered as executive function (EF) that requires skills in working memory and organizing the pictures. Children born preterm might have difficulties in these skills. The present study aimed to develop practical Picture Sequencing test (PS test) and examine the sequencing ability in preterm children comparing with term children. The PS test was developed to assess the child's ability to arrange pictures into a sequence. It consisted of three conditions, which were daily activities, social interaction routines, and feeling expressions. Each story had four cartoon styles cards. The child had to rearrange picture cards into the correct sequence positions. Thirty preterm children aged five to six years with gestational ages of 32 weeks and birth weights of < 1,500 grams, and thirty-five term children matched age, gender child 's education, parental education, and socioeconomic status were performed the PS test. The total scores were compared between the preterm group and the term group. The PS test scores on the daily activities domain of the preterm and term group were 18 and 25 (p = 0.03), respectively. The scores on the social interaction routines domain ofthe preterm and term group were 20 and 28 (p = 0.01) and the scores on the feeling expression domain were 18.5 and25 (p = 0.03), respectively. There was no significant correlation between perinatal complications and the PS test scores. The preterm children with IQs in the average range showed impairment in sequencing ability compared with the term children. The results underline the need for follow-up care with more comprehensive assessment of EF.

  3. Effects of affective picture viewing on postural control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beek Peter J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emotion theory holds that unpleasant events prime withdrawal actions, whereas pleasant events prime approach actions. Recent studies have suggested that passive viewing of emotion eliciting images results in postural adjustments, which become manifest as changes in body center of pressure (COP trajectories. From those studies it appears that posture is modulated most when viewing pictures with negative valence. The present experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that pictures with negative valence have a greater impact on postural control than neutral or positive ones. Thirty-four healthy subjects passively viewed a series of emotion eliciting images, while standing either in a bipedal or unipedal stance on a force plate. The images were adopted from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS. We analysed mean and variability of the COP and the length of the associated sway path as a function of emotion. Results The mean position of the COP was unaffected by emotion, but unipedal stance resulted in overall greater body sway than bipedal stance. We found a modest effect of emotion on COP: viewing pictures of mutilation resulted in a smaller sway path, but only in unipedal stance. We obtained valence and arousal ratings of the images with an independent sample of viewers. These subjects rated the unpleasant images as significantly less pleasant than neutral images, and the pleasant images as significantly more pleasant than neutral images. However, the subjects rated the images as overall less pleasant and less arousing than viewers in a closely comparable American study, pointing to unknown differences in viewer characteristics. Conclusion Overall, viewing emotion eliciting images had little effect on body sway. Our finding of a reduction in sway path length when viewing pictures of mutilation was indicative of a freezing strategy, i.e. fear bradycardia. The results are consistent with current knowledge about the

  4. Heisenberg picture approach to the stability of quantum Markov systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yu, E-mail: yu.pan@anu.edu.au, E-mail: zibo.miao@anu.edu.au; Miao, Zibo, E-mail: yu.pan@anu.edu.au, E-mail: zibo.miao@anu.edu.au [Research School of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Amini, Hadis, E-mail: nhamini@stanford.edu [Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Gough, John, E-mail: jug@aber.ac.uk [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, SY23 3BZ Wales (United Kingdom); Ugrinovskii, Valery, E-mail: v.ugrinovskii@gmail.com [School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of New South Wales at ADFA, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); James, Matthew R., E-mail: matthew.james@anu.edu.au [ARC Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, Research School of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Quantum Markovian systems, modeled as unitary dilations in the quantum stochastic calculus of Hudson and Parthasarathy, have become standard in current quantum technological applications. This paper investigates the stability theory of such systems. Lyapunov-type conditions in the Heisenberg picture are derived in order to stabilize the evolution of system operators as well as the underlying dynamics of the quantum states. In particular, using the quantum Markov semigroup associated with this quantum stochastic differential equation, we derive sufficient conditions for the existence and stability of a unique and faithful invariant quantum state. Furthermore, this paper proves the quantum invariance principle, which extends the LaSalle invariance principle to quantum systems in the Heisenberg picture. These results are formulated in terms of algebraic constraints suitable for engineering quantum systems that are used in coherent feedback networks.

  5. Heisenberg picture approach to the stability of quantum Markov systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu; Amini, Hadis; Miao, Zibo; Gough, John; Ugrinovskii, Valery; James, Matthew R.

    2014-06-01

    Quantum Markovian systems, modeled as unitary dilations in the quantum stochastic calculus of Hudson and Parthasarathy, have become standard in current quantum technological applications. This paper investigates the stability theory of such systems. Lyapunov-type conditions in the Heisenberg picture are derived in order to stabilize the evolution of system operators as well as the underlying dynamics of the quantum states. In particular, using the quantum Markov semigroup associated with this quantum stochastic differential equation, we derive sufficient conditions for the existence and stability of a unique and faithful invariant quantum state. Furthermore, this paper proves the quantum invariance principle, which extends the LaSalle invariance principle to quantum systems in the Heisenberg picture. These results are formulated in terms of algebraic constraints suitable for engineering quantum systems that are used in coherent feedback networks.

  6. The sources of Gessner's pictures for the Historia animalium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusukawa, S

    2010-07-01

    Gessner's sources for the pictures in his Historia animalium were varied in kind and in quality. This should be understood within the larger context of the Historia animalium in which Gessner sought to collect everything ever written about animals, an enterprise that could not be completed by a single individual. Just as Gessner did not distil or reduce similar texts but retained these as well as contradictory or false textual descriptions as part of a repository of knowledge, so also Gessner included several pictures of the same animal, false or badly drawn ones, and juxtaposed erroneous and 'true' images. The attribution of images to witnesses and correspondences also reflects Gessner's strategy to credit those who drew his attention to new information first. The sources of Gessner's images thus indicate how his visual world encompassed more than the strictly self-observable, and a pictorial practice that was intimately connected with textual traditions and intellectual networks.

  7. High magnetic field pulsars and magnetars a unified picture

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Zhang, Bing; Harding, Alice K.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a unified picture of high magnetic field radio pulsars and magnetars by arguing that they are all rotating high-field neutron stars, but have different orientations of their magnetic axes with respective to their rotation axes. In strong magnetic fields where photon splitting suppresses pair creation near the surface, the high-field pulsars can have active inner accelerators while the anomalous X-ray pulsars cannot. This can account for the very different observed emission characteristics of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 2259+586 and the high field radio pulsar PSR J1814-1744. A predicted consequence of this picture is that radio pulsars having surface magnetic field greater than about $2\\times 10^{14}$ G should not exist.

  8. Cognitive impairments of aphasics in picture sorting and matching tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R; Glöckner-Rist, A; Lutz, M; Maier, T; Meier, E

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of earlier experiments showing a differential deficit of aphasics in picture sorting and matching tasks, two experiments were conducted to test the conjecture of a specific deficit of aphasics in the analytical appraisal of individual features. Broca's and Wernicke's aphasics--according to clinical diagnoses and the Aachener Aphasie Test--were compared with patients having right-hemisphere lesions or left-hemisphere lesions without aphasia. Both groups of aphasics differed from the control groups in the sorting task, irrespective of the sorting criterion, but the differences were small. The picture matching task did not discriminate between groups. Obviously, the basic assumption has to be modified with respect to specific conditions of task requirements. The experimental literature is reviewed.

  9. Picture this: Managed change and resistance in business network settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Hanne; Andersen, Poul Houman

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses change management in networks. The literature on business networks tends to downplay the role of managerial initiative in network change. The change management literature addresses such initiative, but with its single-firm perspective it overlooks the interdependence of network...... actors. In exploring the void between these two streams of literature, we deploy the concept of network pictures to discuss managed change in network settings. We analyze a change project from the furniture industry and address the consequences of attempting to manage change activities in a network...... context characterized by limited managerial authority over these activities. Our analysis suggests that change efforts unfold as a negotiated process during which the change project is re-negotiated to fit the multiple actor constituencies. The degree of overlap in the co-existing network pictures...

  10. Probabilistic picture of in-medium jet evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine

    2014-01-01

    We briefly discuss the recently developed probabilistic picture for in-medium jet evolution that is driven by independent multiple scatterings and branchings. These are controlled by the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q$. In this framework, large radiative corrections to $p_\\perp$-broadening of partons in the jet, enhanced by a double logarithm (DL) of the medium size $L$, are recovered. We argue that these non-local corrections are universal and can be reabsorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter without spoiling the probabilistic picture. As a consequence, we find that for large media, the mean radiative energy loss result scales as $L^{2+\\gamma}$, where the anomalous dimension $\\gamma=2\\sqrt{\\alpha_sN_c/\\pi}$.

  11. Communicating pictures a course in image and video coding

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, David R

    2014-01-01

    Communicating Pictures starts with a unique historical perspective of the role of images in communications and then builds on this to explain the applications and requirements of a modern video coding system. It draws on the author's extensive academic and professional experience of signal processing and video coding to deliver a text that is algorithmically rigorous, yet accessible, relevant to modern standards, and practical. It offers a thorough grounding in visual perception, and demonstrates how modern image and video compression methods can be designed in order to meet the rate-quality performance levels demanded by today's applications, networks and users. With this book you will learn: Practical issues when implementing a codec, such as picture boundary extension and complexity reduction, with particular emphasis on efficient algorithms for transforms, motion estimators and error resilience Conflicts between conventional video compression, based on variable length coding and spatiotemporal prediction,...

  12. Heisenberg Picture Approach to the Stability of Quantum Markov Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Yu; Amini, Hadis; Miao, Zibo; Gough, John; Ugrinovskii, Valery; James, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum Markovian systems, modeled as unitary dilations in the quantum stochastic calculus of Hudson and Parthasarathy, have become standard in current quantum technological applications. This paper investigates the stability theory of such systems. Lyapunov-type conditions in the Heisenberg picture are derived in order to stabilize the evolution of system operators as well as the underlying dynamics of the quantum states. In particular, using the quantum Markov semigroup associated with this...

  13. Revisiting the phenomenology on the QCD color dipole picture

    CERN Document Server

    Lengyel, A I

    2005-01-01

    Using the QCD dipole picture of the hard BFKL Pomeron, we perform a 3 parameter fit analysis of the recent inclusive structure function experimental measurements at small-$x$ and intermediate $Q^2$. As a byproduct, the longitudinal structure function and the gluon distribution are predicted without further adjustments. The data description is quite reasonable, being timely a further study using resummed NLO BFKL kernels along the lines of recent theoretical developments.

  14. Dual Shapiro-Virasoro amplitudes in the QCD dipole picture

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R

    1997-01-01

    Using the QCD dipole picture of BFKL dynamics and the conformal invariance properties of the BFKL kernel in transverse coordinate space, we show that the 1--to--p dipole densities can be expressed in terms of dual Shapiro- Virasoro amplitudes B{2p+2} and their generalization including non-zero conformal spins. We discuss the possibility of an effective closed string theory of interacting QCD dipoles.

  15. High-mass diffraction in the QCD dipole picture

    CERN Document Server

    Bialas, A; Peschanski, R

    1998-01-01

    Using the QCD dipole picture of the BFKL pomeron, the cross-section of single diffractive dissociation of virtual photons at high energy and large diffractively excited masses is calculated. The calculation takes into account the full impact-parameter phase-space and thus allows to obtain an exact value of the triple BFKL Pomeron vertex. It appears large enough to compensate the perturbative 6-gluon coupling factor (alpha/pi)^3 thus suggesting a rather appreciable diffractive cross-section.

  16. Study of the impact of environmental pictures on emotional aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Miranda, Martha Patricia; Garza González, Arturo De la

    2015-01-01

    The present research examined emotions that automatically and implicitly trigger pictures of nature and the city, with the affective priming technique, and determined if the same phenomenon that has been studied in unimodal experiments was replicated in cross modality experiments. The sample included 57 psychology students from a Mexican public university who were exposed to images of natural and urban environments. They used words with positive and negative emotional connotations. The result...

  17. Quantum-like picture for intrinsic, classical, arrival distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Vega, Gabino [Physics Department, Cinvestav, Apdo. postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: gabino@fis.cinvestav.mx

    2009-11-20

    We introduce a marginal, quantum-like picture for the arrival of classical quantities in which the representation vectors are the quantities that evolve and probability densities remain static. The representation functions can be seen as probe functions which are the evolution of delta functions with support on a curve in phase space, the time fronts. This procedure provides a classical analog as well as a clear physical interpretation of the 'time eigenstates' used in quantum systems.

  18. A Corpuscular Picture of Electrons in Chemical Bond

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a theory of chemical bond with a corpuscular picture of electrons. It employs a minimal set of localized electron wave packets with 'floating and breathing' degrees of freedom and the spin-coupling of non-orthogonal valence-bond theory. It accurately describes chemical bonds in ground and excited states of spin singlet and triplet, in a distinct manner from conventional theories, indicating potential for establishing a dynamical theory of electrons in chemical bonds.

  19. Removing speech artifacts from electroencephalographic recordings during overt picture naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Camillo; Medaglia, Maria Teresa; Krott, Andrea

    2015-01-15

    A number of electroencephalography (EEG) studies have investigated the time course of brain activation during overt word production. The interpretation of their results is complicated by the fact that articulatory movements may mask the cognitive components of interest. The first aim of the present study was to investigate when speech artifacts occur during word production planning and what effects they have on the spatio-temporal neural activation pattern. The second aim was to propose a new method that strongly attenuates speech artifacts during overt picture naming and to compare it with existing methods. EEG and surface electromyograms (EMGs) of the lips were recorded while participants overtly named pictures in a picture-word interference paradigm. The comparison of the raw data with lip EMG and the comparison of source localizations of raw and corrected EEG data showed that speech artifacts occurred mainly from ~400 ms post-stimulus onset, but some earlier artifacts mean that they occur much earlier than hitherto assumed. We compared previously used methods of speech artifacts removal (SAR) with a new method, which is based on Independent Component Analysis (SAR-ICA). Our new method clearly outperformed other methods. In contrast to other methods, there was only a weak correlation between the lip EMG and the corrected data by SAR-ICA. Also, only the data corrected with our method showed activation of cerebral sources consistent with meta-analyses of word production.

  20. PICTURES FOR IMPROVING INDONESIAN EFL STUDENTS’ SPEAKING COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aprianto Budie Nugroho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate whether to what extent pictures can improve students’ speaking competence. It was carried out at SMAN in Cigugur for three months. The subject of the research was the students of SMAN in Cigugur in the academic year 2012/2013. The research method was classroom research and it was conducted in two cycles. The data was collected through interview, observation, diaries, document and test. The qualitative data were analyzed by using constant comparative method. While the quantitative data were analyzed by descriptive statistic to calculate the mean scores of pre-test, test, and post-test. The research findings show pictures can improve the students’ speaking competence by indicating their speaking fluency, appropriate vocabularies, grammatical sentences, and good pronunciation. The advantages of pictures were also shown by the classroom situation, i.e.: during the speaking class the students can answer teacher’s questions; the students had courage to express their idea freely; the speaking activities was not limited in the written way; and their attention in speaking class.

  1. Picture agnosia as a characteristic of posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Midorikawa, Akira; Koyama, Shinichi; Futamura, Akinori; Hieda, Sotaro; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a degenerative disease characterized by progressive visual agnosia with posterior cerebral atrophy. We examine the role of the picture naming test and make a number of suggestions with regard to diagnosing PCA as atypical dementia. We investigated 3 cases of early-stage PCA with 7 control cases of Alzheimer disease (AD). The patients and controls underwent a naming test with real objects and colored photographs of familiar objects. We then compared rates of correct answers. Patients with early-stage PCA showed significant inability to recognize photographs compared to real objects (F = 196.284, p = 0.0000) as measured by analysis of variants. This difficulty was also significant to AD controls (F = 58.717, p = 0.0000). Picture agnosia is a characteristic symptom of early-stage PCA, and the picture naming test is useful for the diagnosis of PCA as atypical dementia at an early stage. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Does it Matter to be Pictured from Below?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Sevenants

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Does the way in which a scene is viewed influence the interpretation of the role of the characters that appear in it, and does narrative context influence sensitivity to camera angle? In the linear conditions of the present study, each of 3 stories consisted of a sequence of 5 pictures. Pictures 2 and 3 introduced the 2 characters with either a high-angle, an eye-level, or a low-angle shot. In the random conditions, the 5 pictures were rearranged into a random order. Immediately after viewing each story, the 2 characters were rated on the 3 factors of Osgood's semantic differential (Evaluation, Potency, & Activation. Thereafter, an acceptable end to each of the 3 stories was to be chosen on a multiple-choice questionnaire. The results show a significant effect of the camera angle on the factor "Potency" under the linear condition: A low-angle shot elicited more potency. In addition, for one of the 3 stories in which the 2 characters were engaged in a common activity (chess playing, there was a significant difference on the choice of the probable ends as a function of camera position: The character, presented with a low-angle shot, was perceived as the winning player.

  3. TopicPanorama: A Full Picture of Relevant Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiting; Liu, Shixia; Liu, Junlin; Chen, Jianfei; Zhu, Jun; Guo, Baining

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a visual analytics approach to analyzing a full picture of relevant topics discussed in multiple sources, such as news, blogs, or micro-blogs. The full picture consists of a number of common topics covered by multiple sources, as well as distinctive topics from each source. Our approach models each textual corpus as a topic graph. These graphs are then matched using a consistent graph matching method. Next, we develop a level-of-detail (LOD) visualization that balances both readability and stability. Accordingly, the resulting visualization enhances the ability of users to understand and analyze the matched graph from multiple perspectives. By incorporating metric learning and feature selection into the graph matching algorithm, we allow users to interactively modify the graph matching result based on their information needs. We have applied our approach to various types of data, including news articles, tweets, and blog data. Quantitative evaluation and real-world case studies demonstrate the promise of our approach, especially in support of examining a topic-graph-based full picture at different levels of detail.

  4. Formation of anomalous globular clusters with metallicity spreads: A unified picture

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed that at least 8 globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy show internal abundance spreads in [Fe/H]. We investigate the origin of these `anomalous' GCs using numerical simulations of GCs in the dwarfs orbiting around the Galaxy and chemical evolution model of dwarfs hosting the GCs. The principal results are as follows. GCs formed in a host dwarf galaxy with a total mass of ~ 10^10 M_sun can merge to form a single nuclear GC before the host is completely destroyed by the Galaxy, if they are massive (> 3*10^5 M_sun) and if they are formed in the inner region (R<400 pc). The GC merger remnants can capture field stars during its spiral-in to nuclear regions. If two GCs are formed from star formation events separated by ~300 Myr in their host dwarf, then the new GC formed from GC merging can have [Fe/H] spread of 0.2 dex and [Ba/Fe] spread of 0.3 dex. GCs formed from GC merging can show variety of internal abundance spreads depending on the details of their hosts' chemical evoluti...

  5. Testing the snake-detection hypothesis: larger early posterior negativity in humans to pictures of snakes than to pictures of other reptiles, spiders and slugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Strien, Jan W; Franken, Ingmar H A; Huijding, Jorg

    2014-01-01

    According to the snake detection hypothesis (Isbell, 2006), fear specifically of snakes may have pushed evolutionary changes in the primate visual system allowing pre-attentional visual detection of fearful stimuli. A previous study demonstrated that snake pictures, when compared to spiders or bird pictures, draw more early attention as reflected by larger early posterior negativity (EPN). Here we report two studies that further tested the snake detection hypothesis. In Study 1, we tested whether the enlarged EPN is specific for snakes or also generalizes to other reptiles. Twenty-four healthy, non-phobic women watched the random rapid serial presentation of snake, crocodile, and turtle pictures. The EPN was scored as the mean activity at occipital electrodes (PO3, O1, Oz, PO4, O2) in the 225-300 ms time window after picture onset. The EPN was significantly larger for snake pictures than for pictures of the other reptiles. In Study 2, we tested whether disgust plays a role in the modulation of the EPN and whether preferential processing of snakes also can be found in men. 12 men and 12 women watched snake, spider, and slug pictures. Both men and women exhibited the largest EPN amplitudes to snake pictures, intermediate amplitudes to spider pictures and the smallest amplitudes to slug pictures. Disgust ratings were not associated with EPN amplitudes. The results replicate previous findings and suggest that ancestral priorities modulate the early capture of visual attention.

  6. Testing the snake-detection hypothesis: Larger early posterior negativity in humans to pictures of snakes than to pictures of other reptiles, spiders and slugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan W. Van Strien

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the snake detection hypothesis (Isbell, 2006, fear specifically of snakes may have pushed evolutionary changes in the primate visual system allowing pre-attentional visual detection of fearful stimuli. A previous study demonstrated that snake pictures, when compared to spiders or bird pictures, draw more early attention as reflected by larger early posterior negativity (EPN. Here we report two studies that further tested the snake detection hypothesis. In Study, 1 we tested whether the enlarged EPN is specific for snakes or also generalizes to other reptiles. Twenty-four healthy, non-phobic women watched the random rapid serial presentation of snake, crocodile, and turtle pictures. The EPN was scored as the mean activity at occipital electrodes (PO3, O1, Oz, PO4, O2 in the 225–300 ms time window after picture onset. The EPN was significantly larger for snake pictures than for pictures of the other reptiles. In study 2, we tested whether disgust plays a role in the modulation of the EPN and whether preferential processing of snakes also can be found in men. Twelve men and twelve women watched snake, spider, and slug pictures. Both men and women exhibited the largest EPN amplitudes to snake pictures, intermediate amplitudes to spider pictures and the smallest amplitudes to slug pictures. Disgust ratings were not associated with EPN amplitudes. The results replicate previous findings and suggest that ancestral priorities modulate the early capture of visual attention.

  7. Testing the snake-detection hypothesis: larger early posterior negativity in humans to pictures of snakes than to pictures of other reptiles, spiders and slugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Strien, Jan W.; Franken, Ingmar H. A.; Huijding, Jorg

    2014-01-01

    According to the snake detection hypothesis (Isbell, 2006), fear specifically of snakes may have pushed evolutionary changes in the primate visual system allowing pre-attentional visual detection of fearful stimuli. A previous study demonstrated that snake pictures, when compared to spiders or bird pictures, draw more early attention as reflected by larger early posterior negativity (EPN). Here we report two studies that further tested the snake detection hypothesis. In Study 1, we tested whether the enlarged EPN is specific for snakes or also generalizes to other reptiles. Twenty-four healthy, non-phobic women watched the random rapid serial presentation of snake, crocodile, and turtle pictures. The EPN was scored as the mean activity at occipital electrodes (PO3, O1, Oz, PO4, O2) in the 225–300 ms time window after picture onset. The EPN was significantly larger for snake pictures than for pictures of the other reptiles. In Study 2, we tested whether disgust plays a role in the modulation of the EPN and whether preferential processing of snakes also can be found in men. 12 men and 12 women watched snake, spider, and slug pictures. Both men and women exhibited the largest EPN amplitudes to snake pictures, intermediate amplitudes to spider pictures and the smallest amplitudes to slug pictures. Disgust ratings were not associated with EPN amplitudes. The results replicate previous findings and suggest that ancestral priorities modulate the early capture of visual attention. PMID:25237303

  8. Bioavailability of Metal Ions and Evolutionary Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando P. Hong Enriquez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of life on earth has been a long process that began nearly 3,5 x 109 years ago. In their initial moments, evolution was mainly influenced by anaerobic environments; with the rise of O2 and the corresponding change in bioavailability of metal ions, new mechanisms of survival were created. Here we review the relationships between ancient atmospheric conditions, metal ion bioavailability and adaptation of metals homeostasis during early evolution. A general picture linking geochemistry, biochemistry and homeostasis is supported by the reviewed literature and is further illustrated in this report using simple database searches.

  9. Memory for Emotional Pictures in Patients with Alzheimer's Dementia: Comparing Picture-Location Binding and Subsequent Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marloes J. Huijbers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotional content typically facilitates subsequent memory, known as the emotional enhancement effect. We investigated whether emotional content facilitates spatial and item memory in patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD. Twenty-three AD patients, twenty-three healthy elderly, and twenty-three young adults performed a picture relocation task and a delayed recognition task with positive, negative, and neutral stimuli. AD patients showed a benefit in immediate spatial memory for positive pictures, while healthy young and older participants did not benefit from emotional content. No emotional enhancement effects on delayed item recognition were seen. We conclude that AD patients may have a memory bias for positive information in spatial memory. Discrepancies between our findings and earlier studies are discussed.

  10. Tactile picture recognition by early blind children: the effect of illustration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurel, Anne; Witt, Arnaud; Claudet, Philippe; Hatwell, Yvette; Gentaz, Edouard

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated factors that influenced haptic recognition of tactile pictures by early blind children. Such a research is motivated by the difficulty to identify tactile pictures, that is, two-dimensional representations of objects, while it is the most common way to depict the surrounding world to blind people. Thus, it is of great interest to better understand whether an appropriate representative technique can make objects' identification more effective and to what extent a technique is uniformly suitable for all blind individuals. Our objective was to examine the effects of three techniques used to illustrate pictures (raised lines, thermoforming, and textures), and to find out if their effect depended on participants' level of use of tactile pictures. Twenty-three early blind children (half with a regular or moderate level of use of tactile pictures, and half with either no use or infrequent use) were asked to identify 24 pictures of eight objects designed as the pictures currently used in the tactile books and illustrated using these three techniques. Results showed better recognition of textured pictures than of thermoformed and raised line pictures. Participants with regular or moderate use performed better than participants with no or infrequent use. Finally, the effect of illustration technique on picture recognition did not depend on prior use of tactile pictures. To conclude, early and frequent use of tactile material develops haptic proficiency and textures have a facilitating effect on picture recognition whatever the user level. Practical implications for the design of tactile pictures are discussed in the conclusion.

  11. Towards the big picture of the Milky Way bulge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez O.A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has been growing in the last few years that the Bulge is very complex, with maybe two or more components partially overlapping in space, kinematics and metallicity. An extensive mapping of these properties is necessary to disentangle them. I present our results based on α-elements abundances for a total of 650 RGB stars in 4 fields along the major and minor axis of the Bulge. Results point towards a spatial homogeneity of α-element enhancement in the metal-poor regime and a population of alpha-poor metal-rich stars which disappears at high latitudes (b = −12. Bulge metal-poor alpha enhancement is also indistinguishable from the one of the thick disk. Further constrains on Bulge populations are provided by the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea survey (VVV from which I present our recent results in extinction, structure and photometric metallicities.

  12. A many-body states picture of electronic friction: The case of multiple orbitals and multiple electronic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2016-08-07

    We present a very general form of electronic friction as present when a molecule with multiple orbitals hybridizes with a metal electrode. To develop this picture of friction, we embed the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) within a classical master equation (CME). Thus, this article extends our previous work analyzing the case of one electronic level, as we may now treat the case of multiple levels and many electronic molecular states. We show that, in the adiabatic limit, where electron transitions are much faster than nuclear motion, the QCLE-CME reduces to a Fokker-Planck equation, such that nuclei feel an average force as well as friction and a random force-as caused by their interaction with the metallic electrons. Finally, we show numerically and analytically that our frictional results agree with other published results calculated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. Numerical recipes for solving this QCLE-CME will be provided in a subsequent paper.

  13. Attentional disengagement is modulated by the offset of unpleasant pictures: a saccadic reaction time study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Pinheiro, Walter; Faria, Aydamari; Braga, Filipe; Guerra, Pedro; Perakakis, Pandelis; Caldas, Ariane Leão; Mocaiber, Izabela; Oliveira, Letícia; Pereira, Mirtes Garcia; Volchan, Eliane; Vila, Jaime

    2013-12-01

    We studied the influence of passively viewing a picture on saccade latencies to peripheral targets. Thirty-two volunteers were instructed to look at a central picture, wait for the onset of a peripheral target, and execute a saccade toward it as quickly as possible - saccadic reaction time (SRT). The central picture (neutral or unpleasant) could be turned off simultaneously with target onset (the no-gap condition) or 200ms prior to target onset (the gap-200 condition). We found that saccade latencies were influenced by emotional valence and condition. In the no-gap condition, SRTs were longer after viewing unpleasant pictures. In the gap-200 condition, the pattern was reversed, and unpleasant pictures induced shorter SRTs in relation to neutral pictures. Furthermore, the influence of unpleasant pictures gradually decreased when images were re-exposed to the participants - affective habituation. The results are discussed in terms of attentional avoidance and disengagement from unpleasant emotional pictures.

  14. Associative learning of pictures and words by low-functioning children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Melissa Allen

    2008-05-01

    This research investigates whether children with autism learn picture, word and object relations as associative pairs or whether they understand such relations as referential. In Experiment 1, children were taught a new word (e.g. ;whisk') repeatedly paired with a novel picture. When given the picture and a previously unseen real whisk and asked to indicate a whisk, children with autism, unlike typically developing peers matched on receptive language, associated the word with the picture rather than the object. Subsequent experiments respectively confirmed that neither a bias for selecting pictures nor perseverative responding accounted for these results. Taken together, these results suggest that children with autism with cognitive difficulties are learning picture-word and picture-object relations via an associative mechanism and have difficulty understanding the symbolic nature of pictures.

  15. Salivary alpha-amylase changes promoted by sustained exposure to affective pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Navarro, Juan P; Maldonado, Enrique F; Martínez-Selva, José M; Enguix, Alfredo; Ortiz, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    We studied the changes in salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) and other psychophysiological indices (heart rate, skin conductance, and corrugator supercilii activity) elicited by sustained exposure to affective pictures. Thirty-nine subjects viewed five blocks of pictures depicting mutilations, human attack, neutral scenes, sport/adventure, and erotica. Each block comprised 12 pictures of the same content. Saliva samples were collected before and after each block of pictures. The results showed that mutilation pictures promoted the greatest increase in sAA activity and output, as well as greater corrugator supercilii activity than pleasant pictures. Skin conductance response did not differ among high arousal picture contents. Changes in sAA varied with the affective valence but not with the arousal ratings of the pictures. Our results point to sAA as an index directly related to the unpleasantness elicited by sustained exposure to affective stimuli. Copyright © 2012 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  16. Validation of the Amsterdam Beverage Picture Set: A Controlled Picture Set for Cognitive Bias Measurement and Modification Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Thomas; van Deursen, Denise S; Beraha, Esther M; Larsen, Helle; Wiers, Reinout W

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol research may benefit from controlled and validated picture sets. We have constructed the Amsterdam Beverage Picture Set (ABPS), which was designed for alcohol research in general and cognitive bias measurement and modification in particular. Here, we first formulate a position on alcohol stimulus validity that prescribes that alcohol-containing pictures, compared to nonalcohol-containing pictures, should induce a stronger urge to drink in heavy drinkers than in light drinkers. Because a perceptually simple picture might induce stronger cognitive biases but the presence of a drinking context might induce a stronger urge to drink, the ABPS contains pictures with and without drinking context. By limiting drinking contexts to simple consumption scenes instead of real-life scenes, complexity was minimized. A validation study was conducted to establish validity, to examine ABPS drinking contexts, and to explore the role of familiarity, valence, arousal, and control. Two hundred ninety-one psychology students completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, as well as rating and recognition tasks for a subset of the ABPS pictures. The ABPS was well-recognized, familiar, and heavy drinkers reported a greater urge to drink in response to the alcohol-containing pictures only. Alcohol presented in drinking context did not elicit a stronger urge to drink but was recognized more slowly than alcohol presented without context. The ABPS was found to be valid, although pictures without context might be preferable for measuring cognitive biases than pictures with context. We discuss how an explicit approach to picture construction may aid in creating variations of the ABPS. Finally, we describe how ABPS adoption across studies may allow more reproducible and comparable results across paradigms, while allowing researchers to apply picture selection criteria that correspond to a wide range of theoretical positions. The latter is exemplified by ABPS derivatives and

  17. Application of the Interaction Picture to Reactive Scattering in One Dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Moeller states. The interaction picture, in contrast to the usual Schroedinger picture of quantum mechanics, is so constructed that a wavefunction...wavepackets oh tained from the first part of the calculation are further propagated using the Schroedinger picture. The tim&dependent correlation between the

  18. The Effect of Extraversion and Presentation Order on Learning from Picture-Commentary Sequences by Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riding, R. J.; Wicks, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    Groups of extrovert, ambivert, and introvert children, aged 8, saw pictures with a taped commentary about each. On an immediate recall test, extroverts recalled most if given the commentary before the picture, introverts did best when the picture came first, and ambiverts performed similarly in both conditions. (Author/SJL)

  19. The Value of Picture-Book Reading-Based Collaborative Output Activities for Vocabulary Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chia-Ho

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of three instructional modes: picture-book reading-only (PRO), picture-book reading plus vocabulary instruction (PRVI), and picture-book reading plus reading-based collaborative output activity (PRCOA) on young adult EFL (English as a foreign language) learners' vocabulary acquisition and retention. Eighty…

  20. Case Study: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Making a Case for Video Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Aditi

    2014-01-01

    A picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. If a mere picture is worth a thousand words, how much more are "moving pictures" or videos worth? The author poses this not merely as a rhetorical question, but because she wishes to make a case for using videos in the traditional case study method. She recommends four main approaches of…

  1. Using Picture Books to Teach Fairy Tales from the Collection of the Mazza Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Kate

    2005-01-01

    Picture books are the first visual arts experience many students encounter. A picture book equally emphasizes text and illustrations, and though the text often receives most of the attention, in the best cases, the pictures are excellent resources for teaching about creating and responding to images. For a resourceful teacher who knows how to use…

  2. Case Study: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Making a Case for Video Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Aditi

    2014-01-01

    A picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. If a mere picture is worth a thousand words, how much more are "moving pictures" or videos worth? The author poses this not merely as a rhetorical question, but because she wishes to make a case for using videos in the traditional case study method. She recommends four main approaches of…

  3. Postmodernist Impulses and the Contemporary Picture Book: Are There Any Stories to These Meanings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of postmodernism in architecture, visual arts, and literary arts focuses on a postmodern aesthetic in children's picture books. Examples of postmodernism in four recently published picture books are explained and discussed, and implications for new ways of thinking about picture books in the future are suggested. (six references) (LRW)

  4. The Value of Picture-Book Reading-Based Collaborative Output Activities for Vocabulary Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chia-Ho

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of three instructional modes: picture-book reading-only (PRO), picture-book reading plus vocabulary instruction (PRVI), and picture-book reading plus reading-based collaborative output activity (PRCOA) on young adult EFL (English as a foreign language) learners' vocabulary acquisition and retention. Eighty…

  5. The Reading Level Paradox: Why Children's Picture Books Are Less Cohesive than Adult Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Roberta; Surber, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments explored how pictures in award-winning children's storybooks contribute to their cohesion. In Experiment 1, one group of college students read storybooks with pictures, and another group read them with the pictures removed. Both groups answered questions inserted periodically. The source for about one half of the questions was…

  6. PAT workbench: Annotation and Evaluation of Text and Pictures in Multimodal Instructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Ielka; Kloppenburg, Lennart; Redeker, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a tool to investigate the design of multimodal instructions (MIs), i.e., instructions that contain both text and pictures. The benefit of including pictures in information presentation has been established, but the characteristics of those pictures and of their textual counterpar

  7. Reading Picture Books on Television: Implications for the Acquisition of Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony

    1990-01-01

    Mediated and "live" picture books engender different patterns of interaction between reader and child. The reading of a TV picture book is a text, not an interaction centered on a text. Exposure to mediated picture books alone appears to be an inadequate replacement for "live" book reading in the acquisition of literacy. (18 references) (CP)

  8. An Investigation of Teachers' Growing Understandings of the Picture Book Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Miriam G.; Harmon, Janis M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a graduate course that focused on picture books on teachers' understandings of the picture book format and the ways in which these understandings influenced their self-reports of picture book use in the classroom. Findings of this qualitative investigation revealed that immersion in and analysis of the picture…

  9. Reading from Multimedia Materials: Benefits of Non-Congruent Pictures on Reading Comprehension for Dyslexic Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brante, Eva Wennås; Holmqvist, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Pictures are often integrated in digital learning materials with the purpose of enhancing learning. This mixed methods study uses quantitative eye-tracking data and qualitative data such as oral answers to discover whether characteristics of pictures influence patterns of text-picture transition in readers with (n = 10) and without (n = 14)…

  10. 77 FR 37324 - Safety Zone; Major Motion Picture Filming, Cape Fear River; Wilmington, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Major Motion Picture Filming, Cape Fear... will be performed on the river during the filming of this motion picture. DATES: This rule is effective... performed during the filming of a major motion picture. The filming will involve fast-paced,...

  11. 77 FR 40513 - Safety Zone; Major Motion Picture Filming, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Southport, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Major Motion Picture Filming, Atlantic... associated with the stunts that will be performed on the river during the filming of this motion picture... associated with the stunts that will be performed during the filming of a major motion picture. The...

  12. Training and Maintenance of a Picture-Based Communication Response in Older Adults with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trahan, Maranda A.; Donaldson, Jeanne M.; McNabney, Matthew K.; Kahng, SungWoo

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether adults with dementia could learn to emit a picture-based communication response and if this skill would maintain over time. Three women with moderate to severe dementia were taught to exchange a picture card for a highly preferred activity. All participants quickly learned to exchange the picture card and maintained this…

  13. Infrastructure design of a picture archiving and communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H K; Taira, R K

    1992-04-01

    A picture archiving and communication system (PACS) infrastructure is the necessary framework to integrate distributed and heterogeneous imaging systems, provide intelligent data-base management of all radiology-related information, arrange an efficient means of viewing, analyzing, and documenting study results, and furnish a mechanism for effectively communicating study results to the referring physician. The PACS infrastructure consists of a basic skeleton of hardware components integrated by standardized, flexible software subsystems. This review describes these concepts and basic building blocks drawn from our original investigation, past experience, and the current clinical system in our radiology department.

  14. Health Information Technologies for Geriatrics: The Big Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Vallaurie; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir

    2016-01-01

    Nearly five decades ago in 1970, Simone de Beauvoir's "The Coming of Age" painted a broad-strokes picture of urgent issues affecting the welfare of elders in many cultures. Using her agenda and others, this panel will attempt to sketch what specific technological advances and applications offer to older citizens, clients and patients - over these 50 years and into the future. Rapid aging societies warrants the need to transform health systems to be focused on preventions and patient engagement rather than the curative care.

  15. Gender Stereotypes in the Language Picture of the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaukhar I. Issina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The following work is a representation of theoretical grounds of gender stereotypes phenomena in language as well as an attempt to display concepts of femininity and masculinity in English language by means of such fixed language structures as phraseology. It argues that in the English picture of the world the concept of “Woman” is presented in more negative light in comparison to the concept of “Man” where the former is associated with natural weakness while the later with masculine strength

  16. Color Dipole Picture of Deep Inelastic Scattering, Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Based upon the color-dipole picture, we provide closed analytic expressions for the longitudinal and the transverse photoabsorption cross sections at low values of the Bjorken variable of x<0.1. We compare with the experimental data for the longitudinal-to-transverse ratio of the (virtual) photoabsorption cross section and with our previous fit to the experimental data for the total photoabsorption cross section. Scaling in terms of the low-x scaling variable eta(W^2,Q^2) is analyzed in terms of the reduced cross section of deep inelastic scattering.

  17. Quasi-Linear Algebras and Integrability (the Heisenberg Picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Zhedanov

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We study Poisson and operator algebras with the ''quasi-linear property'' from the Heisenberg picture point of view. This means that there exists a set of one-parameter groups yielding an explicit expression of dynamical variables (operators as functions of ''time'' t. We show that many algebras with nonlinear commutation relations such as the Askey-Wilson, q-Dolan-Grady and others satisfy this property. This provides one more (explicit Heisenberg evolution interpretation of the corresponding integrable systems.

  18. Weather satellite picture receiving stations, APT digital scan converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermillion, C. H.; Kamowski, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The automatic picture transmission digital scan converter is used at ground stations to convert signals received from scanning radiometers to data compatible with ground equipment designed to receive signals from vidicons aboard operational meteorological satellites. Information necessary to understand the circuit theory, functional operation, general construction and calibration of the converter is provided. Brief and detailed descriptions of each of the individual circuits are included, accompanied by a schematic diagram contained at the end of each circuit description. Listings of integral parts and testing equipment required as well as an overall wiring diagram are included. This unit will enable the user to readily accept and process weather photographs from the operational meteorological satellites.

  19. Picture this: Managed change and resistance in business network settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Hanne; Andersen, Poul Houman

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses change management in networks. The literature on business networks tends to downplay the role of managerial initiative in network change. The change management literature addresses such initiative, but with its single-firm perspective it overlooks the interdependence of network...... context characterized by limited managerial authority over these activities. Our analysis suggests that change efforts unfold as a negotiated process during which the change project is re-negotiated to fit the multiple actor constituencies. The degree of overlap in the co-existing network pictures...

  20. Knotted Picture of a Quantum Network of Two Nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shang-Wu; GU Zhi-Yu

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the variation of the knotted picture of the quantum pure state |X〉 = α| ↑↓〉 + β|↓↑〉with the varintion of the complex coefficients a and β. It is shown that there are three kinds of link that correspond tc three different ranks of the matrix of covariance correlation tensor, i.e., the zero rank corresponds to trivial link, the rank one corresponds to the two-component link with two crossings, and the rank three corresponds to the two-component link with four crossings.

  1. Current Picture for China’s Mineral Resource Availability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志

    2008-01-01

    Economic growth and structural change has caused China to consume an increasingly immense amount of mineral resources. This article is intended to present a fundamental picture of mineral resource shortages facing China through an in-depth analysis of mineral reserves, demand and supply as well as structure. We believe that China will continue to face a shortage of certain representative minerals resources in the foreseeable future. As a result, China has to rely on imports of such minerals to meet surging domestic demand.

  2. Energy Density of Vortices in the Schroedinger Picture

    CERN Document Server

    Laenge, J D; Reinhardt, H

    2003-01-01

    The one-loop energy density of an infinitely thin static magnetic vortex in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory is evaluated using the Schroedinger picture. Both the gluonic fluctuations as well as the quarks in the vortex background are included. The energy density of the magnetic vortex is discussed as a function of the magnetic flux. The center vortices correspond to local minima in the effective potential. These minima are degenerated with the perturbative vacuum if the fermions are ignored. Inclusion of fermions lifts this degeneracy, raising the vortex energy above the energy of the perturbative vacuum.

  3. Global plastic surgeons images depicted in motion pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Se Jin; Park, Sowhey; Hwang, Kun

    2013-03-01

    Motion pictures are made to entertain and enlighten people, but they are viewed differently by different people. What one considers to be a tearjerker may induce giggles in another. We have gained added interest in this because our professional pictures contain plastic surgery in their venue. We have recently reviewed 21 motion pictures that were made from 1928 to 2006 and that includes plastic surgical procedures in their content. As a habit, we tried to analyze them from a surgical point of view. About one third (35.7%) of the patients were criminals, whereas 14.3% of them were spies. One third of the procedures were done by illegitimate "surgeons," whereas a quarter of the procedures (25%) were performed by renowned surgeons. Surgeons who were in love with the patients did the rest (25%) of the operations. The complication rate was 14.3%; the surgery was successful in 85.7% of cases, but were the patients happy with the results? This was not the case in the movies. Only 7.7% were happy; 14.5 % of them were eminently unhappy. Why the discrepancy? It is difficult to analyze the minds of the people in the film, but considering that the majority of the characters in the films were rather unsavory, one may deduce that a crooked mind functions differently. Motion pictures have advanced greatly in the past several decades with the advent of improved mechanical and electronic devices, and plastic surgery as also advanced in tandem. This surgical field has become a common procedure in our daily life. It is readily available and mostly painless. However, the public sees it in only one way, that is, that the performing physicians are highly compensated. Very few consider the efforts and the suffering that accompanies each and every surgical procedure as it is performed. Perhaps, it is too much to hope for a day that will come when we will see a film that portrays the mental anguish that accompanies each and every procedure the plastic surgeon makes.

  4. Complementarity of the maldacena and randall-sundrum pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff; Liu

    2000-09-04

    We revive an old result, that one-loop corrections to the graviton propagator induce 1/r(3) corrections to the Newtonian gravitational potential, and compute the coefficient due to closed loops of the U(N) N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory that arises in Maldacena's anti-de Sitter conformal field theory correspondence. We find exact agreement with the coefficient appearing in the Randall-Sundrum brane-world proposal. This provides more evidence for the complementarity of the two pictures.

  5. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens and implications for respiratory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Hans K; Iavarone, Anthony T; Gorur, Amita; Yeo, Boon Siang; Tran, Rosalie; Melnyk, Ryan A; Mathies, Richard A; Auer, Manfred; Coates, John D

    2012-01-31

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they may be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an analog of the redox active components of humic substances. The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin-shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS, and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants, suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results provide unique direct evidence for cell wall-associated cytochromes and support MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium.

  6. Thyroid hormones concentrations and ECG picture in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasławska, U; Noszczyk-Nowak, A; Kungl, K; Bioły, K; Popiel, J; Nicpoń, J

    2006-01-01

    Disorders of the thyroid gland activity are the most commonly encountered disturbances of endocrine origin in the dog. Hypo- or hyperthyroidism may disturb the function of the cardiovascular system and cause arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of thyroid gland activity on electrocardiogram (ECG) picture in the dog by comparing ECG curves of healthy dogs, dogs with hypothyroidism and dogs with cardiac insufficiency caused by endocardiosis of the mitral valve. The study was performed on 38 dogs, patients of the Department of Internal and Parasitic Diseases with Clinic for Horses, Dogs and Cats in Wrocław. The animals were assigned to 3 groups: Group I--control group, 13 clinically healthy dogs; Group II--14 dogs with diagnosed cardiac insufficiency caused by endocardiosis of the mitral valve; Group III--11 dogs with hypothyroidism. Clinical examination of the animals was conducted according to the following pattern: anamnesis, general clinical examination, cardiological examination (ECG, USG of the heart) and laboratory analysis (triacylglycerydes, cholesterol, T3, T4, FT4). In this study, the significant influence of thyroid gland activity on ECG picture of the evaluated dogs was found. In the dogs with hypothyroidism a decrease in the sino-atrial node activity was observed, which led to decreased heart rate. In dogs with hypothyroidism, the innerheart conduction was reduced, which was demonstrated by prolongation of the P wave, QRS complex and the QT interval.

  7. Evaluating Picture Quality of Image Plates in Digital CR Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Byung Joon [Dept. of Radiological Tecnology, Choonhae College of Health Science, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ji Tae Jeong [Dept. of Radiological Science, Kaya University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Lab effectively supplemented the effects of outside radiation on image plates in the process of image acquisition of CR (computed radiography) systems and conducted for effective utilization in the case of clinical application. For this, Lab classified the storage places and time periods of image plates and compared and analyzed the differences between small dark spots. Lab also assessed the concentration distribution within the boundaries of images. Lab compared and measured the number of dark spots in a light room and a dark room depending on the storage places of image plates and found that dark spots slightly increased in an image plate when stored in a light room on the first and second days. Dark spots increased in proportion to the length of time stored. In the case of the image plate stored in a dark room, the number of dark spots remarkably decreased. With regard to picture quality as related to the location of image plates, the damage to picture quality could be reduced by locating regions of interest in the center. With regard to differences in sharpness following changes in the thickness of subjects, fewer scatter rays occurred and sharpness improved by reducing the thickness of subjects as much as possible. To get medical images of excellent quality, image plates should be managed effectively and it is desirable to keep images plates in dark iron plate boxes and not to expose them to outside radiation for a long time.

  8. "Big Science: the LHC in Pictures" in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    An exhibition of spectacular photographs of the LHC and its experiments is about to open in the Globe. The LHC and its four experiments are not only huge in size but also uniquely beautiful, as the exhibition "Big Science: the LHC in Pictures" in the Globe of Science and Innovation will show. The exhibition features around thirty spectacular photographs measuring 4.5 metres high and 2.5 metres wide. These giant pictures reflecting the immense scale of the LHC and the mysteries of the Universe it is designed to uncover fill the Globe with shape and colour. The exhibition, which will open on 4 March, is divided into six different themes: CERN, the LHC and the four experiments ATLAS, LHCb, CMS and ALICE. Facts about all these subjects will be available at information points and in an explanatory booklet accompanying the exhibition (which visitors will be able to buy if they wish to take it home with them). Globe of Science and Innovatio...

  9. Developing a molecular picture for polymer glasses under large deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Panpan

    2014-03-01

    Polymer glasses differ from most other types of glassy materials because they can be ductile under tensile extension. Remarkably, a ductile polymer can turn brittle and vice versa. For example, upon cooling, the glass changes from ductile to brittle at a temperature known as the brittle-ductile transition temperature (BDT). Aging causes the ductile glass to be brittle. Mechanical ``rejuvenation'' or pressurization brings a brittle glass into a ductile state. Finally, one glass can be ductile 100 degrees below Tg while another polymer is already brittle even just 10 degree below Tg. Polystyrene and bisphenol A polycarbonate are at the two extremes in the family of polymer glasses. How to rationale such a wide range of behavior in terms of a molecular picture has been a challenging task. What is the role of ``chain entanglement''? Since many of the procedures including the temperature change do not alter the ``chain entanglement'', it is clearly insufficient to explain the nature of the BDT in terms of the entanglement density. Our work attempts to answer the question of what then is the role of chain networking. We have formulated a molecular picture that presents a unifying and coherent explanation for all the known phenomenology concerning the BDT and condition for crazing. This work is supported, in part, by NSF (CMMI-0926522 and DMR-1105135).

  10. Colloid cysts of the third ventricle exhibit heterogeneous clinical picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Ravnik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colloid cysts are rare benign intracranial tumours generally occurring in the front part of the third ventricle. Clinical picture may be non-specific. Various problems are usually associated with hydrocephalus that these cysts may cause.Methods: Five patients with colloid cyst of the third ventricle were consecutively operated on at our department. All had different clinical pictures. Two patients suffered from acute hydrocephalus, one of them also from rapid deterioration of consciousness. In two patients, the cyst was discovered accidentally owing to non-specific problems. One patient experienced progressive deterioration due to chronic hydrocephalus.Results: All patients had a colloid cyst removed via the right anterior interhemispheric transcallosal approach. One patient had surgical complication with transient left-sided haemiparesis, followed by osteomyelitis. Postoperative course in all other patients was unremarkable.Conclusions: Due to a high risk of potential sudden deterioration the colloid cysts may cause, a rapid surgical intervention is generally needed. The anterior interhemispheric transcallosal approach is a well accepted and safe surgical option.

  11. The changing clinical picture and epidemiology of spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tubergen, Astrid

    2015-02-01

    In the past decade, major progress has been made in the recognition, classification and treatment of spondyloarthritis (SpA). Classification criteria have been developed for axial and peripheral SpA by the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) as a response to new insight into the clinical picture and unmet needs. The ASAS criteria have contributed to a better understanding of the full spectrum of axial and peripheral SpA and of the potential for treatment. However, whether all patients fulfilling these criteria should be considered as having true SpA is a matter of debate. Furthermore, the implementation of the ASAS criteria might lead to an increase in the reported prevalence of SpA, as patients who were previously unidentified could now be classified as having the disease, which might have consequences for healthcare budgets. In this Review, the changes in the clinical picture and epidemiology of SpA are discussed in light of the ASAS classification criteria for SpA.

  12. Enzyme kinetics: the whole picture reveals hidden meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Maria F; Estevinho, Berta N; Crespo, Rosa; Rocha, Fernando A; Damas, Ana M; Martins, Pedro M

    2015-06-01

    The methodology adopted by Michaelis and Menten in 1913 is still routinely used to characterize the catalytic power and selectivity of enzymes. These kinetic measurements must be performed soon after the purified enzyme is mixed with a large excess of substrate. Other time scales and solution compositions are no less physiologically relevant, but fall outside the range of applicability of the classical formalism. Here we show that the complete picture of an enzyme's mode of function is critically obscured by the limited scope of conventional kinetic analysis, even in the simplest case of a single active site without inhibition. This picture is now unveiled in a mathematically closed form that remains valid over the reaction time for all combinations of enzyme/substrate concentrations and rate constants. Algebraic simplicity is maintained in the new formalism when stationary reaction phases are considered. By achieving this century-old objective, the otherwise hidden role of the reversible binding step is revealed and atypical kinetic profiles are explained. Most singular kinetic behaviors are identified in a critical region of conditions that coincide with typical cell conditions. Because it is not covered by the Michaelis-Menten model, the critical region has been missed until now by low- and high-throughput screenings of new drugs. New possibilities are therefore raised for novel and once-promising inhibitors to therapeutically target enzymes.

  13. On the parton picture of Froissart asymptotic behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Kancheli, O V

    2016-01-01

    The Froissart \\F asymptotic behavior of high energy cross-sections, if considered in a parton picture, is usually represented as a kind of behavior that occurs in the process of a collision of two almost black disks filled with partons, when radiuses of these \\F -disks grow proportional to log's of there energies. In this article we briefly summarize the main asymptotic properties of \\F-disks that one can expect in QCD. Then we consider if it is possible to guarantee the boost-invariance of transparency $T(s,b) = 1 - \\sigma_{in}(s,b)$, where $\\sigma_{in}(s,b)$ is the total inelastic cross-section at a definite impact parameter $b$, in process of collision of two such \\F-disks. Such a question arise because the mean transverse area of the overlapping of colliding \\F-disks, at the same impact parameter b and total energy $\\sqrt{s}$, is varying with the Lorentz frame. We find that in the simple picture of \\F-disks, that on can expect in QCD, with confinement and parton saturation, the value of T is not boost-inv...

  14. A mental picture of the greenhouse effect. A pedagogic explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benestad, Rasmus E.

    2017-05-01

    The popular picture of the greenhouse effect emphasises the radiation transfer but fails to explain the observed climate change. An old conceptual model for the greenhouse effect is revisited and presented as a useful resource in climate change communication. It is validated against state-of-the-art data, and nontraditional diagnostics show a physically consistent picture. The earth's climate is constrained by well-known and elementary physical principles, such as energy balance, flow, and conservation. Greenhouse gases affect the atmospheric optical depth for infrared radiation, and increased opacity implies higher altitude from which earth's equivalent bulk heat loss takes place. Such an increase is seen in the reanalyses, and the outgoing long-wave radiation has become more diffuse over time, consistent with an increased influence of greenhouse gases on the vertical energy flow from the surface to the top of the atmosphere. The reanalyses further imply increases in the overturning in the troposphere, consistent with a constant and continuous vertical energy flow. The increased overturning can explain a slowdown in the global warming, and the association between these aspects can be interpreted as an entanglement between the greenhouse effect and the hydrological cycle, where reduced energy transfer associated with increased opacity is compensated by tropospheric overturning activity.

  15. The representation of physically active girls in children's picture books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Emily A; Clifton, Alexandra M

    2013-06-01

    Borrowing from Tuchman's (1978) concept of symbolic annihilation, the purpose of this study was to explore the ways in which physically active females were represented in children's picture books. Employing a qualitative content analysis methodology (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005), the written and pictorial portrayals of girls' physical activities were analyzed in 10 children's picture books. A directed approach to content analysis (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005) was employed in which the researchers began with predetermined categories that were used to code the text and images. The findings indicated that the majority of the primary female characters were illustrated wearing appropriate athletic attire that would allow for physical movement. Although all of the primary female characters were depicted as excited about being physically active, 6 of the books described the movement of the primary female characters using action-oriented descriptors. The parents of the primary female characters were identified as the primary source of encouragement and peers were found to be the primary source of discouragement toward the primary female characters' physical activity or sport involvement. The physical abilities of the primary female characters were compared to male peers in 3 of the books. Although the 10 books studied provide young girls with imagery and text that encourage female physicality, it is apparent that more books are needed that focus on girls' involvement in sport and physical activity. Meaningful forms of literature that encourage physical activity and sport involvement for girls are needed.

  16. Comparison of physiological responses to affect eliciting pictures and music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongwan; Wedell, Douglas H

    2016-03-01

    Recent investigations of the neural correlates of affect elicited from different modalities have found both modality-general and modality-specific representations (Chikazoe et al., 2014). The implications for how physiological responses to affect differ across stimulus modalities have not been fully investigated. This study examined similarities and differences between physiological signatures of affect derived from two different modes of presentation: visual pictures and auditory music sampled from an affective space defined by valence and arousal. Electromyography recordings for the zygomaticus major (EMGZ) and corrugator supercilii (EMGC) were measured along with heart rate and skin conductance level (SCL). Multidimensional scaling was used to visualize relationships from physiological and behavioral responses, and the observed relationships were statistically evaluated using multivariate and univariate analyses. Results for physiological measures demonstrated that valence was represented in the same general way across modalities, primarily reflected in EMGC responses. Arousal, however, was represented in a modality-specific manner, with SCL and EMGZ sensitive to music-based arousal but not picture-based arousal. Stimulus modality itself was predicted from EMGC. Thus, physiological responses to valence were similar across modalities but physiological responses to arousal differed across modalities. These results support the utility of testing for affective markers across modalities within the same experimental setting to reveal how physiological responses are linked to either affect, stimulus modality or both.

  17. A mental picture of the greenhouse effect - A pedagogic explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benestad, Rasmus E.

    2016-01-01

    The popular picture of the greenhouse effect emphasises the radiation transfer but fails to explain the observed climate change. An old conceptual model for the greenhouse effect is revisited and presented as a useful resource in climate change communication. It is validated against state-of-the-art data, and nontraditional diagnostics show a physically consistent picture. The earth's climate is constrained by well-known and elementary physical principles, such as energy balance, flow, and conservation. Greenhouse gases affect the atmospheric optical depth for infrared radiation, and increased opacity implies higher altitude from which earth's equivalent bulk heat loss takes place. Such an increase is seen in the reanalyses, and the outgoing long-wave radiation has become more diffuse over time, consistent with an increased influence of greenhouse gases on the vertical energy flow from the surface to the top of the atmosphere. The reanalyses further imply increases in the overturning in the troposphere, consistent with a constant and continuous vertical energy flow. The increased overturning can explain a slowdown in the global warming, and the association between these aspects can be interpreted as an entanglement between the greenhouse effect and the hydrological cycle, where reduced energy transfer associated with increased opacity is compensated by tropospheric overturning activity.

  18. Pictures of Particle Production in Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Alfred H

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on gluon(jet) production in dilute(proton)-dense(nucleus) collisions. Depending on the frame and gauge, gluon production can be viewed as a freeing of gluons coming from either the proton wave function or from the nucleus wave function. These (apparently) very different pictures must lead to the same result and the purpose of this paper is to see how that happens. The focus is on gluons having $k_\\perp\\sim Q_S$ or gluons in the scaling region $k_\\perp/Q_S\\gg 1$. In the McLerran-Venugopalan(MV) model with $k_\\perp\\sim Q_S$ we are able to derive gluon production in a way that (graphically) manifestly shows $k_\\perp$-factorization in terms of the number density of gluons in the nuclear wave function. We presume that this picture, and $k_\\perp$-factorization, continues to hold in the presence of small-$x$ evolution although we have not been able to explicitly verify this. Our result is in agreement with usual $k_\\perp$-factorization where the gluon number density of the nucleus does not appear i...

  19. The iconicity of picture communication symbols for rural Zulu children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Lize; Alant, Erna

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the iconicity of selected Picture Communication Symbols (PCS) for rural Zulu ten-year-olds. Participants were presented with copies of a commercially available communication overlay without glosses. They were required to match a symbol with each of 36 spoken Zulu labels. With both strict and lenient scoring criteria applied, 2.8% and 11.1% (respectively) of the symbols on the communication overlay emerged as iconic for participants. It was further established that the position of symbols on the overlay, the total frequency of selection of symbols, and gender did not influence results. An analysis of errors revealed that for some symbols many of the participants agreed on a single specific label, be it the target label or a non-target label; while for other symbols there were either many possible labels, or none. The term distinctiveness was coined to describe how well defined or specific were the evoked meanings triggered by a symbol in the viewers' minds. Results suggest that participants did not make maximum use of the information provided by arrows in the symbols. This finding could be ascribed to the opaqueness of arrows and participants' lack of previous experience with these conventional cues in pictures, as well as the traditional oral nature of the Zulu culture.

  20. Improving the Second Year Students Ability in Writing Narrative Paragraphs by Using Picture Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalsum Mochtar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This collaborative classroom action research was directed to obtain information about how the second grade students ability in writing a narrative paragraph improved by using picture series. Specifically, it was intended to develop the strategy of using picture series to improve the students ability in writing narrative paragraphs. The result shows that the appropriate model of using picture series in the teaching of writing narrative paragraphs contains some procedures and has some strengths in improving the students ability in writing narrative paragraphs. The improvements resulted from the use of series of pictures in the form of cartoon and series of questions related to the pictures.

  1. Adolescents' and adults' visual preferences for pictures of fruit and vegetable mixes -effect of complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Line Holler; Kildegaard, Heidi; Gabrielsen, G.;

    2012-01-01

    sets of pictures varied in their level of collative properties. They were designed using a 23 design by varying the cut, color, number of products, type of product, and combination of products. The pictures were also evaluated for perceived complexity by a descriptive panel. The results show high...... complexity for vegetable (V), fruit (F), and combined fruit and vegetable (FV) mixes. Two hundred and forty-two adolescents and 119 adults performed three incomplete rankings of visual preference of eight pictures of V mixes, eight pictures of F mixes, and eight pictures of FV mixes, respectively. The three...

  2. Picture encoding and retrieval:An event-related potentials study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Aiqing; GUO Chunyan; WU Yanhong; QU Nan; DING Jinhong

    2004-01-01

    A study-test paradigm was used to investigate the Dm (Differential memory) effect and the old/new effect of pictures. The participants were asked to judge whether the pictures were previously studied or not when they were presented with a series of pictures during the test phase. The event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during encoding and retrieval phases. The results showed that (1) during 400-700 ms of encoding, the remembered old pictures elicited more positive waveforms than the forgotten old pictures at frontal and central areas; (2) during 500-600 ms of retrieval, the correctly judged old pictures elicited more positive waveforms than the correctly judged new pictures at medial-midline in both hemispheres; (3) the duration of Dm effect was longer than that of old/new effect for picture. The present results suggest that the Dm effect of pictures is different from that of words and faces in spatial and temporal distributions. The neural mechanisms of picture encoding and picture retrieval are also different, which indicates that retrieval is not the simple recovery of encoding.

  3. Erotic and disgust-inducing pictures--differences in the hemodynamic responses of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Rudolf; Schienle, Anne; Girod, Cornelia; Walter, Bertram; Kirsch, Peter; Blecker, Carlo; Ott, Ulrich; Schäfer, Axel; Sammer, Gebhard; Zimmermann, Mark; Vaitl, Dieter

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this fMRI study was to explore brain structures that are involved in the processing of erotic and disgust-inducing pictures. The stimuli were chosen to trigger approach and withdrawal tendencies, respectively. By adding sadomasochistic (SM) scenes to the design and examining 12 subjects with and 12 subjects without sadomasochistic preferences, we introduced a picture category that induced erotic pleasure in one sample and disgust in the other sample. Since we also presented neutral pictures, all subjects viewed pictures of four different categories: neutral, disgust-inducing, erotic, and SM erotic pictures. The analysis indicated that several brain structures are commonly involved in the processing of disgust-inducing and erotic pictures (occipital cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and the amygdala). The ventral striatum was specifically activated when subjects saw highly sexually arousing pictures. This indicates the involvement of the human reward system during the processing of visual erotica.

  4. Effects of picture amount on preference, balance, and dynamic feel of Web pages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shu-Ying; Chen, Chien-Hsiung

    2012-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of picture amount on subjective evaluation. The experiment herein adopted two variables to define picture amount: column ratio and picture size. Six column ratios were employed: 7:93,15:85, 24:76, 33:67, 41:59, and 50:50. Five picture sizes were examined: 140 x 81, 220 x 127, 300 x 173, 380 x 219, and 460 x 266 pixels. The experiment implemented a within-subject design; 104 participants were asked to evaluate 30 web page layouts. Repeated measurements revealed that the column ratio and picture size have significant effects on preference, balance, and dynamic feel. The results indicated the most appropriate picture amount for display: column ratios of 15:85 and 24:76, and picture sizes of 220 x 127, 300 x 173, and 380 x 219. The research findings can serve as the basis for the application of design guidelines for future web page interface design.

  5. Investigating the flow of information during speaking: The impact of morpho-phonological, associative and categorical picture distractors on picture naming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens eBölte

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In three experiments, participants named target pictures by means of German compound words (e.g., Gartenstuhl - garden chair, each accompanied by two different distractor pictures (e.g., lawn mower and swimming pool.Targets and distractor pictures were semantically related, either associatively (garden chair and lawn mower or by a shared semantic category (garden chair and wardrobe. Within each type of semantic relation, target and distractor pictures either shared morpho-phonological (word-form information (Gartenstuhl with Gartenzwerg, garden gnome, and Gartenschlauch, garden hose or not. A condition with two completely unrelated pictures served as baseline. Target naming was facilitated when distractor and target pictures were morpho-phonologically related. This is clear evidence for the activation of lexical information of distractor pictures. Effects were larger for associatively than for categorically related distractors and targets, which constitutes evidence for lexical competition. Mere categorical relatedness, in the absence of morpho-phonological overlap, resulted in null effects (Experiments 1 and 2, and only speeded target naming when effects reflect only conceptual, not lexical processing (Experiment 3. Given that distractor pictures activate their word forms, the data cannot be easily reconciled with discrete serial models. The results fit well with models that allow information to cascade forward from conceptual to word-form levels.

  6. Spanish Picture Vocabulary Test. Prueba Ilustrada de vocabulario Espanol. An Adaptation of the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test. Manual [and] Plates. Research Project 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Florence D.; And Others

    The Spanish Picture Vocabulary Test was designed to provide a Spanish-language translation of the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test which would be suitable for Spanish-speaking Puerto Rican school-children in New York City. The 300 stimulus words were translated according to a consensus of linguists and persons of Puerto Rican descent, and were…

  7. Highly-defective nanocrystals of ZnS formed via dissimilatory bacterial sulfate reduction: A comparative study with their abiogenic analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Roco, Charles M.; Veeramani, Harish; Michel, F. Marc; Rimstidt, J. Donald; Winkler, Christopher; Hochella, Michael F.

    2016-05-01

    S crystallization, we also present viable explanations for the exclusive occurrence of structural defects in {1 1 1} planes of the biogenic nanocrystals. The findings of our study provide insight into the origin and fate of metal sulfide nanoparticles in the environment, and have implications for biomineralization, bioremediation of metal-contaminated sites, and bacterial production of functional nanomaterials.

  8. When does picture naming take longer than word reading?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eValente

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences between the cognitive processes involved in word reading and picture naming are well established (e.g. visual or lexico-semantic stages. Still, it is commonly thought that retrieval of phonological forms is shared across tasks. We report a test of this second hypothesis based on the time course of electroencephalographic (EEG neural activity, reasoning that similar EEG patterns might index similar processing stages.Seventeen participants named objects and read aloud the corresponding words while their behavior and EEG activity were recorded. The latter was analyzed from stimulus onset onwards (stimulus-locked analysis and from response onset backwards (response-locked analysis, using non-parametric statistics and the spatio-temporal segmentation of ERPs.Behavioral results confirmed that reading entails shorter latencies than naming. The analysis of EEG activity within the stimulus-to-response period allowed distinguishing three phases, broadly successive. Early on, we observed identical distribution of electric field potentials (i.e. topographies albeit with large amplitude divergences between tasks. Then, we observed sustained cross-task differences in topographies accompanied by extended amplitude differences. Finally, the two tasks again revealed the same topographies, with significant cross-task delays in their onsets and offsets, and still significant amplitude differences. In the response-locked ERPs, the common topography displayed an offset closer to response articulation in word reading compared with picture naming, that is the transition between the offset of this shared map and the onset of articulation was significantly faster in word reading.The results suggest that the degree of cross-task similarity varies across time. The first phase suggests similar visual processes of variable intensity and time course across tasks, while the second phase suggests marked differences. Finally, similarities and differences within the

  9. An Optical Watermarking Solution for Color Personal Identification Pictures

    CERN Document Server

    Yi-zhou, Tan; Shui-hua, Huang; Ben-jian, Sheng; Zhong-ming, Pan; 10.1117/12.839630

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for embedding authentication information into image on printed materials based on optical projection technique. Our experimental setup consists of two parts, one is a common camera, and the other is a LCD projector, which project a pattern on personnel's body (especially on the face). The pattern, generated by a computer, act as the illumination light source with sinusoidal distribution and it is also the watermark signal. For a color image, the watermark is embedded into the blue channel. While we take pictures (256 *256 and 512*512, 567*390 pixels, respectively), an invisible mark is embedded directly into magnitude oefficients of Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) at exposure moment. Both optical an d digital correlation is suitable for detection of this type of watermark. The decoded watermark is a set of concentric circles or sectors in the DFT domain (middle frequencies region) which is robust to photographing, printing and scanning. The unlawful people modify or replace...

  10. [Clinical picture and pathogenesis of the Refsum syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, A M

    1977-01-01

    The author reports of 2 cases (sisters of 13 and 15 years old) with the Refsum syndrome. The disease had its onset at the age of 12 and 5 years with a progressive development and remissions. The clinical picture was characterized by a recurrent syndrome of polyradiculoneurites with a slight protein cellular dissociation in the CSF, an expressed sensitive ataxia with elements of cerebellar disorders, a drop in the acuity of sight, audition, intellectual level and a deformation of the talipes of the Friedreich type. In a single examination of fatty acids in the blood serum by the method of gas chromotography there were no data pointing to the existence of 3, 7, 11, 15-tetra metylhexadecone acids. On the basis of an immunological study the author discusses the role of autoimmune reactions in the pathogenesis of the diseases. A differential diagnosis was conducted between acanthocytosis and porphyria with recommendations in regard to treatment.

  11. Predicting naming latencies for action pictures: Dutch norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zeshu; Roelofs, Ardi; Meyer, Antje S

    2014-03-01

    The present study provides Dutch norms for age of acquisition, familiarity, imageability, image agreement, visual complexity, word frequency, and word length (in syllables) for 124 line drawings of actions. Ratings were obtained from 117 Dutch participants. Word frequency was determined on the basis of the SUBTLEX-NL corpus (Keuleers, Brysbaert, & New, Behavior Research Methods, 42, 643-650, 2010). For 104 of the pictures, naming latencies and name agreement were determined in a separate naming experiment with 74 native speakers of Dutch. The Dutch norms closely corresponded to the norms for British English. Multiple regression analysis showed that age of acquisition, imageability, image agreement, visual complexity, and name agreement were significant predictors of naming latencies, whereas word frequency and word length were not. Combined with the results of a principal-component analysis, these findings suggest that variables influencing the processes of conceptual preparation and lexical selection affect latencies more strongly than do variables influencing word-form encoding.

  12. There's more to the picture than meets the eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Sørensen, Jens Fyhn Lykke

    2007-01-01

    A missing link in economics has been what Veblen in 1908 termed intangible capital. This includes common norms, trust and high levels of cooperative performance. Intangibles are invisible to the eye and not easily measured in quantitative terms. They nevertheless involve visible, socioeconomic...... outcomes and should therefore rightly be seen as productive, like tangibles. Thus, uneven levels of intangible capital would explain Differential Economic Performance (DEP) between, say, two firms containing exactly the same stock of physical, economic and human capital. Despite this common sense...... observation, most economists have failed to see that ‘there's more to the picture than meets the eye', as Neil Young once sang. We use statistical, historical and fieldwork data from two Danish, marginal rural communities both rich on intangible capital. This to show how intangible capital in the form...

  13. The Peak/Dip Picture of the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Graziano

    2016-10-01

    The initial shear field plays a central role in the formation of large-scale structures, and in shaping the geometry, morphology, and topology of the cosmic web. We discuss a recent theoretical framework for the shear tensor, termed the `peak/dip picture', which accounts for the fact that halos/voids may form from local extrema of the density field - rather than from random spatial positions; the standard Doroshkevich's formalism is generalized, to include correlations between the density Hessian and shear field at special points in space around which halos/voids may form. We then present the `peak/dip excursion-set-based' algorithm, along with its most recent applications - merging peaks theory with the standard excursion set approach.

  14. Disc amplitudes, picture changing and space-time actions

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Katrin; Robbins, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We study in detail the procedure for obtaining couplings of D-branes to closed string fields by evaluating string theory disc amplitudes. We perform a careful construction of the relevant vertex operators and discuss the effects of inserting the boundary state which encodes the presence of the D-brane. We confront the issue of non-decoupling of BRST-exact states and prove that the problem is evaded for the computations we need, thus demonstrating that our amplitudes are automatically gauge-invariant and independent of the distribution of picture charge. Finally, we compute explicitly the two-point amplitudes of two NS-NS fields or one NS-NS and one R-R field on the disc, and we carefully compare all the lowest order terms with predictions from supergravity.

  15. Tachyon field in Loop Quantum Cosmology: inflation and evolution picture

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, H H; Xiong, Hua-Hui; Zhu, Jian-Yang

    2007-01-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) predicts a nonsingular evolution of the universe through a bounce in the high energy region. We show that this is always true in tachyon matter LQC. Different from the classical FRW cosmology, the superinflation can appear in the tachyon matter LQC; furthermore, the inflation can be extended to the region where classical inflation stops. Using numerical method, we give an evolution picture of the tachyon field with an exponential potential in the context of LQC. It indicates that the quantum dynamical solutions have the attractor behavior as the classical solutions does. And, the whole evolution of the tachyon field is that: at the far past, the tachyon field, being in the contracting cosmology, is accelerated to climb up the potential hill with a negative velocity; and then, the tachyon field at the boundary is bounced into an expanding universe with positive velocity rolling down to the bottom of the potential.

  16. Unified picture of the oxygen isotope effect in cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Wu, Zhigang; Lin, Hai-Qing; Hemley, Russell J; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2007-03-06

    High-temperature superconductivity in cuprates was discovered almost exactly 20 years ago, but a satisfactory theoretical explanation for this phenomenon is still lacking. The isotope effect has played an important role in establishing electron-phonon interaction as the dominant interaction in conventional superconductors. Here we present a unified picture of the oxygen isotope effect in cuprate superconductors based on a phonon-mediated d-wave pairing model within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. We show that this model accounts for the magnitude of the isotope exponent as functions of the doping level as well as the variation between different cuprate superconductors. The isotope effect on the superconducting transition is also found to resemble the effect of pressure on the transition. These results indicate that the role of phonons should not be overlooked for explaining the superconductivity in cuprates.

  17. A New Evolutionary Picture for CVs and LMXBs

    CERN Document Server

    King, A R; King, Andrew R.; Schenker, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    We consider an alternative to the standard picture of CV and LMXB evolution, namely the idea that most CVs (and by extension LMXBs) may not yet have had time to evolve to their theoretical minimum orbital periods. We call this the Binary Age Postulate (BAP). The observed short-period cutoff in the CV histogram emerges naturally as the shortest period yet reached in the age of the Galaxy, while the post-minimum-period space density problem is removed. The idea has similar desirable consequences for LMXBs. In both cases systems with nuclear-evolved secondary stars form a prominent part of the short-period distributions. Properties such as the existence and nature of ultrashort-period systems, and the spread in mass transfer rates at a given orbital period, are naturally reproduced.

  18. [Familial Mediterranean fever - clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallos, Tomáš; Ilenčíková, Denisa; Kovács, László

    2014-01-01

    Familial mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most prevalent genetically determined autoinflammatory disease. FMF significantly decreases the quality of life and limits life expectancy due to the development of amyloidosis in affected individuals. Prevalence of FMF is highest in the south-eastern Mediterraneans. In other parts of the world, its occurance is often restricted to high-risk ethnic goups. In Central Europe, experience with FMF is scarse. As for Slovakia, we have reported the first cases of FMF in ethnic Slovaks only recently. Along with their complicated fates, this has lead us to compile a comprehensive overview of the clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of this elusive disease. Hereby we hope to be able to promote the awareness about this disease and possibly aid the diagnosis in new patients.

  19. Aberrantly flattened responsivity to emotional pictures in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun; Kim, Jae-Jin; Namkoong, Kee; An, Suk Kyoon; Seok, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Yu Jin; Kang, Jee In; Choi, Jae Hyuk; Hong, Taekyong; Jeon, Jong Hee; Lee, Hong Shick

    2006-08-30

    To investigate the nature of emotional experience in schizophrenia, we examined emotional responses to affective stimuli. Twenty-one outpatients with schizophrenia (9 paranoid, 12 nonparanoid) and 20 normal controls rated the arousal and valence that they experienced from the presentation of 60 pictures. Schizophrenia patients displayed less emotional responsivity to the positive stimuli and they displayed diverse responsivity to the negative stimuli, which depended upon arousal level. Further analysis, using schizophrenia subtype, indicated that nonparanoid patients reported increased negative responsivity and decreased positive responsivity, regardless of arousal level. However, paranoid schizophrenia patients showed enhanced self-reported experiences of emotion to the low arousing stimuli and diminished responsivity to the high arousing stimuli. This pattern was robust to the negative stimuli. These findings suggest that paranoid schizophrenia patients might suffer from aberrantly flattened responses to negative emotional stimuli, and that this may account for paranoid tendency and secondary social isolation in paranoid schizophrenia.

  20. Breathing and affective picture processing across the adult lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Patrick; Filippou, Dimitra; Pais, Bruno; von Gunten, Armin; Danuser, Brigitta

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigated differences between healthy younger, middle-aged, and older adults in their respiratory responses to pictures of different valence and arousal. Expiratory time shortened and end-tidal PCO2 decreased with increasing arousal in all age groups; yet, compared to younger adults, older adults' overall change from baseline was smaller for expiratory time and larger for end-tidal PCO2. Contrary to their younger counterparts, older adults' inspiratory time did not shorten with increasing arousal. Inspiratory duty cycle did not covary with affective ratings for younger adults, increased with unpleasantness for middle-aged adults, and increased with arousal for older adults. Thoracic breathing increased with increasing unpleasantness only among older adults. Age had no effects on mean inspiratory flow and minute ventilation, which both augmented as arousal increased. We discuss how age effects on respiratory response magnitude and pattern may depend on age-associated biological changes or reflect age-related differences in emotional processing.

  1. The sound picture of the Saami shamanic drum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Kristoffersson

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the Saami shamanic drum has mainly concerned the pictorial world of the drumhead. Therefore, studying the sound picture may give new insights into the Saami Shamanic drum. In my study of the Saami drum I have tried to find the answer to two questions: 1 Is it possible to detect the sound pictogram from some of the drums preserved? 2 Are there marks of usage which might indicate what kind of sounds the users preferred? A comparison of the different drums shows that the signs of usage are surprisingly consistent. The drum sounds reach the receptive organs in the human ear in a range of low but strong tones, with low frequencies but high amplitude. This means that more energy is transferred into the nervous system than with various other types of instrumental sounds.

  2. On two pictures in the heuristic approach to gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nikishov, A I

    2007-01-01

    We examine the heuristic approach to constant gravitational field by Dehnen, H\\"onl and Westpfahl, extending it everywhere beyond linear approximation. Then it becomes flexible to accommodate possible modifications of General Relativity. We have found that two pictures introduced in the related paper by Thirring are helpful in better understanding some features of gravitation. In particular, this approach suggest that the privileged system for constant gravitational field must be the isotropic one and that the requirement of gauge invariance in gravitation theory may be a luxury; it is sufficient to take care that the nonphysical degrees of freedom do not invalidate calculations. It follows from this approach that gravitational constant should depend on gravitational field and some universality in the form of metric of an asymmetric body is suggested.

  3. The clinical picture of neonatal infection with Pantoea species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rostenberghe, H; Noraida, R; Wan Pauzi, W I; Habsah, H; Zeehaida, M; Rosliza, A R; Fatimah, I; Nik Sharimah, N Y; Maimunah, H

    2006-04-01

    Pantoea infections are uncommon in humans. Most reports have involved adults or children after thorn injuries. There are only a few reports of systemic infections with Pantoea. This is the first report of the clinical picture of systemic Pantoea spp. infection in neonates as observed during an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit caused by infected parenteral nutrition solutions. Even though detected early, the infections had a fulminant course, causing septicemic shock and respiratory failure. Pulmonary disease was prominent and presented mainly as pulmonary hemorrhage and adult respiratory distress syndrome. The organism was sensitive to most antibiotics used in neonatal intensive care units, but the clinical response to antibiotic therapy was poor. The fatality rate was very high: 7 out of 8 infected infants succumbed to the infection (87.5%).

  4. Venus - Atmospheric motion and structure from Mariner 10 pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B. C.; Belton, M. J. S.; Danielson, G. E.; Davies , M. E.; Gault, D.; Hapke, B.; O'Leary, B.; Strom, R. G.; Suomi , V.; Trask, N.

    1974-01-01

    The Mariner 10 television cameras imaged the planet Venus in the visible and near ultraviolet for a period of 8 days at resolutions ranging from 100 meters to 130 kilometers. The general pattern of the atmospheric circulation in the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric region is displayed in the pictures. Atmospheric flow is symmetrical between north and south hemispheres. The equatorial motions are zonal (east-west) at approximately 100 meters per second, consistent with the previously inferred 4-day retrograde rotation. Angular velocity increases with latitude. The subsolar region, and the region downwind from it, show evidence of large-scale convection that persists in spite of the main zonal motion. Dynamical interaction between the zonal motion and the relatively stationary region of convection is evidenced by bowlike waves.

  5. Malaria films: Motion pictures as a public health tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedunkiw, Marianne

    2003-07-01

    I offer a historical examination of a group of malaria motion pictures, a subset of a larger genre of public health films. The majority of these more than 100 films were produced or coproduced by American and British agencies or production companies since 1940. The material is divided into 5 chronological periods, which include World War II, the postcolonial or DDT era (1946-1961), and the past 2 decades. The films themselves, I argue, represent a unique record of preventive measures, clinical techniques, and sociocultural biases, all within the context of a history of one of the greatest continuing challenges in public health. The malaria films, as a group, represent a large body of work that has not yet been brought together or analyzed as historical sources.

  6. Venus: Atmospheric motion and structure from Mariner 10 pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.C.; Belton, M.J.S.; Edward, Danielson G.; Davies, M.E.; Gault, D.; Hapke, B.; O'Leary, B.; Strom, R.G.; Suomi, V.; Trask, N.

    1974-01-01

    The Mariner 10 television cameras imaged the planet Venus in the visible and near ultraviolet for a period of 8 days at resolutions ranging from 100 meters to 130 kilometers. The general pattern of the atmospheric circulation in the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric region is displayed in the pictures. Atmospheric flow is symmetrical between north and south hemispheres. The equatorial motions are zonal (east-west) at approximately 100 meters per second, consistent with the previously inferred 4-day retrograde rotation. Angular velocity increases with latitude. The subsolar region, and the region downwind from it, show evidence of large-scale convection that persists in spite of the main zonal motion. Dynamical interaction between the zonal motion and the relatively stationary region of convection is evidenced by bowlike waves.

  7. Picture of Beautiful Women with Flowers in Their Hair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    The painting Picture of Beautiful Women with Flowers in Their Hair is attributed by some to Zhou Fang—a well-known painter of figures in the Tang Dynasty. Painted on silk, this 46×180 cm work depicts some of the aspects of the luxurious lives of noble women during the reign of Li Kuo, an emperor of the Tang Dynasty. The painter, by employing fine lines and deep colors, creates a leisurely and carefree mood. In this scene, a group of beautiful women, five mistresses and one servant girl, are playing with dogs, catching butterflies, and enjoying the flowers on a walk in rate spring. The noble women are dressed in gorgeous silk

  8. 奥奈达希瓦氏菌MR-1的Fe(Ⅲ)还原特性及其影响因素%Dissimilatory Fe(Ⅲ) reduction by Shewanclla oneidensis MR-1 and impact factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洁; 储茵; 司友斌

    2011-01-01

    Dissimilatory Fe(Ul) reduction by Shewanclla oneidensis MR-1 was studied, and impact factors such as electronic donors, Fe(III) forms, dissolved oxygen content and pH were investigated. The results showed that Fedissimilatory iron reduction. Strain MR-1 could reduce Fe(III) in the range of pH 5.0 to 9.0. The effects of protein denaturants SDS and OGP suggested that Fe(Ⅲ) reduction function proteins of strain MR-1 were mainly localized to the soluble outer membrane fraction. Tannins acid and pyrogallic acid could enhance Fe(III) reduction, and iron reduction rates were 76.37% and 68.73%, respectively.%研究奥奈达希瓦氏菌MR-1的Fe(Ⅲ)还原特性,并考察不同电子供体、不同形态Fe(Ⅲ)、溶解氧、pH等对奥奈达希瓦氏菌MR-1还原Fe(Ⅲ)的影响.结果表明,奥奈达希瓦氏菌MR-1对Fe(Ⅲ)有还原能力,以乙酸盐、乳酸盐和丙酮酸盐作为Fe(Ⅲ)还原的唯一电子供体,Fe(Ⅲ)还原率分别达到39.12%,50.89%和44.98%;以FeCl3、Fe(OH)3和柠檬酸铁等不同形态Fe(Ⅲ)为菌株MR-1的唯一电子受体,Fe(Ⅲ)还原率分别达到44.72%,51.54%和10.45%;溶解氧的存在可抑制Fe(Ⅲ)异化还原;菌株MR-1可在pH 5.0-9.0范围内进行Fe(Ⅲ)还原;两种不同的蛋白质变性剂SDS和OGP作用下的Fe(Ⅲ)还原结果表明,菌株MR-1的Fe(Ⅲ)还原功能蛋白主要位于细胞外膜;同时,投加一定量的单宁酸和焦性没食子酸可提高Fe(Ⅲ)还原率,螯合铁的还原率分别达到76.37%和68.73%.

  9. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Yufeng; Shi, Liang; Tien, Ming

    2011-09-30

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The components of respiratory metabolism are localized in the membrane fractions which include the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane. Many of the biological components that interact with the various iron forms are proposed to be localized in these membrane fractions. To identify the iron-binding proteins acting either as an iron transporter or as a terminal iron reductase, we used metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. This system catalyzed the oxidation of amino acids in close proximity to the iron binding site. The carbonyl groups formed from this oxidation can then be labeled with fluoresceinamine (FLNH2). The peptide harboring the FLNH2 can then be proteolytically digested, purified by HPLC and then identified by MALDI-TOF tandem MS. A predominant peptide was identified to be part of SO2907 that encodes a putative TonB-dependent receptor. Compared to wild type (wt), the so2097 gene deletion (ΔSO2907) mutant has impaired ability to reduce soluble Fe(III), but retains the same ability to respire oxygen or fumarate as the wt. The ΔSO2907 mutant was also impacted in reduction of insoluble iron. Iron binding assays using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence tryptophan quenching demonstrated that a truncated form of heterologous-expressed SO2907 that contains the Fe(III) binding site, is capable of binding soluble Fe(III) forms with Kd of approximate 50 μM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the physiological role of SO2907 in Fe(III) reduction by MR-1.

  10. Concept for a common operational picture in a guidance vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Boris; Eck, Ralf; Maier, Sebastian

    2017-05-01

    A Common Operational Picture (COP) shows many operational aspects in coded form inside a geodata representation like a map. For building this picture, many specialized groups produce information. Beside the operating forces these are intelligences, logistics, or the own leaders planning group. Operations in which a COP is used typically are disaster management or military actions. An existing software for Interactive Visualization of Integrated Geodata runs on Tablet-PCs, PCs, Digital Map Tables and video walls. It is already used by the Deutsche Führungsakademie (military academy) for the education of staff officers. German civil disaster management agency decided to use the Digital Map Table for their intelligence analysis. In a mobile scenario, however, novel requirements have to be taken into account to adapt the software to the new environment. This paper investigates these requirements as well as the possible adaptions to provide a COP across multiple players on the go. When acting together, the groups do this in a widespread manner. They are physically spread and they use a variety of software and hardware to produce their contribution. This requires hardware to be ruggedized, mobile, and to support a variety of interfaces. The limited bandwidth in such a setting poses the main challenge for the software, which has to synchronize exchanging a minimum of information. Especially for mobile participants, a solution is planned that scales the amount of data (maps/intelligence data) to the available equipment, the upcoming mission, and the underlying theatre. Special focus is laid on a guidance vehicle leading a convoy.

  11. How to Take a Picture of A Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This movie first shows an artist's animation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander snapping a picture of its arm, then transitions to the actual picture of the arm in its stowed configuration, with its biobarrier unpeeled. The arm is still folded up, with its 'elbow' shown at upper left and its scoop at bottom right. The biobarrier is the shiny film seen to the left of the arm in this view. The barrier is an extra precaution to protect Mars from contamination with any bacteria from Earth. While the whole spacecraft was decontaminated through cleaning, filters and heat, the robotic arm was given additional protection because it is the only spacecraft part that will directly touch the ice below the surface of Mars. Before the arm was heated, it was sealed in the biobarrier, which is made of a trademarked film called Tedlar that holds up to baking like a turkey-basting bag. This ensures that any new bacterial spores that might have come about during the final steps before launch, and during the journey to Mars, will not contact the robotic arm. After Phoenix landed, springs were used to pop back the barrier, giving it room to deploy. The arm is scheduled to begin to unlatch on the third Martian day of the mission, or Sol 3 (May 28, 2008). This image was taken on Sol 1 (May 26, 2008) by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Prediction of subjective ratings of emotional pictures by EEG features

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J.; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Sarnacki, William A.; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Emotion dysregulation is an important aspect of many psychiatric disorders. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology could be a powerful new approach to facilitating therapeutic self-regulation of emotions. One possible BCI method would be to provide stimulus-specific feedback based on subject-specific electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to emotion-eliciting stimuli. Approach. To assess the feasibility of this approach, we studied the relationships between emotional valence/arousal and three EEG features: amplitude of alpha activity over frontal cortex; amplitude of theta activity over frontal midline cortex; and the late positive potential over central and posterior mid-line areas. For each feature, we evaluated its ability to predict emotional valence/arousal on both an individual and a group basis. Twenty healthy participants (9 men, 11 women; ages 22-68) rated each of 192 pictures from the IAPS collection in terms of valence and arousal twice (96 pictures on each of 4 d over 2 weeks). EEG was collected simultaneously and used to develop models based on canonical correlation to predict subject-specific single-trial ratings. Separate models were evaluated for the three EEG features: frontal alpha activity; frontal midline theta; and the late positive potential. In each case, these features were used to simultaneously predict both the normed ratings and the subject-specific ratings. Main results. Models using each of the three EEG features with data from individual subjects were generally successful at predicting subjective ratings on training data, but generalization to test data was less successful. Sparse models performed better than models without regularization. Significance. The results suggest that the frontal midline theta is a better candidate than frontal alpha activity or the late positive potential for use in a BCI-based paradigm designed to modify emotional reactions.

  13. The neural correlates of picture naming facilitated by auditory repetition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Shiree

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overt repetition of auditorily presented words can facilitate picture naming performance in both unimpaired speakers and individuals with word retrieval difficulties, but the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms and longevity of such effects remain unclear. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether different neurological mechanisms underlie short-term (within minutes and long-term (within days facilitation effects from an auditory repetition task in healthy older adults. Results The behavioral results showed that both short- and long-term facilitated items were named significantly faster than unfacilitated items, with short-term items significantly faster than long-term items. Neuroimaging analyses identified a repetition suppression effect for long-term facilitated items, relative to short-term facilitated and unfacilitated items, in regions known to be associated with both semantic and phonological processing. A repetition suppression effect was also observed for short-term facilitated items when compared to unfacilitated items in a region of the inferior temporal lobe linked to semantic processing and object recognition, and a repetition enhancement effect when compared to long-term facilitated items in a posterior superior temporal region associated with phonological processing. Conclusions These findings suggest that different neurocognitive mechanisms underlie short- and long-term facilitation of picture naming by an auditory repetition task, reflecting both phonological and semantic processing. More specifically, the brain areas engaged were consistent with the view that long-term facilitation may be driven by a strengthening of semantic-phonological connections. Short-term facilitation, however, appears to result in more efficient semantic processing and/or object recognition, possibly in conjunction with active recognition of the phonological form.

  14. The time course of implicit processing of erotic pictures: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunliang; Wang, Lili; Wang, Naiyi; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2012-12-13

    The current study investigated the time course of the implicit processing of erotic stimuli using event-related potentials (ERPs). ERPs elicited by erotic pictures were compared with those by three other types of pictures: non-erotic positive, negative, and neutral pictures. We observed that erotic pictures evoked enhanced neural responses compared with other pictures at both early (P2/N2) and late (P3/positive slow wave) temporal stages. These results suggested that erotic pictures selectively captured individuals' attention at early stages and evoked deeper processing at late stages. More importantly, the amplitudes of P2, N2, and P3 only discriminated between erotic and non-erotic (i.e., positive, neutral, and negative) pictures. That is, no difference was revealed among non-erotic pictures, although these pictures differed in both valence and arousal. Thus, our results suggest that the erotic picture processing is beyond the valence and arousal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigating the effect of respiratory bodily threat on the processing of emotional pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juravle, Georgiana; Stoeckel, Maria Cornelia; Rose, Michael; Gamer, Matthias; Büchel, Christian; Wieser, Matthias Johannes; von Leupoldt, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that emotions can substantially impact the perception and neural processing of breathlessness, but little is known about the reverse interaction. Here, we examined the impact of breathlessness on emotional picture processing. The continuous EEG was recorded while volunteers viewed positive/neutral/negative emotional pictures under conditions of resistive-load-induced breathlessness, auditory noise, and an unloaded baseline. Breathlessness attenuated P1 and early posterior negativity (EPN) ERP amplitudes, irrespective of picture valence. Moreover, as expected, larger amplitudes for positive and negative pictures relative to neutral pictures were found for EPN and the late positive potential (LPP) ERPs, which were not affected by breathlessness. The results suggest that breathlessness impacts on the early attention-related neural processing of picture stimuli without influencing the later cognitive processing of emotional contents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The interaction of anticipatory anxiety and emotional picture processing: an event-related brain potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublatzky, Florian; Flaisch, Tobias; Stockburger, Jessica; Schmälzle, Ralf; Schupp, Harald T

    2010-07-01

    The present study examined the interaction of anticipatory anxiety and selective emotion processing. Toward this end, a rapid stream of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant pictures was presented in alternating blocks of threat-of-shock or safety, which were signaled by colored picture frames. The main finding is that pleasant pictures elicited a sustained negative difference potential over occipital regions during threat as compared to safety periods. In contrast, unpleasant and neutral picture processing did not vary as a function of threat-of-shock. Furthermore, in both the safety and threat-of-shock conditions, emotional pictures elicited an enlarged early posterior negativity and late positive potential. These data show that the activation of the fear/anxiety network exerts valence-specific effects on affective picture processing. Pleasant stimuli mismatching the current state of anticipatory anxiety apparently draw more attentional resources.

  17. Personal relevance modulates the positivity bias in recall of emotional pictures in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszczyk, Jennifer C; Fernandes, Myra A; MacLeod, Colin M

    2008-02-01

    Some studies have suggested that older adults remember more positive than negative valence information, relative to younger adults, whereas other studies have reported no such difference. We tested whether differences in encoding instructions and in personal relevance could account for these inconsistencies. Younger and older adults were instructed either to passively view positive, negative, and neutral pictures or to actively categorize them by valence. On a subsequent incidental recall test, older adults recalled equal numbers of positive and negative pictures, whereas younger adults recalled negative pictures best. There was no effect of encoding instructions. Crucially, when the pictures were grouped into high and low personal relevance, a positivity bias emerged in older adults only for low-relevance pictures, suggesting that the personal relevance of pictures may be the factor underlying cross-study differences.

  18. Improving the Second Year Students Ability in Writing Narrative Paragraphs by Using Picture Series

    OpenAIRE

    Kalsum Mochtar

    2016-01-01

    This collaborative classroom action research was directed to obtain information about how the second grade students ability in writing a narrative paragraph improved by using picture series. Specifically, it was intended to develop the strategy of using picture series to improve the students ability in writing narrative paragraphs. The result shows that the appropriate model of using picture series in the teaching of writing narrative paragraphs contains some procedures and has some strengths...

  19. Improving the Second Year Students Ability in Writing Narrative Paragraphs by Using Picture Series

    OpenAIRE

    Kalsum Mochtar

    2016-01-01

    This collaborative classroom action research was directed to obtain information about how the second grade students ability in writing a narrative paragraph improved by using picture series. Specifically, it was intended to develop the strategy of using picture series to improve the students ability in writing narrative paragraphs. The result shows that the appropriate model of using picture series in the teaching of writing narrative paragraphs contains some procedures and has some strengths...

  20. Aerial projection of three-dimensional motion pictures by electro-holography and parabolic mirrors

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Kakue; Takashi Nishitsuji; Tetsuya Kawashima; Keisuke Suzuki; Tomoyoshi Shimobaba; Tomoyoshi Ito

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an aerial projection system for reconstructing 3D motion pictures based on holography. The system consists of an optical source, a spatial light modulator corresponding to a display and two parabolic mirrors. The spatial light modulator displays holograms calculated by computer and can reconstruct holographic motion pictures near the surface of the modulator. The two parabolic mirrors can project floating 3D images of the motion pictures formed by the spatial light modulator wi...

  1. VLSI metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G; Gildenblat, Gennady Sh

    1987-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 15: VLSI Metallization discusses the various issues and problems related to VLSI metallization. It details the available solutions and presents emerging trends.This volume is comprised of 10 chapters. The two introductory chapters, Chapter 1 and 2 serve as general references for the electrical and metallurgical properties of thin conducting films. Subsequent chapters review the various aspects of VLSI metallization. The order of presentation has been chosen to follow the common processing sequence. In Chapter 3, some relevant metal deposition tec

  2. Flow Analysis By High Speed Photography And Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, H.

    1985-02-01

    At the ONERA hydrodynamic visualization laboratory, high-speed photography and cinematography are used for analysing flow-phenomena around fixed or mobile models in the test section of three vertical water tunnels, operating by gravity draining. These studies in water are based on the hydraulic analogy of aerodynamic incompressible flows. Flow visualization is archieved by liquid tracers (dye emissions) or gaseous tracers (fine air bubbles in suspension in water). In many cases, the pictures at normal speed or long exposure time are insufficient, for they do not permit to distinguish all the details of the phenomena, due to an averaging or motion effect. Furthermore they must be completed with high speed pictures. This is illustrated by a few visua-lization examples recently obtained on following themes - two dimensional flow around a fixed cylinder, first at the start of the flow (symmetrical vortex), then in steady regime (periodic vortex street) ; - laminar-turbulent transition in a boundary layer along a cylindrical body at zero angle of attack ; - flow separation around a sphere and wake in steady regime at small and high Reynolds numbers; - flow separation around a profile, first with fixed incidence, then with harmonic oscillations in pitch ; - core structure of a longitudinal vortex issued from a wing first organized, then disintegrated under the effect of a lengthwise pressure gradient (vortex breakdown) ; - mixing zone around a turbulent axisymmetric jet, characterized by the formation of large vortex struc-tures ; - hovering tests of an helicopter rotor, first at the start of the rotation, then in established regime, finally in cruise flight ; - case of a complete helicopter model in cruise-flight, with air-intake simulation, gas exhaust and tail rotor ; - flow around a complete delta-wing aircraft model at mean or high angle of attack, first in steady regime, then with harmonic oscillations in yaw or pitch. These results illustrate the contribution of

  3. The Other Side of the Camera: Behind-the-Scenes Jobs in Television and Motion Pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kathleen

    1995-01-01

    Describes the principal occupations involved with television and motion picture production: producers, photographers, electricians, sound mixers, and script supervisors. Discusses salaries, hours, employment opportunities, and schools. (JOW)

  4. Study of journal bearing dynamics using 3-dimensional motion picture graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, D. E.; Sosoka, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Computer generated motion pictures of three dimensional graphics are being used to analyze journal bearings under dynamically loaded conditions. The motion pictures simultaneously present the motion of the journal and the pressures predicted within the fluid film of the bearing as they evolve in time. The correct prediction of these fluid film pressures can be complicated by the development of cavitation within the fluid. The numerical model that is used predicts the formation of the cavitation bubble and its growth, downstream movement, and subsequent collapse. A complete physical picture is created in the motion picture as the journal traverses through the entire dynamic cycle.

  5. Picture archiving and communication systems in digital cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Sandra; Grigioni, Mauro; Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Balzano, Simone; Giansanti, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes a fundamental feature of digital cytology relevant to the implementation of the technology in the hospital net services: the electronic recording of the virtual slides (VS) in the hospital information system (HIS) through a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Starting from the digital cytology (D-CYT) state of art and considering the most important products in the field, particular attention has been devoted in this review to the comparison with the digital radiology (D-RAD). Two main indications emerged from the study: 1. there is not a standard in the digital files relevant to the virtual slides in D-CYT, while in D-RAD the standard digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM), introduced by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), has been adopted from several years; 2. the PACS in D-CYT are not standardized from manufacturers. The study makes a proposal of a useful software architecture to improve the PACS integration for D-CYT applications, with potentialities in the HIS.

  6. Emotional & electroencephalographic responses during affective picture viewing after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabbe, James B; Smith, J Carson; Dishman, Rod K

    2007-02-28

    We examined the effects of 30 min of cycling exercise at a moderate intensity of 50% peak oxygen uptake, compared to 30 min of rest, on changes in emotional responses to pictorial foreground stimuli that reliably elicit unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant affect. Emotional responses were measured by self-reports of valence (unpleasant to pleasant) and arousal (low to high) and by hemispheric asymmetry (R-L) of frontal and parietal brain electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in 13 females and 21 males (24+/-3 y). Compared to after rest, self-reports of arousal in response to unpleasant slides were diminished after exercise, but self-reports of valence and frontal asymmetry of alpha frequencies were generally unchanged. Even so, there were differential responses in asymmetry in the beta frequencies in the frontal region and for alpha and beta frequencies in the parietal region, indicative of decreased activity in the left frontal and right parietal regions after exercise compared to after rest. We conclude that moderately intense cycling exercise generally does not alter emotional responding to pleasant and neutral pictures, but may reduce emotional arousal during exposure to unpleasant stimuli.

  7. Clinicogenetics of Parkinson's disease: a drawing but not completed picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Dong Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder mainly affecting the population over the age of 60 years. The past decade has seen rapidly emerging data supporting a major importance of genetic factors in the development of PD. Increasing number of large-scale and replicating association studies has facilitated the confirmation of the possible predisposing factors to PD and the selection of genetic variants for risk prediction. While evidences are accumulating that variations within the SNCA, LRRK2, MAPT and GBA genes increase the individuals' vulnerability to PD, inconclusive or negative results have been reported for an association between PD and variants of the parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, UCH-L1, Omi/HtrA2, GIGYF2, PLA2G6, VPS35, EIF4G1 and BST1 genes. However, our understanding of the genetic picture of PD remains preliminary. Molecular diagnosis of the disease is only recommended for cases with clear family history, and currently, there is no ideal genomic biomarker available to predict the disease onset and progression, or to make a molecular classification of the disease. Efforts are expected to identify more genetic predisposing factors and to further clarify their roles in the mechanisms of PD.

  8. Picture archiving and communication systems in digital cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Morelli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a fundamental feature of digital cytology relevant to the implementation of the technology in the hospital net services: the electronic recording of the virtual slides (VS in the hospital information system (HIS through a picture archiving and communication system (PACS. Starting from the digital cytology (D-CYT state of art and considering the most important products in the field, particular attention has been devoted in this review to the comparison with the digital radiology (D-RAD. Two main indications emerged from the study: 1. there is not a standard in the digital files relevant to the virtual slides in D-CYT, while in D-RAD the standard digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM, introduced by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA, has been adopted from several years; 2. the PACS in D-CYT are not standardized from manufacturers. The study makes a proposal of a useful software architecture to improve the PACS integration for D-CYT applications, with potentialities in the HIS.

  9. Volumetric display containing multiple two-dimensional color motion pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, R.; Shiraki, A.; Nakayama, H.; Kakue, T.; Shimobaba, T.; Ito, T.

    2014-06-01

    We have developed an algorithm which can record multiple two-dimensional (2-D) gradated projection patterns in a single three-dimensional (3-D) object. Each recorded pattern has the individual projected direction and can only be seen from the direction. The proposed algorithm has two important features: the number of recorded patterns is theoretically infinite and no meaningful pattern can be seen outside of the projected directions. In this paper, we expanded the algorithm to record multiple 2-D projection patterns in color. There are two popular ways of color mixing: additive one and subtractive one. Additive color mixing used to mix light is based on RGB colors and subtractive color mixing used to mix inks is based on CMY colors. We made two coloring methods based on the additive mixing and subtractive mixing. We performed numerical simulations of the coloring methods, and confirmed their effectiveness. We also fabricated two types of volumetric display and applied the proposed algorithm to them. One is a cubic displays constructed by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in 8×8×8 array. Lighting patterns of LEDs are controlled by a microcomputer board. The other one is made of 7×7 array of threads. Each thread is illuminated by a projector connected with PC. As a result of the implementation, we succeeded in recording multiple 2-D color motion pictures in the volumetric displays. Our algorithm can be applied to digital signage, media art and so forth.

  10. The Thatcher illusion: rotating the viewer instead of the picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobmaier, Janek S; Mast, Fred W

    2007-01-01

    Faces are difficult to recognise when presented upside down. This effect of face inversion was effectively demonstrated with the 'Thatcher illusion' by Thompson (1980 Perception 9 483-484). It has been tacitly assumed that this effect is due to inversion relative to retinal coordinates. Here we tested whether it is due to egocentric (i.e. retinal) inversion or whether the orientation of the body with respect to gravity also influences the face-inversion effect. A 3-D human turntable was used to test subjects in 5 different body-tilt (roll) orientations: 0 degree, 45 degrees, 90 degrees, 135 degrees, and 180 degrees. The stimuli consisted of 4 'normal' and 4 'thatcherised' faces and were presented in 8 different orientations in the picture plane. The subjects had to decide in a yes-no task whether the faces were 'normal' or 'thatcherised'. Analysis of the d' values revealed a significant effect of stimulus orientation and body tilt. The significant effect of body tilt was due to a drop in d' values in the 135 degrees orientation. This result is compared to findings of studies on the subjective visual vertical, where larger errors occurred in body-tilt orientations between 90 degrees and 180 degrees. The present findings suggest that the face-inversion effect relies mainly on retinal coordinates, but that in head-down body-tilt orientations around 135 degrees the gravitational reference frame has a major influence on the perception of faces.

  11. Prevalence and clinical picture of celiac disease in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamico, Margherita; Pasquino, Anna M; Mariani, Paolo; Danesi, Helene M; Culasso, Franco; Mazzanti, Laura; Petri, Antonella; Bona, Giovanni

    2002-12-01

    A multicenter study of Turner syndrome (TS) patients was carried out to estimate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) and to detect clinical characteristics and laboratory data of affected patients. Three hundred eighty-nine girls with TS were screened by IgA antigliadin antibodies and/or antiendomysial antibodies. Intestinal biopsy was offered to positive cases. CD was diagnosed in 25 patients. In celiac subjects, anemia, anorexia, and delayed growth (with respect to Italian TS curves) were frequently present; whereas distended abdomen, chronic diarrhea, constipation, and vomiting occurred more rarely. In addition, low serum iron levels, hemoglobinemia, and high values of aminotransferases were observed. Ten patients showed classic CD, 8 showed atypical symptoms, and 7 showed a silent CD. In 11 symptomatic patients, the diagnosis of CD was made at the onset of symptoms, whereas 7 of them showed a median delay of 79 months in diagnosis. Other autoimmune disorders were observed in 40% of the patients. Our study confirms the high prevalence (6.4%) of CD in a large series of TS patients. Moreover, the subclinical picture in 60% of the cases, the diagnostic delay, and the incidence of other autoimmune disorders suggest that routine screening of CD in TS is indicated.

  12. Heavy tetraquarks in the diquark–antidiquark picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Hadizadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous Lippmann–Schwinger integral equation is solved in momentum space to calculate the masses of heavy tetraquarks with hidden charm and bottom. The tetraquark bound states are studied in the diquark–antidiquark picture as a two-body problem. A regularized form of the diquark–antidiquark potential is used to overcome the singularity of the confining potential at large distances or small momenta. Our numerical results indicate that the relativistic effect leads to a small reduction in the mass of heavy tetraquarks, which is less than 2% for charm and less than 0.2% for bottom tetraquarks. The calculated masses of heavy tetraquarks for 1s, 1p, 2s, 1d and 2p states are in good agreement with other theoretical calculations and experimental data. Our numerical analysis predict the masses of heavy tetraquarks for 3s, 2d and 3p states for the first time, and we are not aware of any other theoretical results or experimental data for these states.

  13. Attention Bias of Avoidant Individuals to Attachment Emotion Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Ding, Yi; Lu, Luluzi; Chen, Xu

    2017-01-01

    How attachment style affects emotion processing is tightly connected with individuals’ attention bias. This experiment explored avoidant individuals’ attentional engagement and attentional disengagement using a cue-target paradigm in fMRI. The experimental group consisted of 17 avoidant participants, while the control group consisted of 16 secure participants; these were identified by the Experiences in Close Relationships inventory and the Relationship Questionnaire. Each reacted to pictures of positive parent-child attachment, negative parent-child attachment, positive romantic attachment, negative romantic attachment, and neutral non-attachment. Behaviorally, avoidant individuals were slower than secure individuals in responding to emotions and their attentional disengagement effect for negative parent-child emotions was stronger than positive ones. fMRI results showed that avoidant compared to secure individuals activated more strongly in the right superior temporal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and the left medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, supplementary motor area, and cingulate gyrus. They also showed stronger activation in disengaging from positive than negative emotions in the bilateral fusiform and middle occipital gyri. In conclusion, avoidant individuals could detect emotions as effective as secure individuals in attentioal engaging stages. They can disengage from positive emotions with effective cognitive resources and were harder to get rid of negative emotions with insufficient resource. PMID:28128347

  14. Item difficulty scaling for WAIS-III picture arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Raymond M; Connolly, Sean G

    2005-06-01

    Only one study regarding the sequencing of items of the WAIS-III Picture Arrangement subtest was located in a search of published literature. That study of 50 alcohol abusers failed to demonstrate that the items are sequenced in the perfect order of difficulty as suggested by the test publisher. The current study was accomplished to replicate or refute the prior study and to extend findings into related matters. Two laboratories provided four archival samples of 100 cases. Only five items appear properly placed, with one (OPENS) especially misplaced. A new sequence is recommended so that clinicians can administer the test more efficiently and examine errors from a process approach to evaluation. Difficult items were not passed as often as expected by Hispanic respondents. This finding was considered an artifact related to archival convenience sampling and may not be representative as a general finding regarding Hispanic performance until experimental sampling techniques or proper statistical controls can be applied. Statistically controlling for IQ, through analysis of covariance, eliminated ethnicity effects on total score for the PA subtest.

  15. Investigation of CT picture in so-called loose shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Shigehito; Sakamaki, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Akira; Moriishi, Takeji; Takada, Keiichi

    1985-03-01

    CT picture of the shoulder joint was analyzed in 124 shoulders (114 patients). A line perpendicular to a given line between the precornu of acetabular tegmen (A) and the postcornu of acetabular tegmen (B) was drawn and the intersection where the line and the caput humeri meet (C) was obtained. The angle of CAB was defined as the backward angular aperture of the acetabular tegmen. The angular aperture was 26.2 +- 1.9 in 16 so-called loose shoulders, 17.3 +- 1.0 in 28 loose shoulders restricted to the inward rotation, and 12.2 +- 0.4 in 80 normal shoulders, showing a distinct correlation between the angular aperture and the degree of loose shoulder. An increased backward angular aperture of the acetabular tegmen was considered greatly attributable to the forward glenohumeral movement resulting from malformation of the acetabular tegmen and flaccidity of the joint. Glenoid osteotomy was thus performed in 9 patients, 6 of whom underwent CT scanning before and after osteotomy. Coronal and transverse CT images of the shoulder joint disclosed a noticeable improvement of the glenohumeral alignment. The angular aperture shown on CT seems to be of major importance not only in the diagnosis of so-called loose shoulder but also in surgical choice. (Namekawa, K.).

  16. Structure and Dynamics of the Milky Way: The Evolving Picture

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    From the inception of radio astronomy, the study of the Interstellar Medium has been both aided and frustrated by one fact: we are right within it! Our embedded perspective is favourable to observing kinematic and structural details that are likely to remain inaccessible in external galaxies for some time, but not so to gaining a birdseye view of our Galaxy's strucutre and motions on the largest scales. The CGPS is the original survey with the ability to image both details and the "big picture". We will broadly review what we know of the Milky Way (MW), and focus on large-scale ISM structure and dynamics that the IGPS family of surveys depicts particularly well (e.g. spiral structure, the rotation curve, density waves, rolling motions, the warp & scalloping). We also highlight areas where puzzles still exist (e.g. outer spiral structure, the question of shocks and rolling motions in the MW), and offer some new insights (e.g. multiple shocks in the 2nd quadrant; a radially varying spiral pattern speed in t...

  17. ITS: a practical picture archiving and communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Tianhu; Sewchand, Wilfred

    1990-09-01

    (only) In the design and implementation of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) two types of problems have to be solved. The first is in the aspect of image data formatting and the second is in the image transmission. Radiography X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) radionuclide emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonic imaging are the widely used medical imaging. Microscopic images are the examples of bioimaging. Some of these biomedical imaging modalities such as X-ray CT MRI etc directly create digitized images which are stored in computer disks. Some of them produce non-digitized images which are recorded on films or video-tapes. Using scanners (flatbed overhead slide) or video camera the non-digitized images can be digitized. Due to the diversity of physical principles and image reconstruction procedures of these imaging modalities the image data formats of the digitized biomedical images are extremely different. In addition the data size of the digitized images are usually very large especially when the higher resolution is required. For instance a transaxial thoracic image created by the 3-ni generation of X-ray scanner has about 150 x i03 bytes a digitized radiographic film (14" x 17" ) in the moderate resolution (300 pixel-per-inch) occupies about 20 x 106 bytes. Therefore seeking an unified image data format and compressing the image data for digitized biomedical images are the first issue in developing PACS. Computer networks provide the effective

  18. DeepTalk: A complete conference in a picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Gordon

    2010-04-01

    Particle physics conferences lasting a week (like CHEP) can have 100's of talks and posters presented. Current conference web interfaces (like Indico) are well suited to finding a talk by author or by time-slot. However, browsing the complete material in a modern large conference is not user friendly. Browsing involves continually making the expensive transition between HTML viewing and talk-slides (which are either PDF files or some other format). Further the web interfaces aren't designed for undirected browsing. The advent of multi-core computing and advanced video cards means that we have more processor power available for visualization than any time in the past. This poster describes a technique of rendering a complete conference's slides and posters as a single very large picture. Standard plug-in software for a browser allows a user to zoom in on a portion of the conference that looks interesting. As the user zooms further more and more details become visible, allowing the user to make a quick and chep decision on whether to spend more time on a particular talk. The project, DeepConference, has been implemented as a public web site and can render any conference whose agenda is powered by Indico. The rendering technology is powered by the free download, Silverlight. The poster discusses the implementation and use as well as cross platform performance and possible future directions. A demo will be shown.

  19. A Picture-perfect Pure-disc Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The bright galaxy NGC 3621, captured here using the Wide Field Imager on the 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, appears to be a fine example of a classical spiral. But it is in fact rather unusual: it does not have a central bulge and is therefore described as a pure-disc galaxy. NGC 3621 is a spiral galaxy about 22 million light-years away in the constellation of Hydra (The Sea Snake). It is comparatively bright and can be seen well in moderate-sized telescopes. This picture was taken using the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. The data were selected from the ESO archive by Joe DePasquale as part of the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. Joe's picture of NGC 3621 was ranked fifth in the competition. This galaxy has a flat pancake shape, indicating that it hasn't yet come face to face with another galaxy as such a galactic collision would have disturbed the thin disc of stars, creating a small bulge in its centre. Most astronomers think that galaxies grow by merging with other galaxies, in a process called hierarchical galaxy formation. Over time, this should create large bulges in the centres of spirals. Recent research, however, has suggested that bulgeless, or pure-disc, spiral galaxies like NGC 3621 are actually fairly common. This galaxy is of further interest to astronomers because its relative proximity allows them to study a wide range of astronomical objects within it, including stellar nurseries, dust clouds, and pulsating stars called Cepheid variables, which astronomers use as distance markers in the Universe [2]. In the late 1990s, NGC 3621 was one of 18 galaxies selected for a Key Project of the Hubble Space Telescope: to observe Cepheid variables and measure the rate of expansion of the Universe to a higher accuracy than had been possible before. In the successful project, 69 Cepheid variables were observed in this galaxy alone. Multiple monochrome images taken through

  20. The string-junction picture of multiquark states: an update

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Giancarlo; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    We recall and update, both theoretically and phenomenologically, our (nearly) forty-years-old proposal of a string-junction as a necessary complement to the conventional classification of hadrons based just on their quark-antiquark constituents. In that proposal single (though in general metastable) hadronic states are associated with "irreducible" gauge-invariant operators consisting of Wilson lines (visualized as strings of color flux tubes) that may either end on a quark or an antiquark, or annihilate in triplets at a junction $J$ or an anti-junction $\\bar{J}$. For the junction-free sector (ordinary $q\\, \\bar{q}$ mesons and glueballs) the picture is supported by large-$N$ (number of colors) considerations as well as by a lattice strong-coupling expansion. Both imply the famous OZI rule suppressing quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams. For hadrons with $J$ and/or $\\bar{J}$ constituents the same expansions support our proposal, including its generalization of the OZI rule to the suppression of $J-\\bar{J}$ a...

  1. The string-junction picture of multiquark states: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, G. C.; Veneziano, G.

    2016-06-01

    We recall and update, both theoretically and phenomenologically, our (nearly) forty-years-old proposal of a string-junction as a necessary complement to the conventional classification of hadrons based just on their quark-antiquark constituents. In that proposal single (though in general metastable) hadronic states are associated with "irreducible" gauge-invariant operators consisting of Wilson lines (visualized as strings of color flux tubes) that may either end on a quark or an antiquark, or annihilate in triplets at a junction J or an anti-junction overline{J} . For the junction-free sector (ordinary qoverline{q} mesons and glueballs) the picture is supported by large- N (number of colors) considerations as well as by a lattice strong-coupling expansion. Both imply the famous OZI rule suppressing quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams. For hadrons with J and/or overline{J} constituents the same expansions support our proposal, including its generalization of the OZI rule to the suppression of J-overline{J} annihilation diagrams. Such a rule implies that hadrons with junctions are "mesophobic" and thus unusually narrow if they are below threshold for decaying into as many baryons as their total number of junctions (two for a tetraquark, three for a pentaquark). Experimental support for our claim, based on the observation that narrow multiquark states typically lie below (well above) the relevant baryonic (mesonic) thresholds, will be presented.

  2. Picture this! grasping the dimensions of time and space

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Astronomical concepts can be truly hard to comprehend, especially those of planetary sizes and distances from Earth and from each other. These concepts are made more comprehensible by the group of illustrations in this book, which put, in scale, side by side extraterrestrial objects with objects on Earth we can more easily relate to. For example, study the pictures of Earth floating above Jupiter’s Great Red Spot and the asteroid Itokawa resting beside Toronto’s CN Tower. These mind-bending images bring things better into perspective and will help you understand the size and scale of our Solar System. In later chapters, you will be told how close the visionaries of the past came to guessing what today’s explorers would find. Astronomer/painter Lucien Rudaux’s masterpieces of Mars dust storms anticipated Viking and Mars rover images by nearly a century. Space artist Ludek Pesek envisioned astronauts setting up camp on the lunar surface in scenes hauntingly similar to photos taken by Apollo a...

  3. Progressive coding and transmission of digital diagnostic pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnahas, S E; Tzou, K H; Cox, J R; Hill, R L; Jost, R

    1986-01-01

    In radiology, as a result of the increased utilization of digital imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), over a third of the images produced in a typical radiology department are currently in digital form, and this percentage is steadily increasing. Image compression provides a means for the economical storage and efficient transmission of these diagnostic pictures. The level of coding distortion that can be accepted for clinical diagnosis purposes is not yet well-defined. In this paper we introduce some constraints on the design of existing transform codes in order to achieve progressive image transmission efficiently. The design constraints allow the image quality to be asymptotically improved such that the proper clinical diagnoses are always possible. The modified transform code outperforms simple spatial-domain codes by providing higher quality of the intermediately reconstructed images. The improvement is 10 dB for a compression factor of 256:1, and it is as high as 17.5 dB for a factor of 8:1. A novel progressive quantization scheme is developed for optimal progressive transmission of transformed diagnostic images. Combined with a discrete cosine transform, the new approach delivers intermediately reconstructed images of comparable quality twice as fast as the more usual zig-zag sampled approach. The quantization procedure is suitable for hardware implementation.

  4. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis. An interdisciplinary clinical picture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüss, H; Dalmau, J; Arolt, V; Wandinger, K-P

    2010-04-01

    Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a severe and considerably underdiagnosed form of encephalitis with characteristic clinical features including psychiatric symptoms, decreased levels of consciousness, hypoventilation, epileptic seizures, autonomic dysfunction and dyskinesias. Most patients are primarily seen by psychiatrists, often on the assumption of a drug-induced psychosis. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis had initially been described in young women with ovarian teratoma, but is also common in women without tumour, in men and in children. The diagnosis is based on the characteristic clinical picture, supporting findings of brain MRI, electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the presence of highly specific autoantibodies directed against the NR1 subunit of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in the serum or CSF. In particular, anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis must be excluded in patients with 'encephalitis of unknown cause'. In principle, the prognosis is favourable and recovery from symptoms can be expected even after prolonged intensive care treatment and mechanical ventilation. However, improvement correlates with prompt identification of the disorder, early immunotherapy and - in the case of a malignancy - with complete tumour removal. Patient care requires an interdisciplinary approach including neurologists, psychiatrists, paediatricians, oncologists and gynaecologists.

  5. Diversifying the picture: indigenous responses to European arrival in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Martinón-Torres

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in cultural contact between indigenous peoples and Europeans following their arrival in the New World. In this article the authors explore local responses to European arrival in Cuba, through analysis of metalwork found in indigenous graves. These studies demonstrate that the local communities valued particular metals quite differently from the Europeans, as the imported materials were incorporated into pre-existing symbolic systems relating to sacred power.

  6. Metal Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  7. Depictions and Gaps: Portrayal of U.S. Poverty in Realistic Fiction Children's Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Jane E.; Darragh, Janine J.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers conducted a critical multicultural analysis of 58 realistic fiction children's picture books that portray people living in poverty and compared these depictions to recent statistics from the United States Census Bureau. The picture books were examined for the following qualities: main character, geographic locale and time era, focal…

  8. Red in Tooth and Claw? Images of Nature in Modern Picture Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    Questions whether the mediated experience provided by picture books contributes toward or hinders a realistic and appropriate appreciation of the natural world. Argues that picture books present highly misleading images of animals and their habitats. Examines a few exceptional books that give an accurate and sensitive account of the animal kingdom…

  9. A Comparative Study of Children's Concentration Performance on Picture Books: Age, Gender, and Media Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Min-Yuan; Wei, Chun-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The reading development of children depends on various sensory stimuli, which help them construct reading contexts and facilitate active learning and exploration. This study uses sensory stimuli provided by picture books using various forms of media to improve children's concentration performance. We employ picture books using four forms of media:…

  10. Electrophysiological evidence for endogenous control of attention in switching between languages in overt picture naming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, K.M.W.; Roelofs, A.P.A.; Chwilla, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Language switching in bilingual speakers requires attentional control to select the appropriate language, for example, in picture naming. Previous language-switch studies used the color of pictures to indicate the required language thereby confounding endogenous and exogenous control. To investigate

  11. Brain activations to emotional pictures are differentially associated with valence and arousal ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje B M Gerdes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have investigated the neural responses triggered by emotional pictures, but the specificity of the involved structures such as the amygdala or the ventral striatum is still under debate. Furthermore, only few studies examined the association of stimuli’s valence and arousal and the underlying brain responses. Therefore, we investigated brain responses with functional magnetic resonance imaging of 17 healthy subjects to pleasant and unpleasant affective pictures with comparable arousal levels and afterwards assessed ratings of valence and arousal. As expected, unpleasant pictures strongly activated the right and left amygdala, the right hippocampus, and the medial occipital lobe, whereas pleasant pictures elicited significant activations in left occipital regions, and in parts of the medial temporal lobe. The direct comparison of unpleasant and pleasant pictures which were comparable in arousal clearly indicated stronger amygdala activation in response to the unpleasant pictures. Most important, correlational analyses revealed on the one hand that the arousal of unpleasant pictures was significantly associated with activations in the right amygdala and the left caudate body. On the other hand, valence of pleasant pictures was significantly correlated with activations in the right caudate head, extending to the nucleus accumbens (NAcc and the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex. These findings support the notion that the amygdala is primarily involved in processing of unpleasant stimuli, and the stronger the more arousing the stimuli are, whereas reward-related structures like the NAcc primarily responds to pleasant stimuli, the stronger the more positive the valence of these stimuli is.

  12. Two Professors Critique the Representations of Africans and African Americans in Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-D'arezzo, Wendy M.; Musgrove, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the sociocultural representations of black children in picture books. Three critical perspectives were used to examine 23 picture books containing black characters. Questions used in this critical analysis were derived from sociocultural implications of implicit messages within texts, critical literacy, and cultural and social…

  13. Do Worlds Have Corners? When Children's Picture Books Invite Philosophical Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maagero, Eva; Ostbye, Guri Lorentzen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we want to present and analyse the picture book "The World has no Corners" (2006/1999) by the Norwegian author and illustrator Svein Nyhus. The book represents a new trend in Norwegian picture books for children by inviting the readers into a world of thinking and wondering about existential topics such as life and death, growing…

  14. Analysis and Comparison of the Tongue Picture of 34 Patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴红金; 王凡; 王斌; 王升启; 赵锡银; 姚军; 许萍; 段姝伟

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of tongue pictures in the developing process of disease in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and to compare the tongue pictures of SARS patients with those of suspected SARS patients. Methods: Materials of tongue picture were dynamically collected from 34 SARS patients and 35 suspected SARS patients, and the difference and similarity between them were analyzed. Meanwhile, the changes in clinic symptoms and tongue picture after integrative medicinal treatment were observed. Results: Characteristics of tongue picture in SARS patients were changed along with the progress of the disease, showing that there existed a tendency of the pathogen invading from exterior to interior, from surface to the deep. Also the tongue pictures were varied due to the coexistence of dampness pathogen; the time of the early stage was generally 1-1.5 days, shorter than that of other stages.While in the patients with suspected SARS, the tongue picture was mostly red with thin white or yellow coating, comparatively steady and showing no obvious change along with the development of the disease. Conclusion: Observing the tongue picture and its changes in different stages can be helpful to understanding the property of pathogenic evil and its developing rules, thus offering a basis for clinical treatment.

  15. Korean Culture as Portrayed in Young Children's Picture Books: The Pursuit of Cultural Authenticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Su-Jeong; Park, Soyeon; Choi, Joung Sun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate how contemporary Korea and its culture are portrayed in children's picture books published in the United States. Our analysis of the representation of Korean culture in text and illustrations was based on a sample of 33 picture books written in English and published in the US between 1990 and…

  16. Portrayals of Bullying: A Content Analysis of Picture Books for Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppliger, Patrice A.; Davis, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Bullying affects a significant number of school children in the United States. Great concern for teaching children about bullying is apparent in the number of picture books published with bullying themes. The following study is a content analysis of how bullies and victims are portrayed in picture books suitable for preschoolers. Many of the…

  17. Emotional Facilitation Effect in the Picture-Word Interference Task: An ERP Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baolin; Xin, Shuai; Jin, Zhixing; Hu, Yu; Li, Yang

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to verify the emotional facilitation effect in the picture-word interference task using event-related potentials. Twenty-one healthy subjects were asked to categorize the emotional valences of pictures accompanied by emotionally congruent, either centrally or laterally positioned Chinese words. For both the foveal and…

  18. Interpreting the Images in a Picture Book: Students Make Connections to Themselves, Their Lives and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantei, Jessica; Kervin, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Picture books are an important and accessible form of visual art for children because they offer, among other things, opportunities for making connections to personal experiences and to the values and beliefs of families and communities. This paper reports on the use of a picture book to promote Year 4 students' making of text-to-self connections,…

  19. Effects of Semantic Elaboration and Typicality on Picture Naming in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Claudia A.; Altmann, Lori J. P.; Kendall, Diane; Fischler, Ira; Heilman, Kennneth M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with probable Alzheimer disease (pAD) are frequently impaired at picture naming. This study examined whether a semantic elaboration task would facilitate naming in pAD, and whether training either semantically typical or atypical stimulus items facilitated generalized improvement in picture naming and category generation…

  20. Around the World in 80 Picture Books: Teaching Ancient Civilizations through Text Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Katherine E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce text sets of picture books that address 10 ancient civilizations commonly taught in middle school and also offer instructional strategies that could be used for critical and multicultural literacy exploration. Beginning with discussion of the importance of picture books and text sets in the middle school…