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Sample records for picosecond laser structuration

  1. Picosecond laser induced periodic surface structure on copper thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, Thi Trang Dai; Petit, Agnès; Semmar, Nadjib, E-mail: nadjib.semmar@univ-orleans.fr

    2014-05-01

    LIPSS (Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structure) formation on copper thin films induced by a picosecond laser beam (Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm, 42 ps and 10 Hz) was studied experimentally. Copper thin films were deposited on glass and silicon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The surface modifications of irradiated zones were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Two distinct types of LIPSS were identified with respect to the laser fluence (F), number of laser shots (N) and substrate material. Namely, with a number of laser shots (1000 < N < 10,000) and a fluence of (200 mJ/cm{sup 2} < F < 500 mJ/cm{sup 2}), Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (LSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 260 nm and an orientation perpendicular to polarization) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS (HSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 130 nm and an orientation parallel to the polarization) were observed. The regime of regular spikes formation was determined for N ≥ 1000. Moreover, the 2D-map of the relationship among LIPSS formation, laser fluence and number of laser shots on copper thin film with two different substrates was established. A physics interpretation of regular spikes and LIPSS formation on copper thin film induced by ps laser with overlapping multi-shots is proposed based on experimental data and the theory of Plateau-Rayleigh instability.

  2. Picosecond laser induced periodic surface structure on copper thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thi Trang Dai; Petit, Agnès; Semmar, Nadjib

    2014-05-01

    LIPSS (Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structure) formation on copper thin films induced by a picosecond laser beam (Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm, 42 ps and 10 Hz) was studied experimentally. Copper thin films were deposited on glass and silicon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The surface modifications of irradiated zones were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Two distinct types of LIPSS were identified with respect to the laser fluence (F), number of laser shots (N) and substrate material. Namely, with a number of laser shots (1000 LIPSS (LSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 260 nm and an orientation perpendicular to polarization) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS (HSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 130 nm and an orientation parallel to the polarization) were observed. The regime of regular spikes formation was determined for N ≥ 1000. Moreover, the 2D-map of the relationship among LIPSS formation, laser fluence and number of laser shots on copper thin film with two different substrates was established. A physics interpretation of regular spikes and LIPSS formation on copper thin film induced by ps laser with overlapping multi-shots is proposed based on experimental data and the theory of Plateau-Rayleigh instability.

  3. Wavelength Dependence of Picosecond Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures on Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Maragkaki, Stella; Derrien, Thibault J. -Y.; Levy, Yoann; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Ostendorf, Andreas; Gurevich, Evgeny L.

    2017-01-01

    The physical mechanisms of the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formation are studied in this paper for single-pulse irradiation regimes. The change in the LIPSS period with wavelength of incident laser radiation is investigated experimentally, using a picosecond laser system, which provides 7-ps pulses in near-IR, visible, and UV spectral ranges. The experimental results are compared with predictions made under the assumption that the surface-scattered waves are involved in ...

  4. Structuring of functional thin films and surfaces with picosecond-pulsed lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciukaitis, G.; Gecys, P.; Gedvilas, M.; Voisiat, B.

    2012-03-01

    During the recent few years picosecond lasers have been proved as a reliable tool for microfabrication of diverse materials. We present results of our research on structuring of thin films and surfaces using the direct laser writing and the laser beam interference ablation techniques. The processes of micro-pattering were developed for metallic, dielectric films as well as complex multi-layer structures of thin-film solar cells as a way to manufacture frequency-selective surfaces, fine optical components and integrated series interconnects for photovoltaics. Technologies of nano-structuring of surfaces of advanced technical materials such as tungsten carbide were developed using picosecond lasers as well. Experimental work was supported by modeling and simulation of energy coupling and dissipation inside the layers. Selectiveness of the ablation process is defined by optical and mechanical properties of the materials, and selection of the laser wavelength facilitated control of the structuring process. Implementation of the technologies required fine adjustment of spatial distribution of laser irradiation, therefore both techniques are benefiting from shaping the laser beam with diffractive optical elements. Utilization of the whole laser energy included beam splitting and multi-beam processing.

  5. Periodic surface structures on crystalline silicon created by 532 nm picosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trtica, M.S. [Physical Chemistry Department, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: etrtica@vin.bg.ac.yu; Gakovic, B.M. [Atomic Physics Department, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Radak, B.B. [Physical Chemistry Department, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Batani, D.; Desai, T.; Bussoli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' G. Occhialini' , Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2007-12-30

    Creation of laser-induced morphology features, particularly laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), by a 532 nm picosecond Nd:YAG laser on crystalline silicon is reported. The LIPSS, often termed ripples, were produced at average laser irradiation fluences of 0.7, 1.6, and 7.9 J cm{sup -2}. Two types of ripples were registered: micro-ripples (at micrometer scale) in the form of straight parallel lines extending over the entire irradiated spot, and nano-ripples (at nanometer scale), apparently concentric, registered only at the rim of the spot, with the periodicity dependent on laser fluence. There are indications that the parallel ripples are a consequence of the partial periodicity contained in the diffraction modulated laser beam, and the nano-ripples are very likely frozen capillary waves. The damage threshold fluence was estimated at 0.6 J cm{sup -2}.

  6. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm/sup -1/ and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm/sup -1/, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  7. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  8. Formation of Porous Structure with Subspot Size under the Irradiation of Picosecond Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was presented in this paper on porous structure with microsize holes significantly smaller than laser spot on the stainless steel 304 target surface induced by a picosecond Nd:van regenerative amplified laser, operating at 1064 nm. The target surface variations were studied in air ambience. The estimated surface damage threshold was 0.15 J/cm2. The target specific surface changes and phenomena observed supported a complementary study on the formation and growth of the subspot size pit holes on metal surface with dependence of laser pulse number of 50–1000 and fluences of 0.8 and 1.6 J/cm2. Two kinds of porous structures were presented: periodic holes are formed from Coulomb Explosion during locally spatial modulated ablation, and random holes are formed from the burst of bubbles in overheated liquid during phase explosion. It can be concluded that it is effective to fabricate a large metal surface area of porous structure by laser scanning regime. Generally, it is also difficult for ultrashort laser to fabricate the microporous structures compared with traditional methods. These porous structures potentially have a number of important applications in nanotechnology, industry, nuclear complex, and so forth.

  9. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Kurz, Heiko G.; Bergé, Luc; Skupin, Stefan; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of intense picosecond laser pulses in air in the presence of strong nonlinear self-action effects and air ionization is investigated experimentally and numerically. The model used for numerical analysis is based on the nonlinear propagator for the optical field coupled to the rate equations for the production of various ionic species and plasma temperature. Our results show that the phenomenon of plasma-driven intensity clamping, which has been paramount in femtosecond laser filamentation, holds for picosecond pulses. Furthermore, the temporal pulse distortions in the picosecond regime are limited and the pulse fluence is also clamped. In focused propagation geometry, a unique feature of picosecond filamentation is the production of a broad, fully ionized air channel, continuous both longitudinally and transversely, which may be instrumental for many applications including laser-guided electrical breakdown of air, channeling microwave beams and air lasing.

  10. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-02

    LeibnizUniversityHannover,Welfengarten 1, D-30167Hannover, Germany 3 CEA-DAM,DIF, F-91297Arpajon, France 4 Univ.Bordeaux—CNRS—CEA,Centre Lasers ...optics.arizona.edu Keywords: laser filamentation, picosecond laser pulses, nonlinear propagation, optical ionization Abstract The propagation of intense

  11. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on tool steel by multiple picosecond laser pulses of different polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorčič, Peter; Sedlaček, Marko; Podgornik, Bojan; Reif, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are produced on cold work tool steel by irradiation with a low number of picosecond laser pulses. As expected, the ripples, with a period of about 90% of the laser wavelength, are oriented perpendicular to the laser polarization. Subsequent irradiation with the polarization rotated by 45° or 90° results in a corresponding rotation of the ripples. This is visible already with the first pulse and becomes almost complete - erasing the previous orientation - after as few as three pulses. The phenomenon is not only observed for single-spot irradiation but also for writing long coherent traces. The experimental results strongly defy the role of surface plasmon-polaritons as the predominant key to LIPSS formation.

  12. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Bergé, L; Skupin, S; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of intense picosecond laser pulses in air in the presence of strong nonlinear self-action effects and air ionization is investigated experimentally and numerically. The model used for numerical analysis is based on the nonlinear propagator for the optical field coupled with the rate equations for the production of various ionic species and plasma temperature. Our results show that the phenomenon of plasma-driven intensity clamping, which is paramount in femtosecond laser filamentation, holds for picosecond pulses. Furthermore, the temporal pulse distortions are limited and the pulse fluence is also clamped. The resulting unique feature of the picosecond filamentation regime is the production of a broad, fully ionized air channel, continuous both longitudinally and transversely, which may be instrumental for numerous applications.

  13. Structure of picosecond pulses of a Q-switched and mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donin, V I; Yakovin, D V; Gribanov, A V [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-31

    The pulse duration of a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, in which Q-switching with mode-locking (QML regime) is achieved using a spherical mirror and a travelling-wave acousto-optic modulator, is directly measured with a streak camera. It is found that the picosecond pulses can have a non-single-pulse structure, which is explained by excitation of several competing transverse modes in the Q-switching regime with a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. In the case of cw mode-locking (without Q-switching), a new (auto-QML) regime is observed, in which the pulse train repetition rate is determined by the frequency of the relaxation oscillations of the laser field while the train contains single picosecond pulses. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  14. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Petit, A.; Semmar, N., E-mail: nadjib.semmar@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, UMR7344, CNRS/University of Orleans, 14 rue d' Issoudun, BP6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Vayer, M. [ICMN, UMR 7374, CNRS/University of Orleans, 1b rue de la Ferollerie, CS 40059, 45071 Orleans Cedex (France); Sauldubois, A. [CME, UFR Sciences, University of Orleans, 1 Rue de Chartres, BP 6759, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-11-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm{sup 2}). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.

  15. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Vayer, M.; Sauldubois, A.; Petit, A.; Semmar, N.

    2015-11-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm2). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.

  16. The use of picosecond lasers beyond tattoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbat, E; Al-Niaimi, F

    2016-10-01

    Picosecond lasers are a novel laser with the ability to create a pulse of less than one nanosecond. They have been available in the clinical context since 2012. Dermatologists are now using picosecond lasers regularly for the treatment of blue and green pigment tattoo removal. This article reviews the use of picosecond lasers beyond tattoo removal. The overall consensus for the use of picosecond lasers beyond tattoo treatment is positive. With examples of this in the treatment of nevus of Ota, minocycline-induced pigmentation, acne scarring, and rhytides.

  17. Rapid fabrication of surface micro/nano structures with enhanced broadband absorption on Cu by picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Peixun; Zhong, Minlin; Li, Lin; Huang, Ting; Zhang, Hongjun

    2013-05-20

    A surface micro/nano structuring technique was demonstrated by utilizing a picosecond laser beam to rapidly modify the optical property of copper surfaces with a scanning speed up to tens of millimeters per second. Three kinds of surface micro/nanostructures corresponding to three levels of reflectance were produced which are obviously different from those induced by a femtosecond or nanosecond laser. Specifically, a porous coral-like structure results in over 97% absorptivity in the visible spectral region and over 90% absorptivity in average in the UV, visible, and NIR regions (250 - 2500 nm). Potential applications may include solar energy absorbers, thermal radiation sources, and radiative heat transfer devices.

  18. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  19. Fabrication of periodical surface structures by picosecond laser irradiation of carbon thin films: transformation of amorphous carbon in nanographite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, C.; Dorcioman, G.; Bita, B.; Besleaga, C.; Zgura, I.; Himcinschi, C.; Popescu, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Thin films of carbon were synthesized by ns pulsed laser deposition in vacuum on silicon substrates, starting from graphite targets. Further on, the films were irradiated with a picosecond laser source emitting in visible at 532 nm. After tuning of laser parameters, we obtained a film surface covered by laser induced periodical surface structures (LIPSS). They were investigated by optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. It was observed that changing the irradiation angle influences the LIPSS covered area. At high magnification it was revealed that the LIPSS pattern was quite complex, being composed of other small LIPSS islands, interconnected by bridges of nanoparticles. Raman spectra for the non-irradiated carbon films were typical for a-C type of diamond-like carbon, while the LIPSS spectra were characteristic to nano-graphite. The pristine carbon film was hydrophilic, while the LIPSS covered film surface was hydrophobic.

  20. Fabrication of sub-micron surface structures on copper, stainless steel and titanium using picosecond laser interference patterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieda, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.bieda@iws.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Siebold, Mathias, E-mail: m.siebold@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Lasagni, Andrés Fabián, E-mail: andres_fabian.lasagni@tu-dresden.de [Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Fertigungstechnik, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Laser interference patterning is introduced to generate sub-micrometer surface pattern. • The two-temperature model is applied to ps-laser interference patterning of metals. • Line-like structures with a pitch of 0.7 μm were fabricated on SAE 304, Ti and Cu. • The process is governed by a photo-thermal mechanism for a pulse duration of 35 ps. • A “cold”-ablation process for metals requires a pulse duration shorter than 10 ps. - Abstract: Picosecond direct laser interference patterning (ps-DLIP) is investigated theoretically and experimentally for the bulk metals copper, stainless steel and titanium. While surface texturing with nanosecond pulses is limited to feature sizes in the micrometer range, utilizing picosecond pulses can lead to sub-micrometer structures. The modelling and simulation of ps-DLIP are based on the two-temperature model and were carried out for a pulse duration of 35 ps at 515 nm wavelength and a laser fluence of 0.1 J/cm{sup 2}. The subsurface temperature distribution of both electrons and phonons was computed for periodic line-like structures with a pitch of 0.8 μm. The increase in temperature rises for a lower absorption coefficient and a higher thermal conductivity. The distance, at which the maximum subsurface temperature occurs, increases for a small absorption coefficient. High absorption and low thermal conductivity minimize internal heating and give rise to a pronounced surface micro topography with pitches smaller than 1 μm. In order to confirm the computed results, periodic line-like surface structures were produced using two interfering beams of a Yb:YAG-Laser with 515 nm wavelength and a pulse duration of 35 ps. It was possible to obtain a pitch of 0.7 μm on the metallic surfaces.

  1. Picosecond Pulse Laser Microstructuring of silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明; 尹钢; 朱京涛; 赵利

    2003-01-01

    We report the experimental results of picosecond pulse laser microstructuring (pulse duration 35ps, wavelength 1.06μm, repetition rate 10Hz) of silicon using the direct focusing technique. Arrays of sharp conical spikes located below the initial surface have been formed by cumulative picosecond pulsed laser irradiation of silicon in SF6. Irradiation of silicon surface in air, N2, or vacuum creates ripple-like patterns, but does not create the sharp conical spikes.

  2. Picosecond lasers with the dynamical operation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. G.; Morozov, V. B.; Olenin, A. N.; Yakovlev, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical model for simulation of generation process in advanced pulse-periodic high-peak-power picosecond diode-pumped Nd:YAG and Nd:YLF lasers has been developed. The model adequately describes picosecond pulse formation governed by active and passive mode-locking, negative feedback and adjustable loss level in the oscillator cavity. Optical jitter of output pulses attributed to laser generation development from spontaneous noise level was evaluated using statistical analysis of calculation results. In the presented laser scheme, minimal jitter value on the level ~40 ps was estimated.

  3. The picosecond laser for tattoo removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Vincent M; Aldahan, Adam S; Mlacker, Stephanie; Shah, Vidhi V; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of tattoos continues to grow as modern society's stigma towards this form of body art shifts towards greater acceptance. Approximately one third of Americans aged 18-25 and 40 % of Americans aged 26-40 are tattooed. As tattoos continue to rise in popularity, so has the demand for an effective method of tattoo removal such as lasers. The various colors of tattoo inks render them ideal targets for specific lasers using the principle of selective photothermolysis. Traditional laser modalities employed for tattoo removal operate on pulse durations in the nanosecond domain. However, this pulse duration range is still too long to effectively break ink into small enough particles. Picosecond (10(-12)) lasers have emerged at the forefront of laser tattoo removal due to their shorter pulse lengths, leading to quicker heating of the target chromophores, and consequently, more effective tattoo clearance. Recent studies have cited more effective treatment outcomes using picosecond lasers. Future comparative studies between picosecond lasers of various settings are necessary to determine optimal laser parameters for tattoo clearance.

  4. Additive interconnect fabrication by picosecond Laser Induced Forward Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, G.; Veld, B.H. in 't; Ebberink, G.; Del Cerro, D.A.; Eijnden, E. van den; Chall, P.; Zon, B. van der

    2010-01-01

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is a single step, dry deposition process which shows great potential for interconnect fabrication. TNO, in cooperation with ALSI and University of Twente have studied the feature size and resistivity of copper structures deposited using picosecond (ps) LIFT. Sma

  5. Additive interconnect fabrication by picosecond Laser Induced Forward Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, G.; Veld, B.H. in 't; Ebberink, G.; Del Cerro, D.A.; Eijnden, E. van den; Chall, P.; Zon, B. van der

    2010-01-01

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is a single step, dry deposition process which shows great potential for interconnect fabrication. TNO, in cooperation with ALSI and University of Twente have studied the feature size and resistivity of copper structures deposited using picosecond (ps) LIFT. Sma

  6. Optothermal response of plasmonic nanofocusing lens under picosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Z.; Chen, C.; Traverso, L.; Xu, X.; Pan, L.; Chao, I.-H.; Lavine, A. S.

    2014-03-01

    This work studied the optothermal response of plasmonic nanofocusing structures under picosecond pulsed laser irradiation. The surface plasmon polariton is simulated to calculate the optical energy dissipation as the Joule heating source and the thermal transport process is studied using a two temperature model (TTM). At the picosecond time scale that we are interested in, the Fourier heat equation is used to study the electron thermal transport and the hyperbolic heat equation is used to study the lattice thermal transport. For comparison, the single temperature model (STM) is also studied. The difference between TTM and STM indicates that TTM provides more accurate estimates in the picosecond time scale and the STM results are only reliable when the local electron and lattice temperature difference is negligible.

  7. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  8. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  9. Irradiation of the amorphous carbon films by picosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinauskas, L., E-mail: liutauras.marcinauskas@ktu.lt [Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50, LT-51368 Kaunas (Lithuania); Grigonis, A. [Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50, LT-51368 Kaunas (Lithuania); Račiukaitis, G.; Gedvilas, M. [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu Ave. 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vinciūnaitė, V. [Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50, LT-51368 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2015-10-30

    The effect of a picosecond laser irradiation on structure modification of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and graphite-like carbon (GLC) films was analyzed in this work. The DLC films were irradiated by Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser operating at the 532 nm wavelength with the picosecond (10 ps) pulse duration at the fluence in the range of (0.08–0.76) J/cm{sup 2}. The GLC films were irradiated only at the fluence of 0.76 J/cm{sup 2}. The different pulse number (1, 10, and 100) was used for irradiation the films. The micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements indicated that the laser irradiation led to rearrangement of the sp{sup 3} C–C bonds to the sp{sup 2} C=C bonds in the DLC films. The formation of silicon carbide (SiC) was found in the irradiated spot after 10 and 100 pulses. Modifications in the structure of the DLC film took place even in the areas with low intensity of the Gaussian beam wings (heat affected areas). The increase in the oxygen concentration up to ten times was detected in the heat affected areas after 100 pulses. Opposite to that, the laser irradiation decreased the oxygen concentration and smoothened the surface microrelief of the GLC films. The bonding type remained unchanged in the GLC films even after irradiation with 100 pulses per spot. - Highlights: • The picosecond laser irradiation led to the rearrangement of sp{sup 3} C-C to the sp{sup 2} C = C bonds in the diamond-like carbon film. • The ps-laser irradiation of the DLC films stipulates appearance of the aromatic carbon structures. • The bonding type of the graphite-like carbon films remained unchanged even after ps laser irradiation with 100 pulses.

  10. 100 W all fiber picosecond MOPA laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Hong-Wei; Hou, Jing; Liu, Ze-Jin

    2009-12-21

    A high power picosecond laser is constructed in an all fiber master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The seed source is an ytterbium-doped single mode fiber laser passively mode-locked by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). It produces 20 mW average power with 13 ps pulse width and 59.8 MHz repetition rate. A direct amplification of this seed source encounters obvious nonlinear effects hence serious spectral broadening at only ten watt power level. To avoid these nonlinear effects, we octupled the repetition rate to about 478 MHz though a self-made all fiber device before amplification. The ultimate output laser exhibits an average power of 96 W, a pulse width of 16 ps, a beam quality M2 of less than 1.5, and an optical conversion efficiency of 61.5%.

  11. Picosecond lasers: the next generation of short-pulsed lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Joshua R; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrea I; Green, Jeremy B

    2014-12-01

    Selective photothermolysis, first discussed in the context of targeted microsurgery in 1983, proposed that the optimal parameters for specific thermal damage rely critically on the duration over which energy is delivered to the tissue. At that time, nonspecific thermal damage had been an intrinsic limitation of all commercially available lasers, despite efforts to mitigate this by a variety of compensatory cooling mechanisms. Fifteen years later, experimental picosecond lasers were first reported in the dermatological literature to demonstrate greater efficacy over their nanosecond predecessors in the context of targeted destruction of tattoo ink. Within the last 4 years, more than a decade after those experiments, the first commercially available cutaneous picosecond laser unit became available (Cynosure, Westford, Massachusetts), and several pilot studies have demonstrated its utility in tattoo removal. An experimental picosecond infrared laser has also recently demonstrated a nonthermal tissue ablative capability in soft tissue, bone, and dentin. In this article, we review the published data pertaining to dermatology on picosecond lasers from their initial reports to the present as well as discuss forthcoming technology.

  12. Nanoscale Characterization with Laser Picosecond Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Oliver B.

    2007-11-01

    Nanophotonics—the manipulation of light with nanomaterials—is a booming subject, its success owing to the host of nanoscale fabrication techniques now at our disposal. However, for the characterization of such nanomaterials it is expedient to turn to other types of waves with a wavelength commensurate with the nanostructure in question. One such choice is acoustic waves of nanometre wavelength. The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to laser picosecond acoustics, a means by which gigahertz-terahertz ultrasonic waves can be generated and detected by ultrashort light pulses. This method can therefore be used to characterize materials with nanometre spatial resolution. In this article we review the theoretical background for opaque single-layer thin film isotropic samples with reference to key experiments. Solids including metals and semiconductors are discussed, although liquids and, conceivably, gases, are not excluded.

  13. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with picosecond pulse train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, Vasily N.; Pershin, Sergey M.; Sdvizhenskii, Pavel A.; Grishin, Mikhail Ya; Davydov, Mikhail A.; Stavertiy, Anton Ya; Tretyakov, Roman S.

    2017-02-01

    Picosecond pulse train and nanosecond pulse were compared for laser ablation and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. A detailed study revealed that the picosecond pulse train ablation improved the quality of laser craters (symmetric crater walls and the absence of large redeposited droplets), which was explained by a smaller heat affected zone and suppression of melt splash. Greater plasma dimensions and brighter plasma emission were observed by gated imaging for picosecond pulse train compared to nanosecond pulse ablation. Increased intensity of atomic and ionic lines in gated and time integrated spectra provided better signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond pulse train sampling. Higher temperature and electron density were detected during first microsecond for the plasma induced by the picosecond pulse train. Improved shot-to-shot reproducibility for atomic/ionic line intensity in the case of picosecond pulse train LIBS was explained by more effective atomization of target material in plasma and better quality of laser craters. Improved precision and limits of detections were determined for picosecond pulse train LIBS due to better reproducibility of laser sampling and increased signal-to-noise ratio.

  14. A Comparison in Laser Precision Drilling of Stainless Steel 304 with Nanosecond and Picosecond Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hongyu; DI Jianke; ZHOU Ming; YAN Yu

    2014-01-01

    Precision drilling with picosecond laser has been advocated to significantly improve the quality of micro-holes with reduced recast layer thickness and almost no heat affected zone. However, a detailed comparison between nanosecond and picosecond laser drilling techniques has rarely been reported in previous research. In the present study, a series of micro-holes are manufactured on stainless steel 304 using a nanosecond and a picosecond laser drilling system, respectively. The quality of the micro-holes, e.g., recast layer, micro-crack, circularity, and conicity, etc, is evaluated by employing an optical microscope, an optical interferometer, and a scanning electron microscope. Additionally, the micro-structure of the samples between the edges of the micro-holes and the parent material is compared following etching treatment. The researching results show that a great amount of spattering material accumulated at the entrance ends of the nanosecond laser drilled micro-holes. The formation of a recast layer with a thickness of~25 µm is detected on the side walls, associated with initiation of micro-cracks. Tapering phenomenon is also observed and the circularity of the micro-holes is rather poor. With regard to the micro-holes drilled by picosecond laser, the entrance ends, the exit ends, and the side walls are quite smooth without accumulation of spattering material, formation of recast layer and micro-cracks. The circularity of the micro-holes is fairly good without observation of tapering phenomenon. Furthermore, there is no obvious difference as for the micro-structure between the edges of the micro-holes and the parent material. This study proposes a picosecond laser helical drilling technique which can be used for effective manufacturing of high quality micro-holes.

  15. Dielectric breakdown induced by picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1976-01-01

    The damage thresholds of transparent optical materials were investigated. Single picosecond pulses at 1.06 microns, 0.53 microns and 0.35 microns were obtained from a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator-amplifier-frequency multiplier system. The pulses were Gaussian in space and time and permitted the determination of breakdown thresholds with a reproducibility of 15%. It was shown that the breakdown thresholds are characteristic of the bulk material, which included nine alkali halides, five different laser host materials, KDP, quartz, sapphire and calcium fluoride. The extension of the damage data to the ultraviolet is significant, because some indication was obtained that two- and three-photon absorption processes begin to play a role in determining the threshold. Throughout the visible region of the spectrum the threshold is still an increasing function of frequency, indicating that avalanche ionization is the dominant factor in determining the breakdown threshold. This was confirmed by a detailed study of the damage morphology with a high resolution microscope just above the threshold. The influence of self focusing is discussed, and evidence for beam distortion below the power threshold for complete self focusing is presented, confirming the theory of Marburger.

  16. Numerical analysis of laser ablation and damage in glass with multiple picosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Russ, Simone; Hartmann, Claudia; Siebert, Christof; Zhu, Jianqiang; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-04-08

    This study presents a novel numerical model for laser ablation and laser damage in glass including beam propagation and nonlinear absorption of multiple incident ultrashort laser pulses. The laser ablation and damage in the glass cutting process with a picosecond pulsed laser was studied. The numerical results were in good agreement with our experimental observations, thereby revealing the damage mechanism induced by laser ablation. Beam propagation effects such as interference, diffraction and refraction, play a major role in the evolution of the crater structure and the damage region. There are three different damage regions, a thin layer and two different kinds of spikes. Moreover, the electronic damage mechanism was verified and distinguished from heat modification using the experimental results with different pulse spatial overlaps.

  17. New and Advanced Picosecond Lasers for Tattoo Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatto, Maurice A; Amir, Ruthie; Bhawalkar, Jayant; Sierra, Rafael; Bankowski, Richard; Rozen, Doran; Dierickx, Christine; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    Early methods of tattoo removal ultimately resulted in unacceptable cosmetic outcomes. While the introduction of laser technology was an improvement over the existing chemical, mechanical, and surgical procedures, the use of nonselective tattoo removal with carbon dioxide and argon lasers led to scarring. Q-switched lasers with nanosecond (10-9) pulse domains were considered to have revolutionized tattoo treatment, by selectively heating the tattoo particles, while reducing the adverse sequelae to adjacent normal skin. Theoretical considerations of restricting pulse duration, to heat tattoo particles to higher temperatures, proposed the use of sub-nanosecond pulses to target particles with thermal relaxation times lower than the nanosecond pulses in Q-switched lasers. Initial studies demonstrated that picosecond (10-12) pulses were more effective than nanosecond pulses in clearing black tattoos. Advances in picosecond technology led to the development of commercially available lasers, incorporating several different wavelengths, to further refine pigment targeting. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Picosecond lasers for tattoo removal: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Ofer; Atzmony, Lihi; Akerman, Lehavit; Levi, Assi; Kershenovich, Ruben; Lapidoth, Moshe; Mimouni, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Given that the pigment particles in tattoos have a relaxation time of lasers would be expected to be more effective than nanosecond lasers in tattoo removal. To systematically review the evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of picosecond lasers for tattoo removal, Pubmed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists were searched for relevant trials. The primary outcome was >70 % clearance of tattoo pigment. Secondary outcomes were 90-100 % clearance of tattoo pigment, number of laser sessions required, and adverse effects. Eight trials were included, six with human participants (160 participants) and 2 with animal models. Seven of the eight trials explored the usage of either 755, 758, 795, 1064, or 1064/532-nm picosecond lasers for black and blue ink tattoos. In the human trials, 69-100 % of tattoos showed over 70 % clearance of pigment after 1-10 laser treatments. Reported side effects included pain, hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation, blister formation and transient erythema, edema, and pinpoint bleeding. Included articles varied in type of laser investigated, mostly non-comparative studies and with a medium to high risk of bias. There is sparse evidence that picosecond lasers are more effective than their nanosecond counterparts for mainly black and blue ink tattoo removal, with minor side effects.

  19. Modification of Cu surface with picosecond laser pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obona, J. Vincenc; Ocelik, V.; Rao, J. C.; Skolski, J. Z. P.; Romer, G. R. B. E.; in't Veld, A. J. Huis; de Hosson, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    High purity, mirror-polished polycrystalline Cu surface was treated with single picosecond laser pulses at fluence levels close to the single-pulse modification threshold. The induced surface topography and sub-surface changes were examined with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, respect

  20. Picosecond infrared laser (PIRL): an ideal phonomicrosurgical laser?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Markus; Hildebrandt, Michael Dominik; Müller, Frank; Kruber, Sebastian; Kroetz, Peter; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Kammal, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Wöllmer, Wolfgang; Miller, Dwayne

    2013-11-01

    A comparison of tissue cutting effects in excised cadaver human vocal folds after incisions with three different instruments [scalpel, CO2 laser and the picosecond infrared laser-(PIRL)] was performed. In total, 15 larynges were taken from human cadavers shortly after death. After deep freezing and thawing for the experiment, the vocal folds suspended in the hemilarynx were incised. Histology and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analyses were performed. Damage zones after cold instrument cuts ranged from 51 to 135 μm, as compared to 9-28 μm after cutting with the PIRL. It was shown that PIRL incision had smaller zones of tissue coagulation and tissue destruction, when compared with scalpel and CO2 laser cuts. The PIRL technology provides an (almost) atraumatic laser, which offers a quantum jump towards realistic 'micro'-phonosurgery on a factual cellular dimension, almost entirely avoiding coagulation, carbonization, or other ways of major tissue destruction in the vicinity of the intervention area. Although not available for clinical use yet, the new technique appears promising for future clinical applications, so that technical and methodological characteristics as well as tissue experiments seem worthwhile to be communicated at this stage of development.

  1. Subpicosecond and picosecond laser ablation of dental enamel: comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Andrei V.; Madsen, Nathan R.; Kolev, Vesselin Z.; Gamaly, Eugene G.; Luther-Davies, Barry; Dawes, Judith M.; Chan, A.

    2004-06-01

    We report the use of sub-picosecond near-IR and ps UV pulsed lasers for precision ablation of freshly extracted human teeth. The sub-picosecond laser wavelength was ~800nm, with pulsewidth 150 fs and pulse repetition rate of 1kHz; the UV laser produced 10 ps pulses at 266 nm with pulse rate of ~1.2x105 pulses/s; both lasers produced ~1 W of output energy, and the laser fluence was kept at the same level of 10-25 J/cm2. Laser radiation from both laser were effectively absorbed in the teeth enamel, but the mechanisms of absorption were radically different: the near-IR laser energy was absorbed in a plasma layer formed through the optical breakdown mechanism initiated by multiphoton absorption, while the UV-radiation was absorbed due to molecular photodissociation of the enamel and conventional thermal deposition. The rise in the intrapulpal temperature was monitored by embedded thermocouples, and was shown to remain low with subpicosecond laser pulses, but risen up to 30°C, well above the 5°C pain level with the UV-laser. This study demonstrates the potential for ultra-short-pulsed lasers to precision and painless ablation of dental enamel, and indicated the optimal combination of laser parameters in terms of pulse energy, duration, intensity, and repetition rate, required for the laser ablation rates comparable to that of mechanical drill.

  2. The Self-Injected Laser for Picosecond Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Armani, F.; Martini, F; Mataloni, P.

    1983-01-01

    The principles of operation and the characteristics of the self-injected picosecond laser are presented. We show that in spite of its simple design our device is able to generate very high power pulses in the picosecond domain. This warrants the use of this laser for time resolved spectroscopy in the picosecond domain.

  3. Picosecond resolution soft x-ray laser plasma interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Ng, A; Shlyaptsev, V; Dunn, J; Hunter, J; Keenan, R; Marconi, M; Filevich, J; Rocca, J; Smith, R

    2003-12-01

    We describe a soft x-ray laser interferometry technique that allows two-dimensional diagnosis of plasma electron density with picosecond time resolution. It consists of the combination of a robust high throughput amplitude division interferometer and a 14.7 nm transient inversion soft x-ray laser that produces {approx} 5 ps pulses. Due to its picosecond resolution and short wavelength scalability, this technique has potential for extending the high inherent precision of soft x-ray laser interferometry to the study of very dense plasmas of significant fundamental and practical interest, such as those investigated for inertial confined fusion. Results of its use in the diagnostics of dense large scale laser-created plasmas are presented.

  4. Recent progress in picosecond pulse generation from semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, J. C.; Johnston, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in producing picosecond optical pulses from semiconductor laser diodes. The discussion concentrates on the mode-locking of a semiconductor laser diode in an external resonator. Transform-limited optical pulses ranging from several picoseconds to subpicosecond durations have been observed with active and passive mode-locking. Even though continuing research on the influence of impurities and defects on the mode-locking process is still needed, this technique has good promise for being utilized in fiber-optic communication systems. Alternative methods of direct electrical and optical excitation to produce ultrashort laser pulses are also described. They can generate pulses of similar widths to those obtained by mode-locking. The pulses generated will find applications in laser ranging and detector response measurement.

  5. Boosting laser-ion acceleration with multi-picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, A.; Mima, K.; Iwata, N.; Tosaki, S.; Morace, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Johzaki, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Matsuo, K.; Kamitsukasa, N.; Kojima, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Murakami, M.; Tokita, S.; Kawanaka, J.; Miyanaga, N.; Yamanoi, K.; Norimatsu, T.; Sakagami, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Azechi, H.

    2017-01-01

    Using one of the world most powerful laser facility, we demonstrate for the first time that high-contrast multi-picosecond pulses are advantageous for proton acceleration. By extending the pulse duration from 1.5 to 6 ps with fixed laser intensity of 1018 W cm−2, the maximum proton energy is improved more than twice (from 13 to 33 MeV). At the same time, laser-energy conversion efficiency into the MeV protons is enhanced with an order of magnitude, achieving 5% for protons above 6 MeV with the 6 ps pulse duration. The proton energies observed are discussed using a plasma expansion model newly developed that takes the electron temperature evolution beyond the ponderomotive energy in the over picoseconds interaction into account. The present results are quite encouraging for realizing ion-driven fast ignition and novel ion beamlines. PMID:28211913

  6. Boosting laser-ion acceleration with multi-picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, A.; Mima, K.; Iwata, N.; Tosaki, S.; Morace, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Johzaki, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Matsuo, K.; Kamitsukasa, N.; Kojima, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Murakami, M.; Tokita, S.; Kawanaka, J.; Miyanaga, N.; Yamanoi, K.; Norimatsu, T.; Sakagami, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Azechi, H.

    2017-02-01

    Using one of the world most powerful laser facility, we demonstrate for the first time that high-contrast multi-picosecond pulses are advantageous for proton acceleration. By extending the pulse duration from 1.5 to 6 ps with fixed laser intensity of 1018 W cm‑2, the maximum proton energy is improved more than twice (from 13 to 33 MeV). At the same time, laser-energy conversion efficiency into the MeV protons is enhanced with an order of magnitude, achieving 5% for protons above 6 MeV with the 6 ps pulse duration. The proton energies observed are discussed using a plasma expansion model newly developed that takes the electron temperature evolution beyond the ponderomotive energy in the over picoseconds interaction into account. The present results are quite encouraging for realizing ion-driven fast ignition and novel ion beamlines.

  7. Low-reflectance laser-induced surface nanostructures created with a picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbada, Shashank; Huang, Zhifeng; Shin, Yung C.; Ruan, Xiulin

    2016-04-01

    Using high-speed picosecond laser pulse irradiation, low-reflectance laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) have been created on polycrystalline silicon. The effects of laser fluence, scan speed, overlapping ratio and polarization angle on the formation of LIPSS are reported. The anti-reflective properties of periodic structures are discussed, and the ideal LIPSS for low surface reflectance is presented. A decrease of 35.7 % in average reflectance of the silicon wafer was achieved over the wavelength range of 400-860 nm when it was textured with LIPSS at high scan speeds of 4000 mm/s. Experimental results of broadband reflectance of silicon wafers textured with LIPSS have been compared with finite difference time domain simulations and are in good agreement, showing high predictability in reflectance values for different structures. The effects of changing the LIPSS profile, fill factor and valley depth on the surface reflectance were also analyzed through simulations.

  8. Ultrafast (picosecond) laser oscillator for educational use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, I.; Ugurlu, A.; Seerdar, G.; Pflaum, C.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we present a description of an inexpensive ultrafast self-starting passively mode-locked laser oscillator that can be constructed using widely available off-the-shelf optical components. Such a laser system can be used to teach students the principles of solid state laser engineering, demonstrate a number of nonlinear optical phenomena, and perform qualitative and quantitative comparisons between numerical laser modeling and experimental results.

  9. Fiber laser pumped high power mid-infrared laser with picosecond pulse bunch output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kaihua; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Peipei; Yang, Dingzhong; Wu, Bo; Shen, Yonghang

    2013-10-21

    We report a novel quasi-synchronously pumped PPMgLN-based high power mid-infrared (MIR) laser with picosecond pulse bunch output. The pump laser is a linearly polarized MOPA structured all fiberized Yb fiber laser with picosecond pulse bunch output. The output from a mode-locked seed fiber laser was directed to pass through a FBG reflector via a circulator to narrow the pulse duration from 800 ps to less than 50 ps and the spectral FWHM from 9 nm to 0.15 nm. The narrowed pulses were further directed to pass through a novel pulse multiplier through which each pulse was made to become a pulse bunch composing of 13 sub-pulses with pulse to pulse time interval of 1.26 ns. The pulses were then amplified via two stage Yb fiber amplifiers to obtain a linearly polarized high average power output up to 85 W, which were then directed to pass through an isolator and to pump a PPMgLN-based optical parametric oscillator via quasi-synchronization pump scheme for ps pulse bunch MIR output. High MIR output with average power up to 4 W was obtained at 3.45 micron showing the feasibility of such pump scheme for ps pulse bunch MIR output.

  10. Studies on laser material processing with nanosecond and sub-nanosecond and picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser ablation of widely used metal (Al, Cu. stainless-steel), semiconductor (Si), transparent material (glass, sapphire), ceramic (Al2O3, AlN) and polymer (PI, PMMA) in industry were systematically studied with pulse width from nanosecond (5-100ns), picosecond (6-10ps) to sub-picosecond (0.8-0.95ps). A critical damage zone (CDZ) of up to 100um with ns laser, price. Our studies of cutting and drilling with ns, ps, and sub-ps lasers indicate that it is feasible to achieve user accepted quality and speed with cost-effective and reliable laser by optimizing processing conditions.

  11. Applications des lasers picosecondes à l'optoélectronique

    OpenAIRE

    Chesnoy, J.

    1989-01-01

    Cet article tend à dégager parmi les techniques laser ultra-rapides (picosecondes et femtosecondes) celles qui devraient être appelées à un développement dans le domaine de l'électronique, de l'optoélectronique et des télécommunications. Sont d'abord analysées les possibilités d'étude de circuits électroniques ultra-rapides par laser picoseconde. Les possibilités d'étude de circuits optoélectroniques sont ensuite considérées ainsi que le développement d'appareillages possibles dans ce domaine...

  12. Microprocessor based interface unit for coupling a picosecond laser oscillator with external laser amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navathe, C. P.; Ansari, M. S.; Upadhyaya, J.; Sreedhar, N.; Chandra, R.; Kumbhare, S. R.; Chakera, J. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    1996-07-01

    A microprocessor based interface unit for coupling a commercial picosecond Nd:YLF laser oscillator amplifier to external high power Nd:phosphate glass laser amplifier stages is described. The system generates charging and firing signals required for the picosecond oscillator, and also carries out the charging and firing sequence of external amplifiers for a single shot or a repetitive mode of operation. The electronics developed is simple and modular, with sufficient scope for expansion of the system, and resistant to electromagnetic interference.

  13. Recording sub-picosecond pulses in emission from neodymium dye lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brekhov, O.M.; Lebedev, V.B.; Luzanov, V.B.; Maranichenko, N.I.; Prokhorenko, V.I.; Stepanov, B.M.; Tikhonov, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Using the ''Agent-04M'' experimental optico -electronic camera, the sub-picosecond fluctuation structure at the output of a neodymium laser is recorded. The laser consists of a master oscillator whose non-dispersive resonator uses a tray containing 3274-M dye for passive mode locking, a system for isolating a single 8 to 25 picosecond pulse from the pulse train, and a five-stage amplifier with an output power of 1 gigawatt. The minimum duration of the substructure pulses, detected by the camera wtih a contrast of greater than or equal to 40%, does not exceed .3 picoseconds. The total width of the emission spectrum at the output of this amplifier is 9 nanometers, which in the hypothesis on the Gaussian shape of the pulses corresponds to their minimum duration of 2 picoseconds. The emission from the power amplifier is used to pump a superfluorescence 6zh rhodamine dye laser. Here the pulse duration is measured using both a camera and an autocorrelation method.

  14. Picosecond pulse measurements using the active laser medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardin, James P.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1990-01-01

    A simple method for measuring the pulse lengths of synchronously pumped dye lasers which does not require the use of an external nonlinear medium, such as a doubling crystal or two-photon fluorescence cell, to autocorrelate the pulses is discussed. The technique involves feeding the laser pulses back into the dye jet, thus correlating the output pulses with the intracavity pulses to obtain pulse length signatures in the resulting time-averaged laser power. Experimental measurements were performed using a rhodamine 6G dye laser pumped by a mode-locked frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The results agree well with numerical computations, and the method proves effective in determining lengths of picosecond laser pulses.

  15. Compact All-Fiber 102 W Picosecond MOPA Laser with a Narrow Spectral Linewidth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wen-Di; REN Ting-Qi; ZHOU Jun; DU Song-Tao; GU Xi-Jia; LOU Qi-Hong

    2011-01-01

    We report an all-fiber-based master oscillator power amplifier picosecond ytterbium-doped fiber laser with an average power of 102 W and a spectral line width of 0.1 nm. The seed source is a compact single mode passively mode-locked fiber laser with an average power of 2.48 W. Finally, the laser maximum average output power of 102 W picosecond pulses is realized by a direct all-fiber amplifier structure in one stage. The experiment enables the optical-to-optica] conversion efficiency to rcaclt 61.4%, with the central wavelength of 1063.7nm. A significant feature of this experiment is the spectral line width of 0.1 nm. The spectrum has no broadening or nonlinear effects when the pump is strengthened.%We report an all-fiber-based master oscillator power amplifier picosecond ytterbium-doped fiber laser with an average power of 102 W and a spectral line width of 0.1 nm.The seed source is a compact single mode passively mode-locked fiber laser with an average power of 2.48 W.Finally,the laser maximum average output power of 102 W picosecond pulses is realized by a direct all-fiber amplifier structure in one stage.The experiment enables the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency to reach 61.4%,with the central wavelength of 1063.7nm.A significant feature of this experiment is the spectral line width of 0.1 nm.The spectrum has no broadening or nonlinear effects when the pump is strengthened.Fiber lasers have drawn a great deal of atteution due to their admirable beam quality,conversion efficiency,high stability and high heat dissipation.[1-3]Recently,high power fiber lasers have produced stronger power.With the rapid development of the fiber and supporting technology,especially that of cladding pump technology based on double-cladding fiber,[4] fiber laser power has been enhanced over the level of ten thousand watt.[5] Ultra-short pulsed fiber lasers at the level of picoseconds are being widely applied in the fields of industrial manufacture,medical treatment

  16. Synchronization of Sub-Picosecond Electron and Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Le Sage G.P.

    2000-08-15

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is subpicosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next-generation experiments. Typically, an RF electron accelerator is synchronized to a short pulse laser system by detecting the repetition signal of a laser oscillator, adjusted to an exact subharmonic of the linac RF frequency, and multiplying or phase locking this signal to produce the master RF clock. Pulse-to-pulse jitter characteristic of self-mode-locked laser oscillators represents a direct contribution to the ultimate timing jitter between a high intensity laser focus and electron beam at the interaction point, or a photocathode drive laser in an RF photoinjector. This timing jitter problem has been addressed most seriously in the context of the RF photoinjector, where the electron beam properties are sensitive functions of relative timing jitter. The timing jitter achieved in synchronized photocathode drive laser systems is near, or slightly below one picosecond. The ultimate time of arrival jitter of the beam at the photoinjector exit is typically a bit smaller than the photocathode drive-laser jitter due to velocity compression effects in the first RF cell of the gun. This tendency of the timing of the electron beam arrival at a given spatial point to lock to the RF lock is strongly reinforced by use of magnetic compression.

  17. Picosecond laser-induced water condensation in a cloud chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Du, Shengzhe; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-05

    We investigated water condensation in a laboratory cloud chamber induced by picosecond (ps) laser pulses at ~350 ps (800 nm/1-1000 Hz) with a maximum peak power of ~25 MW. The peak power was much lower than the critical power for self-focusing in air (~3-10 GW depending on the pulse duration). Sparks, airflow and snow formation were observed under different laser energies or repetition rates. It was found that weaker ps laser pulses can also induce water condensation by exploding and breaking down ice crystals and/or water droplets into tiny particles although there was no formation of laser filament. These tiny particles would grow until precipitation in a super-saturation zone due to laser-induced airflow in a cold region with a large temperature gradient.

  18. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-11-01

    A compact multifunctional optical correlator system for pulse width measurement of ultrashort ultraviolet (UV) pulses has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. Both autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions are measured using a single nonlinear crystal, and the switching between two measurements requires no adjustment of phase matching and detector. The system can measure UV pulse widths from sub-picoseconds to 100 ps, and it involves no auxiliary pulse in the measurement. The measurement results on a burst-mode picosecond UV laser show a high-quality performance on speed, accuracy, resolution, and dynamic range. The proposed correlator can be applied to measure any ultrashort UV pulses produced through sum-frequency generation or second-harmonic generation.

  19. Picosecond laser-induced formation of spikes in a single crystal superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an Shaanxi 710119 (China); Cheng Guanghua [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an Shaanxi 710119 (China); Feng Qiang, E-mail: qfeng@skl.ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Cao Lamei [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Advanced High Temperature Structural Materials, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transition from ripples to spikes with pulse number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser fluence has a significant effect on the spike separation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationship between structures and their parametric dependence is established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Capillary waves are responsible for the formation of spikes. - Abstract: The characteristics of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were investigated after laser irradiation with different pulse duration under a certain range of laser fluence (0.25 {<=} {Phi} {<=} 1.91 J/cm{sup 2}) and pulse number (11 {<=} N {<=} 560). Spikes were generated by picosecond laser irradiation in ambient air, in comparison with only periodic ripple structures introduced by nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Microstructural investigations indicate that these spikes were initiated by the fragment of periodic ripple ridges or corrugation on the smooth surface with subsequent pulses, and their separation increased with increasing the laser fluence. Surface capillary waves associated with the resolidification process can be employed to explain the formation of spikes by picosecond laser irradiation.

  20. The use of lasers for studying ultrahigh speed phenomena (picoseconds): equipement of a picosecond spectroscopy laboratory using synchronized mode lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goujon, P.; Pochon, E.; Clerc, M. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Section des Recherches et de l' Interaction du Rayonnement avec la Matiere)

    1975-07-01

    The spectroscopy laboratory is equipped with a dye laser and a neodymium glass laser. Detection in one case is made by means of a streak picosecond camera capable of a 5 ps time interval. A second detection method uses a CS/sub 2/ Kerr cell switch based on the Duguay principle. The first qualitative results concerning the fluorescence of DODCI and chlorophyll in vivo as well as the bleaching and recovering of the absorption of the electron solvated in liquid ammonia, have shown that this equipment could effectively enable the observation of physical-chemical processes as brief as 5 ps. (FR)

  1. Ablation of steel using picosecond laser pulses in burst mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lickschat, Peter; Demba, Alexander; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    Results obtained in picosecond laser processing of steel applying the burst mode are presented. Using the burst mode, pulse trains, i.e., bursts, consisting of a number of picosecond pulses with an inter-pulse delay of 12.5 ns and 10 ps pulse duration are applied for material processing. Small cavities with sizes in the range of the laser beam diameter made by single-burst ablation are compared to quadratic cavities of 0.5 × 0.5 mm² produced by multiburst ablation and simultaneous scanning of the laser beam across the steel sample surface. The ablated volume per pulse within the burst was calculated either from the ablated volume per burst or from the ablation depth of the quadratic cavities. With the second to fourth pulses in the bursts, a reduction of the ablated volume per pulse in comparison with the first pulse in the bursts (i.e., to the use of single pulses) was found for both single- and multiburst ablation, which is assumed to be due to plasma shielding. By contrast, the ablated volume per pulse within the bursts increases for the fifth to eighth pulses. Heat accumulation effect and the influence of the heated plasma can be assumed to be the reason for these higher ablation rates. SEM micrographs also show that there is a higher melt ejection out of the laser processed area. This is indicated by the formation of bulges about the ablated area.

  2. Picosecond laser bonding of highly dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard M.; Troughton, Michael; Chen, Jianyong; Elder, Ian; Thomson, Robert R.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-10-01

    We report on recent progress in developing an industrially relevant, robust technique to bond dissimilar materials through ultra-fast microwelding. This technique is based on the use of a 5.9ps, 400kHz Trumpf laser operating at 1030nm. Tight focusing of the laser radiation at, or around, the interface between two materials allows for simultaneous absorption in both. This absorption rapidly, and locally, heats the material forming plasma from both materials. With suitable surface preparation this plasma can be confined to the interface region where it mixes, cools and forms a weld between the two materials. The use of ps pulses results in a short interaction time. This enables a bond to form whilst limiting the heat affected zone (HAZ) to a region of only a few hundred micrometres across. This small scale allows for the bonding of materials with highly dissimilar thermal properties, and in particular coefficients of thermal expansion e.g. glass-metal bonding. We report on our results for a range of material combinations including, Al-Bk7, Al-SiO2 and Nd:YAG-AlSi. Emphasis will be laid on the technical requirements for bonding including the required surface preparation of the two materials and on the laser parameters required. The quality of the resultant bonds are characterized through shear force measurements (where strengths equal to and exceeding equivalent adhesives will be presented). The lifetime of the welds is also discussed, paying particular attention to the results of thermal cycling tests.

  3. Efficient second harmonic generation of picosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabson, T. A.; Ruiz, H. J.; Shah, P. L.; Tittel, F. K.

    1972-01-01

    Efficient conversion to the second harmonic (SH) using KD2PO4 and CsH2AsO4 crystals inside a folded cavity of a high-power-dye mode-locked neodymium-glass laser is reported. For the first time, frequency-doubled picosecond light pulses have been obtained in CsH2AsO4 with peak powers of the order of 1 GW/sq cm at 0.531 micron for an effective pump power density of 4 GW/sq cm.

  4. Wavelength scaling of silicon laser ablation in picosecond regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, A.; Grojo, D.; Sentis, M.

    2017-07-01

    Single pulse laser ablation of silicon has been investigated at 343, 515, and 1030 nm using a laser pulse duration of 50 ps. In this large spectral range, ablation thresholds of silicon vary from 0.01 to 0.83 J/cm2, confirming a strong dependence on the wavelength. By solving the free-carrier density rate equation at threshold conditions, we show that band-to-band linear absorption dominates energy deposition at 343 and 515 nm, whereas at 1030 nm, the energy leading to ablation is primarily absorbed by the generated free-carriers. This allows us to determine the relevant criteria to derive a simple model predicting the wavelength dependence of the ablation threshold in this regime. We obtain an excellent agreement between experimental measurements and calculations by simply considering an averaged energy density required in the absorption depth for surface ablation and accounting for the laser-induced variations of the important thermophysical parameters. On the basis of this analysis, we discuss the optimal wavelength and fluence conditions for maximum removal rate, ablation efficiency, and accuracy. Despite the difference in mechanisms at the different wavelengths, we find that the maximal efficiency remains at around 7 times the ablation threshold fluence for all investigated wavelengths. This work provides guidelines for high-quality and efficient micromachining of silicon in the scarcely explored picosecond regime, while new picosecond sources offer numerous advantages for real throughput industrial applications.

  5. Picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard M; Chen, Jianyong; Shephard, Jonathan D; Thomson, Robert R; Hand, Duncan P

    2014-07-01

    We report picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials based on plasma formation induced by a tightly focused beam from a 1030 nm, 10 ps, 400 kHz laser system. Specifically, we demonstrate the welding of fused silica, borosilicate, and sapphire to a range of materials including borosilicate, fused silica, silicon, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Dissimilar material welding of glass to aluminum and stainless steel has not been previously reported. Analysis of the borosilicate-to-borosilicate weld strength compares well to those obtained using similar welding systems based on femtosecond lasers. There is, however, a strong requirement to prepare surfaces to a high (10-60 nm Ra) flatness to ensure a successful weld.

  6. STIRAP in sodium vapor with picosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, Jim L; Allen, Susan D; Tilley, Matt; Hoke, Steven; Johnson, J Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experimental measurements and calculations of STIRAP transfer efficiencies were made on a sodium gas starting from the $3^2{\\rm S}_{1/2}$ electronic ground state, passing through the $3^2{\\rm P}_{1/2}$ and/or the $3^2{\\rm P}_{3/2}$ to the $5^2{\\rm S}_{1/2}$ state. The lasers used in the experiments had a pulse width of several picoseconds and were close to the Fourier transform limit. Although the linewidth of the laser was much smaller than the spin orbit splitting between the $3^2{\\rm P}_{1/2}$ and $3^2{\\rm P}_{3/2}$ states, Experiments and calculations reveal that both 3p states play a role in the transfer efficiency when the lasers are tuned to resonance through the $3^2{\\rm P}_{1/2}$ state, revealing evidence for quantum interference between the competing pathways.

  7. Superhydrophobic and colorful copper surfaces fabricated by picosecond laser induced periodic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jiangyou; Fan, Peixun; Zhong, Minlin; Zhang, Hongjun; Xie, Yongde; Lin, Chen

    2014-08-01

    In this study, functional copper surfaces combined with vivid structural colors and superhydrophobicity were fabricated by picosecond laser. Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), i.e. ripples, were fabricated by picosecond laser nanostructuring to induce rainbow-like structural colors which are uniquely caused by the grating - type structure. The effects of laser processing parameters on the formation of ripples were investigated. We also discussed the formation mechanism of ripples. With different combinations of the laser processing parameters, ripples with various morphologies were fabricated. After the modification with triethoxyoctylsilane, different types of ripples exhibited different levels of wettability. The fine ripples with minimal redeposited nanoparticles exhibited high adhesive force to water. The increased amount of nanoscale structures decreased the adhesive force to water and increased the contact angle simultaneously. In particular, a specific type of ripples exhibited superhydrophobicity with a large contact angle of 153.9 ± 3.2° and a low sliding angle of 11 ± 3°.

  8. Emerging terawatt picosecond CO{sub 2} laser technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V. [Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The first terawatt picosecond (TWps) CO{sub 2} laser is under construction at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). TWps-CO{sub 2} lasers, having an order of magnitude longer wavelength than the well-known table-top terawatt solid state lasers, offer new opportunities for strong-field physics research. For laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) the advantage of the new class of lasers is due to a gain of two orders of magnitude in the ponderomotive potential. The large average power of CO{sub 2} lasers is important for the generation of hard radiation through Compton back-scattering of the laser off energetic electron beams. We discuss applications of TWps-CO{sub 2} lasers for LWFA modules of a tentative electron-positron collider, for {gamma}-{gamma} (or {gamma}-lepton) colliders, for a possible `table-top` source of high-intensity x-rays and gamma rays, and the generation of polarized positron beams. (author)

  9. Microstructuring of fused silica by laser-induced backside wet etching using picosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhardt, M. [Leibniz-Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Raciukaitis, G.; Gecys, P. [Laboratory for Applied Research, Institute of Physics, Savanoriu Ave. 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Zimmer, K., E-mail: martin.ehrhardt@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz-Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    The laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) is an advanced laser processing method used for structuring transparent materials. LIBWE with nanosecond laser pulses has been successfully demonstrated for various materials, e.g. oxides (fused silica, sapphire) or fluorides (CaF{sub 2}, MgF{sub 2}), and applied for the fabrication of microstructures. In the present study, LIBWE of fused silica with mode-locked picosecond (t{sub p} = 10 ps) lasers at UV wavelengths ({lambda}{sub 1} = 355 nm and {lambda}{sub 2} = 266 nm) using a (pyrene) toluene solution was demonstrated for the first time. The influence of the experimental parameters, such as laser fluence, pulse number, and absorbing liquid, on the etch rate and the resulting surface morphology were investigated. The etch rate grew linearly with the laser fluence in the low and in the high fluence range with different slopes. Incubation at low pulse numbers as well as a nearly constant etch rate after a specific pulse number for example were observed. Additionally, the etch rate depended on the absorbing liquid used; whereas the higher absorption of the admixture of pyrene in the used toluene enhances the etch rate and decreases the threshold fluence. With a {lambda}{sub 1} = 266 nm laser set-up, an exceptionally smooth surface in the etch pits was achieved. For both wavelengths ({lambda}{sub 1} = 266 nm and {lambda}{sub 2} = 355 nm), LIPSS (laser-induced periodic surface structures) formation was observed, especially at laser fluences near the thresholds of 170 and 120 mJ/cm{sup 2}, respectively.

  10. Picosecond laser ultrasonics for imaging of transparent polycrystalline materials compressed to megabar pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Maju; Raetz, Samuel; Chigarev, Nikolay; Nikitin, Sergey M; Bulou, Alain; Gasteau, Damien; Tournat, Vincent; Castagnede, Bernard; Zerr, Andreas; Gusev, Vitalyi E

    2016-07-01

    Picosecond laser ultrasonics is an all-optical experimental technique based on ultrafast high repetition rate lasers applied for the generation and detection of nanometric in length coherent acoustic pulses. In optically transparent materials these pulses can be detected not only on their arrival at the sample surfaces but also all along their propagation path inside the sample providing opportunity for imaging of the sample material spatial inhomogeneities traversed by the acoustic pulse. Application of this imaging technique to polycrystalline elastically anisotropic transparent materials subject to high pressures in a diamond anvil cell reveals their significant texturing/structuring at the spatial scales exceeding dimensions of the individual crystallites.

  11. 157 W all-fiber high-power picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Hou, Jing; Chen, Shengping; Yang, Weiqiang; Lu, Qisheng

    2012-05-01

    An all-fiber high-power picosecond laser is constructed in a master oscillator power amplifier configuration. The self-constructed fiber laser seed is passively mode locked by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. Average output power of 157 W is obtained after three stages of amplification at a fundamental repetition rate of 60 MHz. A short length of ytterbium double-clad fiber with a high doping level is used to suppress nonlinear effects. However, a stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) effect occurs owing to the 78 kW high peak power. A self-made all-fiber repetition rate increasing system is used to octuple the repetition rate and decrease the high peak power. Average output power of 156.6 W is obtained without SRS under the same pump power at a 480 MHz repetition rate with 0.6 nm line width.

  12. Picosecond Pulsed Laser Ablation for the Surface Preparation of Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank; Ledesma, Rodolfo; Fulton, Tayler; Arthur, Alexandria; Eldridge, Keishara; Thibeault, Sheila; Lin, Yi; Wohl, Chris; Connell, John

    2017-01-01

    As part of a technical challenge under the Advanced Composites Program, methods for improving pre-bond process control for aerospace composite surface treatments and inspections, in conjunction with Federal Aviation Administration guidelines, are under investigation. The overall goal is to demonstrate high fidelity, rapid and reproducible surface treatment and surface characterization methods to reduce uncertainty associated with the bonding process. The desired outcomes are reliable bonded airframe structure, and reduced timeline to certification. In this work, laser ablation was conducted using a q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser capable of nominal pulse durations of 8 picoseconds (ps). Aerospace structural carbon fiber reinforced composites with an epoxy resin matrix were laser treated, characterized, processed into bonded assemblies and mechanically tested. The characterization of ablated surfaces were conducted using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), water contact angle (WCA) goniometry, micro laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (uLIBS), and electron spin resonance (ESR). The bond performance was assessed using a double cantilever beam (DCB) test with an epoxy adhesive. The surface characteristics and bond performance obtained from picosecond ablated carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) are presented herein.

  13. Advantages of Picosecond Laser Machining for Cutting-Edge Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, C.

    The demand to reduce the size, weight and material cost of modern electronic devices results in a requirement for precision micromachining to aid product development. Examples include making smaller and more powerful smartphones with brighter displays, eliminating the requirement for post-process cleaning and machining the latest bio- absorbable medical stents. The pace of innovation in high-tech industries has led to ultrafast (picosecond) industrial lasers becoming an important tool for many applications and the high repetition rates now available help to meet industrial throughput levels. This is due to the unique operating regime (megawatts of peak power) enabling clean cutting and patterning of sensitive materials and thin films used in a number of novel devices and allows micromachining of wide bandgap, "difficult" materials such as glass.

  14. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon [Manufacturing Processes Department, Fundacion TEKNIKER, Av. Otaola 20, 20600, Eibar, Guipuzcoa (Spain); Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon [Department of Mining and Metallurgy Engineering and Materials Science, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country (EHU-UPV), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-11-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  15. Modification of anodised aluminium surfaces using a picosecond fibre laser for printing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, I A; Watkins, K G; Sharp, M C; Hutchinson, R A; Potts, R M; Clowes, J

    2012-06-01

    The use of an ultrafast fibre laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm has allowed the surface modification of anodised aluminium plates coated with a 2 micron thick anodised layer for potential industrial applications. The micro- and nano-scale structuring of the anodised aluminium using picosecond pulses of approximately 25 ps duration at 200 kHz repetition rate was investigated. The interaction of the laser with the substrate created a hydrophilic surface, giving a contact angle of less than 10 degrees. On examination under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), a morphology created due to laser induced spallation was observed. It has been found that these laser processed hydrophilic surfaces revert to a hydrophobic state with time. This has potential for application in the printing industry and offers reusability and sustainability of the process materials. This has been confirmed in initial trials.

  16. Enhanced plasmonic coloring of silver and formation of large laser-induced periodic surface structures using multi-burst picosecond pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Guay, J -M; Baxter, J; Charron, M; Côté, G; Ramunno, L; Berini, P; Weck, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on the creation of angle-independent colors on silver using closely time-spaced laser bursts. The use of burst mode, compared to traditional non-burst is shown to increase the Chroma (color saturation) by ~50% and to broaden the lightness range by up to ~60%. Scanning electron microscope analysis of the surfaces created using burst mode, reveal the creation of 3 distinct sets of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS): low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL), high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) and large laser-induced periodic surface structures (LLIPSS) that are 10 times the laser wavelength and parallel to the laser polarization. Nanoparticles are responsible for each plasmonic color and their distributions are observed to be similar for both burst and non-burst modes, indicating that the underlying structures (i.e. LIPSSs) are responsible for the increased Chroma and Lightness. Two-temperature model simulations of silver irradiated by laser bursts show significant increase in the electron-ph...

  17. Effects of Laser Operating Parameters on Piezoelectric Substrates Micromachining with Picosecond Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamia EL Fissi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ten picoseconds (200 kHz ultrafast laser micro-structuring of piezoelectric substrates including AT-cut quartz, Lithium Niobate and Lithium Tantalate have been studied for the purpose of piezoelectric devices application ranging from surface acoustic wave devices, e.g., bandpass filters, to photonic devices such as optical waveguides and holograms. The study examines the impact of changing several laser parameters on the resulting microstructural shapes and morphology. The micromachining rate has been observed to be strongly dependent on the operating parameters, such as the pulse fluence, the scan speed and the scan number. The results specifically indicate that ablation at low fluence and low speed scan tends to form a U-shaped cross-section, while a V-shaped profile can be obtained by using a high fluence and a high scan speed. The evolution of surface morphology revealed that laser pulses overlap in a range around 93% for both Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3 and Lithium Tantalate (LiTaO3 and 98% for AT-cut quartz can help to achieve optimal residual surface roughness.

  18. Picosecond Laser Shock Peening of Nimonic 263 at 1064 nm and 532 nm Wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Petronic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on the surface modifications of nickel based superalloy Nimonic 263 induced by laser shock peening (LSP process. The process was performed by Nd3+:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (YAG picosecond laser using the following parameters: pulse duration 170 ps; repetition rate 10 Hz; pulse numbers of 50, 100 and 200; and wavelength of 1064 nm (with pulse energy of 2 mJ, 10 mJ and 15 mJ and 532 nm (with pulse energy of 25 mJ, 30 mJ and 35 mJ. The following response characteristics were analyzed: modified surface areas obtained by the laser/material interaction were observed by scanning electron microscopy; elemental composition of the modified surface was evaluated by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS; and Vickers microhardness tests were performed. LSP processing at both 1064 nm and 532 nm wavelengths improved the surface structure and microhardness of a material. Surface morphology changes of the irradiated samples were determined and surface roughness was calculated. These investigations are intended to contribute to the study on the level of microstructure and mechanical properties improvements due to LSP process that operate in a picosecond regime. In particular, the effects of laser wavelength on the microstructural and mechanical changes of a material are studied in detail.

  19. Simultaneous picosecond and femtosecond solitons delivered from a nanotube-mode-locked all-fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D D; Liu, X M; Cui, Y D; Wang, G X; Zeng, C; Yun, L

    2014-03-15

    We propose a compact nanotube-mode-locked all-fiber laser that can simultaneously generate picosecond and femtosecond solitons at different wavelengths. The pulse durations of picosecond and femtosecond solitons are measured to be ∼10.6  ps and ∼466  fs, respectively. Numerical results agree well with the experimental observations and clearly reveal that the dynamic evolutions of the picosecond and femtosecond solitons are qualitatively distinct in the intracavity. Our study presents a simple, stable, low-cost, and dual-scale ultrafast-pulsed laser source suitable for practical applications in optical communications.

  20. Porous nanostructured ZnO films deposited by picosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sima, Cornelia [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Grigoriu, Constantin, E-mail: grigoriu@ifin.nipne.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Besleaga, Cristina; Mitran, Tudor; Ion, Lucian; Antohe, Stefan [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2012-08-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We deposite porous nanostructured ZnO films by picoseconds laser ablation (PLA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes of the films structure on the experimental parameter deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate PLA capability to produce ZnO nanostructured films free of particulates. - Abstract: Porous nanostructured polycrystalline ZnO films, free of large particulates, were deposited by picosecond laser ablation. Using a Zn target, zinc oxide films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates using a picosecond Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser (8 ps, 50 kHz, 532 nm, 0.17 J/cm{sup 2}) in an oxygen atmosphere at room temperature (RT). The morpho-structural characteristics of ZnO films deposited at different oxygen pressures (150-900 mTorr) and gas flow rates (0.25 and 10 sccm) were studied. The post-deposition influence of annealing (250-550 Degree-Sign C) in oxygen on the film characteristics was also investigated. At RT, a mixture of Zn and ZnO formed. At substrate temperatures above 350 Degree-Sign C, the films were completely oxidized, containing a ZnO wurtzite phase with crystallite sizes of 12.2-40.1 nm. At pressures of up to 450 mTorr, the porous films consisted of well-distinguished primary nanoparticles with average sizes of 45-58 nm, while at higher pressures, larger clusters (3.1-14.7 {mu}m) were dominant, leading to thicker films; higher flow rates favored clustering.

  1. Picosecond and nanosecond laser annealing and simulation of amorphous silicon thin films for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakos, I.; Zergioti, I.; Vamvakas, V.; Tsoukalas, D.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a picosecond diode pumped solid state laser and a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser have been used for the annealing and the partial nano-crystallization of an amorphous silicon layer. These experiments were conducted as an alternative/complementary to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method for fabrication of micromorph tandem solar cell. The laser experimental work was combined with simulations of the annealing process, in terms of temperature distribution evolution, in order to predetermine the optimum annealing conditions. The annealed material was studied, as a function of several annealing parameters (wavelength, pulse duration, fluence), as far as it concerns its structural properties, by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and micro-Raman techniques.

  2. Picosecond and subpicosecond pulsed laser deposition of Pb thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gontad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pb thin films were deposited on Nb substrates by means of pulsed laser deposition (PLD with UV radiation (248 nm, in two different ablation regimes: picosecond (5 ps and subpicosecond (0.5 ps. Granular films with grain size on the micron scale have been obtained, with no evidence of large droplet formation. All films presented a polycrystalline character with preferential orientation along the (111 crystalline planes. A maximum quantum efficiency (QE of 7.3×10^{-5} (at 266 nm and 7 ns pulse duration was measured, after laser cleaning, demonstrating good photoemission performance for Pb thin films deposited by ultrashort PLD. Moreover, Pb thin film photocathodes have maintained their QE for days, providing excellent chemical stability and durability. These results suggest that Pb thin films deposited on Nb by ultrashort PLD are a noteworthy alternative for the fabrication of photocathodes for superconductive radio-frequency electron guns. Finally, a comparison with the characteristics of Pb films prepared by ns PLD is illustrated and discussed.

  3. Picosecond laser cutting and drilling of thin flex glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Brunton, Adam; Rumsby, Phil; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the feasibility of cutting and drilling thin flex glass (TFG) substrates using a picosecond laser operating at wavelengths of 1030 nm, 515 nm and 343 nm. 50 μm and 100 μm thick AF32®Eco Thin Glass (Schott AG) sheets are used. The laser processing parameters such as the wavelength, pulse energy, pulse repetition frequency, scan speed and the number of laser passes which are necessary to perform through a cut or to drill a borehole in the TFG substrate are studied in detail. Our results show that the highest effective cutting speeds (220 mm/s for a 50 μm thick TFG substrate and 74 mm/s for a 100 μm thick TFG substrate) are obtained with the 1030 nm wavelength, whereas the 343 nm wavelength provides the best quality cuts. The 515 nm wavelength, meanwhile, can be used to provide relatively good laser cut quality with heat affected zones (HAZ) of <25 μm for 50 μm TFG and <40 μm for 100 μm TFG with cutting speeds of 100 mm/s and 28.5 mm/s, respectively. The 343 nm and 515 nm wavelengths can also be used for drilling micro-holes (with inlet diameters of ⩽75 μm) in the 100 μm TFG substrate with speeds of up to 2 holes per second (using 343 nm) and 8 holes per second (using 515 nm). Optical microscope and SEM images of the cuts and micro-holes are presented.

  4. Superradiant dye solution laser with two-photon picosecond optical pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokhorenko, V.I.; Tikhonov, E.A.; Shpak, M.T.

    1981-01-01

    A superradiant (superfluorescent) dye solution laser with two-photon picosecond pumping was constructed for the first time. A preliminary study was made of the principal characteristics of the output radiation of this laser which performed up-conversion of the frequency of the pump radiation. The physical mechanisms governing the operation of lasers of this type were analyzed.

  5. Development of a new picosecond pulse radiolysis system by using a femtosecond laser synchronized with a picosecond linac. A step to femtosecond pulse radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Tamotsu; Miki, Miyako; Seki, Shu; Okuda, Shuichi; Honda, Yoshihide; Kimura, Norio; Tagawa, Seiichi [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research; Ushida, Kiminori

    1997-03-01

    A new picosecond pulse radiolysis system by using a Ti sapphire femtosecond laser synchronized with a 20 ps electron pulse from the 38 MeV L-band linac has been developed for the research of the ultra fast reactions in primary processes of radiation chemistry. The timing jitter in the synchronization of the laser pulse with the electron pulse is less than several picosecond. The technique can be used in the next femtosecond pulse radiolysis. (author)

  6. Picosecond pulsed infrared laser tuned to amide I band dissociates polyglutamine fibrils in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Ohori, Gaku; Chiba, Tomoyuki; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are causal substances for serious neurodegenerative disorders and amyloidosis. Among them, polyglutamine fibrils seen in multiple polyglutamine diseases are toxic to neurons. Although much efforts have been made to explore the treatments of polyglutamine diseases, there are no effective drugs to block progression of the diseases. We recently found that a free electron laser (FEL), which has an oscillation wavelength at the amide I band (C = O stretch vibration mode) and picosecond pulse width, was effective for conversion of the fibril forms of insulin, lysozyme, and calcitonin peptide into their monomer forms. However, it is not known if that is also the case in polyglutamine fibrils in cells. We found in this study that the fibril-specific β-sheet conformation of polyglutamine peptide was converted into nonfibril form, as evidenced by the infrared microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy after the irradiation tuned to 6.08 μm. Furthermore, irradiation at this wavelength also changed polyglutamine fibrils to their nonfibril state in cultured cells, as shown by infrared mapping image of protein secondary structure. Notably, infrared thermography analysis showed that temperature increase of the cells during the irradiation was within 1 K, excluding thermal damage of cells. These results indicate that the picosecond pulsed infrared laser can safely reduce amyloid fibril structure to the nonfibril form even in cells.

  7. Elemental fractionation in 785 nm picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaheen, M.E., E-mail: mshaheen73@science.tanta.edu.eg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Gagnon, J.E.; Fryer, B.J. [Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research (GLIER), University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada)

    2015-05-01

    Elemental fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse width laser beams originating from the same laser system. Femtosecond and picosecond laser beams at pulse widths of 130 fs and 110 ps, respectively, and wavelength of 785 nm were used to ablate NIST 610 synthetic glass and SRM 1107 Naval Brass B at the same spot for 800 to 1000 laser pulses at different repetition rates (5 to 50 Hz). Elemental fractionation was found to depend on repetition rate and showed a trend with femtosecond laser ablation that is opposite to that observed in picosecond laser ablation for most measured isotopes. ICP-MS signal intensity was higher in femtosecond than picosecond LA-ICP-MS in both NIST 610 and naval brass when ablation was conducted under the same fluence and repetition rate. The differences in signal intensity were partly related to differences in particle size distribution between particles generated by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses and the consequent differences in transport and ionization efficiencies. The main reason for the higher signal intensity resulting from femtosecond laser pulses was related to the larger crater sizes compared to those created during picosecond laser ablation. Elemental ratios measured using {sup 66}Zn/{sup 63}Cu, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th/{sup 238}U, {sup 66}Zn/{sup 232}Th and {sup 66}Zn/{sup 208}Pb were found to change with the number of laser pulses with data points being more scattered in picosecond than femtosecond laser pulses. Reproducibility of replicate measurements of signal intensities, fractionation and elemental ratios was better for fs-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 3 to 6%) than ps-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 7 to 11%). - Highlights: • Fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse widths using NIST 610 and Naval Brass. • Dependence of fractionation indices on repetition rate and pulse width. • Higher ablation rate was observed in picosecond compared to

  8. Experimental and modelling investigations into the laser ablation with picosecond pulses at second harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Paul; Zandonadi, Germana; Eberle, Gregory; Wegener, Konrad

    2015-03-01

    Ablation threshold experiments on various materials are carried out using a picosecond laser generating second harmonic radiation in air at atmospheric pressure. Various materials are investigated which vary according to their different electronic band gap structure and include: silicon, fine grain polycrystalline diamond, copper, steel and tungsten carbide. Through the use of scanning electron microscopy and 3D confocal microscopy, the crater depth and diameter are determined and a correlation is found. The ablation thresholds are given for the aforementioned materials and compared with recent literature results. Picosecond laser-material interactions are modelled using the two-temperature model, simulated and compared with experimental results for metallic materials. An extension of the two-temperature model to semiconducting and insulating materials is discussed. This alternative model uses multiple rate equations to describe the transient free electron density. Additionally, a set of coupled ordinary differential equations describes the processes of multiphoton excitation, inverse bremsstrahlung, and collisional excitation. The resulting electron density distribution can be used as an input for an electron density dependent twotemperature model. This multiple rate equation model is a generic and fast model, which provides important information like ablation threshold, ablation depth and optical properties.

  9. Superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity transition of picosecond laser microstructured aluminum in ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jiangyou; Zhong, Minlin; Zhang, Hongjun; Fan, Peixun

    2015-03-01

    Studies regarding the wettability transition of micro- and nano-structured metal surfaces over time are frequently reported, but there seems to be no generally accepted theory that explains this phenomenon. In this paper, we aim to clarify the mechanism underlying the transition of picosecond laser microstructured aluminum surfaces from a superhydrophilic nature to a superhydrophobic one under ambient conditions. The aluminum surface studied exhibited superhydrophilicity immediately after being irradiated by a picosecond laser. However, the contact angles on the surface increased over time, eventually becoming large enough to classify the surface as superhydrophobic. The storage conditions significantly affected this process. When the samples were stored in CO2, O2 and N2 atmospheres, the wettability transition was restrained. However, the transition was accelerated in atmosphere that was rich with organic compounds. Moreover, the superhydrophobic surface could recover their original superhydrophilicity by low temperature annealing. A detailed XPS analysis indicated that this wettability transition process was mainly caused by the adsorption of organic compounds from the surrounding atmosphere onto the oxide surface.

  10. Sub-surface channels in sapphire made by ultraviolet picosecond laser irradiation and selective etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Rüdiger; Ojha, Nirdesh; Kunzer, Michael; Schwarz, Ulrich T

    2011-11-21

    We demonstrate the realization of sub-surface channels in sapphire prepared by ultraviolet picosecond laser irradiation and subsequent selective wet etching. By optimizing the pulse energy and the separation between individual laser pulses, an optimization of channel length can be achieved with an aspect ratio as high as 3200. Due to strong variation in channel length, further investigation was done to improve the reproducibility. By multiple irradiations the standard deviation of the channel length could be reduced to 2.2%. The achieved channel length together with the high reproducibility and the use of a commercial picosecond laser system makes the process attractive for industrial application.

  11. High-power picosecond laser drilling/machining of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, A.; Li, L.; Mativenga, P.; Sabli, A.

    2016-02-01

    The large differences in physical and thermal properties of the carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite constituents make laser machining of this material challenging. An extended heat-affected zone (HAZ) often occurs. The availability of ultrashort laser pulse sources such as picosecond lasers makes it possible to improve the laser machining quality of these materials. This paper reports an investigation on the drilling and machining of CFRP composites using a state-of-the-art 400 W picosecond laser system. Small HAZs (drilled on sample of 6 mm thickness, whereas no HAZ was seen below the top surface on the cut surfaces. Multiple ring material removal strategy was used. Furthermore, the effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, scanning speed and repetition rate on HAZ sizes and ablation depth was investigated.

  12. Investigations of morphological features of picosecond dual-wavelength laser ablation of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wanqin; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong; Jiang, Gedong; Liu, Bin

    2014-06-01

    Investigations on the morphological features of holes and grooves ablated on the surface of stainless steel using the picosecond dual-wavelength laser system with different powers combinations are presented based on the scarce researches on morphology of dual-wavelength laser ablation. The experimental results show the profiles of holes ablated by the visible beam appear V-shaped while those for the near-infrared have large openings and display U-shaped, which are independent of the ablation mechanism of ultrafast laser. For the dual-wavelength beam (a combination of visible beam and near-infrared), the holes resemble sunflower-like structures and have smoother ring patterns on the bottom. In general, the holes ablated by the dual-wavelength beam appear to have much flatter bottoms, linearly sloped side-walls and spinodal structures between the bottoms of the holes and the side-walls. Furthermore, through judiciously combining the powers of the dual-wavelength beam, high-quality grooves could be obtained with a flat worm-like structure at the bottom surface and less resolidified melt ejection edges. This study provides insight into optimizing ultrafast laser micromachining in order to obtain desired morphology.

  13. Investigation on Soft X-Ray Lasers with a Picosecond-Laser-Irradiated Gas Puff Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowiez, H; Bartnik, A; Jarocki, R; Rakowski, R; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Hunter, J; Hilsen, J; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2002-10-09

    We present results of experimental studies on transient gain soft x-ray lasers with a picosecond-laser-irradiated gas puff target. The target in a form of an elongated gas sheet is formed by pulsed injection of gas through a slit nozzle using a high-pressure electromagnetic valve developed and characterized at the Institute of Optoelectronics. The x-ray laser experiments were performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using the tabletop Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser to irradiate argon, krypton or xenon gas puff targets. Soft x-ray lasing in neon-like argon on the 3p-3s transition at 46.9 nm and the 3d-3p transition at 45.1 nm have been demonstrated, however, no amplification for nickel-like krypton or xenon was observed. Results of the experiments are presented and discussed.

  14. A picosecond widely tunable deep-ultraviolet laser for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Feng-Feng; Yang Feng; Zhang Shen-Jin; Xu Zhi; Wang Zhi-Min; Xu Feng-Liang; Peng Qin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    We develop a picosecond widely tunable laser in a deep-ultraviolet region from 175 nm to 210 nm,generated by two stages of frequency doubling of a 80-MHz mode-locked picosecond Ti:sapphire laser.A β-BaB2O4 walk-off compensation configuration and a KBe2BO3F2 prism-coupled device are adopted for the generation of second harmonic and fourth harmonics,respectively.The highest power is 3.72 mW at 193 nm,and the fluctuation at 2.85 mW in 130 min is less than ±2%.

  15. Molecular collision processes in the presence of picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. W.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    Radiative transitions in molecular collision processes taking place in the presence of picosecond pulses are studied within a semiclassical formalism. An expression for adiabatic potential surfaces in the electronic-field representation is obtained, which directly leads to the evaluation of transition probabilities. Calculations with a Landau-Zener-type model indicate that picosecond pulses can be much more effective in inducing transitions than a single long pulse of the same intensity and the same total energy, if the intensity is sufficiently high that the perturbation treatment is not valid.

  16. Compact KGd(WO4)2 picosecond pulse-train synchronously pumped broadband Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao Qiang; Long, Ming Liang; Meng, Chen

    2016-08-20

    We demonstrate an efficient approach to realizing an extra-cavity, synchronously pumped, stimulated Raman cascaded process under low repetition frequency (1 kHz) pump conditions. We also construct a compact KGd(WO4)2 (KGW) crystal picosecond Raman laser that has been configured as the developed method. A pulse-train green laser pumped the corresponding 70 mm long KGW crystal Raman cavity. The pulse train contains six pulses, about 800 ps separated, for every millisecond; thus, it can realize synchronous pumping between pump pulse and the pumped Raman cavity. The investigated system produced a collinear Raman laser output that includes six laser lines covering the 532 to 800 nm spectra. This is the first report on an all-solid-state, high-average-power picosecond collinear multi-wavelength (more than three laser components) laser to our knowledge. This method has never been reported on before in the synchronously pumped stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) realm.

  17. Comparison of two picosecond lasers to a nanosecond laser for treating tattoos: a prospective randomized study on 49 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorgeou, A; Perrillat, Y; Gral, N; Lagrange, S; Lacour, J-P; Passeron, T

    2017-07-31

    Q-switched nanosecond lasers demonstrated their efficacy in treating most types of tattoos, but complete disappearance is not always achieved even after performing numerous laser sessions. Picosecond lasers are supposed to be more efficient in clearing tattoos than nanosecond lasers, but prospective comparative data remain limited. To compare on different types of tattoos the efficacy of a nanosecond laser with two types of picosecond lasers. We conducted a prospective randomized study performed from December 2014 to June 2016 on adult patients with all types of tattoos. The tattoos were divided into two halves of equal size. After randomization, half of the tattoo was treated with a picosecond laser and the other half with a nanosecond laser. The evaluation was performed on standardized pictures performed before treatment and 2 months after the last session, by two physicians, not involved in the treatment, blinded on the type of treatments received. The main end point was a clearance above 75% of the tattoos. A total of 49 patients were included. Professional tattoos represented 85.7%, permanent make-up 8.2% and non-professional tattoo 6.1%. The majority were black or blue and 10.2% were polychromatic. No patient was lost during follow-up. A reduction of 75% or more of the colour intensity was obtained for 33% of the tattoos treated with the picosecond lasers compared to 14% with the nanosecond laser (P = 0.008). An improvement superior to 75% was obtained in 34% monochromic black or blue tattoos with the picosecond lasers compared to 9% for the nanosecond laser. Only one of the five polychromic tattoos achieved more than 75% of improvement with the two types of laser. Our results show a statistically significant superiority of the picosecond lasers compared to the nanosecond laser for tattoo clearance. However, they do not show better efficacy for polychromic tattoos and the difference in terms of side-effects was also minimal with a tendency of picosecond

  18. Dependence of ablation threshold and LIPSS formation on copper thin films by accumulative UV picosecond laser shots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thi Trang Dai; Semmar, Nadjib

    2014-09-01

    The ablation threshold and Laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on copper thin film were investigated using a picosecond laser (Nd:YAG laser: 266 nm, 42 ps, 10 Hz). We show that the ablation threshold varies with respect to the number of laser shots ( N) on two different substrates. The single-shot ablation threshold was estimated to be close to 170 ± 20 mJ/cm2. The incubation coefficient was estimated to be 0.68 ± 0.03 for copper thin films on silicon and glass substrates. In addition, morphology changes of the ablated regions, in the same spot area, were studied as a function of fluence and number of laser shots. An intermediate structure occurred with a mix of low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL), high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) and regular spikes at a fluence F LIPSS formation was established in the form of a 2D map.

  19. High-average-power and high-beam-quality Innoslab picosecond laser amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liu; Zhang, Hengli; Mao, Yefei; Yan, Ying; Fan, Zhongwei; Xin, Jianguo

    2012-09-20

    We demonstrated a laser-diode, end-pumped picosecond amplifier. With effective shaping of the seed laser, we achieved 73 W amplified laser output at the pump power of 255 W, and the optical-optical efficiency was about 28%. The beam propagation factors M(2) measured at the output power of 60 W in the horizontal direction and the vertical direction were 1.5 and 1.4, respectively.

  20. A New Technology for Applanation Free Corneal Trephination: The Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL)

    OpenAIRE

    Linke, Stephan J; Andreas Frings; Ling Ren; Amadeus Gomolka; Udo Schumacher; Rudolph Reimer; Nils-Owe Hansen; Nathan Jowett; Gisbert Richard; R J Dwayne Miller

    2015-01-01

    The impact of using a Femtosecond laser on final functional results of penetrating kerato-plasty is low. The corneal incisions presented here result from laser ablations with ultrafastdesorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE). The results of the current study arebased on the first proof-of-principle experiments using a mobile, newly introduced picosec-ond infrared laser system, and indicate that wavelengths in the mid-infrared range centeredat 3 $\\mu$m are efficient for obtaining ...

  1. Investigation of laser-surface interactions and optical damage mechanisms using excitation by pairs of picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Lee, H. W. H.; Hughes, Robert S.

    1990-07-01

    It is demonstrated that laser-surface interactions that cause optical surface damage of nominally transparent materials can be investigated by observing the effects of excitation by pairs of picosecond pulses separated by a variable time delay. Laser-induced emission of neutrals is used as the detection mechanism in the present experiments.

  2. A low timing jitter picosecond microchip laser pumped by pulsed LD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sha; Wang, Yan-biao; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shou-huan

    2016-07-01

    SESAM passively Q-switched microchip laser is a very promising instrument to replace mode locked lasers to obtain picosecond pulses. The biggest drawback of a passively Q-switched microchip laser is its un-avoided large timing jitter, especially when the pump intensity is low, i.e. at low laser repetition rate range. In order to obtain a low timing jitter passively Q-switched picosecond microchip laser in the whole laser repetition rate range, a 1000 kHz pulsed narrow bandwidth Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) stablized laser diode was used as the pump source. By tuning the pump intensity, we could control the output laser frequency. In this way, we achieved a very low timing jitter passively Q-switched picosecond laser at 2.13 mW, 111.1 kHz. The relative timing jitter was only 0.0315%, which was around 100 times smaller compared with a cw LD pumped microchip working at hundred kilohertz repetition rate frequency range.

  3. A simple technique for individual picosecond laser pulse duration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    We describe here a simple nonlinear optic technique for the measurement of the duration of individual picosecond pulses. The accuracy and relative simplicity of the technique increase with the number of pulses measured. An experimental test of the basis of the technique is described.

  4. Laser-induced back-ablation of aluminum thin films using picosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK, A B

    1999-05-26

    Experiments were performed to understand laser-induced back-ablation of Al film targets with picosecond laser pulses. Al films deposited on the back surface of BK-7 substrates are ablated by picosecond laser pulses propagating into the Al film through the substrate. The ablated Al plume is transversely probed by a time-delayed, two-color sub-picoseond (500 fs) pulse, and this probe is then used to produce self-referencing interferograms and shadowgraphs of the Al plume in flight. Optical emission from the Al target due to LIBA is directed into a time-integrated grating spectrometer, and a time-integrating CCD camera records images of the Al plume emission. Ablated Al plumes are also redeposited on to receiving substrates. A post-experimental study of the Al target and recollected deposit characteristics was also done using optical microscopy, interferometry, and profilometry. In this high laser intensity regime, laser-induced substrate ionization and damage strongly limits transmitted laser fluence through the substrate above a threshold fluence. The threshold fluence for this ionization-based transmission limit in the substrate is dependent on the duration of the incident pulse. The substrate ionization can be used as a dynamic control of both transmitted spatial pulse profile and ablated Al plume shape. The efficiency of laser energy transfer between the laser pulse incident on the Al film and the ablated Al plume is estimated to be of order 5% and is a weak function of laser pulsewidth. The Al plume is highly directed. Low plume divergence ({theta}{sub divergence} < 5{sup o}) shows the ablated plume temperature to be very low at long time delays ( T << 0.5 eV at delays of 255 ns). Spectroscopic observations and calculations indicate that, in early time (t < 100 ps), the Al film region near the substrate/metal interface is at temperatures of order 0.5 eV. Interferograms of Al plumes produced with 0.1 {micro}m films show these plumes to be of high neutral atom

  5. Picosecond laser welding of optical to metal components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard M.; Troughton, Michael; Chen, Jinanyong; Elder, Ian; Thomson, Robert R.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    We report on practical, industrially relevant, welding of optical components to themselves and aluminum alloy components. Weld formation is achieved through the tight focusing of a 5.9ps, 400kHz Trumpf laser operating at 1030nm. By selecting suitable surface preparation, clamping and laser parameters, the plasma can be confined, even with comparatively rough surfaces, by exploiting the melt properties of the glass. The short interaction time allows for a permanent weld to form between the two materials with heating limited to a region ~300 µm across. Practical application of these weld structures is typically limited due to the induced stress within the glass and, critically, the issues surrounding post-weld thermal expansion. We report on the measured strength of the weld, with a particular emphasis on laser parameters and surface preparation.

  6. Picosecond laser ablation of nano-sized WTi thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, S.; Gaković, B.; Peruško, D.; Desai, T.; Batani, D.; Čekada, M.; Radak, B.; Trtica, M.

    2009-08-01

    Interaction of an Nd:YAG laser, operating at 532 nm wavelength and pulse duration of 40 ps, with tungsten-titanium (WTi) thin film (thickness, 190 nm) deposited on single silicon (100) substrate was studied. Laser fluences of 10.5 and 13.4 J/cm2 were found to be sufficient for modification of the WTi/silicon target system. The energy absorbed from the Nd:YAG laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following WTi/silicon surface morphological changes were observed: (i) ablation of the thin film during the first laser pulse. The boundary of damage area was relatively sharp after action of one pulse whereas it was quite diffuse after irradiation with more than 10 pulses; (ii) appearance of some nano-structures (e.g., nano-ripples) in the irradiated region; (iii) appearance of the micro-cracking. The process of the laser interaction with WTi/silicon target was accompanied by formation of plasma.

  7. Reactor for boron fusion with picosecond ultrahigh power laser pulses and ultrahigh magnetic field trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Miley, G H; Kirchhoff, G

    2015-01-01

    Compared with the deuterium tritium (DT) fusion, the environmentally clean fusion of protons with 11B is extremely difficult. When instead of nanosecond laser pulses for thermal-ablating driven ignition, picosecond pulses are used, a drastic change by nonlinearity results in ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This radically changes to economic boron fusion by a measured new avalanche ignition.

  8. Picosecond optical pulse generation at gigahertz rates by direct modulation of a semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, J.

    1981-01-01

    We report the generation of picosecond pulses by the direct modulation of a buried heterostructure GaAlAs diode laser. Pulse width of 28 ps is achieved at a repetition frequency of 2.5 GHz. Pulse width dependence on the experimental parameters is described.

  9. Development of a picosecond CO2 laser system for a high-repetition γ-source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyanskiy, M.N.; Pogorelsky, I.V.; Yakimenko, V.E.; Platonenko, V.T.

    2009-04-17

    The concept of a high-repetition-rate, high-average power {gamma}-source is based on Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam inside a picosecond CO{sub 2} laser cavity. Proof-of-principle experiments combined with computer simulations allow evaluating the promise of this approach for novel applications in science and technology.

  10. Production of petawatt laser pulses of picosecond duration via Brillouin amplification of nanosecond laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphrey, Kathryn; Alves, Paulo; Fiuza, Frederico; Speirs, David; Bingham, Robert; Cairns, Alan; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis; Norreys, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Raman amplification in plasma is a potential route for the production of petawatt pulses of picosecond duration at 351 nm [Trines et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 105002 (2011)]. In this paper we show, through analytic theory and particle-in-cell simulations, that similar results can also be obtained through Brillouin amplification of a short seed laser beam off a long pump beam at moderate intensity. Scaling laws governing the optimal parameter space for pump beam, seed beam and plasma will be derived using a self-similar model for Brillouin scattering, and verified via simulations. A comparison with Raman scattering will be made, to determine which scheme is most suitable for a range of laser-plasma configurations.

  11. Laser diode structures with a saturable absorber for high-energy picosecond optical pulse generation by combined gain-and Q-switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvkin, B. S.; Avrutin, E. A.; Kostamovaara, J. E. K.; Kostamovaara, J. T.

    2017-02-01

    The performance of gain-switched Fabry-Perot asymmetric-waveguide semiconductor lasers with a large equivalent spot size and an intracavity saturable absorber was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The laser with a short (˜20 μm) absorber emitted high-energy afterpulse-free optical pulses in a broad range of injection current pulse amplitudes; optical pulses with a peak power of about 35 W and a duration of about 80 ps at half maximum were achieved with a current pulse with an amplitude of just 8 A and a duration of 1.5 ns. Good quality pulsations were observed in a broad range of elevated temperatures. The introduction of a substantially longer absorber section leads to strong spectral broadening of the output without a significant improvement to pulse energy and peak power.

  12. Ultrafast high-repetition imaging of fuel sprays using picosecond fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Harsh; Wang, Hongjie; Tang, Mincheng; Idlahcen, Saïd; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Godin, Thomas; Hideur, Ammar

    2015-12-28

    Modern diesel injectors operate at very high injection pressures of about 2000 bar resulting in injection velocities as high as 700 m/s near the nozzle outlet. In order to better predict the behavior of the atomization process at such high pressures, high-resolution spray images at high repetition rates must be recorded. However, due to extremely high velocity in the near-nozzle region, high-speed cameras fail to avoid blurring of the structures in the spray images due to their exposure time. Ultrafast imaging featuring ultra-short laser pulses to freeze the motion of the spray appears as an well suited solution to overcome this limitation. However, most commercial high-energy ultrafast sources are limited to a few kHz repetition rates. In the present work, we report the development of a custom-designed picosecond fiber laser generating ∼ 20 ps pulses with an average power of 2.5 W at a repetition rate of 8.2 MHz, suitable for high-speed imaging of high-pressure fuel jets. This fiber source has been proof tested by obtaining backlight images of diesel sprays issued from a single-orifice injector at an injection pressure of 300 bar. We observed a consequent improvement in terms of image resolution compared to standard white-light illumination. In addition, the compactness and stability against perturbations of our fiber laser system makes it particularly suitable for harsh experimental conditions.

  13. Picosecond pulse duration laser treatment for dermal melanocytosis in Asians : A retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Takafumi; Ohshiro, Toshio; Sasaki, Katsumi; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-06-29

    Background and aims: Recently novel picosecond duration lasers (ps-lasers) have been developed for the treatment of multicolored and recalcitrant tattoos, and safety and efficacy have been reported. We therefore hypothesized that the ps-laser could be an alternative treatment for dermal pigmented lesions and performed a retrospective review to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the ps-laser. Subjects and methods: A retrospective photographic review of 10 patients with dermal pigmented lesions was performed (ages from 4 months to 52 yr), 6 nevus of Ota, 3 ectopic Mongolian spots and 1 Mongolian spots. The patients were treated in the Ohshiro Clinic with picosecond 755 nm alexandrite laser (ps-Alex laser) and picosecond 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser (ps-Nd:YAG laser) from April 2014 to December 2015 (ps-Alex laser, 7 patients; ps-Nd:YAG laser, 3 patients, 1 to 3 treatment sessions). Improvement was evaluated as percentage of pigmentation clearance comparing the baseline findings with those at 3 months after the final treatment using a five category grading scale: Poor, 0-24%; Fair, 25-49%; Good, 50-74%; Excellent, 75-94%; and Complete, 95-100% improvement. Adverse events were also assessed. Results: All ten patients obtained clinical improvement ranging from fair to excellent. Treatment with the ps-Alex laser caused transient hyperpigmentation followed by improvement to complete resolution at 3 months follow-up. The ps-Nd:YAG laser caused severe transient erythema and swelling but no post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the 755 nm and 1064 nm ps-lasers are efficacious for the treatment of dermal pigment lesions, with minimum adverse events.

  14. Picosecond pulse duration laser treatment for dermal melanocytosis in Asians : A retrospective review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Toshio; Sasaki, Katsumi; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Recently novel picosecond duration lasers (ps-lasers) have been developed for the treatment of multicolored and recalcitrant tattoos, and safety and efficacy have been reported. We therefore hypothesized that the ps-laser could be an alternative treatment for dermal pigmented lesions and performed a retrospective review to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the ps-laser. Subjects and methods: A retrospective photographic review of 10 patients with dermal pigmented lesions was performed (ages from 4 months to 52 yr), 6 nevus of Ota, 3 ectopic Mongolian spots and 1 Mongolian spots. The patients were treated in the Ohshiro Clinic with picosecond 755 nm alexandrite laser (ps-Alex laser) and picosecond 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser (ps-Nd:YAG laser) from April 2014 to December 2015 (ps-Alex laser, 7 patients; ps-Nd:YAG laser, 3 patients, 1 to 3 treatment sessions). Improvement was evaluated as percentage of pigmentation clearance comparing the baseline findings with those at 3 months after the final treatment using a five category grading scale: Poor, 0–24%; Fair, 25–49%; Good, 50–74%; Excellent, 75–94%; and Complete, 95–100% improvement. Adverse events were also assessed. Results: All ten patients obtained clinical improvement ranging from fair to excellent. Treatment with the ps-Alex laser caused transient hyperpigmentation followed by improvement to complete resolution at 3 months follow-up. The ps-Nd:YAG laser caused severe transient erythema and swelling but no post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the 755 nm and 1064 nm ps-lasers are efficacious for the treatment of dermal pigment lesions, with minimum adverse events. PMID:27721561

  15. Generation of picosecond laser pulses at 1030 nm with gigahertz range continuously tunable repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubourg, Adrien; Lhermite, Jérôme; Hocquet, Steve; Cormier, Eric; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2015-12-01

    We report on a watt range laser system generating picosecond pulses using electro-optical modulation of a 1030 nm single frequency low noise laser diode. Its repetition rate is continuously tunable between 11 and 18 GHz. Over this range, output spectra and pulse characteristics are measured and compared with a numerical simulation. Finally, amplitude and residual phase noise measurements of the source are also presented.

  16. Semiconductors Investigated by Time Resolved Raman Absorption and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy Using Femtosecond and Picosecond Laser Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-05

    This report summarizes the research progress achieved in the period 1979-1982 in the research effort supported by AFOSR 80-0079. Two main areas of research are: picosecond and subpicosecond laser development and application and time-resolved studies of semiconductors. In the subpicosecond laser development program we investigated a variety of cavities of different physical parameters. A stable and reliable oscillator, which produces 200 fsec pulses, has been developed using

  17. Laser diagnostics in combustion. Elastic scattering and picosecond laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossler, Frederik

    1999-05-01

    Elastic scattering and the Lorenz-Mie (LM) theory in particular is used for the characterization of sub-micron- and micron-sized droplets of organic fuels in sprays and aerosols. Calculations on the Lorenz-Mie theory show that backward-sideward scattered visible radiation can be used for unambiguous detection of ensembles of homogeneous droplets of organic substances with diameters around 1 micrometer (size parameter between 2 and 6). A backward feature in the polarization ratio appears with a value considerably higher than one, on the opposite to the case of the rainbow observed for larger droplets. A comparison between measurements and LM calculations showed that a large amount of droplets in aerosols and well-atomized sprays were smaller than one micrometer in diameter. The LM theory was also used to characterize different size groups in a burning spray. A 3 - D technique based on a picosecond laser and a streak camera was demonstrated for measurements of fast and turbulent biphase flows. The entire 3 - D information was obtained within a time-span of less than 15 nanoseconds. A 2 - D technique for lifetime measurements based on a picosecond laser and a streak camera has been demonstrated on static objects. An analysis indicates that the technique may be applied to measurements of lifetimes around or below one picosecond employing femtosecond lasers and femtosecond streak-cameras. The technique may in principle be used to study dynamic systems when two detectors are used. Fluorescence lifetime measurements on hydrogen and oxygen atoms in flames at atmospheric pressure demonstrate the need of lasers with suiting spectral properties such as jitter and linewidth and the need of detectors with high sensitivity in the near IR in the case of oxygen atoms. The fluorescence lifetimes of gas phase acetone and 3-pentanone at 266 nm excitation wavelength have been measured for mixtures with nitrogen and air at temperatures between 323 and 723 K and pressures between 0

  18. Laser diagnostics in combustion: Elastic scattering and picosecond laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossler, Frederik E.

    Elastic scattering and the Lorenz-Mie (LM) theory in particular is used for the characterization of submicron- and micron-sized droplets of organic fuels in sprays and aerosols. Calculations on the Lorenz-Mie theory show that backward-sideward scattered visible radiation can be used for unambiguous detection of ensembles of homogeneous droplets of organic substances with diameters around 1 micrometer (size parameter between 2 and 6). A backward feature in the polarization ratio appears with a value considerably higher than one, on the opposite to the case of the rainbow observed for larger droplets. A comparison between measurements and LM calculations showed that a large amount of droplets in aerosols and well-atomized sprays were smaller than one micrometer in diameter. The LM theory was also used to characterize different size groups in a burning spray. A 3-D technique based on a picosecond laser and a streak camera was demonstrated for measurements of fast and turbulent biphase flows. The entire 3-D information was obtained within a time-span of less than 15 nanoseconds. A 2-D technique for lifetime measurements based on a picosecond laser and a streak camera has been demonstrated on static objects. An analysis indicates that the technique may be applied to measurements of lifetimes around or below one picosecond employing femtosecond lasers and femtosecond streak-cameras. The technique may in principle be used to study dynamic systems when two detectors are used. Fluorescence lifetime measurements on hydrogen and oxygen atoms in flames at atmospheric pressure demonstrate the need of lasers with suiting spectral properties such as jitter and linewidth and the need of detectors with high sensitivity in the near IR in the case of oxygen atoms. The fluorescence lifetimes of gas phase acetone and 3- pentanone at 266 nm excitation wavelength have been measured for mixtures with nitrogen and air at temperatures between 323 and 723 K and pressures between 0.01 and 10

  19. Picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 5321 and 5347 A - Observation of frequency-dependent behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented of picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 3547 and 5321 A of several materials. The thresholds obtained for breakdown at 5321 A are compared to previous results obtained at 1.064 microns using the same laser system. This comparison illustrates the transition of bulk laser-induced breakdown as it becomes increasingly frequency dependent. UV picosecond pulses are obtained by mixing 5321 A and 1.064 micron pulses in a KH2PO4 crystal. Upper and lower bounds on the 3547 A breakdown threshold are defined, although some effects of walk-off distortion and self-focusing are observed. The results are discussed with reference to models for the intrinsic processes involved in the breakdown, i.e., avalanche and multiphoton ionization.

  20. Iron plasma generation using a Nd:YAG laser pulse of several hundred picoseconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Jun; Kumaki, Masafumi; Kondo, Kotaro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the high intensity plasma generated by using a Nd:YAG laser to apply a laser-produced plasma to the direct plasma injection scheme. The capability of the source to generate high charge state ions strongly depends on the power density of the laser irradiation. Therefore, we focused on using a higher power laser with several hundred picoseconds of pulse width. The iron target was irradiated with the pulsed laser, and the ion current of the laser-produced iron plasma was measured using a Faraday cup and the charge state distribution was investigated using an electrostatic ion analyzer. We found that higher charge state iron ions (up to Fe21+) were obtained using a laser pulse of several hundred picoseconds in comparison to those obtained using a laser pulse of several nanoseconds (up to Fe19+). We also found that when the laser irradiation area was relatively large, the laser power was absorbed mainly by the contamination on the target surface.

  1. Time-resolved microspectrofluorometry and fluorescence lifetime imaging of photosensitizers using picosecond pulsed diode lasers in laser scanning microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Matthias; Meier, Thomas; Steiner, Rudolf; Dolp, Frank; Erdmann, Rainer; Ortmann, Uwe; Rück, Angelika

    2003-01-01

    This work describes the time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of two different photosensitizers in single cells, in detail mTHPC and 5-ALA induced PPIX, which are currently clinically used in photodynamic therapy. The fluorescence lifetime of the drugs was determined in the cells from time-gated spectra as well as single photon counting, using a picosecond pulsed diode laser for fluorescence excitation. The diode laser, which emits pulses at 398 nm with 70 ps full width at half maximum duration, was coupled to a confocal laser scanning microscope. For time-resolved spectroscopy a setup consisting of a Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Time-gated spectra within the cells were acquired by placing the laser beam in "spot scan" mode. In addition, a time-correlated single photon counting module was used to determine the fluorescence lifetime from single spots and to record lifetime images. The fluorescence lifetime of mTHPC decreased from 7.5 to 5.5 ns during incubation from 1 to 6 h. This decrease was probably attributed to enhanced formation of aggregates during incubation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging showed that longer lifetimes were correlated with accumulation in the cytoplasm in the neighborhood of the cell nucleus, whereas shorter lifetimes were found in the outer cytoplasm. For cells that were incubated with 5-ALA, a fluorescence lifetime of 7.4 ns was found for PPIX; a shorter lifetime at 3.6 ns was probably attributed to photoproducts and aggregates of PPIX. In contrast from fluorescence intensity images alone, different fluorescence species could not be distinguished. However, in the lifetime image a structured fluorescence distribution in the cytoplasm was correlated with the longer lifetime and probably coincides with mitochondria. In conclusion, picosecond diode lasers coupled to a laser scanning microscope equipped with appropriate detection units allows time-resolved spectroscopy and lifetime imaging

  2. Surface nano-texturing of silicon by picosecond laser irradiation through TiO2 nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K. E. Sarath Raghavendra; Duraiselvam, Muthukannan

    2015-10-01

    This article presents, nano-texturing of crystalline silicon by irradiating picosecond laser with variable spatial intensity, caused by optically non-linear TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNTA). Along with micro-scale surface structure, highly ordered laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) was observed at nano-scale. The periodicity (Λ) of the LIPSS generated was near to the laser wavelength (532 nm). Surface morphology at micro-level was characterized by optical microscopy (OM) and white light interferometer (WLI) and at the nano-scale by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The results highlight the potential use of TNTA as a single step process to produce micro/nanostructures without any gas/liquid medium under ambient condition.

  3. Effect of different parameters on machining of SiC/SiC composites via pico-second laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weinan; Zhang, Ruoheng; Liu, Yongsheng; Wang, Chunhui; Wang, Jing; Yang, Xiaojun; Cheng, Laifei

    2016-02-01

    Pico-second laser plays an important role in modern machining technology, especially in machining high hardness materials. In this article, pico-second laser was utilized for irradiation on SiC/SiC composites, and effects of different processing parameters including the machining modes and laser power were discussed in detail. The results indicated that the machining modes and laser power had great effect on machining of SiC/SiC composites. Different types of surface morphology and structure were observed under helical line scanning and single ring line scanning, and the analysis of their formulation was discussed in detail. It was believed that the machining modes would be responsible to the different shapes of machining results at the same parameters. The processing power shall also influence the surface morphology and quality of machining results. In micro-hole drilling process, large amount of debris and fragments were observed within the micro-holes, and XPS analysis showed that there existed Si-O bonds and Si-C bonds, indicating that the oxidation during processing was incomplete. Other surface morphology, such as pores and pits were discussed as well.

  4. Picosecond sources for sub-centimeter laser ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Danny J.; Dallas, Joseph; Seery, Bernard D.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the tradeoffs involved in selecting a laser source for space-based laser ranging are outlined, and some of the recent developments in the laser field most relevant to space-based lasers for ranging and altimetry are surveyed. Laser pulse width and laser design are discussed. It is argued that, while doubled/tripled ND-host lasers are currently the best choice for laser ranging in two colors, they have the shortcoming that the atmospheric transmission at 355 nm is significantly poorer than it is at longer wavelengths which still have sufficient dispersion for two-color laser ranging. The life requirement appears to demand that laser diode pumping be used for space applications.

  5. Few-femtosecond timing jitter from a picosecond all-polarization-maintaining Yb-fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Song, Youjian; Jung, Kwangyun; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue; Kim, Jungwon

    2016-01-25

    We characterize the timing jitter of a picosecond all-polarization-maintaining (all-PM) Yb-fiber laser using the optical cross-correlation method. For the 10 MHz all-normal dispersion mode-locked laser with ~0.5 nm spectral bandwidth, the measured high-frequency jitter is as low as 5.9 fs (RMS) when integrated from 10 kHz to the Nyquist frequency of 5 MHz. A complete numerical model with ASE noise is built to simulate the timing jitter characteristics in consideration of intracavity pulse evolution. The mutual comparison among simulation result, analytical model and experiment data indicate that the few femtosecond timing jitter from the picosecond fiber laser is attributed to the complete elimination of Gordon-Haus jitter by narrow bandpass filtering by a fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The low level of timing jitter from this compact and maintenance-free PM picosecond fiber laser source at a low MHz repetition rate is promising to advance a number of femtosecond-precision timing and synchronization applications.

  6. Comparison of characteristics of selected metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles produced by picosecond laser ablation at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Abubaker; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Picosecond laser generation of nanoparticles was only recently reported. The effect of laser wavelength in picosecond laser generation of nanoparticles is not yet fully understood. This investigation reports the new findings comparing the characteristics of Au, Ag, Ag-TiO2, TiO2, ZnO and iron oxide nanoparticles generated by picosecond laser ablation in deionised water at 532 and 1064 nm laser wavelengths. The laser ablation was carried out at a fixed pulse width of 10 ps, a repetition rate of 400 kHz and a scan speed of 250 mm/s. The nanoparticles were characterised by UV-Vis optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The work shows that there is no noticeable difference in the size of the metal oxide nanoparticles produced at 532 and 1064 nm, especially for the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles; however, a considerable size difference can be seen for metallic (e.g. Au) and metallic compound (e.g. Ag-TiO2) nanoparticles at the two wavelengths. It demonstrates that noble metals are more profoundly affected by laser wavelengths. The reasons behind these results are discussed. In addition, the work shows that there are different crystalline structures of the TiO2 nanoparticles at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths.

  7. Mode size and time duration fluctuations in a picosecond Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutolo, A.; Zeni, L.; Berardi, V.; Bruzzese, R.; Solimeno, S.; Spinelli, N.

    1989-05-15

    A new technique is successfully used to analyze in real time the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of mode size and time duration in a picosecond Nd:YAG laser. In particular we show that the pulse length (30 psec) of our active--passive mode-locked Nd:YAG laser is stable to within 10% when the cavity is perfectly tuned and the saturable absorber is fresh. This technique is experimentally shown to be effective and reliable for real-time analysis of the stability of ultrashort laser pulses under a broad range of experimental conditions.

  8. Synchronously pumped picosecond all-fibre Raman laser based on phosphorus-doped silica fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtsev, Sergey; Kukarin, Sergey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey

    2015-07-13

    Reported for the first time is picosecond-range pulse generation in an all-fibre Raman laser based on P₂O₅-doped silica fibre. Employment of phosphor-silicate fibre made possible single-cascade spectral transformation of pumping pulses at 1084 nm into 270-ps long Raman laser pulses at 1270 nm. The highest observed fraction of the Stokes component radiation at 1270 nm in the total output of the Raman laser amounted to 30%. The identified optimal duration of the input pulses at which the amount of Stokes component radiation in a ~16-m long phosphorus-based Raman fibre converter reaches its maximum was 140-180 ps.

  9. Spatiospectral and picosecond spatiotemporal properties of a broad area operating channeled-substrate-planar laser array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, NU; Defreez, Richard K.; Bossert, David J.; Wilson, Geoffrey A.; Elliott, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    Spatiospectral and spatiotemporal properties of an eight-element channeled-substrate-planar laser array are investigated in both CW and pulsed operating conditions. The closely spaced CSP array with strong optical coupling between array elements is characterized by a broad area laserlike operation determined by its spatial mode spectra. The spatiotemporal evolution of the near and far field exhibits complex dynamic behavior in the picosecond to nanosecond domain. Operating parameters for the laser device have been experimentally determined. These results provide important information for the evaluation of the dynamic behavior of coherent semiconductor laser arrays.

  10. Two-photon photoemission from metals induced by picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, J. H.; Smith, W. L.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    We have measured the two-photon photoemission current density from tungsten, tantalum, and molybdenum when irradiated by 532-nm wavelength radiation. This wavelength was produced by the second-harmonic radiation of single picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The results are interpreted in terms of both a simple temperature-independent two-photon photoemission effect and a generalization of the Fowler-DuBridge theory of photoemission. The laser polarization dependence of the emitted current is also reported.

  11. A new technology for applanation free corneal trephination: the picosecond infrared laser (PIRL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan J Linke

    Full Text Available The impact of using a Femtosecond laser on final functional results of penetrating keratoplasty is low. The corneal incisions presented here result from laser ablations with ultrafast desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE. The results of the current study are based on the first proof-of-principle experiments using a mobile, newly introduced picosecond infrared laser system, and indicate that wavelengths in the mid-infrared range centered at 3 μm are efficient for obtaining applanation-free deep cuts on porcine corneas.

  12. A new technology for applanation free corneal trephination: the picosecond infrared laser (PIRL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Stephan J; Frings, Andreas; Ren, Ling; Gomolka, Amadeus; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Hansen, Nils-Owe; Jowett, Nathan; Richard, Gisbert; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    The impact of using a Femtosecond laser on final functional results of penetrating keratoplasty is low. The corneal incisions presented here result from laser ablations with ultrafast desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE). The results of the current study are based on the first proof-of-principle experiments using a mobile, newly introduced picosecond infrared laser system, and indicate that wavelengths in the mid-infrared range centered at 3 μm are efficient for obtaining applanation-free deep cuts on porcine corneas.

  13. Generation of energetic, picosecond seed pulses for CO2 laser using Raman shifter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Eric; Tochitsky, Sergei; Joshi, Chan

    2017-03-01

    We present a new concept for generating 3 ps seed pulses for a high-power CO2 laser amplifier that are multiple orders more energetic than seed pulses generated by slicing from a nanosecond CO2 laser pulse. We propose to send a 1 µm picosecond laser through a C6D6 Raman shifter and mix both the pump and shifted components in a DFG crystal to produce pulses at 10.6 µm. Preliminary results of a proof-of-principle experiment are presented.

  14. Fiber laser pumped burst-mode operated picosecond mid-infrared laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏凯华; 姜培培; 吴波; 陈滔; 沈永行

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact periodically poled MgO-doped lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN)-based optical parametric oscillator (OPO) quasi-synchronously pumped by a fiber laser system with burst-mode operation. The pump source is a peak-power-selectable pulse-multiplied picosecond Yb fiber laser. The chirped pulses from a figure of eight-cavity mode-locked fiber laser seed are narrowed to a duration of less than 50 ps using an FBG refl ector and a circulator. The narrowed pulses are directed to pass through a pulse multiplier and to form pulse bunches, each of which is composed of 13 sub-pulses. The obtained pulse bunches are amplified by two-stage fiber pre-amplifiers:one-stage is core-pumped and the other is cladding-pumped. A fiberized acousto–optic modulator is inserted to control the pulse repetition rate (PRR) of the pulse bunches before they are power-amplified in the final amplifier stage with a large mode area (LMA) PM Yb-doped fiber. The maximum average powers from the final amplifier are 85 W, 60 W, and 45 W respectively, corresponding to the PRR of 2.72 MHz, 1.36 MHz, and 0.68 MHz. The amplified pulses are directed to pump an MgO:PPLN-based optical parametric oscillator (OPO). A maximum peak power at 3.45 µm is obtained approximately to be 8.4 kW. Detailed performance characteristics are presented.

  15. Fabrication and optimization of transparent conductive films using laser annealing and picosecond laser patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keunhee; Ki, Hyungson

    2017-10-01

    In this article, we propose a systematic method of optimizing the properties of transparent conductive films that possess high electrical conductivity and low optical transparency, by using laser patterning and doping. Prediction maps were constructed, which show the effects of patterning and doping for all possible combinations of initial film conditions (in terms of sheet resistance and transparency) and the degrees of patterning. Using these maps, the properties of transparent conductive films can be easily optimized. We first fabricated graphene-based transparent conductive films on fused silica glass by laser annealing of diamond-like carbon films, and then picosecond laser patterning and doping were successively conducted employing the processing conditions suggested by the maps. For patterning, two types of patterns, circular and square, were considered and prediction maps were separately constructed for both patterns. In this study, a film originally having a sheet resistance of 578 Ω/sq and a transparency of 25% was transformed to a 2823 Ω/sq and 80.6% film when 73% of the film was removed using square patterns and doped by nitric acid. Experimental data agreed well with predicted values.

  16. Picosecond holmium fibre laser pumped at 1125 \\ {\\text{nm}}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamynin, V. A.; Filatova, S. A.; Zhluktova, I. V.; Tsvetkov, V. B.

    2016-12-01

    We report a passively mode-locked, all-fibre holmium laser based on nonlinear polarisation rotation. As a pump source use is made of an 1125-{\\text{nm}} ytterbium-doped fibre laser. The pulse repetition rate of the holmium laser is 7.5 {\\text{MHz}}, and the pulse duration does not exceed 52 {\\text{ps}} at wavelengths of 2065 and 2080 {\\text{nm}}. The average laser output power reaches 5 {\\text{mW}}.

  17. Delivery of picosecond lasers in multimode fibers for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Yang, Yaliang; Luo, Pengfei; Gao, Liang; Wong, Kelvin K; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-06-07

    We investigated the possibility of using standard commercial multimode fibers (MMF), Corning SMF28 fibers, to deliver picosecond excitation lasers for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging. We theoretically and/or experimentally analyzed issues associated with the fiber delivery, such as dispersion length, walk-off length, nonlinear length, average threshold power for self-phase modulations, and four-wave mixing (FWM). These analyses can also be applied to other types of fibers. We found that FWM signals are generated in MMF, but they can be filtered out using a long-pass filter for CARS imaging. Finally, we demonstrated that MMF can be used for delivery of picosecond excitation lasers in the CARS imaging system without any degradation of image quality.

  18. Picosecond laser texturization of mc-silicon for photovoltaics: A comparison between 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm radiation wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binetti, Simona [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center (MIB-SOLAR), University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Le Donne, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.ledonne@mater.unimib.it [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center (MIB-SOLAR), University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Rolfi, Andrea [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center (MIB-SOLAR), University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Jäggi, Beat; Neuenschwander, Beat [Bern University of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Information Technology, Institute for Applied Laser, Photonics and Surface Technologies ALPS, Pestalozzistrasse 20, CH-3400 Burgdorf (Switzerland); Busto, Chiara [ENI Spa, Via Giacomo Fauser, 4, 28100 Novara (Italy); Frigeri, Cesare [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco Area Delle Scienze 37/A, Fontanini, 43010 Parma (Italy); Scorticati, Davide; Longoni, Luca; Pellegrino, Sergio [Laserpoint Srl, Via Della Burrona 51, 20090 Vimodrone, Milano (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Self-organized surface structures were produced by picosecond laser pulses on mc-Si. • Three laser wavelengths were used which effectively reduce Si reflectivity up to 8%. • The subsurface damage induced by the three lasers was studied in detail. • μ-Raman, PL and TEM proved that UV laser provides the lowest subsurface damage. • UV laser induced damage is located above the depletion region of the p–n junction. - Abstract: Self-organized surface structures were produced by picosecond laser pulses on multi-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications. Three different laser wavelengths were employed (i.e. 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm) and the resulting morphologies were observed to effectively reduce the reflectivity of the samples after laser irradiation. Besides, a comparative study of the laser induced subsurface damage generated by the three different wavelengths was performed by confocal micro-Raman, photoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy. The results of both the structural and optical characterization showed that the mc-Si texturing performed with the laser at 355 nm provides surface reflectivity between 11% and 8% over the spectral range from 400 nm to 1 μm, while inducing the lowest subsurface damage, located above the depletion region of the p–n junction.

  19. Power scaling of a picosecond vortex laser based on a stressed Yb-doped fiber amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Mio; Hirose, Tetsuya; Okida, Masahito; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2011-01-17

    Power scaling of a picosecond vortex laser based on a stressed Yb-doped fiber amplifier is analyzed. An output power of 25 W was obtained for 53 W of pumping, with a peak power of 37 kW. Frequency doubling of the vortex output was demonstrated using a nonlinear PPSLT crystal. A second-harmonic output power of up to 1.5 W was measured at a fundamental power of 11.2 W.

  20. OPTICAL LIMITING EFFECT IN TWO PHTHALOCYANINES OBSERVED BY PICOSECOND PULSED LASER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU SHI-LIANG; CHEN YU; SONG YING-LIN; CHEN GUO-PING; WANG YU-XIAO; ZHANG XUE-RU; LIU SHU-TIAN; WANG DUO-YUAN

    2001-01-01

    Optical limiting (OL) properties of two phthalocyanines were investigated by using picosecond laser pulses at 532nm. The relative ratios k of the absorption cross section of the first singlet excited state to that of the ground state were approximately obtained by the analysis of the experimental results in which the reverse saturable absorption model of the three-energy-level scheme was employed. A significant comparison with fullerene C60 was presented for OL. The OL mechanisms have been analysed in detail.

  1. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Novel C60 Derivatives under Picosecond Laser Excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Yan-Li; CHENG Yong-Guang; LIU Jun-Hui; LIN Bing-chen; HUO Yan-Ping; ZENG He-Ping

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the third-order nonlinear optical properties of six novel fullerene derivatives under picosecond laser excitation by Z-scan technique.The experimental results reveal that all the derivatives have very large nonlinear absorption coefficient under 532 nm pulses excitation and great third-order nonlinear refraction index under 1064 nm pulses excitation.The molecular second hyperpolarizabilities are obtained from the experimental results.

  2. Research on marking lines of silicone elastomer PDMS for super-hydrophobic surface fabrication based on picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Xiao; Dong, Shiyun; Yan, Shixing; Song, Chaoqun; Wang, Bin

    2016-10-01

    The picosecond laser has ultrashort pulse and superstrong peak power, which make it being focused on and applied in the micro-nanoscale fabrication field. Silicone elastomer PDMS is a typical antifouling material which can desorb defacement, using picosecond laser etching the surface through the way of galvanometer scanning in order to obtain a surface with micro-nano texture. The article studied the relationship between process parameters such as the power density, the scanning rate and the appearance of etched groove respectively, especially the width and depth of the groove. The results show that : for single marking, with the raise of the laser power density I, the depth of the groove increases, the inclination angle of the side wall is reduced. In another time, with the increase of the scanning rate v ,the depth of the groove decreases gradually and the surface morphology cannot be seen clearly. For multiple marking, the depth of the groove shown a falling slope from big to small with the increase of marking number. Finally,we got a path to optimize the process parameters to obtain a surface with micro-nano structures. After testing the surface contact angle, we found that the surface contact angle increased from 113° to 152°,which reached the level of superhydrophobic surface.

  3. New progress in high-power picosecond ultraviolet laser%高功率皮秒紫外激光器新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛小洁

    2015-01-01

    高功率皮秒紫外激光器在高精密加工、激光医疗、光电对抗和光伏产业等领域有重要应用,近年来成为固体激光新光源研究热点。本文对国内外基于和频技术的高功率皮秒紫外激光器研究新进展进行了归纳和总结。首先,阐述了和频工作原理,介绍了和频产生皮秒紫外激光的非线性晶体;然后,介绍了国内外高功率皮秒紫外激光器的新进展,包括:高功率皮秒紫外激光器、高峰值功率皮秒紫外激光器、高功率和高峰值功率皮秒紫外激光器。最后,展望了高功率皮秒紫外激光器的进一步发展及应用。归纳和总结表明:高功率皮秒紫外激光器在国外较成熟,国内在该领域的研究刚刚起步。光子晶体光纤和碟片激光器输出基频光的皮秒紫外激光器有突出的优势,已成为皮秒紫外激光产业的主力军。%High-power picosecond ultraviolet lasers have attracted considerable interests as novel laser source, due to their wide applications in high precision product, laser medical system, optoelectronic countermeasure and structuring of silicon.The research and development on high-power picosecond ultraviolet laser based on technology of sum frequency are classified and summarized.First, the mechanism of sum frequency and pico-second ultraviolet crystal are discussed.Then the high-power picosecond ultraviolet laser, the high-peak-power picosecond ultraviolet laser, and the high-power and high-peak-power picosecond ultraviolet lasers are dis-cussed.Finally, the prospect of further development and applications of high-power picosecond ultraviolet la-ser sources is put forward.According to the latest development, it is indicated that the high power picosecond ultraviolet lasers developed in abroad is in maturity stage but just in starting stage at.The high-power picosec-ond ultraviolet lasers based on photonic crystal fiber laser and thin disk laser have some merits

  4. Analysis of efficient ion acceleration with multi-picosecond LFEX laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Natsumi; Yogo, Akifumi; Mima, Kunioki; Tosaki, Shota; Koga, Keisuke; Nagatomo, Hideo; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Azechi, Horishi

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate an efficient proton acceleration reaching 30 MeV by using high contrast, kilojoule, picosecond laser LFEX at the peak intensity of 2.3 ×1018 W/cm2. Owing to the large spot size of 70 μm FWHM, the target foil expands one-dimensionally during the multi-picosecond pulse duration time, which yields the electron heating beyond the ponderomotive scaling observed in the experiment. We present by a 1D PIC simulation that the electron temperature evolves in time while the electrons recirculate between the front and rear surfaces of the expanding plasma. A theoretical calculation for the ion maximum energy that takes the temperature evolution into account agrees with the experimental result quantitatively. Being supported by the experiment and simulation, our theoretical model for the non-isothermal plasma expansion dynamics will provide an important basis for understanding the multi-picosecond high intensity laser-plasma interactions and for various applications such as energetic ion beam generation for medical applications and fast ignition-based laser fusion.

  5. Dual sub-picosecond and sub-nanosecond laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinglong Xie (谢兴龙); Guanlong Huang (黄关龙); Yifei Zhuang (庄亦飞); Aimei Han (韩爱妹); Zunqi Lin (林尊琪); Fengqiao Liu (刘凤翘); Jingxin Yang (杨镜新); Xin Yang (杨鑫); Meirong Li (李美荣); Zhiling Xue (薛之玲); Qi Gao (高奇); Fuyi Guan (管富义); Weiqing Zhang (张伟清)

    2003-01-01

    A high power laser system delivering a 20-TW, 0.5 - 0.8 ps ultra-short laser pulse and a 20-J, 500-ps long pulse simultaneously in one shot is completed. This two-beam laser operates at the wavelength of 1053 nm and uses Nd doped glass as the gain media of the main amplification chain. The chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) technology is used to compress the stretched laser pulse. After compression, the ultrashort laser pulse is measured: energy above 16.0 J, S/N contrast ratio ~ 105: 1, filling factor ~>52.7%.Another long pulse beam is a non-compressed chirped laser pulse, which is measured: energy ~ 20 J, pulse duration 500 ps. The two beams are directed onto the target surface at an angle of 15°.

  6. The solid state detector technology for picosecond laser ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    We developed an all solid state laser ranging detector technology, which makes the goal of millimeter accuracy achievable. Our design and construction philosophy is to combine the techniques of single photon ranging, ultrashort laser pulses, and fast fixed threshold discrimination while avoiding any analog signal processing within the laser ranging chain. The all solid state laser ranging detector package consists of the START detector and the STOP solid state photon counting module. Both the detectors are working in an optically triggered avalanche switching regime. The optical signal is triggering an avalanche current buildup which results in the generation of a uniform, fast risetime output pulse.

  7. Picosecond laser photolysis studies of DMA DMPP in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Itaya, Akira; Rotkiewicz, Krystyna; Rechthaler, Karl

    1999-07-01

    Picosecond transient absorption spectra of: 4-(4'- N,N-dimethylaminophenyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1,7-diphenyl-bis-pyrazolo-[3,4-b;4',3'-e]-pyridine (DMA-DMPP), 3,5-dimethyl-1,7-diphenyl-bis-pyrazolo-[3,4-b;4',3'-e]-pyridine (BPP) and 3,5-dimethyl-1,4,7-triphenyl-bis-pyrazolo-[3,4-b;4',3'-e]-pyridine (H-DMPP) were measured in solvents of different polarity. The results revealed the previously postulated change of the character of the fluorescing state from a primary excited, low polar state in non-polar solvents to a CT state in highly polar ones. Transient absorption spectra in the equilibrium fluorescent state of DMA-DMPP in polar solvents comprised the band ascribable to the cation radical of the DMA moiety. The charge transfer process is fastest in methanol and acetonitrile; in the former it is not controlled by a dynamic Stokes shift.

  8. Growth of poly-crystalline Cu films on Y substrates by picosecond pulsed laser deposition for photocathode applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontad, F. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi” and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Lorusso, A., E-mail: antonella.lorusso@le.infn.it [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi” and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Klini, A.; Manousaki, A. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), 100 N. Plastira St., GR 70013 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Perrone, A. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi” and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Fotakis, C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), 100 N. Plastira St., GR 70013 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the deposition of Cu thin films on Y substrates for photocathode applications by pulsed laser deposition employing picosecond laser pulses is reported and compared with the use of nanosecond pulses. The influence of power density (6–50 GW/cm{sup 2}) on the ablation of the target material, as well as on the properties of the resulting film, is discussed. The material transfer from the target to the substrate surface was found to be rather efficient, in comparison to nanosecond ablation, leading to the growth of films with high thickness. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated a quasi-continuous film morphology, at low power density values, becoming granular with increasing power density. The structural investigation, through X-ray diffraction, revealed the poly-crystalline nature of the films, with a preferential growth along the (111) crystallographic orientation of Cu cubic network. Finally, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed a low contamination level of the grown films, demonstrating the potential of a PLD technique for the fabrication of Cu/Y patterned structures, with applications in radiofrequency electron gun technology. - Highlights: • Cu thin films were successfully deposited on Y substrates through ultrafast PLD. • The film presents a quasi-continuous morphology. • The use of picosecond pulses increases the film thickness. • The Cu thin films are very adherent to the Y substrate.

  9. Germanium Sub-Microspheres Synthesized by Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melting in Liquids: Educt Size Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongshi; Lau, Marcus; Lu, Suwei; Barcikowski, Stephan; Gökce, Bilal

    2017-01-01

    Pulsed laser melting in liquid (PLML) has emerged as a facile approach to synthesize submicron spheres (SMSs) for various applications. Typically lasers with long pulse durations in the nanosecond regime are used. However, recent findings show that during melting the energy absorbed by the particle will be dissipated promptly after laser-matter interaction following the temperature decrease within tens of nanoseconds and hence limiting the efficiency of longer pulse widths. Here, the feasibility to utilize a picosecond laser to synthesize Ge SMSs (200~1000 nm in diameter) is demonstrated by irradiating polydisperse Ge powders in water and isopropanol. Through analyzing the educt size dependent SMSs formation mechanism, we find that Ge powders (200~1000 nm) are directly transformed into SMSs during PLML via reshaping, while comparatively larger powders (1000~2000 nm) are split into daughter SMSs via liquid droplet bisection. Furthermore, the contribution of powders larger than 2000 nm and smaller than 200 nm to form SMSs is discussed. This work shows that compared to nanosecond lasers, picosecond lasers are also suitable to produce SMSs if the pulse duration is longer than the material electron-phonon coupling period to allow thermal relaxation.

  10. Picosecond laser micromachining of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy for coronary stent applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, N.; Whitehead, D.; Li, L. [University of Manchester, Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, Manchester (United Kingdom); Boor, A.; Oppenlander, W. [Swiss Tec AG, Schaan, Principality of Liechtenstein (Liechtenstein); Liu, Z. [University of Manchester, Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    The demand for micromachining of coronary stents by means of industrial lasers rises quickly for treating coronary artery diseases, which cause more than one million deaths each year. The most widely used types of laser for stent manufacturing are Nd:YAG laser systems with a wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse lengths of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2} seconds. Considerable post-processing is required to remove heat-affected zones (HAZ), and to improve surface finishes and geometry. Using a third harmonic laser radiation of picosecond laser (6 x 10{sup -12} s pulse duration) in UV range, the capability of the picosecond laser micromachining of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy for coronary stent applications are presented. In this study dross-free cut of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy tubes are demonstrated and topography analysis of the cut surface is carried out. The HAZ characteristics have been investigated by means of microscopic examinations and measurement of micro-hardness distribution near the cut zones. (orig.)

  11. Picosecond laser micromachining of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy for coronary stent applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, N.; Whitehead, D.; Boor, A.; Oppenlander, W.; Liu, Z.; Li, L.

    2012-03-01

    The demand for micromachining of coronary stents by means of industrial lasers rises quickly for treating coronary artery diseases, which cause more than one million deaths each year. The most widely used types of laser for stent manufacturing are Nd:YAG laser systems with a wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse lengths of 10-3-10-2 seconds. Considerable post-processing is required to remove heat-affected zones (HAZ), and to improve surface finishes and geometry. Using a third harmonic laser radiation of picosecond laser (6×10-12 s pulse duration) in UV range, the capability of the picosecond laser micromachining of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy for coronary stent applications are presented. In this study dross-free cut of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy tubes are demonstrated and topography analysis of the cut surface is carried out. The HAZ characteristics have been investigated by means of microscopic examinations and measurement of micro-hardness distribution near the cut zones.

  12. Relaxation Oscillation with Picosecond Spikes in a Conjugated Polymer Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa Musa Mujamammi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Optically pumped conjugated polymer lasers are good competitors for dye lasers, often complementing and occasionally replacing them. This new type of laser material has broad bandwidths and high optical gains comparable to conventional laser dyes. Since the Stokes’ shift is unusually large, the conjugated polymer has a potential for high power laser action, facilitated by high concentration. This paper reports the results of a new conjugated polymer, the poly[(9,9-dioctyl-2,7-divinylenefluorenylene-alt-co-{2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy-1,4-phenylene}](PFO-co-MEH-PPV material, working in the green region. Also discussed are the spectral and temporal features of the amplified spontaneous emissions (ASE from the conjugated polymer PFO-co-MEH-PPV in a few solvents. When pumped by the third harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser of 10 ns pulse width, the time-resolved spectra of the ASE show relaxation oscillations and spikes of 600 ps pulses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on relaxation oscillations in conjugated-polymer lasers.

  13. Two-frequency picosecond laser based on composite vanadate crystals with {sigma}-polarised radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirotkin, A A; Sadovskiy, S P; Garnov, Sergei V [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-31

    A two-frequency picosecond laser based on {alpha}-cut Nd:YVO{sub 4}-YVO{sub 4} composite vanadate crystals is experimentally studied for the s-polarised radiation at the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} - {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} transition with frequency tuning using Fabry-Perot etalons of different thickness. The difference between the radiation wavelengths was tuned within the range of 1.2-4.4 nm. In the mode-locking regime, the two-frequency radiation power was 280 mW at an absorbed pump power of 12 W. (lasers)

  14. Analysis of tunable picosecond pulse generation from a distributed feedback Ti:sapphire laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhi; Yao Xiao-Ke

    2004-01-01

    A distributed feedback Ti:sapphire laser (DFTL) pumped by a 532nm Q-switched pulse is proposed for the generation of tunable picosecond pulses. With coupled rate equation model, the temporal characteristics of DFTL are obtained. The numerical solutions show that the DFTL pulse with a 50-ps pulse duration and as much as 3.SmJ pulse energy can be obtained under 40-m J, 5-ns pulse pumping. The dependence of output pulse width on the laser crystal's length, pumping pulse duration, and pumping rate is also discussed in detail.

  15. Influence of Ambient Temperature on Nanosecond and Picosecond Laser-Induced Bulk Damage of Fused Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanosecond (ns and picosecond (ps pulsed laser-induced damage behaviors of fused silica under cryogenic and room temperature have been investigated. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT and damage probability are used to understand the damage behavior at different ambient temperatures. The results show that the LIDTs for both ns and ps slightly increased at cryogenic temperature compared to that at room temperature. Meanwhile, the damage probability has an inverse trend; that is, the damage probability at low temperature is smaller than that at room temperature. A theoretical model based on heated crystal lattice is well consistent with the experimental results.

  16. GHz high power Yb-doped picosecond fiber laser and supercontinuum generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Ge, Tingwu; Li, Wuyi; Kuang, Hongshen; Wang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-20

    We demonstrated a 97 W all-fiber picosecond master oscillator power amplifier seeding by an actively harmonic mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser. The laser seed pulse duration was 7.7 ps at a 1.223 GHz repetition rate with a central wavelength of 1062 nm. In addition, by launching the amplified pulses into a 5 m long photonic crystal fiber, we obtained a 41.8 W supercontinuum covering the wavelength from 600 to 1700 nm with a 10 dB bandwidth of 1040 nm.

  17. Stretching of Picosecond Laser Pulses with Uniform Reflecting Volume Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhov, Sergiy

    It is shown that a uniform reflecting volume Bragg grating (VBG) can be used as a compact monolithic stretcher of high-power picosecond laser pulses in cases when chirped Bragg gratings with an appropriate chirp rate are difficult to fabricate. A chirp-free reflected stretched pulse is generated of almost rectangular shape when incident short pulse propagates along a grating and experiences local Bragg diffraction. The increase in duration of the reflected pulse is approximately equal to twice the propagation times along the grating. We derived the analytic expression for diffraction efficiency, which incorporates incident pulse duration, grating thickness, and amplitude of refractive index modulation, enabling an optimum selection of the grating for pulse stretching. The typical expected theoretical value of diffraction efficiency is about 10% after taking into account the spectral narrowing of the reflected emission. We believe that the relatively low energy efficiency of the proposed method is more than offset by a number of advantages, which are chirp-free spectrum of a stretched pulse, compactness, robustness, preservation of setup alignment and beam quality, and tolerance to high power. Obtained pulses of several tens of picoseconds can be amplified by standard methods which are not requiring special measures to avoid undesirable non-linear effects. We propose a simple and reliable method to control the temporal parameters of the high-power picosecond pulses using the same laser source and the VGB of variable thickness that can significantly simplify the experiments requiring different pulse durations.

  18. Picosecond and femtosecond lasers for industrial material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhofer, R.; Serbin, J.; Deeg, F. W.

    2016-03-01

    Cold laser materials processing using ultra short pulsed lasers has become one of the most promising new technologies for high-precision cutting, ablation, drilling and marking of almost all types of material, without causing unwanted thermal damage to the part. These characteristics have opened up new application areas and materials for laser processing, allowing previously impossible features to be created and also reducing the amount of post-processing required to an absolute minimum, saving time and cost. However, short pulse widths are only one part of thee story for industrial manufacturing processes which focus on total costs and maximum productivity and production yield. Like every other production tool, ultra-short pulse lasers have too provide high quality results with maximum reliability. Robustness and global on-site support are vital factors, as well ass easy system integration.

  19. Picosecond Semiconductor Lasers For Characterizing High-Speed Image Shutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, T. S.; Janson, F. J.; Yates, G. J.; Jaramillo, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    A portable system that utilizes solid state electronic timing circuits and a pulsed semiconductor laser for characterizing the optical gate sequence of high-speed image shutters, including microchannel-plate intensifier tubes (MCPTs), and silicon-intensified target vidicons (SITVs), is described and compared to earlier methods of characterization. Gate sequences obtained using the system and streak camera data of the semiconductor laser pulse are presented, with a brief discussion of the electronic delay timing and avalanche circuits used in the system.

  20. Picosecond to Millisecond Structural Dynamics in Human Ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Maragakis, Paul; Piana, Stefano; Shaw, David E

    2016-08-25

    Human ubiquitin has been extensively characterized using a variety of experimental and computational methods and has become an important model for studying protein dynamics. Nevertheless, it has proven difficult to characterize the microsecond time scale dynamics of this protein with atomistic resolution. Here we use an unbiased computer simulation to describe the structural dynamics of ubiquitin on the picosecond to millisecond time scale. In the simulation, ubiquitin interconverts between a small number of distinct states on the microsecond to millisecond time scale. We find that the conformations visited by free ubiquitin in solution are very similar to those found various crystal structures of ubiquitin in complex with other proteins, a finding in line with previous experimental studies. We also observe weak but statistically significant correlated motions throughout the protein, including long-range concerted movement across the entire β sheet, consistent with recent experimental observations. We expect that the detailed atomistic description of ubiquitin dynamics provided by this unbiased simulation may be useful in interpreting current and future experiments on this protein.

  1. Experimental investigation of picosecond dynamics following interactions between laser accelerated protons and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senje, L.; Coughlan, M.; Jung, D.; Taylor, M.; Nersisyan, G.; Riley, D.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Lundh, O.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Zepf, M.; Dromey, B.

    2017-03-01

    We report direct experimental measurements with picosecond time resolution of how high energy protons interact with water at extreme dose levels (kGy), delivered in a single pulse with the duration of less than 80 ps. The unique synchronisation possibilities of laser accelerated protons with an optical probe pulse were utilized to investigate the energy deposition of fast protons in water on a time scale down to only a few picoseconds. This was measured using absorbance changes in the water, induced by a population of solvated electrons created in the tracks of the high energy protons. Our results indicate that for sufficiently high doses delivered in short pulses, intertrack effects will affect the yield of solvated electrons. The experimental scheme allows for investigation of the ultrafast mechanisms occurring in proton water radiolysis, an area of physics especially important due to its relevance in biology and for proton therapy.

  2. A Study of Pulse by Pulse Microscale Patch Transfer Using Picosecond Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung KL

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The shape restoring capability of Ti/Ni has potential to overcome the shrinkage of polymer in mould cavity, which has potential of solving the demoulding problems and helps dimension accuracy in micro/nano injection molding. However, the deposition of Ti/Ni film precisely and securely on specific location of the micro mould cavity present difficulties with conventional deposition methods. In this paper, the use of photonic impact forward transfer method to deposit Ti/Ni film patches on specific locations of a substrate is demonstrate using a picosecond laser. Pulse by pulse deposition control parameters affecting position accuracy and spot size were studied in this paper. It was found that although laser power, and distance between donor films and the substrate all influence the spot sizes of pulse by pulse deposited patches, adjusting spot size by changing laser power is better than changing distance due to separated particles being found around the deposited film patches. Results of this study proved the feasibility of depositing Ti/Ni film patches on specific location using pico-second laser with high position accuracy. The potential of using photonic impact forward transfer as a complementing method to laser powder 3D printing of difficult to process material to produce better surface quality microproducts such as micro moulds for micro-injection molding is tremendous.

  3. Increasing lifetime of the plasma channel formed in air using picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, V.; Singh, V.; Pandey, Pramod K.; Shukla, Neeraj; Thareja, R. K.

    2007-04-01

    We report experiments on a pump-probe configuration to elucidate the formation of a plasma channel by the hydrodynamic evolution of air breakdown in laser focus. A stable air breakdown was produced by focusing a picosecond laser pulse to create a shock driven plasma channel in the laser focus for propagating a nanosecond pulse. A four fold increase in the lifetime of the channel estimated by monitoring the temporal evolution of the fluorescence of a spectral line at 504.5nm of N+ transition 3pS3-3sP03 is reported. Assuming plasma in local thermal equilibrium plasma temperature of ˜8.2eV and an electron density of ˜1.4×1018cm-3 were determined using a Stark broadening of 649.2nm line of NII transition 3dD03-4pD3 in the channel. An enhancement in the electron density of the plasma channel was observed at the 7ns delay of the nanosecond laser pulse relative to the picosecond laser pulse.

  4. A compact picosecond pulsed laser source using a fully integrated CMOS driver circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuting; Li, Yuhua; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2016-03-01

    Picosecond pulsed laser source have applications in areas such as optical communications, biomedical imaging and supercontinuum generation. Direct modulation of a laser diode with ultrashort current pulses offers a compact and efficient approach to generate picosecond laser pulses. A fully integrated complementary metaloxide- semiconductor (CMOS) driver circuit is designed and applied to operate a 4 GHz distributed feedback laser (DFB). The CMOS driver circuit combines sub-circuits including a voltage-controlled ring oscillator, a voltagecontrolled delay line, an exclusive-or (XOR) circuit and a current source circuit. Ultrashort current pulses are generated by the XOR circuit when the delayed square wave is XOR'ed with the original square wave from the on-chip oscillator. Circuit post-layout simulation shows that output current pulses injected into an equivalent circuit load of the laser have a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 200 ps, a peak current of 80 mA and a repetition rate of 5.8 MHz. This driver circuit is designed in a 0.13 μm CMOS process and taped out on a 0.3 mm2 chip area. This CMOS chip is packaged and interconnected with the laser diode on a printed circuit board (PCB). The optical output waveform from the laser source is captured by a 5 GHz bandwidth photodiode and an 8 GHz bandwidth oscilloscope. Measured results show that the proposed laser source can output light pulses with a pulse FWHM of 151 ps, a peak power of 6.4 mW (55 mA laser peak forward current) and a repetition rate of 5.3 MHz.

  5. Effect of different parameters on machining of SiC/SiC composites via pico-second laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weinan; Zhang, Ruoheng [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an, Shaanxi 10068 (China); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengliu@nwpu.edu.cn [Science and technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Wang, Chunhui; Wang, Jing [Science and technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Yang, Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an, Shaanxi 10068 (China); Cheng, Laifei [Science and technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710072 (China)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The highlights of the manuscript include the following two aspects. • First, we found that the different machining modes (helical line scanning and single ring line scanning) and processing power of machining have remarkable effect on the surface morphology of the machined area, such as the shape, depth and the formation of different surface structures. • Secondly, we investigated that the debris consisted of C, Si and O was observed on the machined surface. • Some of the Si–C bonds of the SiC matrix and fibers would be transformed into Si–O bonds after machined, depending on the processing power. - Abstract: Pico-second laser plays an important role in modern machining technology, especially in machining high hardness materials. In this article, pico-second laser was utilized for irradiation on SiC/SiC composites, and effects of different processing parameters including the machining modes and laser power were discussed in detail. The results indicated that the machining modes and laser power had great effect on machining of SiC/SiC composites. Different types of surface morphology and structure were observed under helical line scanning and single ring line scanning, and the analysis of their formulation was discussed in detail. It was believed that the machining modes would be responsible to the different shapes of machining results at the same parameters. The processing power shall also influence the surface morphology and quality of machining results. In micro-hole drilling process, large amount of debris and fragments were observed within the micro-holes, and XPS analysis showed that there existed Si–O bonds and Si–C bonds, indicating that the oxidation during processing was incomplete. Other surface morphology, such as pores and pits were discussed as well.

  6. High-brightness picosecond ion beam source based on BNL Terawatt CO2 laser: Proof-of-principle experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkolnikov, Peter

    2012-10-04

    Under the continuing DOE support, we have: o assembled the basic experiment setup and then continued expanding it to include diverse diagnostics and to accommodate gas jet targets in addition to metal foils; o conducted an extensive study of our novel laser, significantly enhanced laser beam diagnostics, and improved relevant laser parameters; o turned our experiments into a truly international endeavor with active collaboration of close to 20 researchers in US, UK, and Germany; o conducted the first ever experiments with proton and ion acceleration by lasers interacting with overcritical plasma of gas jets; o for the first time directly observed radiation pressure acceleration of protons, including quasi-monoenergetic spectra promising for future applications; o for the first time directly observed quasi-stable, bubble-like plasma structures that likely evolved from relativistic laser-plasma solitons (post-solitons). Thus, we have confirmed a strong potential of a picosecond TW CO2 laser as a research tool in laser-plasma science and as a promising vehicle for future applications of laser ion acceleration. This has led to apparent increase of the interest in mid-IR laser ion acceleration. In particular, another major research group began extensive proton acceleration experiments with their own CO2 laser at UCLA. As a result, the mechanisms responsible for laser proton acceleration in gas jets have become somewhat clearer. It is also important to note that modest DOE funding played the role of a seed support ensuring the formation of a multinational research team, whose members contributed its time and equipment with value well in excess of that seed amount.

  7. Picosecond laser machined designed patterns with anti-ice effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnaldo del Cerro, Daniel; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Micromachining using ultra short laser pulses (USLP) has evolved over the past years as a versatile tool for introducing functional features in surfaces at a micrometric and even at a sub wavelength scale. Being able to control the surface topography at this level provides a method to change the wet

  8. Photoluminescent zinc oxide polymer nanocomposites fabricated using picosecond laser ablation in an organic solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Philipp; Faramarzi, Shamsolzaman; Schwenke, Andreas; Rosenfeld, Rupert; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-06-01

    Nanocomposites made of ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in thermoplastic polyurethane were synthesized using picosecond laser ablation of zinc in a polymer-doped solution of tetrahydrofuran. The pre-added polymer stabilizes the ZnO nanoparticles in situ during laser ablation by forming a polymer shell around the nanoparticles. This close-contact polymer shell has a layer thickness up to 30 nm. Analysis of ZnO polyurethane nanocomposites using optical spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that oxidized and crystalline ZnO nanoparticles were produced. Those nanocomposites showed a green photoluminescence emission centred at 538 nm after excitation at 350 nm, which should be attributed to oxygen defects generated during the laser formation mechanism of the monocrystalline nanoparticles. Further, the influence of pulse energy and polymer concentration on the production rate, laser fluence and energy-specific mass productivity was investigated.

  9. A High-Energy, 100 Hz, Picosecond Laser for OPCPA Pumping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongpeng Su

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-energy diode-pumped picosecond laser system centered at 1064 nm for optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier (OPCPA pumping was demonstrated. The laser system was based on a master oscillator power amplifier configuration, which contained an Nd:YVO4 mode-locked seed laser, an LD-pumped Nd:YAG regenerative amplifier, and two double-pass amplifiers. A reflecting volume Bragg grating with a 0.1 nm reflective bandwidth was used in the regenerative amplifier for spectrum narrowing and pulse broadening to suit the pulse duration of the optical parametric amplifier (OPA process. Laser pulses with an energy of 316.5 mJ and a pulse duration of 50 ps were obtained at a 100 Hz repetition rate. A top-hat beam distribution and a 0.53% energy stability (RMS were achieved in this system.

  10. Picosecond Neutron Yields from Ultra-Intense Laser-Target Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, C. Leland; Fuchs, Julien

    2009-11-01

    High-flux neutron sources for neutron imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator-based (Spallation Neutron Source) and reactor-based (High Flux Isotope Reactor) neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultra-intense (> 10^18 W/cm^2) laser-target interactions to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons. Here we examine the feasibility of a source based on current (LULI) and upcoming laser facility capabilities. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. The parameters of the deuteron beam are well understood from laser-plasma and laser-target studies relevant to fast-ignition fusion. Expected neutron yields are presented in comparison to conventional neutron sources, previous experimental neutron yields, and within the context of neutron shielding safety requirements.

  11. Picosecond Laser Machining of Deep Holes in Silicon Infi ltrated Silicon Carbide Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qing; WANG Chunhui; LIU Yongsheng; ZHANG Litong; CHENG Guanghua

    2015-01-01

    Silicon infi ltrated silicon carbide (Si-SiC) ceramics, as high hardness materials, are diffi cult to machine, especially drilling micro-holes. In this study, the interaction of picosecond laser pulses (1 ps at 1 030 nm) with Si-SiC ceramics was investigated. Variations of the diameter and depth of circular holes with the growth of the laser energy density were obtained. The results indicate that the increase of machining depth follows a nonlinear relation with the increasing of laser energy density, while the diameter has little change with that. Moreover, it is found that some debris and particles are deposited around and inside the holes and waviness is in the entrance and at walls of the holes after laser processing.

  12. Modeling of multi-burst mode pico-second laser ablation for improved material removal rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen [Purdue University, Center for Laser-based Manufacturing, School of Mechanical Engineering, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2010-02-15

    This paper deals with the unique phenomena occurring during the multi-burst mode picosecond (ps) laser ablation of metals through modeling and experimental studies. The two-temperature model (TTM) is used and expanded to calculate the ablation depth in the multi-burst mode. A nonlinear increment of ablation volume is found during the multi-burst laser ablation. The deactivation of ablated material and the application of temperature-dependent electron-phonon coupling are demonstrated to be important to provide reliable results. The simulation results based on this expanded laser ablation model are experimentally validated. A significant increase of ablation rate is found in the multi-burst mode, compared with the single-pulse mode under the same total fluence. This numerical model provides a physical perspective into the energy transport process during multi-burst laser ablation and can be used to study the pulse-to-pulse separation time effect on the ablation rate. (orig.)

  13. Modeling of multi-burst mode pico-second laser ablation for improved material removal rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen

    2010-02-01

    This paper deals with the unique phenomena occurring during the multi-burst mode picosecond (ps) laser ablation of metals through modeling and experimental studies. The two-temperature model (TTM) is used and expanded to calculate the ablation depth in the multi-burst mode. A nonlinear increment of ablation volume is found during the multi-burst laser ablation. The deactivation of ablated material and the application of temperature-dependent electron-phonon coupling are demonstrated to be important to provide reliable results. The simulation results based on this expanded laser ablation model are experimentally validated. A significant increase of ablation rate is found in the multi-burst mode, compared with the single-pulse mode under the same total fluence. This numerical model provides a physical perspective into the energy transport process during multi-burst laser ablation and can be used to study the pulse-to-pulse separation time effect on the ablation rate.

  14. Quartz Crystal Microbalances for quantitative picosecond laser-material-interaction investigations - Part I: Technical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierse, N.; Schildt, T.; Esser, H. G.; Sergienko, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Freisinger, M.; Zhao, D.; Ding, H.; Terra, A.; Samm, U.; Linsmeier, Ch.

    2016-12-01

    In this work the technical suitability of Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QMBs) for in situ, pulse resolved mass removal measurements is demonstrated for picosecond laser ablation of magnetron sputtered coatings. The QMBs show a linear characteristic of the sensitivity for layer thickness of different metals up to several microns. Laser pulse resolved measurements of the mass ablated from the metal layer were performed. About 400 ng of chromium was ablated during the first laser pulse while in subsequent pulses ablation of the QMBs is found to be larger than for deposition, which is explained by the radial sensitivity of the QMBs. Future refinements of the setup and the benefits of the pulse resolved mass loss measurements for laser based methods like LIBS and LIAS are discussed and will be presented in part II currently in preparation.

  15. Study of plasma pressure evolution driven by strong picosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Wang, J. X.; Xu, Y. X.; Zhu, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Through one dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulation of strong laser interaction with the solid-density plasma, the evolution of the plasma impact pressure behind a thin foil has been investigated in details. An energy-compression mechanism has been proposed to help optimizing the laser and plasma parameters. It has been found that by using a picosecond laser with intensity 1015 W cm-2, an impact pressure as high as several hundreds of GPa order of magnitude can be obtained. The numerical analysis demonstrates that the peak pressure is mainly resulted from the ion contribution. These results are of potential application to the laser loading upon solids in order to study the material properties under extra-high dynamic pressure.

  16. Reduction of thermocoagulative injury via use of a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) in laryngeal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Arne; Kucher, Stanislav; Knecht, Rainald; Jowett, Nathan; Krötz, Peter; Reimer, Rudolph; Schumacher, Udo; Anders, Sven; Münscher, Adrian; Dalchow, Carsten V; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2015-04-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is routinely used in glottic microsurgery for the treatment of benign and malignant disease, despite significant collateral thermal damage secondary to photothermal vaporization without thermal confinement. Subsequent tissue response to thermal injury involves excess collagen deposition resulting in scarring and functional impairment. To minimize collateral thermal injury, short-pulse laser systems such as the microsecond pulsed erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser and picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) have been developed. This study compares incisions made in ex vivo human laryngeal tissues by CO2 and Er:YAG lasers versus PIRL using light microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and infrared thermography (IRT). In comparison to the CO2 and Er:YAG lasers, PIRL incisions showed significantly decreased mean epithelial (59.70 µm) and subepithelial (22.15 µm) damage zones (p lasers (p laser incisions. IRT demonstrated median temperature rise of 4.1 K in PIRL vocal fold incisions, significantly less than for Er:YAG laser cuts (171.85 K; p lasers in human glottis and supraglottic tissues.

  17. Picosecond-petawatt laser-block ignition of avalanche boron fusion by ultrahigh acceleration and ultrahigh magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the thermal laser-plasma interaction for fusion by nanosecond pulses, picosecond pulses offer a fundamentally different non-thermal direct conversion of laser energy into ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This allows to ignite boron fusion which otherwise is most difficult. Trapping by kilotesla magnetic fields and avalanche ignition leads to environmentally clean and economic energy generation.

  18. A picosecond resolution Time Digitizer for laser ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turko, B.

    1978-01-01

    The Time Digitizer capable of covering a range of 0.34 sec in 9.76 psec increments is described. The time interval between a pair of start-stop pulses is digitized coarsely in 20 nsec periods by a very accurate 50 MHz reference clock. The residual fractions of a clock period at the start and the stop end of the measured interval are stretched in two interpolators and digitized in 9.76 psec increments. An equivalent digitizing frequency of 102.4 GHz is thus achieved. The digitizer is built in a minicrate and communicates via a standard crate controller. It is intended for use in the laser ranging between ground stations and the Laser Geodetic Satellite (LAGEOS). It is shown that the distribution in any two adjacent 9.76 psec channels of a small number of identical test time intervals is essentially binomial. The performance of the digitizer and test results are given.

  19. Multi-wavelength Nd:GAGG picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Antonio; Pirzio, Federico; Reali, Giancarlo; Arcangeli, Andrea; Tonelli, Mauro; Jia, Zhitai; Tao, Xutang

    2010-07-01

    Laser operation near 1.06 μm by a diode-pumped Nd:Gd 3Al x Ga (5-x) O 12 ( x = 0.94) (Nd:GAGG) disordered crystal has been investigated. Free-running oscillation, with a slope efficiency as high as 55% and 256 mW output power, was achieved with 500 mW absorbed power using a 1-W laser diode for pumping. Stable passive mode-locking with dual-wavelength operation was obtained with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SAM) and a single-prism, dispersion-compensated cavity. The two-color mode-locking regime is well described by Fourier-limited synchronized pulses with duration ≈3.7 and 5.9 ps and output power ≈65 mW, with wavelength separation of 1.3 nm around 1062 nm.

  20. Hydrodynamic model for picosecond propagation of laser-created nanoplasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Vikrant; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of a free-electron-laser pulse with a moderate or large size cluster is known to create a quasi-neutral nanoplasma, which then expands on hydrodynamic timescale, i.e., $>1$ ps. To have a better understanding of ion and electron data from experiments derived from laser-irradiated clusters, one needs to simulate cluster dynamics on such long timescales for which the molecular dynamics approach becomes inefficient. We therefore propose a two-step Molecular Dynamics-Hydrodynamic scheme. In the first step we use molecular dynamics code to follow the dynamics of an irradiated cluster until all the photo-excitation and corresponding relaxation processes are finished and a nanoplasma, consisting of ground-state ions and thermalized electrons, is formed. In the second step we perform long-timescale propagation of this nanoplasma with a computationally efficient hydrodynamic approach. In the present paper we examine the feasibility of a hydrodynamic two-fluid approach to follow the expansion of spherica...

  1. Femtosecond and picosecond laser drilling of metals at high repetition rates and average powers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancona, A; Döring, S; Jauregui, C; Röser, F; Limpert, J; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A

    2009-11-01

    The influence of pulse duration on the laser drilling of metals at repetition rates of up to 1 MHz and average powers of up to 70 W has been experimentally investigated using an ytterbium-doped-fiber chirped-pulse amplification system with pulses from 800 fs to 19 ps. At a few hundred kilohertz particle shielding causes an increase in the number of pulses for breakthrough, depending on the pulse energy and duration. At higher repetition rates, the heat accumulation effect overbalances particle shielding, but significant melt ejection affects the hole quality. Using femtosecond pulses, heat accumulation starts at higher repetition rates, and the ablation efficiency is higher compared with picosecond pulses.

  2. Supercontinuum Generation with Output Power of 1.7 W Pumped by a Picosecond Laser Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Er-Ming; Ruan, Shuang-Chen; Guo, Chun-Yu; Wang, Yun-Cai; Wei, Hui-Feng

    2010-10-01

    By using a photonic crystal fiber, a supercontinuum source with output power up to 1.7W, pumped by a passively mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 picosecond laser is obtained. A spectral width of the supercontinuum is 1700 nm (500-2200 nm) with the 5 dB spectral width approximately 1000 nm (1200-2200 nm). This high power wide band supercontinuum source meets the demand of many applications such as optical coherence tomography, frequency metrology and wavelength-division-multiplexing systems. The evolution of the supercontinuum with the increasing pump power is presented and analyzed.

  3. Polarized multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using a picosecond laser and a fiber supercontinuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Sébastien; Courjaud, Antoine; Mottay, Eric; Finot, Christophe; Dudley, John; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    We perform multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy with a picosecond pulsed laser and a broadband supercontinuum (SC) generated in photonic crystal fiber. CARS signal stability is achieved using an active fiber coupler that avoids thermal and mechanical drifts. We obtain multiplex CARS spectra for test liquids in the 600-2000 cm(-1) spectral range. In addition we investigate the polarization dependence of the CARS spectra when rotating the pump beam linear polarization state relative to the linearly polarized broad stokes SC. From these polarization measurements we deduce the Raman depolarization ratio, the resonant versus nonresonant contribution, the Raman resonance frequency, and the linewidth.

  4. Sub-picosecond ultra-low frequency passively mode-locked fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Cruz, José L.; Díez, Antonio; Andrés, Miguel V.

    2016-11-01

    We developed a nonlinear polarization rotation all-fiber mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser, with the purpose to reach a sub-picosecond and sub-megahertz light pulse emission. In the process, we observed three different emission regimes as the net birefringence is changed, namely high-power dissipative soliton resonance, low-power soliton regime, and a mixed combination of both. In the pure solitonic regime, a 0.961 MHz train of chirp-free Gaussian pulses was obtained, with a time width of 0.919 ps at 1564.3 nm.

  5. Ion acceleration in a solitary wave by an intense picosecond laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A; Uesaka, M; Sasaki, A; Daido, H

    2002-11-18

    Acceleration of ions in a solitary wave produced by shock-wave decay in a plasma slab irradiated by an intense picosecond laser pulse is studied via particle-in-cell simulation. Instead of exponential distribution as in known mechanisms of ion acceleration from the target surface, these ions accelerated forwardly form a bunch with relatively low energy spread. The bunch is shown to be a solitary wave moving over expanding plasma; its velocity can exceed the maximal velocity of ions accelerated forward from the rear side of the target.

  6. Machining parameter optimization of C/SiC composites using high power picosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruoheng; Li, Weinan [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an, Shaanxi 10068 (China); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengliu@nwpu.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaannxi 710072 (China); Wang, Chunhui; Wang, Jing [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaannxi 710072 (China); Yang, Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an, Shaanxi 10068 (China); Cheng, Laifei, E-mail: liuys99067@163.com [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaannxi 710072 (China)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • We found that the helical line width and the helical line spacing, machining time and the scanning speed on the surface morphology of machined holes had remarkable effects on the qualities of micro-holes such as shape and depth. • The debris consisted of C, Si and O was observed on the machined surface. The Si−C bonds of the SiC matrix transformed into Si−O bonds after machined. - Abstract: Picosecond laser is an important machining technology for high hardness materials. In this paper, high power picosecond laser was utilized to drill micro-holes in C/SiC composites, and the effects of different processing parameters including the helical line width and spacing, machining time and scanning speed were discussed. To characterize the qualities of machined holes, scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the surface morphology, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to describe the element composition change between the untreated and laser-treated area. The experimental results indicated that all parameters mentioned above had remarkable effects on the qualities of micro-holes such as shape and depth. Additionally, the debris consisted of C, Si and O was observed on the machined surface. The Si−C bonds of the SiC matrix transformed into Si−O bonds after machined. Furthermore, the physical process responsible for the mechanism of debris formation was discussed as well.

  7. Fast spectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with high-speed tunable picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyadi, Harsono; Iwatsuka, Junichi; Minamikawa, Takeo; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2013-09-01

    We develop a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy system equipped with a tunable picosecond laser for high-speed wavelength scanning. An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is integrated in the laser cavity to enable wavelength scanning by varying the radio frequency waves applied to the AOTF crystal. An end mirror attached on a piezoelectric actuator and a pair of parallel plates driven by galvanometer motors are also introduced into the cavity to compensate for changes in the cavity length during wavelength scanning to allow synchronization with another picosecond laser. We demonstrate fast spectral imaging of 3T3-L1 adipocytes every 5  cm-1 in the Raman spectral region around 2850  cm-1 with an image acquisition time of 120 ms. We also demonstrate fast switching of Raman shifts between 2100 and 2850  cm-1, corresponding to CD2 symmetric stretching and CH2 symmetric stretching vibrations, respectively. The fast-switching CARS images reveal different locations of recrystallized deuterated and nondeuterated stearic acid.

  8. Machining parameter optimization of C/SiC composites using high power picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruoheng; Li, Weinan; Liu, Yongsheng; Wang, Chunhui; Wang, Jing; Yang, Xiaojun; Cheng, Laifei

    2015-03-01

    Picosecond laser is an important machining technology for high hardness materials. In this paper, high power picosecond laser was utilized to drill micro-holes in C/SiC composites, and the effects of different processing parameters including the helical line width and spacing, machining time and scanning speed were discussed. To characterize the qualities of machined holes, scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the surface morphology, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to describe the element composition change between the untreated and laser-treated area. The experimental results indicated that all parameters mentioned above had remarkable effects on the qualities of micro-holes such as shape and depth. Additionally, the debris consisted of C, Si and O was observed on the machined surface. The Sisbnd C bonds of the SiC matrix transformed into Sisbnd O bonds after machined. Furthermore, the physical process responsible for the mechanism of debris formation was discussed as well.

  9. Picosecond laser damage performance assessment of multilayer dielectric gratings in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, David A; Carr, C Wren; Hackel, Richard P; Negres, Raluca A; Stanion, Kenneth; Fair, James E; Cross, David A; Nissen, James; Luthi, Ronald; Guss, Gabe; Britten, Jerald A; Gourdin, William H; Haefner, Constantin

    2015-06-15

    Precise assessment of the high fluence performance of pulse compressor gratings is necessary to determine the safe operational limits of short-pulse high energy lasers. We have measured the picosecond laser damage behavior of multilayer dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings used in the compression of chirped pulses on the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) kilojoule petawatt laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). We present optical damage density measurements of MLD gratings using the raster scan method in order to estimate operational performance. We also report results of R-on-1 tests performed with varying pulse duration (1-30 ps) in air, and clean vacuum. Measurements were also performed in vacuum with controlled exposure to organic contamination to simulate the grating use environment. Results show sparse defects with lower damage resistance which were not detected by small-area damage test methods.

  10. Study of spallation by sub-picosecond laser driven shocks in metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combis P.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spallation induced by a laser driven shock has been studied for two decades on time scales of nanosecond order. The evolution of laser technologies now provides access to sources whose pulse duration is under the picosecond, corresponding to characteristic times of numerous microscopic phenomena. In this ultra-short irradiation regime, spallation experiments have been performed with time-resolved measurements of the free surface. In this solicitation type, damage occurs at small scale, leading to micrometric spalls. The VISAR measurements have been complemented with post-test observations and microtomography and compared with numerical simulations to check the models consistency of the laser-matter interaction, shock wave propagation and the dynamic damage criteria ability to reproduce spallation at this ultra-short time scale, inducing strong tensile stress states at very high strain rates.

  11. Rapid phase change induced by double picosecond laser pulses and the dynamics of acoustic phonons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Simian, E-mail: lism1972@qq.com [Hebei Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information and Geo-detection Technology, Shijiazhuang University of Economics, Shijiazhuang 050031 (China); State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technology, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Liang, Guangfei [Key Laboratory of High Power Laser Materials, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-12-02

    For a given phase change material and composition, the double laser pulses better than a single pulse for the crystallization process. We investigated the crystallization process in Si{sub 15}Sb{sub 85} thin films induced by double picosecond pulses with constant fluence and variable intervals. The crystallization degree is a function of the intervals of double pump laser pulses. The crystallization time decreased with the increasing of the intervals of the pump pulses. We believe that acoustic phonons play a key role in the crystallization process. - Highlights: • The double pulse crystallization is easier than the single pulse crystallization. • The crystallization is a function of the intervals of double pump laser pulses. • The crystallization time decreases with the increase of the pump pulse intervals. • Acoustic phonons play a key role in the crystallization process.

  12. Picosecond pulsed laser ablation and micromachining of 4H-SiC wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molian, Pal, E-mail: molian@iastate.edu [Laboratory for Lasers, MEMS and Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 301 Black, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Pecholt, Ben; Gupta, Saurabh [Laboratory for Lasers, MEMS and Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 301 Black, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser ablation and micromachining of n-type, 4H-SiC wafer was performed using a 1552 nm wavelength, 2 ps pulse, 5 {mu}J pulse energy erbium-doped fiber laser with an objective of rapid etching of diaphragms for pressure sensors. Ablation rate, studied as a function of energy fluence, reached a maximum of 20 nm per pulse at 10 mJ/cm{sup 2}, which is much higher than that achievable by the femtosecond laser for the equivalent energy fluence. Ablation threshold was determined as 2 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Scanning electron microscope images supported the Coulomb explosion (CE) mechanism by revealing very fine particulates, smooth surfaces and absence of thermal effects including melt layer formation. It is hypothesized that defect-activated absorption and multiphoton absorption mechanisms gave rise to a charge density in the surface layers required for CE and enabled material expulsion in the form of nanoparticles. Trenches and holes micromachined by the picosecond laser exhibited clean and smooth edges and non-thermal ablation mode for pulse repetition rates less than 250 kHz. However carbonaceous material and recast layer were noted in the machined region when the pulse repetition rate was increased 500 kHz that could be attributed to the interaction between air plasma and micro/nanoparticles. A comparison with femtosecond pulsed lasers shows the promise that picosecond lasers are more efficient and cost effective tools for creating sensor diaphragms and via holes in 4H-SiC.

  13. A semiconductor injection-switched high-pressure sub-10-picosecond carbon dioxide laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael Kon Yew

    A multiatmospheric-pressure-broadened CO2 laser amplifier was constructed to amplify sub-10-picosecond pulses generated with semiconductor switching. High-intensity, mid-infrared, amplified pulses have many applications: especially in fields such as non-linear optics, laser-plasma interaction, and laser particle acceleration. The injected pulses are produced by exciting GaAs (or an engineered, fast-recombination time semiconductor) with an ultrafast visible laser pulse to induce transient free carriers with sufficient density to reflect a co-incident hybrid-CO2 laser pulse. The short pulse is injected directly into the regenerative amplifier cavity from an intra-cavity semiconductor switch. The CO2-gas-mix amplifier is operated at 1.24 MPa which is sufficient to collisionally broaden the individual rotational spectral lines so that they merge to produce a gain spectrum wide enough to support pulses less than 10 ps long. After sufficient amplification, the pulse is switched out with another semiconductor switch pumped with a synchronized visible-laser pulse. This system is demonstrated and analysed spectrally and temporally. The pulse-train spectral analysis is done for a GaAs-GaAs double-switch arrangement using a standard spectrometer and two HgCdTe detectors; one of which is used for a reference signal. An infrared autocorrelator was designed and constructed to temporally analyse the pulse trains emerging from the amplifier. Interpretation of the results was aided by the development of a computer model for short-pulse amplification which incorporated saturation effects, rotational- and vibrational-mode energy redistribution between pulse round trips, and the gain enhancement due to one sequence band. The results show that a sub-10-picosecond pulse is injected into the cavity and that it is amplified with some trailing pulses at 18 ps intervals generated by coherent effects. The energy level reached, estimated through modelling, was >100 mJ/cm2.

  14. Pattern analysis of laser-tattoo interactions for picosecond- and nanosecond-domain 1,064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers in tissue-mimicking phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Keun Jae; Zheng, Zhenlong; Kwon, Tae Rin; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Hye Sun; Cho, Sung Bin

    2017-05-08

    During laser treatment for tattoo removal, pigment chromophores absorb laser energy, resulting in fragmentation of the ink particles via selective photothermolysis. The present study aimed to outline macroscopic laser-tattoo interactions in tissue-mimicking (TM) phantoms treated with picosecond- and nanosecond-domain lasers. Additionally, high-speed cinematographs were captured to visualize time-dependent tattoo-tissue interactions, from laser irradiation to the formation of photothermal and photoacoustic injury zones (PIZs). In all experimental settings using the nanosecond or picosecond laser, tattoo pigments fragmented into coarse particles after a single laser pulse, and further disintegrated into smaller particles that dispersed toward the boundaries of PIZs after repetitive delivery of laser energy. Particles fractured by picosecond treatment were more evenly dispersed throughout PIZs than those fractured by nanosecond treatment. Additionally, picosecond-then-picosecond laser treatment (5-pass-picosecond treatment + 5-pass-picosecond treatment) induced greater disintegration of tattoo particles within PIZs than picosecond-then-nanosecond laser treatment (5-pass-picosecond treatment + 5-pass-nanosecond treatment). High-speed cinematography recorded the formation of PIZs after repeated reflection and propagation of acoustic waves over hundreds of microseconds to a few milliseconds. The present data may be of use in predicting three-dimensional laser-tattoo interactions and associated reactions in surrounding tissue.

  15. Femtosecond versus picosecond laser machining of nano-gratings and micro-channels in silica glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbari, Costantino; Champion, Audrey; Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Beresna, Martynas; Bellouard, Yves; Kazansky, Peter G

    2013-02-25

    The ability of 8 picosecond pulse lasers for three dimensional direct-writing in the bulk of transparent dielectrics is assessed through a comparative study with a femtosecond laser delivering 600 fs pulses. The comparison addresses two main applications: the fabrication of birefringent optical elements and two-step machining by laser exposure and post-processing by chemical etching. Formation of self-organized nano-gratings in glass by ps-pulses is demonstrated. Differential etching between ps-laser exposed regions and unexposed silica is observed. Despite attaining values of retardance (>100 nm) and etching rate (2 μm/min) similar to fs pulses, ps pulses are found unsuitable for bulk machining in silica glass primarily due to the build-up of a stress field causing scattering, cracks and non-homogeneous etching. Additionally, we show that the so-called "quill-effect", that is the dependence of the laser damage from the direction of writing, occurs also for ps-pulse laser machining. Finally, an opposite dependence of the retardance from the intra-pulse distance is observed for fs- and ps-laser direct writing.

  16. Narrow linewidth picosecond UV pulsed laser with mega-watt peak power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunning; Deibele, Craig; Liu, Yun

    2013-04-08

    We demonstrate a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) burst mode laser system that generates 66 ps/402.5 MHz pulses with mega-watt peak power at 355 nm. The seed laser consists of a single frequency fiber laser (linewidth picosecond pulse generator, and a fiber based preamplifier. A very high extinction ratio (45 dB) has been achieved by using an adaptive bias control of the EOM. The multi-stage Nd:YAG amplifier system allows a uniformly temporal shaping of the macropulse with a tunable pulse duration. The light output from the amplifier is converted to 355 nm, and over 1 MW peak power is obtained when the laser is operating in a 5-μs/10-Hz macropulse mode. The laser output has a transform-limited spectrum with a very narrow linewidth of individual longitudinal modes. The immediate application of the laser system is the laser-assisted hydrogen ion beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  17. ULTRA-BRIGHT X-RAY GENERATION USING INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING OF PICOSECOND CO(2) LASER PLUSES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TSUNEMI,A.; ENDO,A.; POGORELSKY,I.; BEN-ZVI,I.; KUSCHE,K.; SKARITKA,J.; YAKIMENKO,V.; HIROSE,T.; URAKAWA,J.; OMORI,T.; WASHIO,M.; LIU,Y.; HE,P.; CLINE,D.

    1999-03-01

    Laser-Compton scattering with picosecond CO{sub 2} laser pulses is proposed for generation of high-brightness x-rays. The interaction chamber has been developed and the experiment is scheduled for the generation of the x-rays of 4.7 keV, 10{sup 7} photons in 10-ps pulse width using 50-MeV, 0.5-nC relativistic electron bunches and 6 GW CO{sub 2} laser.

  18. Avalanche boron fusion by laser picosecond block ignition with magnetic trapping for clean and economic reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, H; Eliezer, S; Lalousis, N Nissim P; Giuffrida, L; Margarone, D; Picciotto, A; Miley, G H; Moustaizis, S; Martinez-Val, J -M; Barty, C P J; Kirchhoff, G J

    2016-01-01

    After the very long consideration of the ideal energy source by fusion of the protons of light hydrogen with the boron isotope 11 (boron fusion HB11) the very first two independent measurements of very high reaction gains by lasers basically opens a fundamental breakthrough. The non-thermal plasma block ignition with extremely high power laser pulses above petawatt of picosecond duration in combination with up to ten kilotesla magnetic fields for trapping has to be combined to use the measured high gains as proof of an avalanche reaction for an environmentally clean, low cost and lasting energy source as potential option against global warming. The unique HB11 avalanche reaction is are now based on elastic collisions of helium nuclei (alpha particles) limited only to a reactor for controlled fusion energy during a very short time within a very small volume.

  19. Picosecond laser source at 1 MHz with continuous tunability in the visible red band

    CERN Document Server

    Forget, S; Lucas-Leclin, G; Georges, P; Forget, Sebastien; Balembois, Francois; Lucas-Leclin, Gaelle; Georges, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    We report the first demonstration to our knowledge of a continuously tunable picosecond laser operating around 1 MHz. The emission can be tuned from 640 to 685 nm and the repetition rate from 200 kHz to 1 MHz with a pulse duration of less than 200 ps. The system is based on a Nd:YVO4 passively Q-switched microchip laser providing a few tens of nJ per pulse. Two cascaded stages of amplification are then used to increase the pulse energy to several microJ . The frequency doubled radiation is then used to pump a periodically-poled-niobate-lithium (PPLN)-based optical parametric generator in an all-solid-state architecture. 20 nJ of tunable signal radiation are obtained. We also demonstrated 300-ps pulses generation in the UV (355 nm) at 1 MHz.

  20. Seedless velocimetry at 100  kHz with picosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Naibo; Mance, Jason G; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Felver, Josef J; Stauffer, Hans U; Yi, Tongxun; Danehy, Paul M; Roy, Sukesh

    2017-01-15

    Picosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging (PLEET), a seedless picosecond-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in non-reactive flows at a repetition rate of 100 kHz with a 1064 nm, 100 ps burst-mode laser. The fluorescence lifetime of the PLEET signal was measured in nitrogen, and the laser heating effects were analyzed. PLEET experiments with a free jet of nitrogen show the ability to measure multi-point flow velocity fluctuations at a 100 kHz detection rate or higher. Both spectral and dynamic mode decomposition analyses of velocity on a Ma=0.8 free jet show two dominant Strouhal numbers around 0.24 and 0.48, respectively, well within the shear-layer flapping frequencies of the free jets. This technique increases the laser-tagging repetition rate for velocimetry to hundreds of kilohertz. PLEET is suitable for subsonic through supersonic laminar- and turbulent-flow velocity measurements.

  1. Tunable, continuous-wave Ti:sapphire channel waveguide lasers written by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, Christos; Corbari, Costantino; Brambilla, Gilberto; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G

    2012-11-15

    Fabrication and cw lasing at 798.25 nm is reported for femtosecond (fs) and picosecond (ps) laser-inscribed channel waveguides in Ti:sapphire crystals. Lasing in channels written by fs (ps) pulses was obtained above a threshold of 84 mW (189 mW) with a maximum output power and a slope efficiency of 143 mW (45 mW) and 23.5% (7.1%), respectively. The emission wavelength was tuned over a 170 nm range by using a birefringent filter in an external cavity.

  2. High-repetition-rate picosecond pump laser based on a Yb:YAG disk amplifier for optical parametric amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Thomas; Schwarz, Alexander; Teisset, Catherine Yuriko; Sutter, Dirk; Killi, Alexander; Kienberger, Reinhard; Krausz, Ferenc

    2009-07-15

    We report an optically synchronized picosecond pump laser for optical parametric amplifiers based on an Yb:YAG thin-disk amplifier. At 3 kHz repetition rate, pulse energies of 25 mJ with 1.6 ps pulse duration were achieved with an rms fluctuation in pulse energy of pumped regenerative amplifier.

  3. High energy high repetition rate compact picosecond Holmium YLF laser for mid-IR OPCPA pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel; Biegert, Jens; Matras, Guillaume; Simon-Boisson, Christophe

    2017-02-01

    The development of coherent light sources with emission in the mid-IR is currently undergoing a remarkable revolution. The mid-IR spectral range has always been of tremendous interest, mainly to spectroscopists, due to the ability of mid-IR light to access rotational and vibrational resonances of molecules which give rise to superb sensitivity upon optical probing [1-3]. Previously, high energy resolution was achieved with narrowband lasers or parametric sources, but the advent of frequency comb sources has revolutionized spectroscopy by providing high energy resolution within the frequency comb structure of the spectrum and at the same time broadband coverage and short pulse duration [4-6]. Such carrier to envelope phase (CEP) controlled light waveforms, when achieved at ultrahigh intensity, give rise to extreme effects such as the generation of isolated attosecond pulses in the vacuum to extreme ultraviolet range (XUV) [7]. Motivated largely by the vast potential of attosecond science, the development of ultraintense few-cycle and CEP stable sources has intensified [8], and it was recognized that coherent soft X-ray radiation could be generated when driving high harmonic generation (HHG) with long wavelength sources [9-11]. Recently, based on this concept, the highest waveform controlled soft X-ray flux [12] and isolated attosecond pulse emission at 300 eV [13] was demonstrated via HHG from a 1850 nm, sub-2-cycle source [14]. Within strong field physics, long wavelength scaling may lead to further interesting physics such as the direct reshaping of the carrier field [15], scaling of quantum path dynamics [16], the breakdown of the dipole approximation [17] or direct laser acceleration [18]. The experimental development of long wavelength light sources therefore holds great promise in many fields of science and will lead to numerous applications beyond strong field physics and attosecond science. In this paper, we present results about a high energy picosecond

  4. An automatic robotic system for three-dimensional tooth crown preparation using a picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Dangxiao; Zhang, Yuru; Ma, Lei; Sun, Yuchun; Lv, Peijun

    2014-09-01

    Laser techniques have been introduced into dentistry to overcome the drawbacks of traditional treatment methods. The existing methods in dental clinical operations for tooth crown preparation have several drawbacks which affect the long-term success of the dental treatment. To develop an improved robotic system to manipulate the laser beam to achieve safe and accurate three-dimensional (3D) tooth ablation, and thus to realize automatic tooth crown preparation in clinical operations. We present an automatic laser ablation system for tooth crown preparation in dental restorative operations. The system, combining robotics and laser technology, is developed to control the laser focus in three-dimensional motion aiming for high speed and accuracy crown preparation. The system consists of an end-effector, a real-time monitor and a tooth fixture. A layer-by-layer ablation method is developed to control the laser focus during the crown preparation. Experiments are carried out with picosecond laser on wax resin and teeth. The accuracy of the system is satisfying, achieving the average linear errors of 0.06 mm for wax resin and 0.05 mm for dentin. The angle errors are 4.33° for wax resin and 0.5° for dentin. The depth errors for wax resin and dentin are both within 0.1 mm. The ablation time is 1.5 hours for wax resin and 3.5 hours for dentin. The ablation experimental results show that the movement range and the resolution of the robotic system can meet the requirements of typical dental operations for tooth crown preparation. Also, the errors of tooth shape and preparation angle are able to satisfy the requirements of clinical crown preparation. Although the experimental results illustrate the potential of using picosecond lasers for 3D tooth crown preparation, many research issues still need to be studied before the system can be applied to clinical operations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Measurements of X-ray doses and spectra produced by picosecond laser-irradiated solid targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Rui; Yu, Minghai; Jiao, Jinlong; Lu, Wei; Yan, Yonghong; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhimeng; Zhou, Weimin; Li, Junli; Zhang, Hui

    2017-02-09

    Experiments have shown that high-intensity laser interaction with a solid target can generate significant X-ray doses. This study was conducted to determine the X-ray doses and spectra produced for picosecond laser-irradiated solid targets. The photon doses and X-ray spectra in the laser forward and side directions were measured using an XG III ps 300 TW laser system. For laser intensities of 7×10(18)-4×10(19)W/cm(2), the maximum photon dose was 16.8 mSv at 50cm with a laser energy of ~153J on a 1-mm Ta target. The photon dose in the forward direction increased more significantly with increasing laser intensity than that in the side direction. For photon energies >300keV, the X-ray spectrum can be fit with an effective temperature distribution of the exponential form, dN/dE = k× exp(-E/Tx). The X-ray temperature Tx increased with the laser intensity in the forward direction with values of 0.46-0.75MeV. Tx was less strongly correlated with the laser intensity in the side direction with values of 0.29-0.32MeV. The escaping electron spectrum was also measured. The measured electron temperature was correlated with the electron temperature predicted by the ponderomotive law. The observations in this experiment were also investigated numerically. A good agreement was observed between the experimental and simulation results.

  6. Use of picosecond infrared laser for micromanipulation of early mammalian embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmenyan, Artashes V; Shakhbazyan, Avetik K; Sviridova-Chailakhyan, Tatiana A; Krivokharchenko, Alexander S; Chiou, Arthur E; Chailakhyan, Levon M

    2009-10-01

    A high repetition rate (80 MHz) picosecond pulse (approximately 2 psec) infrared laser was used for the inactivation (functional enucleation) of oocytes and two-cell mouse embryos and also for the fusion of blastomeres of two-cell mouse embryos. The laser inactivation of both blastomeres of two-cell mouse embryos by irradiation of nucleoli completely blocked further development of the embryo. The inactivation of one blastomere, however, did not affect the ability of the second intact blastomere to develop into a blastocyst after treatment. Laser inactivation of oocytes at Metaphase II (MII) stage and parthenogenetically activated pronuclear oocytes also completely blocked their ability for further development. Suitable doses of irradiation in cytoplasm region did not affect the ability of embryos and activated oocytes to development. The efficiency of laser induced fusion for blastomeres of two-cell embryos was 66.7% and all the tetraploid embryos developed successfully into blastocysts in culture. Our results demonstrate unique opportunities of the applications of a suitable infrared periodic pulse laser as a universal microsurgery tool for individual living cells.

  7. Diagnosis of NMOS DRAM functional performance as affected by a picosecond dye laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Q.; Schwartz, H. R.; Edmonds, L. D.; Zoutendyk, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A picosec pulsed dye laser beam was at selected wavelengths successfully used to simulate heavy-ion single-event effects (SEEs) in negative channel NMOS DRAMs. A DRAM was used to develop the test technique because bit-mapping capability and previous heavy-ion upset data were available. The present analysis is the first to establish such a correlation between laser and heavy-ion data for devices, such as the NMOS DRAM, where charge collection is dominated by long-range diffusion, which is controlled by carrier density at remote distances from a depletion region. In the latter case, penetration depth is an important parameter and is included in the present analysis. A single-pulse picosecond dye laser beam (1.5 microns diameter) focused onto a single cell component can upset a single memory cell; clusters of memory cell upsets (multiple errors) were observed when the laser energy was increased above the threshold energy. The multiple errors were analyzed as a function of the bias voltage and total energy of a single pulse. A diffusion model to distinguish the multiple upsets from the laser-induced charge agreed well with previously reported heavy ion data.

  8. Plume splitting in pico-second laser-material interaction under the influence of shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gacek, Sobieslaw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2010 H. M. Black Engineering Building Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2161 (United States); Wang Xinwei, E-mail: xwang3@iastate.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2010 H. M. Black Engineering Building Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2161 (United States)

    2009-09-07

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study the physics of plume splitting in pico-second laser material interaction in background gas. The velocity distribution shows a clear split into two distinctive components. Detailed atom trajectory track reveals the behavior of atoms within the peaks and uncovers the mechanisms of peak formation. The observed plume velocity splitting emerges from two distinguished parts of the plume. The front peak of the plume is from the faster moving atoms and smaller particles during laser-material ablation. This region experiences strong constraint from the ambient gas and has substantial velocity attenuation. The second (rear) peak of the plume velocity originates from the larger and slower clusters in laser-material ablation. These larger clusters/particles experience very little constraint from the background, but are affected by the relaxation dynamics of plume and appear almost as a standing wave during the evolution. Density splitting only appears at the beginning of laser-material ablation and quickly disappears due to spread-out of the slower moving clusters. It is found that higher ambient pressure and stronger laser fluence favor earlier plume splitting.

  9. Ultrafast graphene and carbon nanotube film patterning by picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrinetskiy, Ivan I.; Emelianov, Alexey V.; Otero, Nerea; Romero, Pablo M.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials is among the most promising technologies for advanced electronic applications, due to their extraordinary chemical and physical properties. Nonetheless, after more than two decades of intensive research, the application of carbon-based nanostructures in real electronic and optoelectronic devices is still a big challenge due to lack of scalable integration in microelectronic manufacturing. Laser processing is an attractive tool for graphene device manufacturing, providing a large variety of processes through direct and indirect interaction of laser beams with graphene lattice: functionalization, oxidation, reduction, etching and ablation, growth, etc. with resolution down to the nanoscale. Focused laser radiation allows freeform processing, enabling fully mask-less fabrication of devices from graphene and carbon nanotube films. This concept is attractive to reduce costs, improve flexibility, and reduce alignment operations, by producing fully functional devices in single direct-write operations. In this paper, a picosecond laser with a wavelength of 515 nm and pulse width of 30 ps is used to pattern carbon nanostructures in two ways: ablation and chemical functionalization. The light absorption leads to thermal ablation of graphene and carbon nanotube film under the fluence 60-90 J/cm2 with scanning speed up to 2 m/s. Just under the ablation energy, the two-photon absorption leads to add functional groups to the carbon lattice which change the optical properties of graphene. This paper shows the results of controlled modification of geometrical configuration and the physical and chemical properties of carbon based nanostructures, by laser direct writing.

  10. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard J; Light, Roger A; Sharples, Steve D; Johnston, Nicholas S; Pitter, Mark C; Somekh, Mike G

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  11. Self-starting mode-locked picosecond Ti:sapphire laser by using of a fast SESAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Jiang-Feng; Tian Jin-Rong; Wang Peng; Ling Wei-Jun; Li De-Hua; Wei Zhi-Yi

    2006-01-01

    A stable continuous wave mode-locked picosecond Ti:sapphire laser by using a fast semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) is demonstrated. The laser delivers pulse width of 20 ps at a central wavelength of 813 nm and a repetition rate of 100 MHz. The maximum output power is 1.34 W with pump power of 7 W which corresponds to an optical-optical conversion efficiency of 19.1%.

  12. Damage morphology and mechanism in ablation cutting of thin glass sheets with picosecond pulsed lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Hartmann, Claudia; Schulz, Wolfgang; Zhu, Jianqiang; Lin, Zunqi

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally investigated the morphology and mechanism of laser-induced damage in the ablation cutting of thin glass sheets with picosecond pulsed lasers and we compared the experimental results to our models. After several passes of laser ablation, we observed two different kinds of damage morphologies on the cross-section of the cut channel. They are distinguished to be the damage region caused by high-density free-electrons and the heat-affected zone due to the heat accumulation, respectively. Furthermore, micro-cracks can be observed on the top surface of the workpiece near the cut edge. The nano-cracks could be generated by high energy free-electrons but opened and developed to be visible micro-cracks by thermal stress generated in the heat-affected zone. The crack length was proportional to the volume of heat-affected zone. Heat-affected-zone and visible-cracks free conditions of glass cutting were achieved by controlling the repetition rate and spatial overlap of laser pulses.

  13. Fiber Bragg grating inscription combining DUV sub-picosecond laser pulses and two-beam interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Martin; Bergmann, Joachim; Brückner, Sven; Franke, Marco; Lindner, Eric; Rothhardt, Manfred W; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2008-11-10

    The combination of fiber Bragg grating inscription with femtosecond laser sources and the usage of the Talbot interferometer setup not only gives access to the fabrication of Bragg gratings in new types of materials but also allows, at the same time, to keep the high flexibility of an interferometric setup in choosing the Bragg grating wavelength. Since the spatial and temporal coherence properties of the femtosecond laser source differ strongly from those of conventional laser sources, specific limits and tolerances in the interferometric setup have to be considered. Such limits are investigated on the basis of an analytical ray tracing model. The results are applied to tolerance measurements of fiber Bragg grating reflections recorded with a DUV sub-picosecond laser source at 262 nm. Additionally we demonstrate the wavelength versatility of the two-beam interferometer setup for femtosecond inscription over a 40 nm wavelength band. Inscription experiments in Al/Yb doped silica glasses are demonstrated as a prove for the access to non-photosensitive fibers.

  14. Patterning of Aluminium thin film on polyethylene terephthalate by multi-beam picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y.; Perrie, W.; Harris, P.; Allegre, O. J.; Abrams, K. J.; Dearden, G.

    2015-11-01

    High speed patterning of a 30 nm thick Aluminium thin film on a flexible Polyethylene Terephthalate substrate was demonstrated with the aid of Computer Generated Holograms (CGH's) applied to a phase only Spatial Light Modulator. Low fluence picosecond laser pulses minimise thermal damage to the sensitive substrate and thus clean, single and multi-beam, front side thin film removal is achieved with good edge quality. Interestingly, rear side ablation shows significant Al film delamination. Measured front and rear side ablation thresholds were Fth=0.20±0.01 J cm-2 and Fth=0.15±0.01 J cm-2 respectively. With laser repetition rate of 200 kHz and 8 diffractive spots, a film removal rate of R>0.5 cm2 s-1 was demonstrated during patterning with a fixed CGH and 5 W average laser power. The effective laser repetition rate was feff~1.3 MHz. The application of 30 stored CGH's switching up to 10 Hz was also synchronised with motion control, allowing dynamic large area multi-beam patterning which however, slows micro-fabrication.

  15. Timing control of an intense picosecond pulse laser to the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Hara, Toru; Kitamura, Hideo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a control system to synchronize intense picosecond laser pulses to the hard x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) pulses of SPring-8. A regeneratively amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is synchronized to 40 ps SR pulses by locking the laser to the radio frequency of the ring. The synchronization of the pulses is monitored by detecting both beams simultaneously on a gold photocathode of a streak camera. This method enabled us to make a precise measurement of the time interval between the beams, even if the trigger of the streak camera drifts. Synchronization between the laser and the SR pulses has been achieved with a precision of ±2 ps for some hours. The stable timing control ensures the possibility of making two-photon excitation and pump-probe experiments with time resolution of a few tens of ps (limited by the pulse duration of the SR). We have used this system to show that closing undulator gaps in the storage ring shifts the arrival time of the SR pulses, in accord with expectations for the increased power loss.

  16. An end pumped all internal reflection small-sized slab picosecond laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junchi; Peng, Yujie; Su, Hongpeng; Leng, Yuxin

    2017-05-01

    An end pumped all internal reflection small-sized slab picosecond laser system amplifier is proposed and demonstrated based on the common Nd:YAG crystal. A cylinder lens is introduced to pre-compensate for the one-dimensional thermal effect caused by the high power pumping laser. The maximum output powers of 6.6 and 6.3 W are obtained at the absorbed pumping power of 25 W without and with a cylinder mirror, and the corresponding optical conversion efficiencies are about 10.4% and 9.3% respectively. The measured M 2 factors along the slow and fast axes are 1.71 and 2.47 respectively. The instability of the maximum output laser is below 0.8% (RMS) within measuring time up to 15 min. It is demonstrated that the all internal reflection slab can support long enough optical gain distance to realize the signal laser amplification for the newly developed crystal even with small size and low doped concentration.

  17. High-speed laser-assisted cutting of strong transparent materials using picosecond Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, M. K.; Jedrkiewicz, O.; Sabonis, V.; Mikutis, M.; Recchia, S.; Aprea, A.; Bollani, M.; Trapani, P. Di

    2015-08-01

    We report single-pass cutting of strong transparent glass materials of 700 μm thickness with a speed up to 270 mm/s using single-shot nanostructuring technique exploiting picosecond, zero-order Bessel beams at laser wavelength of 1030 nm. Particularly, we present results of a systematic study of cutting of tempered glass which has high resistance to thermal and mechanical shocks due to the inhomogeneous material properties along its thickness, and homogeneous glass that identify a unique focusing geometry and a finite pitch dependency, for which cutting with high quality and high reproducibility can be achieved. These results represent a significant advancement in the field of high-speed cutting of technologically important transparent materials.

  18. Degradation of picosecond temporal contrast of Ti:sapphire lasers with coherent pedestals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakovskiy, Nikita; Kalashnikov, Mikhail; Gontier, Emilien; Falcoz, Franck; Paul, Pierre-Mary

    2016-10-01

    Recompressed pulses from Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse lasers are accompanied by a slowly decaying post-pulse pedestal that is coherent with the main pulse. The pedestal typically consists of numerous pulses with temporal separation in the picosecond range. The source of this artifact lies in the Ti:sapphire active medium itself, both in the Kerr-lens mode-locked oscillator and in subsequent amplifiers. In the presence of substantial self-phase modulation, after recompression the post-pedestal generates a mirror-symmetric pre-pulse pedestal. This pedestal severely degrades the leading edge of the output pulse. This degradation is far more limiting than the original post-pedestal and severely lowers the achievable temporal contrast.

  19. Fast phosphor picosecond streak tube for ultrafast laser diagnostics in repetitive mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageeva, N. V.; Gornostaev, P. B.; Ivanova, S. R.; Kulechenkova, T. P.; Levina, G. P.; Lozovoi, V. I.; Makushina, V. A.; Schelev, M. Ya; Shashkov, E. V.; Scaballanovich, T. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Vereschagin, A. K.; Vereschagin, K. A.; Vorobiev, N. S.

    2015-08-01

    The well-established PIF-01/S1/P43 picosecond streak tube, designed 30 years ago and still manufactured at the A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, was modified by replacing its traditional P43 phosphor screen with a P47 one having approximately three orders of magnitude shorter decay time. The experimental measurements of this decay time were provided by PIF-01/S1/P47 image tube photocathode irradiation either with a single or a train of 8 ps laser pulses separated by 8 ns from each other at a 1.08 μm wavelength. The results of our preliminary measurements of P47-BH phosphor (manufactured by Phosphor Technology Ltd) indicate the possibility of employing the PIF-01/S1/P47 streak tube for synchrotron diagnostics at a units megahertz repetition rate without the negative influence of ‘ghost images’ from the previous streak records.

  20. Ultra-flat supercontinuum generated from high-power, picosecond telecommunication fiber laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ruoyu; Song, Youjian; Zhou, Xiaokang; Chai, Lu; Wang, Chingyue; Hu, Minglie

    2016-11-20

    An ultra-flat, high-power supercontinuum generated from a picosecond telecommunication fiber laser was presented. The pulse from a carbon nanotube mode-locked oscillator was amplified using an Er-Yb codoped fiber amplifier. The output of the system achieved an average power of 2.7 W, with the center wavelength at 1564 nm and a FWHM of 6 nm in the spectral domain. By passing this amplified high-power pulse through a 4.6 m highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber, an ultra-flat supercontinuum spanning 1600-2180 nm is generated. And the average power of the supercontinuum achieves 1 W.

  1. Treatment of tattoos with a picosecond alexandrite laser: a prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, Nazanin; Metelitsa, Andrei; Petrell, Kathleen; Arndt, Kenneth A; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To study a picosecond 755-nm alexandrite laser for the removal of tattoos to confirm the efficacy of this therapy, focusing on the effect of therapy on the target lesion as well as the surrounding tissues and quantifying the number of necessary treatments. DESIGN Fifteen patients with tattoos were enrolled. Treatments were scheduled approximately 6 ± 2 weeks apart. Standard photographs using 2-dimensional imaging were taken at baseline, before each treatment, and 1 month and 3 months after the last treatment. SETTING Dermatology clinic at SkinCare Physicians in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. PATIENTS Fifteen patients with darkly pigmented tattoos. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Treatment efficacy was assessed by the level of tattoo clearance in standard photographs. These photographs were assessed by a blinded physician evaluator and based on a 4-point scale. Efficacy was also assessed based on physician and patient satisfaction measured on a 4-point scale. RESULTS Twelve of 15 patients with tattoos (80%) completed the study. All 12 patients obtained greater than 75% clearance. Nine patients (75%) obtained greater than 75% clearance after having 2 to 4 treatments. The average number of treatment sessions needed to obtain this level of clearance was 4.25. All 12 patients (100%) were satisfied or extremely satisfied with the treatment. Adverse effects included pain, swelling, and blistering. Pain resolved immediately after therapy, while the swelling and blistering resolved within 1 week. Hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation were reported at the 3-month follow-up. CONCLUSION The picosecond 755-nm alexandrite laser is a safe and very effective procedure for removing tattoo pigment.

  2. Growth of poly-crystalline Cu films on Y substrates by picosecond pulsed laser deposition for photocathode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontad, F.; Lorusso, A.; Klini, A.; Manousaki, A.; Perrone, A.; Fotakis, C.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the deposition of Cu thin films on Y substrates for photocathode applications by pulsed laser deposition employing picosecond laser pulses is reported and compared with the use of nanosecond pulses. The influence of power density (6-50 GW/cm2) on the ablation of the target material, as well as on the properties of the resulting film, is discussed. The material transfer from the target to the substrate surface was found to be rather efficient, in comparison to nanosecond ablation, leading to the growth of films with high thickness. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated a quasi-continuous film morphology, at low power density values, becoming granular with increasing power density. The structural investigation, through X-ray diffraction, revealed the poly-crystalline nature of the films, with a preferential growth along the (111) crystallographic orientation of Cu cubic network. Finally, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed a low contamination level of the grown films, demonstrating the potential of a PLD technique for the fabrication of Cu/Y patterned structures, with applications in radiofrequency electron gun technology.

  3. Picosecond to femtosecond pulses from high power self mode-locked ytterbium rod-type fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, Pierre; Perrin, Mathias; Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Salin, François; Freysz, Eric

    2013-05-06

    We have designed an ytterbium rod-type fiber laser oscillator with tunable pulse duration. This system that delivers more than 10 W of average power is self mode-locked. It yields femtosecond to picosecond laser pulses at a repetition rate of 74 MHz. The pulse duration is adjusted by changing the spectral width of a band pass filter that is inserted in the laser cavity. Using volume Bragg gratings of 0.9 nm and 0.07 nm spectrum bandwidth, this oscillator delivers nearly Fourier limited 2.8 ps and 18.5 ps pulses, respectively. With a 4 nm interference filter, one obtains picosecond pulses that have been externally dechirped down to 130 fs.

  4. A simple and versatile electronic control system for a picosecond Nd:YLF oscillator - Nd:glass amplifier laser chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navathe, C. P.; Ansari, M. S.; Upadhyay, J.; Sreedhar, N.; Chandra, R.; Bundel, H. R.; Moorti, A.; Gupta, P. D.

    1997-11-01

    An electronic control system, developed for power conditioning of a picosecond Nd:YLF - Nd:glass laser oscillator - amplifier chain is described. The system generates charging and firing signals required for a commercial picosecond oscillator operated in a repetitive mode, and also carries out a charging and firing sequence of external amplifiers for single-shot operation. The system also controls a mechanical shutter to selectively pass a laser pulse from the oscillator for subsequent amplification. The laser chain includes a Faraday isolator incorporated with a safety check. A control signal is generated by this unit when conditions suitable for a sufficient level of isolation are achieved, and the same is used for gating the oscillator pulse. Good synchronization is confirmed from the measurements of amplifier gain as a function of the relative time delay in firing of different stages. The electronics developed is simple and modular, with sufficient scope for expansion of the system, and resistant to electromagnetic interference.

  5. Narrow bandwidth passively mode locked picosecond Erbium doped fiber laser using a 45° tilted fiber grating device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianxing; Yan, Zhijun; Mou, Chengbo; Liu, Zuyao; Liu, Yunqi; Zhou, Kaiming; Zhang, Lin

    2017-07-10

    An all-fiber passively picosecond mode locked Erbium doped laser using a 45° tilted fiber grating (45° TFG) and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is reported in this work. Due to the strong polarization dependent loss (PDL) of 45° TFG and narrow 3-dB bandwidth of FBG, the Erbium doped fiber laser (EDFL) can generate picosecond mode locked pulse based on the nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) effect. The laser features a repetition rate of 9.67 MHz, a pulse duration of 33 ps, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 70 dB, an average output power of 1.2 mW, and a single pulse energy of 124 pJ under the pump power of 102 mW. Besides, the central wavelength of the laser can be continuously adjusted from 1550.65 nm to 1551.44 nm. The technique of using a 45° TFG to generate picosecond pulses can be readily extended to other wavelength such as mid-infrared (mid-IR) where fiber polarizing components are either expensive or not available. To the best of our knowledge, the spectral width is the narrowest among all-fiber passively mode locked Erbium-doped laser based on NPR.

  6. Optical tomography of human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond time resolution using intense near infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Wollina, Uwe; Riemann, Iris; Peukert, Christiane; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Konrad, Helga; Fischer, Peter; Fuenfstueck, Veronika; Fischer, Tobias W.; Elsner, Peter

    2002-06-01

    We describe the novel high resolution imaging tool DermaInspect 100 for non-invasive diagnosis of dermatological disorders based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI)and second harmonic generation. Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vitro and in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Second harmonic generation was observed in the stratum corneum and in the dermis. The system with a wavelength-tunable compact 80 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezoelectric objective positioner, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit was used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (t-mapping). In addition, a modified femtosecond laser scanning microscope was involved in autofluorescence measurements. Tissues of patients with psoriasis, nevi, dermatitis, basalioma and melanoma have been investigated. Individual cells and skin structures could be clearly visualized. Intracellular components and connective tissue structures could be further characterized by tuning the excitation wavelength in the range of 750 nm to 850 nm and by calculation of mean fluorescence lifetimes per pixel and of particular regions of interest. The novel non-invasive imaging system provides 4D (x,y,z,t) optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and offers the possibility to introduce a further optical diagnostic method in dermatology.

  7. High-power picosecond 355 nm laser based on La₂CaB₁₀O₁₉ crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Zhang, Ling; Xu, Degang; Zhang, Guochun; Yu, Haijuan; Wang, Yuye; Shan, Faxian; Wang, Lirong; Yan, Chao; Wu, Yicheng; Lin, Xuechun; Yao, Jianquan

    2014-06-01

    Third harmonic generation experiments were performed on a type-I phase-matching La2CaB10O19 crystal cut at θ=49.4° and φ=0.0° with dimensions of 4.0  mm×4.0  mm×17.6  mm. A 1064 nm laser with a maximum average power of 35.2 W was employed as the fundamental light source, which has a pulse width of 10 picoseconds and a pulse repetition rate of 80 MHz. A type-I noncritical phase-matching LBO crystal was used to generate 532 nm lasers. By investigating a series of focusing lens combinations, a picosecond 355 nm laser of 5.3 W was obtained, which is the highest power of picosecond 355 nm laser based on a La2CaB10O19 crystal so far. The total conversion efficiency from 1064 to 355 nm was up to 15.1%.

  8. Picosecond to femtosecond pulses from high power self mode-locked ytterbium rod-type fiber laser

    OpenAIRE

    Deslandes, Pierre; Perrin, Mathias; Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Salin, François; Freysz, Eric

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We have designed an ytterbium rod-type fiber laser oscillator with tunable pulse duration. This system that delivers more than 10 W of average power is self mode-locked. It yields femtosecond to picosecond laser pulses at a repetition rate of 74 MHz. The pulse duration is adjusted by changing the spectral width of a band pass filter that is inserted in the laser cavity. Using volume Bragg gratings of 0.9 nm and 0.07 nm spectrum bandwidth, this oscillator delivers nearl...

  9. Demonstration of an ultraviolet stimulated Brillouin scattering pulse compressed hundred picosecond laser in LiB3O5 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhenxu; Wang, Yulei; Lu, Zhiwei; Jiang, Li; Yuan, Hang; Liu, Zhaohong

    2017-08-01

    A hundred picosecond ultraviolet (UV) laser is demonstrated with a pulse duration of less than 200 ps and peak power of 0.6 GW. With a hundred picosecond stimulated Brillouin scattering compressed pulse as the fundamental light, the UV output at 355 nm is obtained by extra-cavity sum-frequency-mixing in two LiB3O5 crystals. Maximum UV energy was 100 mJ when the incident energy was 280 mJ, yielding an optical-to-optical efficiency of 35.7%. This result is of interest for the generation of high energy sub-nanosecond UV lasers which finds applications in shock ignition and industrial processing.

  10. Ultrafast opacity in borosilicate glass induced by picosecond bursts of laser-driven ions

    CERN Document Server

    Dromey, B; Adams, D; Prasad, R; Kakolee, K F; Stefanuik, R; Nersisyan, G; Sarri, G; Yeung, M; Ahmed, H; Doria, D; Dzelzainis, T; Jung, D; Kar, S; Marlow, D; Romagnani, L; Correa, A A; Dunne, P; Kohanoff, J; Schleife, A; Borghesi, M; Currell, F; Riley, D; Zepf, M; Lewis, C L S

    2014-01-01

    Direct investigation of ion-induced dynamics in matter on picosecond (ps, 10-12 s) timescales has been precluded to date by the relatively long nanosecond (ns, 10-9 s) scale ion pulses typically provided by radiofrequency accelerators1. By contrast, laser-driven ion accelerators provide bursts of ps duration2, but have yet to be applied to the study of ultrafast ion-induced transients in matter. We report on the evolution of an electron-hole plasma excited in borosilicate glass by such bursts. This is observed as an onset of opacity to synchronised optical probe radiation and is characterised by the 3.0 +/- 0.8 ps ion pump rise-time . The observed decay-time of 35 +/- 3 ps i.e. is in excellent agreement with modelling and reveals the rapidly evolving electron temperature (>10 3 K) and carrier number density (>10 17cm-3). This result demonstrates that ps laser accelerated ion bursts are directly applicable to investigating the ultrafast response of matter to ion interactions and, in particular, to ultrafast pu...

  11. High power picosecond vortex laser based on a large-mode-area fiber amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuichi; Okida, Masahito; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2009-08-03

    We present the production of picosecond vortex pulses from a stressed large-mode-area fiber amplifier for the first time. 8.5 W picosecond output with a peak power of approximately 12.5 kW was obtained at a pump power of 29 W. 2009 Optical Society of America.

  12. Investigation of amorphous and crystalline Ni alloys response to machining with micro-second and pico-second lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana, I., E-mail: iquintana@tekniker.es [CIC marGUNE, Pol. Ibaitarte 5, 20870, Elgoibar, Guipuzcoa (Spain); Dobrev, T. [Manufacturing Engineering Centre, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Aranzabe, A. [Manufacturing Processes Department, Fundacion Tekniker, Av. Otaola 20, 2060, Eibar, Guipuzcoa (Spain); Lalev, G.; Dimov, S. [Manufacturing Engineering Centre, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    The machining response of amorphous and polycrystalline Ni-based alloys (Ni{sub 78}B{sub 14}Si{sub 8}) when subjected to micro-second and pico-second laser processing is investigated in this research. The shape and topography of craters created with single pulses as a function of laser energy together with holes drilled in both materials were studied. Focused ion beam (FIB) imaging was used to analyse the single craters and the through holes in the amorphous and polycrystalline samples. The material microstructure analysis revealed that processing both materials with micro-second and pico-second lasers does not lead to crystallisation and the short-range atomic ordering of metallic glasses can be retained. When processing the amorphous sample the material laser interactions resulted in a significant ejection of molten material from the bulk that was then followed by its partial re-deposition around the craters. Additionally, there were no signs of crack formation that indicate a higher surface integrity after laser machining. A conclusion is made that laser processing both with short- and long-pulses is a promising technique for micromachining metallic glasses because it does not lead to material crystallisation.

  13. Fiber-laser-based green-pumped picosecond MgO:sPPLT optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya Kumar, S; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2013-12-15

    We report a stable, high-power, picosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) at 160 MHz repetition rate synchronously pumped by a frequency-doubled mode-locked Yb-fiber laser at 532 nm and tunable in the near-infrared, across 874-1008 nm (signal) and 1126-1359 nm (idler). Using a 30-mm-long MgO:sPPLT crystal, the OPO provides average output power up to 780 mW in the signal at 918.58 nm and 600 mW in the idler at 1242 nm. The device operates stably over many days, even close to degeneracy, exhibiting passive long-term power stability better than 1.8% rms in the signal and 2.4% rms in the idler over 2.5 h at a temperature of 55°C. We investigate spectral and temporal characteristics of the signal pulses under different conditions and demonstrate cavity-length tuning enabled by the dispersion properties of MgO:sPPLT. The output signal pulses have a duration of 2.4 ps at 967 nm.

  14. High power, picosecond green laser based on a frequency-doubled, all-fiber, narrow-bandwidth, linearly polarized, Yb-doped fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenyan; Isyanova, Yelena; Stegeman, Robert; Huang, Ye; Chieffo, Logan R.; Moulton, Peter F.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development of an all-fiber, 68-kW-peak-power, 16-ps-pulse-width, narrow-bandwidth, linearly polarized, 1064-nm fiber laser suitable for high-power, picosecond-pulse-width, green-light generation. Our 1064-nm fiber laser delivered an average power of up to 110 W at a repetition of 100- MHz in a narrow bandwidth, with minimal nonlinear distortion. We developed a high-power, picosecond green source at 532 nm through use of single-pass frequency-doubling of our 1064-nm fiber laser in lithium triborate (LBO). Using a 15-mm long LBO crystal, we have generated 30 W of average power in the second harmonic with 73-W of fundamental average power, for a conversion efficiency of 41%.

  15. Effects of picosecond laser repetition rate on ablation of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoye; Deng, Leimin; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of pulse repetition rate on ablation efficiency and quality of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel have been studied using a picosecond (ps) pulse Nd:YVO4 laser system at λ= 1064 nm. The experimental results of area ablation on target surface reveal that laser repetition rate plays a significant role in controlling ablation efficiency and quality. Increasing the laser repetition rate, while keeping a constant mean power improves the ablation efficiency and quality. For each laser mean power, there is an optimal repetition rate to achieve a higher laser ablation efficiency with low surface roughness. A high ablation efficiency of 42.29, 44.11 and 47.52 μm3/mJ, with surface roughness of 0.476, 0.463 and 0.706 μm could be achieved at laser repetition rate of 10 MHz, for laser mean power of 15, 17 and 19 W, respectively. Scanning electron microcopy images revels that the surface morphology evolves from rough with numerous craters, to flat without pores when we increased the laser repetition rate. The effects of laser repetition rate on the heat accumulation, plasma shield and ablation threshold were analyzed by numerical simulation, spectral analysis and multi-laser shot, respectively. The synergetic effects of laser repetition rate on laser ablation rate and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systemically in this paper.

  16. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Picosecond Infrared Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization (PIR-LAESI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Talbot, Francis; Tata, Alessandra; Ermini, Leonardo; Franjic, Kresimir; Ventura, Manuela; Zheng, Jinzi; Ginsberg, Howard; Post, Martin; Ifa, Demian R; Jaffray, David; Miller, R J Dwayne; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2015-12-15

    A picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) is capable of cutting through biological tissues in the absence of significant thermal damage. As such, PIRL is a standalone surgical scalpel with the added bonus of minimal postoperative scar tissue formation. In this work, a tandem of PIRL ablation with electrospray ionization (PIR-LAESI) mass spectrometry is demonstrated and characterized for tissue molecular imaging, with a limit of detection in the range of 100 nM for reserpine or better than 5 nM for verapamil in aqueous solution. We characterized PIRL crater size using agar films containing Rhodamine. PIR-LAESI offers a 20-30 μm vertical resolution (∼3 μm removal per pulse) and a lateral resolution of ∼100 μm. We were able to detect 25 fmol of Rhodamine in agar ablation experiments. PIR-LAESI was used to map the distribution of endogenous methoxykaempferol glucoronide in zebra plant (Aphelandra squarrosa) leaves producing a localization map that is corroborated by the literature. PIR-LAESI was further used to image the distribution inside mouse kidneys of gadoteridol, an exogenous magnetic resonance contrast agent intravenously injected. Parallel mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) were performed to corroborate PIR-LAESI images of the exogenous agent. We further show that PIR-LAESI is capable of desorption ionization of proteins as well as phospholipids. This comparative study illustrates that PIR-LAESI is an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry applications. As such, a future PIRL scalpel combined with secondary ionization such as ESI and mass spectrometry has the potential to provide molecular feedback to guide PIRL surgery.

  17. 160 W high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited beam quality all-fiber picosecond pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chang; Ge, Tingwu; An, Na; Cao, Kang; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited beam quality all-fiber picosecond pulse laser, which consists of a passively mode-locked seed laser and three-stage master power amplifiers. A repetition frequency multiplier and a high Yb-doped gain fiber with shorter length are utilized in the laser system to suppress the nonlinear effects and reduce the pulse broadening caused by dispersion. Moreover, the homemade light mode controllers based on a coiling and tapering fiber technique and the active fiber of the amplifier with a relatively small mode area are adopted to improve the beam quality. In addition, by experimentally adjusting the active fiber length, the optical conversion efficiency of the overall laser system can be optimized. Eventually, a 160 W high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited picosecond pulse fiber laser is obtained, with the beam quality factor M2 at 1.12 and an optical conversion efficiency of the system of 75%.

  18. Observation of neutron spectrum from deuterated plastic irradiated by 100 picosecond and sub-picosecond ultra-intense laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, N.; Miyoshi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Habara, H.; Kodama, R.; Sentoku, S.; Fujita, H.; Kitagawa, Y.; Katou, Y.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.

    1998-11-01

    For understanding of the fundamental physics of the fast ignition, it is crucial to investigate the fast ion production in a high density plasma irradiated by an ultra-intense laser. The energy spectrum of the neutrons produced in the deuterated target reflects the energy spectrum of fast deuterons accelerated in the interacting region. Due to high penetration ability of fast neutron, the neutron spectra directly bring out the information of the hot ions from the high density plasma. We have observed 10^6 of the DD neutrons produced in a deuterated polystyrene (C8D8)x target irradiated by the 500-fs intense laser (up to 10^19 W/cm^2). The fast neutron spectra were measured by multi-channel time-of-flight neutron spectrometer (MANDALA) at the GEKKO XII laser facility of Osaka University. The spectrometer has two sets of 421 channel detector arrays which were located at 90 and 54.7 degrees with respect to the irradiation axis. The observed spectral width of DD neutrons were 1.35 MeV in full width of half maximum. This spectrum result from the fusion reaction created by accelerated ions which have energy about 300 keV. We report the details of the experimental results and the quantitative analysis using particle in cell code.

  19. Repetition rate continuously tunable 10-GHz picosecond mode-locked fiber ring laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Wan; Ziyu Wang

    2006-01-01

    A couple of simple-structure phase modulators were used in active mode-locked fiber laser to implement repetition rate continuous tuning. The laser produces pulse as short as 5.7 ps whose repetition rate tuning can cover the spacing of the adjoining order mode-locking frequencies.

  20. Picosecond laser with specialized optic for facial rejuvenation using a compressed treatment interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetarpal, Shilpi; Desai, Shraddha; Kruter, Laura; Prather, Heidi; Petrell, Kathleen; Depina, Joahinha; Arndt, Kenneth; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2016-10-01

    Studies using a 755 nm picosecond laser with a focus lens array have been reported to be effective for facial wrinkles and pigmentation. This study reports the safety and efficacy using a shorter interval of 2-3 weeks between treatments. Nineteen female subjects and one male subject, primarily Fitzpatrick skin types II and III (one skin type I), who had mild to moderate wrinkles and sun-induced pigmentation were enrolled and treated using the 755 nm PicoSure Laser with focus lens array. The skin was cleansed then wiped with an alcohol wipe prior to treatment. Lidocaine 30% ointment and/or forced air cooling could be used to increase subject comfort. Adjacent pulses, with minimal overlap (10% or less), were delivered to the full face. Subjects received four treatments, performed at 2-3-week intervals. The laser energy used was 0.71 J/cm(2) . The physician administered 3-7 passes with an average total of 6,253 pulses per treatment. Follow-up visits occurred at 1 and 3 months post-last treatment at which the physician scored satisfaction and improvement and subjects scored satisfaction and likelihood to recommend to others. The most common side effects were mild swelling, pain, redness, and crusting, most of which subsided within hours of the treatment, with the latest resolving within 48 hours. This is similar to a previous reported study (Weiss et al. ASLMS 2015) where treatments were performed every 6 weeks with side effects resolving within 24 hours. At the 1 and 3 month follow-up visits, 94% (n = 19) and 93% (n = 15) of subjects scored themselves as satisfied or extremely satisfied with their overall results and 81% and 93% were likely to recommend the treatment based on global assessment, respectively. The treating physician was satisfied with 93% of subject's overall results. Three blinded evaluators were able to correctly identify the baseline from post-treatment photographs in 77% of the subjects at the 1 month follow-up and 69% of the subjects

  1. 35 W high power all fiber supercontinuum generation in PCF with picosecond MOPA laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongwei; Chen, Shengping; Wang, Jianhua; Chen, Zilun; Hou, Jing

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate 35 W high power all fiber supercontinuum generation by pumping photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a 57.7 W picosecond fiber MOPA. The picosecond fiber MOPA pumped supercontinuum source exhibits an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of up to 61.7%, covering a spectral range from 600 nm to beyond 1700 nm. The compact and practical configuration of this supercontinuum source has potential to achieve higher power scale together with perfect continuum spectrum.

  2. High Compact, High Quality Single Longitudinal Mode Hundred Picoseconds Laser Based on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Pulse Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxu Bai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A high beam quality hundred picoseconds single-longitudinal-mode (SLM laser is demonstrated based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS pulse compression and aberration compensation. Flash-lamp-pumped Q-switched Nd3+:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG SLM laser with Cr4+:Y3Al5O12 (Cr4+:YAG as a saturable absorber is used as the seed source. By combining master-oscillator-power-amplifier (MOPA, a compact single-cell with FC-770 as working medium is generated as pulse compressor. The 7.8 ns SLM laser is temporally compressed to about 450 ps, and 200 mJ energy is obtained at 1064 nm without optical damage. The energy stability is better than 3% with beam quality factor M2 less than 1.8, which makes this laser system an attractive source for scientific and industrial applications.

  3. The Molecular Mechanisms of the Antibacterial Effect of Picosecond Laser Generated Silver Nanoparticles and Their Toxicity to Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshed, Peri; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are known to have antibacterial properties. They are commonly produced by chemical synthesis which involves the use of harmful reducing agents. Contras, the laser technique is able to generate high-purity Ag NPs in water with specified surface charge characteristics. In the past, the molecular mechanisms contributing to the bactericidal effects of Ag NPs have been investigated extensively, but little is known of the antibacterial and toxic effects and mechanisms involved in laser-generated Ag NPs. In the current study Ag NPs were generated by picosecond laser ablation. Their antibacterial activity was determined on the gram-negative bacteria E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the gram positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus including the methicillin resistant strain MRSA. Results showed that the laser generated Ag NPs exhibited strong dose-dependent antibacterial activity against all the three bacterial strains tested. Using E.coli as a model system, the laser Ag NPs treatment induced significantly high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These ROS did not include detectable hydroxyl radicals, suggesting for the first time the selective ROS induction in bacterial cells by laser generated Ag NPs. The increased ROS was accompanied by significantly reduced cellular glutathione, and increased lipid peroxidation and permeability, suggesting ROS related bacterial cell damage. The laser generated Ag NPs exhibited low toxicity (within 72 hours) to five types of human cells although a weak significant decrease in cell survival was observed for endothelial cells and the lung cells. We conclude that picosecond laser generated Ag NPs have a broad spectrum of antibacterial effects against microbes including MRSA with minimal human cell toxicity. The oxidative stress is likely the key mechanism underlying the bactericidal effect, which leads to lipid peroxidation, depletion of glutathione, DNA damages and eventual disintegration of the

  4. Efficient, high-power, ytterbium-fiber-laser-pumped picosecond optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokabee, O; Esteban-Martin, A; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2010-10-01

    We report a high-power picosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) synchronously pumped by a Yb fiber laser at 1.064 μm, providing 11.7 W of total average power in the near to mid-IR at 73% extraction efficiency. The OPO, based on a 50 mm MgO:PPLN crystal, is pumped by 20.8 ps pulses at 81.1 MHz and can simultaneously deliver 7.1 W of signal at 1.56 μm and 4.6 W of idler at 3.33 μm for 16 W of pump power. The oscillator has a threshold of 740 mW, with maximum signal power of 7.4 W at 1.47 μm and idler power of 4.9 W at 3.08 μm at slope efficiencies of 51% and 31%, respectively. Wavelength coverage across 1.43-1.63 μm (signal) and 4.16-3.06 μm (idler) is obtained, with a total power of ~11 W and an extraction efficiency of ~68%, with pump depletion of ~78% maintained over most of the tuning range. The signal and idler output have a single-mode spatial profile and a peak-to-peak power stability of ±1.8% and ±2.9% over 1 h at the highest power, respectively. A signal pulse duration of 17.3 ps with a clean single-peak spectrum results in a time-bandwidth product of ~1.72, more than four times below the input pump pulses.

  5. Thin disk amplifier-based 40 mJ, 1 kHz, picosecond laser at 515 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Jakub; Green, Jonathan T; Metzger, Thomas; Mazanec, Tomáš; Himmel, Bedřich; Horáček, Martin; Hubka, Zbyněk; Boge, Robert; Antipenkov, Roman; Batysta, František; Naylon, Jack A; Bakule, Pavel; Rus, Bedřich

    2016-03-21

    We report on a frequency-doubled picosecond Yb:YAG thin disk regenerative amplifier, developed as a pump laser for a kilohertz repetition rate OPCPA. At a repetition rate of 1 kHz, the compressed output of the regenerative amplifier has a pulse duration of 1.2 ps and pulse energy of 90 mJ with energy stability of σ 2 < 1.2. The pulses are frequency doubled in an LBO crystal yielding 42 mJ at 515 nm.

  6. Record bandwidth and sub-picosecond pulses from a monolithically integrated mode-locked quantum well ring laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, Valentina; Latkowski, Sylwester; Tahvili, Saeed; de Vries, Tjibbe; Smit, Meint; Bente, Erwin

    2014-11-17

    In this paper, we present the detailed characterization of a semiconductor ring passively mode-locked laser with a 20 GHz repetition rate that was realized as an indium phosphide based photonic integrated circuit (PIC). Various dynamical regimes as a function of operating conditions were explored in the spectral and time domain. A record bandwidth of the optical coherent comb from a quantum well based device of 11.5 nm at 3 dB and sub-picosecond pulse generation is demonstrated.

  7. Progress in kW-class picosecond thin-disk lasers development at the HiLASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrž, Martin; Mužík, Jiří; Novák, Ondřej; Chyla, Michal; Turčičová, Hana; Nagisetty, Siva S.; Huynh, Jaroslav; Miura, Taisuke; Linnemann, Jens; Severová, Patricie; Sikocinski, Pawel; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    High average power picosecond Yb:YAG thin-disk lasers are being developed at Hilase. A compact 1 mJ/100 kHz and 4 mJ/100 kHz zero-phonon-line-pumped regenerative amplifiers PERLA C with a CVBG compressor provide high conversion efficiency. High energy, QCW-pumped beamline PERLA B is operated at 45mJ/1kHz in fundamental spatial mode and pulse length < 2ps. Its second stage amplifier is being assembled and 1.8 J was extracted. The latest development status of all thin-disk beamlines at the Hilase center is reported.

  8. Two-photon bioimaging utilizing supercontinuum light generated by a high-peak-power picosecond semiconductor laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Tsubokawa, Hiroshi; Guo, Hengchang; Shikata, Jun-ichi; Sato, Ki-ichi; Takashima, Keijiro; Kashiwagi, Kaori; Saito, Naoaki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Ito, Hiromasa

    2007-01-01

    We developed a novel scheme for two-photon fluorescence bioimaging. We generated supercontinuum (SC) light at wavelengths of 600 to 1200 nm with 774-nm light pulses from a compact turn-key semiconductor laser picosecond light pulse source that we developed. The supercontinuum light was sliced at around 1030- and 920-nm wavelengths and was amplified to kW-peak-power level using laboratory-made low-nonlinear-effects optical fiber amplifiers. We successfully demonstrated two-photon fluorescence bioimaging of mouse brain neurons containing green fluorescent protein (GFP).

  9. Avoiding the requirement for pre-existing optical contact during picosecond laser glass-to-glass welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianyong; Carter, Richard M; Thomson, Robert R; Hand, Duncan P

    2015-07-13

    Previous reports of ultrafast laser welding of glass-to-glass have indicated that a pre-existing optical contact (or very close to) between the parts to be joined is essential. In this paper, the capability of picosecond laser welding to bridge micron-scale gaps is investigated, and successful welding, without cracking, of two glasses with a pre-existing gap of 3 µm is demonstrated. It is shown that the maximum gap that can be welded is not significantly affected by welding speeds, but is strongly dependent on the laser power and focal position relative to the interface between the materials. Five distinct types of material modification were observed over a range of different powers and surface separations, and a mechanism is proposed to explain the observations.

  10. Fiber-laser-based, high-repetition-rate, picosecond ultraviolet source tunable across 329-348  nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kavita; Chaitanya Kumar, S; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2016-10-15

    We report a compact, fiber-laser-based, high-repetition-rate picosecond source for the ultraviolet (UV), providing multi-tens of milliwatt of average power across 329-348 nm. The source is based on internal sum-frequency-generation (SFG) in a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), synchronously pumped at 532 nm by the second harmonic of a picosecond Yb-fiber laser at 80 MHz repetition rate. Using a 30-mm-long single-grating MgO:sPPLT crystal for the OPO and a 5-mm-long BiB3O6 crystal for intracavity SFG, we generate up to 115 mW of average UV power at 339.9 nm, with >50  mW over 73% of the tuning range, for 1.6 W of input pump power. The UV output exhibits a passive rms power stability of ∼2.9% rms over 1 min and 6.5% rms over 2 h in high beam quality. Angular acceptance bandwidth and cavity detuning effects have also been studied.

  11. Application of picosecond lasers in cosmetic dermatology%皮秒激光在皮肤美容中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛媛; 周晨曦; 高琳

    2016-01-01

    Picosecond lasers, one of the latest laser technologies in dermatology, are mainly applied in treatments of pigmentary disorders, acne scar, photoaging, and so on. Due to evident therapeutic effects, few adverse reactions and short downtime, picosecond lasers have been widely applied to clinical practices abroad. At present, picosecond lasers mainly include 532⁃nm, 755⁃nm and 1064⁃nm lasers. However, picosecond lasers have been used in China for just a few years. This review summarizes principles of picosecond lasers for the treatment of skin diseases, and their application in nevus of Ota, acne scar, tattoo and photoaging.%皮秒激光是应用于皮肤科的最新激光技术之一,主要用于皮肤科色素性疾病、痤疮瘢痕、光老化等方面治疗。因其治疗效果显著、不良反应小、停工期短,已在国外临床治疗中得到广泛应用。皮秒激光目前主要包括532 nm、755 nm、1064 nm的激光。我国对于皮秒激光的应用尚处于初始阶段。本文总结皮秒激光治疗皮肤科疾病的原理,并简述其在太田痣、痤疮瘢痕、文身、光老化等方面的应用。

  12. Determination of irradiation parameters for laser-induced periodic surface structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The spatial emergence of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on single-crystalline silicon, upon irradiation with linearly polarized picosecond laser pulses (wavelength λ = 1030 nm, pulse duration τ = 6.7 ps, pulse repetition frequency fp = 1 kHz) was studied theoretically and experime

  13. A 46-W Laser Diode Stack End-Pumped Slab Amplifier with a Pulse Duration of Picoseconds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ying; FAN Zhong-Wei; NIU Gang; YU Jin; ZHANG Heng-Li

    2012-01-01

    A 46-W laser diode end-pumped amplifier is demonstrated by using a SESAM passively mode-locked oscillator and a compact LD stack end-pumped slab amplifier.For the oscillator,a 5-W picosecond mode-locked laser with a repetition frequency of 79MHz is obtained with beam quality factors of M2 < 1.3.A beam shaping system made up of cylindrical lens is designed according to different sizes of the active medium in both directions,and a plane-plane cavity is used in the amplifier for high efficiency.At the absorbed pumping power of 174 W,the highest output power of 46 W is obtained with the slope efficiency of 29.5%.The beam quality factors M2 in both directions are measured to be 1.43 and 1.76,respectively.

  14. Visualizing hippocampal neurons with in vivo two-photon microscopy using a 1030 nm picosecond pulse laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ryosuke; Sawada, Kazuaki; Sato, Aya; Hibi, Terumasa; Kozawa, Yuichi; Sato, Shunichi; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2013-01-01

    In vivo two-photon microscopy has revealed vital information on neural activity for brain function, even in light of its limitation in imaging events at depths greater than several hundred micrometers from the brain surface. We developed a novel semiconductor-laser-based light source with a wavelength of 1030 nm that can generate pulses of 5-picosecond duration with 2-W output power, and a 20-MHz repetition rate. We also developed a system to secure the head of the mouse under an upright microscope stage that has a horizontal adjustment mechanism. We examined the penetration depth while imaging the H-Line mouse brain and demonstrated that our newly developed laser successfully images not only cortex pyramidal neurons spreading to all cortex layers at a superior signal-to-background ratio, but also images hippocampal CA1 neurons in a young adult mouse.

  15. Compact tunable high power picosecond source based on Yb-doped fiber amplification of gain switch laser diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongjun; Gao, Cunxiao; Tao, Jintao; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yishan

    2008-05-26

    A compact tunable high power picosecond source based on Yb-doped fiber amplification of gain switch laser diode is demonstrated. A multi-stage single mode Yb-doped fiber preamplifier was combined with a single mode double-clad Yb-doped fiber main amplifier to construct the amplification system, which is seeded by a gain switch laser diode. By optimizing preamplifier???s parameters to compensate the seed spectrum gain, a "flat top" broadband spectrum is obtained to realize wavelength tunable output with a self-made tunable filter. The tunable pulses were further amplified to 3.5 W average power 90 ps pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate, and the center wavelength was tunable in the ranges from 1053 nm to 1073 nm with excellent beam quality.

  16. On the use of a chirped Bragg grating as a cavity mirror of a picosecond Nd : YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubko, A E; Shashkov, E V; Smirnov, A V; Vorob' ev, N S [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Smirnov, V I [OptiGrate Corp., 562 South Econ Circle, Oviedo, Florida 32765-4311 (United States)

    2016-02-28

    The first experimental evidence is presented that the use of a chirped volume Bragg grating (CVBG) as a cavity mirror of a Q-switched picosecond Nd : YAG laser with self-mode-locking leads to significant changes in the temporal parameters of the laser output. Measurements have been performed at two positions of the CVBG: with the grating placed so that shorter wavelengths reflected from its front part lead longer wavelengths or with the grating rotated through 180°, so that longer wavelengths are reflected first. In the former case, the duration of individual pulses in a train increased from ∼35 to ∼300 ps, whereas the pulse train shape and duration remained the same as in the case of a conventional laser with a mirror cavity. In the latter case, the full width at half maximum of pulse trains increased from ∼70 ns (Nd : YAG laser with a mirror cavity) to ∼1 ms, and the duration of individual pulses increased from 35 ps to ∼1.2 ns, respectively, which is more typical of free-running laser operation. (laser crystals and braggg ratings)

  17. Laser surface texturing of cast iron steel: dramatic edge burr reduction and high speed process optimisation for industrial production using DPSS picosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneel, David; Kearsley, Andrew; Karnakis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present picosecond DPSS laser surface texturing optimisation of automotive grade cast iron steel. This application attracts great interest, particularly in the automotive industry, to reduce friction between moving piston parts in car engines, in order to decrease fuel consumption. This is accomplished by partially covering with swallow microgrooves the inner surface of a piston liner and is currently a production process adopting much longer pulse (microsecond) DPSS lasers. Lubricated interface conditions of moving parts require from the laser process to produce a very strictly controlled surface topography around the laser formed grooves, whose edge burr height must be lower than 100 nm. To achieve such a strict tolerance, laser machining of cast iron steel was investigated using an infrared DPSS picosecond laser (10ps duration) with an output power of 16W and a repetition rate of 200 kHz. The ultrashort laser is believed to provide a much better thermal management of the etching process. All studies presented here were performed on flat samples in ambient air but the process is transferrable to cylindrical geometry engine liners. We will show that reducing significantly the edge burr below an acceptable limit for lubricated engine production is possible using such lasers and remarkably the process window lies at very high irradiated fluences much higher that the single pulse ablation threshold. This detailed experimental work highlights the close relationship between the optimised laser irradiation conditions as well as the process strategy with the final size of the undesirable edge burrs. The optimised process conditions are compatible with an industrial production process and show the potential for removing extra post)processing steps (honing, etc) of cylinder liners on the manufacturing line saving time and cost.

  18. Studies on linear, nonlinear optical and excited state dynamics of silicon nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hamad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report results from our studies on the fabrication and characterization of silicon (Si nanoparticles (NPs and nanostructures (NSs achieved through the ablation of Si target in four different liquids using ∼2 picosecond (ps pulses. The consequence of using different liquid media on the ablation of Si target was investigated by studying the surface morphology along with material composition of Si based NPs. The recorded mean sizes of these NPs were ∼9.5 nm, ∼37 nm, ∼45 nm and ∼42 nm obtained in acetone, water, dichloromethane (DCM and chloroform, respectively. The generated NPs were characterized by selected area electron diffraction (SAED, high resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM, Raman spectroscopic techniques and Photoluminescence (PL studies. SAED, HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy data confirmed that the material composition was Si NPs in acetone, Si/SiO2 NPs in water, Si-C NPs in DCM and Si-C NPs in chloroform and all of them were confirmed to be polycrystalline in nature. Surface morphological information of the fabricated Si substrates was obtained using the field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM technique. FESEM data revealed the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS for the case of ablation in acetone and water while random NSs were observed for the case of ablation in DCM and chloroform. Femtosecond (fs nonlinear optical properties and excited state dynamics of these colloidal Si NPs were investigated using the Z-scan and pump-probe techniques with ∼150 fs (100 MHz and ∼70 fs (1 kHz laser pulses, respectively. The fs pump-probe data obtained at 600 nm consisted of single and double exponential decays which were tentatively assigned to electron-electron collisional relaxation (1 ps. Large third order optical nonlinearities (∼10−14 e.s.u. for these colloids have been estimated from Z-scan data at an excitation wavelength of 680 nm suggesting that the colloidal Si NPs find

  19. Studies on linear, nonlinear optical and excited state dynamics of silicon nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Syed; Nageswara Rao, S. V. S.; Pathak, A. P. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046, Telangana (India); Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Mounika, R.; Venugopal Rao, S., E-mail: soma-venu@yahoo.com, E-mail: soma-venu@uohyd.ac.in [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046, Telangana (India)

    2015-12-15

    We report results from our studies on the fabrication and characterization of silicon (Si) nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures (NSs) achieved through the ablation of Si target in four different liquids using ∼2 picosecond (ps) pulses. The consequence of using different liquid media on the ablation of Si target was investigated by studying the surface morphology along with material composition of Si based NPs. The recorded mean sizes of these NPs were ∼9.5 nm, ∼37 nm, ∼45 nm and ∼42 nm obtained in acetone, water, dichloromethane (DCM) and chloroform, respectively. The generated NPs were characterized by selected area electron diffraction (SAED), high resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopic techniques and Photoluminescence (PL) studies. SAED, HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy data confirmed that the material composition was Si NPs in acetone, Si/SiO{sub 2} NPs in water, Si-C NPs in DCM and Si-C NPs in chloroform and all of them were confirmed to be polycrystalline in nature. Surface morphological information of the fabricated Si substrates was obtained using the field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM) technique. FESEM data revealed the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) for the case of ablation in acetone and water while random NSs were observed for the case of ablation in DCM and chloroform. Femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical properties and excited state dynamics of these colloidal Si NPs were investigated using the Z-scan and pump-probe techniques with ∼150 fs (100 MHz) and ∼70 fs (1 kHz) laser pulses, respectively. The fs pump-probe data obtained at 600 nm consisted of single and double exponential decays which were tentatively assigned to electron-electron collisional relaxation (<1 ps) and non-radiative transitions (>1 ps). Large third order optical nonlinearities (∼10{sup −14} e.s.u.) for these colloids have been estimated from Z-scan data at an excitation wavelength of 680 nm

  20. Studies on linear, nonlinear optical and excited state dynamics of silicon nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Syed; Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Mounika, R.; Nageswara Rao, S. V. S.; Pathak, A. P.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2015-12-01

    We report results from our studies on the fabrication and characterization of silicon (Si) nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures (NSs) achieved through the ablation of Si target in four different liquids using ˜2 picosecond (ps) pulses. The consequence of using different liquid media on the ablation of Si target was investigated by studying the surface morphology along with material composition of Si based NPs. The recorded mean sizes of these NPs were ˜9.5 nm, ˜37 nm, ˜45 nm and ˜42 nm obtained in acetone, water, dichloromethane (DCM) and chloroform, respectively. The generated NPs were characterized by selected area electron diffraction (SAED), high resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopic techniques and Photoluminescence (PL) studies. SAED, HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy data confirmed that the material composition was Si NPs in acetone, Si/SiO2 NPs in water, Si-C NPs in DCM and Si-C NPs in chloroform and all of them were confirmed to be polycrystalline in nature. Surface morphological information of the fabricated Si substrates was obtained using the field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM) technique. FESEM data revealed the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) for the case of ablation in acetone and water while random NSs were observed for the case of ablation in DCM and chloroform. Femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical properties and excited state dynamics of these colloidal Si NPs were investigated using the Z-scan and pump-probe techniques with ˜150 fs (100 MHz) and ˜70 fs (1 kHz) laser pulses, respectively. The fs pump-probe data obtained at 600 nm consisted of single and double exponential decays which were tentatively assigned to electron-electron collisional relaxation (1 ps). Large third order optical nonlinearities (˜10-14 e.s.u.) for these colloids have been estimated from Z-scan data at an excitation wavelength of 680 nm suggesting that the colloidal Si NPs find potential applications

  1. Influence of an Angular Hatching Exposure Strategy on the Surface Roughness During Picosecond Laser Ablation of Hard Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Christian; Manderla, Jannik; Hallmann, Sina; Emmelmann, Claus

    Innovative chip breakers for cutting tools made of very hard materials require laser ablation and demand a high quality regarding the manufactured surface. When processing materials such as polycrystalline cubic boron-nitride or tungsten carbide the surface roughness by laser ablation reaches Sa = 1,0-2,9 μm compared to Sa = 0,42 μm achieved by grinding. Therefore in the presented research the influence of the hatching exposure strategy on surface roughness during picosecond laser ablation of tungsten carbide is examined. The areal, layerwise ablation process is separated into its elements which are represented by intersection zones between single and multiple laser vectors. Thus two mechanisms of roughness formation are identified and described by model functions. Further the mechanisms are transferred to areal ablation in which surface roughness decreases due to improved hatching angles compared to a commonly used one of φ= 0°/90°. With this approach the roughness is reduced by approximately factor 2,0-3,5 to Sa = 0,82 μm. In conclusion guidelines are derived which present favorable settings for high quality laser ablation processes.

  2. Comparison of nanosecond and picosecond excitation for interference-free two-photon laser-induced fluorescence detection of atomic hydrogen in flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Patterson, Brian D; Frank, Jonathan H; Settersten, Thomas B

    2008-09-10

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TP-LIF) line imaging of atomic hydrogen was investigated in a series of premixed CH4/O2/N2, H2/O2, and H2/O2/N2 flames using excitation with either picosecond or nanosecond pulsed lasers operating at 205 nm. Radial TP-LIF profiles were measured for a range of pulse fluences to determine the maximum interference-free signal levels and the corresponding picosecond and nanosecond laser fluences in each of 12 flames. For an interference-free measurement, the shape of the TP-LIF profile is independent of laser fluence. For larger fluences, distortions in the profile are attributed to photodissociation of H2O, CH3, and/or other combustion intermediates, and stimulated emission. In comparison with the nanosecond laser, excitation with the picosecond laser can effectively reduce the photolytic interference and produces approximately an order of magnitude larger interference-free signal in CH4/O2/N2 flames with equivalence ratios in the range of 0.5laser fluence in all flames, stimulated emission, occurring between the laser-excited level, H(n=3), and H(n=2), is the limiting factor for picosecond excitation in the flames with the highest H atom concentration. Nanosecond excitation is advantageous in the richest (Phi=1.64) CH4/O2/N2 flame and in H2/O2/N2 flames. The optimal excitation pulse width for interference-free H atom detection depends on the relative concentrations of hydrogen atoms and photolytic precursors, the flame temperature, and the laser path length within the flame.

  3. Kinetics study of the solvated electron decay in THF using laser-synchronised picosecond electron pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Picosecond pulse radiolysis of neat tetrahydrofuran (THF) shows a fast decay of the solvated electron within 2.5ns. The decay of the solvated electron observed at 790nm is because of spur reaction. A numerical simulation using time dependent Smoluchowski equation containing a sink term with a distance dependent reaction rate is used to fit the pulse-probe data and shows that the geminate reaction can proceed at long distance in this low polar solvent.

  4. High-power, Yb-fiber-laser-pumped, picosecond parametric source tunable across 752-860 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Chaitanya; Kimmelma, O; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2012-05-01

    We report a stable, high-power source of picosecond pulses in the near-infrared based on intracavity second harmonic generation (SHG) of a MgO:PPLN optical parametric oscillator synchronously pumped at 81 MHz by a mode-locked Yb-fiber laser. By exploiting the large spectral acceptance bandwidth for Type I (oo→e) SHG in β-BaB2O4 and a 5 mm crystal, we have generated picosecond pulses over 752-860 nm spectral range under minimal angle tuning, with as much as 3.5 W of output power at 778 nm and >2  W over 73% of the tuning range, in good beam quality with TEM00 spatial profile and M21  W over 1505-1721 nm (25 THz) and idler power >1.8  W over 2787-3630 nm (25 THz), corresponding to a total (signal plus idler) tuning range of 1059 nm. The SHG, signal, and idler output exhibit passive long-term power stability better than 1.6%, 1.3%, and 1.6% rms, respectively, over 14 h.

  5. Yb-fiber-laser-based, 1.8 W average power, picosecond ultraviolet source at 266 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya Kumar, S; Canals Casals, J; Sanchez Bautista, E; Devi, K; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2015-05-15

    We report a compact, stable, high-power, picosecond ultraviolet (UV) source at 266 nm based on simple single-pass two-step fourth-harmonic generation (FHG) of a mode-locked Yb-fiber laser at 79.5 MHz in LiB3O5 (LBO) and β-BaB2O4. Using a 30-mm-long LBO crystal for single-pass second-harmonic generation, we achieve up to 9.1 W of average green power at 532 nm for 16.8 W of Yb-fiber power at a conversion efficiency of 54% in 16.2 ps pulses with a TEM00 spatial profile and passive power stability better than 0.5% rms over 16 h. The generated green radiation is then used for single-pass FHG into the UV, providing as much as 1.8 W of average power at 266 nm under the optimum focusing condition in the presence of spatial walk-off, at an overall FHG conversion efficiency of ∼11%. The generated UV output exhibits passive power stability better than 4.6% rms over 1.5 h and beam pointing stability better than 84 μrad over 1 h. The UV output beam has a circularity of >80% in high beam quality with the TEM00 mode profile. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of picosecond UV generation at 266 nm at megahertz repetition rates.

  6. Debris-free rear-side picosecond laser ablation of thin germanium wafers in water with ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongshi; Gökce, Bilal [Technical Chemistry I and Center for Nanointegration, Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 7, 45141 Essen (Germany); Sommer, Steffen [Dausinger & Giesen GmbH, Rotebühlstrasse 87, 70178 Stuttgart (Germany); Streubel, René [Technical Chemistry I and Center for Nanointegration, Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 7, 45141 Essen (Germany); Barcikowski, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.barcikowski@uni-due.de [Technical Chemistry I and Center for Nanointegration, Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 7, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Picosecond laser cutting of fragile 150 μm thin germanium wafers (typically used for solar cell applications) in liquid results in debris-free surfaces. • Liquid-assisted laser cutting is much better than air-assisted laser cutting in terms of recast, debris and cleanness of the resultant grooves. • Laser cutting in ethanol–water mixtures result in better cut quality than those performed in pure water but lead to less cutting efficiency. • Low repetition rate (10 kHz), mixed solution (1 wt% ethanol in water) and moderate scanning speed (100 μm/s) are preferable for ultrafine high-quality debris-free cutting. - Abstract: In this paper, we perform liquid-assisted picosecond laser cutting of 150 μm thin germanium wafers from the rear side. By investigating the cutting efficiency (the ability to allow an one-line cut-through) and quality (characterized by groove morphologies on both sides), the pros and cons of this technique under different conditions are clarified. Specifically, with laser fluence fixed, repetition rate and scanning speed are varied to show quality and efficiency control by means of laser parameter modulation. It is found that low repetition rate ablation in liquid gives rise to a better cut quality on the front side than high repetition rate ablation since it avoids dispersed nanoparticles redeposition resulting from a bubble collapse, unlike the case of 100 kHz which leads to large nanorings near the grooves resulting from a strong interaction of bubbles and the case of 50 kHz which leads to random cutting due to the interaction of the former pulse induced cavitation bubble and the subsequent laser pulse. Furthermore, ethanol is mixed with pure distilled water to assess the liquid's impact on the cutting efficiency and cutting quality. The results show that increasing the ethanol fraction decreases the ablation efficiency but simultaneously, greatly improves the cutting quality. The improvement

  7. Application of picosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to quantitative analysis of boron in meatballs and other biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedwig, Rinda; Lahna, Kurnia; Lie, Zener Sukra; Pardede, Marincan; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Tjia, May On; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2016-11-10

    This report presents the results of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) study on biological and food samples of high water content using a picosecond (ps) laser at low output energy of 10 mJ and low-pressure helium ambient gas at 2 kPa. Evidence of excellent emission spectra of various analyte elements with very low background is demonstrated for a variety of samples without the need of sample pretreatment. Specifically, limits of detection in the range of sub-ppm are obtained for hazardous Pb and B impurities in carrots and meatballs. This study also shows the inferior performance of LIBS using a nanosecond laser and atmospheric ambient air for a soft sample of high water content and thereby explains its less successful applications in previous attempts. The present result has instead demonstrated the feasibility and favorable results of employing LIBS with a ps laser and low-pressure helium ambient gas as a less costly and more practical alternative to inductively coupled plasma for regular high sensitive inspection of harmful food preservatives and environmental pollutants.

  8. Effect of focusing condition on molten area characteristics in micro-welding of borosilicate glass by picosecond pulsed laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordin, I.H.W.; Okamoto, Y.; Okada, A.; Takekuni, T. [Okayama University, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama (Japan); Sakagawa, T. [Kataoka Corporation, Yokohama (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    The characteristics of the molten area are attributed not only by laser energy condition but also the focusing condition. In this study, a picosecond pulsed laser of 1064 nm in wavelength and 12.5 ps in pulse duration was used as a laser source for joining glass material. Influence of focusing condition on micro-welding of glasses was experimentally investigated by using an objective lens with and without spherical aberration correction, and its molten area was characterized. The usage of objective lens with spherical aberration correction led to a larger molten area inside the bulk material of glass even under the same pulse energy, which related to the efficient micro-welding of glass materials. In addition, an optical system with the spherical aberration correction led to a stable absorption of laser energy inside the bulk glass material, stabilizing the shape of molten area, which resulted in the reliable weld joint. On the other hand, breaking strength of the specimens with spherical aberration correction was higher than that without spherical aberration correction. Therefore, it is concluded that the focusing condition with spherical aberration correction led to the larger and stable molten area, which resulted in higher joining strength in micro-welding of glass materials. (orig.)

  9. Tunable Picosecond Laser Pulses via the Contrast of Two Reverse Saturable Absorption Phases in a Waveguide Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yang; Chen, Lianwei; Wang, Dong; Chen, Yanxue; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Hong, Minghui; Chen, Feng

    2016-05-01

    How to enhance the optical nonlinearity of saturable absorption materials is an important question to improve the functionality of various applications ranging from the high power laser to photonic computational devices. We demonstrate the saturable absorption (SA) of VO2 film attributed to the large difference of optical nonlinearities between the two states of the phase-transition materials (VO2). Such VO2 film demonstrated significantly improved performance with saturation intensity higher than other existing ultrathin saturable absorbers by 3 orders due to its unique nonlinear optical mechanisms in the ultrafast phase change process. Owing to this feature, a Q-switched pulsed laser was fabricated in a waveguide platform, which is the first time to achieve picosecond pulse duration and maintain high peak power. Furthermore, the emission of this VO2 waveguide laser can be flexibly switched between the continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed operation regimes by tuning the temperature of the VO2 film, which enables VO2-based miniature laser devices with unique and versatile functions.

  10. Micro-joule pico-second range Yb3+-doped fibre laser for medical applications in acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.; Rivera-Manrique, S. I.; Jacques, S. L.

    2011-08-01

    The work described here is based on the optical design, simulation and on-going implementation of a pulsed (Q-switch) Yb3+-doped, 1-um diffraction-limited fibre laser with pico-second, 10 micro-Joule-range energy pulses for producing the right energy pulses which could be of benefit for patients who suffer chronic headache, photophobia, and even nausea which could is sometimes triggered by a series of factors. The specific therapeutic effect known as acupunctural analgesia is the main objective of this medium-term project. It is a simple design on which commercially available software was employed for laser cavity design. Monte Carlo technique for skin light-transport, thermal diffusion and the possible thermal de-naturalization optical study and prediction will also be included in the presentation. Full optical characterization will be included and a complete set of recent results on the laser-skin interaction and the so called moxi-bustion from the laser design will be extensively described.

  11. Comparison of plasma parameters and line emissions of laser-induced plasmas of an aluminum target using single and orthogonal double nanosecond/picosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobral, H., E-mail: martin.sobral@ccadet.unam.mx; Sanginés, R.

    2014-04-01

    The emission of laser-induced plasma on aluminum targets in air was investigated with nanosecond- and picosecond-pulsed Nd:YAG laser emitting at the fundamental wavelength. Orthogonal double pulse in pre-ablation and reheating configurations was also performed where the picosecond laser was employed to ablate the target. Ablation fluences were kept fixed at 100 J cm{sup −2} regardless of the laser pulse duration. Time integrated emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the plasma emission; thus, picosecond laser ablation provided larger figures than the nanosecond one. The emission was further enhanced when double pulse schemes were used. This enhancement was analyzed as a function of interpulse delays. Electron density and temperature evolutions were determined from time delays of 150 ns after the ablation plasma onset. Results are discussed in terms of the ablation rate. - Highlights: • A comparison of LIBS signal keeping constant the ablation fluence is performed. • Emission of ps laser ablation is up to four-fold enlarged compared with ns pulses. • Drilling ablation efficiency is 6 times larger with ps compared with ns pulses. • LIBS sensitivity with ps pulse ablation is equivalent to that of ns double pulse configuration.

  12. Study on the Cross Plane Thermal Transport of Polycrystalline Molybdenum Nanofilms by Applying Picosecond Laser Transient Thermoreflectance Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Miao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin metal films are widely used as interconnecting wires and coatings in electronic devices and optical components. Reliable thermophysical properties of the films are required from the viewpoint of thermal management. The cross plane thermal transport of four polycrystalline molybdenum nanofilms with different thickness deposited on glass substrates has been studied by applying the picosecond laser transient thermoreflectance technique. The measurement is performed by applying both front pump-front probe and rear pump-front probe configurations with high quality signal. The determined cross plane thermal diffusivity of the Mo films greatly decreases compared to the corresponding bulk value and tends to increase as films become thicker, exhibiting significant size effect. The main mechanism responsible for the thermal diffusivity decrease of the present polycrystalline Mo nanofilms is the grain boundary scattering on the free electrons. Comparing the cross plane thermal diffusivity and inplane electrical conductivity indicates the anisotropy of the transport properties of the Mo films.

  13. Yb:YAG single-crystal fiber amplifiers for picosecond lasers using the divided pulse amplification technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, Fabien; Gomes, Jean Thomas; Délen, Xavier; Martial, Igor; Didierjean, Julien; Pallmann, Wolfgang; Resan, Bojan; Druon, Frederic; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    A two-stage master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) system based on Yb:YAG single-crystal-fiber (SCF) technology and designed for high peak power is studied to significantly increase the pulse energy of a low-power picosecond laser. The first SCF amplifier has been designed for high gain. Using a gain medium optimized in terms of doping concentration and length, an optical gain of 32 dB has been demonstrated. The second amplifier stage designed for high energy using the divided pulse technique allows us to generate a recombined output pulse energy of 2 mJ at 12.5 kHz with a pulse duration of 6 ps corresponding to a peak power of 320 MW. Average powers ranging from 25 to 55 W with repetition rates varying from 12.5 to 500 kHz have been demonstrated.

  14. Method to control depth error when ablating human dentin with numerically controlled picosecond laser: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuchun; Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Wang, Dangxiao; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yong

    2015-07-01

    A three-axis numerically controlled picosecond laser was used to ablate dentin to investigate the quantitative relationships among the number of additive pulse layers in two-dimensional scans starting from the focal plane, step size along the normal of the focal plane (focal plane normal), and ablation depth error. A method to control the ablation depth error, suitable to control stepping along the focal plane normal, was preliminarily established. Twenty-four freshly removed mandibular first molars were cut transversely along the long axis of the crown and prepared as 48 tooth sample slices with approximately flat surfaces. Forty-two slices were used in the first section. The picosecond laser was 1,064 nm in wavelength, 3 W in power, and 10 kHz in repetition frequency. For a varying number (n = 5-70) of focal plane additive pulse layers (14 groups, three repetitions each), two-dimensional scanning and ablation were performed on the dentin regions of the tooth sample slices, which were fixed on the focal plane. The ablation depth, d, was measured, and the quantitative function between n and d was established. Six slices were used in the second section. The function was used to calculate and set the timing of stepwise increments, and the single-step size along the focal plane normal was d micrometer after ablation of n layers (n = 5-50; 10 groups, six repetitions each). Each sample underwent three-dimensional scanning and ablation to produce 2 × 2-mm square cavities. The difference, e, between the measured cavity depth and theoretical value was calculated, along with the difference, e 1, between the measured average ablation depth of a single-step along the focal plane normal and theoretical value. Values of n and d corresponding to the minimum values of e and e 1, respectively, were obtained. In two-dimensional ablation, d was largest (720.61 μm) when n = 65 and smallest when n = 5 (45.00 μm). Linear regression yielded the quantitative

  15. Utilization of the UV laser with picosecond pulses for the formation of surface microstructures on elastomeric plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoszewski, B.; Tofil, S.; Scendo, M.; Tarelnik, W.

    2017-08-01

    Elastomeric plastics belong to a wide range of polymeric materials with special properties. They are used as construction material for seals and other components in many branches of industry and, in particular, in the biomedical industry, mechatronics, electronics and chemical equipment. The micromachining of surfaces of these materials can be used to build micro-flow, insulating, dispensing systems and chemical and biological reactors. The paper presents results of research on the effects of micro-machining of selected elastomeric plastics using a UV laser emitting picosecond pulses. The authors see the prospective application of the developed technology in the sealing technique in particular to shaping the sealing pieces co-operating with the surface of the element. The result of the study is meant to show parameters of the UV laser’s performance when producing typical components such as grooves, recesses for optimum ablation in terms of quality and productivity.

  16. Debris-free rear-side picosecond laser ablation of thin germanium wafers in water with ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongshi; Gökce, Bilal; Sommer, Steffen; Streubel, René; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we perform liquid-assisted picosecond laser cutting of 150 μm thin germanium wafers from the rear side. By investigating the cutting efficiency (the ability to allow an one-line cut-through) and quality (characterized by groove morphologies on both sides), the pros and cons of this technique under different conditions are clarified. Specifically, with laser fluence fixed, repetition rate and scanning speed are varied to show quality and efficiency control by means of laser parameter modulation. It is found that low repetition rate ablation in liquid gives rise to a better cut quality on the front side than high repetition rate ablation since it avoids dispersed nanoparticles redeposition resulting from a bubble collapse, unlike the case of 100 kHz which leads to large nanorings near the grooves resulting from a strong interaction of bubbles and the case of 50 kHz which leads to random cutting due to the interaction of the former pulse induced cavitation bubble and the subsequent laser pulse. Furthermore, ethanol is mixed with pure distilled water to assess the liquid's impact on the cutting efficiency and cutting quality. The results show that increasing the ethanol fraction decreases the ablation efficiency but simultaneously, greatly improves the cutting quality. The improvement of cut quality as ethanol ratio increases may be attributed to less laser beam interference by a lower density of bubbles which adhere near the cut kerf during ablation. A higher density of bubbles generated from ethanol vaporization during laser ablation in liquid will cause stronger bubble shielding effect toward the laser beam propagation and therefore result in less laser energy available for the cut, which is the main reason for the decrease of cut efficiency in water-ethanol mixtures. Our findings give an insight into under which condition the rear-side laser cutting of thin solar cells should be performed: high repetition, pure distilled water and high laser power

  17. Picosecond melting of peptide nanotubes using an infrared laser: a nonequilibrium simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Truong, Phan Minh; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2015-11-07

    Self-assembled functional peptide biomaterials are emerging with a wide range of envisioned applications in the field of nanotechnology. Currently, methods and tools have been developed to control and manipulate as well as to explore new properties of self-assembled structures. However, considerably fewer studies are being devoted to developing efficient methods to degrade or recycle such extremely stable biomaterials. With this in mind, here we suggest a theoretical framework, inspired by the recent developed mid-infrared free-electron laser pulse technology, to dissociate peptide nanotubes. Adopting a diphenylalanine channel as a prototypical example, we find that the primary step in the dissociation process occurs due to the strong resonance between the carboxylate bond vibrations of the diphenylalanine peptides and the tuned laser frequencies. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between tube formation and dissociation. Our work shows a proof of concept and should provide a motivation for future experimental developments with the final aim to open a new and efficient way to cleave or to recycle bio-inspired materials.

  18. Laser-generated micro- and nanoeffects: inactivation of proteins coupled to gold nanoparticles with nano- and picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radt, Benno; Serbin, Jesper; Lange, Bjoern I.; Birngruber, Reginald; Huettmann, Gereon

    2001-10-01

    Background: Protein denaturation in the fs-ns time regime is of fundamental interest for high precision applications in laser tissue interaction. Conjugates of colloidal gold coupled to proteins are presented as a model system for investigating ultrafast protein denaturation. It is expected that irradiation of such conjugates in tissue using pico- up to nanosecond laser pulses could result in effects with a spatial confinement in the regime of single macromolecules up to organelles. Materials and Methods: Experiments were done with bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (aP) coupled to 15 nm colloidal Gold. This complex was irradiated at 527 nm/ 532 nm with a variable number of pico- and nanosecond pulses. The radiant exposure per pulse was varied from 2 to 50 mJ/cm2 in the case of the picosecond pulses and 10 to 500 mJ/cm2 in the case of the nanosecond pulses. Denaturation was detected as a loss of protein function with the help of the uorescence substrate 4MUP. Results and Discussion: Irradiation did result in a steady decrease of the aP activity with increasing radiant exposures and increasing number of pulses. Inactivations up to 80% using 35 ps pulses at 527 nm with 50 mJ/cm2 and a complete inactivation induced by 16 ns pulses at 450 mJ/cm2 are discussed. The induced temperature in the particles and the surrounding water was calculated using Mie's formulas for the absorption of the nanometer gold particles and an analytical solution of the equations for heat diffusion. The calculated temperatures suggest that picosecond pulses heat a molecular scaled area whereas nanosecond pulses could be used for targeting larger cellular compartiments. It is difficult to identify one of the possible damage mechanisms, i.e. thermal denaturation or formation of micro bubbles, from the dependance of the inactivation on pulse energy and number of applied pulses. Therefore experiments are needed to further elucidate the damage mechanisms. The observed inactivation dependencies

  19. Complete control of a matter qubit using a single picosecond laser pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Kodriano, Y; Poem, E; Benny, Y; Presman, R; Truong, T A; Petroff, P M; Gershoni, D

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that a matter physical two level system, a qubit, can be fully controlled using one ultrafast step. We show that the spin state of an optically excited electron, an exciton, confined in a quantum dot, can be rotated by any desired angle, about any desired axis, during such a step. For this we use a single, resonantly tuned, picosecond long, polarized optical pulse. The polarization of the pulse defines the rotation axis, while the pulse detuning from a non-degenerate absorption resonance, defines the magnitude of the rotation angle. We thereby achieve a high fidelity, universal gate operation, applicable to other spin systems, using only one short optical pulse. The operation duration equals the pulse temporal width, orders of magnitude shorter than the qubit evolution life and coherence times.

  20. Cryogenic nanosecond and picosecond high average and peak power(HAPP) pump lasers for ultrafast applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David C.Brown; Sten Tornegrd; Joseph Kolis

    2016-01-01

    Using cryogenic laser technology, it is now possible to design and demonstrate lasers that have concomitant high average and peak powers, with near-diffraction-limited beam quality. We refer to these new laser systems as HAPP lasers. In this paper, we review important laser crystal materials properties at cryogenic temperature, with an emphasis on Yb lasers, and discuss the important design considerations, including the laser-induced damage threshold, nonlinear effects and thermal effects. A comprehensive model is presented to describe diode pulsed pumping with arbitrary duration and repetition rate, and is used with the Frantz–Nodvik equation to describe, to first order, the performance of HAPP laser systems. A computer code with representative results is also described.

  1. Picosecond Photon Echoes Detected by Optical Mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1978-01-01

    Picosecond photon echoes are shown to be easily detected by optical mixing. The synchronized picosecond excitation and probe pulses are generated by amplifying pulses from two dye lasers, synchronously pumped by a mode-locked argon-ion laser. The technique is used to study optical dephasing in the o

  2. Photosensitivity of the Er/Yb-Codoped Schott IOG1 Phosphate Glass Using 248 nm, Femtosecond, and Picosecond Laser Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pissadakis, Stavros; Michelakaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    The effect of 248 nm laser radiation, with pulse duration of 5 picoseconds, 500 femtoseconds, and 120 femtoseconds, on the optical properties and the Knoop hardness of a commercial Er/Yb-codoped phosphate glass is presented here. Refractive index changes of the order of few parts of 10-4 are correlated with optical absorption centers induced in the glass volume, using Kramers-Kroning relationship. Accordingly, substantially lower refractive index changes are measured in volume Bragg gratings ...

  3. Controlling dental enamel-cavity ablation depth with optimized stepping parameters along the focal plane normal using a three axis, numerically controlled picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Wang, Dangxiao; Wang, Lei; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a depth-control method in enamel-cavity ablation by optimizing the timing of the focal-plane-normal stepping and the single-step size of a three axis, numerically controlled picosecond laser. Although it has been proposed that picosecond lasers may be used to ablate dental hard tissue, the viability of such a depth-control method in enamel-cavity ablation remains uncertain. Forty-two enamel slices with approximately level surfaces were prepared and subjected to two-dimensional ablation by a picosecond laser. The additive-pulse layer, n, was set to 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70. A three-dimensional microscope was then used to measure the ablation depth, d, to obtain a quantitative function relating n and d. Six enamel slices were then subjected to three dimensional ablation to produce 10 cavities, respectively, with additive-pulse layer and single-step size set to corresponding values. The difference between the theoretical and measured values was calculated for both the cavity depth and the ablation depth of a single step. These were used to determine minimum-difference values for both the additive-pulse layer (n) and single-step size (d). When the additive-pulse layer and the single-step size were set 5 and 45, respectively, the depth error had a minimum of 2.25 μm, and 450 μm deep enamel cavities were produced. When performing three-dimensional ablating of enamel with a picosecond laser, adjusting the timing of the focal-plane-normal stepping and the single-step size allows for the control of ablation-depth error to the order of micrometers.

  4. Observation of multiple-harmonic radiation induced from a gold surface by picosecond neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, G.; Toth, C. (Research Institute for Solid-State Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)); Moustaizis, S.D.; Papadogiannis, N.A.; Fotakis, C. (Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10, Crete (Greece))

    1992-10-01

    Illuminating a gold surface by strong (5 GW/cm{sup 2}) picosecond neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser pulses at grazing incidence, we observed a generation of coherent beams of both even and odd harmonics up to fifth order in the reflected direction with efficiencies 10{sup {minus}10--}10{sup {minus}13}. The observed decrease of the harmonic efficiencies with increasing harmonic order is much weaker than predicted by perturbative theories.

  5. Texturing of titanium (Ti6Al4V) medical implant surfaces with MHz-repetition-rate femtosecond and picosecond Yb-doped fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Mutlu; Öktem, Bülent; Kalaycıoğlu, Hamit; Yavaş, Seydi; Mukhopadhyay, Pranab K; Eken, Koray; Ozgören, Kıvanç; Aykaç, Yaşar; Tazebay, Uygar H; Ilday, F Ömer

    2011-05-23

    We propose and demonstrate the use of short pulsed fiber lasers in surface texturing using MHz-repetition-rate, microjoule- and sub-microjoule-energy pulses. Texturing of titanium-based (Ti6Al4V) dental implant surfaces is achieved using femtosecond, picosecond and (for comparison) nanosecond pulses with the aim of controlling attachment of human cells onto the surface. Femtosecond and picosecond pulses yield similar results in the creation of micron-scale textures with greatly reduced or no thermal heat effects, whereas nanosecond pulses result in strong thermal effects. Various surface textures are created with excellent uniformity and repeatability on a desired portion of the surface. The effects of the surface texturing on the attachment and proliferation of cells are characterized under cell culture conditions. Our data indicate that picosecond-pulsed laser modification can be utilized effectively in low-cost laser surface engineering of medical implants, where different areas on the surface can be made cell-attachment friendly or hostile through the use of different patterns.

  6. Large aperture discharge-pumped KrF laser for picosecond amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan Xiao; LiuJingRu; Goldhar, J

    2002-01-01

    A large aperture discharge-pumped KrF laser module with simple spark gaps was developed. The laser beam cross section of 4 cm x 3 cm and the maximum laser output energy of 1.3J in 20ns were obtained at the charging voltage of 30 kV and gas mixtures of [F sub 2] : [Kr] : [Ne] = 0.1 : 2 : 97.9. The gain and absorption coefficients at different gas mixtures were measured with a frequency doubled dye laser pumped by a XeCl laser. Using this laser module as a ps amplifier, the output energy of 140 mJ in 10 ps was obtained

  7. Treatment of pigmentary disorders in patients with skin of color with a novel 755 nm picosecond, Q-switched ruby, and Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond lasers: A retrospective photographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Melissa Kanchanapoomi; Ng, Elise; Bae, Yoon-Soo Cindy; Brauer, Jeremy A; Geronemus, Roy G

    2016-02-01

    Laser procedures in skin of color (SOC) patients are challenging due to the increased risk of dyspigmentation and scarring. A novel 755 nm alexandrite picosecond laser has demonstrated effectiveness for tattoo removal and treatment of acne scars. No studies to date have evaluated its applications in pigmentary disorders. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the safety profile and efficacy of the picosecond alexandrite laser compared to the current standard treatment, Q-switched ruby and neodynium (Nd):YAG nanosecond lasers, for pigmentary disorders in SOC patients. A retrospective photographic and chart evaluation of seventy 755 nm alexandrite picosecond, ninety-two Q-switched frequency doubled 532 nm and 1,064 nm Nd:YAG nanosecond, and forty-seven Q-switched 694 nm ruby nanosecond laser treatments, in forty-two subjects of Fitzpatrick skin types III-VI was conducted in a single laser specialty center. The picosecond laser was a research prototype device. Treatment efficacy was assessed by two blinded physician evaluators, using a visual analog scale for percentage of pigmentary clearance in standard photographs. Subject assessment of efficacy, satisfaction, and adverse events was performed using a questionnaire survey. The most common pigmentary disorder treated was Nevus of Ota (38.1%), followed by solar lentigines (23.8%). Other pigmentary disorders included post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, congenital nevus, café au lait macule, dermal melanocytosis, Nevus of Ito, and Becker's nevus. Clinical efficacy of the Q-switched nanosecond lasers and picosecond laser treatments were comparable for lesions treated on the face with a mean visual analog score of 2.57 and 2.44, respectively, corresponding to approximately 50% pigmentary clearance. Subject questionnaires were completed in 58.8% of the picosecond subjects and 52.0% of the Q-switched subjects. Eighty four percent of subjects receiving Q-switched nanosecond laser treatments and 50% of the

  8. Synchronous pumping of picosecond dye laser using high efficiency second harmonic generation from optical fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Bernardin, J. P.; Macdonald, R. L.; Demouchy, G.

    1991-01-01

    The stable operation of a mode-locked dye laser synchronously pumped by the second harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser produced in an Nd codoped germanosilicate optical fiber is reported. The optical fiber preparation technique, which results in a second harmonic conversion efficiency of 2 percent, is described. This optical fiber SHG conversion efficiency is the highest reported to date using a continuous-wave mode-locked laser.

  9. Amplification of picosecond pulse by electron-beam pumped KrF laser amplifiers. Denshi beam reiki KrF laser zofukuki ni yoru piko byo pulse no zofuku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, I.; Tomie, T.; Owadano, Y.; Yano, M. (Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1991-08-20

    Experiments on the amplification of a picosecond pulse by electron-beam pumped KrF laser amplifiers were carried out for the purpose of its application to the field such as excitation light source for soft X-ray laser which requires large energy besides peak power. The picosecond pulse was amplified by a discharge pumped KrF amplifier and two electron-beam pumped KrF amplifiers(at the middle stage and the final stage). The energy of 4J, which was the largest energy for short pulse excimer laser so far, was obtained by these devices. About 90% of the window area of the final amplifier with 29cm diameter was filled by the input beam, and energy density of the picosecond beam reached 3.9 times saturation energy density. Measured energy of amplified spontaneous emission(ASE) showed good agreement with the theoretically estimated value. Most of ASE was derived from the discharge pumped laser as the first amplifier. As for the focused power density, the power density ratio of the picosecond pulse to ASE was estimated to be as large as 10{sup 5}. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Roland, Christopher, E-mail: cmroland@ncsu.edu; Sagui, Celeste, E-mail: sagui@ncsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, SBI Building, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  11. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  12. Wavelength effect on hole shapes and morphology evolution during ablation by picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wanqin; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Ben Q.; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-10-01

    An experimental study is presented of the effect of wavelength on the shape and morphology evolution of micro holes ablated on stainless steel surface by a 10 ps Q-switched Nd:VAN pulsed laser. Two routes of hole development are associated with the visible (532 nm) and near-infrared (1064 nm) laser beams, respectively. The evolution of various geometric shapes and morphological characteristics of the micro holes ablated with the two different wavelengths is comparatively studied for other given processing conditions such as a laser power levels and the number of pulses applied. Plausible explanations, based on the light-materials interaction associated with laser micromachining, are also provided for the discernable paths of geometric and morphological development of holes under laser ablation.

  13. 58W LD side-pump Nd:YAG picosecond laser system at 1KHz with double length of regenerative cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ming Liang; Li, G.; Chen, Meng

    2016-11-01

    An average power of 58 W, pulse width of 40 ps at 1 KHz repetition rate of Nd:YAG picosecond laser is reported. It used an etalon to directly get pulse width of 135 ps from Nd:YVO4 mode locked laser in 1064 nm, which repetition rate was 88 MHz. When the seed pulses were injected into the double length of regenerative LD side-pump Nd:YAG cavity at 1 KHz repetition rate, the single pulse energy was amplified to 3 mJ, the pulse width was compressed to 99 ps, beam quality of M^2 factor was 1.3. The single pulse energy was amplified up to 58 mJ, the pulse width was self compressed to 40 ps, beam quality of M^2 factor was approximately 3.5 after single passing three stages of double high gain LD side-pump Nd:YAG module. Beam pointing was about 40 urad. The stability for pulse to pulse RMS was less than 3%. A thin-film polarizer and a quarter-wave plate was inserted into the regenerative amplification cavity to let pulses double travel the same geometric path basis on pulse polarization. Serrated aperture were used in the amplification. That's beneficial to decrease the nonlinear effect for the high power in the crystal. High gain LD side-pump Nd:YAG module could lead the pulse energy amplify more and self compress the pulse width. Double length of regenerative cavity was used to enhance the optical cavity length, it greatly decreased the laser's volume and improved stability of picosecond laser. It's a nice way for high power picosecond laser and the laser system would be more simple and smaller.

  14. Fiber-laser-based, green-pumped, picosecond optical parametric oscillator using fan-out grating PPKTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya Kumar, S; Parsa, S; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2016-01-01

    We report a stable, Yb-fiber-laser-based, green-pumped, picosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) for the near-infrared based on periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP) nonlinear crystal, using fan-out grating design and operating near room temperature. The OPO is continuously tunable across 726-955 nm in the signal and 1201-1998 nm in the idler, resulting in a total signal plus idler wavelength coverage of 1026 nm by grating tuning at a fixed temperature. The device generates up to 580 mW of average power in the signal at 765 nm and 300 mW in the idler at 1338 nm, with an overall extraction efficiency of up to 52% and a pump depletion >76%. The extracted signal at 765 nm and idler at 1746 nm exhibit excellent passive power stability better than 0.5% and 0.8% rms, respectively, over 1 h with good beam quality in TEM00 mode profile. The output signal pulses have a Gaussian temporal duration of 13.2 ps, with a FWHM spectral bandwidth of 3.4 nm at 79.5 MHz repetition rate. Power scaling limitations of the OPO due to the material properties of PPKTP are studied.

  15. Optimally efficient, high power, Yb:fiber laser pumped, near- to mid-infrared picosecond optical parametric oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Kokabee, Omid

    2014-01-01

    Absolute output power optimization and performance of a near- to mid-infrared picosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is studied at two high pump powers using a widely-tunable output coupling (OC) technique which provides 15% to 68% OC. The MgO:PPLN-based OPO is synchronously pumped at 81.1 MHz by an Yb:fiber laser with double-peak spectrum. At 2 W pump power, maximum signal (at 1.46 $\\mu$m) and idler (at 3.92 $\\mu$m) power of 670 mW and 270 mW are obtained at 27% OC at 47% total extraction efficiency and 58% pump power depletion where at 15.5 W pump power, 7.4 W signal and 2.7 W idler power are extracted at 53% OC at 65% total extraction efficiency and 80% pump depletion. With respect to non-optimum points, OPO provides signal pulses with narrower single-peak spectrum, smaller time-bandwidth product, much better circular single-mode TEM00 spatial profile and passive peak-to-peak power stability of $\\pm$4.6% at 2 W and $\\pm$1% at 15.5 W pump power in optimum power extraction points.

  16. High-power, fiber-laser-pumped, picosecond optical parametric oscillator based on MgO:sPPLT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Chaitanya; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2011-12-19

    We report a stable, high-power, mid-infrared synchronously-pumped optical parametric oscillator (SPOPO) based on MgO:sPPLT, pumped by a 1064 nm, picosecond Yb-fiber laser operating at a repetition rate of 81.1 MHz. The singly resonant SPOPO is tunable over 1531-1642 nm (111 nm) in the near-infrared signal and 3022-3488 nm (466 nm) in the mid-infrared idler, providing a total tuning range of 577 nm. Careful optimization of output coupling results in a signal output power as high as 4.3 W at 1593 nm and a mid-infrared idler power of 2 W at 3204 nm for 13.4 W of pump power at a total extraction efficiency of 47%. The SPOPO can be operated near room temperature, down to 30 °C, and exhibits passive peak-to-peak power stability better than 8.6% at 1568 nm (signal) and 8.2% at 3310 nm (idler) over 13 hours at full power. The output signal pulses have duration of 17.5 ps, with a FWHM spectral bandwidth of 1.4 nm centered at 1568 nm.

  17. Picosecond dynamics of reactions in the liquid phase: studies of iodine photodissociation and development of new laser techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M.A.

    1985-09-01

    Iodine photodissociation and recombination was studied as a model for processes common to chemical reaction in the liquid phase. Picosecond transient absorption measurements from 1000 to 295 nm were used to monitor the dynamics in a variety of solvents. Most of the atoms which undergo geminate recombination were found to do so in less than or equal to 15 ps, in agreement with the results of existing molecular dynamics simulations. Vibrational relaxation times vary from approx.15 ps near the middle of the ground state well to approx.150 ps for complete relaxation to v = 0. The prediction of strong resonant vibrational energy transfer to chlorinated methane solvents was not supported, but some evidence for this mechanism was found for alkane solvents. Current theory is unable to explain the large variation (65 to 2700 ps) of the excited A'-state lifetime in various solvents. The 10-Hz amplified, synchronously-pumped dye laser which was used in these studies is described and characterized. SERS (Stimulated Electronic Raman Scattering) and difference frequency mixing were used in the generation of the infrared and far-infrared, respectively. 54 refs., 38 figs., 3 tabs. (WRF)

  18. Dendrimer-Capped Nanoparticles Prepared by Picosecond Laser Ablation in Liquid Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Marsili

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifth generation ethylendiamine-core poly(amidoamine (PAMAM G5 is presented as an efficient capping agent for the preparation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles by ps laser ablation in water. In particular, we describe results obtained with the fundamental, second and third harmonic of a ps Nd:YAG laser and the influence of laser wavelength and pulse energy on gold particle production and subsequent photofragmentation. In this framework, the role of the dendrimer and, in particular, its interactions with gold clusters and cations are accounted.

  19. High-power, mid-infrared, picosecond pulses generated by compression of a CO2 laser beat-wave in GaAs

    CERN Document Server

    Pigeon, J J; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the generation of a train of ~ 2 ps, 10 um laser pulses via multiple four-wave mixing and compression of an infrared laser beat-wave propagating in the negative group velocity dispersion region of bulk GaAs and a combination of GaAs and NaCl. The use of a 200 ps, 106 GHz beat-wave, produced by combining laser pulses amplified on the 10P(20) and 10P(16) transition of a CO2 laser, provides a novel method for generating high-power, picosecond, mid-IR laser pulses at a high repetition rate. By using 165 and 882 GHz beat-waves we show that cascaded phase-mismatched difference frequency generation plays a significant role in the four-wave mixing process in GaAs.

  20. A 7.81 W 355 nm ultraviolet picosecond laser using La2CaB10O19 as a nonlinear optical crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Li, Kai; Xu, Degang; Yu, Haijuan; Zhang, Guochun; Wang, Yuye; Wang, Lirong; Shan, Faxian; Yan, Chao; Yang, Yingying; Wang, Baohua; Wang, Nan; Lin, Xuechun; Wu, Yicheng; Yao, Jianquan

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate high-power 355 nm ultraviolet (UV) picosecond (ps) laser using a type I phase-matching nonlinear optical crystal of La(2)CaB(10)O(19) (LCB), which possesses the characteristic of non-hygroscopicity. The high-power third harmonic generation was successfully achieved from two types of 1064 nm ps fundamental lasers. The maximum output power of 7.81 W of 355 nm UV laser was obtained with a pump of 35.2 W 1064 nm ps laser (80 MHz repetition rate, 10 ps pulse width) with optical conversion efficiency of 22.2%. The experimental results show that the LCB crystal is a promising candidate for generating high-power UV laser.

  1. High-power, mid-infrared, picosecond pulses generated by compression of a CO₂ laser beat-wave in GaAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, J J; Tochitsky, S Ya; Joshi, C

    2015-12-15

    We report on the generation of a train of ∼2  ps, 10 μm laser pulses via multiple four-wave mixing and compression of an infrared laser beat-wave propagating in the negative group velocity dispersion region of bulk GaAs and a combination of GaAs and NaCl crystals. The use of a 200 ps, 106 GHz beat-wave, produced by combining laser pulses amplified on the 10P(20) and 10P(16) transition of a CO₂ laser, provides a novel method for generating high-power, picosecond, mid-IR laser pulses at a high repetition rate. By using 165 and 882 GHz beat-waves, we show that cascaded phase-mismatched difference frequency generation plays a significant role in the four-wave mixing process in GaAs.

  2. High-power, mid-infrared, picosecond pulses generated by compression of a CO_2 laser beat-wave in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, J. J.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Joshi, C.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the generation of a train of ~ 2 ps, 10 um laser pulses via multiple four-wave mixing and compression of an infrared laser beat-wave propagating in the negative group velocity dispersion region of bulk GaAs and a combination of GaAs and NaCl. The use of a 200 ps, 106 GHz beat-wave, produced by combining laser pulses amplified on the 10P(20) and 10P(16) transition of a CO2 laser, provides a novel method for generating high-power, picosecond, mid-IR laser pulses at a high repetition rate. By using 165 and 882 GHz beat-waves we show that cascaded phase-mismatched difference frequency generation plays a significant role in the four-wave mixing process in GaAs.

  3. Laser induced structural vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, L. L.; Tobin, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is described for exciting structural vibration by using a focussed laser beam to vaporize material from a target attached to the structure. The rapid ejection of material results in an impulsive reaction to the target which is transmitted to the structure. The method has been studied with a Nd: glass laser, operated in the long pulse mode, in combination with a bismuth target attached in turn to a ballistic pendulum and cantilever beam. The specific mechanical energy was found to be proportional to the laser pulse energy raised to a power in the range 2.5-2.9. The highest efficiency of energy transfer achieved for the first vibrational mode of the cantilever was about 2 millipercent for the maximum laser pulse energy used, 1.5 J, the signal to noise ratio then being about 40 dB.

  4. Dendrimer-capped nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser ablation in liquid environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giorgetti, Emilia; Giusti, Anna; Giammanco, Francesco; Marsili, Paolo; Laza, Simona

    2009-01-01

    Fifth generation ethylendiamine-core poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM G5) is presented as an efficient capping agent for the preparation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles by ps laser ablation in water...

  5. Measurement of pulse lengthening with pulse energy increase in picosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutolo, A.; Zeni, L.; Berardi, V.; Bruzzese, R.; Solimeno, S.; Spinelli, N.

    1989-03-15

    Taking advantage of a new technique, we have monitored the relative variations of time duration and mode size as a function of the pulse energy for 30-ps-long Nd:YAG laser pulses. In particular, by carrying out a statistical analysis, we have observed that the pulse time duration is an increasing function of the pulse energy, according to the theoretical modeling of passively mode-locked lasers. The measurements can be easily extended to the femtosecond regime.

  6. Picosecond pulses from wavelength-swept continuous-wave Fourier domain mode-locked lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Todor, Sebastian; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Klein, Thomas; Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafast lasers have a crucial function in many fields of science; however, up to now, high-energy pulses directly from compact, efficient and low-power semiconductor lasers are not available. Therefore, we introduce a new approach based on temporal compression of the continuous-wave, wavelength-swept output of Fourier domain mode-locked lasers, where a narrowband optical filter is tuned synchronously to the round-trip time of light in a kilometre-long laser cavity. So far, these rapidly swept lasers enabled orders-of-magnitude speed increase in optical coherence tomography. Here we report on the generation of ~60-70 ps pulses at 390 kHz repetition rate. As energy is stored optically in the long-fibre delay line and not as population inversion in the laser-gain medium, high-energy pulses can now be generated directly from a low-power, compact semiconductor-based oscillator. Our theory predicts subpicosecond pulses with this new technique in the future.

  7. Programmable picosecond pulse packets for micromachining with multiwatt UV fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekel, Theodore; Foster, David H.; Crist, Jordan

    2009-02-01

    Nanosecond class lasers have been the mainstay of optical machining for decades, delivering pulses with high fluences (>1 J/cm2) that cause many material sets to undergo thermally-induced phase changes to cause removal of matter. While in many cases their delivery of sheer laser power has proved useful, nanosecond lasers have fallen short of addressing current micromachining requirements with respect to decreased feature sizes and more complex substrates. One main issue is the laser pulse width endures throughout the ablation process, depositing energy is deposited into plasma formation and local material heating. Plasma shielding takes place when the laser pulse energy contributes to plasma formation to a greater extent than direct material ablation processes. The result is a crude "plasma cutter" of the substrate, leaving a telltale trail of localized dross and droplet deposition. Nanosecond lasers of sufficient process speeds are typically Q-switched with repetition rates less than 200 kHz. As a result, the scribed lines are made of a sequence of "blast events" that result in a variety of undesired consequences and a limited process speed.

  8. Generation of sub-picosecond electron bunches from RF photoinjectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafini, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Zhang, R. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Pellegrini, C. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-03-11

    In this paper we discuss the possibility to generate sub-picosecond electron bunches directly from a photoinjector by illuminating a photo-cathode in an RF cavity with a phase-locked sub-picosecond laser pulse. In particular, we address all de-bunching effects taking place during acceleration and transport through a photoinjector. We provide analysis of the beam dynamics, as well as the comparison with numerical simulations. The possible performances of the present SATURNUS linac setup are presented, as well as the anticipated capabilities of a multi-cell RF gun structure based on the PWT linac presently in operation at UCLA. (orig.).

  9. 100 kW peak power picosecond thulium-doped fiber amplifier system seeded by a gain-switched diode laser at 2 μm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, A M; Li, Z; Sahu, J; Shardlow, P C; Becker, M; Rothhardt, M; Ibsen, M; Phelan, R; Kelly, B; Alam, S U; Richardson, D J

    2013-05-15

    We report on the generation of picosecond pulses at 2 μm directly from a gain-switched discrete-mode diode laser and their amplification in a multistage thulium-doped fiber amplifier chain. The system is capable of operating at repetition rates in the range of 2 MHz-1.5 GHz without change of configuration, delivering high-quality 33 ps pulses with up to 3.5 μJ energy and 100 kW peak power, as well as up to 18 W of average power. These results represent a major technological advance and a 1 order of magnitude increase in peak power and pulse energy compared to existing picosecond sources at 2 μm.

  10. Comparison of optical transients during the picosecond laser pulse-induced crystallization of GeSbTe and AgInSbTe phase-change thin films: Nucleation-driven versus growth-driven processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guangfei; Li, Simian; Huang, Huan; Wang, Yang; Lai, Tianshu; Wu, Yiqun

    2013-09-01

    Direct comparison of the real-time in-situ crystallization behavior of as-deposited amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 (GeSbTe) and Ag8In14Sb55Te23 (AgInSbTe) phase-change thin films driven by picosecond laser pulses was performed by a time-resolved optical pump-probe technique with nanosecond resolution. Different optical transients showed various crystallization processes because of the dissimilar nucleation- and growth-dominated mechanisms of the two materials. The effects of laser pulse fluence, thermal conductive structure, and successive pulse irradiation on their crystallization dynamics were also discussed. A schematic was then established to describe the different crystallization processes beginning from the as-deposited amorphous state. The results may provide further insight into the phase-change mechanism under extra-non-equilibrium conditions and aid the development of ultrafast phase-change memory materials.

  11. Picosecond pulse generation in a hybrid Q-switched laser source by using a microelectromechanical mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couderc, Vincent; Crunteanu, Aurelian; Fabert, Marc; Doutre, Florent; El Bassri, Farid; Pagnoux, Dominique; Jalocha, Alain

    2012-02-27

    We present a novel Q-switched laser source using a micro-optical-electromechanical mirror (MOEM) designed for short pulse emission. It is based on a hybrid configuration including a passively Q-switched microchip laser coupled to a fiber cavity closed by a cantilever type MOEM acting as an active modulator. This specially designed mirror with a single reflecting gold membrane is switched by low bias voltage ~50 V (peak to peak). This device emits pulses at tunable repetition rates up to 1.6 kHz, with ~564 ps duration and 3.4 kW peak power, which constitutes the shortest pulse duration ever reported with MOEMs based pulsed lasers.

  12. Effective shortening of picosecond pulses emitted by a YAG:Nd/sup 3 +/ laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianov, E.M.; Karasik, A.Y.; Mamyshev, P.V.; Onishchukov, G.I.; Prokhorov, A.M.; Stel' makh, M.F.; Fomichev, A.A.

    1984-06-01

    A 15-fold reduction in the duration of YAG:Nd/sup 3 +/ laser pulses was achieved under conditions of active mode locking and Q switching at a pulse repetition frequency approx.1 kHz. Phase self-modulation in a single-mode quartz fiber waveguide of length 10 m resulted in broadening of the laser emission spectrum right up to approx.10 cm/sup -1/ at the waveguide exit. The pulses were then shortened in a system with a diffraction grating. The pulse duration was measured by a correlation system in which the second harmonic was generated.

  13. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  14. Characterization of metal sprays created by a picosecond Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, R.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Hoppenbrouwers, M.B.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    A new method to analyze and quantify results obtained with the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) process is presented. This experiment based characterization method was designed to investigate the spraying behavior of the LIFT process, that occurs in certain fluence regimes. This method was

  15. Characterization of Metal Sprays Created by a Picosecond Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, Ralph; Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Hoppenbrouwers, M.; Huis in 't Veld, Bert

    2012-01-01

    A new method to analyze and quantify results obtained with the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) process is presented. This experiment based characterization method was designed to investigate the spraying behavior of the LIFT process, that occurs in certain fluence regimes. This method was

  16. Spectral and picosecond temporal properties of flared guide Y-coupled phase-locked laser arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defreez, R. K.; Bossert, D. J.; Yu, N.; Hartnett, K.; Elliott, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Spatiospectral and spatiotemporal characteristics of flared waveguide Y-coupled laser arrays are studied for the cases of both CW and pulsed operation. Regular sustained self-pulsations were observed for both operation modes. It is suggested that the pulsations are due to the destabilization of phase locking which is caused by amplitude phase coupling.

  17. Picosecond pulse generation from a synchronously pumped mode-locked semiconductor laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, J. C.; Johnston, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    A semiconductor laser diode was mode locked in an external cavity when synchronously pumped with 90-ps current pulses. Transform-limited optical pulses with a 10-ps pulse width and a peak power of 160 mW were produced. Operating characteristics of such a system are described.

  18. Characterization of metal sprays created by a picosecond Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, R.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Hoppenbrouwers, M.B.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    A new method to analyze and quantify results obtained with the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) process is presented. This experiment based characterization method was designed to investigate the spraying behavior of the LIFT process, that occurs in certain fluence regimes. This method was impl

  19. Characterization of metal sprays created by a picosecond Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, R.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Hoppenbrouwers, M.B.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    A new method to analyze and quantify results obtained with the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) process is presented. This experiment based characterization method was designed to investigate the spraying behavior of the LIFT process, that occurs in certain fluence regimes. This method was impl

  20. Characterization of Metal Sprays Created by a Picosecond Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, Ralph; Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Hoppenbrouwers, M.; Huis in 't Veld, Bert

    2012-01-01

    A new method to analyze and quantify results obtained with the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) process is presented. This experiment based characterization method was designed to investigate the spraying behavior of the LIFT process, that occurs in certain fluence regimes. This method was impl

  1. Ejection Regimes in Picosecond Laser-Induced Forward Transfer of Metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, Ralph; Visser, Claas Willem; Römer, Gert-Willem; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao; Huis in 't Veld, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a 3D direct-write method suitable for precision printing of various materials, including pure metals. To understand the ejection mechanism and thereby improve deposition, here we present visualizations of ejection events at high-spatial (submicrometer) and hi

  2. Picosecond pulsed laser processing of polycrystalline diamond and cubic boron nitride composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhanek, Maximilian G.; Pfaff, Josquin; Meier, Linus; Walter, Christian; Wegener, Konrad

    2016-03-01

    Capabilities and advantages of laser ablation processes utilizing ultrashort pulses have been demonstrated in various applications of scientific and industrial nature. Of particular interest are applications that require high geometrical accuracy, excellent surface integrity and thus tolerate only a negligible heat-affected zone in the processed area. In this context, this work presents a detailed study of the ablation characteristics of common ultrahard composite materials utilized in the cutting tool industry, namely polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride composite (PCBN). Due to the high hardness of these materials, conventional mechanical processing is time consuming and costly. Herein, laser ablation is an appealing solution, since no process forces and no wear have to be taken into consideration. However, an industrially viable process requires a detailed understanding of the ablation characteristics of each material. Therefore, the influence of various process parameters on material removal and processing quality at 10 ps pulse duration are investigated for several PCD and PCBN grades. The main focus of this study examines the effect of different laser energy input distributions, such as pulse frequency and burst pulses, on the processing conditions in deep cutting kerfs and the resulting processing speed. Based on these results, recommendations for efficient processing of such materials are derived.

  3. Measurements of the energy spectrum of electrons emanating from solid materials irradiated by a picosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Stefano, C. A., E-mail: carlosds@umich.edu; Kuranz, C. C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Rasmus, A. M.; Wan, W. C.; Joglekar, A. S.; McKelvey, A.; Zhao, Z.; Klein, S. R. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Seely, J. F. [Artep, Inc., Ellicott City, Mary land 21042 (United States); Williams, G. J.; Park, J.; Chen, H.; Kemp, G. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); MacDonald, M. J. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse, Inc., Springfield, Virginia 22150 (United States); Jarrott, L. C.; Peebles, J. [University of California, San Diego, Energy Research Center, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    In this work, we present the results of experiments observing the properties of the electron stream generated laterally when a laser irradiates a metal. We find that the directionality of the electrons is dependent upon their energies, with the higher-energy tail of the spectrum (∼1 MeV and higher) being more narrowly focused. This behavior is likely due to the coupling of the electrons to the electric field of the laser. The experiments are performed by using the Titan laser to irradiate a metal wire, creating the electron stream of interest. These electrons propagate to nearby spectator wires of differing metals, causing them to fluoresce at their characteristic K-shell energies. This fluorescence is recorded by a crystal spectrometer. By varying the distances between the wires, we are able to probe the divergence of the electron stream, while by varying the medium through which the electrons propagate (and hence the energy-dependence of electron attenuation), we are able to probe the energy spectrum of the stream.

  4. Multiwavelength picosecond pulse generation with diode-pumped Nd:GAGG and Nd:LGGG lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, A.; Pirzio, F.; Reali, G.; Arcangeli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Jia, Z.; Tao, X.; Zhang, J.

    2010-05-01

    Laser operation near 1.06 μm by diode-pumped Nd:(LuxGd1-x)3Ga5O12 (Nd:LGGG, with x = 0.1) and Gd3AlxGa5-xO12 (GAGG, with x = 1) disordered crystals has been investigated. Cw oscillation with a slope efficiency as high as 61% and 230 mW output power was achieved with 400 mW absorbed power from a 1-W laser diode in Nd:LGGG. Under the same pumping conditions cw oscillation with a slope efficiency as high as 55% and 255 mW output power was achieved with 500 mW absorbed power in Nd:GAGG. Stable passive mode-locking with single- or multi-wavelength spectrum was obtained with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SAM) and a single-prism, dispersion-compensated cavity with both the samples. Fourier-limited pulses with duration ~ 4-9 ps and output power ~ 40 mW were generated at three well-defined laser transitions in the range 1062-1067 nm with ND:GLGG. Two-color mode-locking regime well described by Fourier-limited synchronized pulses with duration ~ 3.7 and 5.9 ps and output power ~ 65 mW, with wavelength separation of 1.3 nm around 1062 nm was obtained with Nd:GAGG.

  5. Molecular dynamics investigation of desorption and ion separation following picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) ablation of an ionic aqueous protein solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, J.; Wu, C.; Robertson, W. D.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to characterize the ablation process induced by a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) operating in the regime of desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE) of a model peptide (lysozyme)/counter-ion system in aqueous solution. The simulations were performed for ablation under typical experimental conditions found within a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), that is in vacuum with an applied electric field (E = ± 107 V/m), for up to 2 ns post-ablation and compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE ablation condition (E = 0 V/m). Further, a simulation of ablation under an extreme field condition (E = 1010 V/m) was performed for comparison to extend the effective dynamic range of the effect of the field on charge separation. The results show that the plume dynamics were retained under a typical TOF-MS condition within the first 1 ns of ablation. Efficient desorption was observed with more than 90% of water molecules interacting with lysozyme stripped off within 1 ns post-ablation. The processes of ablation and desolvation of analytes were shown to be independent of the applied electric field and thus decoupled from the ion separation process. Unlike under the extreme field conditions, the electric field inside a typical TOF-MS was shown to modify the ions' motion over a longer time and in a soft manner with no enhancement to fragmentation observed as compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE. The study indicates that the PIRL-DIVE ablation mechanism could be used as a new, intrinsically versatile, and highly sensitive ion source for quantitative mass spectrometry.

  6. Molecular dynamics investigation of desorption and ion separation following picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) ablation of an ionic aqueous protein solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, J; Wu, C; Robertson, W D; Zhigilei, L V; Miller, R J D

    2016-11-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to characterize the ablation process induced by a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) operating in the regime of desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE) of a model peptide (lysozyme)/counter-ion system in aqueous solution. The simulations were performed for ablation under typical experimental conditions found within a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), that is in vacuum with an applied electric field (E = ± 10(7) V/m), for up to 2 ns post-ablation and compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE ablation condition (E = 0 V/m). Further, a simulation of ablation under an extreme field condition (E = 10(10) V/m) was performed for comparison to extend the effective dynamic range of the effect of the field on charge separation. The results show that the plume dynamics were retained under a typical TOF-MS condition within the first 1 ns of ablation. Efficient desorption was observed with more than 90% of water molecules interacting with lysozyme stripped off within 1 ns post-ablation. The processes of ablation and desolvation of analytes were shown to be independent of the applied electric field and thus decoupled from the ion separation process. Unlike under the extreme field conditions, the electric field inside a typical TOF-MS was shown to modify the ions' motion over a longer time and in a soft manner with no enhancement to fragmentation observed as compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE. The study indicates that the PIRL-DIVE ablation mechanism could be used as a new, intrinsically versatile, and highly sensitive ion source for quantitative mass spectrometry.

  7. 皮秒脉冲泵浦的高功率超连续谱光源%Picosecond laser pumped high power supercontinuum source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈胜平; 谌鸿伟; 王建华; 陈子伦; 侯静; 许晓军; 陈金宝; 刘泽金

    2012-01-01

    A picosecond fiber laser was applied for high power supercontinuum generation (SCG) in photonic crystal fiber (PCF) , the key technical issues of fabricating high power all fiber supercontinuum sources were considered and the advantages and disadvantages of picosecond fiber lasers in several configurations for SCG in PCF were analyzed. By using a repetition rate increasing system, a high power picosecond fiber laser suitable for SCG was constructed. By enlarging the core of the PCF at the input end through post-processing method, low splicing loss was realized between the double cladding fiber and the PCF. 35. 6 W supercontinuum output is realized with spectrum covering the wavelength range from 650 nm to 1700 nm.%实验研究利用皮秒脉冲泵浦光子晶体光纤产生高功率超连续谱输出,探讨制作高功率全光纤超连续谱光源的关键技术,分析不同结构皮秒脉冲光纤激光器泵浦光子晶体光纤产生超连续谱的优缺点.应用重复频率倍增技术降低激光器自身的非线性效应,得到性能参数合适的高功率皮秒脉冲光纤激光器;采用后处理技术将光子晶体光纤输入端扩芯后与双包层光纤进行低损耗熔接,以增加皮秒激光的耦合效率;得到35.6W高功率全光纤超连续谱输出,光谱覆盖650nm ~ 1700nm.

  8. Picosecond pulses in deep ultraviolet (257.5 nm and 206 nm) and mid-IR produced by a high-power 100 kHz solid-state thin-disk laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turčičová, Hana; Novák, Ondřej; Smrž, Martin; Miura, Taisuke; Endo, Akira; Mocek, TomáÅ.¡

    2016-04-01

    We report on the generation of picosecond deep ultraviolet pulses at 257.5 nm and 206 nm produced as the fourth and fifth harmonic frequencies of the diode-pumped Yb:YAG thin-disk laser at the fundamental wavelength of 1030 nm. We present a proposal for a picosecond pulse mid-IR source tunable between 2 and 3 μm. The laser at the fundamental wavelength is based on a chirped-pulse amplification of pulses of a sub-ps laser oscillator in a regenerative amplifier with a thin-disk active medium. The diode pumping at the zero phonon line is used. The output beam is close to the fundamental spatial mode and the pulses are characterized by a 100 kHz repetition frequency, less than 4 ps pulse duration and Picosecond output pulses tunable between 2 and 3 μm at an average power of 10 W are proposed.

  9. MHz Repetion Rate Yb:YAG and Yb:CaF2 Regenerative Picosecond Laser Amplifiers with a BBO Pockels Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedor Bergmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present picosecond Yb:YAG and Yb:CaF2 regenerative laser amplifiers with ultra-high repetition rates in the MHz range. A maximum pulse energy of 40 μJ was obtained at 20 kHz while we achieved around 1 μJ at 1 MHz. We demonstrated a pulse duration of 2.1 ps for Yb:YAG and 4.8 ps for Yb:CaF2 when seeded by a mode-locked Yb:KGW fs-oscillator without pulse stretching or phase compensation.

  10. 18 W pulse-bursts 532 nm picosecond laser system with four equal amplitude and spacing pulses at 1 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ming Liang; Chen, Meng; Li, Gang

    2017-05-01

    An average power of 18 W pulse-burst 532 nm picosecond laser was obtained with four pulses in a burst at 1 kHz. A mode-locked laser and beam splitter mirrors were used to obtain seed pulse-bursts, that one single pulse was divided into four pulses and each pulse in bursts can be controlled. The pulses were broadened from 23.5 to 135 ps by single-pass volume Bragg gratings. After Nd:YAG regenerative amplifier and single-pass two Nd:YAG modules amplifier, 31.2 W in 1064 nm was got. The four pulses had equal amplitude and pulse spacing of 800 ps. Then, 18 W in 532 nm was obtained with nonlinear optical materials of LiB3O5 frequency doubling, the beam quality of the M2 factor was 1.24, and the pulse width was 50 ps. It is a very nice way to obtain high-power pulse-burst picosecond laser with equal pulse spacing and amplitude.

  11. Picosecond infrared laser-induced all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of dissociation of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Man, Viet; Van-Oanh, Nguyen-Thi; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2016-04-28

    Since the discovery of the plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus as the first viral entity in the late 1800s, viruses traditionally have been mainly thought of as pathogens for disease-resistances. However, viruses have recently been exploited as nanoplatforms with applications in biomedicine and materials science. To this aim, a large majority of current methods and tools have been developed to improve the physical stability of viral particles, which may be critical to the extreme physical or chemical conditions that viruses may encounter during purification, fabrication processes, storage and use. However, considerably fewer studies are devoted to developing efficient methods to degrade or recycle such enhanced stability biomaterials. With this in mind, we carry out all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, inspired by the recently developed mid-infrared free-electron laser pulse technology, to dissociate viruses. Adopting the poliovirus as a representative example, we find that the primary step in the dissociation process is due to the strong resonance between the amide I vibrational modes of the virus and the tuned laser frequencies. This process is determined by a balance between the formation and dissociation of the protein shell, reflecting the highly plasticity of the virus. Furthermore, our method should provide a feasible approach to simulate viruses, which is otherwise too expensive for conventional equilibrium all-atom simulations of such very large systems. Our work shows a proof of concept which may open a new, efficient way to cleave or to recycle virus-based materials, provide an extremely valuable tool for elucidating mechanical aspects of viruses, and may well play an important role in future fighting against virus-related diseases.

  12. Second harmonic pico-second pulse generation with mode-locked 1064nm DBR laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klehr, A.; Prziwarka, T.; Jedrzejczyk, D.; Brox, O.; Bugge, F.; Wenzel, H.; Paschke, K.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2014-02-01

    Detailed experimental investigations of the generation of high-energy short infrared and green pulses with a mode-locked multi-section distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser in dependence on the lengths of the gain section and the saturableabsorber (SA) section as well the corresponding input currents and reverse voltages, respectively, are presented. The laser under investigation is 3.5 mm long and has a 500 μm long DBR section. The remaining cavity was divided into four 50 μm, four 100 μm, two 200 μm and eight 250 μm long electrically separated segments so that the lengths of the gain and SA sections can be simply varied by bonding. Thus, the dependence of the mode-locking behavior on the lengths of the gain and SA sections can be investigated on the same device. Optimal mode-locking was obtained for absorber lengths between LAbs = 200 μm and 300 μm and absorber voltages between UAbs= -2 V and -3 V. A pulse length of τ ≍ 10 ps, a repetition frequency of 13 GHz and a RF line width of less than 100 kHz were measured. An infrared peak pulse power of 900 mW was reached. The FWHM of the optical spectrum was about 150 pm. With an 11.5 mm long periodically poled MgO doped LiNbO3 crystal having a ridge geometry of 5 μm width and 4 μm height green light pulses were generated. With an infrared pump peak power of 900 mW a green pulse energy of 3.15 pJ was reached. The opto-optical conversion efficiency was about 31%.

  13. Simultaneous investigation of ultrafast structural dynamics and transient electric field by sub-picosecond electron pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Run-Ze; Zhu, Pengfei; Chen, Long; Chen, Jie, E-mail: jiec@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jiec@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cao, Jianming [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Physics Department and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    The ultrafast structure dynamics and surface transient electric field, which are concurrently induced by laser excited electrons of an aluminum nanofilm, have been investigated simultaneously by the same transmission electron diffraction patterns. These two processes are found to be significantly different and distinguishable by tracing the time dependent changes of electron diffraction and deflection angles, respectively. This study also provides a practical means to evaluate simultaneously the effect of transient electric field during the study of structural dynamics under low pump fluence by transmission ultrafast electron diffraction.

  14. Demonstration of a neonlike argon soft-x-ray laser with a picosecond-laser-irradiated gas puff target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Hunter, J; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A L; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2001-09-15

    We demonstrate a neonlike argon-ion x-ray laser, using a short-pulse laser-irradiated gas puff target. The gas puff target was formed by pulsed injection of gas from a high-pressure solenoid valve through a nozzle in the form of a narrow slit and irradiated with a combination of long, 600-ps and short, 6-ps high-power laser pulses with a total of 10 J of energy in a traveling-wave excitation scheme. Lasing was observed on the 3p (1)S(0)?3s (1)P(1) transition at 46.9 nm and the 3d (1)P(1)?3p (1)P(1) transition at 45.1 nm. A gain of 11 cm(-1) was measured on these transitions for targets up to 0.9 cm long.

  15. Observation of Ultrafast Bond-length Expansion at the Initial Stage of Laser Ablation by Picosecond Time-resolved EXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    We have demonstrated a time-resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique by using a femtosecond laser produced plasma soft X-ray source. By applying this technique to the measurement of the initial stage of the laser ablation in Si foil, we were able to observe a slight shortening of the EXAFS oscillation period. This result suggests that the Si-Si atomic bond length expands as a result of the solid-liquid phase transition in Si. The realization of this technique is the first step toward understanding atomic structural dynamics during a chemical reaction.

  16. Picosecond Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimling, Johannes; Choi, Gyung-Min; Brangham, Jack T.; Matalla-Wagner, Tristan; Huebner, Torsten; Kuschel, Timo; Yang, Fengyuan; Cahill, David G.

    2017-02-01

    We report time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in normal metal /Y3Fe5 O12 bilayers driven by an interfacial temperature difference between electrons and magnons. The measured time evolution of spin accumulation induced by laser excitation indicates transfer of angular momentum across normal metal /Y3Fe5 O12 interfaces on a picosecond time scale, too short for contributions from a bulk temperature gradient in an yttrium iron garnet. The product of spin-mixing conductance and the interfacial spin Seebeck coefficient determined is of the order of 108 A m-2 K-1 .

  17. Picosecond spin Seebeck effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kimling, Johannes; Choi, Gyung-Min; Brangham, Jack T.; Matalla-Wagner, Tristan; Huebner, Torsten; Kuschel, Timo; Yang, Fengyuan; Cahill, David G.

    2016-01-01

    We report time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect driven by an interfacial temperature difference between itinerant electrons and magnons. The measured time-evolution of spin accumulation induced by laser-excitation indicates transfer of angular momentum across Au/Y$_3$Fe$_5$O$_{12}$ and Cu/Y$_3$Fe$_5$O$_{12}$ interfaces on a picosecond time-scale. The product of spin-mixing conductance and interfacial spin Seebeck coefficient determined is...

  18. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning MOKE microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Henn, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

    2013-01-01

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast `white light' supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of t...

  19. A high-repetition rate scheme for synchrotron-based picosecond laser pump/x-ray probe experiments on chemical and biological systems in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Frederico A; Milne, Christopher J; Amarasinghe, Dimali C V; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes Hannelore; van der Veen, Renske M; Reinhard, Marco; Pham, Van-Thai; Karlsson, Susanne; Johnson, Steven L; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Huthwelker, Thomas; Janousch, Markus; van Mourik, Frank; Abela, Rafael; Chergui, Majed

    2011-06-01

    We present the extension of time-resolved optical pump/x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe experiments towards data collection at MHz repetition rates. The use of a high-power picosecond laser operating at an integer fraction of the repetition rate of the storage ring allows exploitation of up to two orders of magnitude more x-ray photons than in previous schemes based on the use of kHz lasers. Consequently, we demonstrate an order of magnitude increase in the signal-to-noise of time-resolved XAS of molecular systems in solution. This makes it possible to investigate highly dilute samples at concentrations approaching physiological conditions for biological systems. The simplicity and compactness of the scheme allows for straightforward implementation at any synchrotron beamline and for a wide range of x-ray probe techniques, such as time-resolved diffraction or x-ray emission studies.

  20. Over-five octaves wide Raman combs in high-power picosecond-laser pumped H(2)-filled inhibited coupling Kagome fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoît, Aurélien; Beaudou, Benoit; Alharbi, Meshaal; Debord, Benoit; Gérôme, Frédéric; Salin, François; Benabid, Fetah

    2015-06-01

    We report on the generation of over 5 octaves wide Raman combs using inhibited coupling Kagome guiding hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with hydrogen and pumped with 22.7 W average power and 27 picosecond pulsed fiber laser. Combs spanning from ~321 nm in the UV to ~12.5 µm in the long-wavelength IR (i.e. from 24 THz to 933 THz) with different spectral content and with an output average power of up to ~10 W were generated. In addition to the clear potential of such a comb as a laser source emitting at spectral ranges, which existing technology poorly addresses like long-wavelength IR and UV, the combination of high Raman net gain and short pump-pulse duration makes these spectra an excellent candidate for intra-pulse waveform synthesis.

  1. Laser drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by picosecond laser pulses: comparative study of different drilling tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, T.; Stolze, M.; L'huillier, J.

    2014-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) as a lightweight material with superior properties is increasingly being used in industrial manufacturing. Using ultrashort laser pulses can improve the quality in cutting or drilling applications, but at high power levels it is more complicated to maintain the accuracy and precision in CFRP drilling. According to the application requirements for the extent of the heat affected zone, the geometric precision and the productivity different drilling tools can be used. Therefore we report on the application of three different beam delivery systems to drilling processes of CFRP: Galvanometer scanner, trepanning head and diffractive optical elements.

  2. Dissection of the frustules of the diatom Synedra acus under the action of picosecond impulses of submillimeter laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, Vadim V; Kozlov, Alexander S; Danilovtseva, Elena N; Basharina, Tatjana N; Petrov, Alexander K

    2013-07-01

    Diatom algae realize highly intriguing processes of biosynthesis of siliceous structures in living cells under moderate conditions. Investigation of diatom physiology is complicated by frustule (siliceous exoskeleton). Frustules consist of valves and girdle bands which are adhered to each other by means of organic substances. Removal of the frustule from the lipid membrane of diatom cells would open new possibilities for study of silicon metabolism in diatoms. We found that submillimeter laser irradiation produced by a free-electron laser causes splitting of diatom frustules without destruction of cell content. This finding opens the way to direct study of diatom cell membrane and to isolation of cell organelles, including silica deposition vesicles. We suppose that the dissection action of the submillimeter irradiation results from unusual ultrasonic waves produced by the short (30-100 ps) but high-power (1 MW) terahertz laser impulses at 5.6 MHz frequency.

  3. Pure colloidal metal and ceramic nanoparticles from high-power picosecond laser ablation in water and acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärsch, Niko; Jakobi, Jurij; Weiler, Sascha; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2009-11-04

    The generation of colloids by laser ablation of solids in a liquid offers a nearly unlimited material variety and a high purity as no chemical precursors are required. The use of novel high-power ultra-short-pulsed laser systems significantly increases the production rates even in inflammable organic solvents. By applying an average laser power of 50 W and pulse durations below 10 ps, up to 5 mg min(-1) of nanoparticles have been generated directly in acetone, marking a breakthrough in productivity of ultra-short-pulsed laser ablation in liquids. The produced colloids remain stable for more than six months. In the case of yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic, the nanoparticles retain the tetragonal crystal structure of the ablated target. Laser beam self-focusing plays an important role, as a beam radius change of 2% on the liquid surface can lead to a decrease of nanoparticle production rates of 90% if the target position is not re-adjusted.

  4. Laser ablated micropillar energy directors for ultrasonic welding of microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Carl Esben; Kistrup, Kasper; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    We present a new type of energy director (ED) for ultrasonic welding of microfluidic systems. These micropillar EDs are based on the replication of cone like protrusion structures introduced using a pico-second laser and may therefore be added to any mould surface accessible to a pico-second laser...

  5. Laser ablated micropillar energy directors for ultrasonic welding of microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Carl Esben; Kistrup, Kasper; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    We present a new type of energy director (ED) for ultrasonic welding of microfluidic systems. These micropillar EDs are based on the replication of cone like protrusion structures introduced using a pico-second laser and may therefore be added to any mould surface accessible to a pico-second laser...

  6. Evaluation of the composition and morphology of a WTi/Si system processed by a picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Suzana; Peruško, D.; Radović-Bogdanović, I.; Branković, G.; Čekada, M.; Gaković, B.; Jakšić, M.; Trtica, M.; Milosavljević, M.

    2012-06-01

    In this work we studied the influence of laser radiation on the composition, structure and morphology of WTi thin films deposited on n-type (100) silicon wafers. The films were deposited by d.c. sputtering from a 70:30 at% W-Ti target, using Ar ions, to a thickness of ˜190 nm. Irradiation was performed with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm, whereas the pulse duration was 150 ps. Laser fluences of 3.2 and 5.9 J/cm2 were found to be sufficient for modification of the WTi/silicon target system. The results show: (i) ablation of WTi thin film and a Si substrate in the central zone of spots, (ii) appearance of hydrodynamic features like resolidified material, (iii) partial ablation of the WTi thin film at the periphery and (iv) appearance of thin film cracks at the far periphery. On the non-ablated areas, the laser modification induced changes in composition, such as inter-mixing of components at the WTi/Si interface with formation of silicides in both metals. Surface oxidation was the dominant process in the ablated areas, which is demonstrated by the presence of a SiO2 phase.

  7. Avoiding the requirement for pre-existing optical contact during picosecond laser glass-to-glass welding: erratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianyong; Carter, Richard M; Thomson, Robert R; Hand, Duncan P

    2015-10-19

    The results presented in Fig. 8 were incorrect; the growth in the weld structure presented was due to the laser taking 3 ms to reach full power. Here we present a corrected version of the figure and associated discussion. It should be noted that this affects only the exact number of pulses required to form the weld structure and some of the low pulse number observations. This does not therefore affect the theory presented in the paper. In addition Fig. 9 and Fig. 10 were reversed in the published version. The correct figures are presented below.

  8. High Power Picosecond Laser Surface Micro-texturing of H13 Tool Steel and Pattern Replication onto ABS Plastics via Injection Moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otanocha, Omonigho B.; Li, Lin; Zhong, Shan; Liu, Zhu

    2016-03-01

    H13 tool steels are often used as dies and moulds for injection moulding of plastic components. Certain injection moulded components require micro-patterns on their surfaces in order to modify the physical properties of the components or for better mould release to reduce mould contamination. With these applications it is necessary to study micro-patterning to moulds and to ensure effective pattern transfer and replication onto the plastic component during moulding. In this paper, we report an investigation into high average powered (100 W) picosecond laser interactions with H13 tool steel during surface micro-patterning (texturing) and the subsequent pattern replication on ABS plastic material through injection moulding. Design of experiments and statistical modelling were used to understand the influences of laser pulse repetition rate, laser fluence, scanning velocity, and number of scans on the depth of cut, kerf width and heat affected zones (HAZ) size. The characteristics of the surface patterns are analysed. The process parameter interactions and significance of process parameters on the processing quality and efficiency are characterised. An optimum operating window is recommended. The transferred geometry is compared with the patterns generated on the dies. A discussion is made to explain the characteristics of laser texturing and pattern replication on plastics.

  9. Picosecond laser with 11 W output power at 1342 nm based on composite multiple doping level Nd:YVO4 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Aleksej M.; Grishin, Mikhail; Michailovas, Andrejus

    2016-01-01

    We report results of design and optimization of high average output power picosecond and nanosecond laser operating at 1342 nm wavelength. Developed for selective micromachining, this DPSS laser is comprised of master oscillator, regenerative amplifier and output pulse control module. Passively mode-locked by means of semiconductor saturable absorber mirror and pumped with 808 nm wavelength Nd:YVO4 master oscillator emits 12.5 ps pulses at repetition rate of 55 MHz with average output power of ∼100 mW. The four-pass confocal delay line forms a longest part of the oscillator cavity in order to suppress thermo-mechanical misalignment. Picked from the train seed pulses were injected to the cavity of regenerative amplifier based on composite Nd:YVO4 crystal with diffusion-bonded segments of multiple Nd doping concentration end-pumped at 880 nm wavelength. Laser produces pulses of ∼13 ps duration at 300 kHz repetition rate with average output power of 11 W and nearly diffraction limited beam quality of M2∼1.03. Attained high peak power ∼2.8 MW facilitates conversion to the 2nd, 3rd and 6th harmonics at 671 nm, 447 nm and 224 nm wavelengths with 80%, 50% and 15% efficiency respectively. Without seeding the regenerative amplifier transforms to electro-optically cavity-dumped Q-switched laser providing 10 ns output pulses at high repetition rates with beam propagation factor of M2∼1.06.

  10. Quantification of mass-specific laser energy input converted into particle properties during picosecond pulsed laser fragmentation of zinc oxide and boron carbide in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Marcus; Barcikowski, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.barcikowski@uni-due.de

    2015-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Highly defect-rich zinc oxide is obtained by pulsed laser fragmentation in liquids (PLFL). • Bandgap of semiconductor particles can be linearly controlled, simply by the laser energy dose. • Upscaling parameters are derived, that are mass-specific energy input and fragmentation fluence threshold. • Transferability is shown for one of the hardest material known, fabricating crystalline boron carbide nanoparticles. • Conclusions about laser fragmentation mechanisms occurring in liquids are drawn. - Abstract: Pulsed laser fragmentation in liquids is an effective method to fabricate organic, metal or semiconductor nanoparticles by ablation of suspended particles. However, modelling and up-scaling of this process lacks quantification of the laser energy required for a specific product property like particle diameter of the colloid or bandgap energy of the fabricated nanoparticles. A novel set-up for defined laser energy dose in a free liquid jet enables mass-specific energy balancing and exact threshold determination for pulsed laser fragmentation. By this technique laser energy and material responses can be precisely correlated. Linear decrease of the particle diameter and linear increase of the bandgap energy with mass-specific laser energy input has been observed for the examples of ZnO and B{sub 4}C particles. Trends are analysed by density gradient centrifugation, electron microscopy, UV–vis and X-ray diffraction analysis of the crystal structure. The study contributes to quantitative model parameters for up-scaling and provides insight into the mechanisms occurring when suspended particles are irradiated with pulsed laser sources.

  11. Picosecond green and deep ultraviolet pulses generated by a high-power 100  kHz thin-disk laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Ondřej; Turčičová, Hana; Smrž, Martin; Miura, Taisuke; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-11-15

    We report on the generation of the second (515 nm) and fourth (257.5 nm) harmonics from a 100 kHz diode-pumped solid-state laser operating at a wavelength of 1030 nm which uses one Yb:YAG thin disk in the regenerative amplifier and delivers 60 W of the average output power in pulses of 4 ps duration. Thirty-five W in green light and 6 W in deep ultraviolet (DUV) were achieved. The sensitivity of the second harmonic generation efficiency toward the lithium triborate crystal temperature is demonstrated in experiment. The overall conversion efficiency from NIR to DUV of 10% was achieved. The β-barium borate and cesium lithium borate crystals were used as green to DUV convertors and compared regarding the efficiency and spectral bandwidths. The achieved output power is unique for DUV picosecond pulses.

  12. A comparative study of pressure-dependent emission characteristics in different gas plasmas induced by nanosecond and picosecond neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Idris, Nasrullah; Marpaung, Alion Mangasi; Pardede, Marincan; Jobiliong, Eric; Hedwig, Rinda; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Ramli, Muliadi; Suyanto, Heri; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, May On; Lie, Zener Sukra; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Hendrik Koo

    2013-11-01

    An experimental study has been performed on the pressure-dependent plasma emission intensities in Ar, He, and N2 surrounding gases with the plasma induced by either nanosecond (ns) or picosecond (ps) yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The study focused on emission lines of light elements such as H, C, O, and a moderately heavy element of Ca from an agate target. The result shows widely different pressure effects among the different emission lines, which further vary with the surrounding gases used and also with the different ablation laser employed. It was found that most of the maximum emission intensities can be achieved in Ar gas plasma generated by ps laser at low gas pressure of around 5 Torr. This experimental condition is particularly useful for spectrochemical analysis of light elements such as H, C, and O, which are known to suffer from intensity diminution at higher gas pressures. Further measurements of the spatial distribution and time profiles of the emission intensities of H I 656.2 nm and Ca II 396.8 nm reveal the similar role of shock wave excitation for the emission in both ns and ps laser-induced plasmas, while an additional early spike is observed in the plasma generated by the ps laser. The suggested preference of Ar surrounding gas and ps laser was further demonstrated by outperforming the ns laser in their applications to depth profiling of the H emission intensity and offering the prospect for the development of three-dimensional analysis of a light element such as H and C.

  13. Picosecond laser generation of Ag-TiO2 nanoparticles with reduced energy gap by ablation in ice water and their antibacterial activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Abubaker; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu; Zhong, Xiang Li; Wang, Tao

    2015-06-01

    Ag-TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesised in ice water using a picosecond laser with a 1064-nm wavelength, at a 200-kHz repetition rate, a laser pulse energy of 42-43.79 µJ, and laser fluences of 0.342-0.357 J/cm2, by ablation of solid Ag and Ti targets. The absorption spectra and size distribution of the colloidal nanoparticles were obtained by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The morphology and chemical composition of the nanoparticles were characterised using high-angle annular dark-field-scanning transmission electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that the sizes of the Ag-TiO2 nanoparticles range from less than 10-130 nm, with some large particles above 130 nm, of which the predominant size is 20 nm. A significant reduction in the energy gap of TiO2 nanoparticles was obtained to 1.75 eV after the modification with Ag nanoparticles during co-ablation. The role of Ag nanoparticles in the reduction in the energy band gap of the TiO2 nanoparticles can only be seen during laser ablation in an ice environment but not in deionised water at room temperature. Furthermore, the TiO2 nanoparticles were produced in ice and deionised water under the same laser and experimental conditions; the results show that the nanoparticles in both media have the same energy gap (about 2.4 eV). The antibacterial activity of the Ag-TiO2 nanoparticles generated was then tested against E. coli bacteria under standard laboratory light conditions. The results show that the nanoparticles can effectively kill E. coli bacteria much more effectively than laser-generated TiO2 nanoparticles.

  14. Generation of a 2.2 nJ picosecond optical pulse with blue-violet wavelength using a GaInN master oscillator power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Rintaro; Takiguchi, Yoshiro; Kono, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Hideki; Hanzawa, Yasunari; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shiozaki, Masaki; Sugawara, Nobuhiro; Kuramoto, Masaru; Narui, Hironobu

    2015-07-01

    We report the generation of a picosecond optical pulse with 2.2 nJ pulse energy at blue-violet wavelengths using a GaN-based mode-locked laser diode (MLLD) and a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The picosecond optical pulse generated by MLLD at a frequency of 812 MHz was amplified effectively by SOA. We optimized SOA with a widely flared waveguide structure to generate a high optical pulse energy.

  15. Comparison of optical transients during the picosecond laser pulse-induced crystallization of GeSbTe and AgInSbTe phase-change thin films: Nucleation-driven versus growth-driven processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Guangfei [Key Laboratory of High Power Laser Materials, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, Simian [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technology, Department of Physics, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Huang, Huan [Key Laboratory of High Power Laser Materials, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wang, Yang, E-mail: ywang@siom.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of High Power Laser Materials, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Lai, Tianshu, E-mail: stslts@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technology, Department of Physics, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Wu, Yiqun [Key Laboratory of High Power Laser Materials, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-09-01

    Direct comparison of the real-time in-situ crystallization behavior of as-deposited amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GeSbTe) and Ag{sub 8}In{sub 14}Sb{sub 55}Te{sub 23} (AgInSbTe) phase-change thin films driven by picosecond laser pulses was performed by a time-resolved optical pump-probe technique with nanosecond resolution. Different optical transients showed various crystallization processes because of the dissimilar nucleation- and growth-dominated mechanisms of the two materials. The effects of laser pulse fluence, thermal conductive structure, and successive pulse irradiation on their crystallization dynamics were also discussed. A schematic was then established to describe the different crystallization processes beginning from the as-deposited amorphous state. The results may provide further insight into the phase-change mechanism under extra-non-equilibrium conditions and aid the development of ultrafast phase-change memory materials.

  16. Compact sources for the generation of high-peak power wavelength-stabilized laser pulses in the picoseconds and nanoseconds ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, H.; Klehr, A.; Schwertfeger, S.; Liero, A.; Hoffmann, Th.; Brox, O.; Thomas, M.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2012-03-01

    Diode lasers are ideally suited for the generation of optical pulses in the nanoseconds and picoseconds ranges by gainswitching, Q-switching or mode-locking. We have developed diode-laser based light sources where the pulses are spectrally stabilized and nearly-diffraction limited as required by many applications. Diffraction limited emission is achieved by a several microns wide ridge waveguide (RW), so that only the fundamental lateral mode should lase. Spectral stabilization is realized with a Bragg grating integrated into the semiconductor chip, resulting in distributed feedback (DFB) or distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers. We obtained a peak power of 3.8W for 4ns long pulses using a gain-switched DFB laser and a peak power of more than 4W for 65ps long pulses using a three-section DBR laser. Higher peak powers of several tens of Watts can be reached by an amplification of the pulses with semiconductor optical amplifiers, which can be either monolithically or hybrid integrated with the master oscillators. We developed compact modules with a footprint of 4×5cm2 combining master oscillator, tapered power amplifier, beam-shaping optical elements and high-frequency electronics. In order to diminish the generation of amplified spontaneous emission between the pulses, the amplifier is modulated with short-pulses of high amplitude, too. Beyond the amplifier, we obtained a peak power of more than 10W for 4ns long pulses, a peak power of about 35W for 80ps long pulses and a peak power of 70W for 10ps long pulses at emission wavelengths around 1064nm.

  17. Very low electron temperature in warm dense matter formed by focused picosecond soft x-ray laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Masahiko, E-mail: ishino.masahiko@jaea.go.jp; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7, Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Pikuz, Tatiana [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13-2, Izhorskaya Street, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 1-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Skobelev, Igor [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13-2, Izhorskaya Street, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31, Kashirskoe Shosse, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Faenov, Anatoly [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13-2, Izhorskaya Street, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Institute for Academic Initiatives, Osaka University, 1-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Inogamov, Nail [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1-A, Akademika Semenova av., Chernogolovka, Moscow Region 142432 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    We investigated the optical emission from the ablating surfaces induced by the irradiations of soft x-ray laser (SXRL) pulses with the aim of estimation of the maximum electron temperature. No emission signal in the spectral range of 400–800 nm could be observed despite the formation of damage structures on the target surfaces. Hence, we estimated an upper limit for the electron temperature of 0.4–0.7 eV for the process duration of 100–1000 ps. Our results imply that the ablation and/or surface modification by the SXRL is not accompanied by plasma formation but is induced by thermo-mechanical pressure, which is so called a spallative ablation. This spallative ablation process occurs in the low electron temperature region of a non-equilibrium state of warm dense matter.

  18. Split-probe hybrid femtosecond/picosecond rotational CARS for time-domain measurement of S-branch Raman linewidths within a single laser shot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brian D; Gao, Yi; Seeger, Thomas; Kliewer, Christopher J

    2013-11-15

    We introduce a multiplex technique for the single-laser-shot determination of S-branch Raman linewidths with high accuracy and precision by implementing hybrid femtosecond (fs)/picosecond (ps) rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) with multiple spatially and temporally separated probe beams derived from a single laser pulse. The probe beams scatter from the rotational coherence driven by the fs pump and Stokes pulses at four different probe pulse delay times spanning 360 ps, thereby mapping collisional coherence dephasing in time for the populated rotational levels. The probe beams scatter at different folded BOXCARS angles, yielding spatially separated CARS signals which are collected simultaneously on the charge coupled device camera. The technique yields a single-shot standard deviation (1σ) of less than 3.5% in the determination of Raman linewidths and the average linewidth values obtained for N(2) are within 1% of those previously reported. The presented technique opens the possibility for correcting CARS spectra for time-varying collisional environments in operando.

  19. 1  J, 0.5  kHz repetition rate picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Cory; Pedicone, Michael; Bravo, Herman; Wang, Hanchen; Yin, Liang; Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J; Reagan, Brendan A

    2016-07-15

    We report the demonstration of a diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser that produces λ=1.03  μm pulses of up to 1.5 J energy compressible to sub-5 ps duration at a repetition rate of 500 Hz (750 W average power). Amplification to high energy takes place in cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG active mirrors designed for kilowatt average power laser operation. This compact laser system will enable new advances in high-average-power ultrashort-pulse lasers and high-repetition-rate tabletop soft x-ray lasers. As a first application, the laser was used to pump a 400 Hz λ=18.9  nm laser.

  20. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Gallé, G.; Scott, S. A.; Pérez, J. R. Sánchez; Lagally, M. G.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Faure, J.

    2016-11-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-diffraction schemes.

  1. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    He, Z -H; Nees, J A; Gallé, G; Scott, S A; Pérez, J R Sanchez; Lagally, M G; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R; Faure, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-di...

  2. Picosecond calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiou, Panayiotis; Vincent, Jonathan; Andersson, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    Liquid phase time-resolved x-ray diffraction with 100 ps resolution has recently emerged as a powerful technique for probing the structural dynamics of transient photochemical species in solution. It is intrinsic to the method, however, that a structural signal is observed not only from the photo...

  3. Local structures in ionic liquids probed and characterized by microscopic thermal diffusion monitored with picosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kyousuke; Iwata, Koichi; Nishiyama, Yoshio; Kimura, Yoshifumi; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2012-03-14

    Vibrational cooling rate of the first excited singlet (S(1)) state of trans-stilbene and bulk thermal diffusivity are measured for seven room temperature ionic liquids, C(2)mimTf(2)N, C(4)mimTf(2)N, C(4)mimPF(6), C(5)mimTf(2)N, C(6)mimTf(2)N, C(8)mimTf(2)N, and bmpyTf(2)N. Vibrational cooling rate measured with picosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy reflects solute-solvent and solvent-solvent energy transfer in a microscopic solvent environment. Thermal diffusivity measured with the transient grating method indicates macroscopic heat conduction capability. Vibrational cooling rate of S(1) trans-stilbene is known to have a good correlation with bulk thermal diffusivity in ordinary molecular liquids. In the seven ionic liquids studied, however, vibrational cooling rate shows no correlation with thermal diffusivity; the observed rates are similar (0.082 to 0.12 ps(-1) in the seven ionic liquids and 0.08 to 0.14 ps(-1) in molecular liquids) despite large differences in thermal diffusivity (5.4-7.5 × 10(-8) m(2) s(-1) in ionic liquids and 8.0-10 × 10(-8) m(2) s(-1) in molecular liquids). This finding is consistent with our working hypothesis that there are local structures characteristically formed in ionic liquids. Vibrational cooling rate is determined by energy transfer among solvent ions in a local structure, while macroscopic thermal diffusion is controlled by heat transfer over boundaries of local structures. By using "local" thermal diffusivity, we are able to simulate the vibrational cooling kinetics observed in ionic liquids with a model assuming thermal diffusion in continuous media. The lower limit of the size of local structure is estimated with vibrational cooling process observed with and without the excess energy. A quantitative discussion with a numerical simulation shows that the diameter of local structure is larger than 10 nm. If we combine this lower limit, 10 nm, with the upper limit, 100 nm, which is estimated from the transparency (no light

  4. Picosecond pulses of coherent MM-wave radiation in a photoinjector-driven waveguide free-selected laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fochs, S.N.; Le Sage, G.P.; Feng, L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A 5 MeV, high repetition rate (2.142 GHz in burst mode), high brightness, tabletop photoinjector is currently under construction at the UC Davis Department of Applied Science, on the LLNL site. Ultrashort pulses of coherent synchrotron radiation can be generated by transversally accelerating the electron beam with a wiggler in either metallic or dielectric-loaded waveguide FEL structures. This interaction is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Subpicosecond photoelectron bunches will be produced in the photoinjector by irradiating a high quantum efficiency Cs{sub 2}Te (Cesium Telluride) photocathode with a train of 100 UV (210 nm), ultra-short (250 fs) laser pulses. These bunches will be accelerated in a 1-1/2 cell {pi}-mode X-band RF gun e energized by a 20 MW, 8,568 GHz SLAC klystron. The peak current is 0.25 kA (0.25 nC, 1 ps), with a normalized beam emittance {epsilon}{sub n}<2.5 {pi} mm-mrad. This prebunched electron beam is then transversally accelerated in a cylindrical waveguide by a 30-mm period, 10 period long helical wiggler. The peak wiggler field is adjusted to 8.5 kG, so that the group velocity of the radiated electromagnetic waves matches the axial velocity of the electron bunch (grazing condition, zero slippage). Chirped output pulses in excess of 2 MW power are predicted, with an instantaneous bandwidth extending from 125 GHz to 225 GHz and a pulse duration of 15 ps (HWHM). To produce even shorter pulses, a dielectric-loaded waveguide can be used. The dispersion relation of this waveguide structure has an inflection point (zero group velocity dispersion). If the grazing condition is satisfied at this point, the final output pulse duration is no longer determined by slippage, or by group velocity dispersion and bandwidth, but by higher-order dispersive effects yielding transform-limited pulses.

  5. Spectral and Temporal Properties of the Alpha and Beta Subunits and (alpha Beta) Monomer Isolated from Nostoc SP. Using Picosecond Laser Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagen, Aaron J.

    1985-12-01

    The fluorescence decay profiles, relative quantum yield and transmission of the (alpha), (beta) and ((alpha)(beta)) complexes from phycoerythrin isolated from the photosynthetic antenna system of Nostoc sp. and measured by single picosecond laser spectroscopic techniques is studied. The fluorescence decay profiles of all three complexes are found to be intensity independent for the intensity range investigated ((TURN)4 x 10('13) to (TURN)4 x 10('15) photons-cm('-2) per pulse). The apparent decrease in the relative quantum yield of all three complexes as intensity increases is offset by a corresponding increase in the relative transmission. This evidence, along with the intensity independent fluorescence kinetics, suggests that exciton annihilation is absent in these complexes. The decay profiles are fit to models assuming energy transfer amongst fluorescing chromophores. The intraprotein transfer rate is found to be 100 ps in the (alpha) subunit, 666 ps in the (beta) subunit. Constraining these rates to be identical in the monomer results in explaining the monomer kinetics by an increase in the nonradiative rate of the f(,(beta)) chromophore, an apparent result of aggregation effects.

  6. Metal-like heat conduction in laser-excited InSb probed by picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhauss, P.; Synnergren, O.; Hansen, T. N.; Canton, S. E.; Enquist, H.; Srivastava, A.; Larsson, J.

    2008-09-01

    A semiconductor (InSb) showed transient metal-like heat conduction after excitation of a dense electron-hole plasma via short and intense light pulses. A related ultrafast strain relaxation was detected using picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The deduced heat conduction was, by a factor of 30, larger than the lattice contribution. The anomalously high heat conduction can be explained once the contribution from the degenerate photocarrier plasma is taken into account. The magnitude of the effect could provide the means for guiding heat in semiconductor nanostructures. In the course of this work, a quantitative model for the carrier dynamics in laser-irradiated semiconductors has been developed, which does not rely on any adjustable parameters or ad hoc assumptions. The model includes various light absorption processes (interband, free carrier, two photon, and dynamical Burstein-Moss shifts), ambipolar diffusion, energy transport (heat and chemical potential), electrothermal effects, Auger recombination, collisional excitation, and scattering (elastic and inelastic). The model accounts for arbitrary degrees of degeneracy.

  7. 1.5 GHz picosecond pulse generation from a monolithic waveguide laser with a graphene-film saturable output coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Rose; Brown, Graeme; Beecher, Stephen J; Torrisi, Felice; Milana, Silvia; Popa, Daniel; Hasan, Tawfique; Sun, Zhipei; Lidorikis, Elefterios; Ohara, Seiki; Ferrari, Andrea C; Kar, Ajoy K

    2013-04-08

    We fabricate a saturable absorber mirror by coating a graphene- film on an output coupler mirror. This is then used to obtain Q-switched mode-locking from a diode-pumped linear cavity channel waveguide laser inscribed in Ytterbium-doped Bismuthate Glass. The laser produces 1.06 ps pulses at ~1039 nm, with a 1.5 GHz repetition rate, 48% slope efficiency and 202 mW average output power. This performance is due to the combination of the graphene saturable absorber and the high quality optical waveguides in the laser glass.

  8. Pulse radiolysis of liquid water using picosecond electron pulses produced by a table-top terawatt laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Ned [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099 (United States); Flippo, Kirk [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099 (United States); Nemoto, Koshichi [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099 (United States); Umstadter, Donald [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099 (United States); Crowell, Robert A. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Jonah, Charles D. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Trifunac, Alexander D. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2000-06-01

    A laser based electron generator is shown, for the first time, to produce sufficient charge to conduct time resolved investigations of radiation induced chemical events. Electron pulses generated by focussing terawatt laser pulses into a supersonic helium gas jet are used to ionize liquid water. The decay of the hydrated electrons produced by the ionizing electron pulses is monitored with 0.3 {mu}s time resolution. Hydrated electron concentrations as high as 22 {mu}M were generated. The results show that terawatt lasers offer both an alternative to linear accelerators and a means to achieve subpicosecond time resolution for pulse radiolysis studies. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Low threshold diode-pumped picosecond mode-locked Nd:YAG laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, M. J.; Majdabadi, A.; Koohian, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a low threshold diode pumped passively mode-locked Nd:YAG laser has been demonstrated by using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. The threshold power for continuous-wave mode-locking is relatively low, about 3.2 W. The resonator stability across the pump power has been analytically examined. Moreover, the mode overlap between the pump beam and the laser fundamental mode has been simulated by MATLAB software. Adopting Z-shaped resonator configuration and suitable design of the resonator’s arm lengths, has enabled the author to prepare mode-locking conditions, and obtain 40 ps pulses with 112 MHz pulse repetition rate. The laser output was stable without any Q switched instability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the lowest threshold for CW mode-locking operation of a Nd:YAG laser.

  10. 1030-nm diode-laser-based light source delivering pulses with nanojoule energies and picosecond duration adjustable by mode locking or pulse gating operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klehr, A.; Liero, A.; Wenzel, H.; Bugge, F.; Brox, O.; Fricke, J.; Ressel, P.; Knigge, A.; Heinrich, W.; Tränkle, G.

    2017-02-01

    A new compact 1030 nm picosecond light source which can be switched between pulse gating and mode locking operation is presented. It consists of a multi-section distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser, an ultrafast multisection optical gate and a flared power amplifier (PA), mounted together with high frequency electronics and optical elements on a 5×4 cm micro bench. The master oscillator (MO) is a 10 mm long ridge wave-guide (RW) laser consisting of 200 μm long saturable absorber, 1500 μm long gain, 8000 μm long cavity, 200 μm long DBR and 100 μm long monitor sections. The 2 mm long optical gate consisting of several RW sections is monolithically integrated with the 4 mm long gain-guided tapered amplifier on a single chip. The light source can be switched between pulse gating and passive mode locking operation. For pulse gating all sections of the MO (except of the DBR and monitor sections) are forward biased and driven by a constant current. By injecting electrical pulses into one section of the optical gate the CW beam emitted by the MO is converted into a train of optical pulses with adjustable widths between 250 ps and 1000 ps. Peak powers of 20 W and spectral linewidths in the MHz range are achieved. Shorter pulses with widths between 4 ps and 15 ps and peak powers up to 50 W but larger spectral widths of about 300 pm are generated by mode locking where the saturable absorber section of the MO is reversed biased. The repetition rate of 4.2 GHz of the pulse train emitted by the MO can be reduced to values between 1 kHz and 100 MHz by utilizing the optical gate as pulse picker. The pulse-to-pulse distance can be controlled by an external trigger source.

  11. Analysis of persistent organic pollutants at sub-femtogram levels using a high-power picosecond laser for multiphoton ionization in conjunction with gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Taiki; Fukazawa, Kodai; Fujimoto, Masatoshi; Imasaka, Totaro

    2012-01-01

    A low-energy, high-repetition-rate picosecond laser (40 µJ, 20 kHz, 258 nm) was used for multiphoton ionization (MPI) in gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry to quantitatively determine dioxins (DXNs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The sensitivity of the technique was compared with that obtained using a high-energy, low-repetition-rate femtosecond laser (86 µJ, 1 kHz, 261 nm). The limits of detection (LODs) for the picosecond laser were several femtograms for chlorinated DXNs with low numbers of chloro substituents, and were several times lower than values obtained using a femtosecond laser, although the LODs were increased, reaching values that were nearly identical to those for the femtosecond laser for octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (octaCDD) and octachlorodibenzofuran (octaCDF). The LODs were also measured for 16 PAHs specified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency; the values for half of these compounds were at sub-femtogram levels. The procedure was used to analyze a surface-water sample collected from a river.

  12. Single-State Electronic Structure Measurements Using Time-Resolved X-Ray Laser Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Hunter, J

    2004-11-11

    We demonstrate single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy on semiconductor and metal surfaces with picosecond time resolution. The LLNL COMET compact tabletop x-ray laser source provides the necessary high photon flux (>10{sup 12}/pulse), monochromaticity, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for probing ultrafast changes in the city, chemical and electronic structure of these materials. Static valence band and shallow core-level photoemission spectra are presented for ambient temperature Ge(100) and polycrystalline Cu foils. Surface contamination was removed by UV ozone cleaning prior to analysis. In addition, the ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials. Time-resolved electron time-of-flight photoemission results for ultra-thin Cu will be presented.

  13. Generation of Nonlinear Force Driven Blocks from Skin Layer Interaction of Petawatt-Picosecond Laser Pulses for ICF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heinrich Hora; K. Jungwirth; B. Kralikova; J. Kraska; L. Laska; Liu Hong; G.H. Miley; P. Parys; Peng Hansheng; M. Pfeifer; K. Rohlena; Cang Yu; J. Skala; Z. Skladanowski; L. Torrisi; J. Ullschmied; J. Wolowski; Zhang Weiyan; He Xiantu; Zhang Jie; F. Osman; J. Badziak; F.P. Boody; S. Gammino; R. H(o)pfl

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of the essential difference of maximum ion energy for TW-ps laser plasma interaction compared with the 100 ns laser pulses [1] led to the theory of a skin layer model [2] where the control of prepulses suppressed the usual relativistic self-focusing. The subsequent generation of two nonlinear force driven blocks has been demonstrated experimentally and in extensive numerical studies where one block moves against the laser light and the other block into the irradiated target. These blocks of nearly solid state density DT plasma correspond to ion beam current densities [3] exceeding 1010 A/cm2 where the ion velocity can be chosen up to highly relativistic values. Using the results of the expected ignition of DT fuel by light ion beams, a selfsustained fusion reaction front may be generated even into uncompressed solid DT fuel similar to the Nuckolls-Wood [4] scheme where 10 kJ laser pulses produce 100 MJ fusion energy. This new and simplified scheme of laser-ICF needs and optimisation of the involved parameters.

  14. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchies, F.; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ˜1 mn and ˜100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  15. Implementation of a SVWP-based laser beam shaping technique for generation of 100-mJ-level picosecond pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamonis, J; Aleknavičius, A; Michailovas, K; Balickas, S; Petrauskienė, V; Gertus, T; Michailovas, A

    2016-10-01

    We present implementation of the energy-efficient and flexible laser beam shaping technique in a high-power and high-energy laser amplifier system. The beam shaping is based on a spatially variable wave plate (SVWP) fabricated by femtosecond laser nanostructuring of glass. We reshaped the initially Gaussian beam into a super-Gaussian (SG) of the 12th order with efficiency of about 50%. The 12th order of the SG beam provided the best compromise between large fill factor, low diffraction on the edges of the active media, and moderate intensity distribution modification during free-space propagation. We obtained 150 mJ pulses of 532 nm radiation. High-energy, pulse duration of 85 ps and the nearly flat-top spatial profile of the beam make it ideal for pumping optical parametric chirped pulse amplification systems.

  16. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchies, F; Fedorov, N; Lecherbourg, L

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  17. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorchies, F., E-mail: dorchies@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L. [Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, Talence F-33405 (France)

    2015-07-15

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%–20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  18. Pico-second laser materials interactions: mechanisms, material lifetime and performance optimization Ted Laurence(14-ERD-014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Ted A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-14

    Laser-induced damage with ps pulse widths straddles the transition from intrinsic, multiphoton ionization- and avalanche ionization-based ablation with fs pulses to defectdominated, thermal-based damage with ns pulses. We investigated the morphology and scaling of damage for commonly used silica and hafnia coatings as well as fused silica. Using carefully calibrated laser-induced damage experiments, in situ imaging, and high-resolution optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we showed that defects play an important role in laser-induced damage for pulse durations as short as 1 ps. Three damage morphologies were observed: standard material ablation, ultra-high density pits, and isolated absorbers. For 10 ps and longer, the isolated absorbers limited the damage performance of the coating materials. We showed that damage resulting from the isolated absorbers grows dramatically with subsequent pulses for sufficient fluences. For hafnia coatings, we used electric field modeling and experiments to show that isolated absorbers near the surface were affected by the chemical environment (vacuum vs. air) for pulses as short as 10 ps. Coupled with the silica results, these results suggested that improvements in the performance in the 10 -60 ps range have not reached fundamental limits. These findings motivate new efforts, including a new SI LDRD in improving the laser-damage performance of multi-layer dielectric coatings. A damage test facility for ps pulses was developed and automated, and was used for testing production optics for ARC. The resulting software was transferred to other laser test facilities for fs pulses and multiple wavelengths with 30 ps pulses. Additionally, the LDRD supported the retention and promotion of an important staff scientist in high-resolution dynamic microscopy and laser-damage testing.

  19. Sub-Picosecond Tunable Hard X-Ray Undulator Source for Laser/X-Ray Pump-Probe Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingold, G.; Beaud, P.; Johnson, S.; Streun, A.; Schmidt, T.; Abela, R.; Al-Adwan, A.; Abramsohn, D.; Böge, M.; Grolimund, D.; Keller, A.; Krasniqi, F.; Rivkin, L.; Rohrer, M.; Schilcher, T.; Schmidt, T.; Schlott, V.; Schulz, L.; van der Veen, F.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-01

    The FEMTO source under construction at the μXAS beamline is designed to enable tunable time-resolved laser/x-ray absorption and diffraction experiments in photochemistry and condensed matter with ps- and sub-ps resolution. The design takes advantage of (1) the highly stable operation of the SLS storage ring, (2) the reliable high harmonic operation of small gap, short period undulators to generate hard x-rays with energy 3-18 keV at 2.4 GeV beam energy, and (3) the progress in high power, high repetition rate fs solid-state laser technology to employ laser/e-beam `slicing' to reach a time resolution of ultimately 100 fs. The source will profit from the inherently synchronized pump (laser I: 100 fs, 2 mJ, 1 kHz) and probe (sliced X-rays, laser II: 50 fs, 5 mJ, 1 kHz) pulses, and from the excellent stability of the SLS storage ring which is operated in top-up mode and controlled by a fast orbit feedback (FOFB). Coherent radiation emitted at THz frequencies by the sliced 100 fs electron bunches will be monitored as on-line cross-correlation signal to keep the laser-electron beam interaction at optimum. The source is designed to provide at 8 keV (100 fs) a monochromized flux of 104 ph/s/0.01% bw (Si crystal monochromator) and 106 ph/s/1.5% bw (multilayer monochromator) at the sample. It is operated in parasitic mode using a hybrid bunch filling pattern. Because of the low intensity measurements are carried out repetitively over many shots using refreshing samples and gated detectors. `Diffraction gating' experiments will be used to characterize the sub-ps X-ray pulses.

  20. Wavelength-tunable picosecond soliton fiber laser with Topological Insulator: Bi2Se3 as a mode locker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chujun; Zou, Yanhong; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhiteng; Lu, Shunbin; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuangchun; Tang, Dingyuan

    2012-12-03

    Based on the open-aperture Z-scan measurement, we firstly uncovered the saturable absorption property of the topological insulator (TI): Bi2Se3. A high absolute modulation depth up to 98% and a saturation intensity of 0.49 GWcm(-2) were identified. By incorporating this novel saturable absorber material into an erbium-doped fiber laser, wavelength tunable soliton operation was experimentally demonstrated. Our result indicates that like the atomic layer graphene, the topological insulator Bi2Se3 could also operate as an effective saturable absorber for the passive mode locking of lasers at the telecommunication band.

  1. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-03-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provides a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  2. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provide a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  3. The Use of Ultrashort Picosecond Laser Pulses to Generate Quantum Optical Properties of Single Molecules in Biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Sonny

    Generation of quantum optical states from ultrashort laser-molecule interactions have led to fascinating discoveries in physics and chemistry. In recent years, these interactions have been extended to probe phenomena in single molecule biophysics. Photons emitted from a single fluorescent molecule contains important properties about how the molecule behave and function in that particular environment. Analysis of the second order coherence function through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy plays a pivotal role in quantum optics. At very short nanosecond timescales, the coherence function predicts photon antibunching, a purely quantum optical phenomena which states that a single molecule can only emit one photon at a time. Photon antibunching is the only direct proof of single molecule emission. From the nanosecond to microsecond timescale, the coherence function gives information about rotational diffusion coefficients, and at longer millisecond timescales, gives information regarding the translational diffusion coefficients. In addition, energy transfer between molecules from dipole-dipole interaction results in FRET, a highly sensitive method to probe conformational dynamics at nanometer distances. Here I apply the quantum optical techniques of photon antibunching, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and FRET to probe how lipid nanodiscs form and function at the single molecule level. Lipid nanodiscs are particles that contain two apolipoprotein (apo) A-I circumventing a lipid bilayer in a belt conformation. From a technological point of view, nanodiscs mimics a patch of cell membrane that have recently been used to reconstitute a variety of membrane proteins including cytochrome P450 and bacteriorhodopsin. They are also potential drug transport vehicles due to its small and stable 10nm diameter size. Biologically, nanodiscs resemble to high degree, high density lipoproteins (HDL) in our body and provides a model platform to study lipid-protein interactions

  4. Direct generation of 2  W average-power and 232  nJ picosecond pulses from an ultra-simple Yb-doped double-clad fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yizhong; Luo, Zhengqian; Xiong, Fengfu; Li, Yingyue; Zhong, Min; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Huiying; Fu, Hongyan

    2015-03-15

    We report the generation of 2.06 W average-power and 232 nJ picosecond mode-locked pulses directly from an ultra-simple Yb-doped fiber laser. A section of Yb-doped double-clad fiber pumped by a 976 nm laser diode provides the large gain, and the linear cavity is simply formed by a 1064 nm highly reflective fiber Bragg grating and a fiber loop mirror (FLM) using a 5/95 optical coupler. The asymmetric FLM not only acts as the output mirror for providing ∼20% optical feedback, but also equivalently behaves as a nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) to initiate the mode-locking operation in this cavity. Stable mode-locking is therefore achieved over a pump power of 3.76 W. The mode-locked pulses show the dissipative soliton resonance (DSR), which has the pulse duration of 695 ps to ∼1  ns, and the almost unchanged peak power of ∼200  W as increasing the pump power. In particular, this laser can emit 232 nJ high-energy DSR pulses with an average output power of >2  W. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of such an ultra-simple, mode-locked fiber laser that enables watt-level, high energy, picosecond DSR pulses.

  5. The effect of picosecond laser pulses on redox-dependent processes in mice red blood cells studied in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronova, Olga; Gening, Tatyana; Abakumova, Tatyana; Sysolyatin, Aleksey; Zolotovskiy, Igor; Antoneeva, Inna; Ostatochnikov, Vladimir; Gening, Snezhanna

    2014-02-01

    The study highlights the effect of different modes of in vivo laser irradiation of mice using a PFL8LA laser with λ = 1560 nm, pulse duration of 1,4•10-12 s, peak power of 3,72•103 W and average output power of 20•10-3 W on the lipid peroxidation parameters: conjugated dienes, ketodienes and conjugated trienes, malondialdehyde, Schiff bases and the activity of antioxidant enzymes - catalase, glutathione -S-transferase and superoxide dismutase in erythrocytes and plasma of mice. Two groups of mice received a total dose of 3.8 J/cm2 per group, but the 1st group was irradiated only once, while the 2nd - four times. Significant differences in the parameters of the 1st and 2nd groups indicate different effects of the irradiation modes on redox-dependent processes in red blood cells of mice.

  6. Picosecond 1.3{-}\\unicode{956} {\\text{m}} bismuth fibre laser mode-locked by a nonlinear loop mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khegai, A. M.; Afanas'ev, F. V.; Riumkin, K. E.; Firstov, S. V.; Khopin, V. F.; Myasnikov, D. V.; Mel'kumov, M. A.; Dianov, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The influence of the concentration of bismuth active centres (BACs) in phosphosilicate fibres on their optical parameters, including gain coefficient and non-saturable losses, has been studied. A range of BAC concentrations optimal for designing ultrashort-pulse (USP) lasers was chosen based on the obtained results. The optimised fibre was used to fabricate an all-fibre 1.3-\\unicode{956}{\\text{m}} USP laser mode-locked by a nonlinear loop mirror, which emits 11.3-{\\text{ps}} pulses with an energy of 1.65 {\\text{nJ}} and a repetition rate of 3.6 {\\text{MHz}}. A bismuth fibre amplifier made it possible to increase the pulse energy to 8.3 {\\text{nJ}}. After compression in a diffraction grating compressor, the pulse duration decreased to 530 {\\text{fs}}.

  7. Time transfer between the Goddard Optical Research Facility and the U.S. Naval Observatory using 100 picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, C. O.; Rayner, J. D.; Steggerda, C. A.; Mullendore, J. V.; Small, L.; Wagner, S.

    1983-01-01

    A horizontal two-way time comparison link in air between the University of Maryland laser ranging and time transfer equipment at the Goddard Optical Research Facility (GORF) 1.2 m telescope and the Time Services Division of the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) was established. Flat mirrors of 25 cm and 30 cm diameter respectively were placed on top of the Washington Cathedral and on a water tower at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. Two optical corner reflectors at the USNO reflect the laser pulses back to the GORF. Light pulses of 100 ps duration and an energy of several hundred microjoules are sent at the rate of 10 pulses per second. The detection at the USNO is by means of an RCA C30902E avalanche photodiode and the timing is accomplished by an HP 5370A computing counter and an HP 1000 computer with respect to a 10 pps pulse train from the Master Clock.

  8. Pulsed x-ray imaging of high-density objects using a ten picosecond high-intensity laser driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusby, D. R.; Brenner, C. M.; Armstrong, C.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-10-01

    Point-like sources of X-rays that are pulsed (sub nanosecond), high energy (up to several MeV) and bright are very promising for industrial and security applications where imaging through large and dense objects is required. Highly penetrating X-rays can be produced by electrons that have been accelerated by a high intensity laser pulse incident onto a thin solid target. We have used a pulse length of 10ps to accelerate electrons to create a bright x-ray source. The bremsstrahlung temperature was measured for a laser intensity from 8.5-12×1018 W/cm2. These x-rays have sequentially been used to image high density materials using image plate and a pixelated scintillator system.

  9. Coupled phase field, heat conduction, and elastodynamic simulations of kinetic superheating and nanoscale melting of aluminum nanolayer irradiated by picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I

    2015-12-21

    An advanced continuum model for nanoscale melting and kinetic superheating of an aluminum nanolayer irradiated by a picosecond laser is formulated. Barrierless nucleation of surface premelting and melting occurs, followed by a propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other and their collision. For a slow heating rate of Q = 0.015 K ps(-1) melting occurs at the equilibrium melting temperature under uniaxial strain conditions T = 898.1 K (i.e., below equilibrium melting temperature Teq = 933.67 K) and corresponding biaxial stresses, which relax during melting. For a high heating rate of Q = 0.99-84 K ps(-1), melting occurs significantly above Teq. Surprisingly, an increase in heating rate leads to temperature reduction at the 3 nm wide moving interfaces due to fast absorption of the heat of fusion. A significant, rapid temperature drop (100-500 K, even below melting temperature) at the very end of melting is revealed, which is caused by the collision of two finite-width interfaces and accelerated melting in about the 5 nm zone. For Q = 25-84 K ps(-1), standing elastic stress waves are observed in a solid with nodal points at the moving solid-melt interfaces, which, however, do not have a profound effect on melting time or temperatures. When surface melting is suppressed, barrierless bulk melting occurs in the entire sample, and elastodynamic effects are more important. Good correspondence with published, experimentally-determined melting time is found for a broad range of heating rates. Similar approaches can be applied to study various phase transformations in different materials and nanostructures under high heating rates.

  10. Mechanistic investigation of doxycycline photosensitization by picosecond-pulsed and continuous wave laser irradiation of cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, C.R.; Hefetz, Y.; Gillies, R.; Wimberly, J.; Dalickas, G.; Hasan, T. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1990-04-15

    In order to elucidate the photophysical mechanisms of cellular phototoxicity sensitized by doxycycline, MGH-U1 human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro were treated with 20.7 microM doxycycline and irradiated with either a pulsed (lambda = 355 nm, pulse duration = 24 ps) or a continuous wave (lambda = 351 nm) laser. Cumulative radiant exposure and irradiance were systematically varied in experiments with both lasers. Phototoxicity was assessed by epifluorescence microscopy of unfixed cells using rhodamine 123 labeling of mitochondria. With the continuous wave source, the cumulative radiant exposure required for induction of phototoxic injury was independent of irradiance. With the 24-ps-pulsed source, a significantly lower cumulative radiant exposure was required to induce the phototoxicity when the peak irradiance was 5.8 x 10(7) or 1.3 x 10(8) watts cm-2 compared with when peak irradiance was either lower (6.0 x 10(6) watts cm-2) or higher (7.6 x 10(8) watts cm-2). The measured fluorescence lifetimes of doxycycline in buffered saline solution were longer than the laser pulse duration of 24 ps. The increased efficiency of photosensitization at the optimal peak irradiance in the ps domain appears to result from sequential multiphoton absorption involving higher excited states of the singlet manifold. At the highest irradiance studied, on the other hand, reduced efficiency of photosensitization is attributed to increased photodegradation of doxycycline from higher excited states by processes such as photoionization. A model consistent with these observations is presented along with calculations, based on simple rate equations, that fit the essentials of the proposed model.

  11. 1.34 µm picosecond self-mode-locked Nd:GdVO4 watt-level laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ming; Peng, Jiying; Li, Zuohan; Cao, Qiuyuan; Yuan, Ruixia

    2017-01-01

    With a simple linear configuration, a diode-pumped, self-mode-locked Nd:GdVO4 laser at 1.34 µm is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Based on the aberrationless theory of self-focusing and thermal lensing effect, through designing and optimizing the resonator, a pulse width as short as 9.1 ps is generated at a repetition rate of 2.0 GHz and the average output power is 2.51 W. The optical conversion efficiency and the slope efficiency for the stable mode-locked operation are approximately 16.7% and 19.2%, respectively.

  12. A stable pulsed picosecond GSGG:Nd(3+) laser with a resonator based on the Sagnac interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokhorenko, V.I.; Surovtsev, D.V.; Tikhonov, E.A.; Iatskiv, D.IA. (Institut Fiziki, Kiev (Ukrainian SSR))

    1990-03-01

    A study is made of a passively mode-locked laser based on chromium-doped gadolinium-scandium-gallium garnet operating in the ultrashort-pulse emission mode. Statistical expressions are presented which relate the width, energy, and repeatability of the generated pulses as a function of the position of a cell with a saturable absorbent (dye 3274 in ethanol) in the interferometer and its initial transmission. A new resonator scheme with asymmetric positioning of the active element with the interferometer ring is described which makes it possible to achieve stable generation at the lower transverse mode without additional spatial selection. 8 refs.

  13. 21W、56MHz Nd∶YVO4皮秒脉冲激光放大器%Research on 21 W and 56 MHz Nd∶YVO4 Picosecond Pulse Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻云凤; 余锦; 牛岗; 张晶; 赵天卓; 闫莹; 张雪; 樊仲维

    2013-01-01

    Three power amplifier system is reported in which the Nd! YVO4 crystal is pumped by laser diode (LD), in which 1064 nm picosecond laser output average power is more than 21 W. When the repetition frequency of 56 MHz, the average power of 3 W picosecond seed pulse is injected, a maximum power of 26 W is got by a three-stage power amplifier system with the optical conversion efficiency of 25%. The picosecond pulse duration is less than 17 ps, power instability in 1 h is less than 2% , and the light beam quality M2 is less than 1.5. A RbTiOPO, (RTP) electro-optical switch is as a marking switch and the main-minor pulse ratio is up to 210: 1, which is suitable for the use of the marking machine.%报道了通过激光二极管(LD)单端抽运Nd∶ YVO4晶体的三级功率放大系统,获得稳定的平均功率21 W以上的1064 nm皮秒激光输出.当重复频率为56 MHz、平均功率为4W的皮秒种子脉冲注入时,经过三级功率放大,最高功率达26W,光-光转换效率达25%.皮秒单脉冲宽度为17 ps,连续1h内的功率不稳定性小于2%,光束质量M2为1.5.采用RbTiOPO4(RTP)电光开关作为打标开关,实现主从脉冲比达210∶1以上,可以满足打标机的需要.

  14. Reduction of picosecond laser ablation threshold and damage via nanosecond pre-pulse for removal of dielectric layers on silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, A. A.; Meyer, F.; Nekarda, J.-F.; Preu, R.

    2014-10-01

    Laser microstructuring of thin dielectric layers on sensitive electronic devices, such as crystalline silicon solar cells, requires a careful design of the laser ablation process. For instance, degradation of the substrate's crystallinity can vastly decrease minority carrier lifetime and consequently impair the efficiency of such devices. Short-pulse laser ablation seems well suited for clean and spatially confined structuring because of the small heat-affected zone in the remaining substrate material [Dube and Gonsiorawski in Conference record of the twenty first IEEE photovoltaic specialists conference, 624-628 1990]. The short-time regimes, however, generate steep temperature gradients that can lead to amorphization of the remaining silicon surface. By `heating' the substrate via a non-ablative laser pulse in the nanosecond regime before the actual ablation pulse occurs we are able to prevent amorphization of the surface of the silicon solar cell substrate, while lowering the ablation thresholds of a SiNx layer on crystalline silicon wafers.

  15. Invited article: a test-facility for large-area microchannel plate detector assemblies using a pulsed sub-picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bernhard; Chollet, Matthieu; Elagin, Andrey; Oberla, Eric; Vostrikov, Alexander; Wetstein, Matthew; Obaid, Razib; Webster, Preston

    2013-06-01

    The Large Area Picosecond Photodetector Collaboration is developing large-area fast photodetectors with time resolution tests on bare 8 in.-square MCP plates or into a smaller chamber for tests on 33-mm circular substrates. We present the experimental setup, detector calibration, data acquisition, analysis tools, and typical results demonstrating the performance of the test facility.

  16. Probing Dense Sprays with Gated, Picosecond, Digital Particle Field Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Trolinger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes work that demonstrated the feasibility of producing a gated digital holography system that is capable of producing high-resolution images of three-dimensional particle and structure details deep within dense particle fields of a spray. We developed a gated picosecond digital holocamera, using optical Kerr cell gating, to demonstrate features of gated digital holography that make it an exceptional candidate for this application. The Kerr cell gate shuttered the camera after the initial burst of ballistic and snake photons had been recorded, suppressing longer path, multiple scattered illumination. By starting with a CW laser without gating and then incorporating a picosecond laser and an optical Kerr gate, we were able to assess the imaging quality of the gated holograms, and determine improvement gained by gating. We produced high quality images of 50–200 μm diameter particles, hairs and USAF resolution charts from digital holograms recorded through turbid media where more than 98% of the light was scattered from the field. The system can gate pulses as short as 3 mm in pathlength (10 ps, enabling image-improving features of the system. The experiments lead us to the conclusion that this method has an excellent capability as a diagnostics tool in dense spray combustion research.

  17. Probing of Elastic Properties and Texture of Transparent Solids with sub-μm and μm-Resolution at Mbar Pressures Using Picosecond Laser Ultrasonic Interferometry: H2O Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerr, A.; Nikitin, S. M.; Chigarev, N.; Raetz, S.; Kuriakose, M.; Tournat, V.; Bulou, A.; Gasteau, D.; Castagnede, B.; Gusev, V. E.; Lomonosov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Elastic properties of silicates, oxides and other transparent materials, especially their single crystal elastic moduli, texture and its evolution upon compression at Mbar pressures is a subject of continuous interest in geo- and planetary sciences. Picosecond laser ultrasonic technique was earlier proposed to measure elastic moduli of materials compressed in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) [1]. Recently the applications of picosecond laser ultrasonic interferometry have been extended to evaluation of spatially inhomogeneous samples |2]. In this communication we report characterization by this technique of a transparent polycrystalline sample (H2O ice) compressed in a DAC to ~1 Mbar. The method is suitable for measurements in multi-Mbar region due to a high in-depth resolution approaching 300 nm and limited by the used signal processing. In an inhomogeneous medium the transient reflectivity signal obtained by this technique contains at each time instance the information on the parameters of the medium in the spatial position of laser-generated picosecond acoustic pulse corresponding to this moment of time. The lateral resolution is defined by focusing of the laser radiation which can approach ≤1 μm if advanced focusing methods are applied. Here we present results of examination of characteristic features of micro-crystallinity of H2O ice at P up to 840 kbar by two-dimensional imaging based on this technique which provides, in addition, for each spatial position the value of elastic modulus of the sample material along the DAC axis [2]. A significant elastic anisotropy of H2O ice was recognised, its degree evaluated, and compared with the earlier experimental and theoretical data. Feasibility of extension to a three-dimensional imaging of texture (including information on orientation of crystallites or their groups) as well as its evolution upon further compression in a DAC is discussed. The method can be applied to any transparent compounds (silicates, oxides) or

  18. High peak-power picosecond pulse generation at 1.26 µm using a quantum-dot-based external-cavity mode-locked laser and tapered optical amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Y; Aviles-Espinosa, R; Cataluna, M A; Nikitichev, D; Ruiz, M; Tran, M; Robert, Y; Kapsalis, A; Simos, H; Mesaritakis, C; Xu, T; Bardella, P; Rossetti, M; Krestnikov, I; Livshits, D; Montrosset, Ivo; Syvridis, D; Krakowski, M; Loza-Alvarez, P; Rafailov, E

    2012-06-18

    In this paper, we present the generation of high peak-power picosecond optical pulses in the 1.26 μm spectral band from a repetition-rate-tunable quantum-dot external-cavity passively mode-locked laser (QD-ECMLL), amplified by a tapered quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA). The laser emission wavelength was controlled through a chirped volume Bragg grating which was used as an external cavity output coupler. An average power of 208.2 mW, pulse energy of 321 pJ, and peak power of 30.3 W were achieved. Preliminary nonlinear imaging investigations indicate that this system is promising as a high peak-power pulsed light source for nonlinear bio-imaging applications across the 1.0 μm - 1.3 μm spectral range.

  19. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  20. A Study of TPF Structure for Multiple Overlapping of Picosecond Laser Light Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    SECURITY CLASS. (of tht Unclassified ISa. DECLASSIFICATION/DO SCHEDULE 16. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of Chia Report) Approved for public release...best estimate the experimental measurements, P/B was defined to be the ratio of the fluores - " cence intensity at the central maximum to that at the

  1. Modeling of laser induced periodic surface structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skolski, J.Z.P.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Mitko, V.S.; Obona, J.V.; Ocelik, V.; Hosson, J.T.M. de

    2010-01-01

    In surfaces irradiated by short laser pulses, Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) have been observed on all kind of materials for over forty years. These LIPSS, also referred to as ripples, consist of wavy surfaces with periodicity equal or smaller than the wavelength of the laser radi

  2. Composition and structure modification of a WTi/Si system by short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, S.; Gaković, B.; Peruško, D.; Radak, B.; Desai, T.; Kovač, J.; Panjan, P.; Trtica, M.

    2010-03-01

    Picosecond (40 ps) pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation of a WTi thin film on silicon with a wavelength of 532 nm and a fluence 2.1 J/cm2 was performed in air. This led to significant changes of the chemical composition and morphology on the surface of the WTi thin film. The results show an increase in surface roughness, due to formation of conical structures, about 50 nm wide in the base, and a very thin oxide layer composed of WO3 and TiO2, with a dominant TiO2 phase at the top, within the depth of about 20 nm. The thickness of the oxide layer was dependent on the number of laser pulses. The samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  3. High power 888 nm optical fiber end-pumped Nd:YVO4 picosecond regenerative amplifier at hundreds kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhenao; Fan, Zhongwei; Lian, Fuqiang; Tan, Tan; Bai, Zhenxu; Yang, Chao; Kang, Zhijun; Liu, Chang

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes a demonstration of a high power 888 nm end-pumped Nd:YVO4 picosecond regenerative amplifier operated at high repetition rate. By utilizing an all-fiber mode-locking picosecond laser as seed source and 888 nm continuous wave (CW) as pumping source, we obtained regenerative amplified output at 1064.07 nm with spectrum width 0.16 nm, pulse width of 38 ps, maximum power of 21 W, and the repetition rate is continuously adjustable from 300 to 500 kHz. The regenerative amplifier has high power stability and high compact structure.

  4. Numerical simulation of the main characteristics of a high-pressure DF – CO{sub 2} laser for amplification of picosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agroskin, V Ya; Bravy, B G; Vasiliev, G K; Kashtanov, S A; Makarov, E F; Sotnichenko, S A; Chernyshev, Yu A [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-31

    The gain characteristics of the medium of a pulsed DF – CO{sub 2} laser in the ten-micron region at the working gas pressures from 1 to 2.5 atm, which were experimentally determined in [4], are numerically simulated using a scheme that includes the main chemical and relaxation processes. It is shown that the chosen scheme of processes makes it possible (i) to numerically describe the experimental data on the temporal behaviour of gains; (ii) to explain the reason for early degradation of gains (at the degree of D{sub 2} transformation of about 20%); (iii) from comparison of experimental and calculated temporal gain profiles, to determine the degree of photodissociation of F{sub 2} molecules, which is an important parameter determining the operation of pulsed chemical DF – CO{sub 2} lasers; and (iv) to predict the gain characteristics of working mixtures depending on their composition and pressure and on the initiation parameters. The predicted gains in the mixtures of the optimal composition at a pressure of 2.5 atm, a degree of dissociation of F{sub 2} molecules per flash ∼1%, and a flash duration at half-width of ∼3 μs are ∼7 m{sup -1}. (lasers)

  5. Ablation Study of WC and PCD Composites Using 10 Picosecond and 1 Nanosecond Pulse Durations at Green and Infrared Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Gregory; Wegener, Konrad

    An ablation study is carried out to compare 10 picosecond and 1 nanosecond pulse durations as well as 532 nanometre and 1064 nanometre wavelengths at each corresponding pulse duration. All laser parameters are kept constant in order to understand the influence of pulse duration and wavelength independently. The materials processed according to the electronic band structure are a metal and an insulator/metal composite, i.e. tungsten carbide and polycrystalline diamond composite respectively. After laser processing said materials, the ablation rate and surface roughness are determined. Analysis into the ablation behaviour between the various laser parameters and the materials processed is given, with a particular emphasis on the graphitisation of diamond.

  6. Prototyping of Dental Structures Using Laser Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A. O.; Kosenko, M. S.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Mironov, V. D.

    2016-02-01

    The results of experimental studies of the effect of an ytterbium fiber laser radiation parameters on processing efficiency and quality of ZrO2 ceramics widely used in stomatology are presented. Laser operating conditions with optimum characteristics for obtaining high quality final surfaces and rapid material removal of dental structures are determined. The ability of forming thin-walled ceramic structures by laser milling technology (a minimum wall thickness of 50 μm) is demonstrated. The examples of three-dimensional dental structures created in computer 3D-models of human teeth using laser milling are shown.

  7. 1.2 MW peak power, all-solid-state picosecond laser with a microchip laser seed and a high gain single-passing bounce geometry amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhua; Shen, Lifeng; Zhao, Zhiliang; Liu, Bin; Jiang, Hongbo; Chen, Jun; Liu, Chong

    2016-11-01

    A semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) based passively Q-switched microchip Nd:YVO4 seed laser with pulse duration of 90 ps at repetition rate of 100 kHz is amplified by single-passing a Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier with varying seed input power from 20 μW to 10 mW. The liquid pure metal greasy thermally conductive material is used to replace the traditional thin indium foil as the thermal contact material for better heat load transfer of the Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier. Temperature distribution at the pump surface is measured by an infrared imager to compare with the numerically simulated results. A highest single-passing output power of 11.3 W is obtained for 10 mW averaged seed power, achieving a pulse peak power of ~1.25 MW and pulse energy of ~113 μJ. The beam quality is well preserved with M2 ≤1.25. The simple configuration of this bounce laser amplifier made the system flexible, robust and cost-effective, showing attractive potential for further applications.

  8. Laser forward transfer using structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Kim, Heungsoo; Mathews, Scott; Piqué, Alberto

    2015-01-12

    A digital micromirror device (DMD) is used to spatially structure a 532 nm laser beam to print features spatially congruent to the laser spot in a laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) process known as laser decal transfer (LDT). The DMD is a binary (on/off) spatial light modulator and its resolution, half-toning and beam shaping properties are studied using LDT of silver nanopaste layers. Edge-enhanced "checkerboard" beam profiles led to a ~30% decrease in the laser transfer fluence threshold (compared to a reference "checkerboard" profile) for a 20-pixel bitmap pattern and its resulting 10-μm square feature.

  9. Tailored optical vector fields for ultrashort-pulse laser induced complex surface plasmon structuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, J; Perrie, W; Allegre, O J; Heil, T; Jin, Y; Fearon, E; Eckford, D; Edwardson, S P; Dearden, G

    2015-05-18

    Precise tailoring of optical vector beams is demonstrated, shaping their focal electric fields and used to create complex laser micro-patterning on a metal surface. A Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) and a micro-structured S-waveplate were integrated with a picosecond laser system and employed to structure the vector fields into radial and azimuthal polarizations with and without a vortex phase wavefront as well as superposition states. Imprinting Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) elucidates the detailed vector fields around the focal region. In addition to clear azimuthal and radial plasmon surface structures, unique, variable logarithmic spiral micro-structures with a pitch Λ ∼1μm, not observed previously, were imprinted on the surface, confirming unambiguously the complex 2D focal electric fields. We show clearly also how the Orbital Angular Momentum(OAM) associated with a helical wavefront induces rotation of vector fields along the optic axis of a focusing lens and confirmed by the observed surface micro-structures.

  10. Optical Fiber Lasers and All Solid-State Passively Modulated Microchip Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junewen; Chen; Pie-Yau; Chien; Yu-Ting; Lee

    2003-01-01

    Erbium fiber lasers of continuous mode outputs and of pulsed picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses train are reported. Compact all solid state passively modulated microchip lasers are also developed to the same degree.

  11. Diode-Pumped High Energy and High Average Power All-Solid-State Picosecond Amplifier Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present our research on the high energy picosecond laser operating at a repetition rate of 1 kHz and the high average power picosecond laser running at 100 kHz based on bulk Nd-doped crystals. With diode-pumped solid state (DPSS hybrid amplifiers consisting of a picosecond oscillator, a regenerative amplifier, end-pumped single-pass amplifiers, and a side-pumped amplifier, an output energy of 64.8 mJ at a repetition rate of 1 kHz was achieved. An average power of 37.5 W at a repetition rate of 100 kHz pumped by continuous wave laser diodes was obtained. Compact, stable and high power DPSS laser amplifier systems with good beam qualities are excellent picosecond sources for high power optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA and high-efficiency laser processing.

  12. 皮秒级时间分辨超快高能脉冲激光光谱%Picosecond time-resolved spectroscopy of ultrafast & high energy pulsed laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小鹏; 薛战理; 曹锋

    2012-01-01

    介绍了一种利用光电摄谱法和条纹管相结合测量ps级时间分辨超快高能脉冲激光光谱的方法.论述了条纹相机工作原理和平面衍射光栅的分光原理,分析指出利用介绍的装置,可以实现波长300 nm~1 600 nm、脉宽>2 ps超快高能脉冲激光的光谱测量.采用1 054 nm超快高能脉冲激光器,实验得到了条纹像,对条纹像进行数据处理后得到测量光谱曲线,通过能量标定后,得到了超快高能脉冲激光器实际光谱曲线,验证了ps级时间分辨超快高能脉冲激光光谱方法.讨论了系统中耦合透镜组对光谱测量和光纤色散角对条纹图像的影响,论述了ps级时间分辨超快高能脉冲激光光谱的作用.随着务纹管制造技术的飞速发展,该方法可用于fs级激光光谱的测量.%The method for measuring the spectrum of ultrafast & high energy pulsed laser in picosecond pulse width was presented with combination of photoelectrical spectrography and streak camera. The operating principle of streak camera and spectrophometric principle of plane diffraction grating were described respectively. Through thorough"analysis, we pointed out that the spectral measurement of ultrafast & high energy pulsed laser with wavelength in 300nm~1600nm and pulse width above 2 ps could be achieved by using our described facility. The streak image was obtained by utilizing ultrafast & high energy pulsed laser in 1054nm wavelength, and the measured spectral curve was derived by processing the data of streak camera, then the actual spectral curve was also given by calibrating the related energy parameters, the method for measuring the spectrum of ultrafast & high energy pulsed laser in picosecond pulse width was proved. The influence of coupling lens on measuring spectrum and grating fiber's dispersion angle on streak image were analyzed finally, furthermore the role of spectrum for ultrafast & high energy pulsed laser with picosecond pulse width was

  13. Dissipative Structures At Laser-Solid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanai, Laszlo

    1989-05-01

    The questions which are discussed in this lecture refer to one of sections of laser-solid interactions, namely: to formation of different dissipative structures on the surface of metals and semiconductors when they are irradiated by intensive laser light in chemically active media (f.e.air). Some particular examples of the development at different spatial and time instabilities, periodic and stochastic structures, auto-wave processes are present-ed using testing materials vanadium metal and semiconducting V205 single crystals and light sources: cw and pulsed CO2 and YAG lasers.

  14. Formation Of Picosecond Electron Bunches In The Linear Accelerator By Means Of An Optical Deflector

    CERN Document Server

    Dyomin, V S; Reprintsev, L V; Shendrik, V A

    2004-01-01

    A possibility for forming trains of optical picosecond pulses by the microwave scanning of a laser beam across the adjustable diaphragm is considered. After amplification these pulses can be used for obtaining a photoemission in microwave guns.

  15. Picosecond Photon Echoes Stimulated from an Accumulated Grating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that in optical transitions with a bottleneck, a mode-locked cw dye laser may be used to generate and heterodyne detect picosecond photon echoes. These echoes are stimulated from an accumulated grating in the electronic ground state formed by a train of twin excitation pulses of constant

  16. Diode-Pumped High Energy and High Average Power All-Solid-State Picosecond Amplifier Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jiaxing Liu; Wei Wang; Zhaohua Wang; Zhiguo Lv; Zhiyuan Zhang; Zhiyi Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present our research on the high energy picosecond laser operating at a repetition rate of 1 kHz and the high average power picosecond laser running at 100 kHz based on bulk Nd-doped crystals. With diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) hybrid amplifiers consisting of a picosecond oscillator, a regenerative amplifier, end-pumped single-pass amplifiers, and a side-pumped amplifier, an output energy of 64.8 mJ at a repetition rate of 1 kHz was achieved. An average power of 37.5 W at a repetition ra...

  17. Picosecond time resolved conductance measurements of redox molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arielly, Rani; Nachman, Nirit; Zelinskyy, Yaroslav; May, Volkhard; Selzer, Yoram

    2017-03-01

    Due to bandwidth limitations of state of the art electronics, the transient transport properties of molecular junctions are experimentally a terra incognita, which can only be explored if novel picosecond current-probing techniques are developed. Here we demonstrate one such approach: the laser pulse-pair sequence scheme. The method is used to monitor in picosecond resolution the oxidation state of a redox molecule, 6-ferrocenyl-1-hexanethiol, within a junction and to quantify its redox rate constant, which is found to be (80 ps)-1.

  18. The pH-Dependent Picosecond Structural Dynamics in the Distal Pocket of Nitrophorin 4 Investigated by 2D IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mark; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Montfort, William R.; Khalil, Munira

    2013-01-01

    Nitrophorin 4 (NP4) belongs to a family of pH-sensitive, nitric oxide (NO) transporter proteins which undergo a large structural change from a closed to an open conformation at high pH to allow for NO delivery. Measuring the pH-dependent structural dynamics in NP4–NO around the ligand binding site is crucial for developing a mechanistic understanding of NO binding and release. In this study we use coherent two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy to measure picosecond structural dynamics sampled by the nitrosyl stretch in NP4–NO as a function of pH at room temperature. Our results show that both the closed and open conformers of the protein are present at low (pD 5.1) and high (pD 7.9) pH conditions. The closed and open conformers are characterized by two frequencies of the nitrosyl stretching vibration labeled A0 and A1, respectively. Analysis of the 2D IR lineshapes reveals that at pD 5.1, the closed conformer experiences structural fluctuations arising from solvation dynamics on a ∼3 ps timescale. At pD 7.9, both the open and closed conformers exhibit fluctuations on a ∼1 ps timescale. At both pD conditions, the closed conformers maintain a static distribution of structures within the experimental time window of 100 ps. This is in contrast to the open conformer, which is able to interconvert among its sub-states on a ∼100 ps timescale. Our results directly measure the timescales of solvation dynamics in the distal pocket, the flexibility of the open conformation at high pH, and the rigidity of the closed conformers at both pH conditions. We discuss how the pH dependent equilibrium structural fluctuations of the nitrosyl ligand measured in this study are related to the uptake and delivery of nitric oxide in Nitrophorin 4. PMID:23885811

  19. 微纳米薄膜材料中激光皮秒超声的数值模拟%Numerical modeling of laser-induced picosecond ultrasound in micro-nano thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许伯强; 张子国; 徐晨光; 徐桂东; 杨小平

    2012-01-01

    基于双温模型和热弹性耦合理论,采用有限元方法,针对A1/Si3N4和A1/Si3N4/Si两种层状薄膜材料中激励皮秒超声,建立激光飞秒超声的有限元数值模型,得到A1薄膜中电子和晶格的温度场,进而分析薄膜内部的应变和表面位移响应.对比研究了双温模型理论和傅里叶热传导理论的计算,结果表明皮秒超声研究采用双温模型求解温度场更为合适,数值分析得到应变具有幅值较小且波形展宽的结果.表面位移响应峰的形成是超声波在薄膜材料界面处发生反射引起的.%Based on two temperature model(TTM) and thermalelastic theory, finite element numerical model of femtosecond laser-induced picosecond ultrasound was applied in investigating laser interaction of Al/Si_3 N_4 and Al/Si_3 N_4/Si multilayer thin films. The temperature fields of electron and lattice in Al film were caculated by the finite element method to analyze the surface displacement response and strain in thin films. The computational result from TTM theory was compared with that from classical fourier heat transfer theory. The comparison indicates that TTM theory is suitable for picosecond ultrasonic investigation. According to numerical analysis, the strain amplitude is small with wide waveform. The peaks of displacement response spectrum on Al surface are induced by ultrasound reflection within the interface of films.

  20. Fs-Laser structuring of ridge waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, D.; Gottmann, J.

    2008-10-01

    Thin films made by PLD from Er:ZBLAN and Nd:Gd3Ga5O12 are micro machined to form optical wave guiding structures using Ti:sapphire and Yb:glass fiber laser radiation. For the manufacturing of the ridge waveguides grooves are structured by ablation using femtosecond laser radiation. The fluence, the scanning velocity, the repetition rate, and the orientation of the polarization with respect to the scanning direction are varied. The resulting structures are characterized using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Damping and absorption coefficients of the waveguides are determined by observing the light scattered from the waveguides due to droplets in the thin films and the surface roughness of the structured edges. To discriminate between damping due to droplets and the structured edges, damping measurements in the non-structured films and the structured waveguides are performed. Ridge waveguides with non-resonant damping losses smaller than 3 dB/cm are achieved. Due to the high repetition rate of the Yb:glass fiber laser, the manufacturing time for one waveguide has been decreased by a factor of more than 100 compared to earlier results achieved with the Ti:sapphire laser.

  1. Picosecond measurements using photoacoustic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritier, J.-M.; Siegman, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    A report is presented of experimental results on picosecond time-resolved photoacoustic measurements of excited-state lifetimes, cross sections, and polarization properties for organic dye molecules in solution, using a new technique in which the total photoacoustic impulse produced by two ultrashort optical pulses with variable time delay between them is detected. The picosecond photoacoustic detection technique reported here appears to be a promising new way to observe weak excited-state cross sections and to perform picosecond lifetime measurements in a large variety of weakly absorbing and/or nonfluorescing atomic and molecular systems.

  2. Material specific effects and limitations during ps-laser generation of micro structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenhagen, J.; Engelhardt, U.; Smarra, M.; Dickmann, K.

    2012-01-01

    The use of picosecond lasers for microstructuring, especially in the combination with scanner optics, leads to undesired effects with increasing ablation depths. The cavity edges slope to a degree ranging between 50° and 85°, depending on the material. With highly reflective substrates, ditches of up to 20% of their total depth can be formed on its ground structure. In certain materials also diverse substructures such as holes, canals, or grooves can be developed. These could impact the precision of the ablation geometry partially. A systematic study of the specific ablation characteristics is needed to achieve a defined depth of the structure. Considering a huge number of influential parameters, an automation of such measurements would be meaningful. For a study of eight different materials (high-alloy steels, copper, titanium, aluminum, PMMA, Al2O3 ceramics, silicon and fused quartz), an industrial ps-laser coupled with a chromatic sensor for distance measurement was used. Hence a direct acquisition of the generated structures as well as an automatic evaluation of the parameters is possible. Furthermore an online quality control and a local post processing can be implemented. In this way the generation of complex structures with a higher precision is possible.

  3. Exploring transverse pattern formation in a dual-polarization self-mode-locked monolithic Yb: KGW laser and generating a 25-GHz sub-picosecond vortex beam via gain competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M T; Liang, H C; Su, K W; Chen, Y F

    2016-04-18

    Formation of transverse modes in a dual-polarization self-mode-locked monolithic Yb: KGW laser under high-power pumping is thoroughly explored. It is experimentally observed that the polarization-resolved transverse patterns are considerably affected by the pump location in the transverse plane of the gain medium. In contrast, the longitudinal self-mode-locking is nearly undisturbed by the pump position, even under the high-power pumping. Under central pumping, a vortex beam of the Laguerre-Gaussian LGp,l mode with p = 1 and l = 1 can be efficiently generated through the process of the gain competition with a sub-picosecond pulse train at 25.3 GHz and the output power can be up to 1.45 W at a pump power of 10.0 W. Under off-center pumping, the symmetry breaking causes the transverse patterns to be dominated by the high-order Hermite-Gaussian modes. Numerical analyses are further performed to manifest the symmetry breaking induced by the off-center pumping.

  4. Picosecond X-ray streak camera dynamic range measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuber, C., E-mail: celine.zuber@cea.fr; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Gontier, D.; Raimbourg, J.; Rubbelynck, C.; Trosseille, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Fronty, J.-P.; Goulmy, C. [Photonis SAS, Avenue Roger Roncier, BP 520, 19106 Brive Cedex (France)

    2016-09-15

    Streak cameras are widely used to record the spatio-temporal evolution of laser-induced plasma. A prototype of picosecond X-ray streak camera has been developed and tested by Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives to answer the Laser MegaJoule specific needs. The dynamic range of this instrument is measured with picosecond X-ray pulses generated by the interaction of a laser beam and a copper target. The required value of 100 is reached only in the configurations combining the slowest sweeping speed and optimization of the streak tube electron throughput by an appropriate choice of high voltages applied to its electrodes.

  5. Picosecond X-ray streak camera dynamic range measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, C.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Fronty, J.-P.; Gontier, D.; Goulmy, C.; Raimbourg, J.; Rubbelynck, C.; Trosseille, C.

    2016-09-01

    Streak cameras are widely used to record the spatio-temporal evolution of laser-induced plasma. A prototype of picosecond X-ray streak camera has been developed and tested by Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives to answer the Laser MegaJoule specific needs. The dynamic range of this instrument is measured with picosecond X-ray pulses generated by the interaction of a laser beam and a copper target. The required value of 100 is reached only in the configurations combining the slowest sweeping speed and optimization of the streak tube electron throughput by an appropriate choice of high voltages applied to its electrodes.

  6. A comparative study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from plasma produced by the femtosecond, picosecond and nanosecond duration laser pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Arora; P A Naik; B S Rao; P D Gupta

    2012-02-01

    We report here an experimental study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from magnesium plasma produced by laser pulses of three widely different pulse durations (FWHM) of 45 fs, 25 ps and 3 ns, at a constant laser fluence of ∼ 1.5 × 104 J cm-2. It is observed that the X-ray yield of the resonance lines from the higher ionization states such as H- and He-like ions decreases on decreasing the laser pulse duration, even though the peak laser intensities of 3.5 × 1017 W cm-2 for the 45 fs pulses and 6.2 × 1014 W cm-2 for the 25 ps pulses are much higher than 5 × 1012 W cm-2 for the 3 ns laser pulse. The results were explained in terms of the ionization equilibrium time for different ionization states in the heated plasma. The study can be useful to make optimum choice of the laser pulse duration to produce short pulse intense X-ray line emission from the plasma and to get the knowledge of the degree of ionization in the plasma.

  7. Microfabrication of Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-04-07

    We discuss the potential for using microfabrication techniques for laser-driven accelerator construction. We introduce microfabrication processes in general, and then describe our investigation of a particular trial process. We conclude by considering the issues microfabrication raises for possible future structures.

  8. Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Stephen M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-08-04

    The goal of this research program was to develop a detector that would measure x-ray time profiles with picosecond resolution. This was specifically aimed for use at x-ray synchrotrons, where x-ray pulse profiles have Gaussian time spreads of 50-100 ps (FWHM), so the successful development of such a detector with picosecond resolution would permit x-ray synchrotron studies to break through the pulse width barrier. That is, synchrotron time-resolved studies are currently limited to pump-probe studies that cannot reveal dynamics faster than ~50 ps, whereas the proposed detector would push this into the physically important 1 ps domain. The results of this research effort, described in detail below, are twofold: 1) the original plan to rely on converting electronic signals from a semiconductor sensor into an optical signal proved to be insufficient for generating signals with the necessary time resolution and sensitivity to be widely applicable; and 2) an all-optical method was discovered whereby the x-rays are directly absorbed in an optoelectronic material, lithium tantalate, which can then be probed by laser pulses with the desired picosecond sensitivity for detection of synchrotron x-rays. This research program has also produced new fundamental understanding of the interaction of x-rays and optical lasers in materials that has now created a viable path for true picosecond detection of synchrotron x-rays.

  9. Theoretical study of Ni-like Ag 13.9 nm TCE x-ray laser driven by two picosecond pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao Xiu-Mei; Zhang Gou-Ping

    2007-01-01

    The Ni-like Ag 13.9 nm x-ray laser has been previously demonstrated that the higher gain near critical surface contributes little to the amplification of the x-ray laser because of severe refraction. In this paper, the transient collision excitation (TCE) Ni-like Ag 13.9 nm x-ray laser is simulated, driven by two 3ps short pulse preceded by a 330 ps long prepulse, optimization of the peak to peak delay time of the two short pulses is made to get the best results. Simulation indicates that by producing lowly ionized preplasma with smoothly varying electron density, it is possible to decrease electron density gradient in higher density region, and thus higher gains near this region could be utilized, and if the main short pulse is delayed by 900 ps, local gains where electron density larger than ~ 4 x 1020 cm-3 could be utilized.

  10. Comparative studies of semiconductor saturable absorber mirror mode-locking dynamics in pulsed diode-end-pumped picosecond Nd:GdVO4 and Nd:YAG lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingyuan Zhang; Gang Li; Meng Chen; Guoju Wang; Yonggang Wang

    2006-01-01

    Ultrashort pulses were generated in passively mode-locked Nd:YAG and Nd:GdVO4 lasers pumped by a pulsed laser diode with 10-Hz repetition rate. Stable mode-locked pulse trains were produced with the pulse width of 10 ps. The evolution of the mode-locked pulse was observed in the experiment and was discussed in detail. Comparing the pulse evolutions of Nd:YAG and Nd:GdVO4 lasers, we found that the buildup time of the steady-state mode-locking with semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) was relevant to the upper-state lifetime and the emission cross-section of the gain medium.

  11. Picosecond spectroscopic studies of equilibrium structural fluctuations of native and partially unfolded states of Zinc II-substituted and metal-free cytochromes C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Jagnyaseni

    Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to characterize the equilibrium and non-equilibrium protein structural fluctuations in Zn II-substituted (ZnCytc) and metal-free (fbCytc) cytochromes c using dynamic fluorescence Stokes shift (FSS) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) measurements. The intrinsic porphyrin chromophore is used as the probe for the structural fluctuations of the surrounding protein and solvent. The FSS experiments examine how the time scales detected from the dynamic solvation of a chromoprotein report changes in the character of motion. ZnCytc and fbCytc serve as limited, single-chromophore models for photosynthetic reaction center and light-harvesting proteins. The dynamic solvation of redox and light-harvesting chromophores in photosynthesis plays an important role in the quantum efficiency of electron transfer and energy transfer performed by these systems, respectively. The FSS response function of fbCytc in water is biexponential over the 100-ps--50-ns regime and the two time constants are 1.4 ns and 9.1 ns. ZnCytc under similar solution conditions shows a biexponential FSS response but with time constants of 0.2 ns and 1.5 ns. The two correlation times from the FSS response function correspond to motions of the hydrophobic core and the solvent-contact layer, respectively. Both FSS correlation times were lengthened and the solvation reorganization energy was reduced from 43 cm-1 to 33 cm-1 in the presence of 50% (v/v) glycerol. A Brownian diffusion model with thermally activated barrier crossings on the protein-folding energy landscape is used to interpret these results. The conclusion is that the mean-squared deviations of the fluctuations exhibited by fbCytc are perhaps a factor of ten larger than those in ZnCytc, which is consistent with the suggestion that fbCytc assumes a dynamic, partially unfolded structure with some of the characteristics of a molten globule. The nature of the motion associated with the

  12. Multipulse mode of heating nanoparticles by nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Iversen, Christian B.; George, Thomas F.

    2010-02-01

    Nanoparticles are being researched as a noninvasive method for selectively killing cancer cells. With particular antibody coatings on nanoparticles, they attach to the abnormal cells of interest (cancer or otherwise). Once attached, nanoparticles can be heated with UV/visible/IR or RF pulses, heating the surrounding area of the cell to the point of death. Researchers often use single-pulse or multipulse lasers when conducting nanoparticle ablation research. In the present paper, we are conducting an analysis to determine if the multipulse mode has any advantage in heating of spherical metal nanoparticles (such as accumulative heating effect). The laser heating of nanoparticles is very sensitive to the time structure of the incident pulsed laser radiation, the time interval between the pulses, and the number of pulses used in the experiments. We perform time-dependent simulations and detailed analyses of the different nonstationary pulsed laser-nanoparticle interaction modes, and show the advantages and disadvantages of multipulse (set of short pulses) and single-pulse laser heating of nanoparticles. A comparative analysis for both radiation modes (single-pulse and multipulse) are discussed for laser heating of metal nanotargets on nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond time scales to make recommendations for efficient laser heating of nanomaterials in the experiments.

  13. Birefringence controlled room-temperature picosecond spin dynamics close to the threshold of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. Y.; Jähme, H.; Soldat, H.; Gerhardt, N. C.; Hofmann, M. R.; Ackemann, T.

    2010-11-01

    We analyze the spin-induced circular polarization dynamics at the threshold of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers at room-temperature using a hybrid excitation combining electrically pumping without spin preference and spin-polarized optical injection. After a short pulse of spin-polarized excitation, fast oscillations of the circular polarization degree (CPD) are observed within the relaxation oscillations. A theoretical investigation of this behavior on the basis of a rate equation model shows that these fast oscillations of CPD could be suppressed by means of a reduction of the birefringence of the laser cavity.

  14. Fast electron propagation in Ti foils irradiated with sub-picosecond laser pulses at $I\\lambda^{2} > 10^{18}$ Wcm$^{-2} \\mu m^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Makita, M; McKeever, K; Dzelzainis, T; White, S; Kettle, B; Dromey, B; Doria, D; Zepf, M; Lewis, CLS; Riley, D; Hansen, S B; Robinson, A P L

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the propagation of fast electrons through laser irradiated Ti foils by monitoring the emission of hard X-rays and K-{\\alpha} radiation from bare foils and foils backed by a thick epoxy layer. Key observations include strong refluxing of electrons and divergence of the electron beam in the foil with evidence of magnetic field collimation. Our diagnostics have allowed us to estimate the fast electron temperature and fraction of laser energy converted to fast electrons. We have observed clear differences between the fast electron temperatures observed with bare and epoxy backed targets which may be due to the effects of refluxing.

  15. Low Timing Jitter and Tunable Dual- Wavelength Picosecond Pulse Genera from a Fabry-Pérot Laser Diode with External Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yi-Biao; WANG Yun-Cai; ZHANG Ming-Jiang; LIANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    A novel scheme to generate tunable dual-wavelength optical pulses with low timing jitter at arbitrary repetition rates is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The pulses are generated from a gain-switched Fabry-Perot laser diode with two external cw beams for injection seeding simultaneously. The cw light is generated by two independent distributed feedback laser diodes, and their wavelengths can be tuned independently by two temperature controllers. The dual-wavelength pulses with the pulse width of 57 ps, the timing jitter of 340 fs, are obtained. The sidemode-suppression ratio of the output pulses is better than 23 dB over a 10-nm wavelength tuning range.

  16. Sub-picosecond Graphene-based Harmonically Mode-Locked Fiber Laser With Repetition Rates up to 2.22 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramski K.M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Passive harmonic-mode locking (PHML of erbium-doped fiber laser with multilayer graphene is presented. The laser could operate at several harmonics (from 2nd to 21st of the fundamental repetition frequency of the ring resonator (106 MHz. The highest achieved repetition rate was 2.22 GHz (which corresponds to the 21st harmonic with 900 fs pulse duration and 50 dB of the supermode noise suppression. The saturable absorber was formed by multilayer graphene, mechanically exfoliated from pure graphite block through Scotch-tape and deposited on the fiber ferrule.

  17. Nanosecond retinal structure changes in K-590 during the room-temperature bacteriorhodopsin photocycle: picosecond time-resolved coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, O; Ujj, L; Jäger, F; Atkinson, G H

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved vibrational spectra are used to elucidate the structural changes in the retinal chromophore within the K-590 intermediate that precedes the formation of the L-550 intermediate in the room-temperature (RT) bacteriorhodopsin (BR) photocycle. Measured by picosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (PTR/CARS), these vibrational data are recorded within the 750 cm-1 to 1720 cm-1 spectral region and with time delays of 50-260 ns after the RT/BR photocycle is optically initiated by pulsed (< 3 ps, 1.75 nJ) excitation. Although K-590 remains structurally unchanged throughout the 50-ps to 1-ns time interval, distinct structural changes do appear over the 1-ns to 260-ns period. Specifically, comparisons of the 50-ps PTR/CARS spectra with those recorded with time delays of 1 ns to 260 ns reveal 1) three types of changes in the hydrogen-out-of-plane (HOOP) region: the appearance of a strong, new feature at 984 cm-1; intensity decreases for the bands at 957 cm-1, 952 cm-1, and 939 cm-1; and small changes intensity and/or frequency of bands at 855 cm-1 and 805 cm-1; and 2) two types of changes in the C-C stretching region: the intensity increase in the band at 1196 cm-1 and small intensity changes and/or frequency shifts for bands at 1300 cm-1 and 1362 cm-1. No changes are observed in the C = C stretching region, and no bands assignable to the Schiff base stretching mode (C = NH+) mode are found in any of the PTR/CARS spectra assignable to K-590. These PTR/CARS data are used, together with vibrational mode assignments derived from previous work, to characterize the retinal structural changes in K-590 as it evolves from its 3.5-ps formation (ps/K-590) through the nanosecond time regime (ns/K-590) that precedes the formation of L-550. The PTR/CARS data suggest that changes in the torsional modes near the C14-C15 = N bonds are directly associated with the appearance of ns/K-590, and perhaps with the KL intermediate proposed in earlier studies. These

  18. Laser pulse induced multiple exciton kinetics in molecular ring structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiao; Wang, Luxia

    2016-11-01

    Multiple excitons can be formed upon strong optical excitation of molecular aggregates and complexes. Based on a theoretical approach on exciton-exciton annihilation dynamics in supramolecular systems (May et al., 2014), exciton interaction kinetics in ring aggregates of two-level molecules are investigated. Excited by the sub-picosecond laser pulse, multiple excitons keep stable in the molecular ring shaped as a regular polygon. If the symmetry is destroyed by changing the dipole of a single molecule, the excitation of different molecules becomes not identical, and the changed dipole-dipole interaction initiates subsequent energy redistribution. Depending on the molecular distance and the dipole configuration, the kinetics undergo different types of processes, but all get stable within some hundreds of femtoseconds. The study of exciton kinetics will be helpful for further investigations of the efficiency of optical devices based on molecular aggregates.

  19. High-power picosecond fiber source for coherent Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieu, Khanh; Saar, Brian G; Holtom, Gary R; Xie, X Sunney; Wise, Frank W

    2009-07-01

    We report a high-power picosecond fiber pump laser system for coherent Raman microscopy (CRM). The fiber laser system generates 3.5 ps pulses with 6 W average power at 1030 nm. Frequency doubling yields more than 2 W of green light, which can be used to pump an optical parametric oscillator to produce the pump and the Stokes beams for CRM. Detailed performance data on the laser and the various wavelength conversion steps are discussed, together with representative CRM images of fresh animal tissue obtained with the new source.

  20. High-power picosecond fiber source for coherent Raman microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kieu, Khanh; Saar, Brian G.; Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Wise, Frank W

    2009-01-01

    We report a high-power picosecond fiber pump laser system for coherent Raman microscopy (CRM). The fiber laser system generates 3.5 ps pulses with 6 W average power at 1030 nm. Frequency doubling yields more than 2 W of green light, which can be used to pump an optical parametric oscillator to produce the pump and the Stokes beams for CRM. Detailed performance data on the laser and the various wavelength conversion steps are discussed, together with representative CRM images of fresh animal t...

  1. Generation of Stable Picosecond Chirp-Free Pulses at 10 GHz from a Nonpolarization Maintaining Regeneratively Mode-Locked Fibre Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Bin; LI Zhi-Yong; WANG Zhao-Ying; GE Chun-Feng; JIA Dong-Fang; NI Wen-Jun; LI Shi-Chen

    2004-01-01

    @@ A 10 GHz regeneratively mode-lockedfibre laser (RMLFL) at 1550nm constructed with commercially available radio frequency components is presented. Chirp-free hyperbolic secant pulses with duration from 4.4ps to 8ps and output reaching 3.6 mW are acquired. Without any cavity length or polarization maintaining mechanism,the error-free operation of this RMLFL can be carried out in room temperature.

  2. Picosecond laser surface micro-texturing for the modification of aerodynamic and dust distribution characteristics in a multi-cyclone system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omonigho B. Otanocha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic flow control in a cyclone is critical to its performance. Dust accumulation in a multi-cyclone is undesirable. This research investigated, the effects of laser-patterned Ethylene-Propylene-Diene Monomer (EPDM roof in a commercial multi-cyclone system on its aerodynamic and dust accumulation characteristics. Our experimental data show that strategically designed concentric micro-dimples on the cyclone roof can improve both the aerodynamic performance and dust separation capability in the multi-cyclone system. With specific laser-patterned cyclone roof, up to 78% reduction in dust adhesion was demonstrated in one of the cones (cone 9. With the 315-μm diameter micro-dimples on EPDM roof, it was observed that dimples located close to the vortex finder caused an increase in the reverse airflows in the cyclone, thereby effecting entrainment of dust. The overall dust separation efficiency of the multi-cyclone system was at an average of 99.9% with the laser-textured roof, hence no adverse effect on the original cyclone system, in spite of the reported improvements in dust adhesion reduction.

  3. Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Laser and Hybrid Laser-GMA Welds Calculated Using Multiple Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--15-9665 Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Laser and Hybrid Laser-GMA Welds...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Laser and Hybrid Laser-GMA Welds Calculated Using Multiple...202) 767-2601 Inverse thermal analyses of structural steel deep-penetration welds are presented. These analyses employ a methodology that is in terms of

  4. 5 W all-fiber supercontinuum source pumped by picosecond pulse fiber laser%基于皮秒脉冲泵浦的5W全光纤超连续谱光源

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫培光; 赵健; 阮双琛; 舒杰; 赵俊清; 李相; 陈胜平; 韦会峰

    2011-01-01

    A supercontinuum (SC) source based on tri-stage MOPA configuration picosecond fiber laser pumping a 30 m-long home-made photonic crystal is reported. The system is all fiber,and a stable super-continuum source with maximum power of 5 W at input power of 19 W is demonstrated by carefully adjusting the splicing parameter although the mode fields of the photonic crystal fiber and single mode fiber mismatch. The optical-optical conversion efficiency is 24%. The output energy is well confined in the fiber core.and the light spot of the core is in hexagon single mode style. The convolution of the spectrum with pump is also studied The short wavelength is extended to 600 ran and the long wavelength is beyond 1 700 nm at the maximum output power.%基于三级MOPA结构皮秒光纤激光器泵浦一段30 m长的国产光子晶体光纤(PCF),实现了全光纤化结构的超连续谱(SC)光源.在PCF与单模光纤(SMF)模场不匹配条件下,通过仔细调节熔接参数,在19 W入射功率条件下实现了最大功率为5 W的稳定超连续输出,系统光-光转换效率为24%.输出能量被很好地限制在纤芯,纤芯光斑为六边形的基模光斑.研究了光谱的演变过程,在最高功率时,对应的光谱短波展宽至600nm,长波超过1700 nm.

  5. Determination of irradiation parameters for laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichstaedt, J., E-mail: j.eichstadt@utwente.nl [University of Twente, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Chair of Applied Laser Technology, P.O. Box 217, Enschede, 7500 AE (Netherlands); Roemer, G.R.B.E. [University of Twente, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Chair of Applied Laser Technology, P.O. Box 217, Enschede, 7500 AE (Netherlands); Huis in ' t Veld, A.J. [University of Twente, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Chair of Applied Laser Technology, P.O. Box 217, Enschede, 7500 AE (Netherlands); TNO Technical Sciences, Mechatronics, Mechanics and Materials, De Rondom 1, Eindhoven, 5600 HE (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present an approach for the determination of irradiation parameters for laser-induced periodic surface structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The approach is based on accumulated fluence and consists of two steps. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (1) Determination of fluence domain boundaries and (2) approximation of irradiation parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The approach is required to apply LIPSS for surface functionalization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide experimental evidence that the accumulated fluence has a decisive role in the spatial emergence of LIPSS. - Abstract: The spatial emergence of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on single-crystalline silicon, upon irradiation with linearly polarized picosecond laser pulses (wavelength {lambda} = 1030 nm, pulse duration {tau} = 6.7 ps, pulse repetition frequency f{sub p} = 1 kHz) was studied theoretically and experimentally, under lateral displacement conditions. An experimental approach is presented for the determination of irradiation parameters of extended surface areas homogenously covered with LIPSS. The approach is based on accumulated fluence and consists of two steps, first the empirical determination of accumulated fluence domain boundaries and second the approximation of irradiation parameters. Such an approach is required for the application of LIPSS in the field of surface functionalization. The approach was successfully applied for structuring extended surface areas, which were homogenously covered with LIPSS. The areas, obtained by different irradiation parameter combinations, satisfying accumulated fluence boundary conditions, show the same type of LIPSS. This observation provides evidence, that the accumulated fluence has a decisive role in the spatial emergence of LIPSS. In the future, further experiments are required to verify the validity and boundaries of the approximations applied.

  6. Upconversion imaging using short-wave infrared picosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathez, Morgan David; Rodrigo, Peter John; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, we present the first demonstration of short-wavelength infrared image upconversion that employs intense picosecond signal and pump beams. We use a fiber laser that emits a signal beam at 1877 nm and a pump beam at 1550 nm—both with a pulse width of 1 ps and a pulse...... by an improved model that considers the combined image blurring effect due to finite pump beam size, thick nonlinear crystal, and polychromatic infrared illumination....

  7. Energy Efficiency of Laser Driven, Structure Based Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemann, R

    2004-04-21

    The acceleration efficiency of a laser driven linear accelerator is analyzed. The laser power, loss factor and impedances determine the maximum charge that can be accelerated and the efficiency of that acceleration. The accelerator structure can be incorporated into a laser cavity. The equation for the resultant laser pulse is derived and analyzed. A specific example is presented, and the steady-state laser pulse shapes, acceleration efficiency, and average unloaded gradient are calculated.

  8. Low pressure micro-Joule picosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and its prospective applications to minimally destructive and high resolution analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Abdulmadjid, Syahrun; Jobiliong, Eric; Margaretha Suliyanti, Maria; Pardede, Marincan; Suyanto, Hery; Hendrik Kurniawan, Koo; Jie Lie, Tjung; Hedwig, Rinda; Sukra Lie, Zener; Karnadi, Indra; Wihardjo, Erning; Tjia, May On; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2017-09-01

    A time-resolved spectroscopic study is performed by using 125-500 micro-Joule (µJ) ps laser focused directly without the aid of microscope on a Cu plate sample in a variety of low-pressure ambient gases including air, helium and argon. It is shown that the ultrashort µJ laser-induced low-pressure plasma in Ar ambient gas exhibits the typical characteristics of shock wave plasma responsible for the thermal excitation and sharp emission of the analyte atoms. It is found that the highest signal to background (S/B) ratio of about 100 is achieved in 1.3 kPa argon ambient gas and detected with optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) gate delay of 1 ns and gate width of 50 µs. The emission spectra obtained from pure Zn sample show the effective suppression of the ionic emission with ablation energy around and below 500 µJ. The experimental setup is successfully applied to Cr analysis with low detection limit in steel. In particular, its application to C analysis in steel is demonstrated to resolve the long standing problem of overlapping contributions from the neutral and ionic Fe emission. It is further found that an element of high excitation energy such as fluorine (F) can be clearly detected from a non metal teflon sample. Further, its application to alluminum sample containing various concentrations of Mg, Ca, Fe, and Si impurity elements clearly displays the existence of linear calibration lines promising for quantitative analyses in certain dynamical ranges. Finally, in view of the tiny crater sizes of less than 10 µm diameter created by the very low ps laser energy, this technique is promising for micrometer resolution mapping of elemental distribution on the sample surface and its depth profiling.

  9. Timing Characteristics of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Elagin, Andrey L.; Frisch, H.; Obaid, Razib; Oberla, E; Vostrikov, Alexander; Wagner, Robert G.; Wang, Jingbo; Wetstein, Matthew J.; Northrop, R

    2015-09-21

    The LAPPD Collaboration was formed to develop ultralast large-area imaging photodetectors based on new methods for fabricating microchannel plates (MCPs). In this paper we characterize the time response using a pulsed, sub picosecond laser. We observe single photoelectron time resolutions of a 20 cm x 20 cm MCP consistently below 70 ps, spatial resolutions of roughly 500 pm, and median gains higher than 10(7). The RMS measured at one particular point on an LAPPD detector is 58 ps, with in of 47 ps. The differential time resolution between the signal reaching the two ends of the delay line anode is measured to be 5.1 ps for large signals, with an asymptotic limit falling below 2 ps as noise-over-signal approaches zero.

  10. Picosecond optical studies of the carrier dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Alexander Peter de

    2002-01-01

    The development of directly modulated picosecond laser diodes might become the next step in boosting the capacity of long haul optical communication systems. Traditionally, laser diodes are modulated by controlling the injection current. The optical output of the device responds to the current contr

  11. Nano- and picosecond 3 μm Er: YSGG lasers using InAs as passive Q-switchers and mode-lockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopyanov, K. L.; Lukashev, A. V.; Phillips, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    Recent results are reported using ultra-thin molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown InAs epilayers on GaAs substrates as passive shutters for 3 μm Er: YSGG lasers ( λ = 2.8 μm). The laser photon energy is 27% higher than the InAs bandgap at 300 K and bleaching occurs due to a band filling effect with a fast recovery time of < 100 ps. Depending on the resonator geometry two modes of operation can be achieved: Q-switched with pulse duration of 35 ns and 5-6 mJ energy (TEM 00 mode) and a Q-switched/mode-locked regime with an output in the form of a train of 30 pulses separated by a 4.3 ns interval, 0.25 mJ energy per spike and 30-50 ps pulse duration in a TEM 00-mode. The latter are the shortest pulses obtained with this lasing medium to date.

  12. Doping management for high-power fiber lasers: 100 W, few-picosecond pulse generation from an all-fiber-integrated amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, P; Yılmaz, S; Akçaalan, O; Kalaycıoğlu, H; Oktem, B; Senel, C; Ilday, F Ö; Eken, K

    2012-08-01

    Thermal effects, which limit the average power, can be minimized by using low-doped, longer gain fibers, whereas the presence of nonlinear effects requires use of high-doped, shorter fibers to maximize the peak power. We propose the use of varying doping levels along the gain fiber to circumvent these opposing requirements. By analogy to dispersion management and nonlinearity management, we refer to this scheme as doping management. As a practical first implementation, we report on the development of a fiber laser-amplifier system, the last stage of which has a hybrid gain fiber composed of high-doped and low-doped Yb fibers. The amplifier generates 100 W at 100 MHz with pulse energy of 1 μJ. The seed source is a passively mode-locked fiber oscillator operating in the all-normal-dispersion regime. The amplifier comprises three stages, which are all-fiber-integrated, delivering 13 ps pulses at full power. By optionally placing a grating compressor after the first stage amplifier, chirp of the seed pulses can be controlled, which allows an extra degree of freedom in the interplay between dispersion and self-phase modulation. This way, the laser delivers 4.5 ps pulses with ~200 kW peak power directly from fiber, without using external pulse compression.

  13. Efficient picosecond traveling-wave Raman conversion in a SrWO4 crystal pumped by multi-Watt MOPA lasers at 1064 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinello, Paolo; Pirzio, Federico; Zhang, Xingyu; Petrov, Valentin; Agnesi, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Raman conversion with a 50-mm-long SrWO4 crystal in a single-pass, traveling-wave setup has been investigated in both purely steady-state and transient stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) regimes. For steady-state SRS experiment, we employed as a pump source a Q-Switched master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser system at 1064 nm, delivering 325 μJ, 550-ps-long pulses with diffraction limited beam quality and high spectral purity. At 2-kHz repetition rate, we obtained up to 90 μJ pulse energy and 250 ps pulse duration at 1180 nm, with a conversion slope efficiency close to quantum limit. To approach the transient SRS regime, we pumped the same crystal with 16-ps-long pulses from a hybrid MOPA laser system based on a mode-locked Yb-fiber oscillator followed by a diode-pumped bulk Nd:YVO4 power amplifier. At the maximum incident pump average power of 3.75 W, we obtained 1.4 W at the first Stokes Raman-shifted wavelength of 1180 nm (37 % optical-to-optical conversion efficiency), with 15 ps pulse duration and 70 % conversion slope efficiency.

  14. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silicon upon polarization controlled two-color double-pulse irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhm, Sandra; Herzlieb, Marcel; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Krüger, Jörg; Bonse, Jörn

    2015-01-12

    Two-color double-fs-pulse experiments were performed on silicon wafers to study the temporally distributed energy deposition in the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS). A Mach-Zehnder interferometer generated parallel or cross-polarized double-pulse sequences at 400 and 800 nm wavelength, with inter-pulse delays up to a few picoseconds between the sub-ablation 50-fs-pulses. Multiple two-color double-pulse sequences were collinearly focused by a spherical mirror to the sample. The resulting LIPSS characteristics (periods, areas) were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A wavelength-dependent plasmonic mechanism is proposed to explain the delay-dependence of the LIPSS. These two-color experiments extend previous single-color studies and prove the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition for LIPSS formation.

  15. Comparison Between Geometrically Focused Pulses Versus Filaments in Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Steel and Titanium Alloys (Reprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    14. ABSTRACT Kerr self-focusing of high - power ultrashort laser pulses in atmosphere may result in a structure or structures of high intensity...its unique properties. Salient features of filaments include a central region of intense laser power (greater than the ionization threshold of the...titanium samples are ablated by filaments and by sharply focused sub- picosecond laser pulses. We then performed metrology on the samples to compare the

  16. Picosecond spectroscopy of dihydro biliverdin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Manfred; Brunner, Harald; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1991-10-01

    Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy was performed on dihydro biliverdin, a model for the chromophore in the plant pigment phytochrome, a chromoprotein governing plant growth. Close agreement between the model compound and the native chromophore proves the importance of the saturated pyrrol ring for the decay kinetics and renders chromophore protonation in phytochrome unlikely.

  17. Generation of frequency-chirped pulses in the far-infrared by means of a sub-picosecond free-electron laser and an external pulse shaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippels, G. M. H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Mols, R. F. X. A. M.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Vrijen, R. B.; Maas, D. J.; Noordam, L. D.

    1995-02-01

    The generation of frequency-chirped optical pulses in the far-infrared is reported. The pulses are produced by the free-electron laser FELIX. The chirp is induced by means of an external shaping device consisting of a grating and a telescope. The shaper is based on reflective optics to permit operation in a wide spectral range. The present experiments were made at 8.2 μm wavelength. The fwhm duration of the incident pulse was 0.50 ps, which corresponds to a bandwidth of 2.2%. It has been checked that a linear chirp is produced, for the case that the frequency increases from the leading edge of the pulse to the trailing edge, as well as for the reverse case. This is accompanied by an increase of the fwhm pulse duration which ranges up to 16.5 ps.

  18. Tunable High Power Picosecond Laser in Ultra-violet%皮秒级高功率紫外可调谐激光

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 黄骝

    2001-01-01

    采用355 nm主被动锁模YAG激光器作抽运源,结合BBO晶体的倍频调谐特性,获得了200~350 nm的皮秒级紫外可调谐激光,转换效率为15.3%~23.6%.对影响参量光倍频转换效率的发散角、线宽进行模拟和分析,其结果与实验吻合.%Utilizing SHG tunable feature of nonlinear crystal BBO, an experiment of UV tunable laser in 200~350 nm with conversion efficiency from 15.3% to 23.6% has been demonstrated. The influence of the divergence angle and the linewidth of the incident parametric light on the SHG conversion is calculated and compared with the experiments.

  19. In situ measurement of the particle size distribution of the fragmentation product of laser-shock-melted aluminum using in-line picosecond holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hua Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic fragmentation of shock-melted metal is a topic of increasing interest in shock physics. However, high-quality experimental studies of the phenomenon are limited, and data that are essential for developing predictive models of the phenomenon, such as the mass and particle sizes distributions, are quite sparse. In-line holography is an effective non-contact technique for measuring particle size distribution, but critical technical requirements, in particular, particle density limits, complicate its application to the subject phenomenon. These challenges have been reasonably overcome in the present study, allowing for successful in situ measurements of the size distribution of the fragmentation product from laser-shock-melted aluminum. In this letter, we report on our experiments and present the measured data.

  20. Study of the picosecond laser damage in HfO2/SiO2-based thin-film coatings in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, A. A.; Papernov, S.; Oliver, J. B.; Rigatti, A.; Taylor, B.; Charles, B.; Smith, C.

    2016-12-01

    The laser damage thresholds of various HfO2/SiO2-based thin film coatings, including multilayer dielectric (MLD) gratings and high reflectors of different designs, prepared by E-beam and Plasma Ion Assisted Deposition (PIAD) methods, were investigated in vacuum, dry nitrogen, and after air-vacuum cycling. Single and multiple-pulse damage thresholds and their pulse-length scaling in the range of 0.6 to 100 ps were measured using a vacuum damage test station operated at 1053nm. The E-beam deposited high reflectors showed higher damage thresholds with square-root pulse-length scaling, as compared to PIAD coatings, which typically show slower power scaling. The former coatings appeared to be not affected by air/vacuum cycling, contrary to PIAD mirrors and MLD gratings. The relation between 1-on-1 and N-on-1 damage thresholds was found dependent on coating design and deposition methods.

  1. Synthesis of picosecond pulses by spectral compression and shaping of femtosecond pulses in engineered quadratic nonlinear media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangoni, M; Brida, D; Conforti, M; Capobianco, A D; Manzoni, C; Baronio, F; Nalesso, G F; De Angelis, C; Ramponi, R; Cerullo, G

    2009-02-01

    Narrow-bandwidth picosecond pulses of predetermined spectral and temporal shapes are generated with high efficiency by frequency conversion of femtosecond pulses in lithium tantalate crystals with engineered quasi-phase-matching structures. We give examples of the synthesis of Gaussian and super-Gaussian picosecond pulses and also of a pair of synchronized phase-coherent picosecond pulses with a predetermined carrier-frequency difference.

  2. Laser applications in advanced chip packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dirk; Held, Andrew; Pätzel, Rainer; Clark, Dave; van Nunen, Joris

    2016-03-01

    While applications such as drilling μ-vias and laser direct imaging have been well established in the electronics industry, the mobile device industry's push for miniaturization is generating new demands for packaging technologies that allow for further reduction in feature size while reducing manufacturing cost. CO lasers have recently become available and their shorter wavelength allows for a smaller focus and drilling hole diameters down to 25μm whilst keeping the cost similar to CO2 lasers. Similarly, nanosecond UV lasers have gained significantly in power, become more reliable and lower in cost. On a separate front, the cost of ownership reduction for Excimer lasers has made this class of lasers attractive for structuring redistribution layers of IC substrates with feature sizes down to 2μm. Improvements in reliability and lower up-front cost for picosecond lasers is enabling applications that previously were only cost effective with mechanical means or long-pulsed lasers. We can now span the gamut from 100μm to 2μm for via drilling and can cost effectively structure redistribution layers with lasers instead of UV lamps or singulate packages with picosecond lasers.

  3. Supercontinuum generation in standard telecom fiber using picoseconds pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Hernandez-Garcia, J. C.; Pottiez, O.; Mata-Chavez, R. I.; Trejo-Duran, M.; Jauregui-Vazquez, D.; Sierra-Hernandez, J. M.; Andrade-Lucio, J. A.

    2012-02-01

    We reported Supercontinuum (SC) generation in standard telecom fiber using picosecond pulses of microchip laser. The pulses width is 700 ps at 1064 nm, using 57 m long of standard fiber, and the spectra extend from 700 to above 1700 nm, some 100 nm further into the visible. The physical processes leading to the formation of the continuum spectrum were studied by monitoring the growth of the SC while increasing the input power. The coupling efficiency of ours experimental setup between the microchip laser and the telecom fiber helped us to obtain this wide spectrum.

  4. A Simple Laser Teaching Aid for Transverse Mode Structure Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Cheng; Zhang, Shulian

    2009-01-01

    A teaching aid for demonstrating the transverse mode structure in lasers is described. A novel device called "multi-dimension adjustable combined cat-eye reflector" has been constructed from easily available materials to form a He-Ne laser resonator. By finely adjusting the cat-eye, the boundary conditions of the laser cavity can be altered, which…

  5. A GaAssolarAlAs superlattice autocorrelator for picosecond THz radiation pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnerl, S.; Pesahl, S.; Schomburg, E.; Grenzer, J.; Renk, K. F.; Pellemans, H. P. M.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Pavel'ev, D. G.; Koschurinov, Yu.; Ignatov, A. A.; Melzer, B.; Ustinov, V.; Ivanov, S.; Kop'ev, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    We report on a GaAs/AlAs, wide-miniband, superlattice autocorrelator for picosecond THz radiation pulses (operated at room temperature); the autocorrelator is based on the THz radiation-induced reduction of current through the superlattice. THz radiation (frequency 7.2 THz) from the FELIX (free-electron laser for infrared experiments) was coupled into the superlattice with an antenna system. We measured the current reduction for two time-delayed pulses and found that the signal decreased when the time delay was smaller than the pulse duration. With this superlattice autocorrelator we were able to resolve laser pulses that had a duration of a few picoseconds.

  6. Optical Fiber Pumped High Repetition Rate and High Power Nd:YVO4 Picosecond Regenerative Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Ao Bai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a stable optical fiber pumped Nd:YVO4 all solid state regenerative amplifier with all fiber picosecond laser as seed source. 888 nm Yb optical fiber lasers was chosen as pump source to reduce quantum defect for improved thermal performance. At the repetition rate of 99.6 kHz, maximum power of 19.63 W with 36 ps pulse duration were achieved when seeded by a 150 mW picosecond oscillator. The wavelength delivered was 1064.07 nm with spectral width of 0.14 nm.

  7. Studying laser radiation effect on steel structure and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Gazaliyev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the effect of laser radiation on the structure and properties of annealed and tempered steel with different content of carbon. For surface hardening there was used a laser complex equipped with Nd: YAG pulse laser with power density up to 30 kW/сm2. As a result of the carried-out studies there were calculated characteristics of laser, steel microstructure and properties.

  8. 3.7 GHz repetition rate operated narrow-bandwidth picosecond pulsed Yb fiber amplifier with an all-fiber multiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, K. H.; Wen, R. H.; Guo, Y.

    2016-04-01

    A high power picosecond pulsed Yb fiber amplifier with a pulse repetition rate of 3.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated. The seed is a gain switched distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) structured laser diode (LD) with a pulse duration of 130 ps and a repetition rate of 460 MHz. The pulse repetition rate is increased to 3.7 GHz by introducing an all-fiber multiplier, which is composed of four 2  ×  2 structured fiber couplers. The multiplied pulse train is amplified to 81 W through two stage Yb fiber amplifiers.

  9. Controlling the spins angular momentum in ferromagnets with sequences of picosecond acoustic pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Wan; Vomir, Mircea; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2015-02-17

    Controlling the angular momentum of spins with very short external perturbations is a key issue in modern magnetism. For example it allows manipulating the magnetization for recording purposes or for inducing high frequency spin torque oscillations. Towards that purpose it is essential to modify and control the angular momentum of the magnetization which precesses around the resultant effective magnetic field. That can be achieved with very short external magnetic field pulses or using intrinsically coupled magnetic structures, resulting in a transfer of spin torque. Here we show that using picosecond acoustic pulses is a versatile and efficient way of controlling the spin angular momentum in ferromagnets. Two or three acoustic pulses, generated by femtosecond laser pulses, allow suppressing or enhancing the magnetic precession at any arbitrary time by precisely controlling the delays and amplitudes of the optical pulses. A formal analogy with a two dimensional pendulum allows us explaining the complex trajectory of the magnetic vector perturbed by the acoustic pulses.

  10. Laser induced periodic surface structure formation in germanium above laser damage fluence by mid IR femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Kyle; Austin, Drake; Cheng, Jian; Trendafilov, Simeon; Shvets, Gennady; Li, Hui; Yi, Allen; Blaga, Cosmin I.; DiMauro, L. F.; Chowdhury, Enam

    2014-11-01

    Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were generated via interaction of multiple 90 femtosecond 1900 - 3600 nm mid IR laser pulses (3 -10,000) on single crystal Ge targets. For specific laser parameters, both low and high frequency LIPSS are found together, which are oriented perpendicular to each other. Study of polarization dependence of LIPSS revealed that orientation and symmetry of interaction could be controlled by rotating polarization of laser pulses. Low frequency LIPSS formation was consistent with surface plasmon coupling of laser pulses with excited Ge.

  11. Direct observation of free-exciton thermalization in quantum-well structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Umlauff, M.; Hoffmann, J.; Kalt, H.

    1998-01-01

    We report on a direct observation of free-exciton thermalization in quantum-well structures. A narrow energy distribution of free 1s excitons is created in ZnSe-based quantum wells by emission of one LO phonon after optical excitation of the continuum stales with picosecond laser pulses. The subs......We report on a direct observation of free-exciton thermalization in quantum-well structures. A narrow energy distribution of free 1s excitons is created in ZnSe-based quantum wells by emission of one LO phonon after optical excitation of the continuum stales with picosecond laser pulses...

  12. 20 W all fiber supercontinuum generation from picosecond MOPA pumped photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.-P.; Wang, J.-H.; Chen, H.-W.; Chen, Z.-L.; Hou, J.; Xu, X.-J.; Chen, J.-B.; Liu, Z.-J.

    2011-03-01

    An all fiber high power supercontinuum (SC) source is demonstrated by pumping a section of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a picosecond MOPA laser. The core of the PCF is enlarged at the input end through a serious of PCF post processing method to match the output fiber of the picosecond laser, to ensure low loss splicing, hence high power operation of the whole system. The supercontinuum output spectrum covers the wavelength range from 650 nm to beyond 1700 nm. Limited by available pump power, 20 W super-continuum output power is obtained under 29.5 W picosecond pump power, giving a high optical to optical conversion efficiency of 67.8%.

  13. Different supercontinuum generation processes in photonic crystal fibers pumped with a 1064-nm picosecond pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Wei; Jin, Ai-Jun; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Hou, Jing; Lu, Qi-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    Picosecond pulse pumped supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber is investigated by performing a series of comparative experiments. The main purpose is to investigate the supercontinuum generation processes excited by a given pump source through the experimental study of some specific fibers. A 20-W all-fiber picosecond master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) laser is used to pump three different kinds of photonic crystal fibers for supercontinuum generation. Three diverse supercontinuum formation processes are observed to correspond to photonic crystal fibers with distinct dispersion properties. The experimental results are consistent with the relevant theoretical results. Based on the above analyses, a watt-level broadband white light supercontinuum source spanning from 500 nm to beyond 1700 nm is demonstrated by using a picosecond fiber laser in combination with the matched photonic crystal fiber. The limitation of the group velocity matching curve of the photonic crystal fiber is also discussed in the paper.

  14. Different supercontinuum generation processes in photonic crystal fibers pumped with a 1064-nm picosecond pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Hong-Wei; Jin Ai-Jun; Chen Sheng-Ping; Hou Jing; Lu Qi-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Picosecond pulse pumped supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber is investigated by performing a series of comparative experiments.The main purpose is to investigate the supercontinuum generation processes excited by a given pump source through the experimental study of some specific fibers.A 20-W all-fiber picosecond master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) laser is used to pump three different kinds of photonic crystal fibers for supercontinuum generation.Three diverse supercontinuum formation processes are observed to correspond to photonic crystal fibers with distinct dispersion properties.The experimental results are consistent with the relevant theoretical results.Based on the above analyses,a watt-level broadband white light supercontinuum source spanning from 500 nm to beyond 1700 nm is demonstrated by using a picosecond fiber laser in combination with the matched photonic crystal fiber.The limitation of the group velocity matching curve of the photonic crystal fiber is also discussed in the paper.

  15. Simulation of excitation and propagation of pico-second ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Yong; Kim, No Hyu [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University of Technology and Education, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This paper presents an analytic and numerical simulation of the generation and propagation of pico-second ultrasound with nano-scale wavelength, enabling the production of bulk waves in thin films. An analytic model of laser-matter interaction and elasto-dynamic wave propagation is introduced to calculate the elastic strain pulse in microstructures. The model includes the laser-pulse absorption on the material surface, heat transfer from a photon to the elastic energy of a phonon, and acoustic wave propagation to formulate the governing equations of ultra-short ultrasound. The excitation and propagation of acoustic pulses produced by ultra-short laser pulses are numerically simulated for an aluminum substrate using the finite-difference method and compared with the analytical solution. Furthermore, Fourier analysis was performed to investigate the frequency spectrum of the simulated elastic wave pulse. It is concluded that a pico-second bulk wave with a very high frequency of up to hundreds of gigahertz is successfully generated in metals using a 100-fs laser pulse and that it can be propagated in the direction of thickness for thickness less than 100 nm.

  16. Simulation of excitation and propagation of pico-second ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Yong; Kim, No Kyu [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University of Technology and Education, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents an analytic and numerical simulation of the generation and propagation of pico-second ultrasound with nano-scale wavelength, enabling the production of bulk waves in thin films. An analytic model of laser-matter interaction and elasto-dynamic wave propagation is introduced to calculate the elastic strain pulse in microstructures. The model includes the laser-pulse absorption on the material surface, heat transfer from a photon to the elastic energy of a phonon, and acoustic wave propagation to formulate the governing equations of ultra-short ultrasound. The excitation and propagation of acoustic pulses produced by ultra-short laser pulses are numerically simulated for an aluminum substrate using the finite-difference method and compared with the analytical solution. Furthermore, Fourier analysis was performed to investigate the frequency spectrum of the simulated elastic wave pulse. It is concluded that a pico-second bulk wave with a very high frequency of up to hundreds of gigahertz is successfully generated in metals using a 100-fs laser pulse and that it can be propagated in the direction of thickness for thickness less than 100 nm.

  17. Proton radiography of magnetic field produced by ultra-intense laser irradiating capacity-coil target

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, W W; Chen, J; Cai, H B; He, S K; Zhou, W M; Shan, L Q; Lu, F; Wu, Y C; Hong, W; Liu, D X; Bi, B; Zhang, F; Xue, F B; Li, B Y; Zhang, B; He, Y L; He, W; Jiao, J L; Dong, K G; Zhang, F Q; Deng, Z G; Zhang, Z M; Cui, B; Han, D; Zhou, K N; Wang, X D; Zhao, Z Q; Cao, L F; Zhang, B H; He, X T; Gu, Y Q

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-intense ultra-short laser is firstly used to irradiate the capacity-coil target to generate magnetic field. The spatial structure and temporal evolution of huge magnetic fields were studied with time-gated proton radiography method. A magnetic flux density of 40T was measured by comparing the proton deflection and particle track simulations. Although the laser pulse duration is only 30fs, the generated magnetic field can last for over 100 picoseconds. The energy conversion efficiency from laser to magnetic field can reach as high as ~20%. The results indicate that tens of tesla (T) magnetic field could be produced in many ultra intense laser facilities around the world, and higher magnetic field could be produced by picosecond lasers.

  18. Surfaces and thin films studied by picosecond ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maris, J.H.; Tauc, J.

    1992-05-01

    This research is the study of thin films and interfaces via the use of the picosecond ultrasonic technique. In these experiments ultrasonic waves are excited in a structure by means of a picosecond light pulse ( pump pulse''). The propagation of these waves is detected through the use of a probe light pulse that is time-delayed relative to the pump. This probe pulse measures the change {Delta}R(t) in the optical reflectivity of the structure that occurs because the ultrasonic wave changes the optical properties of the structure. This technique make possible the study of the attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves up to much higher frequencies than was previously possible (up to least 500 GHz). In addition, the excellent time-resolution of the method makes it possible to study nanostructures of linear dimensions down to 100 {Angstrom} or less by ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques. 25 refs.

  19. Formation of a fine-dispersed liquid-metal target under the action of femto- and picosecond laser pulses for a laser-plasma radiation source in the extreme ultraviolet range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinokhodov, A Yu; Krivokorytov, M S [EUV Labs, Ltd., Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Koshelev, K N; Krivtsun, V M; Sidelnikov, Yu V; Medvedev, V V; Kompanets, V O; Melnikov, A A; Chekalin, S V [Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-31

    We report the results of studying the dynamics of deformation and fragmentation of liquid-metal droplets under the action of ultrashort laser pulses. The experiments have been performed to optimise the shape of the droplet target used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation sources based on the laser-produced plasma using the pre-pulse technology. The pre-pulse is generated by a system incorporating a master Ti : sapphire oscillator and a regenerative amplifier, allowing one to vary the pulse duration from 50 fs to 50 ps. The power density of laser radiation at the droplet target, averaged over the pulse duration and spatial coordinates, has reached 3 × 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The production of liquid-metal droplets has been implemented by means of a droplet generator based on a nozzle with a ring piezoceramic actuator. The droplet material is the eutectic indium – tin alloy. The droplet generator could operate in the droplet and jet regime with a maximal rate of stable operation 5 and 150 kHz, respectively. The spatial stability of droplet position σ = 1% – 2% of its diameter is achieved. The size of the droplets varied within 30 – 70 μm, their velocity was 2 – 8 m s{sup -1} depending on the operation regime. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  1. Supercontinuum generation from dispersion-flattened photonic crystal fiber using picosecond pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li He; Bojun Yang; Xiaoguang Zhang; Li Yu

    2006-01-01

    We present the all-fiber system for supercontiuum (SC) generation with picosecond pulses. By launching1.6-ps pulses from pulsed erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) into a section of photonic crystal fiber (PCF),the spectral broadening is observed. The bandwidth of 237 nm (at 20 dB level) is achieved.

  2. Laser-Induced Temperature Rise in a Composite Sandwich Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    by a scanning cw laser or electron beam, Journal of Applied Physics , 53 (1982), 4357-4363. [6] J. Calder and R. Sue, Modeling of cw laser annealing...of multilayer structures, Journal of Applied Physics , 53 (1982), 7545-7550. [7] H. Cline and T. Anthony, Heat treating and melting material with a...scanning laser or electron beam, Journal of Applied Physics , 48 (1977), 3895-3900. [8] F. John, .Partial Differential Equations, Springer, New York

  3. Laser fields in dynamically ionized plasma structures for coherent acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of the CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) laser technology, a new scheme for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures has been proposed. By using our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code equipped with ionisation module, we simulate the laser fields dynamics in the periodic structures of different materials. We study how the dynamic ionization influences the field structure.

  4. Laser ceramics with disordered crystalline structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Osipov, V. V.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Solomonov, V. I.; Shitov, V. A.; Maksimov, R. N.; Orlov, A. N.; Petrov, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    New ceramic materials based on yttrium oxide Y2O3 with isovalent (Yb2O3, Nd2 O3, and Lu2O3) and heterovalent (ZrO2 and HfO2) components are synthesized, and their spectroscopic properties are investigated. Possible channels of losses in the gain of stimulated radiation in the radiative transitions of Nd3+ and Yb3+ ions in ceramics with heterovalent additives are studied. The results of measurements of Y2O3 ceramics doped with zirconium and hafnium ions, the emission bandwidth and the lifetimes of the 4F3/2 and 2F5/2 levels of Nd3+ and Yb3+ ions, respectively, are presented. It is shown that the nonradiative population of the 4F3/2 levels of neodymium ions is due to their dipole-dipole interaction with Zr3+ and Hf3+ ions. Laser generation in [(Yb0.01Lu0.24Y0.75)2O3]0.88(ZrO2)0.12 ceramics with disordered crystalline structure was achieved at a wavelength of 1034 nm with a differential efficiency of 29%.

  5. Towards Friction Control using laser-induced periodic Surface Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the description of their tribological properties in order to facilitate the knowledge for contact mechanical applications. To obtain laser parameters for LIPSS formation, we propose to execute two D

  6. Simulation of picosecond pulse propagation in fibre-based radiation shaping units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuptsov, G. V.; Petrov, V. V.; Laptev, A. V.; Petrov, V. A.; Pestryakov, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    We have performed a numerical simulation of picosecond pulse propagation in a combined stretcher consisting of a segment of a telecommunication fibre and diffraction holographic gratings. The process of supercontinuum generation in a nonlinear photoniccrystal fibre pumped by picosecond pulses is simulated by solving numerically the generalised nonlinear Schrödinger equation; spectral and temporal pulse parameters are determined. Experimental data are in good agreement with simulation results. The obtained results are used to design a high-power femtosecond laser system with a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz.

  7. Millijoule pulse energy picosecond fiber chirped-pulse amplification system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Yang; Xiaohong Hu; Yishan Wang; Wei Zhang; Wei Zhao

    2011-01-01

    @@ The efficient generation of a 1.17-mJ laser pul8e with 360 ps duration using an ytterbium (Yb)-doped fiber amplifier chain seeded by a homemade mode-locked fiber laser is demonstrated experimentally.A specially designed figure-of-eight fiber laser acts as the seed source of a chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) system and generates mode-locked pulse8 with hundreds of picosecond widths.Two kinds of large-mode-area (LMA) double-clad Yb-doped fibers are employed to construct the pre-amplifier and main amplifier, All of the adopted instruments help avoid severe nonlinearity in fibers to raise sub-nanosecond pulse energy with acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).The output spectrum of this fiber-based CPA system shows that amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is suppressed to better than 30 dB, and the onset of stimulated Raman scattering is excluded.%The efficient generation of a 1.17-mJ laser pulse with 360 ps duration using an ytterbium (Yb)-doped fiber amplifier chain seeded by a homemade mode-locked fiber laser is demonstrated experimentally. A specially designed figure-of-eight fiber laser acts as the seed source of a chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) system and generates mode-locked pulses with hundreds of picosecond widths. Two kinds of large-mode-area (LMA) double-clad Yb-doped fibers are employed to construct the pre-amplifier and main amplifier. All of the adopted instruments help avoid severe nonlinearity in fibers to raise sub-nanosecond pulse energy with acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The output spectrum of this fiber-based CPA system shows that amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is suppressed to better than 30 dB, and the onset of stimulated Raman scattering is excluded.

  8. Ablation of metals using ultrashort laser pulses in a pump-probe experiment dynamics of laser induced particle emission from metal surfaces on the femto and picosecond time scale

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, V

    2001-01-01

    The main part of this work deals with the dynamics of the laser ablation process of metals (Al, Ag, Fe and Ni) initiated by approx. 50 fs laser pulses. The phenomena have been investigated by interferometric time resolved pump and probe measurements. This work reports one of the first yield measurements of emitted singly charged ions and neutrals from a metal surface induced by laser light. The experiments have been performed using a two-pulse autocorrelation setup in which the differential yield of emitted metal ions is measured as a function of the temporal separation between a pair of excitation pulses with a reflectron-type time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer. The intensity of each pulse is kept below the ablation threshold, thus only the combined interaction of both pulses causes particle emission. It must be pointed out, that the time information obtained in this way concerns only the initial excitation responsible for ablation, but does not yield information about the dynamics of the way this excitation ...

  9. Advancements in time-resolved x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; Widmann, K; Ao, T; Ping, Y; Hunter, J; Ng, A

    2005-07-28

    Time-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the non-steady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultra-thin (50 nm) metal foils and bulk semiconductors. Single-shot soft x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy with picosecond time resolution was used in combination with optical measurements of the disassembly dynamics that have shown the existence of a metastable liquid phase in fs-laser heated metal foils persisting 4-5 ps. This metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.3-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500 x 700 {micro}m{sup 2} spot to create heated conditions of 0.2-1.8 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} intensity. The unique LLNL COMET compact tabletop soft x-ray laser source provided the necessary high photon flux, highly monoenergetic, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for observing the evolution of changes in the valence band electronic structure of laser heated metals and semiconductors with picosecond time resolution. This work demonstrates the continuing development of a powerful new technique for probing reaction dynamics and changes of local order on surfaces on their fundamental timescales including phenomena such as non-thermal melting, chemical bond formation, intermediate reaction steps, and the existence of transient reaction products.

  10. Underwater laser cutting of metal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfille, J.P.; Prunele, D. de [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Pilot, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection de l`Environnement et des Installations; Fredrick, P.; Ramaswami, V.S.; Muys, P. [Radius Engineering, Gent (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    Cutting tests were carried out on stainless steel (304L) in air and under 7 meters of water (application to reactor pools), using CO{sub 2} and YAG lasers; results concerned cutting speed, quality of cut, cutting thickness. By-products of sectioning operations using a CO{sub 2} laser were studied: dross, aerosols, suspended particles in water, gas analysis, chemical analysis of the aerosols. Same measurements are currently being taken in the case of the YAG laser with beam transported via optical fiber. (from author). 16 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs.

  11. Operation of a picosecond narrow-bandwidth Laser–Thomson-backscattering X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochmann, A., E-mail: a.jochmann@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Irman, A.; Lehnert, U.; Couperus, J.P.; Kuntzsch, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Trotsenko, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Friedrich Schiller Universität Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Wagner, A.; Debus, A.D.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Helbig, U.; Bock, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Ledingham, K.W.D. [SUPA, Strathclyde University Glasgow, UK-07743 Glasgow (United Kingdom); Cowan, T.E.; Sauerbrey, R.; Schramm, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    A tunable source of intense ultra-short hard X-ray pulses represents a novel tool for the structural analysis of complex systems with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution. With the simultaneous availability of a high power short-pulse laser system this provides unique opportunities at the forefront of relativistic light–matter interactions. At Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) we demonstrated the principle of such a light source (PHOENIX – Photon Electron collider for Narrow bandwidth Intense X-Rays) by colliding picosecond electron bunches from the ELBE linear accelerator with counter-propagating femtosecond laser pulses from the 150 TW Draco Ti:Sapphire laser system. The generated narrowband X-rays are highly collimated and can be reliably adjusted from 12 keV to 20 keV by tuning the electron energy (24–30 MeV). Ensuring the spatial–temporal overlap at the interaction point and suppressing the Bremsstrahlung background a signal to noise ratio of greater than 300 was reached.

  12. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Applications of Picosecond Spectroscopy to Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    With the development of lasers that can generate light 11 14 pulses ranging from 10- - 10- sec duration, and capable of 13 peak powers in excess of 10 watts scientists have been able to investigate the interactions of light with matter in a time and power domain not previously possible. These ultrashort laser pulses provide a powerful tool for the study of chemical phenomena at the most fundamental level. Many of the elementary processes of importance in chemistry including energy dissipa­ tion, molecular motions, structural and chemical changes occur on a very short time scale and thus require special approaches. Th~ use of ultrashort laser pulses to perturb and to probe systems of interest affords a direct approach to the time reso­ lution of very rapid chemical phenomena. It was recognition of the impact of these relatively new approaches to chemical phenomena that motivated NATO to sponsor a meeting on the applications of picosecond spectroscopy in chemistry. The primary aim of the NATO workshop was to ...

  13. AN ANALYTIC MODEL FOR TRANSIENT COLLISIONAL X-RAY LASERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YING-JUN; ZHANG JIE; TENG Al-PING

    2001-01-01

    A set of similarity equations is derived to describe the hydrodynamics of transient X-ray lasers from slab plasmas generated by combined irradiation of nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses. By separating nanosecond and picosecond laser heating processes into different periods, analytical solutions are obtained for the similarity equations. The calculated results are in agreement with numerical simulations and experimental data.

  14. Generation and measurement of sub-picosecond electron bunch in photocathode rf gun

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Weiwei; He, Zhiagng; Jia, Qika

    2013-01-01

    We consider a scheme to generate sub-picosecond electron bunch in the photocathode rf gun by improving the acceleration gradient in the gun, suitably tuning the bunch charge, the laser spot size and the acceleration phase, and reducing the growth of transverse emittance by laser shaping. A nondestructive technique is also reported to measure the electron bunch length, by measuring the high-frequency spectrum of wakefield radiation which is caused by the passage of a relativistic electron bunc...

  15. Nanosecond pulsed laser generation of holographic structures on metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Ardron, Marcus; Weston, Nick J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    A laser-based process for the generation of phase holographic structures directly onto the surface of metals is presented. This process uses 35ns long laser pulses of wavelength 355nm to generate optically-smooth surface deformations on a metal. The laser-induced surface deformations (LISDs) are produced by either localized laser melting or the combination of melting and evaporation. The geometry (shape and dimension) of the LISDs depends on the laser processing parameters, in particular the pulse energy, as well as on the chemical composition of a metal. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the LISDs formation on various metals, such as stainless steel, pure nickel and nickel-chromium Inconel® alloys. In addition, we provide information about the design and fabrication process of the phase holographic structures and demonstrate their use as robust markings for the identification and traceability of high value metal goods.

  16. Expansion dynamics of supercritical water probed by picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladytz, Thomas; Abel, Bernd; Siefermann, Katrin R

    2015-02-21

    Vibrational excitation of liquid water with femtosecond laser pulses can create extreme states of water. Yet, the dynamics directly after initial sub-picosecond delocalization of molecular vibrations remain largely unclear. We study the ultrafast expansion dynamics of an accordingly prepared supercritical water phase with a picosecond time resolution. Our experimental setup combines vacuum-compatible liquid micro-jet technology and a table top High Harmonic light source driven by a femtosecond laser system. An ultrashort laser pulse centered at a wavelength of 2900 nm excites the OH-stretch vibration of water molecules in the liquid. The deposited energy corresponds to a supercritical phase with a temperature of about 1000 K and a pressure of more than 1 GPa. We use a time-delayed extreme ultraviolet pulse centered at 38.6 eV, and obtained via High Harmonic generation (HHG), to record valence band photoelectron spectra of the expanding water sample. The series of photoelectron spectra is analyzed with noise-corrected target transform fitting (cTTF), a specifically developed multivariate method. Together with a simple fluid dynamics simulation, the following picture emerges: when a supercritical phase of water expands into vacuum, temperature and density of the first few nanometers of the expanding phase drop below the critical values within a few picoseconds. This results in a supersaturated phase, in which condensation seeds form and grow from small clusters to large clusters on a 100 picosecond timescale.

  17. Parametric amplification of broadband radiation of a cw superluminescent diode under picosecond pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagin, K. A.; Il'chenko, S. N.; Morozov, V. B.; Olenin, A. N.; Tunkin, V. G.; Yakovlev, D. V.; Yakubovich, S. D.

    2016-09-01

    It is proposed to use cw superluminescent diodes with a spectral width of about 300 cm-1 and high spatial coherence as seed radiation sources in parametric amplifiers with picosecond pumping in order to form broadband picosecond pulses. A two-cascade parametric amplifier based on BaB2O4 (BBO) crystals is pumped by 20-ps pulses of the second harmonic of an Nd : YAG laser. For a superluminescent diode spectral width of 275 cm-1 (centre wavelength 790 nm), the spectral width of picosecond pulses at the parametric amplifier output is 203 cm-1. At a total pump energy of 7.2 mJ for BBO crystals, the energy of the enhanced emission of the superluminescent diode is found to be 0.6 mJ.

  18. Improvements in time resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in a compact pico-second pulse radiolysis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Hiroyuki [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 17 Kikuicho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0044 (Japan)], E-mail: physik-albert@suou.waseda.jp; Kawaguchi, Masaaki; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Komiya, Keita; Nomoto, Tomoaki; Kamiya, Yoshio; Hama, Yoshimasa; Washio, Masakazu [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 17 Kikuicho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0044 (Japan); Ushida, Kiminori [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kashiwagi, Shigeru [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kuroda, Ryunosuke [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    A compact pico-second pulse radiolysis system has been developing at Waseda University for studying primary processes in radiation chemistry. The system is composed of a photo-injector system and a pico-second all-solid-state laser system. An infrared (IR) and an ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses are obtained from mode-locked Nd:YLF laser system and used for generation of the white light continuum as a probe light and the irradiation to the Cu cathode of a photo-cathode RF-gun, respectively. To improve signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and time resolution of this pulse radiolysis system, we optimized both probe light and pump electron beam. As a result, our pico-second pulse radiolysis system has been enough to study the primary processes of radiation chemistry. The experimental results and the improvements of our system are described in this paper.

  19. Influence of a step-tapered undulator field on the optical pulse shape of a far-infrared free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Mols, Rfxam; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The optical output of the free-electron laser for infrared experiments (FELIX), which operates in the regime of strong slippage, consists of picosecond pulses, Depending on the amount of cavity desynchronization, the optical pulse can develop substantial structure in the form of multiple subpulses,

  20. Influence of a step-tapered undulator field on the optical pulse shape of a far-infrared free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Mols, Rfxam; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The optical output of the free-electron laser for infrared experiments (FELIX), which operates in the regime of strong slippage, consists of picosecond pulses, Depending on the amount of cavity desynchronization, the optical pulse can develop substantial structure in the form of multiple subpulses,