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Sample records for pi starvation effect

  1. Effect of sucrose starvation on sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cell carbohydrate and Pi status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rébeillé, F; Bligny, R; Martin, J B; Douce, R

    1985-03-15

    The mobilization of stored carbohydrates during sucrose starvation was studied with sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells. When sucrose was omitted from the nutrient medium, the intracellular sucrose pool decreased rapidly during the first hours of the experiment, whereas the starch content remained practically unchanged. After 10h of sucrose starvation, starch hydrolysis replaced sucrose breakdown. From this moment, the phosphate-ester pool and respiration rate decreased with time. Conversely, the intracellular Pi concentration increased. 31P n.m.r. of intact sycamore cells indicated that, under these conditions, most of the Pi accumulated in the vacuole. These results strongly suggest that starch breakdown, in contrast with sucrose hydrolysis, is not rapid enough to maintain a high cellular metabolism.

  2. Proteomic Analysis Provides New Insights in Phosphorus Homeostasis Subjected to Pi (Inorganic Phosphate) Starvation in Tomato Plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus is a major nutrient acquired by plants via high-affinity inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. To determine the adaptation and homeostasis strategy to Pi starvation, we compared the proteome analysis of tomato leaves that were treated with and without Pi (as KH2PO4) for 10 days. Among 600 reproducible proteins on 2-DE gels 46 of them were differentially expressed. These proteins were involved in major metabolic pathways, including photosynthesis, transcriptional/translational regulations, carbohydrate/energy metabolism, protein synthesis, defense response, and other secondary metabolism. The results also showed that the reduction in photosynthetic pigments lowered P content under -Pi treatments. Furthermore, high-affinity Pi transporters (lePT1 and lePT2) expressed in higher amounts under -Pi treatments. Also, the accumulation of Pi transporters was observed highly in the epidermis and palisade parenchyma under +Pi treatments compared to -Pi treatments. Our data suggested that tomato plants developed reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging mechanisms to cope with low Pi content, including the up-regulation of proteins mostly involved in important metabolic pathways. Moreover, Pi-starved tomato plants increased their internal Pi utilization efficiency by increasing the Pi transporter genes and their rational localization. These results thus provide imperative information about how tomato plants respond to Pi starvation and its homeostasis.

  3. [Effects of starvation on digestive enzyme activities of Monopterus albus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dai-qin; Chen, Fang; Ruan, Guo-liang; Hu, Cheng-wen; Cao, Sheng-huan

    2007-05-01

    Starvation is a major environmental stress, which has a broad effect on the physiology and ecology of aquatic animals. In this study, Monopterus albus was starved for 30 days at (20 +/- 0.5) degrees C, and the activities of protease, trypsin, amylase and lipase in its digestive organs were measured on the 0, 3rd, 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, and 30th day of starvation. The results showed that starvation had definite effects on the activities of all test enzymes. With the prolongation of starvation, the activities of test enzymes decreased, which was most significant when the fish was starved for 5-10 days. After 10 days of starvation, the decreasing trend of the enzyme activities became less obvious.

  4. Starvation-induced effects on bacterial surface characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelleberg, S; Hermansson, M

    1984-09-01

    Changes in bacterial surface hydrophobicity, charge, and degree of irreversible binding to glass surfaces of seven marine isolates were followed during starvation. The degree of hydrophobicity was measured by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and by two-phase separation in a hexadecane-water system, whereas changes in charge were measured by electrostatic interaction chromatography. All isolates underwent the starvation-induced responses of fragmentation, which is defined as division without growth, and continuous size reduction, which results in populations with increased numbers of smaller cells. The latter process was also responsible for a significant proportion of the total drop in cell volume; this was observed by noting the biovolume (the average cell multiplied by the number of bacteria) of a population after various times of starvation. Four strains exhibited increases in both hydrophobicity and irreversible binding, initiated after different starvation times. The most hydrophilic and most hydrophobic isolates both showed a small increase in the degree of irreversible binding after only 5 h, followed by a small decrease after 22 h. Their hydrophobicity remained constant, however, throughout the entire starvation period. On the other hand, one strain, EF190, increased its hydrophobicity after 5 h of starvation, although the degree of irreversible binding remained constant. Charge effects could not be generally related to the increase in irreversible binding. Scanning electron micrographs showed a large increase in surface roughness throughout the starvation period for all strains that showed marked changes in physicochemical characteristics.

  5. The cusp effect in eta' --> eta pi pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian

    2009-01-01

    Strong final-state interactions create a pronounced cusp in eta' --> eta pi0 pi0 decays. We adapt and generalize the non-relativistic effective field theory framework developed for the extraction of pi pi scattering lengths from K --> 3 pi decays to this case. The cusp effect is predicted to have an effect of more than 8% on the decay spectrum below the pi+ pi- threshold.

  6. Regulation of OsSPX1 and OsSPX3 on Expression of OsSPX Domain Genes and Pi-starvation Signaling in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-ye Wang; Han Hu; Hong-jie Huang; Ke Duan; Zhong-chang Wu; Ping Wu

    2009-01-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) genome contains at least six genes exclusively with an SPX (SYG1/PHO81/XPR1) domain at the N-terminal, designated as OsSPX1-6. Here we report the diverse expression patterns of the OsSPX genes in different tissues and their responses to Pi-starvation. Among them, five genes, OsSPXI, 2,3, 5 and 6 are responsive to Pi-starvation in shoots and/or in roots. The subcellular localization analysis indicates that OsSPXI and OsSPX2 is exclusively located in nucleus, OsSPX3 in the cytoplasm, and OsSPX4 is a membrane localization protein. OsSPXI regulates OsSPX2, 3 and 5 at the transcription level and is positively involved in the responses of the genes to Pi-starvation. Overexpression of OsSPX3 downregulates OsSPXS in shoots under Pi-sufficiency. OsSPX3 negatively regulates the PSI (Pi-starvation induced) gene, OslPSI and is involved in the responses of miR399 and OsPHO2 to Pi-starvation. Our results suggest that OsSPXI may be a regulator involved in the transcriptions of OsSPX2, 3 and 5. OsSPX3 plays a role in OslPS1lmiR399 mediated long distance regulation on OsPHO2. Our results also indicate that OsSPX3 is involved in plant tolerance to Pi-starvation stress.

  7. Effective action for. omega. -> 3. pi. ,. omega. ->. pi gamma. and rho ->. pi gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golterman, M.F.L.

    1988-10-31

    It is argued that the decay widths for ..omega.. -> 3..pi.., ..omega.. -> ..pi gamma.. and rho -> ..pi gamma.. do not follow from the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten action. An alternative effective action for these decays is constructed and its parameters are fitted to the experimental values of the widths.

  8. Starvation effects on pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus in natural seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Jiabo; CHEN Qiang; ZOU Wenzheng; YAN Qingpi; ZHUANG Zhixia; WANG Xiaoru

    2008-01-01

    To get a better understanding of the starvation survival strategy of pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus,log-phase cells were inoculated into sterile natural seawater for starvation studies.The results showed that all of total bacteria number,viable bacteria number and CFU number of V. alginolyticus increased remarkably at the initial starvation stage;after reaching their peaks at 5 d,both total bacteria number and viable bacteria number of V. alginolyricus fell slowly,while the CFU number fell more quickly after reaching its peak at 10 d;V.alginolyticus elongated their cells at the porphase of starvation,and then shrunk their volume and turned their shapes into ovals from rods at the anaphase of starvation;starved cells showed more sensitivity to heating and UV;starved cells showed n0 significant difference from unstarved ones at the lowest detection limit determined by indirect enzyme-linked immu-nosorbent assay(ELISA);starred cells'ability to adhere to the skin mucus of large yellow croaker(Pseudosciaena crocea)shorwed a sharp decline as the starvation time increases;the cellular protein of V.alginotyticus increased remarkably at the ana-phase of starvation.The results indicated that pathogenic V. alginolyticus could survive in starvation for relatively long periods of time(≥2 months)in 28℃ natural seawater due to the morphological and physiological changes;however,starved V. alginolytic-us cells showed Iess virulence and higher sensitivity under environmental stresses.

  9. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  10. Adaptation of intestinal hydrolases to starvation in rats: effect of thyroid function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galluser, M; Belkhou, R; Freund, J N

    1991-01-01

    The effects of long-term starvation on the activities of sucrase, lactase, and aminopeptidase, and on their respective mRNA were determined in the small intestine of thyroidectomized and sham-operated adult rats. Thyroidectomy reduced the protein loss at the level of the intestinal brush border...... membranes during starvation. Prolonged fasting caused a significant decrease in sucrase activity, but thyroidectomy partly prevented this effect. However, the amount of the corresponding mRNA dropped during long term starvation without incidence of thyroidectomy. Lactase activity in the brush border...... membranes was increased by starvation, and thyroidectomy caused a further elevation of the enzyme activity. Simultaneously, lactase mRNA content rose only slightly compared to the enzyme activity. Aminopeptidase activity and mRNA content decreased during starvation and thyroidectomy did not prevent...

  11. Electromagnetic effects in eta --> 3 pi

    CERN Document Server

    Ditsche, Christoph; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2009-01-01

    We re-evaluate the electromagnetic corrections to eta --> 3 pi decays at next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion, arguing that effects of order e^2(m_d-m_u) disregarded so far are not negligible compared to other contributions of order e^2 times a light quark mass. Despite the appearance of the Coulomb pole in eta --> pi+ pi- pi0 and cusps in eta --> 3 pi0, the overall corrections remain small.

  12. The ABC effect in the reaction NN to d pi pi

    CERN Document Server

    Bar-Nir, I; Shuster, M D

    1975-01-01

    A simple peripheral model for the reaction NN to NN pi pi is extended to the reaction NN to d pi pi . Predictions for the differential and total cross sections are compared with recent experiments. The enhancement of the deuteron recoil-momentum spectrum near the pi pi threshold (ABC effect) is well reproduced. (12 refs).

  13. Effects of Starvation on Lipid Metabolism and Gluconeogenesis in Yak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to investigate the physiological consequences of undernourished yak. Twelve Maiwa yak (110.3±5.85 kg were randomly divided into two groups (baseline and starvation group. The yak of baseline group were slaughtered at day 0, while the other group of yak were kept in shed without feed but allowed free access to water, salt and free movement for 9 days. Blood samples of the starvation group were collected on day 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9 and the starved yak were slaughtered after the final blood sample collection. The liver and muscle glycogen of the starvation group decreased (p<0.01, and the lipid content also decreased while the content of moisture and ash increased (p<0.05 both in Longissimus dorsi and liver compared with the baseline group. The plasma insulin and glucose of the starved yak decreased at first and then kept stable but at a relatively lower level during the following days (p<0.01. On the contrary, the non-esterified fatty acids was increased (p<0.01. Beyond our expectation, the ketone bodies of β-hydroxybutyric acid and acetoacetic acid decreased with prolonged starvation (p<0.01. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of lipogenetic enzyme fatty acid synthase and lipoprotein lipase in subcutaneous adipose tissue of starved yak were down-regulated (p<0.01, whereas the mRNA expression of lipolytic enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and hormone sensitive lipase were up-regulated (p<0.01 after 9 days of starvation. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase, responsible for hepatic gluconeogenesis were up-regulated (p<0.01. It was concluded that yak derive energy by gluconeogenesis promotion and fat storage mobilization during starvation but without ketone body accumulation in the plasma.

  14. Effects of starvation on the carbohydrate metabolism in Harmonia axyridis (Pallas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo-Kun Shi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose plays an important role in energy storage, metabolism, and protection from extreme environmental conditions in insects. Trehalose is the main blood sugar in insects, and it can be rapidly used as an energy source in times of need. To elucidate the mechanisms of the starvation response, we observed the effects of starvation on trehalose and glycogen, trehalase activity, and the relative gene expression of genes in the trehalose and glycogen metabolic pathways in the invasive beetle Harmonia axyridis. Our results show that trehalose levels and the activities of two types of trehalases decreased significantly in the first 8 h of starvation, while the relative expression of HaTreh1-1 increased. While trehalose remained nearly constant at a relatively high level from 8 to 24 h, glycogen levels decreased significantly from 8 h to 24 h of starvation. Likewise, glycogen phosphorylase (HaGP expression was significantly higher at 12 to 24 h starvation than the first 8 h, while the expression of glycogen synthase (HaGS was relatively stable. Furthermore, trehalose decreased significantly from 24 h starvation to 72 h starvation, while trehalase activities and the relative expression of some HaTreh genes generally increased toward the end of the starvation period. The expression of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (HaTPS increased significantly, supporting the increase in trehalose synthesis. These results show that trehalose plays a key role in the energy provided during the starvation process through the molecular and biochemical regulation of trehalose and glycogen metabolism.

  15. Evidence for the adverse effect of starvation on bone quality: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueper, Janina; Beyth, Shaul; Liebergall, Meir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and starvation's possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200-800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality.

  16. Effects of starvation on bacterial transport through porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Alfred B.; Sharp, Robert R.; Caccavo, Frank; Gerlach, Robin

    2007-06-01

    A major problem preventing widespread implementation of microbial injection strategies for bioremediation and/or microbially enhanced oil recovery is the tendency of bacteria to strongly adhere to surfaces in the immediate vicinity of the injection point. Long term (weeks to months) nutrient starvation of bacteria prior to injection can decrease attachment and enhance transport through porous media. This paper summarizes results of starvation-enhanced transport experiments in sand columns of 30 cm, 3 m, and 16 m in length. The 16 m column experiments compared transport, breakthrough and distribution of adhered cells for starved and vegetative cultures of Klebsiella oxytoca, a copious biofilm producer. Results from these experiments were subsequently used to design and construct a field-scale biofilm barrier using starved Pseudomonas fluorescens. The 30 cm and 3 m sand columns experiments investigated starvation-enhanced transport of Shewanella algae BrY, a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. In both cases the vegetative cells adsorbed onto the sand in higher numbers than the starved cells, especially near the entrance of the column. These results, taken together with studies cited in the literature, indicate that starved cells penetrate farther (i.e. higher breakthrough concentration) and adsorb more uniformly along the flow path than vegetative cells.

  17. Root architecture remodeling induced by phosphate starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Aiko; Miura, Kenji

    2011-08-01

    Plants have evolved efficient strategies for utilizing nutrients in the soil in order to survive, grow, and reproduce. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is a major macroelement source for plant growth; however, the availability and distribution of Pi are varying widely across locations. Thus, plants in many areas experience Pi deficiency. To maintain cellular Pi homeostasis, plants have developed a series of adaptive responses to facilitate external Pi acquisition, limit Pi consumption, and adjust Pi recycling internally under Pi starvation conditions. This review focuses on the molecular regulators that modulate Pi starvation-induced root architectural changes.

  18. Effects of starvation and molting on the metabolic rate of the bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Zachary C; Kells, Stephen A; Appel, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    The bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) is a common hematophagous pest in the urban environment and is capable of surviving extended periods of starvation. However, the relationship between starvation and metabolism in bed bugs is not well understood. To better understand this relationship, we measured the metabolism of all life stages for >900 h after feeding (starvation) using closed-system respirometry. Measurements were made around molting for the immature life stages, which occurs only after a blood meal. In addition, both mated and unmated adults were measured. Starvation and molting had significant effects on the metabolism of the bed bug. Mass-specific metabolic rate (V(O2); mL g(-1) h(-1)) declined in a curvilinear fashion with the period of starvation for adults and with the postmolting period for immature bed bugs (used to standardize all immature life stages). A standard curve was developed to depict the generalized pattern of metabolic decline observed in all life stages that molted. Individual metabolic comparisons among life stages that molted revealed some differences in metabolic rate between unmated males and females. In addition, the mass scaling coefficient was found to decline with starvation time (postmolting time) for all life stages that molted. In most life stages, the ratio of V(CO2) to V(O2) (respiratory exchange ratio) declined over time, indicating a change in metabolic substrate with starvation. Finally, daily percent loss in body mass declined in a pattern similar to that of V(O2). The observed patterns in metabolic decline are evaluated in relation to the life history of bed bugs. In addition, the evolutionary development of these patterns is discussed. The metabolic pattern after feeding was also found to share several similarities with that of other ectothermic species.

  19. Advances in Studies of the Effects of Starvation on Growth and Development of Fish Larvae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Xiujuan; HUANG Wei; CAO Liang; WU Yunfei

    2008-01-01

    Starvation has important effects on early development of fish. It determines the survival and growth of fish larvae, and plays an important role in the dynamics of fish population and fisheries recruitment, in this review, we discuss the current studies about the effects of starvation on growth and development of fish larval stage. The goals of this review are to understand some adap- tive mechanisms and ecological countermeasures of starved fish larvae and to provide the scientific guideline for exploring early life history processes, evaluating the nutrition condition and growth of larval fish, protecting fish resource and breeding fish larvae.

  20. Evidence for the Adverse Effect of Starvation on Bone Quality: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Kueper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and starvation’s possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200–800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality.

  1. Effect of Oxygen Limitation and Starvation on the Benzalkonium Chloride Susceptibility of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, L.A.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Molin, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the effect of oxygen limitation, glucose-starvation and temperature on the susceptibility of Escherichia coli towards the quaternary ammonium biocide benzalkonium chloride (BAC). Methods and Results: The effect of BAC on planktonic and sessile cells were investigated using...

  2. The reaction pi N-> pi pi N in chiral effective field theory with explicit Delta(1232)

    CERN Document Server

    Siemens, D; Epelbaum, E; Krebs, H; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2014-01-01

    The reaction pi N -> pi pi N is studied at tree level up to next-to-leading order in the framework of manifestly covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit Delta(1232) degrees of freedom. Using total cross section data to determine the relevant low-energy constants, predictions are made for various differential as well as total cross sections at higher energies. A detailed comparison of results based on the heavy-baryon and relativistic formulations of chiral perturbation theory with and without explicit Delta degrees of freedom is given.

  3. Effects of an induced electric field on \\pi^{-}/\\pi^{+} ratio in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Gao-Feng; Cao, Xin-Wei; Zhang, Yun-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Using an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model, we examine the effects of an electric field induced by a variable magnetic field on the \\pi^{-}/\\pi^{+} ratio in central to peripheral heavy-ion collisions at beam energies of 400 and 1500MeV/nucleon. It is shown that while the induced electric field does not affect the total multiplicities of both $\\pi^{-}$ and $\\pi^{+}$ mesons at both the lower beam energy of 400MeV/nucleon and the higher beam energy of 1500MeV/nucleon, it reduces (enhances) the emission of $\\pi^{-}$ ($\\pi^{+}$) mesons in midrapidity, but enhances (reduces) the emission of $\\pi^{-}$ ($\\pi^{+}$) mesons in forward and backward rapidities especially for the more peripheral collisions at the lower beam energy because of the rapidly transient variable magnetic field at more peripheral collisions and longer reaction duration time at the lower beam energy. These findings indicate that the total \\pi^{-}/\\pi^{+} ratio is still a precisely reliable probe of symmetry energy at both the lower an...

  4. Effects of maternal starvation on some blood metabolites, liver glycogen, birth weight and survival of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekwe, M O

    1981-12-01

    Pregnant crossbred sows were assigned to three treatments during the third trimester of gestation for an evaluation of the effects of maternal starvation on fetal development and piglet survival. Two groups of sows were taken off feed (water and trace mineralized salt only) on days 93 and 107 of gestation, respectively; the third group was fed 1.82 kg of complete sow diet/day and served as the control. Litter size, gestation length and pig birth weight in the 7-day and 21-day starvation groups were not different from those in the control group (P less than .05). Liver weight was depressed (P greater than .05) among the 7-day and 21-day progeny. However, liver glycogen concentrations and total liver glycogen were unaffected. Maternal blood glucose decreased to a fasting but steady level, while free fatty acid (FFA) increased in the two starved groups. Blood glucose and FFA at birth were similar for all treatment groups; however, FFA increased in the progeny of sows in the 7-day (P greater than .05) and 21-day (P greater than .01) starvation groups at 48 hr of age. Blood glucose at 48 hr did not vary (P less than .05), but the control progeny showed a faster glucose utilization, suggesting a greater dependence on carbohydrate metabolism than in the progeny of starved dams. Survival rate at 72 hr of age was higher among 21-day (43.8%) and 7-day (37.5%) progeny than among control progeny (8.5%). The increased plasma FFA level observed with fasting in the progeny of starved dams might indicate a shift toward lipid metabolism, which would account for the improved survival observed among the progeny of treated dams.

  5. Effect of Nutrient Starvation on the Cellular Composition and Metabolic Capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Eva; Larsson, Christer; Andlid, Thomas; Walsh, Michael C.; Gustafsson, Lena

    2007-01-01

    This investigation addresses the following question: what are the important factors for maintenance of a high catabolic capacity under various starvation conditions? Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultured in aerobic batch cultures, and during the diauxic shift cells were transferred and subjected to 24 h of starvation. The following conditions were used: carbon starvation, nitrogen starvation in the presence of glucose or ethanol, and both carbon starvation and nitrogen starvation. During the starvation period changes in biomass composition (including protein, carbohydrate, lipid, and nucleic acid contents), metabolic activity, sugar transport kinetics, and the levels of selected enzymes were recorded. Subsequent to the starvation period the remaining catabolic capacity was measured by addition of 50 mM glucose. The results showed that the glucose transport capacity is a key factor for maintenance of high metabolic capacity in many, but not all, cases. The results for cells starved of carbon, carbon and nitrogen, or nitrogen in the presence of glucose all indicated that the metabolic capacity was indeed controlled by the glucose transport ability, perhaps with some influence of hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, aldolase, and enolase levels. However, it was also demonstrated that there was no such correlation when nitrogen starvation occurred in the presence of ethanol instead of glucose. PMID:17545328

  6. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods.

  7. Methylome analysis reveals an important role for epigenetic changes in the regulation of the Arabidopsis response to phosphate starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Villalobos, Lenin; González-Morales, Sandra Isabel; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Gutiérrez-Alanis, Dolores; Cervantes-Peréz, Sergio Alan; Hayano-Kanashiro, Corina; Oropeza-Aburto, Araceli; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Martínez, Octavio; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2015-12-29

    Phosphate (Pi) availability is a significant limiting factor for plant growth and productivity in both natural and agricultural systems. To cope with such limiting conditions, plants have evolved a myriad of developmental and biochemical strategies to enhance the efficiency of Pi acquisition and assimilation to avoid nutrient starvation. In the past decade, these responses have been studied in detail at the level of gene expression; however, the possible epigenetic components modulating plant Pi starvation responses have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we report that an extensive remodeling of global DNA methylation occurs in Arabidopsis plants exposed to low Pi availability, and in many instances, this effect is related to changes in gene expression. Modifications in methylation patterns within genic regions were often associated with transcriptional activation or repression, revealing the important role of dynamic methylation changes in modulating the expression of genes in response to Pi starvation. Moreover, Arabidopsis mutants affected in DNA methylation showed that changes in DNA methylation patterns are required for the accurate regulation of a number of Pi-starvation-responsive genes and that DNA methylation is necessary to establish proper morphological and physiological phosphate starvation responses.

  8. Effects of pH and Trace Minerals on Long-Term Starvation of Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Shik; Thomas, Steven; Fogler, H. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have definitively shown that exopolymer-producing bacteria have the potential to modify the flow of fluids in oil reservoirs to enhance oil production. Once injected into the reservoir, they will be subjected to a wide range of pH values and to starvation resulting from nutrient depletion. For successful field implementation it is necessary to have a fundamental understanding of these effects on the viability of bacteria. This paper addresses the effects of pH and trace minerals on cell viability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides during carbon source depletion. Two different carbon sources were used to grow cells before transferring the cells to starvation conditions: sucrose and a combination of glucose and fructose. These substrates were chosen because L. mesenteroides produces a significant amount of water-insoluble exopolymers (dextran) under sucrose-fed conditions, which may enhance cell survival under harsh conditions. The effects of dextran on the cell viability were tested at different pH values with and without trace minerals. The rate of cell death followed an exponential-decay law for different values of the solution pH. The optimal solution pH for survival was pH 5, whereas cells died rapidly at pH 3 and below and at pH 13 and above. The sucrose-fed cells showed a greater viability than cells fed glucose and fructose for all pH ranges tested. The results indicated that water-insoluble exopolymers help cells survive for longer periods of time under starvation conditions. The effects of trace minerals on cell culturability were tested at two pH values, 4.5 and 7. For both cases, cells showed a greater culturability (smaller decay rate constant) in the presence of trace minerals than without trace minerals. It was also found that the effects of trace minerals on cell culturability were greater for glucose-fructose-fed cells than for sucrose-fed cells. The Michaelis pH function theory was used for comparing the relationships between the

  9. Effect of Neodymium on Physiological Activities in Oilseed Rape during Calcium Starvation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It was reported that rare earth elements promote plant growth and other physiological activities. Since the ion radius of Nd3+ is very close to that of Ca2+, the interaction between Nd and Ca might be one of the important mechanisms to be understand. Seedlings treated with 3 μmol.L-1 Nd(NO3)3 in Ca2+-deficient solution, and the effect of Nd on their membrane damage in oilseed rape(Brassica napus L.) was studied. It shows that the symptom of Ca-starvation is relieved and the peroxidation process in rape is inhibited. It indicates that adding Nd can lower relative permeability of the root and MDA content in leaves and increase CAT, POD, and SOD activities in rape. Likewise, the Nd addition to Hoagland solution shows similar result. The interpretation is that the effect is a consequence of substitution of Nd function for some Ca function through interacting with cellular membrane.

  10. Insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including class II/III PI3Ks, β-arrestin and SGK-1, is required in C. elegans to maintain pharyngeal muscle performance during starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donard S Dwyer

    Full Text Available In C. elegans, pharyngeal pumping is regulated by the presence of bacteria. In response to food deprivation, the pumping rate rapidly declines by about 50-60%, but then recovers gradually to baseline levels on food after 24 hr. We used this system to study the role of insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS in the recovery of pharyngeal pumping during starvation. Mutant strains with reduced function in the insulin/IGF-1 receptor, DAF-2, various insulins (INS-1 and INS-18, and molecules that regulate insulin release (UNC-64 and NCA-1; NCA-2 failed to recover normal pumping rates after food deprivation. Similarly, reduction or loss of function in downstream signaling molecules (e.g., ARR-1, AKT-1, and SGK-1 and effectors (e.g., CCA-1 and UNC-68 impaired pumping recovery. Pharmacological studies with kinase and metabolic inhibitors implicated class II/III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks and glucose metabolism in the recovery response. Interestingly, both over- and under-activity in IIS was associated with poorer recovery kinetics. Taken together, the data suggest that optimum levels of IIS are required to maintain high levels of pharyngeal pumping during starvation. This work may ultimately provide insights into the connections between IIS, nutritional status and sarcopenia, a hallmark feature of aging in muscle.

  11. Effect of starvation stress on morphological changes and production of adhesive exopolysaccharide (EPS by Proteus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Myszka

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background. Proteus vulgaris attach to available surfaces in industrial environments, can develop into extensive biofilm. Such bacterial layer is a potential source of contamination of foods that may lead to spoilage or transmission foodborne pathogens. The purpose of these investigations was to evaluate the influence of limited nutrients availability in the medium on the morphological changes and biosynthesis of bacterial surface-associated EPS by P. vulgaris. The relationship between the dimension of cells, EPS production and P. vulgaris biofilm development process on stainless steel surfaces (type 316L was also examined. Material and methods. P. vulgaris ATCC 6380 was used in this study. The cultures were incubated at 37°C on the Enterobacteriaceae enrichment broth according to Mossel [1962]. During the investigations the medium with optimal and 10 times diluted optimal of nutrient availability were used. For cells dimension analysis a Carl-Zeiss Axiovert 200 inverted microscope and a scanning electron microscope (LEO 435VP was applied. Isolation of exopolysaccharides was based on the procedure employed by Forde and Fitzgerald [1999]. To determine the level of P. vulgaris adhesion to the surface of stainless steel, the method described by Le Thi et al. [2001] was used. Results. In all experimental variants the area of P. vulgaris cells was changed upon long-term starvation. Altering of physical dimension of bacteria was effected by the decreasing value of the cell length. The change of P. vulgaris morphology promoted the beginning stages of biofilm formation process on the surface of stainless steel. Under starvation conditions P. vulgaris produced more EPS. It was observed with an increase of incubation period. These extracellular molecules initiated more advanced stages of P. vulgaris biofilm formation on examined surfaces. Conclusion. The data support the notion thatcellular factors influencing P. vulgaris adhesion process to abiotic

  12. Effects of starvation and mating status on the activity of the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oku, K.; Vermeer, K.M.C.A.; Verbaarschot, P.; Jong, de P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flea beetles are characterized by their tendency to jump. They can also fly. First, the effects of starvation on flight activity in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were determined. After starving P. nemorum for five days a greater number of individuals of both sex

  13. Rescattering effects in eta --> 3pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Sebastian P; Ditsche, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    The isospin-breaking decay eta --> 3pi is an ideal tool to extract information on light quark mass ratios from experiment. For a precise determination, however, a detailed description of the Dalitz plot distribution is necessary. In that respect, in particular the slope parameter alpha of the neutral decay channel causes some concern, since the one-loop prediction from chiral perturbation theory misses the experimental value substantially. We use the modified non-relativistic effective field-theory, a dedicated framework to analyze final-state interactions beyond one loop including isospin-breaking corrections, to extract charged and neutral Dalitz plot parameters. Matching to chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order, we find alpha = -0.025 +- 0.005, in marginal agreement with experimental findings. We derive a relation between charged and neutral decay parameters that points towards a significant tension between the most recent KLOE measurements of these observables.

  14. Techniques for calculations with nPI effective actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrington M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a symmetric scalar theory with quartic coupling in 2- and 3- dimensions and compare the self-consistent 4-point vertex obtained from the 4PI effective action with the Bethe-Salpeter 4-vertex from 2PI effective action. We show that when the coupling is large the contributions from the higher order effective action are large. We also show that one can solve the 2PI equations of motion in 4-dimensions, without introducing counter-terms, using a renormalization group method. This method provides a promising starting point to study the renormalization of higher order nPI theories.

  15. $\\tau^{-} \\to (\\pi \\pi \\pi )^{-} \

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Dumm, D; Portolés, J; 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2004.04.166

    2004-01-01

    We analyse tau to pi pi pi nu /sub tau / decays within the framework of the resonance effective theory of QCD. We have worked out the relevant Lagrangian that describes the axial-vector current hadronization contributing to these processes, and the new coupling constants that arise have been constrained by imposing the asymptotic behaviour of the corresponding spectral function within QCD. Hence we compare the theoretical framework with the experimental data, obtaining a good quality fit from the ALEPH spectral function and branching ratio. We also get values for the mass and on-shell width of the a/sub 1/(1260) resonance, and provide the tau to pi pi pi nu /sub tau / structure functions that have been measured by OPAL and CLEO-II finding an excellent agreement.

  16. Cross-tolerance effects due to adult heat hardening, desiccation and starvation acclimation of tropical drosophilid-Zaprionus indianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Bhawna; Tamang, Aditya Moktan; Parkash, Ravi

    2017-07-01

    Some insect taxa from polar or temperate habitats have shown cross-tolerance for multiple stressors but tropical insect taxa have received less attention. Accordingly, we considered adult flies of a tropical drosophilid-Zaprionus indianus for testing direct as well as cross-tolerance effects of rapid heat hardening (HH), desiccation acclimation (DA) and starvation acclimation (SA) after rearing under warmer and drier season specific simulated conditions. We observed significant direct acclimation effects of HH, DA and SA; and four cases of cross-tolerance effects but no cross-tolerance between desiccation and starvation. Cross-tolerance due to heat hardening on desiccation showed 20% higher effect than its reciprocal effect. There is greater reduction of water loss in heat hardened flies (due to increase in amount of cuticular lipids) as compared with desiccation acclimated flies. However, cross-tolerance effect of SA on heat knockdown was two times higher than its reciprocal. Heat hardened and desiccation acclimated adult flies showed substantial increase in the level of trehalose and proline while body lipids increased due to heat hardening or starvation acclimation. However, maximum increase in energy metabolites was stressor specific i.e. trehalose due to DA; proline due to HH and total body lipids due to SA. Rapid changes in energy metabolites due to heat hardening seem compensatory for possible depletion of trehalose and proline due to desiccation stress; and body lipids due to starvation stress. Thus, observed cross-tolerance effects in Z. indianus represent physiological changes to cope with multiple stressors related to warmer and drier subtropical habitats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fed-batch cultivation of baker's yeast followed by nitrogen or carbon starvation: effects on fermentative capacity and content of trehalose and glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B.

    2002-01-01

    An industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (DGI 342) was cultivated in fed-batch cultivations at a specific growth rate of 0.2 h(-1). The yeast was then exposed to carbon or nitrogen starvation for up to 8 h, to study the effect of starvation on fermentative capacity and content of protein...... of the yeast cells, and the fermentative capacity per gram dry-weight decreased by 40%. The protein content in the carbon-starved yeast increased as a result of starvation due to the fact that the content of glycogen was reduced. The fermentative capacity per gram dry-weight was, however, unaltered....

  18. Exact RG invariance and symmetry improved 2PI effective potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Pilaftsis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Symmetry Improved Two-Particle-Irreducible (SI2PI formalism is a powerful tool to calculate the effective potential beyond perturbation theory, whereby infinite sets of selective loop-graph topologies can be resummed in a systematic and consistent manner. In this paper we study the Renormalization-Group (RG properties of this formalism, by proving for the first time a number of new field-theoretic results. First, the RG runnings of all proper 2PI couplings are found to be UV finite, in the Hartree–Fock and sunset approximations of the 2PI effective action. Second, the SI2PI effective potential is exactly RG invariant, in contrast to what happens in the ordinary One-Particle-Irreducible (1PI perturbation theory, where the effective potential is RG invariant only up to higher orders. Finally, we show how the effective potential of an O(2 theory evaluated in the SI2PI framework, appropriately RG improved, can reach a higher level of accuracy, even up to one order of magnitude, with respect to the corresponding one obtained in the 1PI formalism.

  19. Exact RG invariance and symmetry improved 2PI effective potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2017-07-01

    The Symmetry Improved Two-Particle-Irreducible (SI2PI) formalism is a powerful tool to calculate the effective potential beyond perturbation theory, whereby infinite sets of selective loop-graph topologies can be resummed in a systematic and consistent manner. In this paper we study the Renormalization-Group (RG) properties of this formalism, by proving for the first time a number of new field-theoretic results. First, the RG runnings of all proper 2PI couplings are found to be UV finite, in the Hartree-Fock and sunset approximations of the 2PI effective action. Second, the SI2PI effective potential is exactly RG invariant, in contrast to what happens in the ordinary One-Particle-Irreducible (1PI) perturbation theory, where the effective potential is RG invariant only up to higher orders. Finally, we show how the effective potential of an O (2) theory evaluated in the SI2PI framework, appropriately RG improved, can reach a higher level of accuracy, even up to one order of magnitude, with respect to the corresponding one obtained in the 1PI formalism.

  20. Effect of starvation on global gene expression and proteolysis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rexroad Caird E

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fast, efficiently growing animals have increased protein synthesis and/or reduced protein degradation relative to slow, inefficiently growing animals. Consequently, minimizing the energetic cost of protein turnover is a strategic goal for enhancing animal growth. Characterization of gene expression profiles associated with protein turnover would allow us to identify genes that could potentially be used as molecular biomarkers to select for germplasm with improved protein accretion. Results We evaluated changes in hepatic global gene expression in response to 3-week starvation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss. Microarray analysis revealed a coordinated, down-regulated expression of protein biosynthesis genes in starved fish. In addition, the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism/transport, aerobic respiration, blood functions and immune response were decreased in response to starvation. However, the microarray approach did not show a significant increase of gene expression in protein catabolic pathways. Further studies, using real-time PCR and enzyme activity assays, were performed to investigate the expression of genes involved in the major proteolytic pathways including calpains, the multi-catalytic proteasome and cathepsins. Starvation reduced mRNA expression of the calpain inhibitor, calpastatin long isoform (CAST-L, with a subsequent increase in the calpain catalytic activity. In addition, starvation caused a slight but significant increase in 20S proteasome activity without affecting mRNA levels of the proteasome genes. Neither the mRNA levels nor the activities of cathepsin D and L were affected by starvation. Conclusion These results suggest a significant role of calpain and 20S proteasome pathways in protein mobilization as a source of energy during fasting and a potential association of the CAST-L gene with fish protein accretion.

  1. Effect of Nutrient Starvation under High Irradiance on Lipid and Starch Accumulation in Chlorella fusca (Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez, Celia G; Malapascua, José R; Sergejevová, Magda; Figueroa, Félix L; Masojídek

    2016-02-01

    The effect of nitrogen and sulphur limitation under high irradiance (PAR) was studied in the green microalga Chlorella fusca (Chlorophyta) in order to follow lipid and/or starch accumulation. Growth, biomass composition and the changes in photosynthetic activity (in vivo chlorophyll a fluorescence) were followed in the trials. The full nutrient culture showed high biomass production and starch accumulation at Day 1, when photosynthetic activity was high. Gradual deprivation (no nutrients added) became evident when photosynthesis was significantly suppressed (Day 3 onwards), which entailed a decrease of maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax) and increase of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), accompanied by the onset of lipid accumulation and decline in starch content. In N- and S-starved cultures, rETRmax significantly decreased by Day 3, which caused a substantial drop in biomass production, cell number, biovolume and induction of lipid and starch accumulation. High starch content (45-50 % of DW) was found at the initial stage in full nutrient culture and at the stationary phase in nutrient-starved cultures. By the end of the trial, all treatments showed high lipid content (~30 % of DW). The full nutrient culture had higher biomass yield than starved treatments although starch (~0.2 g L(-1) day(-1)) and lipid (~0.15 g L(-1) day(-1) productivities were fairly similar in all the cultures. Our results showed that we could enrich biomass of C. fusca (% DW) in lipids using a two-stage strategy (a nutrient replete stage followed by gradual nutrient limitation) while under either procedure, N- or S-starvation, both high lipid and starch contents could be achieved.

  2. Isospin effects in the exclusive dp -> 3He{\\pi}+{\\pi}- reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, M; Chiladze, D; Dymov, S; Fritzsch, C; Gebel, R; Goslawski, P; Hartmann, M; Kacharava, A; Khoukaz, A; Kulessa, P; Lorentz, B; Mersmann, T; Mikirtychiants, S; Ohm, H; Papenbrock, M; Rausmann, T; Serdyuk, V; Ströher, H; Täschner, A; Valdau, Y; Wilkin, C

    2014-01-01

    The differential cross section for the exclusive dp -> 3He{\\pi}+{\\pi}- reaction has been measured with high resolution and large statistics over a large fraction of the backward 3He hemisphere at the excess energy 265 MeV using the COSY-ANKE magnetic spectrometer. Though the well-known ABC enhancement is observed in the {\\pi}+{\\pi}- spectrum, the differences detected between the {\\pi}+3He and {\\pi}-3He invariant-mass distributions show that there must be some isospin-one {\\pi}{\\pi} production even at relatively low excess energies. The invariant-mass differences are modeled in terms of the sequential decay N*(1440) -> Delta(1232){\\pi} -> N{\\pi}{\\pi}.

  3. A multi-pronged investigation into the effect of glucose starvation and culture duration on fed-batch CHO cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    In this study, omics-based analysis tools were used to explore the effect of glucose starvation and culture duration on monoclonal antibody (mAb) production in fed-batch CHO cell culture to gain better insight into how these parameters can be controlled to ensure optimal mAb productivity and qual......In this study, omics-based analysis tools were used to explore the effect of glucose starvation and culture duration on monoclonal antibody (mAb) production in fed-batch CHO cell culture to gain better insight into how these parameters can be controlled to ensure optimal mAb productivity...... and quality. Titer and N-glycosylation of mAbs, as well as proteomic signature and metabolic status of the production cells in the culture were assessed. We found that the impact of glucose starvation on the titer and N-glycosylation of mAbs was dependent on the degree of starvation during early stationary...... phase of the fed-batch culture. Higher degree of glucose starvation reduced intracellular concentrations of UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-GalNAc, but increased the levels of UDP-Glc and UDP-Gal. Increased GlcNAc and Gal occupancy correlated well with increased degree of glucose starvation, which can be attributed...

  4. Phosphite disrupts the acclimation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to phosphate starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, A E; Niere, J O; Plaxton, W C

    2001-11-01

    The influence of phosphite (H2PO3-) on the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to orthophosphate (HPO4(2-); Pi) starvation was assessed. Phosphate-repressible acid phosphatase (rAPase) derepression and cell development were abolished when phosphate-sufficient (+Pi) yeast were subcultured into phosphate-deficient (-Pi) media containing 0.1 mM phosphite. By contrast, treatment with 0.1 mM phosphite exerted no influence on rAPase activity or growth of +Pi cells. 31P NMR spectroscopy revealed that phosphite is assimilated and concentrated by yeast cultured with 0.1 mM phosphite, and that the levels of sugar phosphates, pyrophosphate, and particularly polyphosphate were significantly reduced in the phosphite-treated -Pi cells. Examination of phosphite's effects on two PHO regulon mutants that constitutively express rAPase indicated that (i) a potential target for phosphite's action in -Pi yeast is Pho84 (plasmalemma high-affinity Pi transporter and component of a putative phosphate sensor-complex), and that (ii) an additional mechanism exists to control rAPase expression that is independent of Pho85 (cyclin-dependent protein kinase). Marked accumulation of polyphosphate in the delta pho85 mutant suggested that Pho85 contributes to the control of polyphosphate metabolism. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that phosphite obstructs the signaling pathway by which S. cerevisiae perceives and responds to phosphate deprivation at the molecular level.

  5. Glyceroneogenesis in the hepatopancreas of the crab Neohelice granulata: Diet, starvation and season effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapio, E; Santos, J T; Model, J F A; De Fraga, L S; Vinagre, A S; Martins, T L; Da Silva, R S M; Trapp, M

    2017-02-22

    We determined the activity of glyceroneogenesis from [2-(14)C]-pyruvate, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity, [2-(14)C]-pyruvate oxidation and total lipid levels in the hepatopancreas of the crab Neohelice granulata fed with a carbohydrate-rich (HC) diet or a high-protein (HP) diet and then subjected to 5weeks of starvation, in summer and winter, to determine whether the seasonal adjustments of lipid metabolism to food scarcity are modulated by the composition of the diet previously given to the crabs. The results demonstrated that glyceroneogenesis is an active pathway in N. granulata hepatopancreas, and is regulated by seasonal variations, diet composition and starvation. This study showed that in summer the increase in the hepatopancreas glyceroneogenesis activity is among the strategies used by N. granulata fed an HP diet, to maintain the triglyceride/fatty acid cycle during starvation, a normal condition in the biological cycle of this crab. However, the administration of an HC diet reduced the glyceroneogenesis capacity in response to starvation in summer. In winter, the decrease in the glyceroneogenesis capacity in both fed (HP and HC diets) and starved crabs seems to be a strategy to reduce energy consumption and/or requirement. In contrast to the summer results, the incorporation of [2-(14)C]-pyruvate into (14)CO2 was markedly higher in both diet (HC and HP) groups and in starved crabs during the winter. Four decades after the first study describing the glyceroneogenesis pathway in rat white adipose tissue, this pathway is evidenced for the first time in a crustacean.

  6. Evidence for the Adverse Effect of Starvation on Bone Quality: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Janina Kueper; Shaul Beyth; Meir Liebergall; Leon Kaplan; Schroeder, Josh E.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and starvation’s possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200–800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in sev...

  7. Cooperative effect of hydrogen-bonded chains in the environment of a pi --> pi* chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradelos, Georgios; Kaminski, Jakub W; Wesolowski, Tomasz A; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2009-09-10

    Laser resonant two-photon ionization UV spectra provide clear evidence that the effect of increasing the length of the hydrogen-bonded chain consisting of molecules such as NH(3), H(2)O, or CH(3)OH on the pi --> pi* excitations of cis-7-hydroxyquinoline (cis-7HQ) is strongly cooperative [ Thut ; et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008 , 112 , 5566. ] A theoretical analysis of the experimental data is provided to identify the origin of this cooperativity for four chains. The computational method to determine the changes of the electronic structure of a molecule due to interactions with its environment uses the nonempirical expression for the embedding potential [ Wesolowski ; Warshel J. Phys. Chem. 1993 , 97 , 8050. ] It is concluded that the electronic coupling between the molecules at the ends of the chain, which are hydrogen-bonded to cis-7HQ, plays a crucial role in this cooperativity.

  8. Analysis of the production mechanism of narrow enhancements in the effective mass spectrum (pi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$) in the reaction np --> dpi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$ at a neutron incident momentum of P$_{n}$ = 1.73 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Abdivaliev, A; Cotorobai, F; Gasparian, A P; Gruia, S; Ierusalimov, A P; Kopylova, D K; Moroz, V I; Nikitin, A V; Troyan, Yu A

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of the production mechanism of narrow enhancements in the effective mass spectrum (pi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$) in the reaction np --> dpi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$ at a neutron incident momentum of P$_{n}$ = 1.73 GeV/c

  9. The effect of aerobic exercise and starvation on growth performance and postprandial metabolic response in juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Ming; Liu, Li; Yuan, Jian-Ming; Xiao, Yuan-Yuan; Fu, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects of aerobic exercise and starvation on growth performance, postprandial metabolic response and their interaction in a sedentary fish species, either satiation-fed or starved juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis) were exercised at 25 °C under three water velocities, i.e., nearly still water (control), 1 body length (bl) s(-1) and 2 bl s(-1), for eight weeks. Then, the feed intake (FI), food conversion efficiency (FCE), specific growth rate (SGR), morphological parameters, resting ṀO2 (ṀO2rest) and postprandial ṀO2 responses of the experimental fish were measured. Exercise at a low velocity (1 bl s(-1)) showed no effect on any growth performance parameter, whereas exercise at a high velocity (2 bl s(-1)) exhibited higher FI but similar SGR due to the extra energy expenditure from swimming and consequent decreased FCE. Starvation led to a significant body mass loss, whereas the effect intensified in both exercise groups. Exercise resulted in improved cardio-respiratory capacity, as indicated by increased gill and heart indexes, whereas it exhibited no effect on resting and postprandial metabolism in S. meridionalis. The starved fish displayed significantly larger heart, gill and digestive tract indexes compared with the feeding fish, suggesting selective maintenance of cardio-respiratory and digestive function in this fish species during starvation. However, starved fish still exhibited impaired digestive performance, as evidenced by the prolonged duration and low postprandial metabolic increase, and this effect was further exacerbated in both the 1 and 2 bl s(-1) exercise groups. These data suggest the following: (1) aerobic exercise produced no improvement in growth performance but may have led to the impairment of growth under insufficient food conditions; (2) the mass of different organs and tissues responded differently to aerobic exercise and starvation due to the different physiological roles they play; and (3

  10. The effect of severe starvation and captivity stress on plasma thyroxine and triiodothyronine concentrations in an antarctic bird (emperor penguin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groscolas, R; Leloup, J

    1989-01-01

    The effect of confinement and severe starvation on the plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations was determined in emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri). During their annual cycle, emperor penguins fast freely for periods of up to 4 months and may thus represent a unique subject to study endocrine adaptations to fasting. Plasma T4 concentrations progressively decreased following capture and confinement of naturally fasting penguins, and within 15-20 days stabilized at levels three times lower than in free-living penguins. A transient fourfold increase in plasma T3 concentration developed within the day following confinement in parallel with a rise in daily body mass loss. Both plasma T3 concentration and mass loss subsided to normal levels within 15 days. The decrease in plasma T4 concentration is in accordance with the well-known inhibitory effect of stress on thyroid function in birds and mammals, whereas the transient increase in plasma T3 concentration seems related to enhancement of energy expenditure as a consequence of restlessness. Starvation severe enough to exhaust fat stores and to activate protein catabolism induced a 6- and 5 to 10-fold fall in plasma T4 and T3, respectively. This is in marked contrast with maintenance of plasma thyroid levels during long-term natural fasting associated with protein sparing (R. Groscolas and J. Leloup (1986) Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 63, 264-274). Surprisingly, there was a final reincrease in plasma T4 concentration in very lean penguins. These results suggest that the effect of starvation on plasma thyroid hormones seems to depend on how much protein catabolism is activated and demonstrate the acute sensitivity of thyroid hormone balance to stress in penguins.

  11. Regulation of ascorbic acid and of xylulose synthesis in liver extracts. The effect of starvation in various animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirpe, F.; Comporti, M.; Della Corte, E.

    1965-01-01

    1. The effect of starvation on the synthesis of ascorbic acid and of xylulose from glucuronolactone and from gulonate has been studied with liver extracts from cats, rabbits, hamsters, mice and guinea pigs. 2. The synthesis of ascorbic acid from glucuronolactone is decreased in all species except cats, and that from gulonate is decreased in hamsters and mice only. 3. The synthesis of xylulose from glucuronolactone was decreased in all species except cats and mice, whereas from gulonate it was enhanced in all the species examined. PMID:14340085

  12. The effect of $Z_b$ states on $\\Upsilon(3S)\\to\\Upsilon(1S)\\pi\\pi$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yun-Hua; Guo, Feng-Kun; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G; Zou, Bing-Song

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of dispersion theory, we analyze the dipion transitions between the lightest $\\Upsilon$ states, $\\Upsilon(nS) \\rightarrow \\Upsilon(mS) \\pi\\pi$ with $m < n \\leq 3$. In particular, we consider the possible effects of two intermediate bottomonium-like exotic states $Z_b(10610)$ and $Z_b(10650)$. The $\\pi\\pi$ rescattering effects are taken into account in a model-independent way using dispersion theory. We confirm that matching the dispersive representation to the leading chiral amplitude alone cannot reproduce the peculiar two-peak $\\pi\\pi$ mass spectrum of the decay $\\Upsilon(3S) \\rightarrow \\Upsilon(1S) \\pi\\pi$. The existence of the bottomonium-like $Z_b$ states can naturally explain this anomaly. We also point out the necessity of a proper extraction of the coupling strengths for the $Z_b$ states to $\\Upsilon(nS)\\pi$, which is only possible if a Flatt\\'e-like parametrization is used in the data analysis for the $Z_b$ states.

  13. Effective inhibition of lytic development of bacteriophages λ, P1 and T4 by starvation of their host, Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn Alicja

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophage infections of bacterial cultures cause serious problems in genetic engineering and biotechnology. They are dangerous not only because of direct effects on the currently infected cultures, i.e. their devastation, but also due to a high probability of spreading the phage progeny throughout a whole laboratory or plant, which causes a real danger for further cultivations. Therefore, a simple method for quick inhibition of phage development after detection of bacterial culture infection should be very useful. Results Here, we demonstrate that depletion of a carbon source from the culture medium, which provokes starvation of bacterial cells, results in rapid inhibition of lytic development of three Escherichia coli phages, λ, P1 and T4. Since the effect was similar for three different phages, it seems that it may be a general phenomenon. Moreover, similar effects were observed in flask cultures and in chemostats. Conclusion Bacteriophage lytic development can be inhibited efficiently by carbon source limitation in bacterial cultures. Thus, if bacteriophage contamination is detected, starvation procedures may be recommended to alleviate deleterious effects of phage infection on the culture. We believe that this strategy, in combination with the use of automated and sensitive bacteriophage biosensors, may be employed in the fermentation laboratory practice to control phage outbreaks in bioprocesses more effectively.

  14. 2PI effective action and gauge invariance problems

    OpenAIRE

    Carrington, M. E.; Kunstatter, G.; Zaraket, H.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of maintaining gauge invariance when truncating the two particle irreducible (2PI) effective action has been studied recently by several authors. Here we give a simple and very general derivation of the gauge dependence identities for the off-shell 2PI effective action. We consider the case where the gauge is fixed by an arbitrary function of the quantum gauge field, subject only to the restriction that the Faddeev-Popov matrix is invertable. We also study the background field gau...

  15. Effect of Nitrogen Starvation on Desiccation Tolerance of Arctic Microcoleus Strains (Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eTashyreva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although desiccation tolerance of Microcoleus species is a well-known phenomenon, there is very little information about their limits of desiccation tolerance in terms of cellular water content, the survival rate of their cells, and the environmental factors inducing their resistance to drying. We have discovered that three Microcoleus strains, isolated from terrestrial habitats of the High Arctic, survived extensive dehydration (to 0.23 g water g-1 dry mass, but did not tolerate complete desiccation (to 0.03 g water g-1 dry mass regardless of pre-desiccation treatments. However, these treatments were critical for the survival of incomplete desiccation: cultures grown under optimal conditions failed to survive even incomplete desiccation; a low temperature enabled only 0 to 15% of cells to survive, while 39.8 to 65.9% of cells remained alive and intact after nitrogen starvation. Unlike Nostoc, which co-exists with Microcoleus in Arctic terrestrial habitats, Microcoleus strains are not truly anhydrobiotic and do not possess constitutive desiccation tolerance. Instead, it seems that the survival strategy of Microcoleus in periodically dry habitats involves avoidance of complete desiccation, but tolerance to milder desiccation stress, which is induced by suboptimal conditions (e.g. nitrogen starvation.

  16. Effect of nitrogen starvation on desiccation tolerance of Arctic Microcoleus strains (cyanobacteria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashyreva, Daria; Elster, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Although desiccation tolerance of Microcoleus species is a well-known phenomenon, there is very little information about their limits of desiccation tolerance in terms of cellular water content, the survival rate of their cells, and the environmental factors inducing their resistance to drying. We have discovered that three Microcoleus strains, isolated from terrestrial habitats of the High Arctic, survived extensive dehydration (to 0.23 g water g(-1) dry mass), but did not tolerate complete desiccation (to 0.03 g water g(-1) dry mass) regardless of pre-desiccation treatments. However, these treatments were critical for the survival of incomplete desiccation: cultures grown under optimal conditions failed to survive even incomplete desiccation; a low temperature enabled only 0-15% of cells to survive, while 39.8-65.9% of cells remained alive and intact after nitrogen starvation. Unlike Nostoc, which co-exists with Microcoleus in Arctic terrestrial habitats, Microcoleus strains are not truly anhydrobiotic and do not possess constitutive desiccation tolerance. Instead, it seems that the survival strategy of Microcoleus in periodically dry habitats involves avoidance of complete desiccation, but tolerance to milder desiccation stress, which is induced by suboptimal conditions (e.g., nitrogen starvation).

  17. Effects of starvation on the vitellogenesis, ovarian development and fecundity in the ectoparasitoid, Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Zhang Dong; Gong-Yin Ye; Peng-Cheng Yao; Yao-Liang Huang; Xue-Xin Chen; Zhi-Cheng Shen; Cui Hu

    2008-01-01

    A female-specific protein, vitellogenin (Vg), and its corresponding egg vitellin (Vt) are identified in the ectoparasific wasp Nasonia vitripennis. Both native Vt and Vg have a molecular mass of about 350 kDa, which is composed of two subunits of approximately 190 kDa and 165 kDa under reducing and denaturing conditions (sodium dodecyl sulfatepolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). An indirect sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay developed with both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against N. vitripennis Vt.Vg was first detected in the hemolymph on the 10th day after parasitism, and was first observed in oocytes on the 12th day. In adults deprived of food, the highest hemolymph Vg level occurred at the time of adult eclosion and the highest level of Vt in ovaries was found at 30 h after eclosion. In contrast, feeding adults with 20% sucrose resulted in the reduction of Vt uptake by ovaries and the extension of life span, but had little effect on Vg production.Deprived of hosts, starvation of female wasps had no significant effects on ovariole growth and oocyte maturation before the wasps died. However, starvation of female wasps supplied with hosts accelerated the wasps laying progeny into hosts, but resulted in a decrease of total progeny production by comparison with wasps fed with 20% sucrose.

  18. Effects of starvation, surgery and infusion of adrenocorticotrophin on plasma amino acid concentration in the pregnant ewe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, J S; Mellor, D J

    1977-01-01

    Total plasma amino acid concentrations (TAA) in 12 Scottish Blackface ewes between 80 and 140 days of pregnancy were unaltered by two days of starvation, but concentrations of essential amino acids (EAA) increased and non-essential amino acid (NAA) levels decreased. These trends were more pronounced later in pregnancy. Ewes fasted before surgery to implant fetal catheters showed marked reductions in mean TAA levels (--26 per cent, n-5) on the day after operation (day+ 1). Half of this decrease was accounted for by glycine. Mean concentrations of NAA increased after day +1 but by day +6 were still 15 per cent below baseline values. In contrast mean plasma concentrations of EAA were 31 per cent above prestarvation levels on day +6 and maximal on day +4(+39 per cent). Following a two-day fast, sheep given half rations and simultaneously infused with adrenocorticotrophin showed changes in plasma-free amino acid composition like those observed during the two days after operation. Disturbances to plasma amino acid concetrations persisted for up to 12 days after operation and are attributed to the preoperative starvation and the combined effects of irregular feeding patterns and elevated plasma corticosteroid levels during and after operation.

  19. Long-Term Starvation and Posterior Feeding Effects on Biochemical and Physiological Responses of Midgut Gland of Cherax quadricarinatus Juveniles (Parastacidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán, Hernán Javier; Ansaldo, Martín; Franco-Tadic, Luis Marcelo; Fernández Gimenez, Analía Verónica; López Greco, Laura Susana

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of long-term starvation and posterior feeding on energetic reserves, oxidative stress, digestive enzymes, and histology of C. quadricarinatus midgut gland. The crayfish (6.27 g) were randomly assigned to one of three feeding protocols: continuous feeding throughout 80 day, continuous starvation until 80 day, and continuous starvation throughout 50 day and then feeding for the following 30 days. Juveniles from each protocol were weighed, and sacrificed at day 15, 30, 50 or 80. The lipids, glycogen, reduced glutathione (GSH), soluble protein, lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein oxidation (PO), catalase (CAT), lipase and proteinase activities, and histology were measured on midgut gland. Starved crayfish had a lower hepatosomatic index, number of molts, specific growth rate, lipids, glycogen, and GSH levels than fed animals at all assay times. The starvation did not affect the soluble protein, TBARS, PO levels and CAT. In starved juveniles the lipase activity decreased as starvation time increased, whereas proteinase activity decreased only at day 80. The histological analysis of the starved animals showed several signs of structural alterations. After 30 days of feeding, the starved-feeding animals exhibited a striking recovery of hepatosomatic index, number of molts, lipids and glycogen, GSH, lipase activity and midgut gland structure.

  20. A multi-pronged investigation into the effect of glucose starvation and culture duration on fed-batch CHO cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    In this study, omics-based analysis tools were used to explore the effect of glucose starvation and culture duration on monoclonal antibody (mAb) production in fed-batch CHO cell culture to gain better insight into how these parameters can be controlled to ensure optimal mAb productivity...... and quality. Titer and N-glycosylation of mAbs, as well as proteomic signature and metabolic status of the production cells in the culture were assessed. We found that the impact of glucose starvation on the titer and N-glycosylation of mAbs was dependent on the degree of starvation during early stationary...... phase of the fed-batch culture. Higher degree of glucose starvation reduced intracellular concentrations of UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-GalNAc, but increased the levels of UDP-Glc and UDP-Gal. Increased GlcNAc and Gal occupancy correlated well with increased degree of glucose starvation, which can be attributed...

  1. Effect of starvation on vein preference of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) on chilli as host plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siti Sakinah, A.; Mohamad Roff M., N.; Idris, A. B.

    2014-09-01

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a cosmopolitan pest of horticultural crops. It caused serious damaged to the plants by feeding on plant saps as direct damage and transmit virus as indirect damage. Vein preferences of both female and male whitefly (WF) on chilli plant were recorded using Dinolite, a portable microscope, under laboratory conditions. WF adults of both sexes were starved for 2 and 4 hours before used for observation while no starvation for control individual (treatment). Results showed that both female and male preferred to feed on secondary veins rather than lamina, midrib and vein. From the result of whitefly preferred target site, hopefully this information will help to improve control tactics in WF management.

  2. [Effects of starvation on the consumption of energy sources and swimming performance in juvenile Gambusia affinis and Tanichthys albonubes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-tao; Lin, Xiao-tao; Zhou, Chen-hui; Zeng, Peng; Xu, Zhong-neng; Sun, Jun

    2016-01-01

    To explore the consumption of energy sources and swimming performance of juvenile Gambusia affinis and Tanichthys albonubes after starvation, contents of glycogen, lipid and protein, burst swimming speeds (Uburst), and critical swimming speeds (Ucrit) at different starvation times (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 days) were evaluated. The results showed that, at 0 day, contents of glycogen and lipid were significantly lower in G. affinis than those in T. albonubes, whereas no significant difference in content of protein between two experimental fish was found. Swimming speeds in G. affinis were significantly lower than those in T. albonubes for all swimming performances. After different starvation scenarios, content of glycogen both in G. affinis and T. albonubes decreased significantly in power function trend with starvation time and were close to zero after starvation for 10 days, whereas the contents of lipid and protein were linearly significantly decreased. The slope of line regression equation between content of lipid and starvation time in G. affinis was significantly lower than that in T. albonubes, whereas there was a significantly higher slope of line equation between content of protein and starvation time in G. affinis. 40 days later, the consumption rate of glycogen both in G. affinis and T. albonubes were significantly higher than that of lipid, while the consumption rate of protein was the least. Consumption amounts of glycogen in all experimental fish were the least, G. affinis consumed more protein than lipid, and T. albonubes consumed more lipid than protein. Uburst and Ucrit decreased significantly linearly with starvation time for all experimental fish. Slope of linear equation between Uburst and starvation time was not significantly different between G. affinis and T. albonubes. However, the straight slope between Ucrit and starvation time was significantly lower in G. affinis than that in T. albonubes. These findings indicated that there was close

  3. Cusps in eta' --> eta pi pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Sebastian P

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of the cusp effect in the decay K+ --> pi+ pi0 pi0 has spurred the search for other decay channels, where this phenomenon, which is generated by strong final-state interactions, should also occur. A very promising candidate is eta' --> eta pi0 pi0. The cusp effect offers an excellent opportunity to experimentally extract pi pi S-Wave scattering lengths. We adapt and generalize the non-relativistic effective field theory framework developed for K --> 3 pi decays to eta' --> eta pi pi. The cusp effect is predicted to have an effect of more than 8 % on the decay spectrum below the pi+ pi- threshold. We also show that with our current theoretical information about eta' --> eta pi pi decays, it is not possible to extract pi eta threshold parameters.

  4. Nuclear counter effect and pi-e misidentification

    CERN Document Server

    Zürcher, D

    2000-01-01

    The e sup+-/pi sup+- discrimination within the CMS(1) ECAL is investigated using GEANT simulations and the 1998 test beam results. If one takes into account the energy left in the ECAL crystals alone (i.e. without read-out effects), the probability that a pi sup+- leaves more than 95% of its initial energy decreases from about 0.01% for 10 GeV to about 0.001% for 50 GeV. The Nuclear Counter Effect within the Avalanche Photo-Diodes (APD) enhances the probability of an electron misidentification. With the expected value of this effect (approx 100 MeV), this probability appears then to be between 0.2% and 0.01% for initial momenta varying, respectively, between 5 and 50 GeV. Important consequences of the pion-electron misidentification could appear in the form of new possible backgrounds for physics channels.

  5. Effect of hypophysectomy and starvation on the fine structure of vitellogenic oocytes in the newt, Triturus pyrrhogaster (Laur).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, N H; Inoue, S

    1982-01-01

    Hypophysectomy and starvation in Triturus pyrrhogaster result in a similar ultrastructural pattern of follicular atresia. The first detectable change in the oocytes is decrease in the size and number of microvilli. Subsequently the yolk precursor bodies (YPB) disappear from the micropinocytotic vesicles and the mitochondria degenerate. Finally the yolk platelets undergo decomposition. The smaller yolk platelets disintegrate by granulation, vacuolation and lobule formation. The larger platelets, after losing their superficial layer and the inner crystalline lattice, are surrounded by a laminated membrane complex. The pattern of yolk breakdown is comparable to that during development. A rather delayed effect is observed on the nucleolus of the oocytes. Pigment granules seem to play an important role in the proteolysis of the yolk.

  6. Phosphorus limitation and starvation effects on cell growth and lipid accumulation in Isochrysis galbana U4 for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarain, A; Gray, V M; Sym, S D

    2014-03-01

    The effect of varying levels of phosphorus (P) on Isochrysis galbana U4 growth, pigmentation and lipid accumulation were investigated. A reduction in the P content to 25% of the recommended level for f/2 medium did not lead to declines in cell growth rates or lipid accumulation levels relative to the cultures maintained on medium supplemented with the normal P dose. Evidence suggesting that the recommended P supply in f/2 exceeds the requirements for maximal algal growth has obvious economic implications for the mass production of I. galbana for biodiesel production. When P supply was in excess this species was also found to accumulate intracellular levels of P that exceeded by up to 6 times its P requirements for growth and cell division. The reduction in P concentration to levels below 25% resulted in P starvation stimulated chlorophyll reductions and carotenoid and lipid accumulation in this species.

  7. Amino acid starvation has opposite effects on mitochondrial and cytosolic protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Johnson

    Full Text Available Amino acids are essential for cell growth and proliferation for they can serve as precursors of protein synthesis, be remodelled for nucleotide and fat biosynthesis, or be burnt as fuel. Mitochondria are energy producing organelles that additionally play a central role in amino acid homeostasis. One might expect mitochondrial metabolism to be geared towards the production and preservation of amino acids when cells are deprived of an exogenous supply. On the contrary, we find that human cells respond to amino acid starvation by upregulating the amino acid-consuming processes of respiration, protein synthesis, and amino acid catabolism in the mitochondria. The increased utilization of these nutrients in the organelle is not driven primarily by energy demand, as it occurs when glucose is plentiful. Instead it is proposed that the changes in the mitochondrial metabolism complement the repression of cytosolic protein synthesis to restrict cell growth and proliferation when amino acids are limiting. Therefore, stimulating mitochondrial function might offer a means of inhibiting nutrient-demanding anabolism that drives cellular proliferation.

  8. QCD Factorization Based on Six-Quark Operator Effective Hamiltonian from Perturbative QCD and Charmless Bottom Meson Decays $B_{(s)}\\to \\pi\\pi,\\pi K, KK$

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Fang; Yang, Yi-Bo; Zhuang, Ci

    2008-01-01

    The charmless bottom meson decays are systematically investigated based on an approximate six quark operator effective Hamiltonian from perturbative QCD. It is shown that within this framework the naive QCD factorization method provides a simple way to evaluate the hadronic matrix elements of two body mesonic decays. The singularities caused by on mass-shell quark propagator and gluon exchanging interaction are appropriately treated. Such a simple framework allows us to make theoretical predictions for the decay amplitudes with reasonable input parameters. The resulting theoretical predictions for all the branching ratios and CP asymmetries in the charmless $B^0, B^+, B_s\\to \\pi\\pi, \\pi K, KK$ decays are found to be consistent with the current experimental data except for a few decay modes. The observed large branching ratio in $B\\to \\pi^0\\pi^0$ decay remains a puzzle though the predicted branching ratio may be significantly improved by considering the large vertex corrections in the effective Wilson coeffici...

  9. Effects of Starvation and Thermal Stress on the Thermal Tolerance of Silkworm, Bombyx mori: Existence of Trade-offs and Cross-Tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, A H; Qamar, A

    2017-09-27

    Organisms, in nature, are often subjected to multiple stressors, both biotic and abiotic. Temperature and starvation are among the main stressors experienced by organisms in their developmental cycle and the responses to these stressors may share signaling pathways, which affects the way these responses are manifested. Temperature is a major factor governing the performance of ectothermic organisms in ecosystems worldwide and, therefore, the thermal tolerance is a central issue in the thermobiology of these organisms. Here, we investigated the effects of starvation as well as mild heat and cold shocks on the thermal tolerance of the larvae of silkworm, Bombyx mori (Linnaeus). Starvation acted as a meaningful or positive stressor as it improved cold tolerance, measured as chill coma recovery time (CCRT), but, at the same time, it acted as a negative stressor and impaired the heat tolerance, measured as heat knockdown time (HKT). In the case of heat tolerance, starvation negated the positive effects of both mild cold as well as mild heat shocks and thus indicated the existence of trade-off between these stressors. Both mild heat and cold shocks improved the thermal tolerance, but the effects were more prominent when the indices were measured in response to a stressor of same type, i.e., a mild cold shock improved the cold tolerance more than the heat tolerance and vice versa. This improvement in thermal tolerance by both mild heat as well as cold shocks indicated the possibility of cross-tolerance between these stressors.

  10. The negative effect of starvation and the positive effect of mild thermal stress on thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Inon; Wexler, Yonatan; MacMillan, Heath Andrew; Presman, Shira; Simson, Eddie; Rosenstein, Shai

    2016-04-01

    The thermal tolerance of a terrestrial insect species can vary as a result of differences in population origin, developmental stage, age, and sex, as well as via phenotypic plasticity induced in response to changes in the abiotic environment. Here, we studied the effects of both starvation and mild cold and heat shocks on the thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Starvation led to impaired cold tolerance, measured as chill coma recovery time, and this effect, which was stronger in males than females, persisted for longer than 2 days but less than 7 days. Heat tolerance, measured as heat knockdown time, was not affected by starvation. Our results highlight the difficulty faced by insects when encountering multiple stressors simultaneously and indicate physiological trade-offs. Both mild cold and heat shocks led to improved heat tolerance in both sexes. It could be that both mild shocks lead to the expression of heat shock proteins, enhancing heat tolerance in the short run. Cold tolerance was not affected by previous mild cold shock, suggesting that such a cold shock, as a single event, causes little stress and hence elicits only weak physiological reaction. However, previous mild heat stress led to improved cold tolerance but only in males. Our results point to both hardening and cross-tolerance between cold and heat shocks.

  11. The negative effect of starvation and the positive effect of mild thermal stress on thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Inon; Wexler, Yonatan; MacMillan, Heath Andrew; Presman, Shira; Simson, Eddie; Rosenstein, Shai

    2016-04-01

    The thermal tolerance of a terrestrial insect species can vary as a result of differences in population origin, developmental stage, age, and sex, as well as via phenotypic plasticity induced in response to changes in the abiotic environment. Here, we studied the effects of both starvation and mild cold and heat shocks on the thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Starvation led to impaired cold tolerance, measured as chill coma recovery time, and this effect, which was stronger in males than females, persisted for longer than 2 days but less than 7 days. Heat tolerance, measured as heat knockdown time, was not affected by starvation. Our results highlight the difficulty faced by insects when encountering multiple stressors simultaneously and indicate physiological trade-offs. Both mild cold and heat shocks led to improved heat tolerance in both sexes. It could be that both mild shocks lead to the expression of heat shock proteins, enhancing heat tolerance in the short run. Cold tolerance was not affected by previous mild cold shock, suggesting that such a cold shock, as a single event, causes little stress and hence elicits only weak physiological reaction. However, previous mild heat stress led to improved cold tolerance but only in males. Our results point to both hardening and cross-tolerance between cold and heat shocks.

  12. Probing the effects of heterogeneity on delocalized pi...pi interaction energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Desiree M; Anderson, Julie A; Oloyede, Ponmile; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2008-05-21

    Dimers composed of benzene (Bz), 1,3,5-triazine (Tz), cyanogen (Cy) and diacetylene (Di) are used to examine the effects of heterogeneity at the molecular level and at the cluster level on pi...pi stacking energies. The MP2 complete basis set (CBS) limits for the interaction energies (E(int)) of these model systems were determined with extrapolation techniques designed for correlation consistent basis sets. CCSD(T) calculations were used to correct for higher-order correlation effects (deltaE(CCSD)(T)(MP2)) which were as large as +2.81 kcal mol(-1). The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the parallel-slipped dimers of the aforementioned molecules causes significant changes to E(int). The CCSD(T)/CBS E(int) for Di-Cy is -2.47 kcal mol(-1) which is substantially larger than either Cy-Cy (-1.69 kcal mol(-1)) or Di-Di (-1.42 kcal mol(-1)). Similarly, the heteroaromatic Bz-Tz dimer has an E(int) of -3.75 kcal mol(-1) which is much larger than either Tz-Tz (-3.03 kcal mol(-1)) or Bz-Bz (-2.78 kcal mol(-1)). Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations reveal a correlation between the electrostatic component of E(int) and the large increase in the interaction energy for the mixed dimers. However, all components (exchange, induction, dispersion) must be considered to rationalize the observed trend. Another significant conclusion of this work is that basis-set superposition error has a negligible impact on the popular deltaE(CCSD)(T)(MP2) correction, which indicates that counterpoise corrections are not necessary when computing higher-order correlation effects on E(int). Spin-component-scaled MP2 (SCS-MP2 and SCSN-MP2) calculations with a correlation-consistent triple-zeta basis set reproduce the trends in the interaction energies despite overestimating the CCSD(T)/CBS E(int) of Bz-Tz by 20-30%.

  13. Structural Effects of Oncogenic PI3K alpha Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Gabelli; C Huang; D Mandelker; O Schmidt-Kittler; B Vogelstein; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Physiological activation of PI3K{alpha} is brought about by the release of the inhibition by p85 when the nSH2 binds the phosphorylated tyrosine of activated receptors or their substrates. Oncogenic mutations of PI3K{alpha} result in a constitutively activated enzyme that triggers downstream pathways that increase tumor aggressiveness and survival. Structural information suggests that some mutations also activate the enzyme by releasing p85 inhibition. Other mutations work by different mechanisms. For example, the most common mutation, His1047Arg, causes a conformational change that increases membrane association resulting in greater accessibility to the substrate, an integral membrane component. These effects are examples of the subtle structural changes that result in increased activity. The structures of these and other mutants are providing the basis for the design of isozyme-specific, mutation-specific inhibitors for individualized cancer therapies.

  14. Structural effects of oncogenic PI3Kα mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Mandelker, Diana; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L Mario

    2010-01-01

    Physiological activation of PI3Kα is brought about by the release of the inhibition by p85 when the nSH2 binds the phosphorylated tyrosine of activated receptors or their substrates. Oncogenic mutations of PI3Kα result in a constitutively activated enzyme that triggers downstream pathways that increase tumor aggressiveness and survival. Structural information suggests that some mutations also activate the enzyme by releasing p85 inhibition. Other mutations work by different mechanisms. For example, the most common mutation, His1047Arg, causes a conformational change that increases membrane association resulting in greater accessibility to the substrate, an integral membrane component. These effects are examples of the subtle structural changes that result in increased activity. The structures of these and other mutants are providing the basis for the design of isozyme-specific, mutation-specific inhibitors for individualized cancer therapies.

  15. Effect of confinement and starvation on stress parameters in the American lobster (Homarus americanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edo D'Agaro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The American lobster (Homarus americanus is one of the most important crustacean resources in North America. In Italy and Europe, this fishery product is available throughout the year and it has a high and increasing commercial demand. American lobsters are traditionally marketed live and stocked, without feed, in temperature controlled recirculating systems for several weeks before being sold in the market places. The current Italian legislation does not fix a maximum length of time for the crustacean confinement and specific welfare requirements. In the present research, a 4-week experiment was carried out using 42 adult H. americanus reared in 4 recirculating aquaculture tanks. After one month of confinement, mean glucose, protein and total haemocyte count levels in the hemolymph of H. americanus were stable and similar (P>0.05 to the values observed at the beginning of the experiment. Results of the proximate analysis of the abdominal muscles of H. americanus showed no significant differences in concentrations of crude protein, lipid and ash during the trial. At the end of the experiment, the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting analysis revealed a marked degradation of the muscle myofibrillar proteins. A number of fragments, possibly from myosin, were evident in the range between 50 and 220 kDa between time t0 and t28. Results of this study show that the main hemolymphatic variables and degradation analysis of the muscle myofibrillar proteins can be used as sensitive indicators of the crustacean stress response to confinement and starvation.

  16. A multi-pronged investigation into the effect of glucose starvation and culture duration on fed-batch CHO cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian; Lund, Anne Mathilde; Sen, Jette Wagtberg; Rasmussen, Søren Kofoed; Kontoravdi, Cleo; Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Weilguny, Dietmar; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-10-01

    In this study, omics-based analysis tools were used to explore the effect of glucose starvation and culture duration on monoclonal antibody (mAb) production in fed-batch CHO cell culture to gain better insight into how these parameters can be controlled to ensure optimal mAb productivity and quality. Titer and N-glycosylation of mAbs, as well as proteomic signature and metabolic status of the production cells in the culture were assessed. We found that the impact of glucose starvation on the titer and N-glycosylation of mAbs was dependent on the degree of starvation during early stationary phase of the fed-batch culture. Higher degree of glucose starvation reduced intracellular concentrations of UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-GalNAc, but increased the levels of UDP-Glc and UDP-Gal. Increased GlcNAc and Gal occupancy correlated well with increased degree of glucose starvation, which can be attributed to the interplay between the dilution effect associated with change in specific productivity of mAbs and the changed nucleotide sugar metabolism. Herein, we also show and discuss that increased cell culture duration negatively affect the maturation of glycans. In addition, comparative proteomics analysis of cells was conducted to observe differences in protein abundance between early growth and early stationary phases. Generally higher expression of proteins involved in regulating cellular metabolism, extracellular matrix, apoptosis, protein secretion and glycosylation was found in early stationary phase. These analyses offered a systematic view of the intrinsic properties of these cells and allowed us to explore the root causes correlating culture duration with variations in the productivity and glycosylation quality of monoclonal antibodies produced with CHO cells.

  17. Effects of starvation on intermolt development in Calanus finmarchicus copepodites: a comparison between theoretical models and field studies1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Jennifer A.; Miller, Charles B.

    Campbell et al . (Deep Sea Research II, 48 (2001) 531) have shown that there was a localized starvation event affecting Calanus finmarchicus on the southern flank of Georges Bank in April 1997. Growth and molting rates of this dominant copepod were reduced. We have used the morphology of tooth development in field-collected samples to show that this starvation affected animals living continuously in the field, as well as those in Campbell et al .'s experimental tanks. Assuming a point of reserve saturation (PRS) response of Calanus to food limitation, and correspondence between PRS and advance from the postmolt jaw facies, the proportion of individuals with postmolt jaws should increase in all copepodite stages under starvation. Individuals that have developed past PRS should molt to the next stage, acquiring postmolt facies. Thus, the fraction of postmolt jaws should increase, while the fraction of jaws in later phases should decrease. This was observed for a drifter-marked station over five days. Numerical simulations of jaw phase distributions expected under full nutrition, and both total and patchy starvation were generated from individual-based models of development. Proportions of copepodites in postmolt phase do not increase with full nutrition. A simulation of a total starvation event showed a marked increase in postmolts during food limitation, but the increase was more extreme than the field data. A modification of the starvation simulation, representing patchy feeding conditions, matched the level of increase of postmolt individuals in all stages that was observed in the field samples.

  18. The Effect of Long Term Starvation on Galanin, Leptin, Thyroid Hormones, Insulin, Prolactin, Growth Hormone, Ghrelin and Factors Involved in Energy Metabolism in Adult Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda ESKANDARZADE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Some hormonal disturbances have been demonstrated in starvation, but in ruminants such as goats, the role of galanin in adaptation to starvation or endocrine functions is not well studied. The present study was conducted to assess the effect of long term starvation on galanin, leptin, thyroid hormones, insulin, prolactin, growth hormone, ghrelin and factors involved in energy metabolism including HDL, Cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, NEFA, TG and VLDL concentrations in adult goats. Eight non-lactating non-pregnant goats aged 4-5 years and BCS 3 were randomly divided to control and test groups. The animals were trained to eat their daily forage ration during a 10 day period. The experimental procedure was applied for 20 days, during which control group received 120% of maintenance energy, while the test group was supplied with 80% of maintenance energy for the first 10 days and with 40% of maintenance energy for another 10 days. Blood samples were collected at day 10 of training and 2, 4, 10, 12, 14 and 20 days after beginning of starvation. Blood parameters were measured according to standard procedures. No significant difference was observed in the concentrations of cholesterol, fT3, T4, T3, growth hormone, NEFA, insulin and ghrelin between control and test groups (P=0.05. There was significant difference in galanin, leptin, fT4, HDL, glucose, TG, VLDL and prolactin concentrations between control and test groups (P=0.05. Control of energy balance and the role of galanin in adaptation to long starvation or endocrine functions in goat are different from other species.

  19. [Effect of starvation on the ultrastructure of hepatocytes of Hemidactylus frenatus (Lacertilia: Gekkonidae) with special emphasis on peroxisomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito-Gitirana, L; Storch, V

    1998-06-01

    The influence of starvation on hepatocyte ultrastructure of Hemidactylus frenatus (Lacertilia: Gekkonidae) was investigated with special emphasis on peroxisomes. Wall lizards (Hemidactylus frenatus) were sacrificed after different periods of starvation and their livers were processed for standard transmission electron microscopy. Peroxisomes were demonstrated by means of the 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) cytochemical technique. A control group consisted of individuals which were fed "ad libitum" with Tenebrio molitor larvae. After a 7-day period of starvation the ultrastructural observation of hepatocytes disclosed a marked reduction of glycogen and lipid inclusions associated with fragmentation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In later stages of starvation (14 and 25 days) ER proliferation and partial reconstruction of glycogen aggregations were observed. Increasing numbers of peroxisomes were arranged either in clusters (14 days) or in close association with mitochondria, lipid droplets and elongated crystalloid structures (25 days). Particularly noteworthy is the increasing cytochemical response of these organelles to the DAB reaction, suggesting greater metabolic activity of catalase. These data suggest that morphological and functional plasticity of hepatocytes may contribute to adaptation of Hemidactylus frenatus to prolonged starvation.

  20. Density dependence in Caenorhabditis larval starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Avery, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Availability of food is often a limiting factor in nature. Periods of food abundance are followed by times of famine, often in unpredictable patterns. Reliable information about the environment is a critical ingredient of successful survival strategy. One way to improve accuracy is to integrate information communicated by other organisms. To test whether such exchange of information may play a role in determining starvation survival strategies, we studied starvation of L1 larvae in C. elegans and other Caenorhabditis species. We found that some species in genus Caenorhabditis, including C. elegans, survive longer when starved at higher densities, while for others survival is independent of the density. The density effect is mediated by chemical signal(s) that worms release during starvation. This starvation survival signal is independent of ascarosides, a class of small molecules widely used in chemical communication of C. elegans and other nematodes. PMID:24071624

  1. Why does starvation make bones fat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Maureen J

    2011-01-01

    Body fat, or adipose tissue, is a crucial energetic buffer against starvation in humans and other mammals, and reserves of white adipose tissue (WAT) rise and fall in parallel with food intake. Much less is known about the function of bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT), which are fat cells found in bone marrow. BMAT mass actually increases during starvation, even as other fat depots are being mobilized for energy. This review considers several possible reasons for this poorly understood phenomenon. Is BMAT a passive filler that occupies spaces left by dying bone cells, a pathological consequence of suppressed bone formation, or potentially an adaptation for surviving starvation? These possibilities are evaluated in terms of the effects of starvation on the body, particularly the skeleton, and the mechanisms involved in storing and metabolizing BMAT during negative energy balance.

  2. Effects of starvation on body composition and cold tolerance in the collembolan Orchesella cincta and the isopod Porcellio scaber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, H A.; Nedved, O; Lavy, D

    1997-10-01

    The effects of long-term starvation on the body composition of the isopod Porcellio scaber (Latreille) and the collembolan Orchesella cincta (L.) were studied, by determining the body composition in starved and fed animals. A period under summer conditions (19 degrees C, 75% RH and L/D 16/8 photoperiod), was followed by a period under winter conditions (5 degrees C, 75% RH and LD 6/18 photoperiod). O. cincta was held under summer conditions for 3weeks, during which its protein and lipid content decreased, while its water content increased. In P. scaber, the same occurred during the 6weeks they were kept under summer conditions. During subsequent weeks under winter conditions, changes in cold tolerance of the animals were investigated. Cold tolerance and haemolymph osmolality were measured once a week. Starved animals had lower cold tolerance than fed ones. For P. scaber a decreased haemolymph osmolality was found in starved animals compared to fed ones. This is assumed to be caused by a combination of the consumption of carbohydrates out of the haemolymph and of protein reserves and the accumulation of body water. O. cincta appeared to be capable of osmoregulation, as haemolymph osmolality did not differ between starved and fed animals, despite differences in body water content. Decreased cold tolerance in starved animals of both species may be caused by increased water content or, more probably, by the decrease in reserves needed to produce cryoprotective substances.

  3. Revealing fosfomycin primary effect on Staphylococcus aureus transcriptome: modulation of cell envelope biosynthesis and phosphoenolpyruvate induced starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruden Kristina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a highly adaptable human pathogen and there is a constant search for effective antibiotics. Fosfomycin is a potent irreversible inhibitor of MurA, an enolpyruvyl transferase that uses phosphoenolpyruvate as substrate. The goal of this study was to identify the pathways and processes primarily affected by fosfomycin at the genome-wide transcriptome level to aid development of new drugs. Results S. aureus ATCC 29213 cells were treated with sub-MIC concentrations of fosfomycin and harvested at 10, 20 and 40 minutes after treatment. S. aureus GeneChip statistical data analysis was complemented by gene set enrichment analysis. A visualization tool for mapping gene expression data into biological pathways was developed in order to identify the metabolic processes affected by fosfomycin. We have shown that the number of significantly differentially expressed genes in treated cultures increased with time and with increasing fosfomycin concentration. The target pathway - peptidoglycan biosynthesis - was upregulated following fosfomycin treatment. Modulation of transport processes, cofactor biosynthesis, energy metabolism and nucleic acid biosynthesis was also observed. Conclusions Several pathways and genes downregulated by fosfomycin have been identified, in contrast to previously described cell wall active antibiotics, and was explained by starvation response induced by phosphoenolpyruvate accumulation. Transcriptomic profiling, in combination with meta-analysis, has been shown to be a valuable tool in determining bacterial response to a specific antibiotic.

  4. Measurement of the pp {yields} d{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} reaction - {delta}{delta} excitation without ABC-effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kren, Florian; Bashkanov, Mikhail; Clement, Heinz; Doroshkevich, Evgueny; Khakimova, Olena; Skorodko, Tatiana; Wagner, Gerhard J. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Inclusive measurements of double-pionic fusion indicate that isovector {pi}{pi} channels should not exhibit any ABC effect, which is a low-mass enhancement in the invariant {pi}{pi} mass spectrum. At CELSIUS-WASA we conducted the first exclusive experiments on this issue by measuring the reaction pp {yields} d{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}. In this talk first results will be presented for the measurements at T{sub p} = 1.1 GeV, i.e. in the energy region, where the ABC-effect is supposed to be largest and the {delta}{delta} excitation already should be the dominant process. The d{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} data reveal that indeed the ABC-effect is absent in this reaction despite a strong {delta}{delta} excitation, which is clearly seen in the d{pi} invariant mass spectra. The distribution of the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} opening angle is consistent with a spinflip p-wave distribution. The results are compared to those from the isoscalar double-pion production in the fusion reaction pn {yields} d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, where a huge ABC-effect is observed. The total cross section of this reaction also does not exhibit the peculiar resonance-like behavior of the d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel. It rather agrees with simple {delta}{delta} calculations without mutual interaction between the {delta} states.

  5. Sudakov effects in B -> pi l nu form factors

    CERN Document Server

    Descotes, S

    2002-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the Standard Model from exclusive hadronic two-body B-decays, we have to quantify non-perturbative QCD effects. Approaches based on the factorization of mass singularities into hadronic distribution amplitudes and form factors provide a rigorous theoretical framework for the evaluation of these effects in the heavy quark limit. But it is not possible to calculate power corrections in a model-independent way, because of non-factorizing long-distance contributions. It has been argued that Sudakov effects suppress these contributions and render the corresponding corrections perturbatively calculable. In this paper we examine this claim for the related example of semileptonic B -> pi decays and conclude that it is not justified. The uncertainties in our knowledge of the mesons' distribution amplitudes imply that the calculations of the form factors are not sufficiently precise to be useful phenomenologically. Moreover, a significant contribution comes from the non-perturbative...

  6. Phosphate starvation enhances the pathogenesis of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Somya; Somani, Vikas Kumar; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the factors responsible for survival and virulence of Bacillus anthracis within the host is prerequisite for the development of therapeutics against anthrax. Host provides several stresses as well as many advantages to the invading pathogen. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation within the host has been considered as one of the major contributing factors in the establishment of infection by pathogenic microorganisms. Here, we report for the first time that Pi fluctuation encountered by B. anthracis at different stages of its life cycle within the host, contributes significantly in its pathogenesis. In this study, Pi starvation was found to hasten the onset of infection cycle by promoting spore germination. After germination, it was found to impede cell growth. In addition, phosphate starved bacilli showed more antibiotic tolerance. Interestingly, phosphate starvation enhanced the pathogenicity of B. anthracis by augmenting its invasiveness in macrophages in vitro. B. anthracis grown under phosphate starvation were also found to be more efficient in establishing lethal infections in mouse model as well. Phosphate starvation increased B. anthracis virulence by promoting the secretion of primary virulence factors like protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF). Thus, this study affirms that besides other host mediated factors, phosphate limitation may also contribute B. anthracis for successfully establishing itself within the host. This study is a step forward in delineating its pathophysiology that might help in understanding the pathogenesis of anthrax.

  7. Larval starvation improves metabolic response to adult starvation in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Campbell, Jacob B; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-04-01

    Environmental changes during development have long-term effects on adult phenotypes in diverse organisms. Some of the effects play important roles in helping organisms adapt to different environments, such as insect polymorphism. Others, especially those resulting from an adverse developmental environment, have a negative effect on adult health and fitness. However, recent studies have shown that those phenotypes influenced by early environmental adversity have adaptive value under certain (anticipatory) conditions that are similar to the developmental environment, though evidence is mostly from morphological and behavioral observations and it is still rare at physiological and molecular levels. In the companion study, we applied a short-term starvation treatment to fifth instar honey bee larvae and measured changes in adult morphology, starvation resistance, hormonal and metabolic physiology and gene expression. Our results suggest that honey bees can adaptively respond to the predicted nutritional stress. In the present study, we further hypothesized that developmental starvation specifically improves the metabolic response of adult bees to starvation instead of globally affecting metabolism under well-fed conditions. Here, we produced adult honey bees that had experienced a short-term larval starvation, then we starved them for 12 h and monitored metabolic rate, blood sugar concentrations and metabolic reserves. We found that the bees that experienced larval starvation were able to shift to other fuels faster and better maintain stable blood sugar levels during starvation. However, developmental nutritional stress did not change metabolic rates or blood sugar levels in adult bees under normal conditions. Overall, our study provides further evidence that early larval starvation specifically improves the metabolic responses to adult starvation in honey bees.

  8. Measurement of the ABC effect in the most basic double-pionic fusion reaction pn{yields}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakimova, Olena; Bashkanov, Mikhail; Clement, Heinz; Doroshkevich, Evgueny; Kren, Florian; Skorodko, Tatiana; Wagner, Gerhard J. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The ABC effect - a puzzling low-mass enhancement in the {pi}{pi} invariant mass spectrum - is known from inclusive measurements of two-pion production in nuclear fusion reactions. For the most basic fusion reaction in this context - the pn{yields}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} reaction - the first exclusive measurements have been carried out at CELSIUS-WASA at T{sub p}=1.03 and 1.35 GeV by analyzing the reaction pd{yields}p{sub spectator}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The measurements show the excitation of the {delta}{delta} process in the M{sub d{pi}{sup 0}} invariant mass spectrum as well as the ABC-effect in the M{sub {pi}{sup 0}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}} spectrum, where a hugh low-mass {pi}{pi} enhancement is observed. The data reveal the ABC effect to be a {sigma} channel phenomenon associated with the formation of a {delta}{delta} system in the intermediate state. The differential distributions keep the same shape over the full measured range of energies. This is associated with a total cross section, which exhibits a resonance-like energy dependence in the measured energy range with a width of 100 MeV or possibly even less. Both the ABC effect and the intriguing energy dependence can be accommodated by a quasibound state in the {delta}{delta} system leading to a resonance both in pn and d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} systems.

  9. The High-Risk Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncogene Exacerbates the Negative Effect of Tryptophan Starvation on the Development of Chlamydia trachomatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherchand, Shardulendra P.; Ibana, Joyce A.; Zea, Arnold H.; Quayle, Alison J.; Aiyar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen that requires specific essential nutrients from the host cell, one of which is the amino acid tryptophan. In this context interferon gamma (IFNγ) is the major host protective cytokine against chlamydial infections because it induces the expression of the host enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1, that degrades tryptophan, thereby restricting bacterial replication. The mechanism by which IFNγ acts has been dissected in vitro using epithelial cell-lines such as HeLa, HEp-2, or the primary-like endocervical cell-line A2EN. All these cell-lines express the high-risk human papillomavirus oncogenes E6 & E7. While screening cell-lines to identify those suitable for C. trachomatis co-infections with other genital pathogens, we unexpectedly found that tryptophan starvation did not completely block chlamydial development in cell-lines that were HR-HPV negative, such as C33A and 293. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that HR-HPV oncogenes modulate the effect of tryptophan starvation on chlamydial development by comparing chlamydial development in HeLa and C33A cell-lines that were both derived from cervical carcinomas. Our results indicate that during tryptophan depletion, unlike HeLa, C33A cells generate sufficient intracellular tryptophan via proteasomal activity to permit C. trachomatis replication. By generating stable derivatives of C33A that expressed HPV16 E6, E7 or E6 & E7, we found that E6 expression alone was sufficient to convert C33A cells to behave like HeLa during tryptophan starvation. The reduced tryptophan levels in HeLa cells have a biological consequence; akin to the previously described effect of IFNγ, tryptophan starvation protects C. trachomatis from clearance by doxycycline in HeLa but not C33A cells. Curiously, when compared to the known Homo sapiens proteome, the representation of tryptophan in the HR-HPV E6 & E6AP degradome is substantially lower, possibly providing a mechanism that

  10. Signaling Components Involved in Plant Responses to Phosphate Starvation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yuan; Dong Liu

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorus is one of the macronutrients essential for plant growth and development. Many soils around the world are deficient in phosphate (Pi) which is the form of phosphorus that plants can absorb and utilize. To cope with the stress of Pi starvation, plants have evolved many elaborate strategies to enhance the acquisition and utilization of Pi from the environment. These strategies include morphological, biochemical and physiological responses which ultimately enable plants to better survive under low Pi conditions. Though these adaptive responses have been well described because of their ecological and agricultural importance, our studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying these responses are still in their infancy. In the last decade, significant progresses have been made towards the identification of the molecular components which are involved in the control of plant responses to Pi starvation. In this article, we first provide an overview of some major responses of plants to Pi starvation, then summarize what we have known so tar about the signaling components involved in these responses, as well as the roles of sugar and phytohormones.

  11. Impacts of Strigolactone on Shoot Branching under Phosphate Starvation in Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum cv. Jinba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin eXi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum cv. Jinba shoot branching is determined by bud outgrowth during the vegetative growth stage. The degree of axillary bud outgrowth is highly influenced by environmental conditions, such as nutrient availability. Here, we demonstrated that phosphorus (Pi starvation significantly reduces axillary bud outgrowth in chrysanthemum. A strigolactone (SL biosynthesis gene, DgCCD7, was isolated and characterized as an ortholog of MAX3/DAD3/RMS5/D17. By using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS, three putative SLs were identified and detected strong induction under Pi starvation conditions. Determinations of the distribution of SLs and negative regulation of DgCCD7/8 time-course in root indicated systemic response of SL. However, temporal expression patterns of biosynthesis and signaling genes in nodes revealed that Pi starvation causes a local response of SL pathway. Application of modified node segments treated with or without auxin and Pi revealed that in the absence of exogenous auxin, Pi delay axillary buds outgrowth and up-regulating local SL pathway genes. These data indicate that an auxin-SL regulatory loop respond to Pi starvation for delaying bud outgrowth locally, root biosynthesized SLs are transported acropetally and function in shoot branching inhibition under Pi starvation. We propose that SLs contribute to chrysanthemum shoot branching control in response to Pi-limiting conditions in a systemic way.

  12. The Deck effect in piN to pipipiN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozef Dudek; Adam Szczepaniak

    2005-08-21

    Recent high-statistics analyses of the reaction $\\pi p \\to \\pi \\pi \\pi p$ have motivated a reconsideration of the Deck effect which was widely applied to such data in the 1960's and 70's. The Deck effect is essentially kinematic in origin yet considerable subtleties can arise when one attempts to model its contribution to the data. We will discuss previous Deck studies and propose how it may be constrained further than was possible before using the data now available.

  13. Vertex and Propagator in $\\Phi^{4}$ Theory from 4PI Effective Action in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Carrington, M E

    2012-01-01

    A set of self-consistent nonlinear integral equations for the four-point vertex and the propagator are derived from the 4-loop 4PI effective action for scalar field theories. This set of integral equations are solved in two dimensions through numerical lattice calculations. We compare the calculated results with those of perturbation theories. We find that the 4PI calculations are well consistent with the perturbation ones in perturbative regions. Non-perturbative results are also obtained in the 4PI formalism when the interacting strength becomes large. Furthermore, the full-momentum dependence of the four-point vertex is easily obtained in the 4PI effective action theories.

  14. Raspberry Pi- A Small, Powerful, Cost Effective and Efficient Form Factor Computer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Nayyar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raspberry Pi, an efficient and cost effective credit card sized computer comes under light of sun by United Kingdom-Raspberry Pi foundation with the aim to enlighten and empower computer science teaching in schools and other developing countries. Since its inception, various open source communities have contributed tons towards open source apps, operating systems and various other small form factor computers similar to Raspberry Pi. Till date, researchers, hobbyists and other embedded systems enthusiast across the planet are making amazing projects using Pi which looks unbelievable and have out-of-the-box implementation. Raspberry Pi since its launch is regularly under constant development cum improvement both in terms of hardware and software which in-turn making Pi a “Full Fledged Computer” with possibility to be considered for almost all computing intensive tasks. The aim of this research paper is to enlighten regarding what is Raspberry Pi, Why Raspberry Pi is Required, Generations of Raspberry Pi, operating systems available till date in Pi and other hardware available for project development. This paper will lay foundation for various open source communities across planet to become aware and use this credit card sized computer for making projects ranging from day to day activities to scientific and complex applications development.

  15. Exclusive Measurements of pp -> dpi+pi0: Double-Pionic Fusion without ABC Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kren, F; Bogoslawsky, D; Calén, H; Clement, H; Demiroers, L; Ekström, C; Fransson, k; Greiff, J; Gustafsson, L; Höistad, B; Ivanov, G; Jacewicz, M; Jiganov, E; Kohansson, T; Khakimova, O; Keleta, S; Koch, I; Kullander, S; Kupsc, A; Marciniewski, P; Meier, R; Morosov, B; Pauly, C; Petren, H; Petukhov, Yu P; Povtoreijko, A; Ruber, R J M Y; Schonning, K; Scobel, W; Skorodko, T; Shwartz, B; Stepaniak, J; Thorngren-Engblom, P; Tikhomirov, V; Wagner, G J; Wolke, M; Yamamoto, A; Zabierowski, J; Zlomanczuk, Yu

    2009-01-01

    Exclusive measurements of the reaction pp -> dpi+pi0 have been carried out at T_p = 1.1 GeV at the CELSIUS storage ring using the WASA detector. The isovector pi+pi0 channel exhibits no enhancement at low invariant pipi masses, i. e. no ABC effect. The differential distributions are in agreement with the conventional t-channel Delta-Delta excitation process, which also accounts for the observed energy dependence of the total cross section.

  16. The effect of starvation and re-feeding on mitochondrial potential in the midgut of Neocaridina davidi (Crustacea, Malacostraca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Agnieszka; Sonakowska, Lidia; Kamińska, Karolina; Marchewka, Angelika; Wilczek, Grażyna; Wilczek, Piotr; Student, Sebastian; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The midgut in the freshwater shrimp Neocaridina davidi (previously named N. heteropoda) (Crustacea, Malacostraca) is composed of a tube-shaped intestine and a large hepatopancreas that is formed by numerous blind-ended tubules. The precise structure and ultrastructure of these regions were presented in our previous papers, while here we focused on the ultrastructural changes that occurred in the midgut epithelial cells (D-cells in the intestine, B- and F- cells in the hepatopancreas) after long-term starvation and re-feeding. We used transmission electron microscopy, light and confocal microscopes and flow cytometry to describe all of the changes that occurred due to the stressor with special emphasis on mitochondrial alterations. A quantitative assessment of cells with depolarized mitochondria helped us to establish whether there is a relationship between starvation, re-feeding and the inactivation/activation of mitochondria. The results of our studies showed that in the freshwater shrimp N. davidi that were analyzed, long-term starvation activates the degeneration of epithelial cells at the ultrastructural level and causes an increase of cells with depolarized (non-active) mitochondria. The process of re-feeding leads to the gradual regeneration of the cytoplasm of the midgut epithelial cells; however, these changes were observed at the ultrastructural level. Additionally, re-feeding causes the regeneration of mitochondrial ultrastructure. Therefore, we can state that the increase in the number of cells with polarized mitochondria occurs slowly and does not depend on ultrastructural alterations. PMID:28282457

  17. 2PI Effective Action and Evolution Equations of N = 4 super Yang-Mills

    CERN Document Server

    Smolic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    We employ nPI effective action techniques to study N = 4 super Yang-Mills, and write down the 2PI effective action of the theory. We also supply the evolution equations of two-point correlators within the theory.

  18. 2PI effective action and evolution equations of N=4 super Yang-Mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena [University of Amsterdam, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    We employ nPI effective action techniques to study N=4 super Yang-Mills, and write down the 2PI effective action of the theory to two-loop order in the symmetric phase. We also supply the evolution equations of two-point correlators within the theory. (orig.)

  19. Ethylene signalling is involved in regulation of phosphate starvation-induced gene expression and production of acid phosphatases and anthocyanin in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, Mingguang

    2010-11-30

    With the exception of root hair development, the role of the phytohormone ethylene is not clear in other aspects of plant responses to inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation. The induction of AtPT2 was used as a marker to find novel signalling components involved in plant responses to Pi starvation. Using genetic and chemical approaches, we examined the role of ethylene in the regulation of plant responses to Pi starvation. hps2, an Arabidopsis mutant with enhanced sensitivity to Pi starvation, was identified and found to be a new allele of CTR1 that is a key negative regulator of ethylene responses. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), the precursor of ethylene, increases plant sensitivity to Pi starvation, whereas the ethylene perception inhibitor Ag+ suppresses this response. The Pi starvation-induced gene expression and acid phosphatase activity are also enhanced in the hps2 mutant, but suppressed in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-5. By contrast, we found that ethylene signalling plays a negative role in Pi starvation-induced anthocyanin production. These findings extend the roles of ethylene in the regulation of plant responses to Pi starvation and will help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying these responses. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Effects of $Z_b$ states and bottom meson loops on $\\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\Upsilon(1S,2S) \\pi^+\\pi^-$ transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yun-Hua; Daub, Johanna T; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G; Zou, Bing-Song

    2016-01-01

    We study the dipion transitions $\\Upsilon(4S) \\rightarrow \\Upsilon(nS) \\pi^+\\pi^-$ $(n=1,2)$. In particular, we consider the effects of the two intermediate bottomoniumlike exotic states $Z_b(10610)$ and $Z_b(10650)$ as well as bottom meson loops. The strong pion-pion final-state interactions, especially including channel coupling to $K\\bar{K}$ in the $S$-wave, are taken into account model-independently by using dispersion theory. Based on a nonrelativistic effective field theory we find that the contribution from the bottom meson loops is comparable to those from the chiral contact terms and the $Z_b$-exchange terms. For the $\\Upsilon(4S) \\rightarrow \\Upsilon(2S) \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay, the result shows that including the effects of the $Z_b$-exchange and the bottom meson loops can naturally reproduce the two-hump behavior of the $\\pi\\pi$ mass spectra. Future angular distribution data are decisive for the identification of different production mechanisms. For the $\\Upsilon(4S) \\rightarrow \\Upsilon(1S) \\pi^+\\pi^-$...

  1. Extracting the photoproduction cross section off the neutron gn-->pi-p from deuteron data with FSI effects

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasov, V E; Gao, H; Kudryavtsev, A E; Strakovsky, I I

    2011-01-01

    The incoherent pion photoproduction reaction gd-->pi-pp is considered theoretically in a wide energy region Eth =pi-p reaction cross section beyond the impulse approximation for gd-->pi-pp. For the elementary gN-->piN, NN-->NN, and piN-->piN amplitudes, the results of the GW DAC are used. There are no additional theoretical constraints. The calculated cross section dSigma/dOmega(gd->pi-pp) are compared with existing data. The procedure used to extract information on the differential cross section dSigma/dOmega(gn-->pi-p) on the neutron from the deuteron data using the FSI correction factor R is discussed. The calculations for R versus pi-p CM angle \\theta_1 of the outgoing pion are performed at different photon-beam energies with kinematical cuts for "quasi-free" process gn-->pi-p. The results show a sizeable FSI effect R \

  2. Precision measurements of the pp\\to \\pi^+pn and pp\\to \\pi^+d reactions: importance of long-range and tensor force effects

    CERN Document Server

    Budzanowski, A; Hawranek, P; Jahn, R; Jha, V; Kilian, K; Kirillov, Da; Kirillov, Di; Kliczewski, S; Kolev, D; Kravcikova, M; Lesiak, M; Lieb, J; Machner, H; Magiera, A; Maier, R; Martinská, G; Nedev, S; Niskanen, J A; Piskunov, N; Protic, D; Ritman, 6 J; Von Rossen, P; Roy, B J; Sitnik, I; Siudak, R; Stein, H J; Tsenov, R; Urbán, J; Vankova, 2 G; Wilkin, C

    2009-01-01

    Inclusive measurements of pion production in proton--proton collisions in the forward direction were undertaken at 400 and 600 MeV at COSY using the Big Karl spectrograph. The high resolution in the $\\pi^+$ momentum ensured that there was an unambiguous separation of the $pp\\to {\\pi}^+d/\\pi^+pn$ channels. Using these and earlier data, the ratio of the production cross sections could be followed through the $\\Delta$ region and compared with the predictions of final state interaction theory. Deviations are strongly influenced by long-range terms in the production operator and the tensor force in the final $pn$ system. These have been investigated in a realistic $pp\\to\\pi^+d/\\pi^+pn$ calculation that includes $S \\rightleftharpoons D$ channel coupling between the final nucleons. A semi-quantitative understanding of the observed effects is achieved.

  3. Oxidative Stress-Induced Dysfunction of Muller Cells During Starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Gurubaran, Iswariyaraja Sridevi; Madsen, Claus Desler;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE. Muller cells support retinal neurons with essential functions. Here, we aim to examine the impact of starvation and oxidative stress on glutamate uptake and mitochondrial function in Muller cells. METHODS. Cultured human retinal Muller cells (MIO-M1) were exposed to H2O2 and additional...... starvation for 24 hours. Effects of starvation and H2O2 on glutamate uptake and mitochondrial function were assessed by kinetic glutamate uptake assays and Seahorse assays, respectively. Cell survival was evaluated by cell viability assays. mRNA and protein expressions were assessed by quantitative PCR...... and Western blot. RESULTS. Starvation of Muller cells increased the glutamate uptake capacity as well as the expression of the most abundant glutamate transporter, EAAT1. Mitochondrial and glycolytic activity were diminished in starved Muller cells despite unaffected cell viability. Simultaneous starvation...

  4. Oxygen starvation analysis during air feeding faults in PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerard, Mathias [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), DRT/LITEN, 17, rue des Martyrs -38000 Grenoble (France); University of Franche-Comte, FEMTO-ST ENISYS/FCLAB Laboratory, rue Thierry Mieg, bat. F -90010 Belfort (France); Poirot-Crouvezier, Jean-Philippe [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), DRT/LITEN, 17, rue des Martyrs -38000 Grenoble (France); Hissel, Daniel; Pera, Marie-Cecile [University of Franche-Comte, FEMTO-ST ENISYS/FCLAB Laboratory, rue Thierry Mieg, bat. F -90010 Belfort (France)

    2010-11-15

    A new analysis of performance degradation during oxygen starvation of PEMFC (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell) is proposed in this paper. Oxygen starvation happens for several reasons like compressor delay, fault during peak power demand or water management issues. The consequences on fuel cell performance degradation are not still well understood. This paper proposes a complete study with experimental tests and modeling. Impacts on performance were investigated under oxygen starvation and effects on the local conditions in the MEA (Membrane Electrode Assembly) were measured and modeled. In particular, current density measurements during oxygen starvation have been made with a specific bi-cell stack. Voltage oscillations were also found. Durability test have been realized on a PEMFC stack. Samples from the degraded MEA were analyzed by TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy). Degradation mechanisms are proposed and the local conditions during oxygen starvation are identified. (author)

  5. Effect of hydration on the lowest singlet PiPi* excited-state geometry of guanine: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, M K; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2005-09-15

    An ab-initio computational study was performed to investigate the effect of explicit hydration on the ground and lowest singlet PiPi* excited-state geometry and on the selected stretching vibrational frequencies corresponding to the different NH sites of the guanine acting as hydrogen-bond donors. The studied systems consisted of guanine interacting with one, three, five, six, and seven water molecules. Ground-state geometries were optimized at the HF level, while excited-state geometries were optimized at the CIS level. The 6-311G(d,p) basis set was used in all calculations. The nature of potential energy surfaces was ascertained via the harmonic vibrational frequency analysis; all structures were found minima at the respective potential energy surfaces. The changes in the geometry and the stretching vibrational frequencies of hydrogen-bond-donating sites of the guanine in the ground and excited state consequent to the hydration are discussed. It was found that the first solvation shell of the guanine can accommodate up to six water molecules. The addition of the another water molecule distorts the hydrogen-bonding network by displacing other neighboring water molecules away from the guanine plane.

  6. The $e^+ e^-\\to 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\pi^0$, 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\eta$, $K^+ K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $K^+ K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\eta$ Cross Sections Measured with Initial-State Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabé, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schröder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Foulkes, C; Buchanan S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L

    2007-01-01

    We study the processes $e^+ e^-\\to 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\pi^0\\gamma$, $2(\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\eta\\gamma$, $K^+ K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0\\gamma$ and $K^+ K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\eta\\gamma$ with the hard photon radiated from the initial state. About 20000, 4300, 5500 and 375 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 232 fb$^{-1}$ of BaBar data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective $e^+ e^-$ center-of-mass energy, so that the obtained cross sections from the threshold to about 5 GeV can be compared with corresponding direct \\epem measurements, currently available only for the $\\eta\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $\\omega\\pi^+\\pi^-$ submodes of the $e^+ e^-\\to 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\pi^0$ channel. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and we extract their cross sections where possible. In particular, we isolate the contribution from $e^+ e^-\\to\\omega(782)\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and study the $\\omega(1420)$ and $\\omega(1650)$ resonances. In the charmonium region, we observe ...

  7. Study of $\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ Production via Primakoff Effect on Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposed experiment makes use of the FRAMM spectrometer (experiments NA1 and NA7). The aim of the experiment is to study the reaction @p|-Pb @A @p|-@p|0Pb via Primakoff effect in order to measure the radiative decay width @G(@r|- @A @p|-@g) of the @r|- meson and to measure the cross-section of the reaction at threshold. The controversial data on @G(@r|- @A @p|-@g) and the theoretical importance of this process justify a high statistics study of the reaction in the @r|- region. The physical interest of the measurement of the @p|-@p|0 production cross-section at threshold is to check the validity of the low energy theorem for the @g @A 3@p vertex (Adler, Bell and Jackiw anomalies) and to obtain a direct determination

  8. Phosphate Starvation Responses and Gibberellic Acid Biosynthesis Are Regulated by the MYB62 Transcription Factor in Arabiclopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ballachanda N. Devaiah; Ramaiah Madhuvanthi; Athikkattuvalasu S. Karthikeyan; Kashchandra G. Raghothama

    2009-01-01

    The limited availability of phosphate (Pi) in most soils results in the manifestation of Pi starvation responses in plants. To dissect the transcriptional regulation of Pi stress-response mechanisms, we have characterized the biological role of MYB62, an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor that is induced in response to Pi deficiency. The induction of MYB62 is a specific response in the leaves during Pi deprivation. The MYB62 protein localizes to the nucleus. The overexpression of MYB62 resulted in altered root architecture, Pi uptake, and acid phosphatase activity, leading to decreased total Pi content in the shoots. The expression of several Pi starvation-induced (PSI) genes was also suppressed in the MYB62 overexpressing plants. Overexpression of MYB62 resulted in a characteristic gibberellic acid (GA)-deficient phenotype that could be partially reversed by exogenous application of GA. In addition, the expression of SOC1 and SUPERMAN, molecular regulators of flowering, was suppressed in the MYB62 overexpressing plants. Interestingly, the expression of these genes was also reduced during Pi deprivation in wild-type plants, suggesting a role for GA biosynthetic and floral regulatory genes in Pi starvation responses. Thus, this study highlights the role of MYB62 in the regulation of phosphate starvation responses via changes in GA metabolism and signaling. Such cross-talk between Pi homeostasis and GA might have broader implications on flowering, root development and adaptive mechanisms during nutrient stress.

  9. Nitrogen starvation affects bacterial adhesion to soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Maria Tereza; Nascimento, Antônio Galvão; Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Tótola, Marcos Rogério

    2008-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting the bioremediation of subsoil environments based on bioaugmentation is the transport of selected microorganisms to the contaminated zones. The characterization of the physiological responses of the inoculated microorganisms to starvation, especially the evaluation of characteristics that affect the adhesion of the cells to soil particles, is fundamental to anticipate the success or failure of bioaugmentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrogen starvation on cell surface hydrophobicity and cell adhesion to soil particles by bacterial strains previously characterized as able to use benzene, toluene or xilenes as carbon and energy sources. The strains LBBMA 18-T (non-identified), Arthrobacter aurescens LBBMA 98, Arthrobacter oxydans LBBMA 201, and Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1 were used in the experiments. Cultivation of the cells in nitrogen-deficient medium caused a significant reduction of the adhesion to soil particles by all the four strains. Nitrogen starvation also reduced significantly the strength of cell adhesion to the soil particles, except for Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1. Two of the four strains showed significant reduction in cell surface hydrophobicity. It is inferred that the efficiency of bacterial transport through soils might be potentially increased by nitrogen starvation. PMID:24031246

  10. The effect of pyramiding Phytophthora infestans resistance genes R Pi-mcd1 and R Pi-ber in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, M.Y.A.; Hutten, R.C.B.; Visser, R.G.F.; Eck, van H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite efforts to control late blight in potatoes by introducing R(pi)-genes from wild species into cultivated potato, there are still concerns regarding the durability and level of resistance. Pyramiding R(pi)-genes can be a solution to increase both durability and level of resistance. In this stu

  11. Effective lifetime measurements in the B-s(0) -> K+K-, B-0 -> K+pi(-) and B-s(0) -> pi K-+(-) decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M. -O.; Vanbeuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suarez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Gaendara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Graug, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lathi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Legac, R.; Vanleerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefranois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the effective lifetimes in the B-s(0) -> K+K-, B-0 -> K+pi(-) and B-s(0) -> pi K-+(-) decays are presented using 1.0 fb(-1)of pp collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV by the LHCb experiment. The analysis uses a data-driven approach to correct for the decay time

  12. Effects of starvation on the transport of Escherichia coli K12 in saturated porous media are dependent on pH and ionic strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Walczak, J. J.; Wang, L.; Bardy, S. L.; Li, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this research, we investigate the effects of starvation on the transport of E. coli K12 in saturated porous media. Particularly, we examine the relationship between such effects and the pH and ionic strength of the electrolyte solutions that were used to suspend bacterial cells. E. coli K12 (ATCC 10798) cells were cultured using either Luria-Bertani Miller (LB-Miller) broth (10 g trypton, 5 g yeast extract and 10 g NaCl in 1 L of deionized water) or LB-Luria broth (10 g tryptone, 5 g yeast extract and 0.5 g NaCl in 1 L of deionized water). Both broths had similar pH (~7.1) but differed in ionic strength (LB-Miller: ~170 mM, LB-Luria: ~ 8 mM). The bacterial cells were then harvested and suspended using one of the following electrolyte solutions: phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (pH ~7.2; ionic strength ~170 mM), 168 mM NaCl (pH ~5.7), 5% of PBS (pH ~ 7.2; ionic strength ~ 8 mM) and 8 mM NaCl (pH ~ 5.7). Column transport experiments were performed at 0, 21 and 48 hours following cell harvesting to evaluate the change in cell mobility over time under “starvation” conditions. Our results showed that 1) starvation increased the mobility of E. coli K12 cells; 2) the most significant change in mobility occurred when bacterial cells were suspended in an electrolyte solution that had different pH and ionic strength (i.e., LB-Miller culture suspended in 8 mM NaCl and LB-Luria culture suspended in 168 mM Nacl); and 3) the change in cell mobility primarily occurred within the first 21 hours. The size of the bacterial cells was measured and the surface properties (e.g., zeta potential, hydrophobicity, cell-bound protein, LPS sugar content, outer membrane protein profiles) of the bacterial cells were characterized. We found that the measured cell surface properties could not fully explain the observed changes in cell mobility caused by starvation.

  13. Effects of light intensity and nitrogen starvation on glycerolipid, glycerophospholipid, and carotenoid composition in Dunaliella tertiolecta culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hyun Kim

    Full Text Available Time-course variation of lipid and carotenoid production under high light (300 μE/m²s and nitrogen starvation conditions was determined in a Dunaliella tertiolecta strain. Nanoelectrospray (nanoESI chip based direct infusion was used for lipid analysis and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC coupled with a photodiode array (PDA or atmospheric chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS was used for carotenoid analysis. A total of 29 lipids and 7 carotenoids were detected. Alterations to diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserine (DGTS and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG species were significant observations under stress conditions. Their role in relation to the regulation of photosynthesis under stress condition is discussed in this study. The total carotenoid content was decreased under stress conditions, while ã-carotene was increased under nitrate-deficient cultivation. The highest productivity of carotenoid was attained under high light and nitrate sufficiency (HLNS condition, which result from the highest level of biomass under HLNS. When stress was induced at stationary phase, the substantial changes to the lipid composition occurred, and the higher carotenoid content and productivity were exhibited. This is the first report to investigate the variation of lipids, including glycerolipid, glycerophospholipid, and carotenoid in D. tertiolecta in response to stress conditions using lipidomics tools.

  14. The 2PI effective action at four loop order in $\\varphi^4$ theory

    CERN Document Server

    Carrington, M E; Pickering, D

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that perturbative pressure calculations show poor convergence. Calculations using a two particle irreducible (2PI) effective action show improved convergence at the 3 loop level, but no calculations have been done at 4 loops. We consider the 2PI effective theory for a symmetric scalar theory with quartic coupling in 4-dimensions. We calculate the pressure and two different non-perturbative vertices as functions of coupling and temperature. Our results show that the 4 loop contribution can become larger than the 3 loop term when the coupling is large. This indicates a breakdown of the 2PI approach, and the need for higher order $n$PI approximations. In addition, our results demonstrate the renormalizability of 2PI calculations at the 4 loop level. This is interesting because the counterterm structure of the 2PI theory at 4 loops is different from the structure at $n\\le 3$ loops. Two vertex counterterms are required at the 4 loop level, but not at lower loop order. This unique feature of the 2P...

  15. Dynamical coupled-channels study of pi N --> pi pi N reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kamano, H; Lee, T -S H; Matsuyama, A; Sato, T

    2008-01-01

    As a step toward performing a complete coupled-channels analysis of the world data of pi N, gamma^* N --> pi N, eta N, pi pi N reactions, the pi N --> pi pi N reactions are investigated starting with the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in Phys. Rev. C76, 065201 (2007). The channels included are pi N, eta N, and pi pi N which has pi Delta, rho N, and sigma N resonant components. The non-resonant amplitudes are generated from solving a set of coupled-channels equations with the meson-baryon potentials defined by effective Lagrangians. The resonant amplitudes are generated from 16 bare excited nucleon (N^*) states which are dressed by the non-resonant interactions as constrained by the unitarity condition. The available total cross section data of pi^+ p --> pi^+ pi^+ n, pi^+ pi^0p and pi^- p --> pi^+ pi^- n, pi^- pi^0 n, pi^0 pi^0 n can be reproduced to a very large extent both in magnitudes and energy-dependence. Possible improvements of the model are investigated, in particular on the role of the n...

  16. Effects of Starvation Stress on the Histological Structure of the Digestive Organs for Juveniles of Trachinotus ovatus%饥饿胁迫对卵形鲳鲹幼鱼消化器官组织学的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    区又君; 苏慧; 李加儿; 王永翠; 刘汝建; 曹守花

    2013-01-01

    By using morphorlogy and paraffin section technique, effects of starvation stress on the histological structure of the digestive organs including esophagus, stomach, pyloric caecum, intestine and hepatopancreas and their characteristics of changes were investigated in 375 juveniles of Trachinotus ovatus starved for 0, 3 , 6, 9 and 12 d respectively for the purpose of understanding the changes in morphorlogy and histology and capacity of tolerence under starvation. The histology results show that effects of the short time starvation within 3 d on the digestive system were of no significance, with starvation time injury began to occur in digestive organs. The damage to digestive organs was lesser from the 6 to 9th days after starvation, and on 12th days after starvation, severe damage were found. Lumen of digestive tract became narrow and thinning, the epithelial cell boundaries were blurred , epithelial failed off and fractured, and secretory cells bacame smaller in size. Damage of histological structure in esophagus by starvation were minor compared with other organs. The effects of starvation were similar about the histological structure of the stomach, pyloric caeca and intestinal tract. Severer damage were found in hepatopancreas than other organs. In conclusion changes to varying degrees took place in digestive organs of juveniles of T. Ovatu by starvation, and effect of starvation on differenct organs varied as time.%将375尾卵形鲳鲹Trachinotus ovatus幼鱼分别饥饿0、3、6、9和12d,利用形态学和连续组织切片技术,观察和研究了饥饿胁迫对卵形鲳鲹幼鱼食道、胃、幽门盲囊、肠和肝胰脏等消化器官组织结构的影响,了解其在饥饿状态下的形态和组织学结构变化及耐受饥饿的能力.3d以内的短时间饥饿对消化器官组织结构的影响不明显,随着饥饿时间延长,消化器官开始出现损伤,饥饿6~9d对消化器官的损伤程度较轻,饥饿12 d消化器官损伤严重,

  17. Parity-violating $\\pi NN$ coupling constant from the flavor-conserving effective weak chiral Lagrangian

    CERN Document Server

    Hyun, Chang Ho; Lee, Hee-Jung

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the parity-violating pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constant $h^1_{\\pi NN}$, based on the chiral quark-soliton model. We employ an effective weak Hamiltonian that takes into account the next-to-leading order corrections from QCD to the weak interactions at the quark level. Using the gradient expansion, we derive the leading-order effective weak chiral Lagrangian with the low-energy constants determined. The effective weak chiral Lagrangian is incorporated in the chiral quark-soliton model to calculate the parity-violating $\\pi NN$ constant $h^1_{\\pi NN}$. We obtain a value of about $10^{-7}$ at the leading order. The corrections from the next-to-leading order reduce the leading order result by about 20~\\%.

  18. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Michal

    2016-01-01

    In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual starvation resistance was strongly positively affected by pre-starvation body mass but only slightly by beetle structural body size per se. Females outperformed males even when the effect of gender was corrected for the effects of structural body size and pre-starvation body mass. The better performance of females compared to males and of beetles with higher relative pre-starvation body mass could be linked to higher fat content and lean dry mass before starvation, followed by a greater decrease in both during starvation. There was also a difference between the sexes in the extent of body mass changes both during ad libitum feeding and following starvation; the body masses of females fluctuated more compared to males. This study stresses the need to distinguish between body mass and structural body size when investigating the ecological and evolutionary consequences of body size. Investigation of the net effects of body size and sex is necessary to disentangle the causes of differences in individual performances in studies of species with significant sexual size dimorphism.

  19. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Knapp

    Full Text Available In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual starvation resistance was strongly positively affected by pre-starvation body mass but only slightly by beetle structural body size per se. Females outperformed males even when the effect of gender was corrected for the effects of structural body size and pre-starvation body mass. The better performance of females compared to males and of beetles with higher relative pre-starvation body mass could be linked to higher fat content and lean dry mass before starvation, followed by a greater decrease in both during starvation. There was also a difference between the sexes in the extent of body mass changes both during ad libitum feeding and following starvation; the body masses of females fluctuated more compared to males. This study stresses the need to distinguish between body mass and structural body size when investigating the ecological and evolutionary consequences of body size. Investigation of the net effects of body size and sex is necessary to disentangle the causes of differences in individual performances in studies of species with significant sexual size dimorphism.

  20. The effects of the PoPI act on small and medium enterprises in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, JG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available to medium enterprises (SMEs) have not been explored in detail. Current practices such as direct marketing are perceived as a cost effective option for driving sales in SMEs and this option will largely be removed once PoPI is in effect. The POPI Act is a...

  1. On the B -> pi pi puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Li, H; Li, Hsiang-nan; Mishima, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the resolutions in the literature to the B -> pi pi puzzle arising from the large observed B^0 -> pi^0 pi^0 branching ratio, and conclude that the puzzle still stands. The next-to-leading-order (NLO) contributions from the vertex corrections, the quark loops, and the magnetic penguin evaluated in the perturbative QCD approach, having saturated the experimental upper bound of the B^0 -> rho^0 rho^0 branching ratio, do not help. The inclusion of the NLO jet function from the soft-collinear effective theory into the QCD-improved factorization approach, though enhancing the B^0 -> pi^0 pi^0 branching ratio sufficiently, deteriorates the predictions for the B^\\pm -> pi^0 K^\\pm and B^0 -> pi^\\mp K^\\pm direct CP asymmetries, and overshoots the bound of the B^0 -> rho^0 rho^0 branching ratio. The effect of final-state interaction through either elastic or inelastic channels has been constrained by the B -> pi K data, and is not enough to resolve the B -> pi pi puzzle.

  2. Combined effects of high environmental ammonia, starvation and exercise on hormonal and ion-regulatory response in goldfish (Carassius auratus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; Liew, Hon Jung; Diricx, Marjan; Kumar, Vikas; Darras, Veerle M; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2012-06-15

    expression of GHR, IGF-I and THRβ genes were decreased following 10-21 days of HEA. Starvation, the additional challenge in the present study, significantly increased plasma cortisol level and CR transcript level under HEA compared to the fed exposed and control fish. Furthermore, a remarkable reduction in T3 and mRNA levels of THRβ, IGF-I and GHR genes was observed under starvation. The toxic effects in both feeding treatments were exacerbated when imposed to exhaustive swimming with more pronounced effects in starved fish. This confirms that starvation makes fish more vulnerable to external ammonia, especially during exercise. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. MIWI2 and MILI Have Differential Effects on piRNA Biogenesis and DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei A. Manakov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In developing male germ cells, prospermatogonia, two Piwi proteins, MILI and MIWI2, use Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA guides to repress transposable element (TE expression and ensure genome stability and proper gametogenesis. In addition to their roles in post-transcriptional TE repression, both proteins are required for DNA methylation of TE sequences. Here, we analyzed the effect of Miwi2 deficiency on piRNA biogenesis and transposon repression. Miwi2 deficiency had only a minor impact on piRNA biogenesis; however, the piRNA profile of Miwi2-knockout mice indicated overexpression of several LINE1 TE families that led to activation of the ping-pong piRNA cycle. Furthermore, we found that MILI and MIWI2 have distinct functions in TE repression in the nucleus. MILI is responsible for DNA methylation of a larger subset of TE families than MIWI2 is, suggesting that the proteins have independent roles in establishing DNA methylation patterns.

  4. Mammalian autophagy is essential for hepatic and renal ketogenesis during starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Kondo, Motoyuki; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Chano, Tokuhiro; Matsusaka, Taiji; Nagao, Kenji; Adachi, Yusuke; Chan, Lawrence; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-06

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system activated, across species, by starvation. Although accumulating evidence has shown that mammalian autophagy is involved in pathogenesis of several modern diseases, its physiological role to combat starvation has not been fully clarified. In this study, we analysed starvation-induced gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in mouse strains lacking autophagy in liver, skeletal muscle or kidney. Autophagy-deficiency in any tissue had no effect on gluconeogenesis during starvation. Though skeletal muscle- and kidney-specific autophagy-deficiency did not alter starvation-induced increases in blood ketone levels, liver-specific autophagy-deficiency significantly attenuated this effect. Interestingly, renal as well as hepatic expression of HMG-CoA synthase 2 increased with prolonged starvation. Furthermore, during starvation, mice lacking autophagy both in liver and kidney showed even lower blood ketone levels and physical activity than mice lacking autophagy only in liver. Starvation induced massive lipid droplet formation in extra-adipose tissues including liver and kidney, which was essential for ketogenesis. Moreover, this process was impaired in the autophagy-deficient liver and kidney. These findings demonstrate that hepatic and renal autophagy are essential for starvation-induced lipid droplet formation and subsequent ketogenesis and, ultimately, for maintaining systemic energy homeostasis. Our findings provide novel biological insights into adaptive mechanisms to combat starvation in mammals.

  5. Raspberry Pi: An Effective Vehicle in Teaching the Internet of Things in Computer Science and Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Raspberry Pi is being increasingly adopted as a suitable platform in both research and applications of the Internet of Things (IoT. This study presents a novel project-based teaching and learning approach devised in an Internet of Things course for undergraduate students in the computer science major, where the Raspberry Pi platform is used as an effective vehicle to greatly enhance students’ learning performance and experience. The devised course begins with learning simple hardware and moves to building a whole prototype system. This paper illustrates the outcome of the proposed approach by demonstrating the prototype IoT systems designed and developed by students at the end of one such IoT course. Furthermore, this study provides insights and lessons regarding how to facilitate the use of the Raspberry Pi platform to successfully achieve the goals of project-based teaching and learning in IoT.

  6. The genetic basis for mating-induced sex differences in starvation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Taehwan; Lee, Kwang Pum

    2015-11-01

    Multiple genetic and environmental factors interact to influence starvation resistance, which is an important determinant of fitness in many organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster. Recent studies have revealed that mating can alter starvation resistance in female D. melanogaster, but little is known about the behavioral and physiological mechanisms underlying such mating-mediated changes in starvation resistance. In the present study, we first investigated whether the effect of mating on starvation resistance is sex-specific in D. melanogaster. As indicated by a significant sex×mating status interaction, mating increased starvation resistance in females but not in males. In female D. melanogaster, post-mating increase in starvation resistance was mainly attributed to increases in food intake and in the level of lipid storage relative to lean body weight. We then performed quantitative genetic analysis to estimate the proportion of the total phenotypic variance attributable to genetic differences (i.e., heritability) for starvation resistance in mated male and female D. melanogaster. The narrow-sense heritability (h(2)) of starvation resistance was 0.235 and 0.155 for males and females, respectively. Mated females were more resistant to starvation than males in all genotypes, but the degree of such sexual dimorphism varied substantially among genotypes, as indicated by a significant sex×genotype interaction for starvation resistance. Cross-sex genetic correlation was greater than 0 but less than l for starvation resistance, implying that the genetic architecture of this trait was partially shared between the two sexes. For both sexes, starvation resistance was positively correlated with longevity and lipid storage at genetic level. The present study suggests that sex differences in starvation resistance depend on mating status and have a genetic basis in D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Observation of $\\eta'$ decays to $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\e^+e^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, P; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Robichaud, A N; Tatishvili, G; Briere, R A; Vogel, H; Onyisi, P U E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tan, B J Y; Tomaradze, A G; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Méndez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A

    2008-01-01

    Using psi(2S) --> pi+ pi- J/psi, J/psi --> gamma eta' events acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e+e- collider, we make the first observations of the decays eta' --> pi+ pi- pi0 and eta' --> pi+ pi- e+ e-, measuring absolute branching fractions (37 +11 -9 +- 4) x 10^-4 and (25 +12 -9 +- 5) x 10^-4, respectively. For eta' --> pi+ pi- pi0, this result probes the mechanism of isospin violation and the roles of pi0/eta/eta'-mixing and final state rescattering in strong decays. We also set upper limits on branching fractions for eta' decays to pi+ pi- mu+ mu-, 2(pi+ pi-), pi+ pi- 2pi0, 2(pi+ pi-)pi0, 3(pi+ pi-), and invisible final states.

  8. Glomus intraradices Attenuates the Negative Effect of Low Pi Supply on Photosynthesis and Growth of Papaya Maradol Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava-Gutiérrez Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low inorganic phosphorus (Pi supply limits the photosynthetic process and hence plants growth and development. Contradictory reports exist in the literature on whether mycorrhyzal association can attenuate the negative effects of low Pi supply on photosynthesis and growth. In the present paper, the effect that low Pi supply may have on photosynthesis and growth of papaya Maradol plants was evaluated in intact plants and in those inoculated with two different strains of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus intraradices. Plant growth was significantly reduced as the Pi supply decreased. However, inoculation with any strain of G. intraradices was able to attenuate such effect. Without Pi in the nutrient solution, the mycorrhizal plants had on average 6.1 times and 7.5 higher photosynthesis than non mycorrhizal plants. The chlorophyll fluorescence values were significantly higher in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants. These results could be associated to an increased ability of mycorhyzal plants to take up Pi from the substrate, as they had higher Pi content than non-mycorrhizal plants. A high correlation was found between internal Pi content and plant biomass. The lower correlation between Pi content and photosynthesis, suggests that some photosynthates could had been used to maintain the symbiosis.

  9. SIZ1 regulation of phosphate starvation-induced root architecture remodeling involves the control of auxin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kenji; Lee, Jiyoung; Gong, Qingqiu; Ma, Shisong; Jin, Jing Bo; Yoo, Chan Yul; Miura, Tomoko; Sato, Aiko; Bohnert, Hans J; Hasegawa, Paul M

    2011-02-01

    Phosphate (Pi) limitation causes plants to modulate the architecture of their root systems to facilitate the acquisition of Pi. Previously, we reported that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 regulates root architecture remodeling in response to Pi limitation; namely, the siz1 mutations cause the inhibition of primary root (PR) elongation and the promotion of lateral root (LR) formation. Here, we present evidence that SIZ1 is involved in the negative regulation of auxin patterning to modulate root system architecture in response to Pi starvation. The siz1 mutations caused greater PR growth inhibition and LR development of seedlings in response to Pi limitation. Similar root phenotypes occurred if Pi-deficient wild-type seedlings were supplemented with auxin. N-1-Naphthylphthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux activity, reduced the Pi starvation-induced LR root formation of siz1 seedlings to a level equivalent to that seen in the wild type. Monitoring of the auxin-responsive reporter DR5::uidA indicated that auxin accumulates in PR tips at early stages of the Pi starvation response. Subsequently, DR5::uidA expression was observed in the LR primordia, which was associated with LR elongation. The time-sequential patterning of DR5::uidA expression occurred earlier in the roots of siz1 as compared with the wild type. In addition, microarray analysis revealed that several other auxin-responsive genes, including genes involved in cell wall loosening and biosynthesis, were up-regulated in siz1 relative to wild-type seedlings in response to Pi starvation. Together, these results suggest that SIZ1 negatively regulates Pi starvation-induced root architecture remodeling through the control of auxin patterning.

  10. Effect of extended and daily short-term starvation/shut-down events on the performance of a biofilter treating toluene vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Lucero; Arriaga, Sonia; Muñoz, Raúl; Aizpuru, Aitor

    2017-12-01

    Industrial emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds are usually discontinuous. To assess the impact of interruptions in pollutant supply on the performance of biological treatment systems, two identical biofilters previously operated under continuous toluene loadings were subjected for 110 days to extended (12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84 and 96 h) and for a week to daily (8 h on, 16 h off) toluene starvation/shutdown events. One biofilter was operated under complete shutdowns (both air and toluene supply were interrupted), while the other maintained the air supply under toluene starvation. The biofilter operated under complete shutdowns was able to withstand both the extended and daily pollutant interruptions, while starvation periods >24 h severely impacted the performance of the other biofilter, with a removal efficiency decrease from 97.7 ± 0.1% to 45.4 ± 6.7% at the end of the extended starvation periods. This deterioration was likely due to a reduction in liquid lixiviation (from a total volume of 2380 mL to 1800 mL) mediated by the countercurrent airflow during the starvation periods. The presence of air under toluene starvation also favored the accumulation of inactive biomass, thus increasing the pressure drop from 337 to 700 mm H2O.m(-1), while decreasing the wash out of acidic by-products with a significantly higher pH of leachates (Student paired t-test <0.05). This study confirmed the need to prevent the accumulation of inhibitory compounds produced during process perturbation in order to increase biofiltration robustness. Process operation with sufficient drainage in the packing material and the absence of countercurrent airflow are highly recommended during toluene deprivation periods. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Mammalian autophagy is essential for hepatic and renal ketogenesis during starvation

    OpenAIRE

    Ayano Takagi; Shinji Kume; Motoyuki Kondo; Jun Nakazawa; Masami Chin-Kanasaki; Hisazumi Araki; Shin-ichi Araki; Daisuke Koya; Masakazu Haneda; Tokuhiro Chano; Taiji Matsusaka; Kenji Nagao; Yusuke Adachi; Lawrence Chan; Hiroshi Maegawa

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system activated, across species, by starvation. Although accumulating evidence has shown that mammalian autophagy is involved in pathogenesis of several modern diseases, its physiological role to combat starvation has not been fully clarified. In this study, we analysed starvation-induced gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in mouse strains lacking autophagy in liver, skeletal muscle or kidney. Autophagy-deficiency in any tissue had no effect on gluconeo...

  12. Measurement of the CP-violating phase $\\beta$ in $B^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays and limits on penguin effects

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Domenico, Antonio; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Time-dependent CP violation is measured in the $B^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$ channel for each $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ resonant final state using data collected with an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ in $pp$ collisions using the LHCb detector. The final state with the largest rate, $J/\\psi\\rho^0(770)$, is used to measure the CP-violating angle $2\\beta^{\\rm eff}$ to be $(41.7\\pm 9.6_{-6.3}^{+2.8})^{\\circ}$. This result can be used to limit the size of penguin amplitude contributions to CP violation measurements in, for example, $B_s^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi$ decays. Assuming approximate SU(3) flavour symmetry and neglecting higher order diagrams, the shift in the CP-violating phase $\\phi_s$ is limited to be within the interval [$-1.05^\\circ$, +$1.18^\\circ$] at 95% confidence level. Changes to the limit due to SU(3) symmetry breaking effects are also discussed.

  13. Starvation Based Differential Chemotherapy: A Novel Approach for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Naveed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment are advised to increase food intake to overcome the therapy-induced side effects, and weight loss. Dietary restriction is known to slow down the aging process and hence reduce age-related diseases such as cancer. Fasting or short-term starvation is more effective than dietary restriction to prevent cancer growth since starved cells switch off signals for growth and reproduction and enter a protective mode, while cancer cells, being mutated, are not sensitized by any external growth signals and are not protected against any stress. This phenomenon is known as differential stress resistance (DSR. Nutrient signaling pathways involving growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis and its downstream effectors, play a key role in DSR in response to starvation controlling the other cell maintenance systems, such as autophagy and apoptosis, that are related to the tumorigenesis. Yeast cells lacking these effectors are better protected against oxidative stress compared to normal cells. In the same way, starvation protects many cell lines and mice against high-dose chemotherapeutic drugs. According to a series of studies, fasting results in overall reduction in chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients. Data shows that starvation-dependent differential chemotherapy is safe, feasible and effective in cancer treatment, but the possible side effects of starvation limit its efficacy. However, further studies and clinical trials may result in its implementation in cancer treatment.

  14. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking achieved efficient cell cycle synchronization and altered the expression of p27, p53, bcl-2 in canine breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jinjin; Sun, Dongdong; Yang, Chao; Wang, Yingxue; Sun, Sichao; Li, Qing; Bao, Jun; Liu, Yun

    2016-04-01

    Cell synchronization is an approach to obtain cell populations of the same stage, which is a prerequisite to studying the regulation of cell cycle progression in vivo. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking (TdR) are two important practices in studying cell cycle synchronization. However, their effects on canine cancer cells as well as the regulatory mechanisms by these two methods are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the optimum conditions of serum starvation and TdR and their effects on cell cycle synchronization. We further explored the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the cell cycle synchronization by investigating the expression of three key genes (p27, p53 and bcl-2). Serum starvation resulted in a reversible cell cycle arrest and synchronously progress through G0/G1. The highest percentage of CHMm cells (87.47%) in G0/G1 stage was obtained after 42 h incubation with 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS). TdR double blocking could arrest 98.9% of CHMm cells in G1/S phase (0 h of release), and could arrest 93.74% of CHMm cells in S phase after 4h of release. We also found that the p27, p53, bcl-2 genes were most highly expressed in G0/G1 phase. Our current work revealed that serum starvation and TdR methods could achieve sufficient synchronization of CHMm cells. Moreover, the expression of p27, p53 and bcl-2 genes was related to cyclical movements and apoptosis. Our results will provide a new insight into cell cycle regulation and reprogramming of canine cancer cells induced by serum starvation and TdR blocking.

  15. Developmental and age-specific effects of selection on divergent virgin life span on fat content and starvation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Cornelis; Van de Zande, Louis; Bijlsma, R.

    2006-01-01

    Investigations into the genetic basis of longevity variation have shown life span to be positively correlated with starvation resistance and negatively with female fecundity, both of which rely on lipid content. To assess the firmness of this relation, we assayed correlated responses in age-specific

  16. The Fungicide Phosphonate Disrupts the Phosphate-Starvation Response in Brassica nigra Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, C.; Grant, B. R.; Theodorou, M. E.; Harris, J.; Niere, J. O.; Plaxton, W. C.

    1996-01-01

    The development of Brassica nigra seedlings over 20 d of growth was disrupted by the fungicide phosphonate (Phi) in a manner inversely correlated with nutritional inorganic phosphate (Pi) levels. The growth of Pi-sufficient (1.25 mM Pi) seedlings was suppressed when 10, but not 5, mM Phi was added to the nutrient medium. In contrast, the fresh weights and root:shoot ratios of Pi-limited (0.15 mM) seedlings were significantly reduced at 1.5 mM Phi, and they progressively declined to about 40% of control values as medium Phi concentration was increased to 10 mM. Intracellular Pi levels generally decreased in Phi-treated seedlings, and Phi accumulated in leaves and roots to levels up to 6- and 16-fold that of Pi in Pi-sufficient and Pi-limited plants, respectively. Extractable activities of the Pi-starvation-inducible enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate phosphatase and inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase were unaltered in Pi-sufficient seedlings grown on 5 or 10 mM Phi. However, when Pi-limited seedlings were grown on 1.5 to 10 mM Phi (a) the induction of phosphoenolpyruvate phosphatase and inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase activities by Pi limitation was reduced by 40 to 90%, whereas (b) soluble protein concentrations and the activities of the ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase were unaffacted. It is concluded that Phi specifically interrupts processes involved in regulation of the Pi-starvation response in B. nigra.

  17. Effect of the Biofilm Age and Starvation on Acid Tolerance of Biofilm Formed by Streptococcus mutans Isolated from Caries-Active and Caries-Free Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Chengfei; Zhao, Xingfu; Huang, Xiaojing; Cai, Zhiyu

    2017-03-30

    Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is considered a leading cause of dental caries. The capability of S. mutans to tolerate low pH is essential for its cariogenicity. Aciduricity of S. mutans is linked to its adaptation to environmental stress in oral cavity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of biofilm age and starvation condition on acid tolerance of biofilm formed by S. mutans clinical isolates. S. mutans clinical strains isolated from caries-active (SM593) and caries-free (SM18) adults and a reference strain (ATCC25175) were used for biofilm formation. (1) Both young and mature biofilms were formed and then exposed to pH 3.0 for 30 min with (acid-adapted group) or without (non-adapted group) pre-exposure to pH 5.5 for three hours. (2) The mature biofilms were cultured with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (starved group) or TPY (polypeptone-yeast extract) medium (non-starved group) at pH 7.0 for 24 h and then immersed in medium of pH 3.0 for 30 min. Biofilms were analyzed through viability staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. In all three strains, mature, acid-adapted and starved biofilms showed significantly less destructive structure and more viable bacteria after acid shock than young, non-adapted and non-starved biofilms, respectively (all p biofilm was denser, with a significantly larger number of viable bacteria than that of SM18 and ATCC25175 (all p biofilms of all three S. mutans strains against acid shock. Additionally, SM593 exhibited greater aciduricity compared to SM18 and ATCC25175, which indicated that the colonization of high cariogenicity of clinical strains may lead to high caries risk in individuals.

  18. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaicha D. Winters

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea—microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum

  19. Regulation of K uptake, water uptake, and growth of tomato during K starvation and recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, del F.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to analyze the dynamics of growth, water and K uptake, the effects of 1, 3 and 7 days of potassium starvation and the recovery capability during 7 days afterwards were investigated in vegetative tomato plants. After 7 days of K starvation, plant dry matter was reduced by 36% compared to con

  20. Regulation of nutrient uptake, water uptake and growth under calcium starvation and recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, del F.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2003-01-01

    To analyze the dynamics of growth, water and nutrient uptake, the effects of 1, 3 and 7 d of calcium starvation and the recovery capability during 7 d afterwards were investigated in vegetative tomato plants. Results showed that after only 1 d of Ca-starvation, leaf photosynthesis, leaf expansion an

  1. Study of the D0 ---> pi- pi+ pi- pi+ decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, they present new measurements for the Cabbibo-suppressed decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. They measure the branching ratio {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0914 {+-} 0.0018 {+-} 0.0022. An amplitude analysis has been performed, a first for this channel, in order to determine the resonant substructure of this decay mode. The dominant component is the decay D{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup +}{pi}{sup -}, accounting for 60% of the decay rate. The second most dominant contribution comes from the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, with a fraction of 25%. They also study the a{sub 1}(1260) line shape and resonant substructure. Using the helicity formalism for the angular distribution of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, they measure a longitudinal polarization of P{sub L} = (71 {+-} 4 {+-} 2)%.

  2. Experimental Starvation in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-10-15

    acid and the urinary excretion of thiamine, riboflavin and pyrimidine ("pyramin") were measured. The metabolism in anerobic work, where near exhaustion...men exhibited a patchy brownish pigmentation most frequently distributed around the mouth and around the eyes in a "spectacle" effect, but occasionally...such pigmented patches were seen elsewhere on the body. Almost all of the men exhibited a slight or moder- ate degree of cyanosis, most conspicuous

  3. Effects of starvation on digestive enzyme and antioxidant enzyme activities of Procambarus clarkii%饥饿对克氏原螯虾消化酶和抗氧化酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芦光宇; 刘国兴; 陈肖玮; 李佳佳; 魏万红; 唐建清

    2012-01-01

    在水温(20±1)℃条件下,探讨不同饥饿时间对克氏原螯虾(Procambarus clarkii)消化酶(胃肠组织胃蛋白酶、肝胰脏脂肪酶和胃肠淀粉酶)和抗氧化酶(血清超氧化物歧化酶SOD、肝胰脏过氧化氢酶CAT)的影响.结果表明:随着饥饿时间的延长,胃肠组织胃蛋白酶和肝胰脏脂肪酶活性呈逐渐降低的趋势.饥饿1、2、4d组胃肠组织胃蛋白酶活性分别为(15.80±0.98)、(14.01±1.32)和(13.82±0.93)U,与对照组差异不显著.肝胰脏脂肪酶活性变化趋势更为明显,饥饿2、4d组肝胰脏脂肪酶活性显著低于对照组和饥饿1d组.饥饿8d组胃肠组织胃蛋白酶和肝胰脏脂肪酶活性分别为(12.16±0.44)和(47.43±3.95)U·g-1,显著低于对照组[(16.16±0.23)和(109.98±8.20)U·g-1].胃肠淀粉酶活性则随饥饿时间的延长呈先升高后降低的趋势,饥饿4d组胃肠淀粉酶活性最高[达(1.89±0.08)U·g1].饥饿对克氏原螯虾抗氧化酶活性有显著影响,血清SOD和肝胰脏CAT活性先升高,饥饿1d后迅速降低,饥饿2、4、8d组血清SOD活性分别比对照组下降7.65%、20.37%和28.66%;饥饿2、4、8d组肝胰脏CAT活性分别较对照组下降36.73%、45.58%和63.95%,差异显著.%This study was conducted to investigate the effect of starvation on major digestive enzymes (gastrointestinal pepsin, hepatopancreatic lipase and gastrointestinal amylase) , antioxidant enzymes [serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) and hepatopancreatic catalase (CAT)] of the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). The results showed that the activities of gastrointestinal pepsin and hepatopancreatic lipase decreased gradually as the starvation time extended. On the lst, 2nd and 4th day of starvation, the activities of gastrointestinal pepsin were 15. 80, 14. 01 and 13. 82 U respectively, which were approximated to that of the control group (P>0. 05). The variation trend of the hepatopancreatic lipase activity was more obvious, 2 days and

  4. Low-energy pi pi photoproduction off nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Mühlich, P; Buss, O; Mosel, U

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate pi0 pi0 and pi(+/-)pi0 photoproduction off complex nuclei at incident beam energies of 400-460 MeV. Simulations of two pion photoproduction on protons and nuclei are performed by means of a semi-classical BUU transport model including a full coupled-channel treatment of the final state interactions. Elastic scattering of the final state pions with the nucleons in the surrounding nuclear medium is found to yield a downward shift of the pi pi invariant mass distribution. We show that the target mass dependence of the pi0 pi0 invariant mass spectrum as measured by the TAPS collaboration can be explained without introducing medium effects beyond absorption and quasi-elastic scattering of the final state particles. On the other hand, we find considerable discrepancies with the data in the pi(+/-)pi0 channel, which are not understood.

  5. Unified theory of. gamma. N. --> pi. N,. pi pi. N, and. pi. N. --> pi. N,. pi pi. N reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afnan, I.R.

    1988-10-01

    We present a set of coupled integral equations for the reactions ..gamma..N..--> pi..N,..pi pi..N and ..pi..N..--> pi..N,..pi pi..N, that satisfy two- and three-body unitarity. These equations are based on a chiral bag Lagrangian in which the coupling to the photon is introduced at the quark level by demanding U(1) local gauge invariance. The final equations include the contribution of both meson exchange and isobar currents.

  6. Scalar O(N) Model at Finite Temperature -- 2PI Effective Potential in Different Approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Baacke, J; Baacke, Jurgen; Michalski, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective potential of the O(N) linear sigma model in 1+1 dimensions. The approximations we use are the next-to-leading order of a 1/N expansion (for arbitrary N) and a kind of "resummed loop approximation" for N=1. We show that the effective potential of the 1/N expansion is convex for N=4 and N=10 whereas it is not for the "loop" expansion and the case N=1 of the 1/N expansion.

  7. Study of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility antihypertensive drugs used in hiperdia peaked - PI

    OpenAIRE

    NapoleÃo Moura Dias Neto

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major cause of cardiovascular disease and study the costeffectiveness and cost-utility of anti-hypertensive drugs are rare in Brazil. This paper is a study of type pharmacoeconomic cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of patients enrolled in the program HiperDia the municipality of Picos â PI in the period 20/8/2009 to 30/10/2009. We analyzed the direct costs of treatment, considering only the price of antiretroviral drugs, the effectiveness as measured by mean re...

  8. Survivorship During Starvation for Cimex lectularius L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlyle C. Brewster

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Four bed bug strains (Cimex lectularius with different levels of pyrethroid resistance were evaluated to determine their ability to survive extended periods of starvation. First instar bed bugs of all strains were the most vulnerable to starvation (13.8–36.3 days mean survival time. Fifth instars and adults survived the longest during starvation (41.5–142.6 days. Significant differences in survivorship during starvation were observed between resistant and susceptible strains of bed bugs. Overall, all immature and adult stages of the resistant bed bug strains had significantly shorter survival times than those of the susceptible strains (P < 0.05.

  9. Survivorship During Starvation for Cimex lectularius L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Andrea M; Miller, Dini M; Brewster, Carlyle C

    2011-05-11

    Four bed bug strains (Cimex lectularius) with different levels of pyrethroid resistance were evaluated to determine their ability to survive extended periods of starvation. First instar bed bugs of all strains were the most vulnerable to starvation (13.8-36.3 days mean survival time). Fifth instars and adults survived the longest during starvation (41.5-142.6 days). Significant differences in survivorship during starvation were observed between resistant and susceptible strains of bed bugs. Overall, all immature and adult stages of the resistant bed bug strains had significantly shorter survival times than those of the susceptible strains (P < 0.05).

  10. Observation of a cusp-like structure in the $\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ invariant mass distribution from $K^{+-} \\to \\pi^{+-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ decay and determination of the $\\pi\\pi$ scattering lengths

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J Richard; Arcidiacono, R; Baldini, W; Balev, S; Behler, M; Biino, C; Bizzeti, A; Bloch-Devaux, B; Bocquet, G; Cabibbo, Nicola; Calvetti, M; Cartiglia, N; Ceccucci, A; Celeghini, E; Cenci, P; Cerri, C; Cheshkov, C; Chèze, J B; Clemencic, M; Collazuol, G; Costantini, F; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Coward, D; Cundy, Donald C; Dabrowski, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; De Beer, M; Derré, J; Di Lella, Luigi; Dibon, Heinz; Doble, Niels T; Eppard, K; Falaleev, V; Fantechi, R; Fidecaro, Maria; Fiorini, L; Fiorini, M; Fonseca-Martin, T; Frabetti, P L; Gatignon, L; Gianoli, A; Giudici, Sergio; Gonidec, A; Goudzovski, E; Goy-Lopez, S; Holder, M; Iacopini, E; Imbergamo, E; Jeitler, Manfred; Kekelidze, V D; Khristov, P Z; Kleinknecht, K; Kozhuharov, V; Kubischta, Werner; Lamanna, G; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Lenti, M; Litov, L; Madigozhin, D T; Maier, A; Mannelli, I; Marchetto, F; Marel, Gérard; Marinova, E; Markytan, Manfred; Marouelli, P; Martelli, F; Martini, M; Masetti, L; Mazzucato, E; Michetti, A; Mikulec, I; Molokanova, N A; Monnier, E; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Munday, D J; Neuhofer, G; Norton, A; Patel, M; Pepé, M; Peters, A; Petrucci, F; Petrucci, M C; Peyaud, B; Piccini, M; Pierazzini, G M; Polenkevich, I; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Raggi, M; Renk, B; Rubin, P; Ruggiero, G; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Shieh, M; Slater, M W; Sozzi, M; Stoynev, S; Swallow, E; Szleper, M; Valdata-Nappi, M; Vallage, B; Velasco, M; Veltri, M; Wache, M; Wahl, H; Walker, A; Wanke, R; Widhalm, L; Winhart, A; Winston, R; Wood, M D; Wotton, S A; Zinchenko, A I; Ziolkowski, M

    2006-01-01

    We report the results from a study of ~23 Million K+- ==> pi+- pizero pizero decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS, showing an anomaly in the pizero pizero invariant mass distribution in the region around 2m+, where m+ is the charged pion mass. This anomaly, never observed in previous experiments, can be interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process pi+ pi- ==> pizero pizero in K+- ==> pi+- pi+ pi- decay. It provides a precise determination of a0 - a2, the difference between the pi-pi scattering lengths in the isospin I=0 and I=2 states.

  11. 饥饿胁迫对刺参(Apostichopus japonicus)免疫和生长的影响%Starvation Stress Effect on the Immunity and Growth of Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田青; 荣小军; 李彬; 廖梅杰; 姜燕; 范瑞用; 王印庚; 李强

    2014-01-01

    为了探究饥饿胁迫对刺参免疫和生长的影响,在11-13℃条件下,研究体质量为(20±0.15)g的刺参在不同时间(0、10、20、30、40、50、60 d),饥饿胁迫对体腔液中酸性磷酸酶(ACP)活性、溶菌酶(LZM)活性、超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)活性、呼吸爆发(RB)活性、吞噬活性以及对刺参体质量、脏壁比、存活率的影响。研究结果表明,随着饥饿时间的延长,刺参体腔液中的ACP活性、LZM活性呈现降低的趋势,饥饿60 d后,比初始值分别下降47.06%、17.57%;SOD活性、RB活性和吞噬活性呈现出先上升后下降的趋势,分别在饥饿胁迫第20、20、10天时达到最高值依次为32.88、0.328、1.35 U/ml,其后显著下降,第60天时显著低于初始值,分别下降27.87%、38.08%、53.43%;其体质量在第60天时为初始体质量的68.08%,呈现负生长;脏壁比逐渐增大,第60天时为0.56,显著高于初始值0.44(P<0.05)。随着存储营养物质的消耗,刺参体质量损失率增加,存活率下降,存活率与体质量损失率之间存在着y =-0.0354x2+0.4354x+99.117的函数关系,呈二次曲线线性负相关。研究结果显示,饥饿时刺参通过消耗体内的营养物质来满足机体需要,长期的饥饿有可能降低刺参的免疫能力,直接影响刺参的健康和生长。%In this study we investigated the effects of starvation on the growth and immunity of sea cucumberApostichopus japonicus.Sea cucumber seedlings with the initial weight of (20±0.15) g were exposed to starvation stress for different periods (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 d). Non-specific immunity including activities of acidic phosphatase (ACP), lysozyme (LZM), superoxide dismutase (SOD), respiratory burst (RB), and phagocytic activity of coelomic fluid were examined to determine the effects of starvation on the immune responses. The body weight, the ratio of viscera to body wall (VBWR), and the survival rate were

  12. Phosphate/Zinc Interaction Analysis in Two Lettuce Varieties Reveals Contrasting Effects on Biomass, Photosynthesis, and Dynamics of Pi Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Bouain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic phosphate (Pi and Zinc (Zn are essential nutrients for normal plant growth. Interaction between these elements has been observed in many crop plants. Despite its agronomic importance, the biological significance and genetic basis of this interaction remain largely unknown. Here we examined the Pi/Zn interaction in two lettuce (Lactuca sativa varieties, namely, “Paris Island Cos” and “Kordaat.” The effects of variation in Pi and Zn supply were assessed on biomass and photosynthesis for each variety. Paris Island Cos displayed better growth and photosynthesis compared to Kordaat under all the conditions tested. Correlation analysis was performed to determine the interconnectivity between Pi and Zn intracellular contents in both varieties. Paris Island Cos showed a strong negative correlation between the accumulation levels of Pi and Zn in shoots and roots. However, no relation was observed for Kordaat. The increase of Zn concentration in the medium causes a decrease in dynamics of Pi transport in Paris Island Cos, but not in Kordaat plants. Taken together, results revealed a contrasting behavior between the two lettuce varieties in terms of the coregulation of Pi and Zn homeostasis and provided evidence in favor of a genetic basis for the interconnection of these two elements.

  13. Unravelling the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM colonization on arsenic tolerance in Medicago: Glomus mosseae is more effective than G. intraradices, associated with lower expression of root epidermal Pi transporter genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Martha Christophersen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We used medic (Medicago truncatula to investigate effects of inoculation with two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi and application of arsenate (AsV and phosphate (Pi on mechanisms underlying increased tolerance (in terms of growth of AM plants to AsV. We tested the hypotheses that 1 inoculation with AM fungi results in down-regulation of MtPht1;1 and MtPht1;2 genes (encoding high-affinity Pi- and AsV-uptake systems in the direct root epidermal pathway and up-regulation of the AM-induced MtPht1;4 (responsible for transfer of Pi from the arbuscular interface to cortical cells, and 2 these changes are involved in decreased As uptake relative to P uptake and hence increased As tolerance. We also measured expression of MtMT4, a Pi starvation-inducible gene, other genes encoding Pi-uptake systems (MtPht 1;5 and MtPht1;6 and arsenate reductase (MtACR and phytochelatin synthase (MtPCS, to gain insights into broader aspects of P transfers in AM plants and possible detoxification mechanisms.Medic responded slightly to AM colonization in terms of growth in the absence of As, but positively in P uptake. Both growth and P responses in AM plants were positive when As was applied, indicating As tolerance relative to non-mycorrhizal (NM plants. All AM plants showed high expression of MtPT4 and those inoculated with Glomus mosseae showed higher selectivity against As (shown by P/As molar ratios and much lower expression of MtPht1;1 (and to some extent MtPht1;2 than G. intraradices-inoculated or NM plants. Results are consistent with increased P/As selectivity in AM plants (particularly those inoculated with G. mosseae as a consequence of high P uptake but little or no As uptake via the AM pathway. However, the extent to which selectivity is dependent on down-regulation of direct Pi and AsV uptake through epidermal cells is still not clear. Marked up-regulation of a PCS gene and an ACR gene in AM plants may also be involved and require further investigatio

  14. [Changes of HPAA in Different Rat Models of Gan Stagnation, Pi Deficiency, Gan Stagnation Pi Defi- ciency and Interventional Effect of Chaishu Sijun Decoction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rong-hua; Liu, Jin-na; Li, Cong; Zhang, Jing-sheng; Wang, Bang-zhong; Yao, Yuan-chao; Xie, Ming; Wang, Dao-han

    2015-07-01

    To compare changes of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) in different rat models of Gan stagnation (GS), Pi deficiency (PD), Gan stagnation Pi deficiency (GSPD) syndromes, and to observe interventional effect of Chaishu Sijun Decoction (CSD, capable of soothing Gan-qi invigorating Pi) on them. Seventy Wistar rats were divided into the normal control group (group 1), the GS group (group 2), the PD group (group 3), the GSPD group (group 4), the GS intervention group (group 5), the PD intervention group (group 6), and the GSPD intervention group (group 7) according to random digit table, 10 in each group. Rats in group 1 received no treatment. Rats in group 2 and 5 were modeled by chronic restraint method. Rats in group 3 and 6 were modeled by excess fatigue plus alimentary abstinence method. Rats in group 4 and 7 were modeled by chronic restraint, excess fatigue, and alimentary abstinence method. At the 2nd weekend of modeling, CSD at 2.86 g/kg was fed to rats in group 5, 6, and 7 by gastrogavage for 2 successive weeks. Equal volume of distilled water was given to rats in the rest 4 groups. On the 29th day, rats were killed, adrenal weight weighed, and adrenal index calculated. Levels of plasma and hypothalamus corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), plasma and pituitary adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), and plasma corticosterone (CORT) were determined using radioimmunity. Compared with group 1, adrenal index significantly decreased in group 2, 3, and 4 (P HPAA, but with optimal effect on GSPD syndrome. CSD had higher correlation with GSPD syndrome.

  15. Feedback upregulation of HER3 (ErbB3) expression and activity attenuates antitumor effect of PI3K inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Anindita; Sánchez, Violeta; Kuba, María G.; Rinehart, Cammie; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of an inhibitor of PI3K, XL147, against human breast cancer cell lines with constitutive PI3K activation. Treatment with XL147 resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and levels of pAKT and pS6, signal transducers in the PI3K/AKT/TOR pathway. In HER2-overexpressing cells, inhibition of PI3K was followed by up-regulation of expression and phosphorylation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including HER3. Knockdown of FoxO1 and FoxO3a transcription factors suppressed the induction of HER3, InsR, IGF1R, and FGFR2 mRNAs upon inhibition of PI3K. In HER2+ cells, knockdown of HER3 with siRNA or cotreatment with the HER2 inhibitors trastuzumab or lapatinib enhanced XL147-induced cell death and inhibition of pAKT and pS6. Trastuzumab and lapatinib each synergized with XL147 for inhibition of pAKT and growth of established BT474 xenografts. These data suggest that PI3K antagonists will inhibit AKT and relieve suppression of receptor tyrosine kinase expression and their activity. Relief of this feedback limits the sustained inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway and attenuates the response to these agents. As a result, PI3K pathway inhibitors may have limited clinical activity overall if used as single agents. In patients with HER2-overexpressing breast cancer, PI3K inhibitors should be used in combination with HER2/HER3 antagonists. PMID:21368164

  16. Effects of Starvation on Metabolism of Glucose in Juvenile Silurus meridonalis%饥饿胁迫对南方鲇幼鱼糖代代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范国燕; 李英文

    2011-01-01

    在(20±1)℃条件下,以饥饿0周作为对照,分别测定了饥饿处理0、1、2、4和8周后南方鲇(Silurus meridonalis)幼鱼的肝指数、糖原含量、血糖浓度及己糖激酶(HK)、葡萄糖激酶(GK)酶活性.结果显示,实验鱼随饥饿时间的延长,肝指数、糖原含量均呈明显下降趋势;饥饿1周后的肝指数为(2.44±0.36),肝糖原含量为(35.20±2.25)mg·g-1,肌糖原含量为(30.69±10.24)mg·kg-1,均开始显著低于对照(P<0.05);其中肝指数与肝糖原变化趋势相似.血糖浓度至饥饿4周时开始显著低于初始水平(p<0.05),表现出较好的稳定性.己糖激酶(HK)、葡萄糖激酶(GK)活性均在饥饿4周后开始显著低于初始水平(p<0.05),两者表现出相似的变化趋势.研究推测,南方鲇幼鱼应对饥饿胁迫时,优先动用肝脏内的储存物质肝糖原来提供能量;肝糖原含量与维持血糖的稳定有直接关系;饥饿可降低HK、GK活性,但短暂饥饿2周对两者活性无显著影响.%To investigate the effects of starvation with different time courses on hepatosomatic index ( HSI), glycogen , serum glucose and activities of glycolytic key enzymes(HK、GK) in juvenile Silurus meridonalis. The fish were starved for 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 weeks respectively at (20 ± 1 ) ℃. Samples were taken after the process. The starvation for 0 week is set as the control group. The results showed that, as starvation continued, HSI and glycogen decreased significantly. Fasting for 1 week, the HSI was (2.44 ±0.36) mg · g-1,the liver glycogen was ( 35.20 ± 2.25 ) mg · g-1 and the muscle glycogen was ( 30.69 + 10.24 ) mg · kg - 1 respectively; all of the three indices were significanely below original value (p < 0.05 ). During the experiment, HSI took on a similar trend with liver glycogen. Fasting for4 weeks, serum glucose had began to significanely below original value (p <0.05), but it had a lesser variation extent. The activities of HK and GK had began to

  17. 乏油对间歇运动条件下弹流润滑油膜的影响∗%Effect of Oil Starvation on EHL Oil Film in Intermittent Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭初; 王飞; 王静

    2015-01-01

    The influence on elastohydrodynamic lubrication film in intermittent motion by oil supplied condition,such as fully supply,middle starvation and heavy starvation,was studied with optical interferemetric experiments.The results show that,if other conditions remain the same,middle starvation only has an effect on oil film thickness and shape in the stages of deceleration and acceleration;in the intermittent period,its film variation coincides with that in the fully supplied condi⁃tion.In the heavy starved condition,entrainment velocity hardly exerts an influence on the variation of oil film in the stages of deceleration and acceleration.The film thickness is decreased obviously in the intermittent period because of heavy star⁃vation.%采用光干涉实验技术研究间歇运动条件下,充分供油、中度乏油和严重乏油3种供油条件对弹流润滑油膜的影响。结果显示,在其他条件一致情况下,中度乏油只是在减速和加速阶段对油膜厚度和形状有影响,在停歇阶段,油膜变化与充分供油条件下的油膜变化情况一致;在严重乏油条件下,在减速和增速区间,速度对膜厚的变化基本无影响,在停歇阶段严重乏油也会造成油膜的明显降低。

  18. Multiplex bioimaging of piRNA molecular pathway-regulated theragnostic effects in a single breast cancer cell using a piRNA molecular beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn Jung; Moon, Sung Ung; Park, Min Geun; Jung, Woon Yong; Park, Yong Keun; Song, Sung Kyu; Ryu, Je Gyu; Lee, Yong Seung; Heo, Hye Jung; Gu, Ha Na; Cho, Su Jeong; Ali, Bahy A; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Lee, Ilkyun; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-09-01

    Recently, PIWI-interacting small non-coding RNAs (piRNAs) have emerged as novel cancer biomarkers candidate because of their high expression level in various cancer types and role in the control of tumor suppressor genes. In this study, a novel breast cancer theragnostics probe based on a single system targeting the piRNA-36026 (piR-36026) molecular pathway was developed using a piR-36026 molecular beacon (MB). The piR-36026 MB successfully visualized endogenous piR-36026 biogenesis, which is highly expressed in MCF7 cells (a human breast cancer cell line), and simultaneously inhibited piR-36026-mediated cancer progression in vitro and in vivo. We discovered two tumor suppressor proteins, SERPINA1 and LRAT, that were directly regulated as endogenous piR-36026 target genes in MCF7 cells. Furthermore, multiplex bioimaging of a single MCF7 cell following treatment with piR-36026 MB clearly visualized the direct molecular interaction of piRNA-36026 with SERPINA1 or LRAT and subsequent molecular therapeutic responses including caspase-3 and PI in the nucleus.

  19. Starvation-free mutual exclusion with semaphores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.; IJbema, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The standard implementation of mutual exclusion by means of a semaphore allows starvation of processes. Between 1979 and 1986, three algorithms were proposed that preclude starvation. These algorithms use a special kind of semaphore. We model this so-called buffered semaphore rigorously and provide

  20. A study of the centrally produced $\\pi0\\pi0\\pi0$ channel in pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D; Close, Francis Edwin; Danielsen, K M; Donskov, S V; Earl, B C; Evans, D; French, Bernard R; Hino, T; Inaba, S; Jacholkowski, A; Jacobsen, T; Khaustov, G V; Kinson, J B; Kirk, A; Kondashov, A A; Lednev, A A; Lenti, V; Minashvili, I A; Peigneux, J P; Romanovsky, V I; Rusakovitch, N A; Semenov, A A; Shagin, P M; Shimizu, H; Singovsky, A V; Sobol, A E; Stassinaki, M; Stroot, Jean-Pierre; Takamatsu, K; Tsuru, T; Villalobos Baillie, O; Votruba, M F; Yasu, Y

    2001-01-01

    The reaction pp -> pf (pi0pi0pi0) ps has been studied at 450 GeV/c. The pi0pi0pi0 effective mass spectrum shows clear eta(547) and pi2(1670) signals. Branching ratios for the eta(547) and pi_2(1670) are given as well as upper limits for the decays of the omega(782), a1(1260) and a2(1320) into 3pi0.

  1. Horror’s Effect on Identity in Life of Pi and Arthur Gordon Pym

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyx Steensma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Both Life of Pi by Yann Martel and The Narative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket by Edgar Allen Poe provide climatic moments of horror that lead to a change of motivation. Specifically, I will be taking a look at one important scene from each novel: the arrival and departure of the ‘death ship’ when Arthur Gordon Pym is stranded on a slightly sunk ship and the materialization of the mystical green island that Pi comes across. With the entrance of horror, both scenes portray a change in the narrator, a renewal then subsequent loss of hope, a moment of self-assessment that changes the young boys’ lives. I will be evaluating the effect of horror through the lens of Julia Kristeva’s “The Powers of Horror: an Essay on Abjection”. According to Kristeva, the abject refers to the human reaction (which is horror to a threatened breakdown in meaning caused by the loss of the distinction between subject and object or between self and other. The primary example for what causes such a reaction is the corpse (which traumatically reminds us of our own materiality which is the object of horror that changes the identities of Pi and Pym. The questions I will pursue are: Why does horror change the identities or conscious motivations of these boys? Are their reactions universal or individualized? What previous notions do they project on the horror they face?   Keywords: Abjection, Identity, Universality, Isolation, Survival.

  2. PI 3-kinase pathway is responsible for antiapoptotic effects of atrial natriuretic peptidein rat liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Uwe Grutzner; Melanie Keller; Michael Bach; Alexandra K Kiemer; Herbert Meissner; Manfred Bilzer; Stefan Zahler; Alexander L Gerbes; Angelika M Vollmar

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vivo effect of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and its signaling pathway during orthotopic rat liver transplantation.METHODS: Rats were infused with NaCl, ANP (5 μg/kg), wortmannin (WM, 16 μg/kg), or a combination of both for 20 min. Livers were stored in UW solution (4°C) for 24 h, transplanted and reperfused. Apoptosis was examined by caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining.Phosphorylation of Akt and Bad was visualized by Western blotting and phospho-Akt-localization by confocai microscopy.RESULTS: ANP-pretreatment decreased caspase-3activity and TUNEL-positive cells after cold ischemia,indicating antiapoptotic effects of ANP in vivo. The antiapoptotic signaling of ANP was most likely caused by phosphorylation of Akt and Bad, since pretreatment with PI 3-kinase inhibitor WM abrogated the ANP-induced reduction of caspase-3 activity. Interestingly, analysis of liver tissue by confocal microscopy showed translocation of phosphorylated Akt to the plasma membrane of hepatocytes evoked by ANP.CONCLUSION: ANP activates the PI-3-kinase pathway in the liver in vivo leading to phosphorylation of Bad,an event triggering antiapoptotic signaling cascade in ischemic liver.

  3. Transcriptome response to nitrogen starvation in rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hongmei Cai; Yongen Lu; Weibo Xie; Tong Zhu; Xingming Lian

    2012-09-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient required for plant growth and development. Insufficient nitrogen (N) supply triggers extensive physiological and biochemical changes in plants. In this study, we used Affymetrix GeneChip rice genome arrays to analyse the dynamics of rice transcriptome under N starvation. N starvation induced or suppressed transcription of 3518 genes, representing 10.88% of the genome. These changes, mostly transient, affected various cellular metabolic pathways, including stress response, primary and secondary metabolism, molecular transport, regulatory process and organismal development. 462 or 13.1% transcripts for N starvation expressed similarly in root and shoot. Comparative analysis between rice and Arabidopsis identified 73 orthologous groups that responded to N starvation, demonstrated the existence of conserved N stress coupling mechanism among plants. Additional analysis of transcription profiles of microRNAs revealed differential expression of miR399 and miR530 under N starvation, suggesting their potential roles in plant nutrient homeostasis.

  4. Alternative scenarios of starvation-induced adaptation in Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Olga; Gorshkov, Vladimir; Sergeeva, Iuliia; Daminova, Amina; Ageeva, Marina; Gogolev, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria have high adaptive potential that ensures their survival during various environmental challenges. To adapt, bacteria activate a physiological program of stress response that makes them able to persist under adverse conditions. The present study sought to examine the ability of a particular bacterial species to induce a stress response in alternative scenarios. Cells of the phytopathogenic microorganism Pectobacterium atrosepticum were taken as a model. The cells were exposed to starvation in different physiological states (actively growing exponential phase and stationary phase cells), and the resulting starving cultures were monitored using CFU counting, quantitative PCR and electron microscopy. When exponential phase cells were subjected to starvation, the nucleoids of the cells became condensed and their DNA was detected by qPCR less effectively than that of cells growing in nutrient-rich medium, or stationary phase cells after starvation. Exponential phase cells subjected to starvation showed increased expression of genes encoding DNA binding histone-like proteins, whereas, in cultures inoculated by stationary phase cells, cell-wall-deficient forms that were inefficient at colony forming and that had a non-culturable phenotype were formed. The cell-wall-deficient forms displayed reduced expression of genes encoding synthases of cell wall components.

  5. Determination of the S-Wave Pi Pi Scattering Lengths From a Study of K - to Pi - Pi0 Pi0 Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batley, J.R.; Culling, A.J.; Kalmus, G.; /Cambridge U.; Lazzeroni, C.; /Cambridge U. /Birmingham U.; Munday, D.J.; /Cambridge U.; Slater, M.W.; /Cambridge U. /Birmingham U.; Wotton, S.A.; /Cambridge U.; Arcidiacono, R.; /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Bocquet, G.; /CERN; Cabibbo, N.; /CERN /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Ceccucci, A.; /CERN; Cundy, D.; /CERN /Turin, Cosmo-Geofisica Lab; Falaleev, V.; Fidecaro, M.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Kubischta, W.; /CERN; Norton, A.; /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara; Maier, A.; Patel, M.; Peters, A.; /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Birmingham U. /Dubna, JINR /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Sofiya U. /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /INFN, Perugia /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Northwestern U. /Dubna, JINR /Chicago U., EFI /Marseille, CPPM /Chicago U., EFI /Edinburgh U. /George Mason U. /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Florence /Modena U. /INFN, Florence /INFN, Florence /Urbino U. /INFN, Florence /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Bonn U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Northwestern U. /SLAC /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /UCLA /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Frascati /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /CERN /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Siegen U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bern U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Madrid, CIEMAT /Vienna, OAW

    2012-03-29

    We report the results from a study of the full sample of {approx}6.031 x 10{sup 7} K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass (M{sub 00}) distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around M{sub 00} = 2m{sub +}, where m{sub +} is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} in K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. Fits to the M{sub 00} distribution using two different theoretical formulations provide the presently most precise determination of a{sub 0} - a{sub 2}, the difference between the {pi}{pi} S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I = 0 and I = 2 states. Higher-order {pi}{pi} rescattering terms, included in the two formulations, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a{sub 2}.

  6. Determination of the S-wave $\\pi \\pi$ scattering lengths from a study of $K^{\\pm} \\to \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J R; Kalmus, G; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Slater, M W; Wotton, S A; Arcidiacono, R; Bocquet, G; Cabibbo, N; Ceccucci, A; Cundy, D; Falaleev, V; Fidecaro, Maria; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Kubischta, W; Norton, A; Maier, A; Patel, M; Peters, A; Balev, S; Frabetti, P L; Goudzovski, E; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Madigozhin, D T; Marinova, E; Molokanova, N; Polenkevich, I; Potrebenikov, Yu; Stoynev, S; Zinchenko, A; Monnier, E; Swallow, E; Winston, R; Rubin, P; Walker, A; Baldini, W; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Fiorini, M; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Wahl, H; Calvetti, M; Iacopini, E; Ruggiero, G; Bizzeti, A; Lenti, M; Veltri, M; Behler, M; Eppard, K; Kleinknecht, K; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Renk, B; Wache, M; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Coward, D; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca-Martin, T; Shieh, M; Szleper, M; Velasco, M; Wood, M D; Anzivino, G; Imbergamo, E; Nappi, A; Piccini, M; Raggi, M; Valdata-Nappi, M; Cenci, P; Pepé, M; Pettrucci, M C; Cerri, C; Fantechi, R; Collazuol, G; Di Lella, L; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Michetti, A; Costantini, F; Doble, N; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Pierazzini, G; Sozzi, M; Venditti, S; Bloch-Devaux, B; Cheshkov, C; Chèze, J B; De Beer, M; Derré, J; Marel, G; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Bifani, S; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Marchetto, F; Bifani, S; Clemencic, M; Goy-Lopez, S; Dibon, H; Jeitler, M; Markytan, M; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, G; Widhalm, L

    2009-01-01

    We report the results from a study of the full sample of $~6.031 x 10^{7} K^{\\pm} \\to \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the $\\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ invariant mass (M_00) distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around $M_{00} = 2m_{+}$, where m_{+} is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-} \\to \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ in $K^{\\pm} \\to \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decay. Fits to the M_{00} distribution using two different theoretical models provide the presently most precise determination of $a_{0}-a_{2}$, the difference between the pi pi S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I = 0 and I = 2 states. Higher-order pi pi rescattering terms, included in the two models, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a_2.

  7. A Conserved Two-Component Signal Transduction System Controls the Response to Phosphate Starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez-Martin, P.; Fernandez, M.; O'Connell-Motherway, M.; O'Connell, K.J.; Sauvageot, N.; Fitzgerald, G.F.; Macsharry, J.; Zomer, A.L.; Sinderen, D. van

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on the identification and molecular characterization of the two-component regulatory system (2CRS) PhoRP, which controls the response to inorganic phosphate (P(i)) starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. The response regulator PhoP was shown to bind to the promoter region of

  8. The Effect of Network Parameters on Pi-Sigma Neural Network for Temperature Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husaini, Noor Aida; Ghazali, Rozaida; Nawi, Nazri Mohd; Ismail, Lokman Hakim

    In this paper, we present the effect of network parameters to forecast temperature of a suburban area in Batu Pahat, Johor. The common ways of predicting the temperature using Neural Network has been applied for most meteorological parameters. However, researchers frequently neglected the network parameters which might affect the Neural Network's performance. Therefore, this study tends to explore the effect of network parameters by using Pi Sigma Neural Network (PSNN) with backpropagation algorithm. The network's performance is evaluated using the historical dataset of temperature in Batu Pahat for one step-ahead and benchmarked against Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) for comparison. We found out that, network parameters have significantly affected the performance of PSNN for temperature forecasting. Towards the end of this paper, we concluded the best forecasting model to predict the temperature based on the comparison of our study.

  9. Extracting the chiral anomaly from gamma pi --> pi pi

    CERN Document Server

    Hoferichter, Martin; Sakkas, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    We derive dispersive representations for the anomalous process gamma pi --> pi pi with the pi pi P-wave phase shift as input. We investigate how in this framework the chiral anomaly can be extracted from a cross-section measurement using all data up to 1 GeV, and discuss the importance of a precise representation of the gamma pi --> pi pi amplitude for the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

  10. Constrain the UT angle gamma by CP violation parameters in B0 -> pi+ pi-

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Qin; Lü, Cai-Dian; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the tree and penguin amplitudes in the $B^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay channel employing the perturbative QCD factorization approach. Using the amplitudes as input with the theoretical uncertainties sufficiently considered, we constrain the UT angle $\\gamma$ to $51^\\circ\\leq\\gamma\\leq64^\\circ$, from the measurements of the CP violation parameters $C_{\\pi^+\\pi^-}$ and $S_{\\pi^+\\pi^-}$ in $B^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$. The U-spin breaking effect between $B^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $B_s^0\\to K^+K^-$ is estimated to be around 30\\%.

  11. Resistance of soil microorganisms to starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Alexander, M.

    1972-01-01

    Most groups of soil microorganisms died when exposed to prolonged starvation in a carbon-free solution, but the relative abundance of Bacillus and actinomycetes increased with time. Certain nonspore-forming bacteria also persisted. The ability of individual soil isolates to endure starvation in solution was not correlated with their glycogen content or rate of endogenous respiration. However, cells of the resistant populations were rich in poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, whereas the starvation-susceptible bacteria generally contained little of this substance. Poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate was used rapidly in cells deprived of exogenous sources of carbon.

  12. 饥饿对太平洋鲑(Oncorhynchusspp.)鱼体脂肪与脂肪酸的影响%THE EFFECTS OF STARVATION ON FAT AND FATTY ACIDS COMPOSITION IN PACIFIC SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS spp.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈斌; 冯健; 吴彬; 彭淇

    2012-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of starvation on fat and fatty acids composition in grower fish of Pacific Salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) by fasting test. The results indicated that fat in fish body was main energy resource for Pacific Salmon during the starvation. Pacific salmon consumed liver fat on early starvation stage mainly and the consumption of energy was relatively low. On middle and later starvation stages, fish consumed mesentery fat and muscle fat for energy resource mainly and the consumption of energy rose obviously (P〈0.05). After starvation, the proportion of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) reduced significantly, Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) proportion as well as the rates of docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA)/Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and to 6PUFA/w 3PUFA elevated significantly (P〈0.05). The grower fish of Pacific salmon under starvation could utilize fatty acids in tissue fat selectively. On starvation stage, the fish got energy by oxidation of SFA and MUFA mainly, while PUFA, especially DHA was seldom utilized for energy. The proportion of fatty acids in fat of liver, muscle and mesentery were different, so that the consumption degree of fat in above tissues also showed difference on starvation stage. The test con- siders that the fish utilized SFA and MUFA in fat of different tissues mainly, and therefore it saved body protein and PUFA in fat for keeping important life activities.%采用禁食试验方法进行了太平洋鲑生长鱼经8—32d饥饿后对其鱼体脂肪与脂肪酸变化的影响研究。结果表明,饥饿期间脂肪是太平洋鲑主要的能量来源,饥饿初期太平洋鲑主要消耗肝脏脂肪作为能量维持生命活动,能耗较低;饥饿中后期主要以消耗肠系膜脂肪和肌肉脂肪作为能量维持生命活动,能耗逐步增加(P〈0.05)。饥饿后,鱼体肝脏、背肌和肠系膜脂肪中大多数饱和脂肪酸(SFA)和

  13. Processing Strategy and PI Effects in Recognition Memory of Word Lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Milton H.; Britton, Bruce K.

    Previous research by A. I. Schulman argued that an observed systematic decline in recognition memory in long word lists was due to the build-up of input and output proactive interference (PI). It also suggested that input PI resulted from process automatization; that is, each list item was processed or encoded in much the same way, producing a set…

  14. Fair Pi

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we define fair computations in the pi-calculus. We follow Costa and Stirling's approach for CCS-like languages but exploit a more natural labeling method of process actions to filter out unfair process executions. The new labeling allows us to prove all the significant properties of the original one, such as unicity, persistence and disappearance of labels. It also turns out that the labeled pi-calculus is a conservative extension of the standard one. We...

  15. Observation of $\\eta^{\\prime}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $\\eta^{\\prime}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Braun, S; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fuks, O; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, L; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Kloss, B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leyhe, M; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q J; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, H L; Lu, J G; Lu, X R; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Moeini, H; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Q., N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C B; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of $1.3\\times 10^9$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector, we report the first observation of $\\eta^{\\prime}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $\\eta^{\\prime}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$. The measured branching fractions are $\\mathcal{B}$($\\eta^{\\prime}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$) = $(8.41\\pm0.68({\\rm stat.})\\pm0.63({\\rm syst.}))\\times10^{-5}$ and $\\mathcal{B}$($\\eta^{\\prime}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$) = $(1.90\\pm0.36({\\rm stat.})\\pm0.19({\\rm syst.}))\\times10^{-4}$, which are consistent with theoretical predictions based on a combination of chiral perturbation theory and vector-meson dominance.

  16. Combination effects of sorafenib with PI3K inhibitors under hypoxia in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia DR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dimple R Bhatia, Padma Thiagarajan School of Biosciences and Technology, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India Aim: This study reports the influence of hypoxia on response of colorectal cancer cells to anticancer effects of sorafenib in combination with PI3K inhibitors GDC-0941 and BEZ-235.Materials and methods: All hypoxic exposures were carried out at 1% O2/5% CO2. Antiproliferation activity was evaluated by 48 hours propidium iodide and 14 days clonogenic assay. Protein levels were evaluated by fluorescence ELISA. Metabolites lactate and glucose were evaluated biochemically.Results: In the 48-hour proliferation assay, sorafenib acted synergistically with GDC-0941 but not with BEZ-235. In long-term colony-forming assays, both GDC-0941 and BEZ-235 were shown to potentiate the antiproliferative activity of sorafenib. At the molecular level, the synergism is mediated through inhibition of pAKT, pS6, p4EBP1, pERK, cyclin D1, and Bcl-2. No change in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α levels was observed in cells treated with the combination of compounds under hypoxia. A significant reduction in glucose uptake and lactate release was observed in cells treated with the combination of compounds under normoxia and hypoxia.Conclusion: Combinations of sorafenib with PI3K inhibitors BEZ-235 and GDC-0941 are efficacious under hypoxia. Thus, these anticancer combinations have a potential to overcome the hypoxia-mediated resistance mechanisms to antiproliferative agents in cancer therapy. Keywords: GDC-0941, BEZ-235, anticancer, antiproliferation

  17. Effects of AFP-activated PI3K/Akt signaling pathway on cell proliferation of liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lu; Gong, Wei; Liang, Ping; Huang, XiaoBing; You, Nan; Han, Ke Qiang; Li, Yu Ming; Li, Jing

    2014-05-01

    This study aims to investigate effects of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) signaling pathway on hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation. Active cirrhosis patients after hepatitis B infection (n = 20) and viral hepatitis patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n = 20) were selected as the subjects of the present study. Another 20 healthy subjects were selected as the control group. The serum AFP expression and liver tissue PI3K and Akt gene mRNA expression were detected. The hepatoma cell model HepG2 which had a stable expression of AFP gene was used. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot and other methods were used to analyze the intracellular PI3K and Akt protein levels. Compared with control group and cirrhosis group, the serum AFP levels in HCC group significantly increased, and the tissue PI3K and Akt mRNA expression also significantly increased. HepG2 cells were intervened using AFP, in which the PIK and Akt protein expression significantly increased. After intervention by use of AFP monoclonal antibodies or LY294002 inhibitor, the PIK and Akt protein expression in HepG2 cell was significantly decreased (P AFP can promote the proliferation of hepatoma cells via activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  18. Fourth Generation CP Violation Effect on B -> K pi, phi K and rho K in NLO PQCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, W S; Mishima, S; Nagashima, M; Hou, Wei-Shu; Li, Hsiang-nan; Mishima, Satoshi; Nagashima, Makiko

    2006-01-01

    We study the effect from a fourth generation quark on penguin-dominated two-body nonleptonic B meson decays in the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD formalism. With an enhancement of the color-suppressed tree amplitude and possibility of a new CP phase in the electroweak penguin, we can account better for A_{CP}(B^0 -> K^+ pi^-)-A_{CP}(B^+ -> K^+ pi^0). Taking |V_{t's}V_{t'b}| \\sim 0.02 with phase just below 90^\\circ, which are consistent with the b -> s l^+ l^- rate and the B_s mixing parameter \\Delta m_{B_s}, we find a downward shift in the mixing-induced CP asymmetries of B^0 -> K_S pi^0 and phi K_S, but the predicted behavior for B^0 -> rho^0 K_S is opposite.

  19. Will PI3K pathway inhibitors be effective as single agents in patients with cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joan T.; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2011-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) axis regulates essential cellular functions including cell survival, proliferation, metabolism, migration, and angiogenesis. The PI3K pathway is activated in human cancers by mutation, amplification, and deletion of genes encoding components of this pathway. The critical role of PI3K in cancer has led to the development of drugs targeting the effector mechanisms of this signaling network. Recent studies have shown that inhibition at multiple levels of the PI3K pathway results in FOXO-dependent feedback reactivation of several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) which, in turn, limit the sustained inhibition of this pathway and attenuates the action of therapeutic antagonists. This suggests that if used as single agents, PI3K pathway inhibitors may have limited clinical activity. We propose herein that to successfully target the output of the PI3K pathway in cancer cells, combination therapies that hinder these compensatory mechanisms should be used. Thus, combination therapies that target RTKs, PI3K, and mTOR activities may be required to maximize the clinical benefit derived from treatment with these inhibitors. PMID:22248929

  20. An Amplitude Analysis of the Decay B+- -> pi+- pi+- pi-+

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai, F; Tehrani; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S W; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    We present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B+- decays to the final state pi+- pi+- pi-+ using 210 fb^-1 of data recorded by the BABAR experiment at sqrt(s) = 10.58 GeV. We measure the branching fractions B(B+- -> pi+- pi+- pi-+) = (16.2 +- 1.2 +- 0.9) x 10^-6 and B(B+- -> rho^0(770) pi+-) = (8.8 +- 1.0 +- 0.6 +0.1-0.7) x 10^-6. Measurements of branching fractions for the quasi-two-body decays B+- -> rho^0(1450) pi+-, B+- -> f_0(980) pi+- and B+- -> f_2(1270) pi+- are also presented. We observe no charge asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B+- -> chic0 pi+-, B+- -> f_0(1370) pi+- and B+- -> sigma pi+-.

  1. Amplitude Analysis of B -> pi pi pi and B -> K pi pi

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Bailey, S; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bóna, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Borgland, A W; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brochard, F; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bulten, H; Burchat, Patricia R; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Côté, D; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cormack, C M; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Dickopp, M; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Elsen, E E; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Farbin, A; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B J; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J M; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Geddes, N I; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M; Grancagnolo, S; Green, M G; Greene, M G; Grenier, G J; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hart, P A; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hicheur, A; Hill, E J; Hitlin, D G; Höcker, A; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Laplace, S; Latham, T E; Lau, Y P; Lavin, D; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, H; Libby, J; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; LoSecco, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Lü, C; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lyon, A J; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Manfredi, P F; Mangeol, D J J; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, T I; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petrak, S; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Pivk, M; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Re, V; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Rubin, A E; Ryd, A; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sandrelli, F; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Simani, M C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spradlin, P; Stängle, H; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; T'Jampens, S; Tan, P; Tantot, L; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Treadwell, E; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; Del Re, D; La Vaissière, C de

    2004-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a maximum-likelihood Dalitz-plot analysis of the charmless hadronic B decays to the final states pi pi pi and K pi pi from data corresponding to an integrated on-resonance luminosity of 166 fb^-1 recorded by the BABAR experiment at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. We measure the total branching fractions B(B -> pi pi pi) = (16.2 +- 2.1 +- 1.3) x 10^-6 and B(B -> K pi pi) = (61.4 +- 2.4 +- 4.5) x 10^-6, and provide fit fractions and phases for intermediate resonance states.

  2. Biochemical compounds' dynamics during larval development of the carpet-shell clam Ruditapes decussatus (Linnaeus, 1758): effects of mono-specific diets and starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Domitília; Joaquim, Sandra; Ramos, Margarete; Sobral, Paula; Leitão, Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    Successful larval growth and development of bivalves depend on energy derived from internal (endotrophic phase) and external (exotrophic phase) sources. The present paper studies survival, growth and biochemical changes in the early developmental stages (from egg to pediveliger) of the clam Ruditapes decussatus in order to characterize the nutritional requirements and the transition from the endotrophic to the exotrophic phase. Three different feeding regimes were applied: starvation and two mono-specific microalgal diets ( Isochrysis aff galbana and Chaetoceros calcitrans). A comparison between fed and unfed larvae highlighted the importance of egg lipid reserves, especially neutral lipids, during a brief endotrophic phase of embryonic development (first 2 days after fertilization). Egg reserves, however, may energetically contribute to the maintenance of larvae beyond the embryonic development. In fed larvae, the endotrophic phase is followed by a mixotrophic phase extending to days 5-8 after fertilization and a subsequent exotrophic phase. Metamorphosis starts around day 20. The intense embryonic activities are supported by energy derived from lipids, mainly from neutral lipids, and the metamorphic activities are supported by energy derived essentially from proteins accumulated during the planktonic phase and depend on the nutritional value of diets. The diet of I. aff galbana proves to be more adequate to R. decussatus larval rearing. The results provide useful information for the successful production of R. decussatus aquaculture.

  3. Double pomeron exchange in the reactions pp --> pppi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$, K$^{+}$p --> K$^{+}$ppi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$, pi$^{+}$p --> pi$^{+}$ppi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$ and pi$^{-}$p --> pi$^{-}$ppi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$ at 147 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Brick, D H; Shapiro, A M; Widgoff, M; Ansorge, Rainer E; Carter, J R; Neale, William W; Rushbrooke, John G; Ward, D R; Whyman, B M; Burnstein, R A; Rubin, H A; Cooper, J W; Snyder, A; Alyea, E D; Bachman, L; Chien, C Y; Lucas, P; Pevsner, A; Bober, J T; Elahi, M; Frank, T; Hafen, E S; Haridas, P; Hochman, D; Huang, D; Hulsizer, R I; Kistiakowsky, V; Levy, A; Lutz, P; Oh, S; Pless, I A; Stoughton, T B; Suchorebrow, V; Tether, S; Trepagnier, P C; Wu, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Grard, F; Hanton, J; Henri, V; Herquet, P; Lesceux, J M; Windmolders, R; Crijns, F; De Bock, H; Kittel, E W; Metzger, W J; Pols, C L A; Schouten, M M; Van de Walle, R T; Cohn, H O

    1980-01-01

    Double pomeron exchange in the reactions pp --> pppi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$, K$^{+}$p --> K$^{+}$ppi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$, pi$^{+}$p --> pi$^{+}$ppi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$ and pi$^{-}$p --> pi$^{-}$ppi$^{+}$pi$^{-}$ at 147 GeV/c

  4. Expressionof Drosophila FOXO regulates growth and can phenocopy starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockyer Joseph M

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Components of theinsulin signaling pathway are important regulators of growth. TheFOXO (forkhead box, sub-group "O" transcriptionfactors regulate cellular processes under conditions of low levelsof insulin signaling. Studies in mammalian cell culture show thatactivation of FOXO transcription factors causes cell death or cellcycle arrest. The Caenorhabiditis elegans homologue ofFOXO, Daf-16, is required for the formation of dauer larvae in responseto nutritional stress. In addition, FOXO factors have been implicatedin stress resistance and longevity. Results We have identifiedthe Drosophila melanogaster homologue of FOXO (dFOXO,which is conserved in amino acid sequence compared with the mammalianFOXO homologues and Daf-16. Expression of dFOXO during early larvaldevelopment causes inhibition of larval growth and alterations infeeding behavior. Inhibition of larval growth is reversible upondiscontinuation of dFOXO expression. Expression of dFOXO duringthe third larval instar or at low levels during development leadsto the generation of adults that are reduced in size. Analysis ofthe wings and eyes of these small flies indicates that the reductionin size is due to decreases in cell size and cell number. Overexpressionof dFOXO in the developing eye leads to a characteristic phenotypewith reductions in cell size and cell number. This phenotype canbe rescued by co-expression of upstream insulin signaling components,dPI3K and dAkt, however, this rescue is not seen when FOXO is mutatedto a constitutively active form. Conclusions dFOXO is conservedin both sequence and regulatory mechanisms when compared with otherFOXO homologues. The establishment of Drosophila as a model forthe study of FOXO transcription factors should prove beneficialto determining the biological role of these signaling molecules.The alterations in larval development seen upon overexpression ofdFOXO closely mimic the phenotypic effects of starvation, suggestinga

  5. Transverse Momentum and Sudakov Effects in Exclusive QCD Processes $\\gamma* \\gamma \\pi0$ Form Factor

    CERN Document Server

    Musatov, I V

    1997-01-01

    We analyze effects due to transverse degrees of freedom in QCD calculations of the fundamental hard exclusive amplitude of $\\gamma^*\\gamma \\to \\pi^0$ transition. A detailed discussion is given of the relation between the modified factorization approach (MFA) of Sterman {\\it et al.} and standard factorization (SFA). Working in Feynman gauge, we construct basic building blocks of MFA from the one-loop coefficient function of the SFA, demonstrating that Sudakov effects are distinctly different from higher-twist corrections. We show also that the handbag-type diagram, contrary to naive expectations, does not contain an infinite chain of $(M^2/Q^2)^n$ corrections: they come only from diagrams with transverse gluons emitted from the hard propagator. A simpler picture emerges within the QCD sum rule approach: the sum over soft $\\bar q G \\ldots G q$ Fock components is dual to $\\bar qq$ states generated by the local axial current. We combine the results based on QCD sum rules with pQCD radiative corrections and observ...

  6. IMPACT OF STARVATION ON SURVIVAL, MEAT CONDITION AND METABOLISM OF CHLAMYS FARRERI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of 60-day starvation on survival rate, condition index (CI), changes of nutrient composition of different tissues, respiration and excretion of scallop Chlamys farreri were studied in laboratory from Oct. 17 to Dec. 15,1997. Two groups (control and starvation with 200 individuals each) were cultured in two 2 m3 tanks, with 31 to 32 salinity water at 17℃. Starvation effects were measured after 10, 20, 40 and 60 days. There was no mass mortality of scallops of the two tanks and survival rates of the control and starvation groups were 93.5% and 92.0%, respectively. Starvation had strong effect on the meat condition of the scallops, especially after 10 days; when relative lipid percentage dropped sharply while relative protein percentage increased. The impact of starvation on the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and the ammonia-N excretion rate (AER) was obvious. The OCR increased rapidly after 10 days but decreased after 20 days. The AER increased after 10 days and 20 days, but decreased obviously from 20 to 40 days. The O:N ratios varied to different degrees, and minimized after 20 days. The low O:N ratios implied that the protein was the main material for the metabolism of C. farreri.

  7. Impact of starvation on survival, meat condition and metabolism of Chlamys farreri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Sheng; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Ping; He, Yi-Chao; Zhang, Fu-Sui

    2001-03-01

    The effects of 60-day starvation on survival rate, condition index (CI), changes of nutrient composition of different tissues, respiration and excretion of scallop Chlamys farreri were studied in laboratory from Oct. 17 to Dec. 15, 1997. Two groups (control and starvation with 200 individuals each) were cultured in two 2 m3 tanks, with 31 to 32 salinity water at 17°C. Starvation effects were measured after 10, 20, 40 and 60 days. There was no mass mortality of scallops of the two tanks and survival rates of the control and starvation groups were 93.5% and 92.0%, respectively. Starvation had strong effect on the meat condition of the scallops, especially after 10 days; when relative lipid percentage dropped sharply while relative protein percentage increased. The impact of starvation on the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and the ammonia-N excretion rate (AER) was obvious. The OCR increased rapidly after 10 days but decreased after 20 days. The AER increased after 10 days and 20 days, but decreased obviously from 20 to 40 days. The O∶N ratios varied to different degrees, and minimized after 20 days. The low O∶N ratios implied that the protein was the main material for the metabolism of C. farreri.

  8. Heat Stress Affects Pi-related Genes Expression and Inorganic Phosphate Deposition/Accumulation in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacak, Andrzej; Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Swida-Barteczka, Aleksandra;

    2016-01-01

    of heat stress, Pi accumulated in barley shoots but not in the roots, and transcriptomic data analysis as well as RT-qPCR led us to propose an explanation for this phenomenon. Pi transport inhibition from soil to roots is balanced by lower Pi efflux from roots to shoots directed by the PHO1 transporter....... In shoots, the PHO2 mRNA level is decreased, leading to an increased Pi level. We concluded that Pi homeostasis in barley during heat stress is maintained by dynamic changes in Pi-related genes expression....... accumulation in shoots. In contrast, the pho1 mutant shows a decreased level of Pi concentration in shoots. Finally, Pi starvation leads to decreased Pi concentration in all plant tissues. Little is known about plant Pi homeostasis in other abiotic stress conditions. We found that, during the first hour...

  9. Effects of switching to PI monotherapy on measures of lipoatrophy: meta-analysis of six randomized HIV clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Arribas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Switching from triple combination treatment to protease inhibitor (PI monotherapy may prevent or reverse adverse events related to long-term nucleoside analogues. Lipoatrophy is associated with long-term use of thymidine analogues (zidovudine and stavudine. Methods: A detailed MEDLINE search was conducted to identify randomised clinical trials of triple combination treatment versus PI monotherapy. Summary results from analysis of changes in body composition (DEXA analysis were collected: the mean change in limb fat and trunk fat to Week 48 or 96, and the percentage of patients with lipoatrophy (20% reduction from baseline in limb fat or lipohypertrophy (20% rise from baseline in trunk fat. Results: Six randomised trials of PI monotherapy versus triple therapy with data on body composition changes, measured by DEXA scanning at baseline and Week 48 or 96, were identified: Abbott-613 (LPV/r vs ZDV/3TC/EFV, induction-maintenance trial, n=105, Monark (LPV/r vs ZDV/3TC/LPV/r, first-line trial, n=63, Kalesolo (LPV/r vs LPV/r +2NRTIs, switch trial, n=42, MONOI (DRV/r vs DRV/r + 2NRTIs, switch trial, n=156, MONARCH (DRV/r vs DRV/r + 2NRTIs, switch trial, n=30 and KRETA (LPV/r vs LPV/r + ABC/3TC, switch trial, n=74. In the meta-analysis, there were greater rises in limb fat in the PI monotherapy arms than the triple therapy arms (mean difference =277g, 95% CI=+36 to+517g, p=0.024. The percentage of patients with lipoatrophy was significantly lower in the PI monotherapy arms (4% than the triple therapy arms (20%, (p=0.0005. There was no difference between PI monotherapy and triple therapy for mean change in trunk fat (mean difference=−73g, 95% CI = −621 to +475g, p=ns. There was also no significant difference in the risk of lipohypertrophy between the PI monotherapy arms (32% and the triple therapy arms (27% (p=ns. In each of the four analyses, there was no evidence for heterogeneity of treatment effects between the trials (Cochran's Q

  10. 体重、温度和饥饿对口虾蛄呼吸和排泄的影响%STUDIES ON EFFECTS OF BODY WEIGHT, WATER TEMPERATURE AND STARVATION ON RESPIRATION AND EXCRETION OFMANTIS SHRIMP (ORATOSQUILLA ORATORIA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜祖辉; 王俊; 唐启升

    2000-01-01

    Effects of body weight, temperature and starvation on oxygen consumption rate and ammonia excretion rate of Oratosquilla oratoria were studied under experimental conditions in laboratory. The experimental results indicate that the oxygen consumption rate and ammonia excretion rate are all correlated positively with water temperature and negatively with the body weight. The relationship of oxygen consumption rate and ammonia excretion rate with the body weight of Oratosquilla oratoria can be both expressed by the model of Y=aXb. The oxygen consumption rate and ammonia excretion rate of Oratosquilla oratoria obriously decreased with starvation days increasing, and decreased by 47% and 50% respectively after 16 days.%在室内实验条件下,测定了体重、温度和饥饿对口虾蛄耗氧率和排氨率的影响。实验结果表明,随个体重量的增加,口虾蛄单位体重的耗氧率和排氨率均减小,呈负相关的幂指数关系,均符合Y=aWb模式。随温度增加,口虾蛄的耗氧率、排氨率均增加。饥饿对口虾蛄的代谢有明显的影响。随饥饿天数增加口虾蛄的耗氧率和排氨率明显下降,16d后分别下降约47%和50%,且大个体下降幅度较大。

  11. Nitrogen excretion in rats on a protein-free diet and during starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chwalibog, André; Sawosz, Ewa; Niemiec, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen balances (six days) were determined in male Wistar rats during feeding a diet with sufficient protein or a nearly protein-free diet (n = 2 x 24), and then during three days of starvation (n = 2 x 12). The objective was to evaluate the effect of protein withdrawal on minimum nitrogen excr...... with protein, demonstrating a major influence of protein content in a diet on N excretion during starvation. Consequently, the impact of former protein supply on N losses during starvation ought to be considered when evaluating minimum N requirement necessary to sustain life.......Nitrogen balances (six days) were determined in male Wistar rats during feeding a diet with sufficient protein or a nearly protein-free diet (n = 2 x 24), and then during three days of starvation (n = 2 x 12). The objective was to evaluate the effect of protein withdrawal on minimum nitrogen...... excretion in urine (UN), corresponding to endogenous UN, during feeding and subsequent starvation periods. The rats fed the protein free-diet had almost the same excretion of urinary N during feeding and starvation (165 and 157 mg/kg W(0.75)), while it was 444 mg/kg W(0.75) in rats previously fed...

  12. Symmetry-improved 2PI approach to the Goldstone-boson IR problem of the SM effective potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    The effective potential of the Standard Model (SM), from three loop order and higher, suffers from infrared (IR) divergences arising from quantum effects due to massless would-be Goldstone bosons associated with the longitudinal polarizations of the W± and Z bosons. Such IR pathologies also hinder accurate evaluation of the two-loop threshold corrections to electroweak quantities, such as the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field. However, these divergences are an artifact of perturbation theory, and therefore need to be consistently resummed in order to obtain an IR-safe effective potential. The so-called Two-Particle-Irreducible (2PI) effective action provides a rigorous framework to consistently perform such resummations, without the need to resort to ad hoc subtractions or running into the risk of over-counting contributions. By considering the recently proposed symmetry-improved 2PI formalism, we address the problem of the Goldstone-boson IR divergences of the SM effective potential in the gaugeless limit of the theory. In the same limit, we evaluate the IR-safe symmetry-improved 2PI effective potential, after taking into account quantum loops of chiral fermions, as well as the renormalization of spurious custodially breaking effects triggered by fermionic Yukawa interactions. Finally, we compare our results with those obtained with other methods presented in the literature.

  13. Symmetry-improved 2PI approach to the Goldstone-boson IR problem of the SM effective potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Pilaftsis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effective potential of the Standard Model (SM, from three loop order and higher, suffers from infrared (IR divergences arising from quantum effects due to massless would-be Goldstone bosons associated with the longitudinal polarizations of the W± and Z bosons. Such IR pathologies also hinder accurate evaluation of the two-loop threshold corrections to electroweak quantities, such as the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field. However, these divergences are an artifact of perturbation theory, and therefore need to be consistently resummed in order to obtain an IR-safe effective potential. The so-called Two-Particle-Irreducible (2PI effective action provides a rigorous framework to consistently perform such resummations, without the need to resort to ad hoc subtractions or running into the risk of over-counting contributions. By considering the recently proposed symmetry-improved 2PI formalism, we address the problem of the Goldstone-boson IR divergences of the SM effective potential in the gaugeless limit of the theory. In the same limit, we evaluate the IR-safe symmetry-improved 2PI effective potential, after taking into account quantum loops of chiral fermions, as well as the renormalization of spurious custodially breaking effects triggered by fermionic Yukawa interactions. Finally, we compare our results with those obtained with other methods presented in the literature.

  14. Complete and Voluntary Starvation of 50 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Bradley; Mina, Michelle; Ferrier, Chrystalla

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old obese male (96.8 kg; BMI, 30.2 kg m(-1)) volitionally undertook a 50-day fast with the stated goal of losing body mass. During this time, only tea, coffee, water, and a daily multivitamin were consumed. Severe and linear loss of body mass is recorded during these 50 days (final 75.4 kg; BMI, 23.5 kg m(-1)). A surprising resilience to effects of fasting on activity levels and physical function is noted. Plasma samples are suggestive of early impairment of liver function, and perturbations to cardiovascular dynamics are also noted. One month following resumption of feeding behavior, body weight was maintained (75.0 kg; BMI, 23.4 kg m(-1)). Evidence-based decision-making with the fasting or hunger striking patient is limited by a lack of evidence. This case report suggests that total body mass, not mass lost, may be a key observation in clinical decision-making during fasting and starvation.

  15. Effects of MAPK and PI3K Pathways on PD-L1 Expression in Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atefi, Mohammad; Avramis, Earl; Lassen, Amanda; Wong, Deborah; Robert, Lidia; Foulad, David; Cerniglia, Michael; Titz, Bjoern; Chodon, Thinle; Graeber, Thomas G.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose PD-L1 is the main ligand for the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1. This ligand is frequently expressed by melanoma cells. In this study we investigated whether PD-L1 expression is controlled by melanoma driver mutations and modified by oncogenic signaling inhibition. Experimental Design Expression of PD-L1 was investigated in a panel of 51 melanoma cell lines containing different oncogenic mutations, including cell lines with innate and acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors. The effects of targeted therapy drugs on expression of PD-L1 by melanoma cells were investigated. Results No association was found between the level of PD-L1 expression and mutations in BRAF, NRAS, PTEN or amplification of AKT. Resistance to vemurafenib due to the activation of alternative signaling pathways was accompanied with the induction of PD-L1 expression, while the resistance due to the reactivation of the MAPK pathway had no effect on PD-L1 expression. In melanoma cell lines the effects of BRAF, MEK and PI3K inhibitors on expression of PD-L1 were variable from reduction to induction, particularly in the presence of INFγ. In PD-L1-exposed lymphocytes, vemurafenib paradoxically restored activity of the MAPK pathway and increased the secretion of cytokines. Conclusions In melanoma cell lines, including BRAF inhibitor-resistant cells, PD-L1 expression is variably regulated by oncogenic signaling pathways. PD-L1-exposed lymphocytes decrease MAPK signaling, which is corrected by exposure to vemurafenib, providing potential benefits of combining this drug with immunotherapies. PMID:24812408

  16. Identification of Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that Are Haploinsufficient for Overcoming Amino Acid Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy S. Bae

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to amino acid deprivation by activating a pathway conserved in eukaryotes to overcome the starvation stress. We have screened the entire yeast heterozygous deletion collection to identify strains haploinsufficient for growth in the presence of sulfometuron methyl, which causes starvation for isoleucine and valine. We have discovered that cells devoid of MET15 are sensitive to sulfometuron methyl, and loss of heterozygosity at the MET15 locus can complicate screening the heterozygous deletion collection. We identified 138 cases of loss of heterozygosity in this screen. After eliminating the issues of the MET15 loss of heterozygosity, strains isolated from the collection were retested on sulfometuron methyl. To determine the general effect of the mutations for a starvation response, SMM-sensitive strains were tested for the ability to grow in the presence of canavanine, which induces arginine starvation, and strains that were MET15 were also tested for growth in the presence of ethionine, which causes methionine starvation. Many of the genes identified in our study were not previously identified as starvation-responsive genes, including a number of essential genes that are not easily screened in a systematic way. The genes identified span a broad range of biological functions, including many involved in some level of gene expression. Several unnamed proteins have also been identified, giving a clue as to possible functions of the encoded proteins.

  17. Influence of starvation on heart contractility and corticosterone level in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Ko, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Marquez, Jubert; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The physiological changes, including cardiac modification, that occur during starvation are not yet completely understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a 2-week starvation period on heart contractility, muscle mass, and irisin and corticosterone levels in rats. Rats in the starved group showed a significant reduction in the body, heart, kidney, and muscle weight (n = 23, p echocardiography were further compared with the body-weight-matched control group. Starvation reduced the left ventricle mass; however, this difference was not significant compared with the body-weight-matched group (p > 0.05). In the starvation group, the impairment of cardiac output was dependent on the reduction in stroke volume and heart rate. Starvation induced a severe reduction in ejection fraction and fractional shortening when compared with the body-weight-matched control group (p < 0.05). In summary, prolonged starvation, which leads to a deficiency of available nutrition, increases the stress-related corticosterone level, impairs the cardiac output, and is associated with changes in cardiac morphogeometry.

  18. The $2\\pi$ Subsystem in Diffractively Produced $\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN has collected a large dataset of $50$ million $\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ events produced diffractively from a proton target using a $190\\,\\mathrm{GeV}/c$ pion beam. The partial-wave analysis (PWA) of these high-precision data reveals previously unseen details but is limited in parts by systematic effects. The PWA is based on the isobar model, in which multi-particle decays are described as a chain of subsequent two-body decays. Here, fixed mass distributions for the appearing intermediate resonances, the so-called isobars, are assumed. These shapes, which e.g. may be parametrized by Breit-Wigner amplitudes, represent prior knowledge that has to be put into the analysis model and may therefore introduce a model dependence, thus increasing systematic uncertainties. We present a novel method, which allows to extract isobar amplitudes directly from the data in a more model-independent way. As a first application, diffractively produced $\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ events are analyzed. Here, the focus l...

  19. Studies on effect of chronic intermittent starvation on neuroendocrinous function in rats%慢性间歇饥饿对大鼠神经内分泌功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋世一; 马宏

    2001-01-01

    探讨了慢性间歇饥饿及重饲过程中神经内分泌功能的动态变化并与急性饥饿进行比较.研究发现慢性间歇饥饿每100克体重垂体重量升高,附性器官无显著变化,重饲后恢复较快,与急性饥饿明显不同;慢性间歇饥饿时血液及垂体催乳素(PRL)无显著变化,PRL诱发反应减弱,与急性饥饿时PRL释放障碍较重,PRL诱发分泌增强有明显不同.结果表明:尽管体重下降程度完全一致,不同的饥饿方式和时程也可能对神经内分泌功能造成不同的影响.%This paper studies the dynamic changes of neuroendcrinous function during chronic intermittent starvation in rats and compares it with the result of acute starvation. The data shows that chronic intermittent starvation causes an elevation in pituitary weight per 100g body weight and no significant changes are found in accessory sex organs ,the changes can return to normal rapidly after refeeding. In chronic intermittent starvation, pituitary PRL and blood PRL show no significant changes, induced PRL serection is attenuated. A significant difference is revealed between chronic starvation and acute starvation. Although the body weight drops in the same degree during the above two kinds of starvation, various ways and periods of starvation can cause different changes in neuroendocrinous function.

  20. Long-term p110α PI3K inactivation exerts a beneficial effect on metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Foukas, Lazaros C.; Bilanges, Benoit; Bettedi, Lucia; Pearce, Wayne; Ali, Khaled; Sancho, Sara; Withers, Dominic J.; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2013-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 signalling (IIS) pathway regulates cellular and organismal metabolism and controls the rate of aging. Gain-of-function mutations in p110α, the principal mammalian IIS-responsive isoform of PI 3-kinase (PI3K), promote cancer. In contrast, loss-of-function mutations in p110α impair insulin signalling and cause insulin resistance, inducing a pre-diabetic state. It remains unknown if long-term p110α inactivation induces further metabolic deterioration over...

  1. Charging Levels of Four tRNA Species in Escherichia coli Rel+ and REL- Strains during Amino Acid Starvation: A Simple Model for the Effect of ppGpp on Translational Accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    tenfold to 40-fold. This reduction corresponds much better with the decreased rate of protein synthesis during starvation than that reported earlier. The determination of the charging levels of tRNA2Arg and tRNA1Thr during starvation were accurate enough to demonstrate that charging levels were at least......Escherichia coli strains mutated in the relA gene lack the ability to produce ppGpp during amino acid starvation. One consequence of this deficiency is a tenfold increase in misincorporation at starved codons compared to the wild-type. Previous work had shown that the charging levels of tRNAs were...... the same in Rel+ and Rel- strains and reduced, at most, two- to fivefold in both strains during starvation. The present reinvestigation of the charging levels of tRNA2Arg, tRNA1Thr, tRNA1Leu and tRNAHis during starvation of isogenic Rel+ and Rel- strains showed that starvation reduced charging levels...

  2. Low-energy {pi}{pi} photoproduction off nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlich, P.; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Buss, O.; Mosel, U

    2004-08-12

    In the present Letter we investigate {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0} photoproduction off complex nuclei at incident beam energies of 400-460 MeV. Simulations of two pion photoproduction on protons and nuclei are performed by means of a semi-classical BUU transport model including a full coupled-channel treatment of the final state interactions. Elastic scattering of the final state pions with the nucleons in the surrounding nuclear medium is found to yield a downward shift of the {pi}{pi} invariant mass distribution. We show that the target mass dependence of the {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass spectrum as measured by the TAPS Collaboration can be explained without introducing medium effects beyond absorption and quasi-elastic scattering of the final state particles. On the other hand, we find considerable discrepancies with the data in the {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0} channel, which are not understood.

  3. Measurements of B{sup 0} Decays to pi{sup +}pi{sup -}pi{sup 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Paul F.

    2001-07-30

    We present preliminary results of searches for exclusive B{sup 0} decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0} among 22.7 million b{bar b} pairs collected by the BABAR experiment from electron-positron collisions near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We measure {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}) = (28.9 {+-} 5.4 {+-} 4.3) x 10{sup 6}, and find no evidence for the presence of any other decay mode in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0} Dalitz plot. Upper limits are determined for the branching fractions of B{sup 0} {yields} {sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, non-resonant B{sup 0} decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0} and of several discrete regions of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0} phase-space. We also measure the direct CP-violating asymmetry between the rates of untagged {sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {sup -}{pi}{sup +}, finding no significant evidence for an effect.

  4. Some comments on B -> pi pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Fayyazuddin, A

    2004-01-01

    Isospin analysis has been used to constrain the CP-asymmetries in B -> pi pi decays. In particular correlation between a weak phase \\theta and a strong phase \\delta is obtained. Further using the experimental values for the CP-average branching ratios, the following bounds on direct CP-asymmetries are obtained: -0.35+/- 0.22=< C_{\\pi ^+\\pi^-}\\leq 0; C_{\\pi ^0\\pi ^0}=-(2.4\\pm 1.0) C_{\\pi ^+\\pi ^-}. Constraints on mixing induced CP-asymmetries are also discussed.

  5. 4$\\pi$ detector for study of Zeno effect using 220Rn -> 216Po alpha->alpha correlated chains

    CERN Document Server

    Nadderd, L; Subotic, K; Polyakov, A N; Lobanov, Y V; Rykhlyuk, A V

    2015-01-01

    First test of the 4pi detector for study of exponential law of radioactive decay and possibility of observation of Zeno effect [1-3], measuring the mean life of 216Po is presented. This detector consists of two surface-barrier n-Si(Au) detectors placed in the close contact ( 4T1/2. Both, the data acquisition system and the vacuum chamber design are presented in brief.

  6. Effects of Relativistic Dynamics in $pp \\to pp \\pi^0$ near Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, J; Peña, M T; Gross, F; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

    1997-01-01

    The cross-section for threshold $\\pi^0$ production in proton-proton collisions is evaluated in the framework of the covariant spectator description. The negative energy intermediate states are included non-perturbatively and seen to yield a considerably smaller contribution, when compared to perturbative treatments. A family of OBE-models with different off-shell scalar coupling is considered.

  7. Electromagnetic corrections in eta --> 3 pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ditsche, Christoph; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2008-01-01

    We re-evaluate the electromagnetic corrections to eta --> 3 pi decays at next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion, arguing that effects of order e^2(m_u-m_d) disregarded so far are not negligible compared to other contributions of order e^2 times a light quark mass. Despite the appearance of the Coulomb pole in eta --> pi+ pi- pi0 and cusps in eta --> 3 pi0, the overall corrections remain small.

  8. Digestive enzyme activity of Trachinotus ovatus Ⅵ Effects of starvation on survival and enzyme activity in young fish%卵形鲳鲹消化酶活力的研究Ⅵ饥饿对幼鱼存活和消化酶活力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏慧; 区又君; 李加儿; 王永翠; 刘汝建; 曹守花

    2012-01-01

    研究了饥饿对卵形鲳鲹(Trachinotus ovatus)消化器官中主要消化酶(蛋白酶、淀粉酶、脂肪酶)活力的影响.在水温25±0.5℃、盐度20 ±1条件下,对卵形鲳鲹幼鱼进行短期饥饿处理(0d、3d、6d、9d、12 d),并分别测定卵形鲳鲹幼鱼的比内脏重与蛋白酶、淀粉酶和脂肪酶3种消化酶的活力.结果表明,随着饥饿时间的延长,卵形鲳鲹幼鱼的比内脏重不断下降,饥饿第0~6天下降速度最快(P<0.01),6d后下降不显著(P>0.05);蛋白酶活力表现为饥饿第0~6天不断上升,第9天下降,第12天又显著升高(P<0.01),并且饥饿后的蛋白酶活力始终高于对照组(P<0.01);淀粉酶活力不断下降,并在第3天下降最显著(P<0.01);脂肪酶活力在饥饿前9d总体上下降,第12天活力明显上升并高于对照组(P<0.01).饥饿第8天开始出现幼鱼死亡,至第12天幼鱼的存活率为64.67%,表明第8天是卵形鲳鲹幼鱼饥饿致死的临界期.%Trachinotus ovatus was starved for 12 days when the water temperature was 25 ±0. 5 t and the salinity was 20 ± 1, and the activity of protease, amylase and lipase in its digestive organs and the ratio of viscera weight to body weight were measured on the 0, 3rd, 6th, 9th, and 12th day of starvation, respectively. The results showed that starvation had definite effects on the activity of all test enzymes and the ratio of viscera weight to body weight. The ratio of viscera weight to body weight and the amylase activity were found to decrease gradually as the starvation period increased; the ratio of viscera weight to body weight had the fastest decline from the 0 to 6th day after starvation(P 0. 05) . The amylase activity decreased throughout the experiment, and was significantly lower 3 days after starvation ( P < 0. 01 ). With the prolongation of starvation, the protease activity was found toincrease gradually, and was higher than that of the control (P < 0. 01 ). In general, the

  9. AgPi: Agents on Raspberry Pi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Semwal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Raspberry Pi and its variants have brought with them an aura of change in the world of embedded systems. With their impressive computation and communication capabilities and low footprint, these devices have thrown open the possibility of realizing a network of things in a very cost-effective manner. While such networks offer good solutions to prominent issues, they are indeed a long way from being smart or intelligent. Most of the currently available implementations of such a network of devices involve a centralized cloud-based server that contributes to making the necessary intelligent decisions, leaving these devices fairly underutilized. Though this paradigm provides for an easy and rapid solution, they have limited scalability, are less robust and at times prove to be expensive. In this paper, we introduce the concept of Agents on Raspberry Pi (AgPi as a cyber solution to enhance the smartness and flexibility of such embedded networks of physical devices in a decentralized manner. The use of a Multi-Agent System (MAS running on Raspberry Pis aids agents, both static and mobile, to govern the various activities within the network. Agents can act autonomously or on behalf of a human user and can collaborate, learn, adapt and act, thus contributing to embedded intelligence. This paper describes how Tartarus, a multi-agent platform, embedded on Raspberry Pis that constitute a network, can bring the best out of the system. To reveal the versatility of the concept of AgPi, an application for a Location-Aware and Tracking Service (LATS is presented. The results obtained from a comparison of data transfer cost between the conventional cloud-based approach with AgPi have also been included.

  10. The e+ e- --> 3(pi+pi-), 2(pi+pi-pi0) and K+K- 2(pi+pi-) Cross Sections at Center-of-Mass Energies from Production Threshold to 4.5 GeV Measured with Initial-State Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Best, D S; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Y; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We study the processes e+ e- --> 3(pi+pi-)gamma, 2(pi+pi-pi0)gamma and K+ K- 2(pi+pi-)gamma, with the photon radiated from the initial state. About 20,000, 33,000 and 4,000 fully reconstructed events, respectively, have been selected from 232 fb-1 of BaBar data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e+e- center-of-mass energy, so that these data can be compared with the corresponding direct e+e- measurements. From the 3(pi+pi-), 2(pi+pi-pi0) and K+ K- 2(pi+pi-) mass spectra, the cross sections for the processes e+ e- --> 3(pi+pi-), e+ e- --> 2(pi+pi-pi0) and e+ e- --> K+ K- 2(pi+pi-) are measured for center-of-mass energies from production threshold to 4.5 GeV. The uncertainty in the cross section measurement is typically 6-15%. We observe the J/psi in all these final states and measure the corresponding branching fractions.

  11. Glucose starvation boosts Entamoeba histolytica virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Tovy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, during its life cycle stages in the human host. In the present study, we examined whether the parasite virulence could be influenced by glucose starvation (GS. The migratory behaviour of the parasite and its capability to kill mammalian cells and to lyse erythrocytes is strongly enhanced following GS. In order to gain insights into the mechanism underlying the GS boosting effects on virulence, we analyzed differences in protein expression levels in control and glucose-starved trophozoites, by quantitative proteomic analysis. We observed that upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP, a transcription factor that modulates E.histolytica virulence, and the lysine-rich protein 1 (KRiP1 which is induced during liver abscess development, are upregulated by GS. We also analyzed E. histolytica membrane fractions and noticed that the Gal/GalNAc lectin light subunit LgL1 is up-regulated by GS. Surprisingly, amoebapore A (Ap-A and cysteine proteinase A5 (CP-A5, two important E. histolytica virulence factors, were strongly down-regulated by GS. While the boosting effect of GS on E. histolytica virulence was conserved in strains silenced for Ap-A and CP-A5, it was lost in LgL1 and in KRiP1 down-regulated strains. These data emphasize the unexpected role of GS in the modulation of E.histolytica virulence and the involvement of KRiP1 and Lgl1 in this phenomenon.

  12. The $\\epem\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $K^+K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$, and $K^+K^- K^+K^- $ Cross Sections at Center-of-Mass Energies 0.5--4.5 \\gev Measured with Initial-State Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Bailey, S; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Benelli, G; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bóna, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Borgland, A W; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bulten, H; Burchat, Patricia R; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Côté, D; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Cunha, A; D'Orazio, A; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, D; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, C M; Cormack, F; Di Marco, E; Dickopp, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckhart, E A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Farbin, A; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flacco, C J; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B J; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M; Grancagnolo, S; Graugès-Pous, E; Graziani, G; Green, M G; Grenier, G J; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamano, K; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hill, E J; Hitlin, D G; Höcker, A; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Koeneke, K; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Lau, Y P; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Levesque, J A; Lewandowski, B; Li, H; Li, L; Libby, J; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; Lo Secco, C P; Jessop, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Lü, C; Lu, M; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M; Majewski, S A; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Maly, E; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marks, J; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Naisbit, M T; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Greene, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Peters, K; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Polci, F; Pompili, A; Palano, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, P M; Patel, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Rubin, A E; Ruddick, W O; Ryd, A; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schröder, H; Schröder, T; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shen, B C; Simani, M C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spradlin, P; Stängle, H; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; Tan, P; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Ulmer, K A; Uwer, U; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; Del Re, D; La Vaissière, C de; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H

    2005-01-01

    We study the process $e^+e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma$, with a hard photon radiated from the initial state. About 60,000 fully reconstructed events have been selected from 89 $fb^{-1}$ of BaBar data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective \\epem center-of-mass energy, so that these data can be compared with the corresponding direct $e^+e^-$ measurements. From the $4\\pi$-mass spectrum, the cross section for the process $e^+e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ is measured for center-of-mass energies from 0.6 to 4.5 $GeV/c^2$. The uncertainty in the cross section measurement is typically 5%. We also measure the cross sections for the final states $K^+ K^- \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^+ K^- K^+ K^-$. We observe the $J/\\psi$ in all three final states and measure the corresponding branching fractions. We search for X(3872) in $J/\\psi (\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-) \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and obtain an upper limit on the product of the $e^+e^-$ width of the X(3872) and the branching fraction for $X(3872) \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$.

  13. Effect of supplementation of protein diet on morphology of intestinal tract in semi-starvation rat%蛋白质对半饥饿大鼠肠黏膜形态的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于晓明; 金宏; 王永辉; 李培兵

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of supplement of protein diet on morphology of intestinal mucosa in semi-starvation rats. Methods: Twenty-four male Wister rats were randomly divided into normal control, 50% intake group, 50% intake with supplementation of protein diet group. The morphology were observed in intestinal villus, and SOD, MDA and DNA were determined in intestinal mucosa. Results: Intestinal wall thickness and villus height in 50% intake with supplementation of protein diet group were raised compared with 50% intake group (P <0.05). The content of DNA in the 50% intake with supplementation of protein diet group were higher than that in control group ( P < 0.05 ). The activity of SOD was increased significantly and MDA level in serum in 50% intake with supplementation of protein diet group was decreased (P <0.05). Conclusion:The supplementation of protein in diet may effectively protect the morphology of intestinal mucosa in semi-starvation rats.%目的:研究半饥饿大鼠肠黏膜形态变化与补充蛋白质对保护肠黏膜的作用. 方法:将24只大鼠随机分为正常对照组、50%正常饲料组、50%饲料+蛋白组.2 周杀死大鼠取小肠,观察肠黏膜形态的变化,测定小肠黏膜超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、丙二醛(MDA)和DNA含量. 结果:50%饲料+蛋白组大鼠的小肠壁厚度、绒毛高度均好于50%正常饲料组,小肠DNA含量、SOD活性明显高于50%正常饲料组(P<0.05);肠黏膜MDA含量明显低于50%正常饲料组(P<0.05). 结论:半饥饿状态下,增加大鼠饲料中蛋白质的比例,对半饥饿大鼠肠黏膜形态有一定的保护作用.

  14. Effective lifetime measurements in the $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}$, $B^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}K^{-}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R.B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Brand, J. van den; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G.A.; Craik, D.C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P.N.Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Rifai, I. El; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S.C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S.T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R.F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Gac, R. Le; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I.V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J.F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sánchez, A. Martín; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Minard, M. -N.; Moggi, N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M.J.; Moron, J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A.D.; Nguyen, T.D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B.K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C.J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G.D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Alvarez, A. Pazos; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Trigo, E. Perez; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J.H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M.S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M.M.; Reis, A. C. dos; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Romero, D. A. Roa; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A.B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Sabatino, G.; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N.A.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V.K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M.T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J.J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Diaz, M. Vieites; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J.A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D.R.; Watson, N.K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F.F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S.A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the effective lifetimes in the $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}$, $B^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}K^{-}$ decays are presented using $1.0~\\mathrm{fb^{-1}}$ of $pp$ collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV by the LHCb experiment. The analysis uses a data-driven approach to correct for the decay time acceptance. The measured effective lifetimes are $\\tau_{B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}}$ = $1.407~\\pm~0.016~\\pm~0.007~\\mathrm{ps}$, $\\tau_{B^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}}$ = $1.524~\\pm~0.011~\\pm~0.004~\\mathrm{ps}$, $\\tau_{B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}K^{-}}$ = $1.60~\\pm~0.06~\\pm~0.01~\\mathrm{ps}$. This is the most precise determination to date of the effective lifetime in the $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}$ decay and provides constraints on contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model to the $B_{s}^{0}$ mixing phase and the width difference $\\Delta\\Gamma_{s}$.

  15. Effective lifetime measurements in the $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}$, $B^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}K^{-}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves Jr, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R.B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L.Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G.A.; Craik, D.C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P.N.Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; de Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V.V.; Gobel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L.A.; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grunberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S.C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S.T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R.F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the effective lifetimes in the $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}$, $B^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}K^{-}$ decays are presented using $1.0~\\mathrm{fb^{-1}}$ of $pp$ collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV by the LHCb experiment. The analysis uses a data-driven approach to correct for the decay time acceptance. The measured effective lifetimes are $\\tau_{B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}}$ = $1.407~\\pm~0.016~\\pm~0.007~\\mathrm{ps}$, $\\tau_{B^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}}$ = $1.524~\\pm~0.011~\\pm~0.004~\\mathrm{ps}$, $\\tau_{B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}K^{-}}$ = $1.60~\\pm~0.06~\\pm~0.01~\\mathrm{ps}$. This is the most precise determination to date of the effective lifetime in the $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}$ decay and provides constraints on contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model to the $B_{s}^{0}$ mixing phase and the width difference $\\Delta\\Gamma_{s}$.

  16. Up-regulation of lysosomal TRPML1 channels is essential for lysosomal adaptation to nutrient starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Yang, Meimei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Lu; Lawas, Maria; Li, Xinran; Bryant-Genevier, Marthe; Southall, Noel T; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2015-03-17

    Upon nutrient starvation, autophagy digests unwanted cellular components to generate catabolites that are required for housekeeping biosynthesis processes. A complete execution of autophagy demands an enhancement in lysosome function and biogenesis to match the increase in autophagosome formation. Here, we report that mucolipin-1 (also known as TRPML1 or ML1), a Ca(2+) channel in the lysosome that regulates many aspects of lysosomal trafficking, plays a central role in this quality-control process. By using Ca(2+) imaging and whole-lysosome patch clamping, lysosomal Ca(2+) release and ML1 currents were detected within hours of nutrient starvation and were potently up-regulated. In contrast, lysosomal Na(+)-selective currents were not up-regulated. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) or activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) mimicked a starvation effect in fed cells. The starvation effect also included an increase in lysosomal proteostasis and enhanced clearance of lysosomal storage, including cholesterol accumulation in Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) cells. However, this effect was not observed when ML1 was pharmacologically inhibited or genetically deleted. Furthermore, overexpression of ML1 mimicked the starvation effect. Hence, lysosomal adaptation to environmental cues such as nutrient levels requires mTOR/TFEB-dependent, lysosome-to-nucleus regulation of lysosomal ML1 channels and Ca(2+) signaling.

  17. Synthesis, electrochemical properties and effect of substituents on [pi]-extended TCNO and DCNOI systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco, E. (Dept. de Quimica Organica y Analitica, Facultad de C. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Gonzalez, A. (Dept. de Quimica Organica y Analitica, Facultad de C. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Martin, N. (Dept. de Quimica Organica y Analitica, Facultad de C. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Pingarron, J.M. (Dept. de Quimica Organica y Analitica, Facultad de C. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Segura, J.L. (Dept. de Quimica Organica y Analitica, Facultad de C. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Seoane, C. (Dept. de Quimica Organica y Analitica, Facultad de C. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Cruz, P. de la (Dept. de Quimica Organica, Inorganica y Bioquimica, Facultad de C. Quimicas, Univ. de Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo (Spain)); Langa, F. (Dept. de Quimica Organica, Inorganica y Bioquimica, Facultad de C. Quimicas, Univ. de Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo (Spain))

    1993-03-29

    The synthesis of novel [pi]-extended TCNQ and DCNQI derivatives from the corresponding 1,4-anthraquinones is described. The cyclic voltammetric data reveal that both TCNQ-type and DCNQI-type acceptors present two one-electron reduction waves to the corresponding anion-radical and dianion. These novel 2,3-fused TCNQ and DCNQI [pi]-extended systems are, according to the electrochemical values, better acceptors than the previously reported 2,3-5,6-fused TCNQ and DCNQI molecules. A good linear correlation between the first reduction potential of the substituted DCNQI-type derivatives versus the Hammett's [sigma][sub 3] constant has been found. (orig.)

  18. Synergistic effects of concurrent blockade of PI3K and MEK pathways in pancreatic cancer preclinical models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhong

    Full Text Available Patients with pancreatic cancer have dismal prognoses, and novel therapies are urgently needed. Mutations of the KRAS oncogene occur frequently in pancreatic cancer and represent an attractive target. Direct targeting of the predominant KRAS pathways have been challenging and research into therapeutic strategies have been now refocused on pathways downstream of KRAS, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK [MEK]. We hypothesized that concurrent inhibition of the PI3K and MEK pathways would result in synergistic antitumor activity, as it would circumvent the compensatory feedback loop between the two pathways. We investigated the combined effect of the PI3K inhibitor, GDC0941, and the MEK inhibitor, AZD6244, on cell viability, apoptosis and cell signaling in a panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines. An in vivo analysis was conducted on pancreatic cancer xenografts. While BxPC-3 (KRAS wild type and MIA PaCa-2 (KRAS mutated cell lines were sensitive to GDC0941 and AZD6244 as single agents, synergistic inhibition of tumor cell growth and induction of apoptosis were observed in both cell lines when the two drugs were combined. Interestingly, phosphorylation of the cap-dependent translational components, 4E-binding protein (p-4E-BP1 and S6 was found to be closely associated with sensitivity to GDC0941 and AZD6244. In BxPC-3 cell xenografts, survival differences were observed between the control and the AZD6244, GDC0941, and combination groups. Our study provides the rationale for concurrent targeting of the PI3K and MEK pathways, regardless of KRAS status, and suggests that phosphorylation of 4E-BP1and S6 can serve as a predictive biomarker for response to treatment.

  19. The Effect of Tianmai Xiaoke Pian on Insulin Resistance through PI3-K/AKT Signal Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the clinical setting, given the potential adverse effects of thiazolidinediones and biguanides, we often have difficulty in treatment that no other insulin sensitizers are available for use in type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM patients. Tianmai Xiaoke Pian (TMXKP is a traditional Chinese medicine tablet, which is comprised of chromium picolinate, Tianhuafen, Maidong, and Wuweizi. To understand its mechanism of action on insulin resistance, TMXKP (50 mg/kg orally was tested in T2DM rats (induced by a high-fat diet and streptozotocin. Eight weeks later, fasting blood glucose (FBG and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT were performed. Area under the curve (AUC and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were calculated, and PI3-K/AKT signal pathway-related genes and proteins were tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and western blot analysis in muscle, adipose, and liver tissues, respectively. TMXKP significantly reduced FBG, OGTT, AUC, and HOMA-IR in diabetic rats P<0.05. Furthermore, we also observed that TMXKP could significantly decrease IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3-K p85α, and AKT2 gene expression and also IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3-K, AKT2, and p-AKT2 protein expression levels P<0.05 in diabetic rats. These findings confirm that TMXKP can alleviate insulin resistance in T2DM rats through the PI3K/AKT pathway. Thus TMXKP appears to be a promising insulin sensitizer.

  20. Induction of cat-86 by chloramphenicol and amino acid starvation in relaxed mutants of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambulos, N P; Rogers, E J; Alexieva, Z; Lovett, P S

    1988-12-01

    The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene cat-86 is induced through a mechanism that is a variation of classical attenuation. Induction results from the destabilization of an RNA stem-loop that normally sequesters the cat-86 ribosome-binding site. Destabilization of the stem-loop is due to the stalling of a ribosome in the leader region of cat-86 mRNA at a position that places the A site of the stalled ribosome at leader codon 6. Two events can stall ribosomes at the correct location to induce cat-86 translation: addition of chloramphenicol to cells and starvation of cells for the amino acid specified by leader codon 6. Induction by amino acid starvation is an anomaly because translation of the cat-86 coding sequence requires all 20 amino acids. To explain this apparent contradiction we postulated that amino acid starvation triggers intracellular proteolysis, thereby providing levels of the deprived amino acid sufficient for cat-86 translation. Here we show that a mutation in relA, the structural gene for stringent factor, blocks intracellular proteolysis that is normally triggered by amino acid starvation. The relA mutation also blocks induction of cat-86 by amino acid starvation, but the mutation does not interfere with chloramphenicol induction. Induction by amino acid starvation can be demonstrated in relA mutant cells if the depleted amino acid is restored at very low levels (e.g., 2 micrograms/ml). A mutation in relC, which may be the gene for ribosomal protein L11, blocks induction of cat-86 by either chloramphenicol or amino acid starvation. We believe this effect is due to a structural alteration of the ribosome resulting from the relC mutation and not to the relaxed phenotype of the cells.

  1. Effects of PI and PIII Snake Venom Haemorrhagic Metalloproteinases on the Microvasculature: A Confocal Microscopy Study on the Mouse Cremaster Muscle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrera, Cristina; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Escalante, Teresa; Rucavado, Alexandra; Nourshargh, Sussan; Gutiérrez, José María

    2016-01-01

    .... In the present study, we compared the effects induced by BaP1, a PI SVMP isolated from Bothrops asper venom, and CsH1, a PIII SVMP from Crotalus simus venom, on cremaster muscle microvasculature...

  2. Chiral-loop and vector-meson contributions to $\\eta \\to \\pi \\pi \\gamma \\gamma$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ametller, L; Bramon, A; Talavera, P; Ametller, Ll.

    1997-01-01

    The process eta -> pi0 pi0 gamma gamma is discussed in Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) extending two recent analyses. Special attention is devoted to one-loop corrections, eta-eta' mixing effects and vector-meson dominance of ChPT counter-terms. The less interesting eta -> pi^+ pi^- gamma gamma transition is briefly discussed too.

  3. An Amplitude Analysis of the Decay B+- -> pi+- pi+- pi-+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-11

    The authors present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B{sup {+-}} decays to the final state {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using 210 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the BABAR experiment at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}) = (16.2 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(770){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (8.8 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.6{sub -0.7}{sup +0.1}) x 10{sup -6}. Measurements of branching fractions for the quasi-two-body decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(1450){pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(980){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup {+-}} are also presented. They observe no charge asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(1370){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {sigma}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

  4. An Amplitude Analysis of the Decay B+- -> pi+- pi+- pi-+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-11

    The authors present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B{sup {+-}} decays to the final state {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using 210 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the BABAR experiment at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}) = (16.2 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(770){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (8.8 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.6{sub -0.7}{sup +0.1}) x 10{sup -6}. Measurements of branching fractions for the quasi-two-body decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(1450){pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(980){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup {+-}} are also presented. They observe no charge asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(1370){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {sigma}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

  5. Pi and PiPi Decays of Excited D Mesons

    OpenAIRE

    Lahde, T. A.; Riska, D. O.

    2001-01-01

    The $\\pi$ and $\\pi\\pi$ decay widths of the excited charm mesons are calculated using a Hamiltonian model within the framework of the covariant Blankenbecler-Sugar equation. The pion-light constituent quark coupling is described by the chiral pseudovector Lagrangian.

  6. Electromagnetic corrections to gamma pi(-) -> pi(0) pi(-)

    CERN Document Server

    Ametller, L; Talavera, P; Ametller, Ll.

    2001-01-01

    The amplitude for the anomalous transition gamma pi(-) --> pi(0) pi(-) is analyzed within Chiral Perturbation Theory including electromagnetic interactions. The presence of a t-channel one-photon exchange contribution induces sizeable O(e^2) corrections which enhance the cross-section in the threshold region and bring the theoretical prediction into agreement with available data.

  7. Symmetry-Improved 2PI Approach to the Goldstone-Boson IR Problem of the SM Effective Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    The effective potential of the Standard Model (SM), from three loop order and higher, suffers from infra-red (IR) divergences arising from quantum effects due to massless would-be Goldstone bosons associated with the longitudinal polarizations of the W and Z bosons. Such IR pathologies also hinder accurate evaluation of the two-loop threshold corrections to electroweak quantities, such as the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field. However, these divergences are an artifact of perturbation theory, and therefore need to be consistently resummed in order to obtain a IR-safe effective potential. The so-called Two-Particle-Irreducible (2PI) effective action provides a rigorous framework to consistently perform such resummations, without the need to resort to ad hoc subtractions or running into the risk of over-counting contributions. By considering the recently proposed symmetry-improved 2PI formalism, we address the problem of the Goldstone-boson IR divergences of the SM effective potential in the gaugeless...

  8. Performance of biotrickling filters for hydrogen sulfide removal under starvation and shock loads conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-he ZHANG; Xiu-li MENG; Ying WANG; Li-dan LIU

    2009-01-01

    In the industrial operation of biotrickling filters for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) removal, shock loads or starvation was common due to process variations or equipment malfunctions. In this study, effects of starvation and shock loads on the performance of biotrickling filters for H2S removal were investigated. Four experiments were conducted to evaluate the changes of biomass and viable bacteria numbers in the biotrickling filters during a 24-d starvation. Compared to biomass, viable bacteria numbers decreased significantly during the starvation, especially when airflow was maintained in the absence of spray liquid. During the subsequent re-acclimation, all the bioreactors could resume high removal efficiencies within 4 d regardless of the previous starvation conditions. The results show that the re-acclimation time, in the case of biotrickling filters for H2S removal, is mainly controlled by viable H2S oxidizing bacteria numbers. On the other hand, the biotrickling filters can protect against shock loads in inlet fluctuating H2S concentration after resuming normal operation. When the biotrickling filters were supplied with H2S at an input of lower than 1700 mg/m3, their removal efficiencies were nearly 98% regardless of previous H2S input.

  9. Virulence of Entamoeba histolytica is upregulated by short-term glucose starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Velázquez, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    Evaluation of: Tovy A, Hertz R, Siman-Tov R et al. Glucose starvation boosts Entamoeba histolytica virulence. PLoS Negl. Trop. Dis. 5(8), e1247 (2011). Intestinal parasites of the large intestine interact with bacteria and cell debris, and potentially with intestinal epithelium. Entamoeba histolytica lives in the colon and because of unknown reasons, trophozoites become invasive and also differentiate into cysts. In this article, Tovy and colleagues studied the effect of glucose on amoeba starvation for 12 h. In addition, they performed a quantitative proteomic analysis of control and glucose-starved trophozoites and examined the in vitro virulence of some E. histolytica mutants. They found that resistance to heat shock at 42°C, or to oxidative stress with 2.5 mM hydrogen peroxide, is similar in control amoebas or under glucose starvation; however, trophozoite mobility, adhesion to cells, cytopathic activity and hemolytic activity are augmented after the treatment. URE3-BP, KRiP1 and Lgl1 proteins are upregulated while virulence factors amoebapore A and cysteine proteinase A5 are downregulated by glucose starvation. These results suggest that glucose starvation upregulates in vitro E. histolytica virulence but amoebapore A and cysteine proteinase A5 are not essential for the virulence boosting by such treatment. Host nutrients, such as glucose, could regulate parasite in vivo virulence and differentiation.

  10. Weak-Light, Zero to -\\pi Lossless Kerr-Phase Gate in Quantum-well System via Tunneling Interference Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Y L; Wu, J X; Zhu, C J; Xu, J P; Yang, Y P

    2015-01-01

    We examine a Kerr phase gate in a semiconductor quantum well structure based on the tunnelling interference effect. We show that there exist a specific signal field detuning, at which the absorption/amplification of the probe field will be eliminated with the increase of the tunnelling interference. Simultaneously, the probe field will acquire a -\\pi phase shift at the exit of the medium. We demonstrate with numerical simulations that a complete 180^\\circ phase rotation for the probe field at the exit of the medium is achieved, which may result in many applications in information science and telecommunication.

  11. Emerging role of mammalian autophagy in ketogenesis to overcome starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for the survival of lower organisms under conditions of nutrient depletion. However, whether autophagy plays a physiological role in mammals experiencing starvation is unknown. Ketogenesis is critical for overcoming starvation in mammals. We recently revealed that hepatic and renal autophagy are involved in starvation-induced ketogenesis, by utilizing tissue-specific autophagy-deficient mouse models. The liver is the principal organ to regulate ketogenesis, and a deficiency of liver-specific autophagy partially but significantly attenuates starvation-induced ketogenesis. While deficiency of renal-specific autophagy does not affect starvation-induced ketogenesis, mice with deficiency of both liver and kidney autophagy have even lower blood ketone levels and physical activity under starvation conditions than those lacking autophagy in the liver alone. These results suggest that the kidney can compensate for impaired hepatic ketogenesis. Since ketone bodies are catabolized from fatty acids, the uptake of fatty acids, the formation of intracellular lipid droplets, and fatty acid oxidation are critical for ketogenesis. We found that starvation-induced lipid droplet formation is impaired in autophagy-deficient organs. Thus, hepatic and renal autophagy are required for starvation-induced ketogenesis. This process is essential for maintaining systemic energy homeostasis and physical activity during starvation. Our findings provide a novel insight into mammalian autophagy and the physiology of starvation.

  12. The nuclear matter effects in {pi}{sup 0} photoproduction at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, T.E.; Arruda-Neto, J.D.T.; Garcia, C. [University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Physics Institute; Mesa, J. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica e Biofisica; Shtejer, K. [Center of Applied Studies for Nuclear Developments (CEADEN), Havana (Cuba); Dale, D. [Idaho State University (United States); Nakagawa, I. [RIKEN, Wako (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    The in-medium influence on {pi}{sup 0} photoproduction from spin zero nuclei is carefully studied in the GeV range using a straightforward Monte Carlo analysis. The calculation takes into account the relativistic nuclear recoil for coherent mechanisms (electromagnetic and nuclear amplitudes) plus a time dependent multi-collisional intranuclear cascade approach (MCMC) to describe the transport properties of mesons produced in the surroundings of the nucleon. A detailed analysis of the meson energy spectra for the photoproduction on {sup 12}C at 5.5 GeV indicates that both the Coulomb and nuclear coherent events are associated with a small energy transfer to the nucleus (< or {approx} 5 MeV), while the contribution of the nuclear incoherent mechanism is vanishing small within this kinematical range. The angular distributions are dominated by the Primakoff peak at extreme forward angles, with the nuclear incoherent process being the most important contribution above {theta}{sub {pi}}{sup 0} > or {approx} 2{sup 0}. Such consistent Monte Carlo approach provides a suitable method to clean up nuclear backgrounds in some recent high precision experiments, such as the Prim Ex experiment at the Jefferson Laboratory Facility. (author)

  13. Inhibitory effect of some triterpenes from cacti on 32Pi-incorporation into phospholipids of HeLa cells promoted by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, K; Yang, Y; Koyama, K; Takahashi, K; Nishino, H

    1999-05-01

    Seventeen triterpenes isolated from cacti and the 10 derivatives were examined for the inhibition of tumor promoter-induced effects in vitro, such as stimulation of 32Pi-incorporation into phospholipids of cultured cells. Betulinic acid (1), cochalic acid (15), erythrodiol (16), oleanolic acid (21) and queretaroic acid (24) inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulated 32Pi-incorporation into phospholipids of the cultured cells.

  14. Dalitz Plot Analysis of Ds+->pi+pi-pi+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-01-26

    A Dalitz plot analysis of {approx} 13, 000 D{sub s}{sup +} decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} has been performed. A 384 fb{sup -1} data sample, recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring running at center of mass energies near 10.6 GeV, is used. Amplitudes and phases of the intermediate resonances which contribute to this final state are measured. A high precision measurement of the ratio: {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.199 {+-} 0.004 {+-} 0.006 is performed. Using a model independent partial wave analysis the amplitude and phase of the S-wave have been measured.

  15. Effect of Starvation and Re-feeding on Blood Physiological and Non-specific Immune Parameters of Carassius auratus gibelio%饥饿后再投喂对异育银鲫血液生理和非特异性免疫指标的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董学兴; 吕林兰; 黄金田; 王爱民; 於叶兵

    2011-01-01

    The effect of starvation periods and re-feeding on blood physiological and non-specific immune parameters in Carassius auratus gibelio (15.6 ±0.84) were studied. Compared to the control, the content of blood glucose and malondialdehyde (MDA) were significantly decreased during starvation (P<0.01). The starvation led an initial significantly decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity followed by increased. The phosphatase (ACP) activity was not effected in short-term starvation, however prolong the starvation, ACP activity increased, but then sharp declined (P<0.01). The content of blood glucose and MDA, the activity of SOD and ACP were significantly increased in short-term starvation group after re-feeding. The content of blood glucose and Hb, ACP activity also increased, however, SOD activity and content of MDA were significantly declined in middle-term starvation (P<0.05) after re-feeding. The content of blood glucose and MDA were remarkable declined compared to control, but ACP activity was gradually restored to the control level in long-term starvation after re-feeding. The results showed that short-term hunger and then re-feeding could enhance metabolism and non-specific immune function of Carassius auratus gibelio.%对体重(15.6±0.84)g的异育银鲫(Carassius auratus gibelio)进行了不同时间的饥饿处理和再投喂恢复生长试验.研究饥饿和再投喂后对其血液生理指标和非特异性免疫指标的影响.研究发现,饥饿使血糖和MDA含量极显著降低(P<0.01),随饥饿时间的延长,SOD活性显著下降后逐渐升高,短期饥饿对ACP活性无显著影响,进一步延长饥饿时间则先升高后显著下降(P<0.01);恢复投喂后,短期饥饿组血糖浓度、SOD和ACP活性均显著上升,中期饥饿组血糖、血红蛋白含量和ACP活性逐渐上升,SOD活性和MDA含量显著下降(P<0.05),长期饥饿组血糖和MDA含量显著低于对照组(P<0.01),ACP活性逐渐恢复到对照水平.结果表

  16. Study of B0 -> pi0pi0, B+ -> pi+pi0 and B+ -> K+pi0 decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Bailey, S; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bóna, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Borgland, A W; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brochard, F; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bulten, H; Burchat, Patricia R; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Côté, D; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cormack, C M; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Dickopp, M; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Elsen, E E; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Farbin, A; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B J; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J M; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Geddes, N I; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M; Grancagnolo, S; Green, M G; Greene, M G; Grenier, G J; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hart, P A; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hicheur, A; Hill, E J; Hitlin, D G; Höcker, A; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Laplace, S; Latham, T E; Lau, Y P; Lavin, D; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, H; Libby, J; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; LoSecco, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Lü, C; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lyon, A J; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Manfredi, P F; Mangeol, D J J; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, T I; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petrak, S; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Pivk, M; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Re, V; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Rubin, A E; Ryd, A; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sandrelli, F; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Simani, M C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spradlin, P; Stängle, H; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; T'Jampens, S; Tan, P; Tantot, L; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Treadwell, E; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; Del Re, D; La Vaissière, C de

    2004-01-01

    We present updated measurements of the branching fractions for the modes B0->pi0pi0, B+ -> pi+pi0, and B+ -> K+pi0. We also measure the time-integrated asymmetry C_pi0pi0 and the charge asymmetries A_CP(pi+pi0) and A_CP(K+pi0). Based on a sample of approximately 227 million BBar pairs collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, we measure BR(B0 -> pi0pi0) = (1.17 +/- 0.32 +/- 0.10)*10^{-6}, C_pi0pi0 = -0.12 +/- 0.56 +/- 0.06, where the first errors are statistical and the second are systematic. The B0 -> pi0pi0 signal has a significance of 4.9sigma including systematic uncertainties. We also measure BR(B+ -> pi+pi0) = (5.8 +/- 0.6 +/- 0.4)*10^{-6}, A_CP(pi+pi0) = -0.01 +/- 0.10 +/- 0.02, BR(B+ -> K+pi0) = (12.0 +/- 0.7 +/- 0.6)*10^{-6}, A_CP(K+pi0) = 0.06 +/- 0.06 +/- 0.01 . Using related BaBar measurements and isospin relations we find an upper bound on the angle difference |delta| = |alpha - alpha_eff| of 35 degrees at the 90% C.L.

  17. Decay width of $d^*(2380)\\to NN \\pi\\pi$ processes

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Yubing; Shen, Pengnian; Zhang, Zongye

    2016-01-01

    The decay widths of four-body double-pion decays $\\ds\\to pn \\pi^0\\pi^0$, $\\ds\\to pn \\pi^+\\pi^-$, and iso-scalar parts of $\\ds\\to pp \\pi^0\\pi^-$ and $\\ds\\to nn \\pi^+\\pi^0$ are explicitly calculated with the help of the $d^*$ wave function obtained in a chiral SU(3) quark model calculation. The effect of the dynamical structure on $\\ds$'s width is analyzed both in the single $\\Delta\\Delta$ channel and coupled $\\Delta\\Delta$ and $CC$ channel approximations. It is found that in the coupled-channel approximation, the obtained partial decay widths of $\\ds\\to pn \\pi^0\\pi^0$, $\\ds\\to pn \\pi^+\\pi^-$, and those of $d^*$ to the iso-scalar parts of $pp \\pi^0\\pi^-$ and $nn \\pi^+\\pi^0$ are about $7.4$MeV, $16.4$MeV, $3.5$MeV and $3.5$MeV, respectively As a consequence, the total width is about $64.5$MeV. These widths are consistent with those estimated by using the corresponding cross section data in our previous investigation and also the observed data. But in the single $\\Delta\\Delta$ channel approximation, the widths ar...

  18. Analysis of the $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi-$ and $\\pi^+ \\pi^{0}\\pi^- \\pi^{0}$ final states in quasi-real two-photon collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, J; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; De Asmundis, R; Deglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Jin, B N; Jindal, P; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, J; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V; Kraber, M; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Nesterov, S; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A; Razis, P; Rembeczki, S; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Schopper, H; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shumilov, V Shoutko E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Swain, H Suter J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Samuel; Ting, C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, G; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2006-01-01

    The reactions gamma gamma -> pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^- and gamma gamma -> pi^+pi^0pi^-pi^0 are studied with the L3 detector at LEP in a data sample collected at centre-of-mass energies from 161GeV to 209GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 698/pb. A spin-parity-helicity analysis of the rho^0 rho^0 and rho^+ rho^- systems for two-photon centre-of-mass energies between 1GeV and 3GeV shows the dominance of the spin-parity state 2+ with helicity 2. The contribution of 0+ and 0- spin-parity states is also observed, whereas contributions of 2- states and of a state with spin-parity 2+ and zero helicity are found to be negligible.

  19. Effect of starvation on main nutrients of Paddlefish(Polyodon spathula)in different parts%饥饿对匙吻鲟不同部位主要营养成分的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷跃磊; 黄琪琳; 沈硕; 熊善柏; 赵思明

    2011-01-01

    Main nutrients of paddlefish(Polyodon spathula)in back muscle,abdominal muscle,tail muscle,skin and head at pre and post 3 days starvation were compared to investigate the nutrient changes between starvated and control(fresh muscle).Results showed that the moisture content of back muscle and abdominal muscle decreased significantly(P0.05),and moisture content of skin increased significantly(P0.05),while moisture content of head muscle and tail muscle did not change significantly after starvation.Tail muscle indicated an decrease and skin manifested an increase in protein content after starvation,the other parts showed no significant changes between starvated and control.The fat content of all parts were not significantly different after starvation.Total sugar content of skin and total muscle decreased significantly(P0.05),the other parts of paddlefish did not change significantly after starvation.%以匙吻鲟(Polyodon spathula)为对象,比较3d饥饿组和对照组(鲜样)匙吻鲟背部肌肉、腹部肌肉、尾部肌肉、皮和头部主要营养成分的变化。结果表明,匙吻鲟经3d饥饿后,背部肌肉和腹部肌肉的水分含量下降明显(P〈0.05),表皮的水分含量明显上升(P〈0.05),头部和尾部肌肉的水分含量变化不明显;除尾部肌肉的蛋白质含量明显下降和表皮的蛋白质明显上升外(P〈0.05),其他部位变化不大;各部位的脂肪含量没有明显的变化;除表皮和总肌肉的总糖含量下降明显外,其他部位变化不明显。

  20. Mimosine As Well As Serum Starvation Can Be Used for Cell Cycle Synchronization of Sheep Granulosa Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This study was evaluated the effect of different synchronization protocols such as serum starvation for 1–3 days, confluency and chemical inhibitors on synchronization accuracy at G0/G1, apoptosis, and DNA synthesis in sheep granulosa cells. The cells were obtained from ovarian antral follicles of slaughtered sheep and used at first and fifth passages. Flow cytometry analysis showed that confluent cells, serum starvation for 24, 48, and 72 hours, and mimosine treatment significantly increase...

  1. Observation of B+ -> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-) and B+ -> psi (2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M. H.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A. Jr; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; BEACH, LA; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R.B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Romeu, J. Arnau; Artamonov, AY; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S; Back, Jaap Willem; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, MG; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, D.E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, R. J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, J. R.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. H. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, T.F.S.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; COOK, AM; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Sobral, C. M. Costa; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Marinho, F. Da Cunha; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; Francisco, O. De Aguiar; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, Paolo; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suarez, A. Dosil; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Deleage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, Martin A.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, SIdi Ould; Esen, S.; Evans, Helen M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Fazzini, D.; FERGUSON, D; Prieto, A. Fernandez; Ferrari, F; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Lima, V. Franco; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Farber, CR; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Martin, L. M. Garcia; Pardinas, J. Garcia; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E. G; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Cazon, B. R. Gruberg; Grunberg, O.; Gushchin, EM; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Gobel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, D.B.; Han, Xiaoyan; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, Christine J.; Hatch, M.; He, J. J.; Head, T.; Heister, J. A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, Lee; Morata, J. A. Hernando; Van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; HILL, D; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, Fuman; John, Jestinah M. Mahachie; Johnson, D; Jones, Jonathan C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.

    2017-01-01

    The decays B+-> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-) and B+ -> psi(2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) are observed for the first time using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment in proton- proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The

  2. $B_{s,d} \\to \\pi\\pi,\\pi K, KK$: Status and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Several years ago, it was pointed out that the U-spin-related decays $B_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B_s\\to K^+K^-$ and $B_d\\to\\pi^\\mp K^\\pm$, $B_s\\to \\pi^\\pm K^\\mp$ offer interesting strategies for the extraction of the angle gamma of the unitarity triangle. Using the first results from the Tevatron on the $B_s$ decays and the B-factory data on $B_{u,d}$ modes, we compare the determinations of gamma from both strategies, study the sensitivity on U-spin-breaking effects, discuss the resolution of discrete ambiguities, predict observables that were not yet measured but will be accessible at LHCb, explore the extraction of the width difference $\\Delta\\Gamma_s$ from untagged $B_s\\to K^+K^-$ rates, and address the impact of new physics. The data for the $B_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B_s\\to K^+K^-$ system favour the BaBar measurement of direct CP violation in $B_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$, which will be used in the numerical analysis, and result in a fortunate situation, yielding $\\gamma=(66.6^{+4.3+4.0}_{-5.0-3.0})^\\circ$, where the latter err...

  3. 饥饿和再投喂对中间球海胆代谢和生长的影响%Effects of starvation and refeeding on metabolism and growth in sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦艳杰; 李霞; 吴立新; 周一兵

    2011-01-01

    The sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus intermedins) with body weight of (5. 72±0. 23) g was starved for 0 (control group, C) , 3 d (S3) , 6 d (S6) , 9 d (S9) and 12 d (S12) , and then re-fed until the 30th d to evaluate the effects of starvation on growth and metabolism in the sea urchin. The wet weight of whole body and gonad, special growth rate of body and gonad, the oxygen consumption rate, ammonia excretion rate and the food conversion efficiency were measured and calculated every five days in control group, on the day at the end of starvation, and 2,4,8 and 12 days after re-fed in four starved groups. Results showed that there were no significant differences in body wet weight between S3, S6 and C groups at the end of the experiment, but significantly lower in S9 and S12 than those in the control. There was significantly lower in gonad wet weight in S6, S9 and S12 compared to C and S3 at the end. The sea urchin in S6, S9 and S12 showed a peak in special growth rate in body and gonad after re-fed and lasted 3-5 days. The oxygen consumption rate and ammonia excretion rate were found to decrease for 4-8 days in S6, S9 and S12 at the beginning of re-fed. The food conversion efficiencies were increased in varying degrees after re-fed in the four experimental groups. It is indicated that the food deprivation for 6 d, 9 d and 12 d leads to part compensatory growth in the sea urchin, which are contributed in the significant decrease in metabolic rate and the increase in the food conversion efficiency during the initial stage of refeeding.%将体质量为(5.72±0.23)g的中间球海胆Strongylocentrotus intermedius分别饥饿0、3、6、9、12 d(分别记为C、S3、S6、S9、S12)后再饱食投喂至30 d,研究了饥饿与再投喂过程中海胆的代谢率、生长率、摄食率、食物转化率的变化.结果表明:在饥饿和再投喂过程中,S3组各指标与对照组无明显差异;S6、S9、S12组在恢复投喂过程中的一段时间内代谢率均维

  4. Measurement of the matrix elements for the decays eta -> pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) and eta/eta ' -> pi(0)pi(0)pi(0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X.C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Tiemens, M.

    2015-01-01

    Based on a sample of 1.31 x 10(9) J/psi events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, Dalitz plot analyses of selected 79,625 eta -> pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) events, 33,908 eta -> pi(0)pi(0)pi(0) events, and 1,888 eta' -> pi(0)pi(0)pi(0) events are performed. The measured matrix elements

  5. Measurement of the matrix elements for the decays eta -> pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) and eta/eta ' -> pi(0)pi(0)pi(0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X.C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Tiemens, M.

    2015-01-01

    Based on a sample of 1.31 x 10(9) J/psi events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, Dalitz plot analyses of selected 79,625 eta -> pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) events, 33,908 eta -> pi(0)pi(0)pi(0) events, and 1,888 eta' -> pi(0)pi(0)pi(0) events are performed. The measured matrix elements

  6. The effect of changes in {pi}-conjugated terthienyl systems using thienyl and ethylenedioxybenzene functionalized thieno[3,4-b]pyrazine precursors: Multicolored low band gap polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarkuc, Simge; Unver, Elif Kose [Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science and Technology, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Udum, Yasemin Arslan [Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Advanced Technologies, Gazi University, 06570 Ankara (Turkey); Tanyeli, Cihangir [Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science and Technology, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Toppare, Levent, E-mail: toppare@metu.edu.t [Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science and Technology, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-10-01

    New classes of thieno[3,4-b]pyrazines containing thienyl and ethylenedioxy phenyl units on electron-withdrawing moieties of {pi}-conjugated terthienyl were synthesized. The effect of structural differences on electrochemical and optoelectronic properties of the resulting polymers was investigated. Changes in the electronic nature of the functional groups enable to tune the electrochemical properties of the {pi}-conjugated terthienyl monomers by lowering oxidation potential from 0.62 V (DTTP) to 0.56 V (DBTP). Spectroelectrochemical analyses revealed that the neutral polymer (PDBTP) is dark green in its neutral state revealing {pi}-{pi}* transitions in two well-separated bands at 410 and 751 nm. The electronic band gap of polymer, defined as the onset of the {pi}-{pi}* transition, is found to be 1.0 eV. Using the thienyl unit instead of ethylenedioxy phenyl, a red shift in the band gap (0.95 eV) is observed. The polymer, PDTTP, exhibits multicolor electrochromism and can be switched between a dark yellow neutral state, a green intermediate state, and a brown oxidized state. PDBTP also shows a multicolored electrochromic behavior with three distinct states: dark green at the neutral state, a brown intermediate state, and a brown-violet oxidized state.

  7. Synergistic anti-tumor effect of 17AAG with the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 on human melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, R; Morchon, E; Martinez-Argudo, I; Serrano, R

    2017-10-10

    Drug resistance by MAPK signaling recovery or activation of alternative signaling pathways, such as PI3K/AKT/mTOR, is an important factor that limits the long-term efficacy of targeted therapies in melanoma patients. In the present study, we investigated the phospho-proteomic profile of RTKs and its correlation with downstream signaling pathways in human melanoma. We found that tyrosine kinase receptors expression correlated with the expression of pivotal downstream components of the RAS/RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways in melanoma cell lines and tumors. We also found high expression of HSP90 and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway proteins, 4EBP1 and AKT compared with healthy tissue and this correlated with poor overall survival of melanoma patients. The combination of the HSP90 inhibitor 17AAG with the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 showed a synergistic activity decreasing melanoma cell growth, inducing apoptosis and targeting simultaneously the MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways. These results demonstrate that the combination of HSP90 and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors could be an effective therapeutic strategy that target the main survival pathways in melanoma and must be considered to overcome resistance to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A conserved two-component signal transduction system controls the response to phosphate starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Martin, Pablo; Fernández, Matilde; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; MacSharry, John; Zomer, Aldert; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2012-08-01

    This work reports on the identification and molecular characterization of the two-component regulatory system (2CRS) PhoRP, which controls the response to inorganic phosphate (P(i)) starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. The response regulator PhoP was shown to bind to the promoter region of pstSCAB, specifying a predicted P(i) transporter system, as well as that of phoU, which encodes a putative P(i)-responsive regulatory protein. This interaction is assumed to cause transcriptional modulation under conditions of P(i) limitation. Our data suggest that the phoRP genes are subject to positive autoregulation and, together with pstSCAB and presumably phoU, represent the complete regulon controlled by the phoRP-encoded 2CRS in B. breve UCC2003. Determination of the minimal PhoP binding region combined with bioinformatic analysis revealed the probable recognition sequence of PhoP, designated here as the PHO box, which together with phoRP is conserved among many high-GC-content Gram-positive bacteria. The importance of the phoRP 2CRS in the response of B. breve to P(i) starvation conditions was confirmed by analysis of a B. breve phoP insertion mutant which exhibited decreased growth under phosphate-limiting conditions compared to its parent strain UCC2003.

  9. Resonance Production and $\\pi\\pi$ S-wave in $\\pi^- + p \\to \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+ + p_{recoil}$ at 190 GeV/$\\it c$

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C; Alexeev, M G; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Andrieux, V; Anosov, V; Augustyniak, W; Austregesilo, A; Azevedo, C D R; Badełek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Beck, R; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bicker, K; Bielert, E R; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bodlak, M; Boer, M; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bressan, A; Büchele, M; Burtin, E; Chang, W-C; Chiosso, M; Choi, I; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Curiel, Q; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dünnweber, W; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger jr , M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Fuchey, E; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Giordano, F; Gnesi, I; Gorzellik, M; Grabmüller, S; Grasso, A; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Grube, B; Grussenmeyer, T; Guskov, A; Haas, F; Hahne, D; von Harrach, D; Hashimoto, R; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; d’Hose, N; Hsieh, C-Y; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, A; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Joosten, R; Jörg, P; Kabuß, E; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Königsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Krämer, M; Kremser, P; Krinner, F; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuchinski, N; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Kurjata, R P; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levillain, M; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Longo, R; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makins, N; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Marchand, C; Marianski, B; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matoušek, J; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Miyachi, Y; Montuenga, P; Nagaytsev, A; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Nový, J; Nowak, W-D; Nukazuka, G; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Orlov, I; Ostrick, M; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Peng, J-C; Pereira, F; Pešek, M; Peshekhonov, D V; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Regali, C; Reicherz, G; Riedl, C; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Rychter, A; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, C; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schlüter, T; Schmidt, K; Schmieden, H; Schönning, K; Schopferer, S; Selyunin, A; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sirtl, S; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Suzuki, H; Szabelski, A; Szameitat, T; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Thibaud, F; Tosello, F; Tskhay, V; Uhl, S; Veloso, J; Virius, M; Weisrock, T; Wilfert, M; ter Wolbeek, J; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zink, A

    2015-01-01

    The COMPASS collaboration has collected the currently largest data set on diffractively produced $\\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ final states using a negative pion beam of 190 GeV/$\\it c$ momentum impinging on a stationary proton target. This data set allows for a systematic partial-wave analysis in 100 bins of three-pion mass, 0.5 GeV/$\\it c^2$ < $m_{3\\pi}$ < 2.5 GeV/$\\it c^2$ and in 11 bins of the reduced four-momentum transfer squared, 0.1 (GeV/$\\it c$)$^2$ < t$ ^{\\prime}$ < 1.0 (GeV/$\\it c$)$^2$. This two-dimensional analysis offers sensitivity to genuine one-step resonance production, i.e. the production of a state followed by its decay, as well as to more complex dynamical effects in nonresonant $3\\pi$ production. In this paper, we present detailed studies on selected $3\\pi$ partial waves with $J^{PC} = 0^{-+}$, $1^{++}$, $2^{-+}$, $2^{++}$, and $4^{++}$. In these waves, we observe the well-known ground-state mesons as well as a new narrow axial-vector meson ${\\it a}_1$(1420) decaying into ${\\it f}_0$(980...

  10. Resolution to the B -> pi K puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Li, H; Sanda, A I; Li, Hsiang-nan; Mishima, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the important next-to-leading-order contributions to the B -> pi K, pi pi decays from the vertex corrections, the quark loops, and the magnetic penguins in the perturbative QCD approach. It is found that the latter two reduce the leading-order penguin amplitudes by about 10%, and modify only the B -> pi K branching ratios. The main effect of the vertex corrections is to increase the small color-suppressed tree amplitude by a factor of 3, which then resolves the large difference between the direct CP asymmetries of the B^0 -> pi^\\mp K^\\pm and B^\\pm -> pi^0 K^\\pm modes. The puzzle from the large B^0 -> pi^0 pi^0 branching ratio still remains.

  11. Resolution of the B -> pi pi, pi K puzzles

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hsiang-nan

    2009-01-01

    We show that there exist uncanceled soft divergences in the k_T factorization for nonfactorizable amplitudes of two-body nonleptonic B meson decays, similar to those identified in hadron-hadron collisions. Viewing the special role of the pion as a q qbar bound state and as a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson, we associate a soft factor with it in the perturbative QCD formalism. This soft factor enhances the nonfactorizable color-suppressed tree amplitudes, such that the branching ratios B(pi^0 pi^0) and B(pi^0 rho^0) are increased under the constraint of the B(rho^0 rho^0) data, the difference between the direct CP asymmetries A_{CP}(pi^\\mp K^\\pm) and A_{CP}(pi^0 K^\\pm) is enlarged, and the mixing-induced CP asymmetry S_{pi^0 K_S} is reduced. That is, the known pi pi and pi K puzzles can be resolved simultaneously.

  12. pi pi correlations in gamma+A reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messchendorp, JG

    2003-01-01

    Preliminary differential cross-sections of the reactions A(gamma,pi(0)pi(0)) and A(gamma,pi(0)pi(+) + pi(0)pi(-)) with A = H-1, C-12, and Pb-nat are presented. A significant nuclear-mass dependence of the pipi invariant-mass distribution is found in the pi(0)pi(0) channel. The dependence is not obse

  13. Involvement of PI3-K in neuroprotective effects of the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 analogue - PRI-2191.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulska, Magdalena; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Kutner, Andrzej; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Kubera, Marta; Jaworska-Feil, Lucylla; Lasoń, Władysław

    2006-01-01

    The active form of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) prevents neuronal damage in vitro and in vivo , however, it induces also hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. Side-chain-modified analogues of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), which show low calcemic activity, may be potentially useful in the treatment of some neurodegenerative diseases. Previously, we have found that PRI-2191 more potently than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) protects human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells against hydrogen-peroxide-induced toxicity. In the present study, we evaluated effects of two other 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) analogues - PRI-1890 and PRI-1901 on the neuronal degeneration in the same cell model. In line with the previous study, 24-h incubation with hydrogen peroxide (0.5 mM) was toxic to cells, as evidenced by an enhanced efflux of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, and these effects were prevented by PRI-1890 and PRI-1901 at concentration of 5, 50 and 500 nM. Comparing the neuroprotective effects of secosteroids, we found that all three analogues were efficient at lower concentration than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and among them the PRI-2191 showed the most evident concentration-dependent effect. In the second part of this study, an involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), kinases which play a crucial role in neurodegenerative processes, in neuroprotective action of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and its the most potent analogue PRI-2191 has been investigated. The inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-MAPK (SP600125, 1 microM), inhibitor of p38-MAPK (SB-203580, 1 and 10 microM) and inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-MAPK (PD-98059, 15 and 30 microM) attenuated the hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity. Moreover, PD-98059 (30 microM) enhanced neuroprotective effects of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) but not that of PRI-2191. In contrast, the inhibitor of PI3-K (wortmannin, 10, 100 nM) did not affect hydrogen

  14. Neuroprotective effects of salidroside through PI3K/Akt pathway activation in Alzheimer’s disease models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; Wang, Ying; Li, Hui; Xiong, Ran; Zhao, Zongbo; Chu, Xingkun; Li, Qiongqiong; Sun, Suya; Chen, Shengdi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by deposits of aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain parenchyma. Despite considerable research to elucidate the pathological mechanisms and identify therapeutic strategies for AD, effective treatments are still lacking. In the present study, we found that salidroside (Sal), a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., can protect against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in four transgenic Drosophila AD models. Both longevity and locomotor activity were improved in Sal-fed Drosophila. Sal also decreased Aβ levels and Aβ deposition in brain and ameliorated toxicity in Aβ-treated primary neuronal culture. The neuroprotective effect of Sal was associated with upregulated phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling. Our findings identify a compound that may possess potential therapeutic benefits for AD and other forms of neurodegeneration. PMID:27103787

  15. Extraction of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ Subsystem in Diffractively Produced $\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Krinner, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN has collected a large data sample of 50 million diffractively produced $\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ events using a $190\\,$GeV$/c$ negatively charged hadron beam. The partial-wave analysis (PWA) of these high-precision data reveals previously unseen details. The PWA, which is currently limited by systematic uncertainties, is based on an isobar model, where multi-particle decays are described as subsequent two-body decays and where a prior-knowledge parametrization for the intermediate two-pion resonances has to be assumed -- usually a Breit-Wigner amplitude -- thus increasing systematic uncertainties, due to the concrete choice of the parametrization. We present a novel method, which allows to extract isobar amplitudes directly from the data in a less biased way. The focus lies on the scalar $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ subsystem, where a previous analysis found a signal for a new axial-vector state $a_1(1420)$ decaying into $f_0(980)\\pi$.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effect of honokiol is mediated by PI3K/Akt pathway suppression1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung Hun KIM; Jae Youl CHO

    2008-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of honokiol on various inflammatory events mediated by monocytes/macrophages (U937/RAW264.7 cells)and lymphocytes (splenic lymphocytes and CTLL-2 cells) and their putative ac-tion mechanism. Methods: In order to investigate the regulatory effects, various cell lines and primary cells (U937, RAW264.7, CTLL-2 cells, and splenic lymphocytes) were employed and various inflammatory events, such as the pro-duction of inflammatory mediators, cell adhesion, cell proliferation, and the early signaling cascade, were chosen. Results: Honokiol strongly inhibited various inflammatory responses, such as: (ⅰ) the upregulation of nitric oxide (NO), pros-taglandin.E2 and TNF-α production and costimulatory molecule CD80 induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS); (ⅱ) the functional activation of β1-integrin (CD29) as-sessed by U937 cell-cell and cell-fibronectin adhesions; (ⅲ) the enhancement of lymphocytes and CD8+CTLL-2 cell proliferation stimulated by LPS, phytohemaglutinin A (PHA), and concanavalin A or interleukin (IL)-2; and (ⅳ) the transcriptional upregulation of inducible NO synthase, TNF-α, cyclooxygenase-2, IL-12, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. These anti-inflammatory effects of honokiol seem to be mediated by interrupting the early activated intra-cellular signaling molecule phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, but not Src, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38, according to pharmacological, biochemical, and functional analyses. Conclusion: These results suggest that honokiol may act as a potent anti-inflammatory agent with multipotential activities due to an inhibitory effect on the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  17. The Challenge of Appropriate Identification and Treatment of Starvation, Sarcopenia, and Cachexia: A Survey of Australian Dietitians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Yaxley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is an umbrella term that includes starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia; however, differentiating between these terms is infrequent in clinical practice. Given that the effectiveness of treatment depends on the aetiology of unintentional weight loss, it is important that clinicians are aware of the defining characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine whether Australian dietitians understand and use the terms starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia and provide targeted treatment strategies accordingly. Members of the Dietitians Association of Australia were surveyed to gain information on practices and attitudes to diagnosis and treatment of adult malnutrition. In addition, three case studies were provided to examine understanding of starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia. 221 dietitians accessed the survey. 81 respondents (43% indicated the use of at least one alternate term (starvation, sarcopenia, and/or cachexia. Muscle wasting was the most commonly used diagnostic criterion. High-energy high-protein diet was the most common therapy prescribed. Correct diagnoses for case studies were recorded by 6% of respondents for starvation, 46% for sarcopenia, and 21% for cachexia. There is a need for increased awareness of the existence of starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia amongst Australian dietitians and research into appropriate methods of identification and treatment for each condition.

  18. Search for $CP$ violation in $D^{0} \\to \\pi^{-} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    We perform the first model-independent search for $CP$ violating variations in the phase space distribution of a four-body decay. We study the singly Cabibbo suppressed decay $D^{0} \\to \\pi^{-} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$, using approximately 180k signal events in LHCb's 2011 dataset of 1.0 fb^{-1}. No evidence for $CP$ violation is observed.

  19. Direct CP violation in B{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}: determination of {alpha} without discrete ambiguity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, O. [Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, and Special Research Center for the Subatomic Structure of Matter, University of Adelaide, 5005, Adelaide (Australia); Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, 24 avenue des Landais, 63177, Aubiere Cedex (France); Guo, X.H.; Thomas, A.W. [Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, and Special Research Center for the Subatomic Structure of Matter, University of Adelaide, 5005, Adelaide (Australia)

    2003-11-01

    Direct CP violation in the hadronic decays B{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} is investigated near the peak of the {rho}{sup 0}, taking into account the effect of {rho}- {omega} mixing. The branching ratios for the processes B{sup {+-}}{sup ,0} {yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{sup ,0}{pi}{sup {+-}}{sup ,0} and B{sup -}{yields}{omega}{pi}{sup -} are calculated as well. We find that the CP violating asymmetry is strongly dependent on the CKM matrix elements. For a fixed N{sub c}{sup eff}, the CP violating asymmetry, a{sub CP}, has a maximum of order -40% to - 70% for B{yields}{rho}{sup 0}({omega}) {pi}{sup 0} when the invariant mass of the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} pair is in the vicinity of the {omega} resonance. The sensitivity of the asymmetry to N{sub c}{sup eff} is small in that case. Moreover, we find that in the range of N{sub c}{sup eff} which is allowed by the most recent experimental branching ratios from the BABAR, BELLE and CLEO Collaborations, the sign of sin {delta} is always positive. Thus, a measurement of direct CP violation in the decays B{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} would remove the mod ({pi}) ambiguity in the determination of the CP violating phase angle {alpha}. (orig.)

  20. Direct CP violation in B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}. Determination of {alpha} without discrete ambiguity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, O. [Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics and Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005 (Australia)]|[Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, IN2P3/CNRS, 24 avenue des Landais, Universite Blaise Pascal, F-63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Guo, X-H.; Thomas, A.W. [Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics and Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005 (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    Direct CP violation in the hadronic decays B-bar{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} is investigated near the peak of the {rho}{sup 0} taking into account the effect of {rho} - {omega} mixing. Branching ratio for processes B{sup {+-}}{sup ,0} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{sup ,0}{pi}{sup {+-}}{sup ,0} and B{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -} are calculated as well. We find that the CP violation asymmetry is strongly dependent on the CKM matrix elements. For a fixed N{sub c}{sup eff}, the CP violation asymmetry, a, has a maximum of order - 40% to - 70% for B-bar{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}({omega}){pi}{sup 0} when the invariant mass of the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} pair is in the vicinity of the {omega} resonance. The sensitivity of the asymmetry to N{sub c}{sup eff} is small in that case. Moreover, we find that in the range of N{sub c}{sup eff} which is allowed by the most recent experimental branching ratios from the BABAR, BELLE and CLEO Collaborations, the sign of sin{delta} is always positive. Thus, a measurement of direct CP violation in decays B-bar{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} would remove the mod({pi}) ambiguity in the determination of the CP violating phase angle {alpha}. (authors)

  1. Effects of growth phase and nitrogen starvation on expression of fatty acid desaturases and fatty acid composition of Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerlimann, Roger; Steinig, Eike J; Loxton, Heather; Zenger, Kyall R; Jerry, Dean R; Heimann, Kirsten

    2014-07-15

    Very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFAs) are important dietary requirements for maintaining human health. Many marine microalgae are naturally high in ω-3 VLC-PUFAs, however, the molecular mechanisms underpinning fatty acid (FA) desaturation and elongation in algae are poorly understood. An advanced molecular understanding would facilitate improvements of this nascent industry. We aimed to investigate expression responses of four front-end fatty acid desaturase genes and downstream effects on FA profiles to nitrogen limitation and cultivation growth stage in Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO). Cultures were grown in nitrogen-replete and -deplete medium; samples were harvested during logarithmic, late logarithmic and stationary growth phases to analyse FA content/composition and gene expression of ∆(6)-, ∆(8)-, ∆(5)- and ∆(4)-desaturases (d6FAD (putative), d8FAD, d5FAD and d4FAD, respectively). d6FAD (putative) exhibited no differential expression, while d8FAD, d5FAD and d4FAD were significantly upregulated during logarithmic growth of nutrient-replete cultures, coinciding with rapid cell division. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that expression of some FADs in I. aff. galbana varies with culture age and nitrogen status which has downstream consequences on FA desaturation levels. This has implications for the commercial production of VLC-PUFAs where a trade-off between total lipid yield and VLC-PUFAs has to be made.

  2. Resonances in the System of Pi+Pi- -- Mesons from the Reaction np->npPi+Pi- at Pn=5.20GeV/c: Search, Results of Direct Observations, Interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Troyan, Yu. A.; Plekhanov, E. B.; Pechenov, V. N.; Troyan, A. Yu.; Beljaev, A. V.; Jerusalimov, A. P.; Aracelian, S. G.

    2004-01-01

    Ten resonances were found in the mass spectrum of pi+pi- -system from the reaction np->nppi+pi- in np-interactions at Pn=5.20 GeV/c in the 1-m HBC of LHE JINR by using the criterion cos(teta)[c.m.c.] p>0. Such effects were not found in pi-pi0 - combinations from the reaction np->pppi-pi0. Therefore, it is necessary to attribute the value of isotopic spin I = 0 to the resonances found in the mass spectrum of the pi+pi- -system. The spin was estimated for the most statistically provided resonan...

  3. $K \\to \\pi \\pi \\pi \\gamma$ in chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, G; Isidori, Gino; Neufeld, H

    1996-01-01

    We present a complete analysis of K -> 3 pi gamma decays to O(p^4) in the low-energy expansion of the Standard Model. We employ the notion of "generalized bremsstrahlung" to take full advantage of experimental information on the corresponding non-radiative K -> 3 pi decays.

  4. [Effects of acupuncture on PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in rats with premature ovarian failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimin; Yu, Bin; Chen, Jia; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wang Jiali; Huang, Fasen; Lin, Yuee; Wang, Mengwei; Zhang, Yupei; Wei, Bo

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effects of acupuncture and medication on PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in rats with premature ovarian failure. Ten of fifty SPF-grade female SD rats were randomly selected into a normal group, and the remaining 40 rats were treated with intraperitoneal injection of cyclophospha mide (30 mg/kg) for consecutive 5 days to establish rat model of premature ovarian failure. Thirty five successful rat models were randomly divided into a model group (9 cases), a medication group (9 cases), an acupuncture group A (9 cases) and an acupuncture group B (8 cases). The rats in the model group and normal group did not receive any treatment. The rats in the medication group were treated with intragastric administration of diethylstil bestrol, once a day. The rats in the acupuncture group A and acupuncture group B were respectively treated with acupuncture at different acupoints, twice a day. All the treatment was given for 4 weeks. After the treatment, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to test the levels of estradiol (E2), progesterone (P), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteotropic hormone (LH). The ovarian tissue sample was processed with hematoxylin eosin (HE) staining as well as RNA and protein extraction to test the mRNA expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), estrogen receptor beta (ERP), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/serine/threonine kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). High-dose short-term in- tervention of cyclophosphamide could establish rat model of premature ovarian failure with a successful rate of 87.5%. Compared with the normal group, the vaginal smear in the model group was featured with signs of estro gen deficiency, early-follicle reduction, structural damage to the follicle, and reducing number of mature follicles; the level of E2 was significantly reduced (Pacupuncture groups, the levels of E2 was obviously increased (all Pacupuncture groups and medication group

  5. Determination of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering lengths from measurement of $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atom lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; Benayoun, M; Benelli, A; Berka, Z; Brekhovskikh, V; Caragheorgheopol, G; Cechak, T; Chiba, M; Chliapnikov, P V; Ciocarlan, C; Constantinescu, S; Costantini, S; Curceanu, C; Doskarova, P; Dreossi, D; Drijard, D; Dudarev, A; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Fungueiriño Pazos, J L; Gallas Torreira, M; Gerndt, J; Gianotti, P; Goldin, D; Gomez, F; Gorin, A; Gorchakov, O; Guaraldo, C; Gugiu, M; Hansroul, M; Hons, Z; Hosek, R; Iliescu, M; Karpukhin, V; Kluson, J; Kobayashi, M; Kokkas, P; Komarov, V; Kruglov, V; Kruglova, L; Kulikov, A; Kuptsov, A; Kuroda, K I; Lamberto, A; Lanaro, A; Lapshin, V; Lednicky, R; Leruste, P; Levi Sandri, P; Lopez Aguera, A; Lucherini, V; Maki, T; Manuilov, I; Marin, J; Narjoux, J L; Nemenov, L; Nikitin, M; Nunez Pardo, T; Okada, K; Olchevskii, V; Pazos, A; Pentia, M; Penzo, A; Perreau, J M; Plo, M; Ponta, T; Rappazzo, G F; Riazantsev, A; Rodriguez, J M; Rodriguez Fernandez, A; Romero Vidal, A; Ronjin, V.M.; Rykalin, V; Saborido, J; Santamarina, C; Schacher, J; Schuetz, C; Sidorov, A; Smolik, J; Takeutchi, F; Tarasov, A; Tauscher, L; Tobar, M J; Trojek, T; Trusov, S; Utkin, V; Vazquez Doce, O; Vlachos, S; Voskresenskaya, O; Vrba, T; Willmott, C; Yazkov, V; Yoshimura, Y; Zhabitsky, M; Zrelov, P

    2011-01-01

    The DIRAC experiment at CERN has achieved a sizeable production of $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atoms and has significantly improved the precision on its lifetime determination. From a sample of 21227 atomic pairs, a 4% measurement of the S-wave $\\pi\\pi$ scattering length difference $|a_0-a_2| = (.0.2533^{+0.0080}_{-0.0078}|_\\mathrm{stat}.{}^{+0.0078}_{-0.0073}|_\\mathrm{syst})M_{\\pi^+}^{-1}$ has been attained, providing an important test of Chiral Perturbation Theory.

  6. The effect of Liuwei Dihuang decoction on PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in liver of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bing; Wu, Qinxuan; Zeng, Chengxi; Zhang, Jiani; Cao, Luting; Xiao, Zizeng; Yang, Menglin

    2016-11-04

    Liuwei Dihaung decoction (LWDHT) is a well-known classic traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of six herbs including Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch.(family: Scrophulariaceae), Cornus officinalis Sieb.(family: Cornaceae), Dioscorea opposite Thunb.(family: Dioscoreaceae), Alisma orientale(G. Samuelsson) Juz (family: Alismataceae), Poria cocos (Schw.) Wolf (family: Polyporaceae) and Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews (family: Paeoniaceae). It has been used in the treatment of many types of diseases with signs of deficiency of Yin in the kidneys in China clinically. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of Liuwei dihuang decoction on PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in liver of T2DM rats with insulin resistance. T2DM model was induced in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats by high sugar and high fat diets combined with small dose of streptozocin (STZ) injection. The successful T2DM rats were randomly allocated three group--vehicle group, positive control group and Liuwei Dihuang decoction group. After 12-weeks treatment with distilled water, rosiglitazone and LWDHT by intragastric administration respectively, the rats were put to death in batches. The variance of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and fasting insulin (FINS) in serum were determined, the pathological changes of each rats' liver were observed by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, the expression of insulin receptor substrate 2(IRS2), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinas B (Akt) involving the canonical PI3K/Akt signaling pathway were detected by Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (RT-PCR), and the expression level of IRS2, PI3K, Akt protein and phosphorylated IRS2, PI3K, Akt protein were evaluated by Western Blot. All the data were analyzed by SPSS 17.0. Four weeks of treatment with LWDHT could significantly decrease the level of FBG and FINS in serum, improve the cellular morphology of liver, kidney, pancreas tissue, and the expression of IRS2, PI3K, Akt mRNA and phosphorylated IRS2, PI3K, Akt

  7. On the pi pi continuum in the nucleon form factors and the proton radius puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Hoferichter, M; de Elvira, J Ruiz; Hammer, H -W; Meißner, U -G

    2016-01-01

    We present an improved determination of the $\\pi\\pi$ continuum contribution to the isovector spectral functions of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. Our analysis includes the most up-to-date results for the $\\pi\\pi\\to\\bar N N$ partial waves extracted from Roy-Steiner equations, consistent input for the pion vector form factor, and a thorough discussion of isospin-violating effects and uncertainty estimates. As an application, we consider the $\\pi\\pi$ contribution to the isovector electric and magnetic radii by means of sum rules, which, in combination with the accurately known neutron electric radius, are found to slightly prefer a small proton charge radius.

  8. Huge right-handed current effects in B->K*(K pi)l+l- in supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunghi, E.; /Fermilab; Matias, J.; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2006-12-01

    Transverse asymmetries in the decay B {yields} K*(K{pi}){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} are an extremely sensitive probe of right-handed flavor-changing neutral currents. They show how to include the contribution from the chiral partner of the electromagnetic operator on the transverse asymmetries at NLO in QCD factorization. They then consider supersymmetric models with non-minimal flavor violation in the down-squark sector. They include all the relevant experimental constraints and present a numerical formula for B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} that takes into account the most recent NNLO calculations. they show that the flavor-changing parameters of these models are poorly constrained by present data and allow for large effects on the transverse asymmetries that they consider.

  9. Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Effect of Apocynum venetum Leaf Extract via Src/PI3K/Akt Signalling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Siang Lau

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Botanical herbs are consumed globally not only as an essential diet but also as medicines or as functional/recreational food supplements. The extract of the Apocynum venetum leaves (AVLE, also known as Luobuma, exerts its antihypertensive effect via dilating the blood vessels in an endothelium- and concentration-dependent manner with optimal effect seen at as low as 10 µg/mL. A commercial Luoboma “antihypertensive tea” is available commercially in the western province of China. The present study seeks to investigate the underlying cellular mechanisms of the nitric oxide (NO-releasing property of AVLE in rat aortas and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by AVLE was assessed in organ chambers in the presence or absence of polyethyleneglycol catalase (PP2, 20 µM; inhibitor of Src kinase, wortmannin (30 nM and LY294002 (20 µM; PI3 (phosphatidylinositol3-Kinase inhibitor, NG-nitro-l-arginine (L-NAME, 100 µM; endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (eNOS and ODQ (1 µM; soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. Total nitrite and nitrate (NOx level and protein expression of p-Akt and p-eNOS were measured. AVLE-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was reduced by PP2, wortmannin and LY294002 and abolished by L-NAME and ODQ. AVLE significantly increased total NOx level in rat aortas and in HUVECs compared to control. It also instigated phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in cultured HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner and this was markedly suppressed by PP2, wortmannin and LY294002. AVLE also inhibited superoxide generated from both NADPH oxidase and xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. Taken together, AVLE causes endothelium-dependent NO mediated relaxations of rat aortas through Src/PI3K/Akt dependent NO signalling pathway and possesses superoxide scavenging activity.

  10. Zinc deficiency (ZD) without starvation affects thyroid hormone metabolism of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukaski, H.C.; Smith, S.M.; Hall, C.B.; Bucher, D.R. (Dept. of Agriculture, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Young rats fed diets severely deficient in Zn exhibit impaired growth and endocrine function. These hormone effects may be confounded by cyclical feeding and starvation. To examine the effects of zinc deficiency (ZD) with and without starvation, 40 male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a semipurified diet containing all essential nutrients and 30 ppm Zn until they weighed 150 g, then were matched by weight into four groups and were fed one of the following diets for 28d: ad lib control Zn diet, marginal ZD diet, severe ZD diet, and C diet pair-fed (PF) in amounts consumed by matched ZD1 rat. Food intake was depressed in ZD1; body weights were reduced in ZD1 and PF. There was no difference in either food intake or weight gain between C and ZD6. ZD reduced liver and femur Zn concentrations. Plasma thyroxine (T{sub 4}) concentration was greater in ZD6 then ZD1 or PF, but less than C; triodothyronine concentration was less in PF than C, but similar to ZD1 and ZD6. Hepatic T{sub 4}-5{prime}-deiodinase activity was greater in ZD6 than ZD1 or PF, but less than C. These findings indicate that altered thyroid hormone metabolism of severe ZD is related to Zn intake and starvation, whereas ZD uncomplicated by starvation affects peripheral deiodination of T{sub 4}, and suggests altered rates of thyroid hormone synthesis or degradation.

  11. Dynamics of the pi(-)p-->pi(0)pi(0)n reaction for p(pi(-))<750 MeV/c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, K; Comfort, J R; Allgower, C E; Bekrenev, V; Berger, E; Briscoe, W J; Clajus, M; Draper, B; Grosnick, D; Isenhower, D; Knecht, N; Koetke, D; Koulbardis, A; Kozlenko, N; Kruglov, S; Lolos, G J; Lopatin, I; Manley, D M; Manweiler, R; Marusić, A; McDonald, S; Nefkens, B M K; Olmsted, J; Papandreou, Z; Peaslee, D; Phaisangittisakul, N; Prakhov, S; Price, J W; Pulver, M; Ramirez, A F; Sadler, M E; Shafi, A; Spinka, H; Stanislaus, S; Starostin, A; Supek, I; Staudenmaier, H M; Tippens, W B

    2003-09-05

    Data are presented for the reaction pi(-)p-->pi(0)pi(0)n in the range from threshold to p(pi(-))=750 MeV/c. The systematics of the data and multipole analyses are examined for sensitivity to a f(0)(600) ("sigma") meson. A one-pion-exchange mechanism is found to be very weak, or absent. The reaction appears to become dominated by sequential pi(0) decays through the Delta(1232) resonance as the beam momentum increases, along with substantial interference effects from several competing mechanisms.

  12. Amplitude analysis of $D^{0} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decays using CLEO-c data

    CERN Document Server

    d'Argent, Philippe; Dalseno, Jeremy; Gersabeck, Evelina; Harnew, Sam; Naik, Paras; Prouve, Claire; Rademacker, Jonas; Skidmore, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The resonant substructure of the decay $D^{0} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ is studied by performing a full five-dimensional amplitude analysis. Preliminary results based on data collected by the CLEO-c detector are presented. This is the largest dataset of $D^{0} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decays analysed in this way to-date. The two most significant contributions are $D^{0} \\rightarrow a_{1}(1260)^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $D^{0} \\rightarrow \\rho(770)^{0}\\rho(770)^{0}$. The line shape, mass and width of the $a_{1}(1260)$ resonance are determined, and model-independent studies of the line shapes of several resonant contributions are preformed.

  13. The pi-pi mass spectrum in Y(4260) -> pi-pi-J/psi

    CERN Document Server

    Bugg, D V

    2007-01-01

    Three ways of fitting the pi-pi mass spectrum in Y(4260) decays are studied. Data presented recently by Belle cannot be fitted by the pi-pi S-wave intensity for elastic scattering. They can be fitted by adding a rather arbitrary destructive interference with the sigma pole term. A better fit may be obtained with the decay sequence Y -> pi-H, H -> pi-J/psi, where H is a JPC=1-- hybrid or c-cbar-q-qbar state peaking at 4.0 GeV with a width ~280 MeV. A third possibility, involving a triangle diagram due to Y(4260)-> DD_1(2420), D_1->D*(2007)-pi, DD*->pi-J/psi fails to fit the data. The first and second possibilities could be resolved by analysis of the Y(4260) Dalitz plot and pi-J/psi mass projection, not presently publicly available.

  14. dGTP starvation in Escherichia coli provides new insights into the thymineless-death phenomenon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Itsko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Starvation of cells for the DNA building block dTTP is strikingly lethal (thymineless death, TLD, and this effect is observed in all organisms. The phenomenon, discovered some 60 years ago, is widely used to kill cells in anticancer therapies, but many questions regarding the precise underlying mechanisms have remained. Here, we show for the first time that starvation for the DNA precursor dGTP can kill E. coli cells in a manner sharing many features with TLD. dGTP starvation is accomplished by combining up-regulation of a cellular dGTPase with a deficiency of the guanine salvage enzyme guanine-(hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyltransferase. These cells, when grown in medium without an exogenous purine source like hypoxanthine or adenine, display a specific collapse of the dGTP pool, slow-down of chromosomal replication, the generation of multi-branched nucleoids, induction of the SOS system, and cell death. We conclude that starvation for a single DNA building block is sufficient to bring about cell death.

  15. The complex logic of stringent response regulation in Caulobacter crescentus: starvation signalling in an oligotrophic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutte, Cara C; Crosson, Sean

    2011-05-01

    Bacteria rapidly adapt to nutritional changes via the stringent response, which entails starvation-induced synthesis of the small molecule, ppGpp, by RelA/SpoT homologue (Rsh) enzymes. Binding of ppGpp to RNA polymerase modulates the transcription of hundreds of genes and remodels the physiology of the cell. Studies of the stringent response have primarily focused on copiotrophic bacteria such as Escherichia coli; little is known about how stringent signalling is regulated in species that live in consistently nutrient-limited (i.e. oligotrophic) environments. Here we define the input logic and transcriptional output of the stringent response in the oligotroph, Caulobacter crescentus. The sole Rsh protein, SpoT(CC), binds to and is regulated by the ribosome, and exhibits AND-type control logic in which amino acid starvation is a necessary but insufficient signal for activation of ppGpp synthesis. While both glucose and ammonium starvation upregulate the synthesis of ppGpp, SpoT(CC) detects these starvation signals by two independent mechanisms. Although the logic of stringent response control in C. crescentus differs from E. coli, the global transcriptional effects of elevated ppGpp are similar, with the exception of 16S rRNA transcription, which is controlled independently of spoT(CC). This study highlights how the regulatory logic controlling the stringent response may be adapted to the nutritional niche of a bacterial species.

  16. Glucose starvation-mediated inhibition of salinomycin induced autophagy amplifies cancer cell specific cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R; Jain, Mayur V; Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta; Roberg, Karin; Lotfi, Kourosh; Łos, Marek J

    2015-04-30

    Salinomycin has been used as treatment for malignant tumors in a small number of humans, causing far less side effects than standard chemotherapy. Several studies show that Salinomycin targets cancer-initiating cells (cancer stem cells, or CSC) resistant to conventional therapies. Numerous studies show that Salinomycin not only reduces tumor volume, but also decreases tumor recurrence when used as an adjuvant to standard treatments. In this study we show that starvation triggered different stress responses in cancer cells and primary normal cells, which further improved the preferential targeting of cancer cells by Salinomycin. Our in vitro studies further demonstrate that the combined use of 2-Fluoro 2-deoxy D-glucose, or 2-deoxy D-glucose with Salinomycin is lethal in cancer cells while the use of Oxamate does not improve cell death-inducing properties of Salinomycin. Furthermore, we show that treatment of cancer cells with Salinomycin under starvation conditions not only increases the apoptotic caspase activity, but also diminishes the protective autophagy normally triggered by the treatment with Salinomycin alone. Thus, this study underlines the potential use of Salinomycin as a cancer treatment, possibly in combination with short-term starvation or starvation-mimicking pharmacologic intervention.

  17. Role of PI3-K/Akt pathway and its effect on glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in midbrain dopamine cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-jun WANG; Jun-ping CAO; Jing-kao YU; Dian-shuai GAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To explore the intracellular mechanisms underlying the survival/differentia-don effect of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on dopamine(DA) cells. Methods: Midbrain slice culture and primary cell culture were established, and the cultures were divided into 3 groups: control group, GDNF group, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI3-K/Akt) pathway-inhibited group. Then the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was detected by immunostaining as well as Western blotting. Results: GDNF treatment induced an increase in the number of TH-immunoreactive (ir) cells and the neurite number of TH-ir cells, as well as in the level of TH expression in cultures (Number of TH-ir cells in the slice culture: control group, 8.76±0.75; GDNF group, 18.63±0.95.Number of TH-ir cells and neurite number of TH-ir cells in cell culture: controlgroup, 3.65±0.88 and 2.49±0.42; GDNF group, 6.01±0.43 and 4.89±0.46). Meanwhile, the stimulation of cultured cells with GDNF increased the phosphorylation of Akt, which is a downstream effector of PI3-K/Akt. The effects of GDNF were specifically blocked by the inhibitor of the PI3-K/Akt pathway, wortmannin (Number of TH-ir cells in slice culture: PI3-K/Akt pathway-inhibited group, 6.98±0.58. Num-ber of TH-ir cells and neurite number of TH-ir cells in cell culture: PI3-K/Aktpathway-inhibited group, 3.79±0.62 and 2.50±0.25, respectively). Conclusion: The PI3-K/Akt pathway mediates the survival/differentiation effect of GDNF on DA cells.8±0.58.

  18. Differential effects of selective inhibitors targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badura, Susanne; Tesanovic, Tamara; Pfeifer, Heike; Wystub, Sylvia; Nijmeijer, Bart A; Liebermann, Marcus; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Ruthardt, Martin; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling has been linked to oncogenesis and therapy resistance in various malignancies including leukemias. In Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) positive leukemias, activation of PI3K by dysregulated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TK) contributes to the pathogenesis and development of resistance to ABL-TK inhibitors (TKI). The PI3K pathway thus is an attractive therapeutic target in BCR-ABL positive leukemias, but its role in BCR-ABL negative ALL is conjectural. Moreover, the functional contribution of individual components of the PI3K pathway in ALL has not been established. We compared the activity of the ATP-competitive pan-PI3K inhibitor NVP-BKM120, the allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor RAD001, the ATP-competitive dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors NVP-BEZ235 and NVP-BGT226 and the combined mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitors Torin 1, PP242 and KU-0063794 using long-term cultures of ALL cells (ALL-LTC) from patients with B-precursor ALL that expressed the BCR-ABL or TEL-ABL oncoproteins or were BCR-ABL negative. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors profoundly inhibited growth and survival of ALL cells irrespective of their genetic subtype and their responsiveness to ABL-TKI. Combined suppression of PI3K, mTORC1 and mTORC2 displayed greater antileukemic activity than selective inhibitors of PI3K, mTORC1 or mTORC1 and mTORC2. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway is a promising therapeutic approach in patients with ALL. Greater antileukemic activity of dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors appears to be due to the redundant function of PI3K and mTOR. Clinical trials examining dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors in patients with B-precursor ALL are warranted, and should not be restricted to particular genetic subtypes.

  19. Differential effects of selective inhibitors targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Badura

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Aberrant PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling has been linked to oncogenesis and therapy resistance in various malignancies including leukemias. In Philadelphia chromosome (Ph positive leukemias, activation of PI3K by dysregulated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TK contributes to the pathogenesis and development of resistance to ABL-TK inhibitors (TKI. The PI3K pathway thus is an attractive therapeutic target in BCR-ABL positive leukemias, but its role in BCR-ABL negative ALL is conjectural. Moreover, the functional contribution of individual components of the PI3K pathway in ALL has not been established. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We compared the activity of the ATP-competitive pan-PI3K inhibitor NVP-BKM120, the allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor RAD001, the ATP-competitive dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors NVP-BEZ235 and NVP-BGT226 and the combined mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitors Torin 1, PP242 and KU-0063794 using long-term cultures of ALL cells (ALL-LTC from patients with B-precursor ALL that expressed the BCR-ABL or TEL-ABL oncoproteins or were BCR-ABL negative. RESULTS: Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors profoundly inhibited growth and survival of ALL cells irrespective of their genetic subtype and their responsiveness to ABL-TKI. Combined suppression of PI3K, mTORC1 and mTORC2 displayed greater antileukemic activity than selective inhibitors of PI3K, mTORC1 or mTORC1 and mTORC2. CONCLUSIONS: Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway is a promising therapeutic approach in patients with ALL. Greater antileukemic activity of dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors appears to be due to the redundant function of PI3K and mTOR. Clinical trials examining dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors in patients with B-precursor ALL are warranted, and should not be restricted to particular genetic subtypes.

  20. [Starvation and chemoreception in Antarctic benthic invertebrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakusa-Suszczewski, S; Janecki, T; Domanov, M M

    2010-01-01

    Sensitivity (chemoreception) to different amino acids was studied in six invertebrate species: Serolis polita, Glyptonotus antarcticus, Abyssochromene plebs, Waldeckia obesa, Odontaster validus, and Sterechinus neumayeri. The sensitivity was estimated by the changes in basic metabolism (respiration rate). Starvation increased the sensitivity in all the species. The metabolism rates increased in the presence of L-glutamic acid in G. antarcticus, A. plebs, O. validus, and S. neumayeri. The serine and arginine amino acids had a significant impact on the metabolism of the necrophagous species S. polita and W. obesa. The chemical information may be mediated by means of L-glutamic acid via glutamate receptors, which can be blocked by kynurenic acid, as occurs in the experiments with G. antarcticus and A. plebs.

  1. Study of $B^{0} \\rightarrow D^{*-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}$ and $B^{0} \\rightarrow D^{*-}K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Using proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, the ratio of branching fractions of the $B^{0}\\rightarrow D^{*-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}$ decay relative to the $B^{0} \\rightarrow D^{*-}\\pi^{+}$ decay is measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^{0}\\rightarrow D^{*-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+})}{\\mathcal{B}(B^{0} \\rightarrow D^{*-}\\pi^{+})} = 2.64 \\pm 0.04\\,(\\text{stat.}) \\pm 0.13\\,(\\text{syst.})\\, . \\label{eq:CF_BF_ratio_result} \\end{equation*} The Cabibbo-suppressed decay $B^{0}\\rightarrow D^{*-}K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}$ is observed for the first time and the measured ratio of branching fractions is \\begin{equation*} \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^{0}\\rightarrow D^{*-}K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+})}{\\mathcal{B}(B^{0} \\rightarrow D^{*-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+})} = (6.47 \\pm 0.37\\,(\\text{stat.}) \\pm 0.35\\,(\\text{syst.})) \\times 10^{-2} \\label{eq:CS_BF_ratio_result}\\, . \\end{equation*} A search for orbital excitations of charm mesons co...

  2. Regulatory Response to Carbon Starvation in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britos, Leticia C.; Abeliuk, Eduardo; Taverner, Thomas; Lipton, Mary S.; McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucy

    2011-04-11

    Bacteria adapt to shifts from rapid to slow growth, and have developed strategies for long-term survival during prolonged starvation and stress conditions. We report the regulatory response of C. crescentus to carbon starvation, based on combined high-throughput proteome and transcriptome analyses. Our results identify cell cycle changes in gene expression in response to carbon starvation that involve the prominent role of the FixK FNR/CAP family transcription factor and the CtrA cell cycle regulator. Notably, the SigT ECF sigma factor mediates the carbon starvation-induced degradation of CtrA, while activating a core set of general starvation-stress genes that respond to carbon starvation, osmotic stress, and exposure to heavy metals. Comparison of the response of swarmer cells and stalked cells to carbon starvation revealed four groups of genes that exhibit different expression profiles. Also, cell pole morphogenesis and initiation of chromosome replication normally occurring at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition are uncoupled in carbon-starved cells.

  3. Regulatory response to carbon starvation in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Britos

    Full Text Available Bacteria adapt to shifts from rapid to slow growth, and have developed strategies for long-term survival during prolonged starvation and stress conditions. We report the regulatory response of C. crescentus to carbon starvation, based on combined high-throughput proteome and transcriptome analyses. Our results identify cell cycle changes in gene expression in response to carbon starvation that involve the prominent role of the FixK FNR/CAP family transcription factor and the CtrA cell cycle regulator. Notably, the SigT ECF sigma factor mediates the carbon starvation-induced degradation of CtrA, while activating a core set of general starvation-stress genes that respond to carbon starvation, osmotic stress, and exposure to heavy metals. Comparison of the response of swarmer cells and stalked cells to carbon starvation revealed four groups of genes that exhibit different expression profiles. Also, cell pole morphogenesis and initiation of chromosome replication normally occurring at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition are uncoupled in carbon-starved cells.

  4. Electro-acupuncture at points of Zusanli and Quchi exerts anti-apoptotic effect through the modulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiehua; You, Yongmei; Tao, Jing; Ye, Xiaoqian; Huang, Jia; Yang, Shanli; Lin, Zhicheng; Hong, Zhenfeng; Peng, Jun; Chen, Lidian

    2014-01-13

    We evaluated the neuroprotective effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury and deeply investigated the relationship between this neuroprotective effect and PI3K/Akt pathway. Rats underwent focal cerebral IR injured by suture method and received the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of EA at points of Zusanli(ST36) and Quchi(LI11) after the operation. We found that the EA treatment significantly (psignaling resulted in the inhibition of cerebral cell apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra. Simultaneously EA increased the expression of PI3K, p-Akt, p-Bad and Bcl-2 at the protein level and the expression of Bcl-2 at the mRNA level. On the contrary, EA inhibited the Bax and cleaved Caspase-3-positive expression. The selective PI3K inhibitor LY294002 compromised EA-induced neuroprotective effects and reduced the elevation of p-Akt, p-Bad and Bcl-2 levels. Our data suggested that the PI3K/Akt pathway played a critical role in mediating the neuroprotective effects of EA treatment at points of Zusanli and Quchi after the ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of salidroside through PI3K/Akt pathway activation in Alzheimer’s disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang B

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bei Zhang,1,2 Ying Wang,1 Hui Li,1 Ran Xiong,1 Zongbo Zhao,1 Xingkun Chu,2 Qiongqiong Li,1 Suya Sun,1 Shengdi Chen1,2 1Department of Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Laboratory of Neurodegenerative Diseases, The Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by deposits of aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ peptide and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain parenchyma. Despite considerable research to elucidate the pathological mechanisms and identify therapeutic strategies for AD, effective treatments are still lacking. In the present study, we found that salidroside (Sal, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., can protect against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in four transgenic Drosophila AD models. Both longevity and locomotor activity were improved in Sal-fed Drosophila. Sal also decreased Aβ levels and Aβ deposition in brain and ameliorated toxicity in Aβ-treated primary neuronal culture. The neuroprotective effect of Sal was associated with upregulated phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling. Our findings identify a compound that may possess potential therapeutic benefits for AD and other forms of neurodegeneration. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid-β, salidroside, Drosophila, neuroprotective effect

  6. Low-Mass (M<1.2 Gev/c^2) Sigma0 - Meson Produced in the System Pi+Pi- from the Reaction np --> np Pi+Pi- at Pn = 5.20 Gev/c^2

    CERN Document Server

    Troyan, Yu A; Troyan, A Y; Plekhanov, E B; Jerusalimov, A P; Arakelian, S G; Troyan, Yu. A.

    2006-01-01

    The production and properties of the resonances in the system of Pi+Pi- were studied in the reaction np --> npPi+Pi- at the momentum of incident neutrons Pn=(5.20 +/- 0.12)GeV/c. In this work in comparison with previous ones we made more hard selection of events taking into account track measurement precise. In the distribution of the Pi+Pi- combinations effective masses we have found 8 peculiarities. All the observable peculiarities have spins equal to zero. There were no corresponding picks in the Pi-PI- and Pi-Pi0 - systems in the reactions np --> npPi+Pi- Pi- and np --> npPi-Pi0. So, we have observed a row of resonances with a set of quantum numbers 0+(0++) -- SIGMA0 - mesons decaying on the channel SIGMA0 --> Pi+Pi-. The obtained in other experiments masses coincide with the sequence of masses observed in our experiment. Especially good coincidence can be obtained in the K-matrix approach (see RPP).

  7. Raspberry Pi gaming

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Shea

    2015-01-01

    If you are someone who loves to play games and are interested in learning more about the capabilities of your Raspberry Pi, this book is for you. Basic knowledge of Raspberry Pi programming is expected.

  8. Study of B- -> DK-pi(+)pi(-) and B- -> D pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) decays and determination of the CKM angle gamma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Martinez, M. Lucio; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Mareki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of the suppressed B- -> DK-pi(+)pi(-) and favored B- -> D pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) decays, where the neutral D meson is detected through its decays to the K--/+pi(+/-) and CP -even K+K- and pi(+)pi(-) final states. The measurement is carried out using a proton-proton collision data sample c

  9. Inter and Intra Molecular Phase Separation Environment Effects on PI-PEO Block Copolymers for Batteries and Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chen-Chen; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Eby, R. K.; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.; Ge, Jason J.; Cubon, Valerie A.

    2002-01-01

    Rod-coil molecules have been introduced as a novel type of block copolymers with unique microstructure due to their ability to self-assemble to various ordered morphologies on a nanometer length scale. These molecules, comprised two homo polymers joined together at one end, microphase separate into ordered, periodic arrays of spheres, cylinders in the bulk state and or solution. To get ordered structure in a reasonable scale, additional force field are applied, such as mechanical shearing, electric field and magnetic field. Recently, progress has made it a possible to develop a new class of polyimides (PI)-Polyethylene oxide (PEO) that are soluble in polar organic solvents. The solvent-soluble PI-PEO has a wide variety of applications in microelectronics, since these PI-PEO films exhibit a high degree of thermal and chemical stability. In this paper, we report the self-assembled ordered structure of PI-PEO molecules formed from concentrate solution.

  10. Potentiation of antileukemic therapies by the dual PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor, BAG956: effects on BCR-ABL– and mutant FLT3-expressing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Ellen; Banerji, Lolita; Wright, Renee D.; Barrett, Rosemary; Ray, Arghya; Moreno, Daisy; Catley, Laurence; Jiang, Jingrui; Hall-Meyers, Elizabeth; Sauveur-Michel, Maira; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Fox, Edward; Kung, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Mediators of PI3K/AKT signaling have been implicated in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Studies have shown that inhibitors of PI3K/AKT signaling, such as wortmannin and LY294002, are able to inhibit CML and AML cell proliferation and synergize with targeted tyrosine kinase inhi-bitors. We investigated the ability of BAG956, a dual PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor, to be used in combination with inhibitors of BCR-ABL and mutant FLT3, as well as with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, and the rapamycin derivative, RAD001. BAG956 was shown to block AKT phosphorylation induced by BCR-ABL–, and induce apoptosis of BCR-ABL–expressing cell lines and patient bone marrow cells at concentrations that also inhibit PI3K signaling. Enhancement of the inhibitory effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, imatinib and nilotinib, by BAG956 was demonstrated against BCR-ABL expressing cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have also shown that BAG956 is effective against mutant FLT3-expressing cell lines and AML patient bone marrow cells. Enhancement of the inhibitory effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PKC412, by BAG956 was demonstrated against mutant FLT3-expressing cells. Finally, BAG956 and rapamycin/RAD001 were shown to combine in a nonantagonistic fashion against BCR-ABL– and mutant FLT3-expressing cells both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18184863

  11. Performance of the Effective-characteristic-polynomial Pi2 Method for Diatomic Molecules: Basis-set Dependencies and Vibrational Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Homeier, H. H. H.; Neef, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    The performance of the recently introduced $\\Pi$2 method [1] is investigated for some diatomic molecules. For this end, ground state energies are calculated at the MP4 level for various basis sets of increasing size. With negligible extra effort, the $\\Pi$2, F4, and [2/2] estimators are obtained, together with information on the reliability of the basic perturbation series [1]. The results are compared to more expensive CCSD(T) results. Also, electronic energy hypersurfaces are calculated at ...

  12. Anti-tumor effects of progesterone in human glioblastoma multiforme: role of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Fahim; Yousuf, Seema; Stein, Donald G

    2015-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive primary brain tumor with a mean patient survival of 13-15 months despite surgical resection, radiation therapy and standard-of-care chemotherapy. We investigated the chemotherapeutic effects of the hormone progesterone (P4) on the growth of human GBM in four genetically different cell lines (U87MG, U87dEGFR, U118MG, LN-229) in vitro and in a U87MG subcutaneous xenograft mouse model. At high concentrations (20, 40, and 80 μM), P4 significantly (Pmatrix metalloproteinase-9. Apoptosis in tumor tissue was detected by the expression of cleaved caspase-3, BCl-2, BAD and p53 proteins and confirmed by TUNEL assay. P4 treatment also suppressed PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, which regulates tumor growth, as demonstrated by the suppression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Our data can be interpreted to suggest that P4 suppresses the growth of human GBM cells both in vitro and in vivo and enhances survival time in mice without any demonstrable side effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Sex steroids and brain disorders'.

  13. Finite volume corrections to pi pi scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Ikuro; Bedaque, Paulo F.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2006-01-13

    Lattice QCD studies of hadron-hadron interactions are performed by computing the energy levels of the system in a finite box. The shifts in energy levels proportional to inverse powers of the volume are related to scattering parameters in a model independent way. In addition, there are non-universal exponentially suppressed corrections that distort this relation. These terms are proportional to e-m{sub pi} L and become relevant as the chiral limit is approached. In this paper we report on a one-loop chiral perturbation theory calculation of the leading exponential corrections in the case of I=2 pi pi scattering near threshold.

  14. Short-term starvation attenuates liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) by Sirt1-autophagy signaling in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianjie; Zhou, Junjin; Dai, Xinzheng; Zhou, Haoming; Pan, Xiongxiong; Wang, Xuehao; Zhang, Feng; Rao, Jianhua; Lu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction or starvation (fasting) has some beneficial effects in terms of prolonging life and increasing resistance to stress. It has also been shown that calorie restriction has a protective role during ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in several organs, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. In this study we investigated the effects and molecular mechanisms of short-term starvation (STS) on liver IRI in a mouse liver IRI model. We found that STS significantly attenuated liver IRI in this model, as evidenced by inhibition of serum aminotransferase levels, and decreased pathological damage and hepatocellular apoptosis, especially after 2- or 3-day starvation. Furthermore, we found that 2- or 3-day starvation induced expression of hepatocellular autophagy in vivo and in vitro. Further experiments provided support for the notion that STS-induced autophagy played a key role during starvation-regulated protection against liver IRI via autophagy inhibition with 3-methyladenine. Interestingly, the longevity gene Sirt1 was also significantly up-regulated in liver after STS. Importantly, inhibition of Sirt1 by sirtinol abolished STS-induced autophagy and further abrogated STS-mediated protection against liver IRI. In conclusion, our results indicate that STS attenuates liver IRI via the Sirt1-autophagy pathway. Our findings provide a rationale for a novel therapeutic strategy for managing liver IRI. PMID:27648127

  15. Global poplar root and leaf transcriptomes reveal links between growth and stress responses under nitrogen starvation and excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Zhou, Jing; Li, Hong; Shi, Wenguang; Polle, Andrea; Lu, Mengzhu; Sun, Xiaomei; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) starvation and excess have distinct effects on N uptake and metabolism in poplars, but the global transcriptomic changes underlying morphological and physiological acclimation to altered N availability are unknown. We found that N starvation stimulated the fine root length and surface area by 54 and 49%, respectively, decreased the net photosynthetic rate by 15% and reduced the concentrations of NH4+, NO3(-) and total free amino acids in the roots and leaves of Populus simonii Carr. in comparison with normal N supply, whereas N excess had the opposite effect in most cases. Global transcriptome analysis of roots and leaves elucidated the specific molecular responses to N starvation and excess. Under N starvation and excess, gene ontology (GO) terms related to ion transport and response to auxin stimulus were enriched in roots, whereas the GO term for response to abscisic acid stimulus was overrepresented in leaves. Common GO terms for all N treatments in roots and leaves were related to development, N metabolism, response to stress and hormone stimulus. Approximately 30-40% of the differentially expressed genes formed a transcriptomic regulatory network under each condition. These results suggest that global transcriptomic reprogramming plays a key role in the morphological and physiological acclimation of poplar roots and leaves to N starvation and excess.

  16. pi-pi correlations in photon-induced reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messchendorp, J

    2003-01-01

    Differential cross sections of the-reactions A(gamma,pi(0) pi(0)) and A(gamma, pi(0) pi(+) + pi(0) pi(-)) with A=H-1, C-12, and Pb-nat are presented. A significant. nuclear-mass dependence of the pipi invariant-mass distribution is found in the pi(0) pi(0) channel. The dependence is not observed in

  17. Effects of starvation stress on the physiological characteristics of Melanotus caudex (Coleoptera: Elateridae)%饥饿胁迫对褐纹金针虫生理特征的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹丹; 陈爱端; 李克斌; 尹姣; 张帅; 曹雅忠

    2016-01-01

    [Aim] The wireworm Melanotus caudex occurred more and more severely in recent years.To reveal the physiological and ecological adaptations of M.caudex larvae under starvation stress,their physiological changes under starvation stress were assayed.[Methods] Using 2-3 instar larvae as the initial test objects,we determined the survival,mobility,molting times,body weight,water content and respiration rate of M.caudex larvae bred on soil and vermiculite as culture substrates under starvation stress compared with those fed on wheat seedlings (Zhonghan 101 strain) on both substrates as the controls.[Results] There was no significant difference in the survival rate and molting times of M.caudex larvae between the starvation stress groups and the control groups.When M.caudex larvae were starved for 120 d,their survival rate was still over 90% and molted about 10 times.Both the wet and dry weight of M.caudex larvae under starvation in soil and vermiculite significantly decreased as compared with the controls,while the water content of the larvae under starvation in the soil and vermiculite environment (72.52% and 72.22%,respectively) increased significantly as compared with the corresponding controls (49.01% and 51.37%,respectively).The CO2 release rates of the starvation stress groups decreased dramatically in the soil and vermiculite environment as compared with the controls,reducing by 62.11% and 60.46%,respectively.[Conclusion] M.caudex is an insect highly tolerant to starvation.The larvae can sustain their development (e.g.,normal molting) by reducing respiratory metabolism during lack of food supply.%[目的]褐纹金针虫Melanotus caudex发生为害日趋严重.本研究分析饥饿环境条件下褐纹金针虫的生理特征变化,以期揭示其饥饿胁迫下的生理和生态适应对策.[方法]以2-3龄幼虫为试验的起始对象,以喂食小麦(中旱101)苗的褐纹金针虫为对照,在土壤和蛭石两种饲养环境条件下测定不

  18. The e^+e^- -> 3(\\pi^+\\pi^-), 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0) and K^+K^-2(\\pi^+\\pi^-) Cross Sections at Center-of-Mass Energies 0.5--4.5 GeV Measured with Initial-State Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-02-08

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 3({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){gamma}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}){gamma} and K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +} {sup -}){gamma}, with the photon radiated from the initial state. About 20,000, 33,000 and 4,000 fully reconstructed events, respectively, have been selected from 232 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that these data can be compared with the corresponding direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. From the 3({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}) and K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) mass spectra, the cross sections for the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 3({pi}{sup +}{sup -}), e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}) and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) are measured for center-of-mass energies from production threshold to 4.5 GeV. The uncertainty in the cross section measurement is typically 6-15%. We observe the J/{psi} in all these final states and measure the corresponding branching fractions.

  19. The e^+e^- -> 3(\\pi^+\\pi^-), 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0) and K^+K^-2(\\pi^+\\pi^-) Cross Sections at Center-of-Mass Energies 0.5--4.5 GeV Measured with Initial-State Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-02-08

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 3({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){gamma}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}){gamma} and K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +} {sup -}){gamma}, with the photon radiated from the initial state. About 20,000, 33,000 and 4,000 fully reconstructed events, respectively, have been selected from 232 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that these data can be compared with the corresponding direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. From the 3({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}) and K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) mass spectra, the cross sections for the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 3({pi}{sup +}{sup -}), e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}) and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) are measured for center-of-mass energies from production threshold to 4.5 GeV. The uncertainty in the cross section measurement is typically 6-15%. We observe the J/{psi} in all these final states and measure the corresponding branching fractions.

  20. Cusps in $\\K_{L}\\to$3$\\pi$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bissegger, M; Gasser, J; Kubis, B; Rusetsky, A

    2008-01-01

    The pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in K --> 3 pi decays, the strength of which is related to the pi pi S-wave scattering lengths. We apply an effective field theory framework developed earlier to evaluate the amplitudes for K_L --> 3 pi decays in a systematic manner, where the strictures imposed by analyticity and unitarity are respected automatically. The amplitudes for the decay eta --> 3 pi are also given.

  1. Raspberry Pi projects

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Learn to build software and hardware projects featuring the Raspberry Pi! Raspberry Pi represents a new generation of computers that encourages the user to play and to learn and this unique book is aimed at the beginner Raspberry Pi user who is eager to get started creating real-world projects. Taking you on a journey of creating 15 practical projects, this fun and informative resource introduces you to the skills you need to have in order to make the most of the Pi. The book begins with a quick look at how to get the Pi up and running and then encourages you to dive into the array of exciti

  2. Raspberry Pi user guide

    CERN Document Server

    Upton, Eben

    2013-01-01

    The essential guide to getting started with the Raspberry Pi ® The Raspberry Pi has been a success beyond the dream of its creators. Their goal, to encourage a new generation of computer programmers who understand how computers work, is well under way. Raspberry Pi User Guide 2e is the newest edition of the runaway bestseller written by the Pi's co-creator, Eben Upton, and tech writer Gareth Halfacree. It contains everything you need to know to get the Pi up and running, including how to: Connect a keyboard, mouse, monitor and other peripheralsInstall software and configure your Raspberry

  3. Protective Effect of Tempol on Acute Kidney Injury Through PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gensheng Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Tempol is a protective antioxidant against ischemic injury in many animal models. The molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2 is a master transcription factor during oxidative stress, which is enhanced by activation of protein kinase C (PKC pathway. Another factor, tubular epithelial apoptosis, is mediated by activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB, Akt signaling pathway during renal ischemic injury. We tested the hypothesis that tempol activates PKC or PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathways to transcribe many genes that coordinate endogenous antioxidant defense. Methods: The right renal pedicle was clamped for 45 minutes and the left kidney was removed to study renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury in C57BL/6 mice. The response was assessed from serum parameters, renal morphology and renal expression of PKC, phosphorylated-PKC (p-PKC, Nrf2, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, Akt, phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt, pro-caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3 in groups of sham and I/R mice given vehicle, or tempol (50 or 100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection. Results: The serum malondialdehyde (MDA, marker of reactive oxygen species doubled and the BUN and creatinine increased 5- to 10-fold after I/R injury. Tempol (50 or 100 mg/kg prevented the increases in MDA but only tempol (50 mg/kg lessened the increases in BUN and creatinine and moderated the acute tubular necrosis. I/R did not change expression of PKC or p-PKC but reduced renal expression of Nrf2, p-Akt, HO-1 and pro-caspase-3 and increased cleaved caspase-3. Tempol (50 mg/kg prevented these changes produced by I/R whereas tempol (100 mg/kg had lesser or inconsistent effects. Conclusion: Tempol (50 mg/kg prevents lipid peroxidation and attenuates renal damage after I/R injury. The beneficial pathway apparently is not dependent on upregulation or phosphorylation of PKC, at lower tempol doses, does implicate upregulation of Akt with

  4. Are there any different effects of Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus and Streptococcus on intestinal sensation, barrier function and intestinal immunity in PI-IBS mouse model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Research has increasingly suggested that gut flora plays an important role in the development of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS. Studies of the curative effect of probiotics for IBS have usually been positive but not always. However, the differences of treatment effects and mechanisms among probiotic stains, or mixture of them, are not clear. In this study, we compared the effects of different probiotics (Befidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus or mixture of the three on intestinal sensation, barrier function and intestinal immunity in PI-IBS mouse model. METHODS: PI-IBS model was induced by Trichinella spiralis infection in mice. Different probiotics were administered to mice after 8 weeks infection. Visceral sensitivity was measured by scores of abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR and the threshold intensity of colorectal distention. Colonic smooth muscle contractile response was assessed by contraction of the longitudinal muscle strips. Plasma diamine oxidase (DAO and d-lactate were determined by an enzymatic spectrophotometry. Expression of tight junction proteins and cytokines in ileum were measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: Compared to control mice, PI-IBS mice treated either alone with Befidobacterium or Lactobacillus (but not Streptococcus, or the mixture of the three exhibited not only decreased AWR score and contractile response, but also reduced plasma DAO and D-lactate. These probiotic treatments also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and IL-17 and promoted the expression of major tight junction proteins claudin-1 and occludin. The mixture of the three probiotic strains performed better than the individual in up-regulating these tight junction proteins and suppressing IL-17 expression. CONCLUSIONS: Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, but not Streptococcus, alleviated visceral hypersensitivity and recovered intestinal barrier function as well as inflammation in PI

  5. Quantitative proteomics identifies unanticipated regulators of nitrogen- and glucose starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødkær, Steven V; Pultz, Dennis; Brusch, Michelle;

    2014-01-01

    starvation. We identify nearly 1400 phosphorylation sites of which more than 500 are regulated in a temporal manner in response to glucose- or nitrogen starvation. By bioinformatics and network analyses, we have identified the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Sic1, the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37......, and the Hsp90 isoform Hsp82 to putatively mediate some of the starvation responses. Consistently, quantitative expression analyses showed that Sic1, Cdc37, and Hsp82 are required for normal expression of nutrient-responsive genes. Collectively, we therefore propose that Sic1, Cdc37, and Hsp82 may orchestrate...... parts of the cellular starvation response by regulating transcription factor- and kinase activities....

  6. Conditions for high resistance to starvation periods in bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Yolanda; Ribot-Llobet, Edgar; Baeza, Juan Antonio; Guisasola, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The present work aims at understanding the performance of bioelectrochemical systems when subjected to different starvation periods, which is very relevant in view of their industrial application or use as biosensor. The results show that both microbial fuel cells (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cells (MEC) could resist starvation periods up to 10-11 days without any significant decrease in their performance when endogenous consumption was enabled by closing the circuit in MFC or applying an external voltage in MEC. By contrast, starvation periods longer than 5 days in both MFC and MEC when the flow of electrons from the anode to the cathode was not permitted thereby avoiding endogenous consumption, led to a reversible decrease in the cells performance. A longer starvation period of 21-days under open-circuit caused an irreversible performance loss of the MFC.

  7. The effect of spin polarization on zero field splitting parameters in paramagnetic pi-electron molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gastel, Maurice

    2009-09-28

    Spin polarization effects play an important role in the theory of isotropic hyperfine interactions for aromatic protons. The spin polarization gives rise to significant isotropic proton hyperfine interactions--spin-dependent one-electron properties--smaller than 0 MHz and the effect has been theoretically described [H. M. McConnell and D. B. J. Chesnut, Chem. Phys. 28, 107 (1958)]. The influence of spin polarization on the zero field splitting parameters, which are spin-dependent two-electron properties, has not been clearly identified yet. A phenomenological equation is proposed here for the contribution of spin polarization to the zero field splitting parameter D in analogy to McConnell's equation for hyperfine interactions. The presence of the effect is demonstrated in a series of calculations on polyacenes in the triplet state and turns out to be responsible for up to 50% of the D parameter in the case of naphthalene! It is found that spin-unrestricted single-determinant methods, including the widely used density functional theory methods, do not accurately reproduce the two-electron reduced electron density required for the evaluation of two-electron spin-dependent properties. For the accurate calculation of zero field splitting parameters by quantum chemical methods, it thus seems necessary to resort to correlated ab initio methods which do not give rise to spin contamination and which do provide an accurate description of the two-electron reduced electron density.

  8. First Measurement of Chiral Dynamics in $\\pi^-\\gamma \\to \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C; Alexakhin, V Yu; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Antonov, A A; Austregesilo, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Bicker, K A; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Burtin, E; Chaberny, D; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Das, S; Dasgupta, S S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dunnweber, W; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Elia, C; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Filin, A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N; Friedrich, J M; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gazda, R; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gnesi, I; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Grabmuller, S; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; Hoppner, Ch; d'Hose, N; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jasinski, P; Jegou, G; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Konigsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kramer, M; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Lauser, L; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Massmann, F; Matsuda, T; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Moinester, M A; Morreale, A; Mutter, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Nowak, W D; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Perevalova, E; Pesaro, G; Peshekhonov, D V; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pontecorvo, G; Pretz, J; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J F; Ramos, S; Rapatsky, V; Reicherz, G; Richter, A; Rocco, E; Rondio, E; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schluter, T; Schmitt, L; Schonning, K; Schopferer, S; Schroder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Siebert, H W; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; Ter Wolbeek, J; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Tkatchev, L G; Uhl, S; Uman, I; Vandenbroucke, M; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zhuravlev, N; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    The COMPASS collaboration at CERN has investigated the $\\pi^-\\gamma \\to \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ reaction at center-of-momentum energy below five pion masses, $\\sqrt{s} \\lt 5m_\\pi$ , embedded in the Primakoff reaction of 190 GeV pions impinging on a lead target. Exchange of quasi-real photons is selected by isolating the sharp Coulomb peak observed at smallest momentum transfers, $t' \\lt 0.001 GeV^2/c^2$. Using partial-wave analysis techniques, the scattering intensity of Coulomb production described in terms of chiral dynamics and its dependence on the 3pi-invariant mass $m_{3\\pi} = \\sqrt{s}$ were extracted. The absolute cross section was determined in seven bins of $\\sqrt{s}$ with an overall precision of 20%. At leading order, the result is found to be in good agreement with the prediction of chiral perturbation theory over the whole energy range investigated.

  9. Nonfactorizable Contributions to B {yields} {pi}{pi} Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmann, T.

    2004-09-17

    We investigate to what extent the experimental information on B {yields} {pi}{pi} branching fractions and CP asymmetries can be used to better understand the QCD dynamics in these decays. For this purpose we decompose the independent isospin amplitudes into factorizable and non-factorizable contributions. The former can be estimated within the framework of QCD factorization for exclusive B decays. The latter vanish in the heavy-quark limit, m{sub b} {yields} {infinity}, and are treated as unknown hadronic parameters. We discuss at some length in which way the non-factorizable contributions are treated in different theoretical and phenomenological frameworks. We point out the potential differences between the phenomenological treatment of power-corrections in the ''BBNS approach'', and the appearance of power-suppressed operators in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET). On that basis we define a handful of different (but generic) scenarios where the non-factorizable part of isospin amplitudes is parameterized in terms of three or four unknowns, which can be constrained by data. We also give some short discussion on the implications of our analysis for B {yields} {pi}K decays. In particular, since non-factorizable QCD effects in B {yields} {pi}{pi} may be large, we cannot exclude sizeable non-factorizable effects, which violate SU(3){sub F} flavour symmetry, or even isospin symmetry (via long-distance QED effects). This may help to explain certain puzzles in connection with isospin-violating observables in B {yields} {pi}K decays.

  10. Observation of Coulomb effects in production of. pi. sup +. pi. sup minus , p. pi. sup minus , and K sup + K minus pairs in pp collisions at 27. 5 GeV/ c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiencke, L.R.; Church, M.D.; Gottschalk, E.E.; Hylton, R.A.; Knapp, B.C.; Sippach, W.; Stern, B.J. (Columbia University, Nevis Laboratories, Irvington, New York 10533 (United States)); Hartouni, E.P.; Jensen, D.A.; Klima, B.; Kreisler, M.N.; Rabin, M.S.Z.; Strait, J.B.; Uribe, J. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)); Christian, D.C.; Gutierrez, G.; Holmes, S.D.; Wehmann, A. (Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)); Avilez, C. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajato (Mexico)); Forbush, M.; Huson, F.R.; White, J.T. (Department of Physics, Texas A M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States))

    1992-11-01

    In a study of collisions of 27.5 GeV/{ital c} protons in liquid hydrogen we have observed enhanced production of oppositely charged hadron pairs when the relative velocity of the two hadrons in the pair rest frame approaches {alpha}{ital c}. The scale and velocity dependence of the enhancement agree well with the effect of the attractive Coulomb interaction as described by the Gamow factor.

  11. Mimosine As Well As Serum Starvation Can Be Used for Cell Cycle Synchronization of Sheep Granulosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sadeghian-Nodoushan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was evaluated the effect of different synchronization protocols such as serum starvation for 1–3 days, confluency and chemical inhibitors on synchronization accuracy at G0/G1, apoptosis, and DNA synthesis in sheep granulosa cells. The cells were obtained from ovarian antral follicles of slaughtered sheep and used at first and fifth passages. Flow cytometry analysis showed that confluent cells, serum starvation for 24, 48, and 72 hours, and mimosine treatment significantly increased G0/G1 phase cells when compared to normally growing cells (P<0.05. Nocodazole treatment increased the cell population in the G0/G1 stage when compared with the control group but did not change the G2/M stage population. Treatment of cells with mimosine, nocodazole, and serum starvation in three groups resulted in proliferation arrest (P<0.05. Serum starvation for 72 hours significantly promoted apoptosis in granulosa cells (P<0.05. The results of the primary culture and 5th passage were the same. The use of 48-hour serum starvation and mimosine treatments has been recommended because cell death in these groups was very similar to the control group.

  12. Cusps in K --> 3 pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Colangelo, G; Kubis, B; Rusetsky, A; Colangelo, Gilberto; Gasser, Juerg; Kubis, Bastian; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2006-01-01

    The pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in K --> 3 pi decays. As has recently been pointed out by Cabibbo and Isidori, an accurate measurement of the cusp may allow one to pin down the S-wave pi pi scattering lengths to high precision. Here, we present and illustrate an effective field theory framework that allows one to determine the structure of this cusp in a straightforward manner. The strictures imposed by analyticity and unitarity are respected automatically.

  13. Starvation dynamics of a greedy forager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, U.; Redner, S.; Bénichou, O.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a greedy forager that moves by random walking in an environment where each site initially contains one unit of food. Upon encountering a food-containing site, the forager eats all the food there and can subsequently hop an additional S steps without food before starving to death. Upon encountering an empty site, the forager goes hungry and comes one time unit closer to starvation. We investigate the new feature of forager greed; if the forager has a choice between hopping to an empty site or to a food-containing site in its nearest neighborhood, it hops preferentially towards food. If the neighboring sites all contain food or are all empty, the forager hops equiprobably to one of these neighbors. Paradoxically, the lifetime of the forager can depend non-monotonically on greed, and the sense of the non-monotonicity is opposite in one and two dimensions. Even more unexpectedly, the forager lifetime in one dimension is substantially enhanced when the greed is negative; here the forager tends to avoid food in its local neighborhood. We also determine the average amount of food consumed at the instant when the forager starves. We present analytic, heuristic, and numerical results to elucidate these intriguing phenomena.

  14. Finite volume treatment of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering in the $\\rho$ channel

    CERN Document Server

    Albaladejo, M; Oller, J A; Roca, L

    2013-01-01

    We make a theoretical study of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering with quantum numbers $J^{PC}=1^{--}$ in a finite box. To calculate physical observables for infinite volume from lattice QCD, the finite box dependence of the potentials is not usually considered. We quantify such effects by means of two different approaches for vector-isovector $\\pi\\pi$ scattering based on Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory results: the Inverse Amplitude Method and another one based on the $N/D$ method. We take into account finite box effects stemming from higher orders through loops in the crossed $t,u-$channels as well as from the renormalization of the coupling constants. The main conclusion is that for $\\pi\\pi$ phase shifts in the isovector channel one can safely apply L\\"uscher based methods for finite box sizes of $L$ greater than $2 m_\\pi^{-1}$.

  15. The effects of weekly augmentation therapy in patients with PiZZ α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid ST

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available ST Schmid,1 J Koepke,1 M Dresel,1 A Hattesohl,1 E Frenzel,2 J Perez,3 DA Lomas,4 E Miranda,5 T Greulich,1 S Noeske,1 M Wencker,6 H Teschler,6 C Vogelmeier,1 S Janciauskiene,2,* AR Koczulla1,*1Department of Internal Medicine, Division for Pulmonary Diseases, University Hospital Marburg, Marburg, Germany; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department of Cellular Biology, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain; 4Department of Medicine, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 5Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Istituto Pasteur – Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 6Department of Pneumology, West German Lung Clinic, Essen University Hospital, Essen, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The major concept behind augmentation therapy with human α1-antitrypsin (AAT is to raise the levels of AAT in patients with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ (Glu342Lys-inherited AAT deficiency and to protect lung tissues from proteolysis and progression of emphysema.Objective: To evaluate the short-term effects of augmentation therapy (Prolastin® on plasma levels of AAT, C-reactive protein, and chemokines/cytokines.Materials and methods: Serum and exhaled breath condensate were collected from individuals with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ AAT deficiency-related emphysema (n = 12 on the first, third, and seventh day after the infusion of intravenous Prolastin. Concentrations of total and polymeric AAT, interleukin-8 (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and C-reactive protein were determined. Blood neutrophils and primary epithelial cells were also exposed to Prolastin (1 mg/mL.Results: There were significant fluctuations in serum (but not in exhaled breath condensate levels of AAT polymers, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL

  16. Effects of circulation hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy on tumor marker content and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway function of gastric cancer peritoneal effusion patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ding

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of circulation hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy on tumor marker content and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway function of gastric cancer peritoneal effusion patients. Methods: 80 cases of gastric cancer peritoneal effusion patients in our hospital from May 2013 to August 2014 were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. Observation group received circulation hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy; control group received conventional perfusion chemotherapy. Then blood tumor markers, LAG3 and HSP content, PI3K-AKT-mTOR signal molecules were assayed. Results:(1) tumor markers: DDK1, EXOSC2 contents and PGR ratio of observation group were lower than those of control group; PGI and PGII contents were higher than those of control group; (2) LAG3 and HSP contents: HSP27 and HSP90 contents of observation group were lower than those of control group; sLAG-3 content was higher than that of control group; (3) signal molecules: mRNA contents of PI3K, Akt and mTOR molecules of observation group were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Circulation hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy is helpful to kill tumor cells, reduce tumor marker releasing into blood, regulate LAG3 and HSP expression and inhibit PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway function; it’s an ideal method for treating peritoneal effusion.

  17. Dual Inhibition of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK Pathways Induces Synergistic Antitumor Effects in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Linda Wu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG is a devastating disease with an extremely poor prognosis. Recent studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR and its downstream effector pathway, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, are frequently amplified in DIPG, and potential therapies targeting this pathway have emerged. However, the addition of targeted single agents has not been found to improve clinical outcomes in DIPG, and targeting this pathway alone has produced insufficient clinical responses in multiple malignancies investigated, including lung, endometrial, and bladder cancers. Acquired resistance also seems inevitable. Activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, which shares many nodes of cross talk with the PI3K/AKT pathway, has been implicated in the development of resistance. In the present study, perifosine, a PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitor, and trametinib, a MEK inhibitor, were combined, and their therapeutic efficacy on DIPG cells was assessed. Growth delay assays were performed with each drug individually or in combination. Here, we show that dual inhibition of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways synergistically reduced cell viability. We also reveal that trametinib induced AKT phosphorylation in DIPG cells that could not be effectively attenuated by the addition of perifosine, likely due to the activation of other compensatory mechanisms. The synergistic reduction in cell viability was through the pronounced induction of apoptosis, with some effect from cell cycle arrest. We conclude that the concurrent inhibition of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways may be a potential therapeutic strategy for DIPG.

  18. First Measurements of eta_c Decaying into K^+K^-2(pi^+pi^-) and 3(pi^+pi^-)

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ban, Y; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Chen Jin; Chen Jun; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X P; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Yi Jin; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, Y L; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Fang Liu; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, L X; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Sun, H S; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, K; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wand, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Yu; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X M; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zahng, Yiyun; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2006-01-01

    The decays of eta_c to K^+K^-2(pi^+pi^-) and 3(pi^+pi^-) are observed for the first time using a sample of 5.8X10^7 J/\\psi events collected by the BESII detector. The product branching fractions are determined to be B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c-->K^+K^-pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)=(1.21+-0.32+- 0.23)X10^{-4}$,B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c-->K^{*0}\\bar{K}^{*0}pi^+pi^-)= (1.29+-0.43+-0.32)X10^{-4}$, and (J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)* B(eta_c-->pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)= (2.59+-0.32+-0.48)X10^{-4}. The upper limit for eta_c-->phi pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^- is also obtained as B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c--> phi pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)< 6.03 X10^{-5} at the 90% confidence level.

  19. Inhibitory effect of oxymatrine on hepatocyte apoptosis via TLR4/PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Ai-Ling; Zhao, Min; Jiang, Dao-Rong

    2017-06-07

    To evaluate the effect of oxymatrine (OMT) on hepatocyte apoptosis in rats with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced acute liver failure (ALF). LPS/D-GalN was used to establish a model of ALF in rats. To evaluate the effect of OMT, we assessed apoptosis by transmission electron microscopy, and the pathological changes in the liver by light microscopy with hematoxylin and eosin staining. An automated biochemical analyzer was used to measure serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β. Western blotting was used to detect protein levels in liver tissues. Streptavidin peroxidase immunohistochemistry was used to observe expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)4, active caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2. All rats in the normal control and OMT-pretreated groups survived. The mortality rate in the model group was 30%. OMT preconditioning down-regulated apoptosis of hepatocytes and ameliorated pathological changes in liver tissue. The levels of AST, ALT, TNF-α and IL-1β in the model group increased significantly, and were significantly reduced by OMT pretreatment. OMT pretreatment down-regulated expression of TLR4 and active caspase-3 and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and up-regulated expression of P-Akt(Ser473) (Akt phosphorylated at serine 473) and P-GSK3β(Ser9) (glycogen synthase kinase 3β phosphorylated at serine 9) induced by LPS/D-GalN. OMT inhibits hepatocyte apoptosis by suppressing the TLR4/PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway, which suggests that OMT is an effective candidate for ameliorating acute liver failure.

  20. Symmetry improvement of 3PI effective actions for O (N ) scalar field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.

    2015-04-01

    N-particle irreducible effective actions (nPIEA) are a powerful tool for extracting nonperturbative and nonequilibrium physics from quantum field theories. Unfortunately, practical truncations of nPIEA can unphysically violate symmetries. Pilaftsis and Teresi (PT) addressed this by introducing a "symmetry improvement" scheme in the context of the 2PIEA for an O (2) scalar theory, ensuring that the Goldstone boson is massless in the broken symmetry phase [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. We extend this idea by introducing a symmetry improved 3PIEA for O (N ) theories, for which the basic variables are the one-, two- and three-point correlation functions. This requires the imposition of a Ward identity involving the three-point function. We find that the method leads to an infinity of physically distinct schemes, though a field theoretic analogue of d'Alembert's principle is used to single out a unique scheme. The standard equivalence hierarchy of nPIEA no longer holds with symmetry improvement, and we investigate the difference between the symmetry improved 3PIEA and 2PIEA. We present renormalized equations of motion and counterterms for two- and three-loop truncations of the effective action, though we leave their numerical solution to future work. We solve the Hartree-Fock approximation and find that our method achieves a middle ground between the unimproved 2PIEA and PT methods. The phase transition predicted by our method is weakly first order and the Goldstone theorem is satisfied, while the PT method correctly predicts a second-order phase transition. In contrast, the unimproved 2PIEA predicts a strong first-order transition with large violations of the Goldstone theorem. We also show that, in contrast to PT, the two-loop truncation of the symmetry improved 3PIEA does not predict the correct Higgs decay rate, although the three-loop truncation does, at least to leading order. These results suggest that symmetry improvement should not

  1. Symmetry improvement of 3PI effective actions for O(N) scalar field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] n-Particle Irreducible Effective Actions ($n$PIEA) are a powerful tool for extracting non-perturbative and non-equilibrium physics from quantum field theories. Unfortunately, practical truncations of $n$PIEA can unphysically violate symmetries. Pilaftsis and Teresi (PT) addressed this by introducing a "symmetry improvement" scheme in the context of the 2PIEA for an O(2) scalar theory, ensuring that the Goldstone boson is massless in the broken symmetry phase [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nuc.Phys. B 874, 2 (2013), pp. 594--619]. We extend this by introducing a symmetry improved 3PIEA for O(N) theories, for which the basic variables are the 1-, 2- and 3-point correlation functions. This requires the imposition of a Ward identity involving the 3-point function. The method leads to an infinity of physically distinct schemes, though an analogue of d'Alembert's principle is used to single out a unique scheme. The standard equivalence hierarchy of $n$PIEA no longer holds with symmetry improvement and we i...

  2. 饥饿与再投喂对条石鲷幼鱼组织和血清中主要代谢酶活性及糖元含量的影响%The effects of starvation and refeeding on tissue and serum metabolic enzyme activities and glycogen contents of barred knifejaw( Oplegnathus fasciatus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施兆鸿; 彭士明; 宋国; 孙鹏; 尹飞; 王建钢

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of starvation and refeeding on tissue and serum metabolic enzyme activities and glycogen contents of Oplegnathus fasciatus with an average weight of (10.0 ± 1.0) g. Five experimental groups were designed,i. e. fed twice daily for 30 d(S0,control group) , starved for 3d and refed for 27 d( S3) , starved for 6d and refed for 24 d( S6) , starved for 9d and refed for 21 d(S9) .starved for 12 d and refed for 18 d(S12). The samples (serum, liver and muscle) were collected at the initial experiment, after starvation and refeeding, and the alkaline phosphatase( AKP) , acid phosphatase (ACP) , glutamic-pyruvic transaminase ( GPT) , glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase ( GOT) activities and glycogen contents of tissues were analyzed. The results showed that,serum and liver glycogen contents were significantly affected hy the starvation and refeeding, and serum glycogen ( except S12 group) and liver glycogen contents were reduced significantly as a result of starvation, while the liver glycogen contents returned to the level of control group after refeeding. However, only a little effect on the muscle glycogen contents was found during the starvation and refeeding. During the period of experiment, the AKP and GPT activities of serum and liver were significantly affected by starvation, and after refeeding, both enzymes activities returned to the levels of control group. However,during the whole experimental period,the effects of starvation and refeeding on muscle AKP,ACP,GPT and GOT activities were very little. In conclusion,the serum glycogen content with a level of (2.65 ±0.33) - (3.70 ±0.36) mmol/L was essential to maintain the stabilization of body metabolism. The main metabolic enzymes in serum and liver were very important in maintaining the basic metabolism of O.fasciatus under the condition of starvation.%为研究条石鲷幼鱼在饥饿与再投喂条件下机体各组织和血清中主要代谢酶活性和糖元

  3. Nontranscriptional activation of PI3K/Akt signaling mediates hypotensive effect following activation of estrogen receptor β in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Kay LH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen acts on the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, where sympathetic premotor neurons are located, to elicit vasodepressor effects via an estrogen receptor (ERβ-dependent mechanism. We investigated in the present study nontranscriptional mechanism on cardiovascular effects following activation of ERβ in the RVLM, and delineated the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/serine/threonine kinase (Akt signaling pathway in the effects. Methods In male Sprague–Dawley rats maintained under propofol anesthesia, changes in arterial pressure, heart rate and sympathetic neurogenic vasomotor tone were examined after microinjection bilaterally into RVLM of 17β-estradiol (E2β or a selective ERα or ERβ agonist. Involvement of ER subtypes and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the induced cardiovascular effects were studied using pharmacological tools of antagonists or inhibitors, gene manipulation with antisense oligonucleotide (ASON or adenovirus-mediated gene transfection. Results Similar to E2β (1 pmol, microinjection of ERβ agonist, diarylpropionitrile (DPN, 1, 2 or 5 pmol, into bilateral RVLM evoked dose-dependent hypotension and reduction in sympathetic neurogenic vasomotor tone. These vasodepressive effects of DPN (2 pmol were inhibited by ERβ antagonist, R,R-tetrahydrochrysene (50 pmol, ASON against ERβ mRNA (250 pmol, PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (5 pmol, or Akt inhibitor (250 pmol, but not by ERα inhibitor, methyl-piperidino-pyrazole (1 nmol, or transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D (5 or 10 nmol. Gene transfer by microinjection into bilateral RVLM of adenovirus encoding phosphatase and tensin homologues deleted on chromosome 10 (5 × 108 pfu reversed the vasodepressive effects of DPN. Conclusions Our results indicate that vasodepressive effects following activation of ERβ in RVLM are mediated by nongenomic activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study provides new insight in the

  4. Measurement of the Matrix Elements for the Decays $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^0$ and $\\eta/\\eta^{\\prime}\\rightarrow\\pi^0\\pi^0\\pi^0$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Eren, E E; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kühn, W; Kupsc, A; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01

    Based on a sample of $1.31 \\times 10^9$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, Dalitz plot analyses of selected 79,625 $\\eta\\rightarrow\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^0$ events, 33,908 $\\eta\\rightarrow\\pi^0\\pi^0\\pi^0$ events and 1,888 $\\eta^{\\prime}\\rightarrow\\pi^0\\pi^0\\pi^0$ events are performed. The measured matrix elements of $\\eta\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements. The Dalitz plot slope parameters of $\\eta\\rightarrow\\pi^0\\pi^0\\pi^0$ and $\\eta^{\\prime}\\rightarrow\\pi^0\\pi^0\\pi^0$ are determined to be $-0.055 \\pm 0.014 \\pm 0.004$ and $-0.640 \\pm 0.046 \\pm 0.047$, respectively, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. Both values are consistent with previous measurements, while the precision of the latter one is improved by a factor of three. Final state interactions are found to have an important role in those decays.

  5. Involvement of cAMP/Epac/PI3K-dependent pathway in the antiproteolytic effect of epinephrine on rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baviera, Amanda Martins; Zanon, Neusa Maria; Navegantes, Luiz Carlos C; Kettelhut, Isis Carmo

    2010-02-05

    Very little is known about the signaling pathways by which catecholamines exert anabolic effects on muscle protein metabolism, stimulating protein synthesis and suppressing proteolysis. The present work tested the hypothesis that epinephrine-induced inhibition of muscle proteolysis is mediated through the cAMP/Epac/PI3K-dependent pathway with the involvement of AKT and Foxo. The incubation of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from rats with epinephrine and/or insulin increased the phosphorylation of AKT and its downstream target Foxo3a, a well-known effect that prevents Foxo translocation to the nucleus and the activation of proteolysis. Similar effects on AKT/Foxo signaling were observed in muscles incubated with DBcAMP (cAMP analog). The stimulatory effect of epinephrine on AKT phosphorylation was completely blocked by wortmannin (selective PI3K inhibitor), suggesting that the epinephrine-induced activation of AKT is mediated through PI3K. As for epinephrine and DBcAMP, the incubation of muscles with 8CPT-2Me-cAMP (selective Epac agonist) reduced rates of proteolysis and increased phosphorylation levels of AKT and Foxo3a. The specific PKA agonist (N6BZ-cAMP) inhibited proteolysis and abolished the epinephrine-induced AKT and Foxo3a phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of PKA by H89 further increased the phosphorylation levels of AKT and Foxo3a induced by epinephrine, DBcAMP or 8CPT-2Me-cAMP. These findings suggest that the antiproteolytic effect of the epinephrine on isolated skeletal muscle may occur through a cAMP/Epac/PI3K-dependent pathway, which leads to the phosphorylation of AKT and Foxo3a. The parallel activation of PKA-dependent pathway also inhibits proteolysis and seems to limit the stimulatory effect of cAMP on AKT/Foxo3a signaling.

  6. Genetic parameters of the piglet mortality traits stillborn, weak at birth, starvation, crushing, and miscellaneous in crossbred pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strange, T.; Ask, B.; Nielsen, B.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate genetic parameters for the mortality causes stillborn, weak at birth, starvation, crushing, and miscellaneous in crossbred piglets produced by crossbred dams. Data were collected in a single Danish commercial herd from October 2006 to July 2008 and consisted of 34......,194 piglets (2,152 litters), which originated from 195 Danish Duroc sires and 955 crossbreds between Danish Landrace and Danish Yorkshire dams. Of the 34,194 piglets born, 11.5% were stillborn, 4.2% were crushed by the sow, 2.7% died due to starvation, 2.3% were weak at birth, and 2.2% died of miscellaneous...... causes before weaning. The first 4 mentioned causes were analyzed multivariately using a generalized linear mixed model with a probit link function, including the genetic effect of both sire and dam. Heritabilities based on the sire component ranged between 0.08 for stillborn and 0.21 for starvation...

  7. Glucose starvation-mediated inhibition of salinomycin induced autophagy amplifies cancer cell specific cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R.; Jain, Mayur V.; Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta; Roberg, Karin; Lotfi, Kourosh; Łos, Marek J.

    2015-01-01

    Salinomycin has been used as treatment for malignant tumors in a small number of humans, causing far less side effects than standard chemotherapy. Several studies show that Salinomycin targets cancer-initiating cells (cancer stem cells, or CSC) resistant to conventional therapies. Numerous studies show that Salinomycin not only reduces tumor volume, but also decreases tumor recurrence when used as an adjuvant to standard treatments. In this study we show that starvation triggered different st...

  8. Physiological and behavioral responses to intermittent starvation in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Na; Mitchell, Sharon E; Hambly, Catherine; Morgan, David G; Clapham, John C; Speakman, John R

    2012-01-18

    The dual intervention point model states that body mass is controlled by upper and lower intervention points, above and below which animals (and humans) intervene physiologically to bring their body mass back into the acceptable range. It has been further suggested that the lower intervention point may be defined by the risk of starvation, while the upper intervention point may be defined by the risk of predation. The objective of the present study was to test whether the risk of starvation determines the lower intervention point and to examine the physiological and behavioral mechanisms that underpin the regulation of body mass, when the risk of starvation is increased. Sixty-four mice were exposed to random days of complete fasting or 50% food restriction and their body mass and fat mass responses were measured. Food intake, physical activity and body temperature were measured throughout the experiment. In addition, plasma leptin and insulin, triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acids, along with hypothalamic neuropeptides gene expression in the arcuate nucleus were assessed after 13 and 42 days of treatment. We found that C57BL/6J mice increased body mass and fatness in response to a short-term (13 days) intermittent fasting, which was restored to baseline as the treatment was prolonged. In contrast, intermittently 50% food restricted mice showed no significant changes in body mass or fatness. Over the first 13 days of treatment the data were consistent with the dual intervention point model as the mice showed both increased body mass and adiposity over this period. Over the more protracted period of 42 days the effect waned and was therefore inconsistent with the model. The body mass and fat mass gains in intermittently fasted mice were mainly accounted for by increased food intake. Elevated NPY gene expression after 13 days (three 24 h fasting events) may have driven the increase in food intake. However, no changes were observed in such neuropeptides as POMC

  9. PI3K-GLUT4 Signal Pathway Associated with Effects of EX-B3 Electroacupuncture on Hyperglycemia and Insulin Resistance of T2DM Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Yan Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To explore electroacupuncture’s (EA’s effects on fasting blood glucose (FBG and insulin resistance of type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM model rats and give a possible explanation for the effects. Method. It takes high fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 30 mg/kg for model preparation. Model rats were randomly divided into T2DM Model group, EA weiwanxiashu (EX-B3 group, and sham EA group (n=12/group. EA (2 Hz continuous wave, 2 mA, 20 min/day, 6 days/week, 4 weeks was applied as intervention. FBG, area under curve (AUC of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR, pancreatic B cell function index (HOMA-B, skeletal muscle phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K, glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4, and membrane GLUT4 protein expression were measured. Results. EA weiwanxiashu (EX-B3 can greatly upregulate model rat’s significantly reduced skeletal muscle PI3K (Y607 and membrane GLUT4 protein expression (P<0.01, effectively reducing model rats’ FBG and AUC of OGTT (P<0.01. The effects are far superior to sham EA group. Conclusion. EA weiwanxiashu (EX-B3 can upregulate skeletal muscle phosphorylated PI3K protein expression, to stimulate membrane translocation of GLUT4 and thereby increase skeletal muscle glucose intake to treat T2DM.

  10. PI3K-GLUT4 Signal Pathway Associated with Effects of EX-B3 Electroacupuncture on Hyperglycemia and Insulin Resistance of T2DM Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To explore electroacupuncture's (EA's) effects on fasting blood glucose (FBG) and insulin resistance of type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) model rats and give a possible explanation for the effects. Method. It takes high fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 30 mg/kg) for model preparation. Model rats were randomly divided into T2DM Model group, EA weiwanxiashu (EX-B3) group, and sham EA group (n = 12/group). EA (2 Hz continuous wave, 2 mA, 20 min/day, 6 days/week, 4 weeks) was applied as intervention. FBG, area under curve (AUC) of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), pancreatic B cell function index (HOMA-B), skeletal muscle phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), and membrane GLUT4 protein expression were measured. Results. EA weiwanxiashu (EX-B3) can greatly upregulate model rat's significantly reduced skeletal muscle PI3K (Y607) and membrane GLUT4 protein expression (P < 0.01), effectively reducing model rats' FBG and AUC of OGTT (P < 0.01). The effects are far superior to sham EA group. Conclusion. EA weiwanxiashu (EX-B3) can upregulate skeletal muscle phosphorylated PI3K protein expression, to stimulate membrane translocation of GLUT4 and thereby increase skeletal muscle glucose intake to treat T2DM. PMID:27656242

  11. Study of reaction pi- A --> pi+pi-pi- A at VES setup

    CERN Document Server

    Kachaev, I A

    2002-01-01

    The results on partial wave analysis of 3pi system produced at beam momentum 36.6 GeV/c on beryllium target are presented. New method of amplitude analysis is suggested -- extraction of largest eigenvalue of density matrix. Exotic wave with JPC = 1-+ in rho pi system is studied in four t' regions. No narrow object around M = 1.6 GeV is found. Unusually steep t'-dependence for pi(1300) object is detected.

  12. Amplitude analysis of the decays $\\eta^\\prime\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $\\eta^\\prime\\rightarrow\\pi^0\\pi^0\\pi^0$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Dou, Z L; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Farinelli, R; Fava, L; Fedorov, O; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, L; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, R P; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, X Z; Huang, Y; Huang, Z L; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kupsc, A; Kühn, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q Y; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y B; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, M M; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y M; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, H R; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, M; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X H; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, L J; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, J J; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    Based on a sample of $1.31\\times10^9$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector, an amplitude analysis of the isospin violating decays $\\eta^\\prime\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $\\eta^\\prime\\rightarrow\\pi^0\\pi^0\\pi^0$ is performed. Significant $P$-wave contribution from $\\eta^\\prime\\rightarrow\\rho^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}$ is observed for the first time in $\\eta^\\prime\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$. The branching fraction is determined to be ${\\mathcal B}(\\eta^\\prime\\rightarrow\\rho^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp})=(7.44\\pm0.60\\pm1.26\\pm1.84)\\times 10^{-4}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic and the third model dependent. In addition to the non-resonant $S$-wave component, a contribution from the $\\sigma$ meson is also essential. The branching fractions of the $S$-wave components are determined as ${\\mathcal B}(\\eta^\\prime\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0)_S=(37.63\\pm0.77\\pm2.22\\pm4.48)\\times 10^{-4}$ and ${\\mathcal B}(\\eta^\\prime\\rightarrow\\pi^0\\pi^0\\pi^0)=(35.22\\pm0.82\\pm2.60)\\times 10^{-4}$, respective...

  13. Revision of absorption corrections for the $p p \\to p p \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ process

    CERN Document Server

    Lebiedowicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    We include new additional absorption corrections into the Lebiedowicz-Szczurek (non-resonant) model for $p p \\to p p \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ or $p \\bar p \\to p \\bar p \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ processes. They are related to the $\\pi N$ nonperturbative interaction in the final state of the reaction. The role of the absorption corrections is quantified for several differential distributions for $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.2, 1.96, 7, and 8 TeV. The new absorption corrections lead to further decrease of the cross section by about a factor of two. They change the shape of some distributions ($d \\sigma/dt$, $d \\sigma/dp_{t,p}$, $d \\sigma/d \\phi_{pp}$) but leave almost unchanged shape of other distributions ($d \\sigma/dM_{\\pi \\pi}$, $d \\sigma/dy_{\\pi}$, $d \\sigma /dp_{t,\\pi}$, $d \\sigma/d \\phi_{\\pi \\pi}$). The effect may have important impact on the interpretation of the recent STAR and CDF data as well as the forthcoming data of the ALICE, ATLAS + ALFA and CMS + TOTEM collaborations.

  14. Raspberry Pi for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    McManus, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Embrace the exciting new technology of Raspberry Pi! With the invention of the unique credit-card sized single-board computer, the Raspberry Pi, comes a new wave of hardware geeks, hackers, and hobbyists who are excited about the possibilities of the Raspberry Pi, and this is the perfect guide to get you started in this exhilarating new arena. With this fun and friendly book, you'll quickly discover why the supply for the Pi cannot keep up with the demand! Veteran tech authors Sean McManus and Mike Cook show you how to download and install the operating system, use the installe

  15. Meet the Raspberry Pi

    CERN Document Server

    Upton, Eben

    2012-01-01

    The essential preview guide to getting started with Raspberry Pi ʼ computing and programming Originally conceived of as a fun, easy way for kids (and curious adults) to learn computer programming, the Raspberry Pi quickly evolved into a remarkably robust, credit-card-size computer that can be used for everything from playing HD videos and hacking around with hardware to learning to program! Co-authored by one of the creators of the Raspberry Pi, this special preview eBook fills you in on everything you need to know to get up and running on your Raspberry Pi in no time, including how to:

  16. Adventures in Raspberry Pi

    CERN Document Server

    Philbin, Carrie Anne

    2015-01-01

    Start programming quickly with this super-fun guide to Raspberry Pi Adventures in Raspberry Pi, 2nd Edition includes 9 cool projects that show you how to set up and start developing on your Raspberry Pi. Updated for the release of the Rev 3 board, this second edition covers all the latest features and tells you everything you need to know. Written specifically for 11-15 year-olds, this book uses the wildly successful, Raspberry Pi to explain the fundamentals of computing. You'll have a blast learning basic programming and system administration skills, beginning with the very basics of how to p

  17. Final state interactions and CP violation in K$_{L}$ --> $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$e+e-

    CERN Document Server

    Elwood, J K; Savage, M J; Walden, J W; Elwood, John K; Wise, Mark B; Savage, Martin J; Walden, James W

    1996-01-01

    Using chiral perturbation theory we calculate the imaginary parts of the K_L \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\pi^- e^+ e^- form factors that arise from \\pi \\pi \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\pi^- and \\pi \\pi \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\gamma^* rescattering. We discuss their influence on CP violating variables in K_L \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\pi^- e^+ e^-.

  18. The neuropsychology of starvation: set-shifting and central coherence in a fasted nonclinical sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Pender

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Recent research suggests certain neuropsychological deficits occur in anorexia nervosa (AN. The role of starvation in these deficits remains unclear. Studies of individuals without AN can elucidate our understanding of the effect of short-term starvation on neuropsychological performance. METHODS: Using a within-subjects repeated measures design, 60 healthy female participants were tested once after fasting for 18 hours, and once when satiated. Measures included two tasks to measure central coherence and a set-shifting task. RESULTS: Fasting exacerbated set-shifting difficulties on a rule-change task. Fasting was associated with stronger local and impaired global processing, indicating weaker central coherence. CONCLUSIONS: Models of AN that propose a central role for set-shifting difficulties or weak central coherence should also consider the impact of short-term fasting on these processes.

  19. Sequential Feedback Induction Stabilizes the Phosphate Starvation Response in Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Vardi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Depletion of essential nutrients triggers regulatory programs that prolong cell growth and survival. Starvation-induced processes increase nutrient transport, mobilize nutrient storage, and recycle nutrients between cellular components. This leads to an effective increase in intracellular nutrients, which may act as a negative feedback that downregulates the starvation program. To examine how cells overcome this potential instability, we followed the transcription response of budding yeast transferred to medium lacking phosphate. Genes were induced in two temporal waves. The first wave was stably maintained and persisted even upon phosphate replenishment, indicating a positive feedback loop. This commitment was abolished after 2 hr with the induction of the second expression wave, coinciding with the reduction in cell growth rate. We show that the overall temporal stability of the expression response depends on the sequential pattern of gene induction. Our results emphasize the key role of gene expression dynamics in optimizing cellular adaptation.

  20. DNA microarray analysis suggests that zinc pyrithione causes iron starvation to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasokawa, Daisuke; Murata, Satomi; Iwahashi, Yumiko; Kitagawa, Emiko; Kishi, Katsuyuki; Okumura, Yukihiro; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Zinc pyrithione has been used in anti-dandruff shampoos and in anti-fouling paint on ships. However, little is known of its mode of action. We characterized the effects of sub-lethal concentrations of zinc pyrithione (Zpt) on Saccharomyces cerevisiae using DNA microarrays. The majority of the strongly upregulated genes are related to iron transport, and many of the strongly downregulated genes are related to the biosynthesis of cytochrome (heme). These data suggest that Zpt induces severe iron starvation. To confirm the DNA microarray data, we supplemented cultures containing Zpt with iron, and the growth of the yeast was restored significantly. From these results, we propose that the principal toxicity of zinc pyrithione arises from iron starvation.

  1. Getting the Most from Pi Sigma Alpha Chapters: Exploring the Chapter Activity Grant Program and Its Multiplier Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The political science honor society, Pi Sigma Alpha, has chapters in nearly 700 institutions across the United States. The organization sponsors many programs that can contribute a great deal to students of political science; however, many students are unaware of these opportunities. This article encourages chapter advisors to make use of these…

  2. {pi}{pi}-correlations in hot and dense matter; {pi}{pi}-Korrelationen in heisser und dichter Materie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isselhorst, C.

    2006-07-01

    Properties of the {pi}{pi}-interactions in hot and dense matter are studied within a nonperturbative and symmetry conserving approach. The pion and its chiral partner, the {sigma}-meson, are described within the linear {sigma} model and special attention is given to the conservation of the underlying chiral symmetry. The first part deals with the properties of pion and {sigma} in the vacuum, the further being the ''Goldstone''-boson of the theory, while the latter is a broad resonance. The results in the vacuum are tested against experimental results like {pi}{pi}-phase shifts as well as the mass and the width of the {sigma}-meson. Besides the propagator of the {sigma}-meson, the preservation of the chiral symmetry is explicitly examined and chiral Ward identities for the n-point functions of the theory are fulfilled. Furthermore the {pi}{pi}-scattering matrix is calculated and shown to be consistent with predictions from chiral perturbation theory. In the second part of this work the model is extended to finite temperature with special emphasis on the chiral phase transition. The transition temperature and the critical exponent {beta} are determined, and the influence of the temperature on the propagator of the s-meson as well as on the {pi}{pi}-scattering matrix is examined. The third part deals with the properties of pion and {sigma} in dense matter. Additional couplings like the ones to particle-hole excitations and short range repulsion have to be included to ensure stability at nuclear matter density. At zero three momentum one observes a strong downward shift of the {sigma}-mass accompanied by an accumulation of strength near the two-pion threshhold in the spectral function. Taking into account a finite three momentum for the {pi}{pi}-pair, respectively the {sigma}-meson, one observes a weakening of the aforementioned effect. Having thus developed a model for the {pi}{pi}-interaction at finite temperature and density, we try to describe

  3. Reaction {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N near threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frlez, E.

    1993-11-01

    The LAMPF E1179 experiment used the {pi}{sup 0} spectrometer and an array of charged particle range counters to detect and record {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup 0}p, and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}p coincidences following the reaction {pi}{sup +}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}p near threshold. The total cross sections for single pion production were measured at the incident pion kinetic energies 190, 200, 220, 240, and 260 MeV. Absolute normalizations were fixed by measuring {pi}{sup +}p elastic scattering at 260 MeV. A detailed analysis of the {pi}{sup 0} detection efficiency was performed using cosmic ray calibrations and pion single charge exchange measurements with a 30 MeV {pi}{sup {minus}} beam. All published data on {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N, including our results, are simultaneously fitted to yield a common chiral symmetry breaking parameter {xi} ={minus}0.25{plus_minus}0.10. The threshold matrix element {vert_bar}{alpha}{sub 0}({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}p){vert_bar} determined by linear extrapolation yields the value of the s-wave isospin-2 {pi}{pi} scattering length {alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}({pi}{pi}) = {minus}0.041{plus_minus}0.003 m{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}1}, within the framework of soft-pion theory.

  4. Octopamine mediates starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Yu, Yue; Zhang, Vivian; Tian, Yinjun; Qi, Wei; Wang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Starved animals often exhibit elevated locomotion, which has been speculated to partly resemble foraging behavior and facilitate food acquisition and energy intake. Despite its importance, the neural mechanism underlying this behavior remains unknown in any species. In this study we confirmed and extended previous findings that starvation induced locomotor activity in adult fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. We also showed that starvation-induced hyperactivity was directed toward the localization and acquisition of food sources, because it could be suppressed upon the detection of food cues via both central nutrient-sensing and peripheral sweet-sensing mechanisms, via induction of food ingestion. We further found that octopamine, the insect counterpart of vertebrate norepinephrine, as well as the neurons expressing octopamine, were both necessary and sufficient for starvation-induced hyperactivity. Octopamine was not required for starvation-induced changes in feeding behaviors, suggesting independent regulations of energy intake behaviors upon starvation. Taken together, our results establish a quantitative behavioral paradigm to investigate the regulation of energy homeostasis by the CNS and identify a conserved neural substrate that links organismal metabolic state to a specific behavioral output. PMID:25848004

  5. The carbon starvation response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellström, Magnus; Shah, Firoz; Johansson, Tomas; Ahrén, Dag; Persson, Per; Tunlid, Anders

    2015-04-01

    The amounts of carbon allocated to the fungal partner in ectomycorrhizal associations can vary substantially depending on the plant growth and the soil nutrient conditions, and the fungus may frequently be confronted with limitations in carbon. We used chemical analysis and transcriptome profiling to examine the physiological response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus to carbon starvation during axenic cultivation. Carbon starvation induced a decrease in the biomass. Concomitantly, ammonium, cell wall material (chitin) and proteolytic enzymes were released into the medium, which suggest autolysis. Compared with the transcriptome of actively growing hyphae, about 45% of the transcripts analyzed were differentially regulated during C-starvation. Induced during starvation were transcripts encoding extracellular enzymes such as peptidases, chitinases and laccases. In parallel, transcripts of N-transporters were upregulated, which suggest that some of the released nitrogen compounds were re-assimilated by the mycelium. The observed changes suggest that the carbon starvation response in P. involutus is associated with complex cellular changes that involves autolysis, recycling of intracellular compounds by autophagy and reabsorption of the extracellular released material. The study provides molecular markers that can be used to examine the role of autolysis for the turnover and survival of the ectomycorrhizal mycelium in soils.

  6. The effect of employing the p/i buffer layers and in-situ hydrogen treatment for transparent a-Si:H solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Jung; Yun, Sun Jin; Park, Min A; Lim, Jung Wook

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we describe the effects of various thicknesses of triple p/i buffer layers and hydrogen treatment on various performances in the fabrication of transparent a-Si:H solar cells. For the increment of buffer layer thickness, V(oc) increases steadily and J(sc) firstly increases and then decreases. The triple buffer layers also enhance the transmittance as well as conversion efficiency. For hydrogen plasma treatment, overall performances were enhanced with plasma power due to the passivation of dangling bonds at p/i interface. Therefore, the usage of triple buffer layers with proper treatment is beneficial to obtaining transparent a-Si:H solar cells with high quality.

  7. Study of $B^{-}\\to DK^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $B^-\\to D\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays and determination of the CKM angle $\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Matthieu, Kecke; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Ninci, Daniele; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of the suppressed $B^{-}\\to DK^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and favored $B^-\\to D\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays, where the neutral $D$ meson is detected through its decays to the $K^{\\mp}\\pi^{\\pm}$ and $CP$-even $K^+K^-$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final states. The measurement is carried out using a proton-proton collision data sample collected by the LHCb experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$. We observe the first significant signals in the $CP$-even final states of the $D$ meson for both the suppressed $B^{-}\\to DK^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and favored $B^-\\to D\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ modes, as well as in the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed $D\\to K^+\\pi^-$ final state of the $B^-\\to D\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay. Evidence for the ADS suppressed decay $B^{-}\\to DK^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$, with $D\\to K^+\\pi^-$, is also presented. From the observed yields in the $B^{-}\\to DK^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B^-\\to D\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and their charge conjugate decay modes, we measure the value of the weak phase to be $\\gamma=(74^{+20}_{-18})^{\\rm o}$. Th...

  8. JNK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in diabetic rats: effects of salvianolic acid A intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuping; Xu, Tongda; Li, Dongye; Pan, Defeng; Wu, Pei; Luo, Yuanyuan; Ma, Yanfeng; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that diabetes impairs the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) pathway, while insulin resistance syndrome has been associated with alterations of this pathway in diabetic rats after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), and activation of C-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is involved. The present study was designed to investigate whether inhibiting JNK activity would partially restore the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and protect against myocardial I/R injury in diabetic rats, and to explore the effect of intervention with salvianolic acid A (Sal A). The inhibitor of JNK (SP600125) and Sal A were used in type 2 diabetic (T2D) rats, outcome measures included heart hemodynamic data, myocardial infarct size, the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), SERCA2a activity, cardiomyocyte apotosis, expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and the phosphorylation status of Akt and JNK. The p-Akt levels were increased after myocardial I/R in non-diabetic rats, while there was no change in diabetic rats. Pretreatment with the SP600125 and Sal A decreased the p-JNK levels and increased the p-Akt levels in diabetic rats with I/R, and heart hemodynamic data improved, infarct size and LDH release decreased, SERCA2a activity increased, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 expression levels decreased, and the expression of Bcl-2 and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio increased. Our results suggest that the JNK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in myocardial I/R injury in diabetic rats and Sal A exerts an anti-apoptotic effect and improves cardiac function following I/R injury through the JNK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in this model.

  9. The PI3K signaling-mediated nitric oxide contributes to cardiovascular effects of angiotensin-(1-7) in the nucleus tractus solitarii of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao-Tang; Ren, Chang-Zhen; Yang, Ya-Hong; Zhang, Ru-Wen; Sun, Jia-Cen; Wang, Yang-Kai; Su, Ding-Feng; Wang, Wei-Zhong

    2016-01-30

    Angiotensin-1-7 [Ang-(1-7)], acting via the Mas receptor in the central nervous system, is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity. Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated as an important modulator in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), a key region involved in control of cardiovascular activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in mediating the effect of Ang-(1-7) on NO generation in the NTS. In Sprague-Dawley rats, acute injection of Ang-(1-7) into the NTS significantly increased NO generation and neuronal/endothelial NO synthase (n/eNOS) activity, which were abolished by the selective Mas receptor antagonist d-Alanine-[Ang-(1-7)] (A-779), the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, or the Akt inhibitor triciribine (TCN). Western blotting analysis further demonstrated that Ang-(1-7) significantly increased levels of Akt/NOS phosphorylation in the NTS, and Ang-(1-7)-induced e/nNOS phosphorylation was antagonized by LY294002 or TCN. Furthermore, gene knockdown of PI3K by lentivirus containing small hairpin RNA in the NTS prevented the Ang-(1-7)-induced increases in NOS/Akt phosphorylation and NO production. The physiological (in vivo) experiments showed that pretreatment with the NOS inhibitor l-NAME, LY294002, or TCN abolished the decreases in blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity induced by Ang-(1-7) injected into the NTS. Our findings suggest that nitric oxide release meditated by the Mas-PI3K-NOS signaling pathway is involved in the cardiovascular effects of Ang-(1-7) in the NTS.

  10. B -> pi pi Decays and New Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Baek, S; Baek, Seungwon; London, David

    2005-01-01

    We assume that new physics (NP) is present in B -> pi pi decays, affecting the I=2 and/or I=0 amplitudes. We show that, with two ingredients, one can detect either of these types of NP. These are: (i) the standard-model (SM) weak phases are assumed to be measured independently and (ii) it is argued that the NP strong phases are negligible compared to those of the SM. The theoretical uncertainty associated with the second point is only at the level of 5-10%. This analysis can be carried out with present B -> pi pi measurements, but the errors are too large to draw definitive conclusions about the presence/absence of NP. This situation will improve with future measurements. If NP is found, it is possible to measure its parameters with further theoretical input. Assuming that the NP is present in only one isospin channel, we make three theoretical assumptions and extract its parameters. Present data suggest the presence of I=2 NP, but this conclusion should be viewed with skepticism due to the high level of theo...

  11. Effects of chain length and Au spin-orbit coupling on 3(pi pi*) emission from bridging Cn2- units: theoretical characterization of spin-forbidden radiative transitions in metal-capped one-dimensional carbon chains [H3PAu(C[triple bond]C)nAuPH3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zexing; Zhang, Qianer

    2004-04-19

    Density functional theory and CASSCF calculations have been used to optimize the geometries of binuclear gold(I) complexes [H(3)PAu(C[triple bond]C)(n)AuPH(3)] (n=1-6) in their ground states and selected lowest energy (3)(pi pi*) excited states. Vertical excitation energies obtained by time-dependent density functional calculations for the spin-forbidden singlet-triplet transitions have exponential-decay size dependence. The predicted singlet-triplet splitting limit of [H(3)PAu(C[triple bond]C)(proportional/variant)AuPH(3)] is about 8317 cm(-1). Calculated singlet-triplet transition energies are in reasonable agreement with available experimental observations. The effect of the heavy atom Au spin-orbit coupling on the (3)(pi pi*) emission of these metal-capped one-dimensional carbon allotropes has been investigated by MRCI calculations. The contribution of the spin- and dipole-allowed singlet excited state to the spin-orbit-coupling wave function of the (3)(pi pi*) excited state makes the low-lying acetylenic triplet excited states become sufficiently allowed so as to appear in both electronic absorption and emission.

  12. Low-Mass (M<1.2 Gev/c^2) Sigma0 - Meson Produced in the System Pi+Pi- from the Reaction np --> np Pi+Pi- at Pn = 5.20 Gev/c^2

    OpenAIRE

    Troyan, Yu. A.; Beljaev, A. V.; Troyan, A. Yu.; Plekhanov, E. B.; Jerusalimov, A. P.; Arakelian, S. G.

    2006-01-01

    The production and properties of the resonances in the system of Pi+Pi- were studied in the reaction np --> npPi+Pi- at the momentum of incident neutrons Pn=(5.20 +/- 0.12)GeV/c. In this work in comparison with previous ones we made more hard selection of events taking into account track measurement precise. In the distribution of the Pi+Pi- combinations effective masses we have found 8 peculiarities. All the observable peculiarities have spins equal to zero. There were no corresponding picks...

  13. Once more about the $\\omega$ --> 3$\\pi$ contact term

    CERN Document Server

    Silagadze, Z K

    1995-01-01

    The manifestations of the \\omega \\to 3\\pi contact term and its unitary partners are investigated in the framework of the chiral effective lagrangian theory with vector mesons. We conclude that nowadays the existence and magnitude of the contact term can be extracted neither from theory, nor experiment. The theoretical uncertainty is caused by the one-loop corrections. Some speculations about them lead to the generalized KSRF relation \\frac{f_\\pi^2g^2_{\\rho \\pi \\pi}}{m_\\rho^2}=\\frac{m_K}{2\\sqrt{2} \\pi f_\\pi}.

  14. Starvation and germ tube formation in the exponential phase Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, T; Hamatake, H; Kaminishi, H; Kuroki, A; Suehara, T; Suehara, Y; Sakima, T; Hagihara, Y; Watanabe, K

    1989-01-01

    Two chemically defined media were developed for the induction of germ tubes in exponential phase cells of Candida albicans. One medium was N-acetyl-D-glucosamine medium which is composed of L-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, L-proline, NaHCO3, sodium acetate, NaH2PO4 and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The other one was glucose medium in which N-acetyl-D-glucosamine is exchanged for glucose plus NH4Cl in N-acetyl-D-glucosamine medium. In these media, a high percentage of germ tube forming cells was obtained without a temperature shift. However, starvation of the cells in water at 37 degrees C was a necessary pretreatment to consistently obtain a high percentage of germ tube forming cells. The effect of starvation was remarkable in glucose medium, the percentages of germ tube forming cells among the normal cells and starved cells were 20 and 80, respectively. As for intracellular changes during starvation, a decrease in adenosine triphosphate concentration and an increase in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate concentration were observed.

  15. Induction of Rhizopus oryzae germination under starvation using host metabolites increases spore susceptibility to heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeman, Tidhar; Kakongi, Nathan; Schneider, Avishai; Vinokur, Yakov; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Carmeli, Shmuel; Levy, Maggie; Skory, Christopher D; Lichter, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2014-03-01

    Sweetpotato is a nutritional source worldwide. Soft rot caused by Rhizopus spp. is a major limiting factor in the storage of produce, rendering it potentially unsafe for human consumption. In this study, Rhizopus oryzae was used to develop a concept of postharvest disease control by weakening the pathogen through induction of spore germination under starvation conditions. We isolated the sweetpotato active fractions (SPAFs) that induce spore germination and used them at a low dose to enhance spore weakening caused by starvation. Germination in SPAF at 1 mg/ml weakened the pathogen spores by delaying their ability to form colonies on rich media and by increasing their sensitivity to heat stress. The weakening effect was also supported by reduced metabolic activity, as detected by Alarmar Blue fluorescent dye assays. Spores incubated with SPAF at 1 mg/ml showed DNA fragmentation in some of their nuclei, as observed by TUNEL assay. In addition, these spores exhibited changes in ultrastructural morphology (i.e., shrinkage of germ tubes, nucleus deformation, and vacuole formation) which are hallmarks of programmed cell death. We suggest that induction of spore germination under starvation conditions increases their susceptibility to stress and, therefore, might be considered a new strategy for pathogen control.

  16. 温度对加州新小绥螨捕食作用影响及高温耐饥饿能力研究%Effect of Temperature on Predation of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) and Starvation Tolerance at High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃贵勇; 李庆

    2013-01-01

    The functional responses of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) to Panonychus citri AaGregor at different temperatures and the starvation tolerance at high temperature of N.californicus and other four predatory mites were studied.The result showed that the controlling effect of N.californicus to P.citri AaGregor increased with the experimental temperature range of 20 to 30 ℃,the controlling effect was the strongest at 30 ℃,but when the temperatures was higher than 34 ℃,the controlling effect decreased ; the starvation tolerance at high temperature of N.californicus was higher than that of Amblyseius eharai Amitai et Swirski and Euseius nicholsi,and closed to that of A.pseudolongispinosus and A.makuwa Ehara.%本文研究了在不同温度条件下加州新小绥螨Neoseiulus californicus(McGregor)对柑橘全爪螨Panonychus citri AaGregor的功能反应,以及研究了加州新小绥螨等5种捕食螨的高温耐饥饿能力.结果表明:在20~30℃温度下,随着温度的升高,加州新小绥螨对柑橘全爪螨各螨态的控制能力增强,在30℃时,控制能力最强,而超过30 ℃时,加州新小绥螨的控制能力下降;加州新小绥螨的高温耐饥饿能力显著高于江原钝绥螨Amblyseius eharai Amitai et Swirski和尼氏真绥螨Euseius nicholsi(Ehara et Lee),而与拟长毛钝绥螨A.pseudolongispinosus和真桑钝绥螨A.makuwa Ehara接近.

  17. Starvation of cancer via induced ketogenesis and severe hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelner, Adam; Vorsanger, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Neoplasms are highly dependent on glucose as their substrate for energy production and are generally not able to catabolize other fuel sources such as ketones and fatty acids. Thus, removing access to glucose has the potential to starve cancer cells and induce apoptosis. Unfortunately, other body tissues are also dependent on glucose for energy under normal conditions. However, in human starvation (or in the setting of diet-induced ketogenesis), the body "keto-adapts" and glucose requirements of most tissues drop to almost nil. Exceptions include the central nervous system (CNS) and various other tissues which have a small but obligatory requirement of glucose. Our hypothesized treatment takes keto-adaptation as a prerequisite. We then propose the induction of severe hypoglycemia by depressing gluconeogenesis while administering glucose to the brain. Although severe hypoglycemia normally produces adverse effects such as seizure and coma, it is relatively safe following keto-adaptation. We hypothesize that our therapeutic hypoglycemia treatment has potential to rapidly induce tumor cell necrosis.

  18. STARVATION RESISTANCE IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER IN RELATION TO THE POLYMORPHISMS AT THE ADH AND ALPHA-GPDH LOCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OUDMAN, L; VANDELDEN, W; KAMPING, A; BIJLSMA, R

    In view of the world-wide latitudinal cline of the Adh and alpha Gpdh allozyme frequencies of Drosophila melanogaster and the interactions between these loci, experiments were performed to study the phenotypic effects of these loci. Starvation resistance, oxygen consumption, body weight, protein

  19. STARVATION RESISTANCE IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER IN RELATION TO THE POLYMORPHISMS AT THE ADH AND ALPHA-GPDH LOCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OUDMAN, L; VANDELDEN, W; KAMPING, A; BIJLSMA, R

    1994-01-01

    In view of the world-wide latitudinal cline of the Adh and alpha Gpdh allozyme frequencies of Drosophila melanogaster and the interactions between these loci, experiments were performed to study the phenotypic effects of these loci. Starvation resistance, oxygen consumption, body weight, protein con

  20. Study of the Decays B- -> D(*)+ pi- pi-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Abe, T; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allison, J; Altenburg, D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M A; Back, J J; Bailey, S; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bóna, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Borean, C; Borgland, A W; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandt, T; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brigljevic, V; Brochard, F; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Burchat, Patricia R; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chao, M; Charles, E; Chauveau, J; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Cochran, J; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colberg, T; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cote-Ahern, D; Cottingham, W N; Coupal, D P; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Crosetti, G; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Del Gamba, V; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Dickopp, M; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Falciai, D; Farbin, A; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K; Ford, W T; Forti, A C; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Franek, B J; Frey, R; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabriel, T A; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J M; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Geddes, N I; George, S; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Grancagnolo, S; Graugès-Pous, E; Green, M G; Grenier, G J; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, P A; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hicheur, A; Hill, E J; Hitlin, D G; Höcker, A; Hodgkinson, M C; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hu, T; Hufnagel, D; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, F; Jackson, P D; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kay, M; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knowles, D J; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kral, J F; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kukartsev, G; Kurup, A; Kutter, P E; Kuznetsova, N; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Langer, M; Lankford, A J; Laplace, S; Latham, T E; Lavin, D; Lazzaro, A; Le Clerc, C; Le Diberder, F R; Lee, S J; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Levesque, J A; Levi, M E; Levy, S L; Lewandowski, B; Li, H; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; LoSecco, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Lü, C; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lyon, A J; MacFarlane, D B; MacKay, C; Macri, M; Mallik, U; Maly, E; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Manfredi, P F; Mangeol, D J J; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marker, C E; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKemey, A K; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, T I; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nicholson, H; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Penny, R C; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Peters, K; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petrak, S; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Pivk, M; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Re, V; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Romosan, A; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Roy, J; Ryd, A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sanders, P; Sandrelli, F; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schmitz, R E; Schmücker, H; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Shorthouse, H W; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snyder, A; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Stängle, H; Stark, J; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Strother, P; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Swain, J E; T'Jampens, S; Tanaka E W; Tantot, L; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Treadwell, E; Turri, M; Vaitsas, G; Varnes, H A; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vidal, P B; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walkowiak, W; Walsh, J; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Weatherall, J H; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Xella, S M; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zallo, A; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; Del Re, D; La Vaissière, C de; Van Hoek, W C; Von, J H

    2003-01-01

    We report on analyses of $B^-$ mesons decaying into $D^{*+}\\pi^-\\pi^-$ and $D^+\\pi^-\\pi^-$ final states using 89 million $B^-$ decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy $B$ Factory. Preliminary measurements are given for the inclusive branching fractions for $B^- \\to D^{*+}\\pi^-\\pi^-$ and $B^- \\to D^+\\pi^-\\pi^-$, and for the exclusive branching fractions for $B^- \\to D_1(2420)^0\\pi^-$ and $B^- \\to D_2^{*}(2460)^0\\pi^-$, where $D_1(2420)^0$ and $D_2^{*}(2460)^0$ are the two narrow $c\\bar u$ $P$-wave states. The ratio ${\\mathcal{B}}(B^- \\to D_2^*(2460)^0\\pi^-)/{\\mathcal{B}}(B^- \\to D_1(2420)^0\\pi^-)$ is measured to be $0.80 \\pm 0.07 \\pm 0.16$.

  1. 细胞饥饿及 TNF-α干预后内皮细胞膜微粒对人脑微血管内皮细胞的影响%Effects of cell starvation and TNF-αderived endothelial microvesicles on human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘群文; 何彩霞; 刘雅静; 张惠婷; 王艳; 戴炳琰; 马晓瑭

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨饥饿及TNF-α刺激条件下,内皮细胞膜微粒( EMVs )对人脑微血管内皮细胞( HBMECs )增殖、迁移及血管生成功能的影响。方法体外培养HBMECs,分为PBS组、饥饿组、TNF-α组。于饥饿24 h后提取饥饿后产生的EMVs( sHB-MVs),于TNF-α刺激24 h后提取TNF-α刺激下产生的EMVs(αHB-MVs)。将sHB-MVs与αHB-MVs按照1×108个/mL、每孔10μL分别与饥饿组及TNF-α组HBMECs共培养,PBS组给予10μL PBS处理。采用MTT法测定各组HBMECs增殖能力,倒置显微镜下测定HBMECs迁移距离,观察血管形成数。结果饥饿组增殖能力高于PBS组(P<0.01),TNF-α组HBMECs增殖能力低于PBS组(P<0.01)。饥饿组迁移距离长于PBS组(P<0.05),TNF-α组迁移距离短于PBS组(P<0.01)。饥饿组血管生成数多于PBS组(P<0.01),TNF-α组血管生成数少于PBS组(P<0.01)。结论饥饿刺激下产生的EMVs可促进HBMECs增殖、迁移及血管生成功能,TNF-α刺激下产生的EMVs可抑制HBMECs增殖、迁移及血管生成功能。%Objective To investigate the effects of cell starvation and TNF-αderived endothelial microvesicles (EMVs) on the proliferation, migration and angiogenesis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in vitro.Methods HBMECs were cultured and were divided into the PBS group, starvation group and TNF-αgroup.EMVs were extracted from HB-MECs cultured in a serum deprivation (SD) medium (starving stress, sHB-MVs) or SD medium containing tumor necrosis fac-tor-(TNF-α) (apoptotic stress,αHB-MVs).The HBMECs of the starvation group and TNF-αgroup were cultured with sHB-MVs andαHB-MVs (1 ×108/mL, 10μL each hole), respectively;and the PBS group was treated with 10μL PBS.The prolif-eration of HBMECs in each group was determined by MTT, the migration distance of HBMECs was measured by inverted micro-scope and the number of angiogenesis was observed under the

  2. The Politics of Starvation Deaths in West Bengal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the local socio-political causes behind a sudden wave of starvation deaths that swept across the West Bengali village of Amlashol during the summer of 2004. Following the new paradigm of famine analysis where focus is placed on political failures, the article addresses three...... groups of political dynamics that together contributed to the starvation deaths: (i) political triggering mechanisms; (ii) underlying political dynamics; and (iii) village specific political dynamics. The article finds that the government’s escalating conflict with the Maoists turned a situation...... and politically marginalised panchayat. Within Amlashol, the casualties of starvation came primarily from one particular Scheduled tribe, the Sabars, due to issues of social stigmatisation, political exclusion and eroding livelihoods. The article provides a testament to the importance of addressing disaggregated...

  3. Characterization of starvation-induced dispersion in Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Sternberg, Claus;

    2005-01-01

    that they must be able to regulate their ability to form biofilm and to dissolve biofilm. We present an investigation of a biofilm dissolution process occurring in flow-chamber-grown Pseudomonas putida biofilms. Local starvation-induced biofilm dissolution appears to be an integrated part of P. putida biofilm...... development that causes characteristic structural rearrangements. Rapid global dissolution of entire P. putida biofilms was shown to occur in response to carbon starvation. Genetic analysis suggested that the adjacent P. putida genes PP0164 and PP0165 play a role in P. putida biofilm formation and dissolution....... PP0164 encodes a putative periplasmic protein of previously unknown function, and PP0164 mutant bacteria are sticky, and unable to reduce their adhesiveness and dissolve their biofilm in response to carbon starvation. PP0165 encodes a putative transmembrane protein containing GGDEF and EAL domains...

  4. The oogenic germline starvation response in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah S Seidel

    Full Text Available Many animals alter their reproductive strategies in response to environmental stress. Here we have investigated how L4 hermaphrodites of Caenorhabditis elegans respond to starvation. To induce starvation, we removed food at 2 h intervals from very early- to very late-stage L4 animals. The starved L4s molted into adulthood, initiated oogenesis, and began producing embryos; however, all three processes were severely delayed, and embryo viability was reduced. Most animals died via 'bagging,' because egg-laying was inhibited, and embryos hatched in utero, consuming their parent hermaphrodites from within. Some animals, however, avoided bagging and survived long term. Long-term survival did not rely on embryonic arrest but instead upon the failure of some animals to produce viable progeny during starvation. Regardless of the bagging fate, starved animals showed two major changes in germline morphology: All oogenic germlines were dramatically reduced in size, and these germlines formed only a single oocyte at a time, separated from the remainder of the germline by a tight constriction. Both changes in germline morphology were reversible: Upon re-feeding, the shrunken germlines regenerated, and multiple oocytes formed concurrently. The capacity for germline regeneration upon re-feeding was not limited to the small subset of animals that normally survive starvation: When bagging was prevented ectopically by par-2 RNAi, virtually all germlines still regenerated. In addition, germline shrinkage strongly correlated with oogenesis, suggesting that during starvation, germline shrinkage may provide material for oocyte production. Finally, germline shrinkage and regeneration did not depend upon crowding. Our study confirms previous findings that starvation uncouples germ cell proliferation from germline stem cell maintenance. Our study also suggests that when nutrients are limited, hermaphrodites scavenge material from their germlines to reproduce. We discuss

  5. Mefloquine effectively targets gastric cancer cells through phosphatase-dependent inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanwei; Chen, Sen; Xue, Rui; Zhao, Juan; Di, Maojun

    2016-02-05

    Deregulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway has been recently identified to play a crucial role in the progress of human gastric cancer. In this study, we show that mefloquine, a FDA-approved anti-malarial drug, effectively targets human gastric cancer cells. Mefloquine potently inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of a panel of human gastric cancer cell lines, with EC50 ∼ 0.5-0.7 μM. In two independent gastric cancer xenograft mouse models, mefloquine significantly inhibits growth of both tumors. The combination of mefloquine with paclitaxel enhances the activity of either drug alone in in vitro and in vivo. In addition, mefloquine potently decreased phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, mTOR and rS6. Overexpression of constitutively active Akt significantly restored mefloquine-mediated inhibition of mTOR phosphorylation and growth, and induction of apoptosis, suggesting that mefloquine acts on gastric cancer cells via suppressing PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. We further show that mefloquine-mediated inhibition of Akt/mTOR singaling is phosphatase-dependent as pretreatment with calyculin A does-dependently reversed mefloquine-mediated inhibition of Akt/mTOR phosphorylation. Since mefloquine is already available for clinic use, these results suggest that it is a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for gastric cancer.

  6. Measurement of \\Gamma(\\eta -> \\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma)/\\Gamma(\\eta -> \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0) with the KLOE Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Babusci, D; Balwierz-Pytko, I; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Caldeira Balkest, L; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Di Salvo, R; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Fanizzi, G; Fantini, A; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gauzzi, P; Giardina, G; Giovannella, S; Gonnella, F; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Hoistad, B; Iafolla, L; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Leverington, B; Loddo, F; Loffredo, S; Mandaglio, G; Martemianov, M; Martini, M; Mascolo, M; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Morello, G; Moricciani, D; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Prado Longhi, I; Ranieri, A; Redmer, C.F; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Xu, G; Zdebik, J

    2013-01-01

    The ratio R_{\\eta}=\\Gamma(\\eta -> \\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma)/\\Gamma(\\eta -> \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0) has been measured by analyzing 22 million \\phi \\to \\eta \\gamma decays collected by the KLOE experiment at DA\\PhiNE, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 558 pb^{-1}. The \\eta \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma proceeds both via the \\rho resonant contribution, and possibly a non-resonant direct term, connected to the box anomaly. Our result, R_{\\eta}= 0.1856\\pm 0.0005_{stat} \\pm 0.0028_{syst}, points out a sizable contribution of the direct term to the total width. The di-pion invariant mass for the \\eta -> \\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma decay could be described in a model-independent approach in terms of a single free parameter, \\alpha. The determined value of the parameter \\alpha is \\alpha = (1.32 \\pm 0.08_{stat} +0.10/-0.09_{syst}\\pm 0.02_{theo}) GeV^{-2}

  7. Mefloquine effectively targets gastric cancer cells through phosphatase-dependent inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanwei [Department of General Surgery, Shiyan Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei Province (China); Chen, Sen [Department of Academic Affairs, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei Province (China); Xue, Rui [Department of Anesthesiology, Renmin Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei Province (China); Zhao, Juan [Department of Oncology, Xiangyang Central Hospital, Shiyan, Hubei Province (China); Di, Maojun, E-mail: maoojun_di@163.com [Department of General Surgery, Shiyan Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei Province (China)

    2016-02-05

    Deregulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway has been recently identified to play a crucial role in the progress of human gastric cancer. In this study, we show that mefloquine, a FDA-approved anti-malarial drug, effectively targets human gastric cancer cells. Mefloquine potently inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of a panel of human gastric cancer cell lines, with EC{sub 50} ∼0.5–0.7 μM. In two independent gastric cancer xenograft mouse models, mefloquine significantly inhibits growth of both tumors. The combination of mefloquine with paclitaxel enhances the activity of either drug alone in in vitro and in vivo. In addition, mefloquine potently decreased phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, mTOR and rS6. Overexpression of constitutively active Akt significantly restored mefloquine-mediated inhibition of mTOR phosphorylation and growth, and induction of apoptosis, suggesting that mefloquine acts on gastric cancer cells via suppressing PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. We further show that mefloquine-mediated inhibition of Akt/mTOR singaling is phosphatase-dependent as pretreatment with calyculin A does-dependently reversed mefloquine-mediated inhibition of Akt/mTOR phosphorylation. Since mefloquine is already available for clinic use, these results suggest that it is a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for gastric cancer. - Highlights: • Mefloquine targets a panel of gastric cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. • Combination of mefloquine and paclitaxel is synergistic. • Mefloquine acts on gastric cancer via inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. • Mefloquine can be repurposed for gastric cancer treatment.

  8. 温湿度和幼虫饥饿胁迫对白僵菌毒杀甜菜夜蛾效果的影响%Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Starvation Stress on the Virulence of Beauveria bassiana against the Larvae of Spodoptera exigua

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔璟辉; 陈浩涛

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature, humidity and starvation stress on the virulence of Beauveria bassiana against the larvae of Spodoptera exigua in laboratory were studied. The results showed that the temperature and the humidity had significant impact on the virulence of Beauveria bassiana, range of 24-27℃ and humid environment were beneficial to that Beauveria bassiana infecting the larvae of Spodoptera exigua; The starvation stress could shorten the time of Beauveria bassiana killing the larvae of Spodoptera exigua significantly. Therefore, weather factors such as temperature and humidity, food intake of pests, age of the Larvae must be considered when made use of Beauveria bassiana to prevent the larvae of Spodoptera exigua, and the best control effect could be achieved.%为了研究温、湿度和饥饿胁迫对白僵菌防治甜菜夜蛾幼虫的影响,进行了室内试验.结果表明:温度对白僵菌的致病力有显著影响,24~27℃下有利于白僵菌感染甜菜夜蛾幼虫;湿度对白僵菌的致病力也有显著影响,高湿环境有利于白僵菌感染甜菜夜蛾幼虫;饥饿胁迫能显著缩短甜菜夜娥幼虫被白僵菌杀死的时间.因此,在利用白僵菌防治甜菜夜蛾幼虫时,只有充分考虑温、湿度等天气因素,害虫的食物摄取,幼虫虫龄等基本情况,才能取得最佳的防治效果.

  9. Measurement of the B^0 -> D^*- pi^+ pi^- pi^+ branching fraction

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of (470.9 +- 2.8) x 10^6 BB-bar pairs, we measure the decay branching fraction B(B^0 -> D^*- pi^+ pi^- pi^+) = (7.26 +- 0.11 +- 0.31) x 10^-3, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. Our measurement will be helpful in studies of lepton universality by measuring B(B^0 -> D^*- tau^+ nu_tau) using tau^+ -> pi^+ pi^- pi^+ nu-bar_tau decays, normalized to B(B^0 -> D^*- pi^+ pi^- pi^+.

  10. Lattice QCD study of the s-wave $\\pi\\pi $ scattering lengths in the I=0 and 2 channels

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Ziwen

    2013-01-01

    The s-wave pion-pion ($\\pi\\pi$) scattering lengths are computed below the inelastic threshold by the L\\"uscher technique with pion masses ranging from 240 MeV to 463 MeV. In the Asqtad-improved staggered fermion formulation, we calculate the $\\pi\\pi$ four-point functions for the I=0 and 2 channels with "moving" wall sources without gauge fixing, and analyze them at the next-to-leading order in the continuum three-flavor chiral perturbation theory. At the physical pion mass, we secure the s-wave $\\pi\\pi$ scattering lengths as $m_\\pi a_{\\pi\\pi}^{I=0} = 0.214(4)(7)$ and $m_\\pi a_{\\pi\\pi}^{I=2} = -0.04430(25)(40)$ for the I=0 and 2 channels, respectively, where the first uncertainties are statistical and second ones are our estimates of several systematic effects. Our lattice results for the s-wave $\\pi\\pi$ scattering lengths are in well accordance with available experimental reports and theoretical forecasts at low momentum. A basic ingredient in our study for the I=0 case is properly incorporating disconnected ...

  11. Mapping out starvation responses in yeast by proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard; Færgeman, Nils J.; Andersen, Jens S.;

    2011-01-01

    eukaryotes as well. Here we have used an unbiased mass spectrometry and a stable isotope labelling based approach in order to examine how cells respond to amino acid starvation. Furthermore, since most cellular pathways are regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation, we wish to combine quantitative mass...... spectrometry with site-specific proteomic approaches in order to monitor changes in post-translational modifications incl. phosphorylations in amino acid starved cells. We present results showing some of the novel pathways and proteins that might be of great importance during amino acid starvation....

  12. A search for thermosynthesis: starvation survival in thermally cycled bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Muller, A W J

    2006-01-01

    In a pioneering study experimental evidence was sought of thermosynthesis, a theoretical biological mechanism for free energy gain from thermal cycling that has been invoked as energy source for the origin of life. A PCR machine applied thermal cycling to the K12 strain of Escherichia coli. The viability of this organism during starvation was determined at cyclic and at constant temperature. The found increase in the viability counts during the first days of starvation is consistent with thermosynthesis. The scattering in the results is however large. Further research is needed to proof that the increase is indeed due to a thermosynthesis process.

  13. A study of 3pi production in gammap → npi+pi+pi- and gammap → Delta++pi+pi-pi- with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaris, Aristeidis

    Apart from the mesons that the constituent quark model predicts, QCD allows for additional states beyond the qq¯ system. Previous experiments have performed partial wave analysis on pion- production data and claim observation of an exotic JPC = 1-+ state decaying via rhopi. The g12 experiment took place at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS spectrometer, a liquid hydrogen target was used and a tagged photon beam. By studying the reactions gamma p → npi+pi+pi - and gammap → Delta++pi +pi-pi-, the photoproduction of mesons decaying to 3pi was studied using two different but complimentary channels. Events are selected with low four-momentum transfer to the baryon, in order to enhance one pion exchange production. For both 3pi systems the data exhibit two intermediate decays, rhopi and f 2pi. For the gammap → npi +pi+pi- reaction over 600k events were acquired resulting in the largest 3 photoproduction dataset to date. The exotic JPC = 1-+ partial wave does not show resonant behavior and more so it is strongly consistent with a non-resonant non-interfering wave relative to a resonant pi 2(1670). Furthermore, the partial wave analysis shows production of the a2(1320) and pi2(1670) mesons. For the first time we report observation of a photoproduced a 1(1260) meson. For the gammap → Delta ++pi+pi-pi- reaction nearly 350k events were analyzed. A partial wave analysis was performed for the first time on this channel. The a 1(1260), a2(1320), and the pi2(1670) mesons were observed. Observation of the a1(1260) confirms the result first reported in gammap → npi+pi+pi- reaction.

  14. Deciphering Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Temporal Effects on Different Root Traits in Rice Grown in a Modified Hydroponic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Manisha; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Rai, Vandna; Jain, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi), an essential macronutrient for growth and development of plant, is often limiting in soils. Plants have evolved an array of adaptive strategies including modulation of root system architecture (RSA) for optimal acquisition of Pi. In rice, a major staple food, RSA is complex and comprises embryonically developed primary and seminal roots and post-embryonically developed adventitious and lateral roots. Earlier studies have used variant hydroponic systems for documenting the effects of Pi deficiency largely on primary root growth. Here, we report the temporal effects of Pi deficiency in rice genotype MI48 on 15 ontogenetically distinct root traits by using easy-to-assemble and economically viable modified hydroponic system. Effects of Pi deprivation became evident after 4 days- and 7 days-treatments on two and eight different root traits, respectively. The effects of Pi deprivation for 7 days were also evident on different root traits of rice genotype Nagina 22 (N22). There were genotypic differences in the responses of primary root growth along with lateral roots on it and the number and length of seminal and adventitious roots. Notably though, there were attenuating effects of Pi deficiency on the lateral roots on seminal and adventitious roots and total root length in both these genotypes. The study thus revealed both differential and comparable effects of Pi deficiency on different root traits in these genotypes. Pi deficiency also triggered reduction in Pi content and induction of several Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes in roots of MI48. Together, the analyses validated the fidelity of this modified hydroponic system for documenting Pi deficiency-mediated effects not only on different traits of RSA but also on physiological and molecular responses.

  15. Deciphering Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Temporal Effects on Different Root Traits in Rice Grown in a Modified Hydroponic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Manisha; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Rai, Vandna; Jain, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi), an essential macronutrient for growth and development of plant, is often limiting in soils. Plants have evolved an array of adaptive strategies including modulation of root system architecture (RSA) for optimal acquisition of Pi. In rice, a major staple food, RSA is complex and comprises embryonically developed primary and seminal roots and post-embryonically developed adventitious and lateral roots. Earlier studies have used variant hydroponic systems for documenting the effects of Pi deficiency largely on primary root growth. Here, we report the temporal effects of Pi deficiency in rice genotype MI48 on 15 ontogenetically distinct root traits by using easy-to-assemble and economically viable modified hydroponic system. Effects of Pi deprivation became evident after 4 days- and 7 days-treatments on two and eight different root traits, respectively. The effects of Pi deprivation for 7 days were also evident on different root traits of rice genotype Nagina 22 (N22). There were genotypic differences in the responses of primary root growth along with lateral roots on it and the number and length of seminal and adventitious roots. Notably though, there were attenuating effects of Pi deficiency on the lateral roots on seminal and adventitious roots and total root length in both these genotypes. The study thus revealed both differential and comparable effects of Pi deficiency on different root traits in these genotypes. Pi deficiency also triggered reduction in Pi content and induction of several Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes in roots of MI48. Together, the analyses validated the fidelity of this modified hydroponic system for documenting Pi deficiency-mediated effects not only on different traits of RSA but also on physiological and molecular responses. PMID:27200025

  16. Vanadate proliferative and anti-mineralogenic effects are mediated by MAPK and PI-3K/Ras/Erk pathways in a fish chondrocyte cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Daniel M; Cancela, M Leonor; Aureliano, Manuel; Laizé, Vincent

    2008-04-16

    We recently reported proliferative and anti-mineralogenic effects of vanadate on fish chondrocytes and here we investigate the signalling pathways associated with these effects. Our data show that vanadate stimulates chondrocyte proliferation through the MAPK pathway, using signalling mechanisms similar to those used by IGF-1, while it inhibits chondrocyte differentiation/mineralization through a putative PI-3K/Ras/Erk signalling, a pathway shared with insulin. Our data also suggest that vanadate impairs ECM mineralization not only by interfering with regulatory pathways but also by inhibiting enzymatic activity of ALP. Finally, this work provides additional evidence for the conservation, throughout evolution, of mechanisms regulating chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation.

  17. Extreme calorie restriction and energy source starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae represent distinct physiological states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boender, L.G.M.; Almering, M.J.H.; Dijk, M.; Van Maris, A.J.A.; De Winde, J.H.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran-Lapujade, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cultivation methods used to investigate microbial calorie restriction often result in carbon and energy starvation. This study aims to dissect cellular responses to calorie restriction and starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using retentostat cultivation. In retentostats, cells are continuousl

  18. Raspberry Pi super cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Andrew K

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a step-by-step, tutorial-based approach which will teach you how to develop your own super cluster using Raspberry Pi computers quickly and efficiently.Raspberry Pi Super Cluster is an introductory guide for those interested in experimenting with parallel computing at home. Aimed at Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, this book is a primer for getting your first cluster up and running.Basic knowledge of C or Java would be helpful but no prior knowledge of parallel computing is necessary.

  19. Raspberry Pi user guide

    CERN Document Server

    Halfacree, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Make the most out of the world’s first truly compact computer It's the size of a credit card, it can be charged like a smartphone, it runs on open-source Linux, and it holds the promise of bringing programming and playing to millions at low cost. And now you can learn how to use this amazing computer from its co-creator, Eben Upton, in Raspberry Pi User Guide. Cowritten with Gareth Halfacree, this guide gets you up and running on Raspberry Pi, whether you're an educator, hacker, hobbyist, or kid. Learn how to connect your Pi to other hardware, install software, write basic programs, an

  20. Initial-State Radiation Measurement of the e+e- -> pi+pi-pi+pi- Cross Section

    CERN Document Server

    Lees, J.P.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; Druzhinin, V.P.; Golubev, V.B.; Kravchenko, E.A.; Onuchin, A.P.; Serednyakov, S.I.; Skovpen, Yu.I.; Solodov, E.P.; Todyshev, K.Yu.; Yushkov, A.N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A.J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D.P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J.W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G.M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T.M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J.D.; West, C.A.; Eisner, A.M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W.S.; Martinez, A.J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B.A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C.H.; Doll, D.A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.T.; Hitlin, D.G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F.C.; Rakitin, A.Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M.S.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B.T.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P.C.; Ford, W.T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J.G.; Wagner, S.R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W.H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M.J.; Schubert, K.R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P.J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I.M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M.R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C.L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A.J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F.U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H.M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P.D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P.K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W.T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rubin, A.E.; Gritsan, A.V.; Guo, Z.J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A.M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M.H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D.J.; Wright, D.M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C.A.; Coleman, J.P.; Fry, J.R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Payne, D.J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A.J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, David Norvil; Davis, C.L.; Denig, A.G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K.E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R.J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G.D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D.A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P.M.; Robertson, S.H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D.J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H.L.; Jessop, C.P.; Knoepfel, K.J.; LoSecco, J.M.; Wang, W.F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N.B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G.R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A.J.S.; Telnov, A.V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M.A.; Piredda, G.; Bunger, C.; Grunberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schroder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E.O.; Wilson, F.F.; Emery, S.; de Monchenault, G.Hamel; Vasseur, G.; Y\\`, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D.J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M.R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R.C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B.G.; Gabareen, A.M.; Graham, M.T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W.R.; Kelsey, M.H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M.L.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.L.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Muller, D.R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A.A.; Schindler, R.H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M.K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A.P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W.J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D.H.; Wulsin, H.W.; Yarritu, A.K.; Young, C.C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M.V.; White, R.M.; Wilson, J.R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S.J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J.F.; Burchat, P.R.; Miyashita, T.S.; Alam, M.S.; Ernst, J.A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D.R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S.M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J.L.; Ruland, A.M.; Schilling, C.J.; Schwitters, R.F.; Wray, B.C.; Izen, J.M.; Lou, X.C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Choi, H.H.F.; King, G.J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M.J.; Nugent, I.M.; Roney, J.M.; Sobie, R.J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T.J.; Harrison, P.F.; Latham, T.E.; Puccio, E.M.T.; Band, H.R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We study the process e+e- -> pi+pi-pi+pi-gamma, with a photon emitted from the initial-state electron or positron, using 454.3 fb^-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC, corresponding to approximately 260,000 signal events. We use these data to extract the non-radiative sigma(e+e- ->pi+pi-pi+pi-) cross section in the energy range from 0.6 to 4.5 Gev. The total uncertainty of the cross section measurement in the peak region is less than 3%, higher in precision than the corresponding results obtained from energy scan data.

  1. Supersymmetric contributions to direct CP violation in $K \\rightarrow \\pi\\pi\\gamma$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Colangelo, G; Portolés, J

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the supersymmetric contributions to direct-CP-violating observables in $K \\to \\pi\\pi\\gamma$ decays induced by gluino-mediated magnetic-penguin operators. We find that $\\epsp_{+-\\gamma}$ and the differential width asymmetry of $K^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \\gamma$ decays could be substantially enhanced with respect to their Standard Model values, especially in the scenario where $\\epsp/\\eps$ is dominated by supersymmetric contributions. These observables could therefore provide a useful tool to search for New Physics effects in $|\\Delta S|=1$ transitions, complementary to

  2. 多重周期饥饿对奥尼罗非鱼体内蛋白酶活力影响%Effects of Multiple Cycle Starvation and Re-feeding on Protease Activity of Tilapia(Oreochromis niloticus×O.Areus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩春艳; 郑清梅; 冯丽娜; 黄勋和

    2012-01-01

    A 8 weeks study was conducted to determine the effect of multiple cycle starvation and re-feeding on protease activity in hepatopancreas,stomach and intestine of talipia(Oreochromis niloticus×O.Areus).After two weeks acclimation,180 juveniles were divided into four groups(control,1,2 and 3 respectively,three replicates,each 15 individuals),which were cycle starved for 0 d(control),1 d,2 d and 3 d,then cycle re-fed 7 d,6 d,5d and 4 d respectively,The results showed that the change of trypsin activity in hepatopancreas was consistency between starvation and re-feeding period,it was significantly higher in 1 group than control and 3 group(P〈0.05).Trypin activity in stomach and intestine was decreased gradually with cycle starvation prolonged,after re-feeding trypsin activity in 1 group was significantly higher than the other three groups(P〈0.05).Pepsin activity in hepatopancreas was gradually decreased with starvation prolonged,after re-feeding pepsin activity in hepatopancreas,stomach and intestine from high to low is as follows: group 1,group 2,group 3 and control group.%研究了多重周期饥饿对奥尼罗非鱼(Oreochromis niloticus×O.Areus.)肝胰脏及胃肠内蛋白酶活性的影响.分成4组:对照组、饥饿1 d投喂6 d(实验1组)、饥饿2 d投喂5 d(实验2组)和饥饿3 d投喂4 d(实验3组),实验持续56d.结果显示:循环饥饿处理和恢复投喂后,肝胰脏内胰蛋白酶的活力表现高度一致,实验1组均显著高于对照组和实验3组(P〈0.05);胃肠内胰蛋白酶活力随循环饥饿时间的延长逐渐下降,恢复投喂后实验1组胃肠内胰蛋白酶活力显著高于其它三组(P〈0.05);肝胰脏和胃肠内胃蛋白酶活力随循环饥饿时间延长均逐步下降,恢复投喂后肝胰脏及胃肠内胃蛋白酶活力从高至低依次为:实验1组、实验2组、实验3组和对照组.

  3. Coordination polymers assembled through pi-pi interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Plummer, E A

    2001-01-01

    Chapter one is a review of the relevant literature. In chapter two the coordination chemistry of biphenyl-tailed terpyridines with octahedral metal dications is investigated. The effect of different metal ions on their aggregation modes in the solid state is also investigated. In chapter three the coordination chemistry of polyaryl-tailed terpyridines with octahedral metal dications is investigated. The effect of different aryl tails on their aggregation modes in the solid state is investigated. In chapter four the pi-pi aggregation of molecular boxes through biphenyl tails is studied. In chapter five the immobilisation of aryl tailed complexes into polyelectrolyte films has been investigated, and the arrangement of these complexes in the films has been compared with same complexes in the crystal, thus moving from three dimensional aggregation to two dimensions.

  4. Measurement of the Wrong-Sign Decay D0 -> K+ pi- pi+ pi-

    CERN Document Server

    White, E; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, P; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, I -S; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dingfelder, J; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Esen, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Ferber, T; Frey, A; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Iwashita, T; Jaegle, I; Julius, T; Kah, D H; Kang, J H; Kato, E; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H O; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Klucar, J; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kronenbitter, B; Kuhr, T; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lange, J S; Lee, S -H; Li, J; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liu, C; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nedelkovska, E; Ng, C; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Oswald, C; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, H; Park, H K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ritter, M; Röhrken, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Varner, G; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamashita, Y; Yashchenko, S; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2013-01-01

    A measurement of the rate for the "wrong-sign" decay D0 -> K+ pi- pi+ pi- relative to that for the "right-sign" decay D0 -> K- pi+ pi+ pi- is presented. Using 791 fb-1 of data collected with the Belle detector, we obtain a branching fraction ratio of R_WS = [0.324 +- 0.008 (stat) +- 0.007 (sys)]%. Multiplying this ratio by the world average value for the branching fraction B(D0 -> K- pi+ pi+ pi-) gives a branching fraction B(D0 -> K+ pi- pi+ pi-) = (2.61 +- 0.06 +0.09 -0.08) x 10-4.

  5. Dying piece by piece: carbohydrate dynamics in aspen seedlings under severe carbon stress and starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Erin; Chow, Pak; Landhäusser, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Carbon stress and starvation remain poorly understood in trees, despite their potential role in mortality from a variety of agents. To explore the effects of carbon stress on nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) dynamics and recovery potential and to examine the process of starvation, we grew aspen seedlings under one of three levels of shade: 40% (light shade), 8% (medium shade), and 4% (dark shade) of full sunlight. We then exposed seedlings to 24 hours darkness at either 20° or 28° C until trees had died. Periodically, seedlings were harvested for NSC analysis and to measure stem and root respiration. In addition, some seedlings were moved back into the light to determine if recovery was possible at certain points during starvation. Specifically, we sought to address the following questions: 1) Do NSC concentrations or mass influence tree survival under carbon stress? 2) At what carbohydrate levels do trees fail to recover and starve? 3) Does temperature affect the NSC level at which trees starve? Increasing shade reduced growth, but surprisingly did not reduce NSC levels, except in a portion of deep shade seedlings that experienced dieback. Once in darkness, leaves died first, with final NSC levels ranging from ~4% (Medium shade, 28 degrees) to 7.5% (Light shade). Stem death generally occurred gradually down the stem. Stem tissues retained ~1-2% NSC when dead. Recovery was still possible when only the upper half of the stem had died; at this point, seedlings had relatively high root NSC levels in their remaining roots (7-10%), with 1-3% starch. No trees recovered after the whole stem had died, at which point, some trees root systems were completely dead. However, most retained substantial amounts of live roots, averaging 5-6% NSC, with 0.25-1.5% starch. Despite the initially similar NSC concentrations, light shade seedlings took longer to reach half stem and whole stem death than seedlings from medium and dark shade. Longer survival times were associated with

  6. Archimedes and Pi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilgalis, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a calculation method to approximate pi. Describes how to get an approximation to the circumscribed and inscribed perimeters of regular polygons of n sides. Presents the computer program and result of the approximation. (YP)

  7. $\\gamma\\gamma$ \\to $\\pi\\pi\\pi$ to one loop in chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Talavera, P; Bijnens, J; Bramon, A; Cornet, F

    1995-01-01

    The \\gamma\\gamma \\to \\pi^0 \\pi^0 \\pi^0 and \\gamma\\gamma \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0 amplitudes are discussed in the general context of Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) to O(p^6). Chiral loops are found to play a major role. This makes these processes a good test of ChPT, mainly in its anomalous sector. We correct earlier numerical results at tree level and determine the one-loop results as well.

  8. Raspberry Pi robotics projects

    CERN Document Server

    Grimmett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This book is for enthusiasts who want to use the Raspberry Pi to build complex robotics projects. With the aid of the step-by-step instructions in this book, you can construct complex robotics projects that can move, talk, listen, see, swim, or fly. No previous Raspberry Pi robotics experience is assumed, but even experts will find unexpected and interesting information in this invaluable guide.

  9. Amplitude analyses of the decays chi_c1 -> eta pi+ pi- and chi_c1 -> eta' pi+ pi-

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, G S; Ecklund, K M; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Pearson, L J; Thorndike, E H; Ricciardi, S; Thomas, C; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Lincoln, A; Smith, M J; Zhou, P; Zhu, J; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Randrianarivony, K; Tatishvili, G; Briere, R A; Vogel, H; Onyisi, P U E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Das, S; Ehrlich, R; Gibbons, L; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Sun, W M; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Lowrey, N; Mehrabyan, S; Selen, M; Wiss, J; Libby, J; Kornicer, M; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Szczepaniak, A; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Hietala, J; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Xiao, T; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B

    2011-01-01

    Using a data sample of 2.59 x 10^7 psi(2S) decays obtained with the CLEO-c detector, we perform amplitude analyses of the complementary decay chains chi_c1 -> eta pi+ pi- and chi_c1 -> eta' pi+ pi-. We find evidence for a P-wave eta' pi scattering amplitude, which, if interpreted as a resonance, would have exotic J^PC = 1^-+ and parameters consistent with the pi_1(1600) state reported in other production mechanisms. We also make the first observation of the decay a_0(980) -> eta' pi and measure the ratio of branching fractions B(a_0(980) -> eta' pi)/B(a_0(980) -> eta pi) = 0.064 +- 0.014 +- 0.014. The pi pi spectrum produced with a recoiling eta is compared to that with eta' recoil.

  10. Carbon starvation in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nitsche, Benjamin Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated carbon starvation in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger during submerged cultivation in bioreactor batch cultures. The work described in this thesis can be discussed as follows: (I) Establishment of computational resources for omics data analysis and interpretation in c

  11. Agouti-related protein prevents self-starvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kas, M.J.H.; van Dijk, G; Scheurink, AJW; Adan, RAH

    2003-01-01

    Food restriction leads to a paradoxical increase in physical activity and further suppression of food intake, such as observed in anorexia nervosa.(1,2) To understand this pathophysiological process, we induced physical hyperactivity and self-starvation in rats by restricting food in the presence of

  12. Agouti-related protein prevents self-starvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kas, M J H; van Dijk, G; Scheurink, A J W; Adan, R A H

    2003-01-01

    Food restriction leads to a paradoxical increase in physical activity and further suppression of food intake, such as observed in anorexia nervosa.(1,2) To understand this pathophysiological process, we induced physical hyperactivity and self-starvation in rats by restricting food in the presence of

  13. Iron starvation induces apoptosis in Rhizopus oryzae in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2015-01-01

    Mortality associated with mucormycosis remains high despite current antifungals. Iron-starvation strategies have been shown to have promising activity against Mucorales. We hypothesized that iron starvation enhances apoptosis in Rhizopus oryzae. Apoptosis was characterized in R. oryzae transformed with RNAi plasmid targeting FTR1 expression (iron permease mutant) or empty plasmid grown in iron rich (0.125% FeCl3) and iron depleted media (YNB+1mM ferrozine and 1 mM ascorbic acid). Increased apoptosis was observed with dihydrorhodamine-123 and rhodamine-123 staining in the iron starved mutant FTR1 when compared to empty plasmid, followed by increased extracellular ATP levels. In addition, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity were prominent in FTR1. In contrast, Rhizopus strains grown in iron-rich medium displayed minimal apoptosis. Our results demonstrate a metacaspase dependent apoptotic process in iron deprived condition and further support the role of iron starvation strategies as an adjunct treatment for mucormycosis, a mechanism by which iron starvation affects R. oryzae.

  14. Resonance formation in the $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ final state in two-photon collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A study of resonance formation is presented in the $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ final state in two-photon collisions at LEP. The $a_2(1320)$ radiative width is measured to be $\\Gamma_{\\gamma\\gamma}=0.98\\pm0.05\\pm0.09$ keV{}. The helicity 2 production is dominant. Exclusive $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ production has also been studied in the mass region above the $a_2$ in the $\\rho\\pi$ and $f_2\\pi$ channels. This region is dominated by a $\\rm J^P$=$2^+$ helicity 2 wave.

  15. 针刺对戊四唑诱发癫痫大鼠海马PI3K、Akt蛋白表达的影响%Effects of Acupuncture on Expressions of PI3K and Akt in Hippocampus of Rats with Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨帆; 昂文平; 沈德凯; 杨永清; 马允

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of acupuncture on expressions of PI3K and Akt in hippocampus of rats with pentylenetetrazol - induced epilepsy. Methods :60 SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups( n = 12) ; epilepsy mode! Group, LY294002 group, acupuncture treatment group, acupuncture treatment + LY294002 group, normal control group.4h and 24h after seizures, each group of rats were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde, and the brain tissue were removed. PI3K and Akt protein expressions were measured with immunohistochemical method. Results; No significant expressions of PI3K and Akt in acupuncture + LY294002 group and LY294002 group during two time periods of 4h and 24h after seizures; expressions of PI3K. And Akt were observed in epilepsy model group, the expression was significant at 4h compared with that at 24h ( P < 0. 01) ; expression sof PI3K and Akt were significantly increased in acupuncture group, the expressions of protein were increased more significantly at 4h (compared with the that at 24h, P < 0. 05 ) ; Conclusion: Acupuncture has obvious regulation effects of PI3K and Akt protein expressions, the effects of regulation had relationship with intracellular PI3K / Akt signal transduction pathway.%目的:观察针刺对戊四唑诱发癫痫大鼠海马神经元P13K、Akt蛋白表达的影响.方法:SD大鼠60只随机分为5组(n=12):癫痫模型组、LY294002组、针刺治疗组、针刺+LY294002组、正常对照组.各组分别于癫痫发作后4h与24h两个时间段左心灌注固定取脑组织,免疫组化法测PI3K、Akt蛋白表达.结果:针刺+LY294002组和LY294002组两个时间段均未见明显PI3K和Akt蛋白表达;癫痫模型组可见PI3K和Akt蛋白阳性表达,其中癫痫发作4h表达较24h明显(P<0.01);针刺组PI3K和Akt蛋白阳性表达量明显增多,其中4h时间点蛋白阳性表达量增加更为明显(与24h时间点比较,P<0.05.结论:针刺具有明显调节PI3K和Akt蛋白表达,其作用与细胞内PI3K/Akt信号转导通路有关.

  16. Ca++-sensitizing mutations in troponin, P(i), and 2-deoxyATP alter the depressive effect of acidosis on regulated thin-filament velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longyear, Thomas J; Turner, Matthew A; Davis, Jonathan P; Lopez, Joseph; Biesiadecki, Brandon; Debold, Edward P

    2014-05-01

    Repeated, intense contractile activity compromises the ability of skeletal muscle to generate force and velocity, resulting in fatigue. The decrease in velocity is thought to be due, in part, to the intracellular build-up of acidosis inhibiting the function of the contractile proteins myosin and troponin; however, the underlying molecular basis of this process remains poorly understood. We sought to gain novel insight into the decrease in velocity by determining whether the depressive effect of acidosis could be altered by 1) introducing Ca(++)-sensitizing mutations into troponin (Tn) or 2) by agents that directly affect myosin function, including inorganic phosphate (Pi) and 2-deoxy-ATP (dATP) in an in vitro motility assay. Acidosis reduced regulated thin-filament velocity (VRTF) at both maximal and submaximal Ca(++) levels in a pH-dependent manner. A truncated construct of the inhibitory subunit of Tn (TnI) and a Ca(++)-sensitizing mutation in the Ca(++)-binding subunit of Tn (TnC) increased VRTF at submaximal Ca(++) under acidic conditions but had no effect on VRTF at maximal Ca(++) levels. In contrast, both Pi and replacement of ATP with dATP reversed much of the acidosis-induced depression of VRTF at saturating Ca(++). Interestingly, despite producing similar magnitude increases in VRTF, the combined effects of Pi and dATP were additive, suggesting different underlying mechanisms of action. These findings suggest that acidosis depresses velocity by slowing the detachment rate from actin but also by possibly slowing the attachment rate.

  17. Ca++-sensitizing mutations in troponin, Pi, and 2-deoxyATP alter the depressive effect of acidosis on regulated thin-filament velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longyear, Thomas J.; Turner, Matthew A.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Lopez, Joseph; Biesiadecki, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Repeated, intense contractile activity compromises the ability of skeletal muscle to generate force and velocity, resulting in fatigue. The decrease in velocity is thought to be due, in part, to the intracellular build-up of acidosis inhibiting the function of the contractile proteins myosin and troponin; however, the underlying molecular basis of this process remains poorly understood. We sought to gain novel insight into the decrease in velocity by determining whether the depressive effect of acidosis could be altered by 1) introducing Ca++-sensitizing mutations into troponin (Tn) or 2) by agents that directly affect myosin function, including inorganic phosphate (Pi) and 2-deoxy-ATP (dATP) in an in vitro motility assay. Acidosis reduced regulated thin-filament velocity (VRTF) at both maximal and submaximal Ca++ levels in a pH-dependent manner. A truncated construct of the inhibitory subunit of Tn (TnI) and a Ca++-sensitizing mutation in the Ca++-binding subunit of Tn (TnC) increased VRTF at submaximal Ca++ under acidic conditions but had no effect on VRTF at maximal Ca++ levels. In contrast, both Pi and replacement of ATP with dATP reversed much of the acidosis-induced depression of VRTF at saturating Ca++. Interestingly, despite producing similar magnitude increases in VRTF, the combined effects of Pi and dATP were additive, suggesting different underlying mechanisms of action. These findings suggest that acidosis depresses velocity by slowing the detachment rate from actin but also by possibly slowing the attachment rate. PMID:24651988

  18. Measurements of the Branching fractions for $B_{(s)} \\to D_{(s)}\\pi\\pi\\pi$ and $\\Lambda_b^0 \\to \\Lambda_c^+\\pi\\pi\\pi$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Brisbane, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Caicedo Carvajal, J M; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Constantin, F; Conti, G; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Almagne, B; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Deissenroth, M; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Donleavy, S; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Eames, C; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; d'Enterria, D G; Esperante Pereira, D; Estéve, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hofmann, W; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koblitz, S; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kukulak, S; Kumar, R; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefévre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Luisier, J; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Mclean, C; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nardulli, J; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Nies, S; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B; Palacios, J; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilar, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; du Pree, T; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shao, B; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skottowe, H P; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Styles, N; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Vervink, K; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wacker, K; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2011-01-01

    Branching fractions of the decays $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ relative to $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-$ are presented, where $H_b$ ($H_c$) represents $\\overline{B^0}$ ($D^+$), $B^-$ ($D^0$), $\\overline{B_s^0}$ ($D_s^+$) and $\\Lambda_b^0$ ($\\Lambda_c^+$). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35~${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ of data collected at $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be \\begin{eqnarray*} {{\\cal{B}}(\\overline{B^0}\\to D^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\over{\\cal{B}}(\\overline{B^0}\\to D^+\\pi^-)} = 2.38\\pm0.11\\pm0.21 \

  19. Perturbative framework for the pi(+)pi(-) atom

    OpenAIRE

    Lyubovitskij, V. E.; Lipartia, E. Z.; Rusetsky, A. G.

    1998-01-01

    The perturbative framework is developed for the calculation of the pi(+)pi(-) atom characteristics on the basis of the field-theoretical Bethe-Salpeter approach. A closed expression for the first-order correction to the pi(+)pi(-) atom lifetime has been obtained.

  20. pi-pi interaction amplitudes with chiral constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The pi-pi interaction amplitudes have been calculated using a three coupled channel model both with and without constraints imposed by chiral models. Roy's equations have been used to compare the amplitudes and to study the role played by chiral constraints in the pi-pi interaction.

  1. Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)

    CERN Document Server

    Abulencia, A; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca-Almenar, C; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Da Ronco, S; Dagenhart, D; Davies, T; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; De Pedis, D; Deisher, A; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Di Turo, P; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dorr, C; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; García, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Höcker, A; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lee, Y J; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P F; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; MacQueen, D; Mack, P; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mukherjee, A; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mäki, T; Müller, T; Mülmenstädt, J; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Saint-Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Sánchez, C; Söderberg, M; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; Van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Volpi, G; Vázquez, F; Wagner, J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S; Österberg, K

    2006-01-01

    Using 355 pb^-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector in \\ppbar collisions at sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, we study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B -> D pi and B -> D pi pi pi. We present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) = 1.05 pm 0.10 (stat) pm 0.22 (syst). We also update our measurement of B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi) to 1.13 pm 0.08 (stat) pm 0.23 (syst) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. We find B(Bs -> Ds pi) = [3.8 pm 0.3 (stat) pm 1.3 (syst)] \\times 10^{-3} and B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) = [8.4 pm 0.8 (stat) pm 3.2 (syst)] \\times 10^{-3}.

  2. Measurement of the ratios of branching fractions B(B0s --> Ds- pi+ pi+ pi-)/B(B0-->D- pi+ pi+ pi-) and B(B0s --> Ds- pi+)/B(B0-->D- pi+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-02-09

    Using 355 pb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, we study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B_{(s)};{0}-->D_{(s)};{-}pi;{+} and B_{(s)};{0}-->D_{(s)};{-}pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-}. We present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(B_{s};{0}-->D_{s};{-}pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-})/B(B;{0}-->D;{-}pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-})=1.05+/-0.10(stat)+/-0.22(syst). We also update our measurement of B(B_{s};{0}-->D_{s};{-}pi;{+})/B(B;{0}-->D;{-}pi;{+}) to 1.13+/-0.08(stat)+/-0.23(syst), improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of 2. We find B(B_{s};{0}-->D_{s};{-}pi;{+})=[3.8+/-0.3(stat)+/-1.3(syst)]x10;{-3} and B(B_{s};{0}-->D_{s};{-}pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-})=[8.4+/-0.8(stat)+/-3.2(syst)]x10;{-3}.

  3. Precision measurement of the ratio BR($K_{S} \\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$)/BR($K_{L} \\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}_{D}$)

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J R; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Patel, M; Slater, M W; Wotton, S A; Arcidiacono, R; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, A; Cundy, D; Doble, N; Falaleev, V; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Grafström, P; Kubischta, W; Marchetto, F; Mikulec, I; Norton, A; Panzer-Steindel, B; Rubin, P; Wahl, H; Goudzovski, E; Hristov, P; Kekelidze, V; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Madigozhin, D; Molokanova, N; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Stoynev, S; Zinchenko, A; Monnier, E; Swallow, E C; Winston, R; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Baldini, W; Dalpiaz, P; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Scarpa, M; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, E; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Ruggiero, G; Veltri, M; Behler, M; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Hirstius, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Moosbrugger, U; Morales Morales, C; Peters, A; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca Martin, T; Szleper, M; Velasco, M; Anzivino, G; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lamanna, G; Lubrano, P; Michetti, A; Nappi, A; Pepe, M; Petrucci, M C; Piccini, M; Valdata, M; Cerri, C; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G; Sozzi, M; Cheshkov, C; Chèze, J B; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Gouge, G; Marel, G; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Clemencic, M; Goy Lopez, S; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Wislicki, W; Dibon, H; Jeitler, M; Markytan, M; Neuhofer, G; Widhalm, L

    2011-01-01

    The $K_{S} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$ decay mode was investigated using the data collected in 2002 by the NA48/1 collaboration. With about 23,k $K_{S} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$ events and 59,k $K_{L} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}_{D}$ normalization decays, the $K_{S} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$ branching ratio relative to the $K_{L}\\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}_{D}$ one was determined to be BR($K_{S} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$)/BR($K_{L} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}_{D}$) = $ (3.28 \\pm 0.06_{stat}\\pm 0.04_{syst})\\times 10^{-2}$. This result was used to set the upper limit $|g_{E1}/g_{BR}| \\lt 3.0$ at $90%$ CL on the presence, in the decay amplitude, of an E1 direct emission ($g_{E1}$) term relative to the dominant inner bremsstrahlung ($g_{BR}$) term. The CP-violating asymmetry ${cal A}_{\\phi}$ in the sin$\\phi$,cos$\\phi$ distribution of $K_{S} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$ events, where $\\phi$ is the angle between the $\\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and the $...

  4. Search for hadronic transition $\\chi_{cJ}\\to\\eta_{c}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and observation of $\\chi_{cJ}\\to K\\bar{K}\\pi\\pi\\pi$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Ferroli, R B; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2012-01-01

    Hadronic transitions of $\\chi_{cJ}\\to \\eta_{c}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ (J=0, 1, 2) are searched for using a sample of $1.06\\times 10^{8}$ $\\psi(3686)$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring. The $\\etac$ is reconstructed with $K_{S}^{0}K^{+}\\pi^{-}+c.c.$ and $K^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{0}$ final states. No signals are observed in any of the three $\\chi_{cJ}$ states in either $\\etac$ decay mode. At the 90% confidence level, the upper limits are determined to be $\\BR(\\chi_{c0}\\to \\eta_{c}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-})<0.07%$, $\\BR(\\chi_{c1}\\to \\eta_{c}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-})<0.32%$, and $\\BR(\\chi_{c2}\\to \\eta_{c}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-})<0.54%$. The upper limit of $\\BR(\\chi_{c1}\\to \\eta_{c}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ is lower than the existing theoretical prediction by almost an order of magnitude. The branching fractions of $\\chi_{cJ}\\to K_{S}^{0}K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}+c.c.$, $K^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$, $\\omega K^{+}K^{-}$ and $\\phi\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ (J=0, 1, 2) are measured for the first time.

  5. [PI 3 K/Akt signaling pathway contributed to the protective effect of acupuncture intervention on epileptic seizure-induced injury of hippocampal pyramidal cells in epilepsy rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Ang, Wen-Ping; Shen, De-Kai; Liu, Xiang-Guo; Yang, Yong-Qing; Ma, Yun

    2013-02-01

    To observe the protective effect of acupuncture stimulation on pyramidal cells in hippocampal CA 1 and CA 3 regions and to analyze the involvement of phosphatidy linositol-3-kinase (PI 3 K)/protein kinase B(PKB or Akt) signaling pathway in the acupuncture effect in epilepsy rats. A total of 120 SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group, model group, LY 294002 (a specific antagonist for PI 3 K/Akt signaling) group, acupuncture+ LY 294002 group and acupuncture group (n = 24 in each group, 12 for H. E. staining, and 12 for electron microscope observation). Epilepsy model was established by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 5 microL). Manual acupuncture stimulation was applied to "Baihui" (GV 20) and "Dazhui" (GV 14) once daily for 5 days. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO, 5 microL, a control solvent) was given to rats of the normal, model and acupuncture groups, and LY294002 (5 microL, dissolved in DMSO) given to rats of the LY 294002 and acupuncture+ LY 294002 groups by lateral ventricular injection. Four hours and 24 h after modeling, the hippocampus tissues were sampled for observing pathological changes of CA 1 and CA 3 regions after H. E. staining under light microscope and for checkin ultrastructural changes of the pyramidal cells under transmission electron microscope. In comparison with the normal control group, the numbers of pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA 3 region in the model group were decreased significantly 4 h and 24 h after epileptic seizure (P acupuncture group were increased considerably in the number at both 4 h and 24 h after seizure (P acupuncture+ LY 294002 and model groups in the numbers of pyramidal cells at 4 h and 24 h after seizure (P > 0.05). Findings of the light microscope and electron microscope showed that the injury severity of pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA 1 and CA 3 regions was moderate 4 h after epileptic seizure and even worse 24 h after seizure in the model group, LY 294002 group and acupuncture+ LY

  6. Search for direct CP violating charge asymmetries in $K^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^0\\pi^0$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J Richard; Kalmus, George Ernest; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Slater, M W; Wotton, S A; Arcidiacono, R; Bocquet, G; Cabibbo, Nicola; Ceccucci, A; Cundy, Donald C; Falaleev, V; Fidecaro, Maria; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Kubischta, Werner; Norton, A; Maier, A; Patel, M; Peters, A; Balev, S; Frabetti, P L; Goudzovski, E; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V D; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Madigozhin, D T; Marinova, E; Molokanova, N A; Polenkevich, I; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Stoynev, S; Zinchenko, A I; Monnier, E; Swallow, E; Winston, R; Rubin, P; Walker, A; Baldini, W; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Fiorini, M; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Wahle, H; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Celeghini, E; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Ruggiero, G; Veltri, M; Behler, M; Eppard, K; Kleinknecht, K; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Renk, B; Wache, M; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Coward, D; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca-Martin, T; Shieh, M; Szleper, M; Velasco, M; Wood, M D; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Nappi, A; Pepé, M; Petrucci, M C; Piccini, M; Raggi, M; Valdata-Nappi, M; Cerri, C; Collazuol, G; Costantini, F; Di Lella, L; Doble, N; Fantechi, R; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Michetti, A; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Bloch-Devaux, B; Cheshkov, C; Chèze, J B; De Beer, M; Derré, J; Marel, Gérard; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Bifani, S; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Clemencic, M; Goy-Lopez, S; Marchetto, F; Dibon, Heinz; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, G; Widhalm, L

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the direct CP violating charge asymmetries of the Dalitz plot linear slopes $A_g=(g^+-g^-)/(g^++g^-)$ in $K^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^0\\pi^0$ decays by the NA48/2 experiment at CERN SPS is presented. A new technique of asymmetry measurement involving simultaneous $K^+$ and $K^-$ beams and a large data sample collected allowed a result of an unprecedented precision. The charge asymmetries were measured to be $A^c_g=(-1.5\\pm2.1)\\times10^{-4}$ with $3.11\\times 10^9$ $K^{\\pm}\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays, and $A^n_g=(1.8\\pm1.8)\\times10^{-4}$ with $9.13\\times 10^7$ $K^{\\pm}\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^0\\pi^0$ decays. The precision of the results is limited mainly by the size of the data sample.

  7. Model-independent search for $CP$ violation in $D^{0} \\to K^{-}K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}$ and $D^{0} \\to \\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen,