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Sample records for phytophthora infestans effectors

  1. Effector genomics accelerates discovery and functional profiling of potato disease resistance and phytophthora infestans avirulence genes.

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    Vivianne G A A Vleeshouwers

    Full Text Available Potato is the world's fourth largest food crop yet it continues to endure late blight, a devastating disease caused by the Irish famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Breeding broad-spectrum disease resistance (R genes into potato (Solanum tuberosum is the best strategy for genetically managing late blight but current approaches are slow and inefficient. We used a repertoire of effector genes predicted computationally from the P. infestans genome to accelerate the identification, functional characterization, and cloning of potentially broad-spectrum R genes. An initial set of 54 effectors containing a signal peptide and a RXLR motif was profiled for activation of innate immunity (avirulence or Avr activity on wild Solanum species and tentative Avr candidates were identified. The RXLR effector family IpiO induced hypersensitive responses (HR in S. stoloniferum, S. papita and the more distantly related S. bulbocastanum, the source of the R gene Rpi-blb1. Genetic studies with S. stoloniferum showed cosegregation of resistance to P. infestans and response to IpiO. Transient co-expression of IpiO with Rpi-blb1 in a heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana system identified IpiO as Avr-blb1. A candidate gene approach led to the rapid cloning of S. stoloniferum Rpi-sto1 and S. papita Rpi-pta1, which are functionally equivalent to Rpi-blb1. Our findings indicate that effector genomics enables discovery and functional profiling of late blight R genes and Avr genes at an unprecedented rate and promises to accelerate the engineering of late blight resistant potato varieties.

  2. Functionally redundant RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans act at different steps to suppress early flg22-triggered immunity.

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    Xiangzi Zheng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequences of several economically important phytopathogenic oomycetes have revealed the presence of large families of so-called RXLR effectors. Functional screens have identified RXLR effector repertoires that either compromise or induce plant defense responses. However, limited information is available about the molecular mechanisms underlying the modes of action of these effectors in planta. The perception of highly conserved pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs, such as flg22, triggers converging signaling pathways recruiting MAP kinase cascades and inducing transcriptional re-programming, yielding a generic anti-microbial response. We used a highly synchronizable, pathogen-free protoplast-based assay to identify a set of RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans (PiRXLRs, the causal agent of potato and tomato light blight that manipulate early stages of flg22-triggered signaling. Of thirty-three tested PiRXLR effector candidates, eight, called Suppressor of early Flg22-induced Immune response (SFI, significantly suppressed flg22-dependent activation of a reporter gene under control of a typical MAMP-inducible promoter (pFRK1-Luc in tomato protoplasts. We extended our analysis to Arabidopsis thaliana, a non-host plant species of P. infestans. From the aforementioned eight SFI effectors, three appeared to share similar functions in both Arabidopsis and tomato by suppressing transcriptional activation of flg22-induced marker genes downstream of post-translational MAP kinase activation. A further three effectors interfere with MAMP signaling at, or upstream of, the MAP kinase cascade in tomato, but not in Arabidopsis. Transient expression of the SFI effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans and, for the most potent effector, SFI1, nuclear localization is required for both suppression of MAMP signaling and virulence function. The present study provides a framework to decipher the

  3. Determination of virulence contributions from Phytophthora infestans effectors IPI-O1 and IPI-O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most destructive plant diseases. Despite decades of intensive breeding efforts, it remains a threat to potato production worldwide, in part because newly evolved pathogen isolates quickly overcome major resista...

  4. Phytophthora infestans effectors IPI-O1 and IPI-O4 each contribute to pathogen virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most destructive plant diseases. Despite decades of intensive breeding efforts, it remains a threat to potato production worldwide, in part because newly evolved pathogen isolates quickly overcome major resista...

  5. Silencing of the PiAvr3a effector-encoding gene from Phytophthora infestans by transcriptional fusion to a short interspersed element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Tian, Zhendong; Avrova, Anna O; Savenkov, Eugene I; Dixelius, Christina; Whisson, Stephen C

    2011-12-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the notorious oomycete causing late blight of potato and tomato. A large proportion of the P. infestans genome is composed of transposable elements, the activity of which may be controlled by RNA silencing. Accumulation of small RNAs is one of the hallmarks of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate the presence of small RNAs corresponding to the sequence of a short interspersed retrotransposable element (SINE) suggesting that small RNAs might be involved in silencing of SINEs in P. infestans. This notion was exploited to develop novel tools for gene silencing in P. infestans by engineering transcriptional fusions of the PiAvr3a gene, encoding an RXLR avirulence effector, to the infSINEm retroelement. Transgenic P. infestans lines expressing either 5'-infSINEm::PiAvr3a-3' or 5'-PiAvr3a::SINEm-3' chimeric transcripts initially exhibited partial silencing of PiAvr3a. Over time, PiAvr3a either recovered wild type transcript levels in some lines, or became fully silenced in others. Introduction of an inverted repeat construct was also successful in yielding P. infestans transgenic lines silenced for PiAvr3a. In contrast, constructs expressing antisense or aberrant RNA transcripts failed to initiate silencing of PiAvr3a. Lines exhibiting the most effective silencing of PiAvr3a were either weakly or non-pathogenic on susceptible potato cv. Bintje. This study expands the repertoire of reverse genetics tools available for P. infestans research, and provides insights into a possible mode of variation in effector expression through spread of silencing from adjacent retroelements. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Using effectors of Phytophthora infestans to teach pathogenesis: Our attempt to provide a more comprehensive education

    Science.gov (United States)

    The topic of pathogenesis mechanisms (R/avirulence genes, effectors, and hypersensitive response) has proved challenging for students in our introductory plant pathology course. An apparent gap exists in the curriculum between this introductory course and higher level plant-microbe interaction cours...

  7. Determination of virulence contribution from Phytophthora infestans effector IPI-O4 in a resistant potato host contaning the RB gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most destructive plant diseases. Despite decades of intensive breeding efforts, it remains a threat to potato production worldwide, because newly evolved pathogen strains have overcome major resistance genes qu...

  8. Low genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans population in potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    genetic diversity of P. infestans and geographical origin. These results provided a foundation for making integrated control measures in the future. Key words: Phytophthora infestans, population genetics, simple-sequence repeat (SSR), potato late blight. INTRODUCTION. Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, causing the ...

  9. Effector-driven marker development and cloning of resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans in potato breeding clone SW93-1015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenman, Marit; Ali, Ashfaq; Mühlenbock, Per

    2016-01-01

    different P. infestans effectors, containing the conserved motif RXLR (for Arg, any amino acid, Leu, Arg), revealed a specific response to Avr2, which suggests that SW93-1015 might contain a functional homolog of the R2 resistance gene. We cloned eight R2 gene homologs from SW93-1015, whereof seven have...

  10. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern Andean region.

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    Cárdenas, Martha; Grajales, Alejandro; Sierra, Roberto; Rojas, Alejandro; González-Almario, Adriana; Vargas, Angela; Marín, Mauricio; Fermín, Gustavo; Lagos, Luz E; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Bernal, Adriana; Salazar, Camilo; Restrepo, Silvia

    2011-02-09

    Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato, and more recently, solanaceous fruits such as cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana) and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum), all of which are hosts of this oomycete. In the Andean region, P. infestans populations have been well characterized in Ecuador and Peru, but are poorly understood in Colombia and Venezuela. To understand the P. infestans population structure in the Northern part of the Andes, four nuclear regions (ITS, Ras, β-tubulin and Avr3a) and one mitochondrial (Cox1) region were analyzed in isolates of P. infestans sampled from different hosts in Colombia and Venezuela. Low genetic diversity was found within this sample of P. infestans isolates from crops within several regions of Colombia and Venezuela, revealing the presence of clonal populations of the pathogen in this region. We detected low frequency heterozygotes, and their distribution patterns might be a consequence of a high migration rate among populations with poor effective gene flow. Consistent genetic differentiation exists among isolates from different regions. The results here suggest that in the Northern Andean region P. infestans is a clonal population with some within-clone variation. P. infestans populations in Venezuela reflect historic isolation that is being reinforced by a recent self-sufficiency of potato seeds. In summary, the P. infestans population is mainly shaped by migration and probably by the appearance of variants of key effectors such as Avr3a.

  11. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern Andean region

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    Grünwald Niklaus J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato, and more recently, solanaceous fruits such as cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum, all of which are hosts of this oomycete. In the Andean region, P. infestans populations have been well characterized in Ecuador and Peru, but are poorly understood in Colombia and Venezuela. To understand the P. infestans population structure in the Northern part of the Andes, four nuclear regions (ITS, Ras, β-tubulin and Avr3a and one mitochondrial (Cox1 region were analyzed in isolates of P. infestans sampled from different hosts in Colombia and Venezuela. Results Low genetic diversity was found within this sample of P. infestans isolates from crops within several regions of Colombia and Venezuela, revealing the presence of clonal populations of the pathogen in this region. We detected low frequency heterozygotes, and their distribution patterns might be a consequence of a high migration rate among populations with poor effective gene flow. Consistent genetic differentiation exists among isolates from different regions. Conclusions The results here suggest that in the Northern Andean region P. infestans is a clonal population with some within-clone variation. P. infestans populations in Venezuela reflect historic isolation that is being reinforced by a recent self-sufficiency of potato seeds. In summary, the P. infestans population is mainly shaped by migration and probably by the appearance of variants of key effectors such as Avr3a.

  12. Phytophthora infestans population structure: A worldwide scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, Martha; Danies, Giovanna; Tabima, Javier; Bernal, Adriana; Restrepo, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease in potato and other members of the Solanaceae family, is responsible for causing the Irish potato famine and, even today, it causes enormous economic losses all over the world. For the establishment of an adequate pest management strategy, the determination of the pathogen's population structure is required. To characterize P. infestans populations worldwide two allozymes, Gpi (Glucose-6-phospate isomerase) and Pep (Pep tidase), the RG57 DNA RFLP fingerprinting probe, as well as resistance to the fungicide metalaxyl and mating type, have been used as markers. P. infestans populations in Mexico have been one of the main focuses of research in the population biology of this pathogen because this country has been considered as one of the possible centers of origin of this oomycete. In this review we present the population structure of P. infestans in Mexico, Europe, Africa, Asia, North America, and South America, expanding it on the present situation of P. infestans in Colombia. Finally, we will discuss different lines of research that are being carried out today with respect to P. infestans in Colombia, which have shown the importance of continuing the study of this devastating plant pathogen in our country.

  13. Phytophthora infestans population structure: a worldwide scale

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    Martha Cárdenas Toquica

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease in potato and other members of the Solanaceae family, is responsible for causing the Irish potato famine and, even today, it causes enormous economic losses all over the world. For the establishment of an adequate pest management strategy, the determination of population structure is required. To characterize P. infestans populations worldwide two allozymes, Gpi (Glucose-6-phospate isomerase and Pep (Peptidase, the RG57 DNA RFLP fingerprinting probe, as well as resistance to the fungicide metalaxyl and the mating type, have been used as markers. P. infestans populations in Mexico have been one of the main focuses of research in the population biology of this pathogen because this country has been considered as one of the possible centers of origin of this oomycete. In this review we present the population structure of P. infestans in Mexico, Europe, Africa, Asia, North America, and South America expanding on the present situation of P. infestans in Colombia. Finally, we will discuss different lines of research that are being carried out today with respect to P. infestans in Colombia, which have shown the importance of continuing the study of this devastating plant pathogen in our country.

  14. The interplay between a Phytophthora RXLR effector and an Arabidopsis lectin receptor kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, K.

    2010-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans – the causal agent of potato late blight – secretes a plethora of effector proteins to facilitate plant infection. The central subject of this thesis is ipiO, one of the first cloned Phytophthora genes with a putative function in pathogenicity as was anticipated based on its

  15. Reduced efficacy of fluazinam against Phytophthora infestans in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H.T.A.M.; Kessel, G.J.T.; Lucca, F.; Förch, M.G.; Den Bosch, van G.B.M.; Topper, C.G.; Evenhuis, A.

    2018-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the causal organism of potato late blight, the most important disease in potato, the second most important arable crop in Europe. The P. infestans population in Europe is well known for its sudden changes in composition. Currently it is composed of a wide variety of

  16. Stable transformation of the oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, using microprojectile bombardment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2003-01-01

    Germinated asexual sporangia, zoospores, and mycelia of Phytophthora infestans were transformed to G418-resistance by microprojectile bombardment. After optimization, an average of 14 transformants/shot were obtained, using 10(6) germinated sporangia and gold particles coated with 1 microg...

  17. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunobiosensor for Detection of Phytophthora infestans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hejgaard, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    In this study we focused on the development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) immunosensor for Phytophthora infestans detection. The fungus-like organism is the cause of potato late blight and is a major problem in potato growing regions of the world. Efficient control is dependent on early...

  18. Validation of a tuber blight (Phytophthora infestans) prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato tuber blight caused by Phytophthora infestans accounts for significant losses in storage. There is limited published quantitative data on predicting tuber blight. We validated a tuber blight prediction model developed in New York with cultivars Allegany, NY 101, and Katahdin using independent...

  19. The biology of Phytophthora infestans at its center of origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünwald, N.J.; Flier, W.G.

    2005-01-01

    The central highlands of Mexico are considered to be a center of genetic diversity for both the potato late blight pathogen and for tuber-bearing Solanum spp. Recent work conducted in Mexico and South America sheds new light on the biology and evolution of Phytophthora infestans and other related

  20. Molecular tools to unravel the role of genes from Phytophthora infestans

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    West, van P.

    2000-01-01

    The oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans is the causal agent of potato late blight. P. infestans is undoubtedly the best known and most studied Phytophthora species today. This is mainly because it is such a

  1. Variation in capsidiol sensitivity between Phytophthora infestans and Phytophthora capsici is consistent with their host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulou, Artemis; Schornack, Sebastian; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Haart, Dave; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Faraldos, Juan A; Kamoun, Sophien; O'Maille, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    Plants protect themselves against a variety of invading pathogenic organisms via sophisticated defence mechanisms. These responses include deployment of specialized antimicrobial compounds, such as phytoalexins, that rapidly accumulate at pathogen infection sites. However, the extent to which these compounds contribute to species-level resistance and their spectrum of action remain poorly understood. Capsidiol, a defense related phytoalexin, is produced by several solanaceous plants including pepper and tobacco during microbial attack. Interestingly, capsidiol differentially affects growth and germination of the oomycete pathogens Phytophthora infestans and Phytophthora capsici, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study we revisited the differential effect of capsidiol on P. infestans and P. capsici, using highly pure capsidiol preparations obtained from yeast engineered to express the capsidiol biosynthetic pathway. Taking advantage of transgenic Phytophthora strains expressing fluorescent markers, we developed a fluorescence-based method to determine the differential effect of capsidiol on Phytophtora growth. Using these assays, we confirm major differences in capsidiol sensitivity between P. infestans and P. capsici and demonstrate that capsidiol alters the growth behaviour of both Phytophthora species. Finally, we report intraspecific variation within P. infestans isolates towards capsidiol tolerance pointing to an arms race between the plant and the pathogens in deployment of defence related phytoalexins.

  2. Characteristics of Phytophthora infestans isolates from China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Zhu, J.; Jin, G.; Lan, C.; Liu, B.; Zhang, R.; Zhao, Z.; Yang, Y.; Huang, S.; Jacobsen, E.

    2009-01-01

    In several of the main potato production area’s in China the climate is favorable for P. infestans and consequently, potato late blight is one of the most serious threats to potato production in China. As part of a comprehensive monitoring program that we could establish for China we started

  3. Integrating cultural control methods for tomato late blight (Phytophthora infestans) in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tumwine, J.; Frinking, H.D.; Jeger, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Cultural control measures against tomato late blight (Phytophthora infestans) were evaluated in six field experiments over 3 years in Uganda. Each experiment included sanitation (removal of diseased plant tissues), fungicide (mancozeb) application, and an untreated control, as standard treatments.

  4. Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing 2 is a conserved RxLR effector that promotes infection in soybean and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qin; Ye, Wenwu; Choi, Duseok; Wong, James; Qiao, Yongli; Tao, Kai; Wang, Yuanchao; Ma, Wenbo

    2014-12-01

    The genus Phytophthora consists of notorious and emerging pathogens of economically important crops. Each Phytophthora genome encodes several hundreds of cytoplasmic effectors, which are believed to manipulate plant immune response inside the host cells. However, the majority of Phytophthora effectors remain functionally uncharacterized. We recently discovered two effectors from the soybean stem and root rot pathogen Phytophthora sojae with the activity to suppress RNA silencing in plants. These effectors are designated Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing (PSRs). Here, we report that the P. sojae PSR2 (PsPSR2) belongs to a conserved and widespread effector family in Phytophthora. A PsPSR2-like effector produced by P. infestans (PiPSR2) can also suppress RNA silencing in plants and promote Phytophthora infection, suggesting that the PSR2 family effectors have conserved functions in plant hosts. Using Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy roots induction, we demonstrated that the expression of PsPSR2 rendered hypersusceptibility of soybean to P. sojae. Enhanced susceptibility was also observed in PsPSR2-expressing Arabidopsis thaliana plants during Phytophthora but not bacterial infection. These experiments provide strong evidence that PSR2 is a conserved Phytophthora effector family that performs important virulence functions specifically during Phytophthora infection of various plant hosts.

  5. Multiplex SSR analysis of Phytophthora infestans in different countries and the importance for potato breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Potato is the most important non-cereal crop in the world. Late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is the most devastating disease of potato. In the mid-19th century, P. infestans attacked the European potato fields and this resulted in a widespread famine in Ireland

  6. Rapid Determination of Phytophthora infestans sporangia Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Nicolaisen, Mogens; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    2007-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the cause of late blight disease in potato and is an economically important pathogen worldwide. Early disease detection is important to implement disease control measures. In this study a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor for detection of P. infestans sporangia...

  7. Large subclonal variation in Phytophthora infestans populations associated with Ecuadorian potato landraces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delgado, R.A.; Monteros-Altamiro, A.R.; Li, Y.; Visser, R.G.F.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Vosman, B.

    2013-01-01

    The population of Phytophthora infestans on potato landraces in three provinces (Carchi, Chimborazo and Loja) of Ecuador was analysed. All isolates (n = 66) were of the A1 mating type. Simple sequence repeats (SSR) were used to assess the genetic diversity of the isolates. The P. infestans isolates

  8. Infection of a tomato cell culture by Phytophthora infestans; a versatile tool to study Phytophthora-host interactions

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    Charikleia Schoina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oomycete Phytophthora infestans causes late blight on potato and tomato. Despite extensive research, the P. infestans-host interaction is still poorly understood. To find new ways to further unravel this interaction we established a new infection system using MsK8 tomato cells. These cells grow in suspension and can be maintained as a stable cell line that is representative for tomato. Results MsK8 cells can host several Phytophthora species pathogenic on tomato. Species not pathogenic on tomato could not infect. Microscopy revealed that 16 h after inoculation up to 36% of the cells were infected. The majority were penetrated by a germ tube emerging from a cyst (i.e. primary infection while other cells were already showing secondary infections including haustoria. In incompatible interactions, MsK8 cells showed defense responses, namely reactive oxygen species production and cell death leading to a halt in pathogen spread at the single cell level. In compatible interactions, several P. infestans genes, including RXLR effector genes, were expressed and in both, compatible and incompatible interactions tomato genes involved in defense were differentially expressed. Conclusions Our results show that P. infestans can prosper as a pathogen in MsK8 cells; it not only infects, but also makes haustoria and sporulates, and it receives signals that activate gene expression. Moreover, MsK8 cells have the ability to support pathogen growth but also to defend themselves against infection in a similar way as whole plants. An advantage of MsK8 cells compared to leaves is the more synchronized infection, as all cells have an equal chance of being infected. Moreover, analyses and sampling of infected tissue can be performed in a non-destructive manner from early time points of infection onwards and as such the MsK8 infection system offers a potential platform for large-scale omics studies and activity screenings of inhibitory

  9. Core Promoter Structure in the Oomycete Phytophthora infestans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Adele; Smart, Christine D.; Fry, William E.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the core promoter structure of the oomycete Phytophthora infestans. The transcriptional start sites (TSS) of three previously characterized P. infestans genes, Piexo1, Piexo3, and Piendo1, were determined by primer extension analyses. The TSS regions were homologous to a previously identified 16-nucleotide (nt) core sequence that overlaps the TSS in most oomycete genes. The core promoter regions of Piexo1 and Piendo1 were investigated by using a transient protoplast expression assay and the reporter gene β-glucuronidase. Mutational analyses of the promoters of Piexo1 and Piendo1 showed that there is a putative core promoter element encompassing the TSS (−2 to + 5) that has high sequence and functional homology to a known core promoter element present in other eukaryotes, the initiator element (Inr). Downstream and flanking the Inr is a highly conserved oomycete promoter region (+7 to + 15), hereafter referred to as FPR (flanking promoter region), which is also important for promoter function. The importance of the 19-nt core promoter region (Inr and FPR) in Piexo1 and Piendo1 was further investigated through electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). The EMSA studies showed that (i) both core promoters were able to specifically bind a protein or protein complex in a P. infestans whole-cell protein extract and (ii) the same mutations that reduced binding of the EMSA complex also reduced β-glucuronidase (GUS) levels in transient expression assays. The consistency of results obtained using two different assays (GUS transient assays [in vivo] and EMSA studies [in vitro]) supports a convergence of inference about the relative importance of specific nucleotides within the 19-nt core promoter region. PMID:14871940

  10. Genotype and Phenotype Characterization of Indonesian Phytophthora infestans Isolates Collected From Java and Outside Java Island

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    Dwinita Wikan Utami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora infestans, the cause of late blight disease, is a worldwide problem in potato and tomato production. To understand the biology and ecology of P. infestans and the mechanism of spatial and temporal factors for the variation in P. infestans, the population diversity is required to be fully characterized. The objective of this research is to characterize the diversity of P. infestans. Surveys and collection of P. infestans isolates were performed on many locations of potato's production center in Indonesia, as in Java (West Java, Central Java, and East Java and outside of Java islands (Medan, Jambi, and Makassar. The collected isolates were then analyzed for their virulence diversity via plant disease bioassays on differential varieties and genotype diversity based on fragment analysis genotypes profile using the multiplexing 20 simple sequence repeat markers. The virulence characterization showed that the isolates group from Makassar, South Sulawesi, have the broad spectrum virulence pathotype to R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5 differential plants. Simple sequence repeat genotype characterization showed that in general, the population structure of P. infestans grouping is accordance to the origin of the sampling locations. The diversity between populations is lower than diversity between isolates in one location population groups. The characters of P. infestans population showed that the population diversity of P. infestans more occurs on individual isolates in one location compared with the diversity between the population location sampling.

  11. Genetic structure of the population of Phytophthora infestans attacking Solanum ochranthum in the highlands of Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chacón, M.G.; Adler, N.E.; Jarrin, F.; Flier, W.G.; Gessler, C.; Forbes, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-nine isolates of Phytophthora infestans were collected from the wild host Solanum ochranthum in the highland tropics of Ecuador and characterized with a set of phenotypic and molecular markers (mating type, metalaxyl sensitivity, the allozyme loci Gpi, and Pep, mitochondrial DNA haplotype,

  12. Population structure of Phytophthora infestans in the Toluca Valley region of Central Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünwald, N.J.; Flier, W.G.; Sturbaum, A.K.; Garay-Serrano, E.; Bosch, van den G.B.M.; Smart, C.D.; Matuszak, J.M.; Turkensteen, L.J.; Fry, W.E.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the population of Phytophthora infestans in the Toluca valley region is genetically differentiated according to habitat. Isolates were sampled in three habitats from (i) wild Solanum spp. (WILD), (ii) land-race varieties in low-input production systems (RURAL), and

  13. Identification, characterization and high-resolution mapping of resistance genes to Phytophthora infestans in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, T.H.

    2005-01-01

    Potato ( Solanum tuberosum L.) is one of the most important crops in the world. The oomycete Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary) is the causal agent of late blight which is the most devastating disease of the cultivated potato. It causes economic losses of several billion US dollars in crop

  14. Population structure of Phytophthora infestans in China – geographic clusters and presence of the EU genotype Blue_13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Zhu, J.H.; Jin, G.H.; Lan, C.Z.; Zhu, S.X.; Zhang, R.F.; Liu, B.W.; Zhao, Z.J.; Kessel, G.J.T.; Huang, S.W.; Jacobsen, E.

    2013-01-01

    The population structure of Phytophthora infestans in China was studied and three mitochondrial haplotypes (Ia, IIa, IIb) were observed. Genetic analysis with 10 highly informative SSR markers identified 68 different genotypes, including three dominant clonal lineages. In the Chinese P. infestans

  15. Preemergence infection of potato sprouts by Phytophthora infestans in the highland tropics of Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Peter; Taipe, Arturo; Andrade-Piedra, Jorge L.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine whether preemergence infection of potato sprouts by Phytophthora infestans occurs in the highland tropics of Ecuador. In three separate experiments in the field, P. infestans was identified on the preemerged sprouts of 49, 5, and 43% of tubers, respectively...

  16. Identification of stable resistance to Phytophthora infestans in potato genotypes evaluated in field experiments in Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Ednar Gadelha; Pérez, W.; Nelson, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: In this study, genotype by environment (G x E) interactions and phenotypic stability of resistance to Phytophthora infestans, the cause of late blight, were analysed in Peru lot 13 potato genotypes, using additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) analysis and Huehn's non......-parametric test. The potato genotypes were tested in seven experiments over two years in the vicinity of Comas, Peru, an area used by the International potato Center to screen for resistance to late blight. Results of the two analyses generally correlated and indicated that quantitative resistance to P. infestans...

  17. Stage-specific gene expression during sexual development in Phytophthora infestans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabritius, Anna-Liisa; Cvitanich, Cristina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2002-01-01

    Eight genes that are upregulated during sexual development in the heterothallic oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, were identified by suppression subtractive hybridization. Two genes showed very low but detectable expression in vegetative hyphae and became induced about 40- to >100-fold early...... revealed that the predicted products of three of the genes had similarity to proteins that influence RNA stability, namely a ribonuclease activator, the pumilio family of RNA-binding proteins and RNase H. The products of two other mating-induced genes resembled two types of Phytophthora proteins previously...

  18. The in vitro culture of Phytophthora infestans isolates occurring on the tomato - their pathogenicity and usefulness for artificial inoculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Horodecka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In investigations on the fungus, Phytophthora infestans, isolated from open air, field-grown tomatoes, particular attention was paid to the pathogenicity of 32 isolates and the suitability of 10 kinds of natural media. It is concluded that Phytophthora races in Poland have highly varied pathogenicities and that they belong to race 0 or 1. The races were divided into subgroups of various aggressiveness. It was found that the best medium to obtain an inoculum was the agar-oat medium without vitamin B1. Vitamin B1 as well as tomatine added to agar media stimulated growth, but inhibited sporulation of Phytophthora infestans.

  19. Gene expression profiling during asexual development of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans reveals a highly dynamic transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judelson, Howard S; Ah-Fong, Audrey M V; Aux, George; Avrova, Anna O; Bruce, Catherine; Cakir, Cahid; da Cunha, Luis; Grenville-Briggs, Laura; Latijnhouwers, Maita; Ligterink, Wilco; Meijer, Harold J G; Roberts, Samuel; Thurber, Carrie S; Whisson, Stephen C; Birch, Paul R J; Govers, Francine; Kamoun, Sophien; van West, Pieter; Windass, John

    2008-04-01

    Much of the pathogenic success of Phytophthora infestans, the potato and tomato late blight agent, relies on its ability to generate from mycelia large amounts of sporangia, which release zoospores that encyst and form infection structures. To better understand these stages, Affymetrix GeneChips based on 15,650 unigenes were designed and used to profile the life cycle. Approximately half of P. infestans genes were found to exhibit significant differential expression between developmental transitions, with approximately (1)/(10) being stage-specific and most changes occurring during zoosporogenesis. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assays confirmed the robustness of the array results and showed that similar patterns of differential expression were obtained regardless of whether hyphae were from laboratory media or infected tomato. Differentially expressed genes encode potential cellular regulators, especially protein kinases; metabolic enzymes such as those involved in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, or the biosynthesis of amino acids or lipids; regulators of DNA synthesis; structural proteins, including predicted flagellar proteins; and pathogenicity factors, including cell-wall-degrading enzymes, RXLR effector proteins, and enzymes protecting against plant defense responses. Curiously, some stage-specific transcripts do not appear to encode functional proteins. These findings reveal many new aspects of oomycete biology, as well as potential targets for crop protection chemicals.

  20. Organically grown tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.): bioactive compounds in the fruit and infection with Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Afrah E; Smit, Inga; Pawelzik, Elke; Keutgen, Anna J; Horneburg, Bernd

    2012-05-01

    Tomato fruits are characterized by a good nutritional profile, including different bioactive compounds such as carotenoids, phenolic compounds and ascorbic acid. The objective of this study was to analyze the content of bioactive compounds in the fruit and the infection by Phytophthora infestans of 28 tomato genotypes from organic outdoor production. The relationship between bioactive compounds in the fruit and infection with P. infestans was estimated. Field experiments were carried out in 2004 and 2005 at two locations in central Germany. Significant variation among genotypes, locations and years was observed for the content of lycopene, ascorbic acid, total phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and the infection level of P. infestans. Antioxidant capacity seemed to be influenced mainly by the phenolics and was highest in small fruits, which were less infected with P. infestans. The large genetic variation among tomato genotypes for the content of bioactive compounds in their fruit allows for selection gains. None of the investigated bioactive compounds can be recommended for the indirect selection for increased field resistance against P. infestans. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Screening of novel microorganisms for biosurfactant and biocontrol activity against Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Sonica; Singh, B P; Lal, Mehi; Ma, Khan; Hussain, Touseef; Sharma, Sanjeev; Kaushik, S K; Kumar, Satish

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, 95 isolates of bacteria were tested for their biosurfactant as well as biocontrol activity against Phytophthora infestans. The results revealed that only 15.8% isolates showed biosurfactant activity. The emulsification index ranged from 0-68% and 24.2% isolates showed positive reaction for biosurfactant properties. In emulsification assay and oil spreading test, 18.95% and 5.26% isolates, respectively scored positive for biosurfactant production. Among all, only five isolates were found effective against P. infestans, for biocontrol properties. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-1 showed 62.22% inhibition zone after 72 hrs while P. aeruginosa-3 showed 46.42%. Forty-eight hrs old culture supernatants were highly effective in food-poisoning test, tuber slice test and detached leaf method against P. infestans. In whole potato plant test, bacterial cell based formulation, culture supernatant and bacterial cell suspension of P. aeruginosa-1 showed 10.42%, 9.94% and 17.96% diseases severity respectively, as against 53.96% in control. This isolate holds promise as biological control agent against P. infestans in field.

  2. The kinome of Phytophthora infestans reveals oomycete-specific innovations and links to other taxonomic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah-Fong Audrey MV

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oomycetes are a large group of economically and ecologically important species. Its most notorious member is Phytophthora infestans, the cause of the devastating potato late blight disease. The life cycle of P. infestans involves hyphae which differentiate into spores used for dispersal and host infection. Protein phosphorylation likely plays crucial roles in these stages, and to help understand this we present here a genome-wide analysis of the protein kinases of P. infestans and several relatives. The study also provides new insight into kinase evolution since oomycetes are taxonomically distant from organisms with well-characterized kinomes. Results Bioinformatic searches of the genomes of P. infestans, P. ramorum, and P. sojae reveal they have similar kinomes, which for P. infestans contains 354 eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs and 18 atypical kinases (aPKs, equaling 2% of total genes. After refining gene models, most were classifiable into families seen in other eukaryotes. Some ePK families are nevertheless unusual, especially the tyrosine kinase-like (TKL group which includes large oomycete-specific subfamilies. Also identified were two tyrosine kinases, which are rare in non-metazoans. Several ePKs bear accessory domains not identified previously on kinases, such as cyclin-dependent kinases with integral cyclin domains. Most ePKs lack accessory domains, implying that many are regulated transcriptionally. This was confirmed by mRNA expression-profiling studies that showed that two-thirds vary significantly between hyphae, sporangia, and zoospores. Comparisons to neighboring taxa (apicomplexans, ciliates, diatoms revealed both clade-specific and conserved features, and multiple connections to plant kinases were observed. The kinome of Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, an oomycete with a simpler life cycle than P. infestans, was found to be one-third smaller. Some differences may be attributable to gene clustering, which

  3. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans sensu lato in Ecuador provides new insight into the origin of this important plant pathogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adler, N.E.; Erselius, L.J.; Chacón, G.M.; Flier, W.G.; Ordonez, M.E.; Kroon, L.P.N.M.; Forbes, G.A.

    2004-01-01

    The metapopulation structure of Phytophthora infestans sensu lato is genetically diverse in the highlands of Ecuador. Previous reports documented the diversity associated with four putative clonal lineages of the pathogen collected from various hosts in the genus Solanum. This paper simultaneously

  4. Genetic variation within clonal lineages of Phytophthora infestans revealed through genotyping-by-sequencing, and implications for late blight epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) was performed on 257 Phytophthora infestans isolates belonging to four clonal lineages to study within-lineage diversity. The four lineages used in the study included US-8 (n=28), US-11 (n=27), US-23 (n=166), and US-24 (n=36), with isolates originating from 23 of the U...

  5. Gene expression profiling during asexual development of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans reveals a highly dynamic transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Judelson, H.S.; Ah-Fong, A.M.V.; Aux, G.; Avrova, A.O.; Bruce, C.; Cakir, C.; Cunha, da L.; Grenville-Briggs, L.; Latijnhouwers, M.; Ligterink, W.; Meijer, H.J.G.; Roberts, S.; Thurber, C.S.; Whisson, S.C.; Birch, P.R.J.; Govers, F.; Kamoun, S.; West, van P.; Windass, J.

    2008-01-01

    Much of the pathogenic success of Phytophthora infestans, the potato and tomato late blight agent, relies on its ability to generate from mycelia large amounts of sporangia, which release zoospores that encyst and form infection structures. To better understand these stages, Affymetrix GeneChips

  6. Phytophthora infestans isolates lacking class I ipiO variants are virulent on Rpi-blb1 potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Champouret, N.; Bouwmeester, K.; Rietman, H.; Lee, van der T.; Maliepaard, C.A.; Heupink, A.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Jacobsen, E.; Visser, R.G.F.; Vossen, van der E.A.G.; Govers, F.; Vleeshouwers, V.G.A.A.

    2009-01-01

    A strategy to control the devastating late blight disease is providing potato cultivars with genes that are effective in resistance to a broad spectrum of Phytophthora infestans isolates. Thus far, most late blight resistance (R) genes that were introgressed in potato were quickly defeated. In

  7. Impacts of climate change on the first occurrence of the Light blight (Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary 1876

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Žalud

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the infestation pressure of various pathogens will be one the most important factors limiting the crop production under the future climate conditions. Weather driven NegFry model has been used for estimating future Phytophthora infestans occurrence at four experimental potato stations of the State Institute for Agriculture Supervision and Testing. Both the infestation dates of Phytophthora infestans occurrence and the shape of the critical number curve were analyzed using observed weather data as well as datasets constructed according to four climate change scenarios that were based on two global circulation models. The results show the shift of the infestation pressure to the beginning of the year and describe increasing trend of critical number reaching to detecting of the first Phyto­phtho­ra infestans occurrence for 2025 and 2050. Scenarios created according to HadCM and SRES – A2 seem to be more suitable for disease development.

  8. Demonstrating concepts of pathogenesis using effectors of Phytophthora infestans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathogenesis, or how pathogens cause disease, is an important concept in plant pathology. The study of pathogenesis in plant pathology has rapidly expanded and is now a significant portion of plant pathology research (especially research at the molecular level of host-pathogen interaction). With the...

  9. The plant pathogen Phytophthora andina emerged via hybridization of an unknown Phytophthora species and the Irish potato famine pathogen, P. infestans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M Goss

    Full Text Available Emerging plant pathogens have largely been a consequence of the movement of pathogens to new geographic regions. Another documented mechanism for the emergence of plant pathogens is hybridization between individuals of different species or subspecies, which may allow rapid evolution and adaptation to new hosts or environments. Hybrid plant pathogens have traditionally been difficult to detect or confirm, but the increasing ease of cloning and sequencing PCR products now makes the identification of species that consistently have genes or alleles with phylogenetically divergent origins relatively straightforward. We investigated the genetic origin of Phytophthora andina, an increasingly common pathogen of Andean crops Solanum betaceum, S. muricatum, S. quitoense, and several wild Solanum spp. It has been hypothesized that P. andina is a hybrid between the potato late blight pathogen P. infestans and another Phytophthora species. We tested this hypothesis by cloning four nuclear loci to obtain haplotypes and using these loci to infer the phylogenetic relationships of P. andina to P. infestans and other related species. Sequencing of cloned PCR products in every case revealed two distinct haplotypes for each locus in P. andina, such that each isolate had one allele derived from a P. infestans parent and a second divergent allele derived from an unknown species that is closely related but distinct from P. infestans, P. mirabilis, and P. ipomoeae. To the best of our knowledge, the unknown parent has not yet been collected. We also observed sequence polymorphism among P. andina isolates at three of the four loci, many of which segregate between previously described P. andina clonal lineages. These results provide strong support that P. andina emerged via hybridization between P. infestans and another unknown Phytophthora species also belonging to Phytophthora clade 1c.

  10. Expresión diferencial durante la interacción Solanum tuberosum - Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulma Isabel Monsalve-Fonnegra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Título en ingles: Differential expression during Solanum tuberosum- Phytophthora infestans interaction Resumen: La papa (Solanum tuberosum L. es el cuarto cultivo más importante a nivel mundial y es el producto agrícola con mayor demanda de fungicidas, insecticidas y fertilizantes químicos. Las pérdidas mundiales ocasionadas por Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary en este cultivo, ascienden a 6,7 billones de dólares al año y su control químico genera un aumento en los costos, perjudica la salud humana y el ambiente. Todo esto justifica la búsqueda constante de mecanismos alternativos para el control de la enfermedad, entre ellos la obtención de variedades resistentes mediante cisgenesis usando genotipos silvestres. Como un aporte en este sentido, y dada la falta de conocimiento de lo que controla y constituye la diferencia entre una respuesta compatible e incompatible, en el presente estudio se compararon los perfiles de expresión génica obtenidos mediante Despliegue Diferencial de variedades resistentes y susceptibles durante su interacción con P. infestans. Los resultados evidenciaron diferencias en la expresión génica, tanto a distintos tiempos post-inoculación como en el tipo de cambio de expresión, incluyendo la presencia y ausencia de bandas diferenciales y el aumento o disminución en su intensidad. Al analizar las secuencias de fragmentos diferencialmente expresados, se encontró que algunos fragmentos sobre-expresados en las variedades susceptibles, tenían homología con secuencias que codifican para una serina-acetiltranferasa y para la subunidad β de la RNA polimerasa. Por su parte, fragmentos sobre-expresados en la variedad resistente, tenían homología con una secuencia codificante para un dominio transmembranal. Palabras claves: pastusa suprema;  diacol-capiro; parda pastusa; despliegue diferencial Abstract: Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. is the fourth most important crop worldwide; also, is the agriculture

  11. In vitro translocation experiments with RxLR-reporter fusion proteins of Avr1b from Phytophthora sojae and AVR3a from Phytophthora infestans fail to demonstrate specific autonomous uptake in plant and animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawra, Stephan; Djamei, Armin; Albert, Isabell; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Kahmann, Regine; van West, Pieter

    2013-05-01

    Plant-pathogenic oomycetes have a large set of secreted effectors that can be translocated into their host cells during infection. One group of these effectors are the RxLR effectors for which it has been shown, in a few cases, that the RxLR motif is important for their translocation. It has been suggested that the RxLR-leader sequences alone are enough to translocate the respective effectors into eukaryotic cells through binding to surface-exposed phosphoinositol-3-phosphate. These conclusions were primary based on translocation experiments conducted with recombinant fusion proteins whereby the RxLR leader of RxLR effectors (i.e., Avr1b from Phytophthora sojae) were fused to the green fluorescent protein reporter-protein. However, we failed to observe specific cellular uptake for a comparable fusion protein where the RxLR leader of the P. infestans AVR3a was fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein. Therefore, we reexamined the ability of the reported P. sojae AVR1b RxLR leader to enter eukaryotic cells. Different relevant experiments were performed in three independent laboratories, using fluorescent reporter fusion constructs of AVR3a and Avr1b proteins in a side-by-side comparative study on plant tissue and human and animal cells. We report that we were unable to obtain conclusive evidence for specific RxLR-mediated translocation.

  12. Physiological and molecular characterization of Phytophthora infestans isolates from the Central Colombian Andean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, María C; Cárdenas, Martha E; Vargas, Angela M; Rojas, Alejandro; Morales, Juan G; Jiménez, Pedro; Bernal, Adriana J; Restrepo, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most devastating diseases found in potato and tomato crops worldwide. In Colombia it also attacks other important crops: cape gooseberry and tree tomato. The knowledge of the pathogen population is determinant to effectively design control strategies. To determine the physiological and molecular characteristics of a set of Colombian P. infestans isolates. Strains isolated from Cundinamarca and Boyacá were examined for the level of resistance to mefenoxam and cymoxanil. Virulence was tested for all strains and crosses between A1 mating type, from different hosts, and the Colombian A2 mating type were tested for the production and viability of oospores in different substrates. Additionally, the molecular diversity of the avirulence gene Avr3a, the β-tubulin gene, and two single copy genes showing RxLR motif, was assessed. We found all levels of mefenoxam sensitivity, with 48% of the strains resistant. A high diversity of races was detected and the population was genetically clonal. Colombian strains had the possibility of sexual reproduction. These results will help in optimizing the use of fungicides and deployment of resistance as control strategies and will contribute to broader studies on diversity of this pathogen. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative analysis of sterol acquisition in the oomycetes Saprolegnia parasitica and Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Paul; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Ekengren, Sophia; McKee, Lauren S; Bulone, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The oomycete class includes pathogens of animals and plants which are responsible for some of the most significant global losses in agriculture and aquaculture. There is a need to replace traditional chemical means of controlling oomycete growth with more targeted approaches, and the inhibition of sterol synthesis is one promising area. To better direct these efforts, we have studied sterol acquisition in two model organisms: the sterol-autotrophic Saprolegnia parasitica, and the sterol-heterotrophic Phytophthora infestans. We first present a comprehensive reconstruction of a likely sterol synthesis pathway for S. parasitica, causative agent of the disease saprolegniasis in fish. This pathway shows multiple potential routes of sterol synthesis, and draws on several avenues of new evidence: bioinformatic mining for genes with sterol-related functions, expression analysis of these genes, and analysis of the sterol profiles in mycelium grown in different media. Additionally, we explore the extent to which P. infestans, which causes the late blight in potato, can modify exogenously provided sterols. We consider whether the two very different approaches to sterol acquisition taken by these pathogens represent any specific survival advantages or potential drug targets.

  14. An ephemeral sexual population of Phytophthora infestans in the Northeastern United States and Canada.

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    Giovanna Danies

    Full Text Available Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease, has been reported in North America since the mid-nineteenth century. In the United States the lack of or very limited sexual reproduction has resulted in largely clonal populations of P. infestans. In 2010 and 2011, but not in 2012 or 2013, 20 rare and diverse genotypes of P. infestans were detected in a region that centered around central New York State. The ratio of A1 to A2 mating types among these genotypes was close to the 50∶50 ratio expected for sexual recombination. These genotypes were diverse at the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase locus, differed in their microsatellite profiles, showed different banding patterns in a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay using a moderately repetitive and highly polymorphic probe (RG57, were polymorphic for four different nuclear genes and differed in their sensitivity to the systemic fungicide mefenoxam. The null hypothesis of linkage equilibrium was not rejected, which suggests the population could be sexual. These new genotypes were monomorphic in their mitochondrial haplotype that was the same as US-22. Through parentage exclusion testing using microsatellite data and sequences of four nuclear genes, recent dominant lineages US-8, US-11, US-23, and US-24 were excluded as possible parents for these genotypes. Further analyses indicated that US-22 could not be eliminated as a possible parent for 14 of the 20 genotypes. We conclude that US-22 could be a parent of some, but not all, of the new genotypes found in 2010 and 2011. There were at least two other parents for this population and the genotypic characteristics of the other parents were identified.

  15. Species tree estimation for the late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, and close relatives.

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    Jaime E Blair

    Full Text Available To better understand the evolutionary history of a group of organisms, an accurate estimate of the species phylogeny must be known. Traditionally, gene trees have served as a proxy for the species tree, although it was acknowledged early on that these trees represented different evolutionary processes. Discordances among gene trees and between the gene trees and the species tree are also expected in closely related species that have rapidly diverged, due to processes such as the incomplete sorting of ancestral polymorphisms. Recently, methods have been developed for the explicit estimation of species trees, using information from multilocus gene trees while accommodating heterogeneity among them. Here we have used three distinct approaches to estimate the species tree for five Phytophthora pathogens, including P. infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease in potato and tomato. Our concatenation-based "supergene" approach was unable to resolve relationships even with data from both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and from multiple isolates per species. Our multispecies coalescent approach using both Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods was able to estimate a moderately supported species tree showing a close relationship among P. infestans, P. andina, and P. ipomoeae. The topology of the species tree was also identical to the dominant phylogenetic history estimated in our third approach, Bayesian concordance analysis. Our results support previous suggestions that P. andina is a hybrid species, with P. infestans representing one parental lineage. The other parental lineage is not known, but represents an independent evolutionary lineage more closely related to P. ipomoeae. While all five species likely originated in the New World, further study is needed to determine when and under what conditions this hybridization event may have occurred.

  16. Species tree estimation for the late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, and close relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jaime E; Coffey, Michael D; Martin, Frank N

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the evolutionary history of a group of organisms, an accurate estimate of the species phylogeny must be known. Traditionally, gene trees have served as a proxy for the species tree, although it was acknowledged early on that these trees represented different evolutionary processes. Discordances among gene trees and between the gene trees and the species tree are also expected in closely related species that have rapidly diverged, due to processes such as the incomplete sorting of ancestral polymorphisms. Recently, methods have been developed for the explicit estimation of species trees, using information from multilocus gene trees while accommodating heterogeneity among them. Here we have used three distinct approaches to estimate the species tree for five Phytophthora pathogens, including P. infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease in potato and tomato. Our concatenation-based "supergene" approach was unable to resolve relationships even with data from both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and from multiple isolates per species. Our multispecies coalescent approach using both Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods was able to estimate a moderately supported species tree showing a close relationship among P. infestans, P. andina, and P. ipomoeae. The topology of the species tree was also identical to the dominant phylogenetic history estimated in our third approach, Bayesian concordance analysis. Our results support previous suggestions that P. andina is a hybrid species, with P. infestans representing one parental lineage. The other parental lineage is not known, but represents an independent evolutionary lineage more closely related to P. ipomoeae. While all five species likely originated in the New World, further study is needed to determine when and under what conditions this hybridization event may have occurred.

  17. Genome-wide prediction and functional validation of promoter motifs regulating gene expression in spore and infection stages of Phytophthora infestans.

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    Sourav Roy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Most eukaryotic pathogens have complex life cycles in which gene expression networks orchestrate the formation of cells specialized for dissemination or host colonization. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, the potato late blight pathogen, major shifts in mRNA profiles during developmental transitions were identified using microarrays. We used those data with search algorithms to discover about 100 motifs that are over-represented in promoters of genes up-regulated in hyphae, sporangia, sporangia undergoing zoosporogenesis, swimming zoospores, or germinated cysts forming appressoria (infection structures. Most of the putative stage-specific transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs thus identified had features typical of TFBSs such as position or orientation bias, palindromy, and conservation in related species. Each of six motifs tested in P. infestans transformants using the GUS reporter gene conferred the expected stage-specific expression pattern, and several were shown to bind nuclear proteins in gel-shift assays. Motifs linked to the appressoria-forming stage, including a functionally validated TFBS, were over-represented in promoters of genes encoding effectors and other pathogenesis-related proteins. To understand how promoter and genome architecture influence expression, we also mapped transcription patterns to the P. infestans genome assembly. Adjacent genes were not typically induced in the same stage, including genes transcribed in opposite directions from small intergenic regions, but co-regulated gene pairs occurred more than expected by random chance. These data help illuminate the processes regulating development and pathogenesis, and will enable future attempts to purify the cognate transcription factors.

  18. Myb transcription factors and light regulate sporulation in the oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Qijun; Judelson, Howard S

    2014-01-01

    Life cycle progression in eukaryotic microbes is often influenced by environment. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, which causes late blight on potato and tomato, sporangia have been reported to form mostly at night. By growing P. infestans under different light regimes at constant temperature and humidity, we show that light contributes to the natural pattern of sporulation by delaying sporulation until the following dark period. However, illumination does not permanently block sporulation or strongly affect the total number of sporangia that ultimately form. Based on measurements of sporulation-induced genes such as those encoding protein kinase Pks1 and Myb transcription factors Myb2R1 and Myb2R3, it appears that most spore-associated transcripts start to rise four to eight hours before sporangia appear. Their mRNA levels oscillate with the light/dark cycle and increase with the amount of sporangia. An exception to this pattern of expression is Myb2R4, which is induced several hours before the other genes and declines after cultures start to sporulate. Transformants over-expressing Myb2R4 produce twice the number of sporangia and ten-fold higher levels of Myb2R1 mRNA than wild-type, and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Myb2R4 binds the Myb2R1 promoter in vivo. Myb2R4 thus appears to be an early regulator of sporulation. We attempted to silence eight Myb genes by DNA-directed RNAi, but succeeded only with Myb2R3, which resulted in suppressed sporulation. Ectopic expression studies of seven Myb genes revealed that over-expression frequently impaired vegetative growth, and in the case of Myb3R6 interfered with sporangia dormancy. We observed that the degree of silencing induced by a hairpin construct was correlated with its copy number, and ectopic expression was often unstable due to epigenetic silencing and transgene excision.

  19. Myb transcription factors and light regulate sporulation in the oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijun Xiang

    Full Text Available Life cycle progression in eukaryotic microbes is often influenced by environment. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, which causes late blight on potato and tomato, sporangia have been reported to form mostly at night. By growing P. infestans under different light regimes at constant temperature and humidity, we show that light contributes to the natural pattern of sporulation by delaying sporulation until the following dark period. However, illumination does not permanently block sporulation or strongly affect the total number of sporangia that ultimately form. Based on measurements of sporulation-induced genes such as those encoding protein kinase Pks1 and Myb transcription factors Myb2R1 and Myb2R3, it appears that most spore-associated transcripts start to rise four to eight hours before sporangia appear. Their mRNA levels oscillate with the light/dark cycle and increase with the amount of sporangia. An exception to this pattern of expression is Myb2R4, which is induced several hours before the other genes and declines after cultures start to sporulate. Transformants over-expressing Myb2R4 produce twice the number of sporangia and ten-fold higher levels of Myb2R1 mRNA than wild-type, and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Myb2R4 binds the Myb2R1 promoter in vivo. Myb2R4 thus appears to be an early regulator of sporulation. We attempted to silence eight Myb genes by DNA-directed RNAi, but succeeded only with Myb2R3, which resulted in suppressed sporulation. Ectopic expression studies of seven Myb genes revealed that over-expression frequently impaired vegetative growth, and in the case of Myb3R6 interfered with sporangia dormancy. We observed that the degree of silencing induced by a hairpin construct was correlated with its copy number, and ectopic expression was often unstable due to epigenetic silencing and transgene excision.

  20. Variations in the Phytophthora infestans Population in Nepal as Revealed by Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, S R; Hyde, K D; Hodgkiss, I J; Shaw, D S; Liew, E C Y

    2003-02-01

    ABSTRACT Phytophthora infestans isolates collected from potato and tomato crops from various parts of Nepal during the 1999 and 2000 crop seasons were characterized for nuclear and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms using restriction fragment length polymorphism markers. The nuclear DNA probe RG57 detected 11 multilocus genotypes among 280 isolates. Three genotypes were detected 21 times or more, constituting 94% of the total population, whereas frequencies of other genotypes ranged from 0.004 to 0.014. The overall genotypic diversity as estimated by the Gleason index was 1.78. Most of the overall diversity was present at the highest level (i.e., interregional, 46%), indicating limited gene flow among regions. Cluster analysis of multilocus genotypes derived from RG57 and mating type data for Nepalese isolates and representative isolates worldwide showed Nepalese isolates grouping into four clusters. Characterization of 67 isolates for mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms revealed the presence of two mt-haplotypes, Ia and Ib with the proportions of 0.88 and 0.12, respectively. Polymorphisms in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA revealed a moderate level of diversity in this population. Genotype NP3 had an identical RG57 fingerprint to US1 and had mt-haplotype Ib, confirming the presence of an old population in Nepal. Most of the genotypes had a different RG57 fingerprint than that of US1 and mt-haplotype Ia, the common characteristics of new populations. The presence of a new population at high proportions in Nepal was consistent with the global trend of mt-haplotype distribution, and suggests the displacement of old populations. This study indicates at least three possible introductions of P. infestans to Nepal.

  1. Characterization of Phytophthora infestans populations in Colombia: first report of the A2 mating type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Angela M; Quesada Ocampo, Lina M; Céspedes, Maria Catalina; Carreño, Natalia; González, Adriana; Rojas, Alejandro; Zuluaga, A Paola; Myers, Kevin; Fry, William E; Jiménez, Pedro; Bernal, Adriana J; Restrepo, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight in crops of the Solanaceae family, is one of the most important plant pathogens in Colombia. Not only are Solanum lycopersicum, and S. tuberosum at risk, but also several other solanaceous hosts (Physalis peruviana, S. betaceum, S. phureja, and S. quitoense) that have recently gained importance as new crops in Colombia may be at risk. Because little is known about the population structure of Phytophthora infestans in Colombia, we report here the phenotypic and molecular characterization of 97 isolates collected from these six different solanaceous plants in Colombia. All the isolates were analyzed for mating type, mitochondrial haplotypes, genotype for several microsatellites, and sequence of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. This characterization identified a single individual of A2 mating type (from Physalis peruviana) for the first time in Colombia. All isolates had an ITS sequence that was at least 97% identical to the consensus sequence. Of the 97 isolates, 96 were mitochondrial haplotype IIa, with the single A2 isolate being Ia. All isolates were invariant for the microsatellites. Additionally, isolates collected from S. tuberosum and P. peruviana (64 isolates) were tested for: aggressiveness on both hosts, genotype for the isozymes (glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and peptidase), and restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprint pattern as detected by RG57. Isolates from S. tuberosum were preferentially pathogenic on S. tuberosum, and isolates from P. peruviana were preferentially pathogenic on P. peruviana. The population from these two hosts was dominated by a single clonal lineage (59 of 64 individuals assayed), previously identified from Ecuador and Peru as EC-1. This lineage was mating type A1, IIa for mitochondrial DNA, invariant for two microsatellites, and invariant for both isozymes. The remaining four A1 isolates were in lineages very closely related to EC-1 (named EC-1.1, CO

  2. Actividad inhibitoria del aceite esencial de Lippia origanoides H.B.K sobre el crecimiento de Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    óscar Arango Bedoya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary es el fitopatógeno más perjudicial de la papa (Solanum tuberosum al causar la enfermedad conocida como ‘gota o tizón tardío’. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la actividad in vitro del aceite esencial obtenido de una especie de orégano silvestre (Lippia origanoides H.B.K. sobre Phytophthora infestans. Para el efecto se evaluaron diferentes concentraciones de este aceite esencial (10, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 µg/ml y de un fungicida comercial usado como testigo. La actividad antifúngica se determinó con base en la evaluación del crecimiento del micelio mediante el método de dilución en agar tomate. A partir de una concentración de aceite de 150 µg/ml se inhibió completamente el crecimiento del patógeno, por lo que ésta fue considerada como la concentración letal. Este estudio demostró que el aceite esencial de orégano silvestre del Alto Patía, Colombia, es un potencial agente antifúngico que podría ser usado en sistemas de control integrado de P. infestans.

  3. Utilizing ‘Omic’ technologies to identify and prioritize novel sources of resistance to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans in potato germplasm collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Stephanie Marie Van Weymers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The biggest threat to potato production world-wide is late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. A screen of 126 wild diploid Solanum accessions from the Commonwealth Potato Collection (CPC with P. infestans isolates belonging to the genotype 13-A2 identified resistances in the species S. bulbocastanum, S. capsicibaccatum, S. microdontum, S. mochiquense, S. okadae, S. pinnatisectum, S. polyadenium, S. tarijense and S. verrucosum. Effector-omics, allele mining and diagnostic RenSeq (dRenSeq were utilized to investigate the nature of resistances in S. okadae accessions. dRenSeq in resistant S. okadae accessions 7129, 7625, 3762 and a bulk of 20 resistant progeny confirmed the presence of full-length Rpi-vnt1.1 under stringent mapping conditions and corroborated allele mining results in the accessions 7129 and 7625 as well as Avr-vnt1 recognition in transient expression assays. In contrast, susceptible S. okadae accession 3761 and a bulk of 20 susceptible progeny lacked sequence homology in the 5’ end compared to the functional Rpi-vnt1.1 gene. Further evaluation of S. okadae accessions with late blight isolates that have a broad spectrum of virulence demonstrated that, although S. okadae accessions 7129, 7625 and 7629 contain functional Rpi-vnt1.1, they also carry a novel resistance gene. We provide evidence that existing germplasm collection are important sources of novel resistances and that ‘omic’ technologies such as dRenSeq-based genomics and effector-omics are efficacious tools to rapidly explore the diversity within these collections.

  4. Late Blight of Potato (Phytophthora infestans I: Fungicides Application and Associated Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Majeed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. has been remained an important agricultural crop in resolving global food issues through decades. The crop has experienced enormous growth in terms of production throughout the world in recent decades because of improvement in agricultural mechanization, fertilizers application and irrigation practices. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of this valuable crop is still vulnerable to losses due to prevalence of different viral, bacterial, fungal and nematodes infestations. Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, is one of the most threatening pathogenic diseases which not only results in direct crop losses but also cause farmers to embrace huge monetary expenses for disease control and preventive measures. The disease is well known for notorious ‘Irish Famine’ which resulted in drop of Irish population by more than 20% as result of hunger and potato starvation. Globally, annual losses of crop and money spend on fungicides for late blight control exceeds one trillion US dollars. This paper reviews the significance of late blight of potato and controlling strategies adopted for minimizing yield losses incurred by this disease by the use of synthetic fungicides. Advantages and disadvantages of fungicides application are discussed.

  5. Identification of key molecular components of the resistance of cherry tomato against Phytophthora infestans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Kleine, Liliana; Smart, Christine D; Fry, William E; Restrepo, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Cherry tomato Solanum lycopersicum var cerasiforme CV matt's wild cherry is a very resistant cultivar to most Phytophthora infestans isolates. Two isolates were identified, us 940480 and us 970001 that cause an incompatible and a compatible interaction respectively. Us 970001 is one of the few isolates producing a compatible interaction with this cultivar. To identify genes with a differential gene expression between compatible and incompatible interactions, gene expression patterns were analyzed with tomato CDNA microarrays including 12,899 independent tomato CDNA clones at different time points after inoculation. A diverse set of statistical tools were used to identify key components of the plant response to the pathogen. Forty-three genes were up-regulated during the incompatible reaction at time point 36 hours, 15 globally at all-time points and twelve were found both in globally and at 36 hours. Northern blots analysis was performed to confirm differential expression showed by microarray analysis and to study the differential expression of more plant resistance genes (PR) genes between compatible and incompatible interactions for this interaction.

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF KEY MOLECULAR COMPONENTS OF THE RESISTANCE OF CHERRY TOMATO AGAINST Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LILIANA LÓPEZ KLEINE

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cherry tomato Solanum lycopersicum var cerasiforme cv Matt’s wild cherry is a very resistant cultivar to most Phytophthora infestans isolates. Two isolates were identified, US940480 and US970001 that cause an incompatible and a compatible interaction respectively. US970001 is one of the few isolates producing a compatible interaction with this cultivar. To identify genes with a differential gene expression between compatible and incompatible interactions, gene expression patterns were analyzed with tomato cDNA microarrays including 12,899 independent tomato cDNA clones at different time points after inoculation. A diverse set of statistical tools were used to identify key components of the plant response to the pathogen. Forty-three genes were up-regulated during the incompatible reaction at time point 36 hours, 15 globally at all time points and twelve were found both in globally and at 36 hours. Northern blots analysis was performed to confirm differential expression showed by microarray analysis and to study the differential expression of more PR genes between compatible and incompatible interactions for this interaction.

  7. Sensitivity of Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary Isolates to Fluazinam, Fosetyl-Al and Propamocarb-hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Rekanović

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of in vitro sensitivity of twelve isolates of the Phytophthora infestans to the fluazinam,fosetyl-Al and propamocarb-hydrochloride was conducted. The isolates were isolated from infeceted potato leaves collected from eight different localities in Serbia during 2005-2007. All P. infestans isolates were sensitive to tested fungicides. The obtained values of resistance factor were in the range from 1.0 to 2.8. The EC50 values of fluazinam were from0.14 to 0.27 mg l-1, fosetyl-Al from 30.2 to 85.8 mg l-1, propamocarb-hydrochloride between 12.1 and 31.1 mg l-1, respectively.

  8. Response to artificial inoculation with Phytophthora infestans of potato clones insensitive to culture filtrate of the fungus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, A.; Veronese, P.; Crino, P.; Sonnino, A.

    1997-01-01

    Induction of general resistance to Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary by in vitro culture has been reported for cvs. 'Bintje' and 'Kennebec'. In both cases, sporangia suspension of the fungus were used as selective agent. As reported for many host-pathogen interactions, culture filtrate or purified toxins may also contribute to the selection of resistant genotypes. Challenge of mutagenized buds of cv. 'Spunta' with culture filtrate of P. infestans allowed selection of insensitive clones. To verify the possible correlation between culture filtrate insensitivity and disease resistance, different inoculation technique were applied to these clones. Considering that general resistance to late blight is a complex trait, different tests were performed to evaluate the behaviour during various stages of pathogenesis, such as infection, invasion, mycelial growth and sporulation. 7 refs, 1 tab

  9. Response to artificial inoculation with Phytophthora infestans of potato clones insensitive to culture filtrate of the fungus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, A; Veronese, P; Crino, P; Sonnino, A [Technological Innovation Dept., Sector of Biotechnology and Agriculture, ENEA - Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy)

    1997-12-01

    Induction of general resistance to Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary by in vitro culture has been reported for cvs. `Bintje` and `Kennebec`. In both cases, sporangia suspension of the fungus were used as selective agent. As reported for many host-pathogen interactions, culture filtrate or purified toxins may also contribute to the selection of resistant genotypes. Challenge of mutagenized buds of cv. `Spunta` with culture filtrate of P. infestans allowed selection of insensitive clones. To verify the possible correlation between culture filtrate insensitivity and disease resistance, different inoculation technique were applied to these clones. Considering that general resistance to late blight is a complex trait, different tests were performed to evaluate the behaviour during various stages of pathogenesis, such as infection, invasion, mycelial growth and sporulation. 7 refs, 1 tab.

  10. Effects of the foliar-applied protein "Harpin(Ea)" (messenger) on tomatoes infected with Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanilla, M; Montes, M; De Prado, R

    2005-01-01

    The active ingredient in Messenger, is Harpin(Ea), a naturally occurring protein derived from Erwinia amylovora, a causal agent of fire blight. When Messenger is applied to a plant, the protein Harpin(Ea) binds foliar receptors to it. The receptors recognize the presence of Harpin(Ea), sending a signal that a pathogen is present, actually "tricking" the plant into thinking that it is under attack. This binding process triggers a cascade of responses affecting a global change of gene expressions, stimulating several distinct biochemical pathways within the plant responsible for growth and disease and insect resistance. The objective of this work is to characterize the development of an induced resistance against Phytophthora infestans. No effective treatment is currently available against this pathogenic agent, which causes the loss of complete harvests of different crops. Tomato plants with and without Messenger applications were inoculated with Phytophthora infestans in the same way. In addition, some plants with and without Messenger applications were not inoculated. Inoculated plants were symptomatologically checked for local and systemic symptoms. Evaluations of the number of tomatoes produced, with or without damage, and their growth, were also carried out. Based on the data obtained from the assays, significant changes were observed in the parameters measured due to Messenger treatment. The severe damage of this disease was reduced in the plants which received Messenger applications. These results open up new pathways in the control of diseases like Phytophthora infestans, in which effective means to combat them still do not exist, or these means are harmful to the environment.

  11. The receptor-like kinase SERK3/BAK1 is required for basal resistance against the late blight pathogen phytophthora infestans in Nicotiana benthamiana.

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    Angela Chaparro-Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The filamentous oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans causes late blight, an economically important disease, on members of the nightshade family (Solanaceae, such as the crop plants potato and tomato. The related plant Nicotiana benthamiana is a model system to study plant-pathogen interactions, and the susceptibility of N. benthamiana to Phytophthora species varies from susceptible to resistant. Little is known about the extent to which plant basal immunity, mediated by membrane receptors that recognise conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, contributes to P. infestans resistance.We found that different species of Phytophthora have varying degrees of virulence on N. benthamiana ranging from avirulence (incompatible interaction to moderate virulence through to full aggressiveness. The leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK BAK1/SERK3 is a major modulator of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI in Arabidopsis thaliana and N. benthamiana. We cloned two NbSerk3 homologs, NbSerk3A and NbSerk3B, from N. benthamiana based on sequence similarity to the A. thaliana gene. N. benthamiana plants silenced for NbSerk3 showed markedly enhanced susceptibility to P. infestans infection but were not altered in resistance to Phytophthora mirabilis, a sister species of P. infestans that specializes on a different host plant. Furthermore, silencing of NbSerk3 reduced the cell death response triggered by the INF1, a secreted P. infestans protein with features of PAMPs.We demonstrated that N. benthamiana NbSERK3 significantly contributes to resistance to P. infestans and regulates the immune responses triggered by the P. infestans PAMP protein INF1. In the future, the identification of novel surface receptors that associate with NbSERK3A and/or NbSERK3B should lead to the identification of new receptors that mediate recognition of oomycete PAMPs, such as INF1.

  12. A proteomics study of in vitro cyst germination and appressoria formation in ¤Phytophthora infestans¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebstrup, T.; Saalbach, G.; Egsgaard, H.

    2005-01-01

    A proteomics study using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry was performed on Phytophthora infestans. Proteins from cysts, germinated cysts and appressoria grown in vitro were isolated and separated by 2-DE. Statistical quantitative analysis of the protein spots from ...... five independent experiments of each developmental stage revealed significant up-regulation of ten spots on gels from germinated cysts compared to cysts. Five spots were significantly up-regulated on gels from appressoria compared to germinated cysts and one of these up-regulated spots...

  13. Strain Specific Factors Control Effector Gene Silencing in Phytophthora sojae.

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    Sirjana Devi Shrestha

    Full Text Available The Phytophthora sojae avirulence gene Avr3a encodes an effector that is capable of triggering immunity on soybean plants carrying the resistance gene Rps3a. P. sojae strains that express Avr3a are avirulent to Rps3a plants, while strains that do not are virulent. To study the inheritance of Avr3a expression and virulence towards Rps3a, genetic crosses and self-fertilizations were performed. A cross between P. sojae strains ACR10 X P7076 causes transgenerational gene silencing of Avr3a allele, and this effect is meiotically stable up to the F5 generation. However, test-crosses of F1 progeny (ACR10 X P7076 with strain P6497 result in the release of silencing of Avr3a. Expression of Avr3a in the progeny is variable and correlates with the phenotypic penetrance of the avirulence trait. The F1 progeny from a direct cross of P6497 X ACR10 segregate for inheritance for Avr3a expression, a result that could not be explained by parental imprinting or heterozygosity. Analysis of small RNA arising from the Avr3a gene sequence in the parental strains and hybrid progeny suggests that the presence of small RNA is necessary but not sufficient for gene silencing. Overall, we conclude that inheritance of the Avr3a gene silenced phenotype relies on factors that are variable among P. sojae strains.

  14. Identification and Characterisation CRN Effectors in Phytophthora capsici Shows Modularity and Functional Diversity.

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    Remco Stam

    Full Text Available Phytophthora species secrete a large array of effectors during infection of their host plants. The Crinkler (CRN gene family encodes a ubiquitous but understudied class of effectors with possible but as of yet unknown roles in infection. To appreciate CRN effector function in Phytophthora, we devised a simple Crn gene identification and annotation pipeline to improve effector prediction rates. We predicted 84 full-length CRN coding genes and assessed CRN effector domain diversity in sequenced Oomycete genomes. These analyses revealed evidence of CRN domain innovation in Phytophthora and expansion in the Peronosporales. We performed gene expression analyses to validate and define two classes of CRN effectors, each possibly contributing to infection at different stages. CRN localisation studies revealed that P. capsici CRN effector domains target the nucleus and accumulate in specific sub-nuclear compartments. Phenotypic analyses showed that few CRN domains induce necrosis when expressed in planta and that one cell death inducing effector, enhances P. capsici virulence on Nicotiana benthamiana. These results suggest that the CRN protein family form an important class of intracellular effectors that target the host nucleus during infection. These results combined with domain expansion in hemi-biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, suggests specific contributions to pathogen lifestyles. This work will bolster CRN identification efforts in other sequenced oomycete species and set the stage for future functional studies towards understanding CRN effector functions.

  15. Evaluación de marcadores moleculares asociados con resistencia a gota (Phytophthora infestans L. en papas diploides y tetraploides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Juyó

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Título en ingles: Evaluation of molecular markers associated with resistance to late blight (Phytophthora infestans L.  in diploid and tetraploid potatoes Resumen La papa, cultivo de importancia a nivel mundial es gravemente afectado por gota, enfermedad ocasionada por el oomycete Phytophthora infestans. Actualmente la forma más efectiva para combatir la enfermedad es mediante el desarrollo de cultivares resistentes al patógeno. Para esto, una estrategia es identificar genes que confieran resistencia al patógeno, para lo cual se buscan marcadores asociados con el carácter de resistencia. En este estudio se evaluaron marcadores moleculares tipo SCAR (Sequence Characterized Amplified Region: CosA, GP179, BA47f2 y Prp1 asociados con resistencia a P. infestans y el gen de resistencia R1, en 22 cultivares tetraploides pertenecientes a la subespecie andigena y cinco especies silvestres. Se evaluó el polimorfismo y se determinó si los alelos polimórficos permitían diferenciar genotipos resistentes de susceptibles. Se comparó el  tamaño de los fragmentos obtenidos con los fragmentos esperados asociados con resistencia de acuerdo a reportes. El análisis se realizó considerando presencia/ausencia de los fragmentos: CosA210, CosA250, R11400, R11800, BA47f2500, GP179570, Prp1300, Prp1600, y Prp1900. Los resultados indicaron que en los cultivares tetraploides y silvestres, se presentaron polimorfismos en todos los marcadores evaluados, con excepción del marcador GP179. No se encontró correlación entre el rasgo de resistencia y los alelos. Los resultados de este estudio muestran que hay repuesta diferencial a los marcadores entre las subsp. tuberosum y subsp. Andigena.   Palabras clave: Phytophthora infestans, resistencia a gota, marcadores diagnóstico, Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigena. Abstract Potato is an important worldwide crop seriously affected by late blight disease caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans. Currently, the

  16. Tuber resistance and slow rotting characteristics of potato clones associated with the Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project to the US-24 clonal lineage of Phytophthora infestans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease on potato worldwide and new lineages of the pathogen continue to develop in the U.S. Breeding for resistance is important for economic and environmental purposes. The Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project (SolCAP) focuses ...

  17. Revealing the importance of meristems and roots for the development of hypersensitive responses and full foliar resistance to Phytophthora infestans in the resistant potato cultivar Sarpo Mira

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowska, Elzbieta Zofia; Basile, Alessio; Kandzia, Izabela

    2012-01-01

    The defence responses of potato against Phytophthora infestans were studied using the highly resistant Sarpo Mira cultivar. The effects of plant integrity, meristems, and roots on the hypersensitive response (HR), plant resistance, and the regulation of PR genes were analysed. Sarpo Mira shoots a...

  18. The population structure of Phytophthora infestans from the Toluca Valley of Central Mexico suggests genetic differentiation between populations from cultivated potato and wild Solanum spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flier, W.G.; Grünwald, N.J.; Kroon, L.P.N.M.; Sturbaum, A.K.; Bosch, van den G.B.M.; Garay-Serrano, E.; Lozoya-Saldaña, H.; Fry, W.E.; Turkensteen, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Population structure of Phytophthora infestans in the Toluca Valley of central Mexico was assessed using 170 isolates collected front cultivated potatoes and the native wild Solanum spp., S. demissum and S. xedinense. All isolates were analyzed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype and

  19. VARIABILIDAD GENÉTICA DE AISLAMIENTOS COLOMBIANOS DE Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary EN SOLANÁCEAS CULTIVADAS EN COLOMBIA GENETIC VARIABILITY OF ISOLATES OF Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary IN SOLANACEOUS CROPS FROM COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Raigosa Gómez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Se estudio el nivel de variabilidad genética de una población de 35 aislamientos de Phytophthora infestans obtenidos en diferentes hospedantes y regiones geográficas de Colombia, mediante las técnicas de haplotipos mitocondriales y RAPD. Los resultados encontrados sugieren la existencia en el país de los haplotipos mitocondriales Ia en los aislamientos que afectan tomate de árbol (Solanum betaceum y IIa en cultivos de papa; dichos haplotipos están asociados a los linajes genéticos EC-3 y EC-1, respectivamente. Sin embargo, tres aislamientos obtenidos en tomate de mesa (S. lycopersicum, pimentón (Capsicum sp. y pepino de agua (S. muricatum requieren de un análisis posterior, debido a la falta de correlación entre los perfiles de restricción generados con los cuatro pares de cebadores utilizados en esta prueba y los haplotipos mitocondriales mencionados en la literatura. De otra parte, mediante cuatro cebadores RAPD, fue posible encontrar variabilidad al interior de los dos linajes genéticos, siendo interesante el hecho que los aislamientos obtenidos en tomate de árbol (EC-3 fueron divididos en dos grupos, relacionados con una distancia genética de 0,17. Estos hallazgos indican que es importante contemplar las fuentes de variación asexual en el análisis de la estructura poblacional de este oomycete y por tanto en el diseño de las estrategias de control de las enfermedades que causa P. infestans en cultivos de solanáceas de importancia económica.The level of genetic variability of 35 isolates of Phytophthora infestans obtained from different hosts and geographical regions of Colombia was studied through mitochondrial haplotypes and RAPD techniques. Results suggested the existence of mitochondrial haplotypes Ia affecting tree tomato (Solanum betaceum and IIa in potato, which are associated with genetic lineages EC-3 and EC-1, respectively. However, three isolates obtained from tomato (S. lycopersicum, capsicum (Capsicum sp. and

  20. Assessment of metabolic capacity of Trichoderma inhamatum Bol12 QD biocontrol on native strains of Phytophthora infestans in vitro

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    Puño Ramon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans is a cause of decreased crop yield of tomato, to control these losses, farmers use chemicals. This has consequences for the environment, human health and beneficial organisms in the ecosystem. The objective was to obtain and identify native isolates of Trichoderma spp. In soil planted with tomato Tlayacapan, Morelos (Mexico, Alternaria solani problems and Phytophthora infestans, also determine their antagonistic capacity in vitro. Trichoderma was isolated directly from soil by dilution in culture medium plate with potato dextrose agar (PDA. On the other side plate dilutions of yeast T. QD Bol12 inhamatum crops produced in batch for 30 days to compare the effectiveness of biocontrol. The filtered yeast inhibited mycelial growth kinetic of the agent in laboratory with the 1:2 dilution growth was 32.5% for the 1:4 dilution mycelial growth was 69.1% and finally to the dilution of 1:8 of the yeast biocontrol mycelium grew to 95.2%. To demonstrate the inhibitory activity on the pathogen in field crops, there were 3 L batch for four months. The application of three doses (undiluted, diluted 1:2 and 1:4 plus a control dilution water only was performed in a complete block design with four replications randomly with the tomato crop, belonging to the variety Santa Cruz Kada Gigante in the plots of the Academic Rural United Campesina Carmen Pampa. Statistical analysis by Duncan's test showed that the pure leaven reduce infection by Phytophthora infestans significantly in tomato. Appeared another tomato plant pathogen, Septoria lycopersici, in the course of fieldwork. We also evaluated the effect of the dose of yeast to this disease, and also noticed a significant reduction with all doses of yeast. These experiments demonstrated that the seeds of T. QD Bol12 inhamatum have biocontrol effect on the tomato crop. The antagonistic capacity was assessed using the cellophane and the kind of antagonism with the dual culture

  1. Genetic structure of Phytophthora infestans populations in China indicates multiple migration events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liyun; Zhu, Xiao-Qiong; Hu, Chia-Hui; Ristaino, Jean Beagle

    2010-10-01

    One hundred isolates of Phytophthora infestans collected from 10 provinces in China between 1998 and 2004 were analyzed for mating type, metalaxyl resistance, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype, allozyme genotype, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) with the RG-57 probe. In addition, herbarium samples collected in China, Russia, Australia, and other Asian countries were also typed for mtDNA haplotype. The Ia haplotype was found during the first outbreaks of the disease in China (1938 and 1940), Japan (1901, 1930, and 1931), India (1913), Peninsular Malaysia (1950), Nepal (1954), The Philippines (1910), Australia (1917), Russia (1917), and Latvia (1935). In contrast, the Ib haplotype was found after 1950 in China on both potato and tomato (1952, 1954, 1956, and 1982) and in India (1968 and 1974). Another migration of a genotype found in Siberia called SIB-1 (Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase [Gpi] 100/100, Peptidase [Pep] 100/100, IIa mtDNA haplotype) was identified using RFLP fingerprints among 72% of the isolates and was widely distributed in the north and south of China and has also been reported in Japan. A new genotype named CN-11 (Gpi 100/111, Pep 100/100, IIb mtDNA haplotype), found only in the south of China, and two additional genotypes (Gpi 100/100, Pep 100/100, Ia mtDNA haplotype) named CN-9 and CN-10 were identified. There were more diverse genotypes among isolates from Yunnan province than elsewhere. The SIB-1 (IIa) genotype is identical to those from Siberia, suggesting later migration of this genotype from either Russia or Japan into China. The widespread predominance of SIB-1 suggests that this genotype has enhanced fitness compared with other genotypes found. Movement of the pathogen into China via infected seed from several sources most likely accounts for the distribution of pathogen genotypes observed. MtDNA haplotype evidence and RFLP data suggest multiple migrations of the pathogen into China after the initial introduction of the

  2. Efecto antagónico in vitro de actinomicetos aislados de purines de chipaca (bidens pilosa l.) frente a phytophthora infestans (mont) de bary

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca Ardila, Yudy Astrid; Castellanos Suárez, Diana Edith; León Sicard, Tomás Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Se estudió el efecto inhibidor de los actinomicetos presentes en purines o extractos fermentados de plantas de chipaca (Bidens pilosa L.), sobre el crecimiento de Phytophthora infestans (Mont) de Bary, causante del tizón tardío de la papa. Se elaboraron cuatro purines de flores, raíces, hojas-tallos y su mezcla. De estos purines se obtuvieron 25 aislamientos de actinomicetos, cada uno de los cuales se enfrentó con P. infestans en placas de medio de cultivo, utilizando la técnica de anillos de...

  3. Antimicrobial activities of the essential oils of various plants against tomato late blight disease agent Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, E Mine; Soylu, Soner; Kurt, Sener

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to find an alternative to synthetic fungicides currently used in the control of devastating oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, causal agent of late blight disease of tomato. Antifungal activities of essential oils obtained from aerial parts of aromatic plants such as oregano (Origanum syriacum var. bevanii), thyme (Thymbra spicata subsp. spicata), lavender (Lavandula stoechas subsp. stoechas), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and laurel (Laurus nobilis), were investigated against P. infestans. Both contact and volatile phase effects of different concentrations of the essential oils used were determined by using two in vitro methods. Chemical compositions of the essential oils were also determined by GC-MS analysis. Major compounds found in essential oils of thyme, oregano, rosemary, lavender, fennel and laurel were carvacrol (37.9%), carvacrol (79.8), borneol (20.4%), camphor (20.2%), anethole (82.8%) and 1,8-cineole (35.5%), respectively. All essential oils were found to inhibit the growth of P. infestans in a dose-dependent manner. Volatile phase effect of oregano and thyme oils at 0.3 microg/ml air was found to completely inhibit the growth of P. infestans. Complete growth inhibition of pathogen by essential oil of fennel, rosemary, lavender and laurel was, however, observed at 0.4-2.0 microg/ml air concentrations. For the determination of the contact phase effects of the tested essential oils, oregano, thyme and fennel oils at 6.4 microg/ml were found to inhibit the growth of P. infestans completely. Essential oils of rosemary, lavender and laurel were inhibitory at relatively higher concentrations (12.8, 25.6, 51.2 microg/ml respectively). Volatile phase effects of essential oils were consistently found to be more effective on fungal growth than contact phase effect. Sporangial production was also inhibited by the essential oil tested. Light and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation on

  4. The behaviour of certain potato varieties and lines towards the attack of the Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela POPA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the behaviour of some potato varieties and lines towards the attack of the Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary fungus under the field conditions of the Potato Research and Development Station, Targu-Secuiesc. During the observed period (2001-2003 the appearance of new forms of attack was registered, for example the attack on the stem, on the leaf petioles, as well as a greater number of infected tubers. The greatest number of blighted stems belonged to the varieties Sante and Ostara, and the smallest one was registered in the case of the variety Lady Roseta, followed by Desiree and Nemere. The results prove that there is a direct relationship between the frequency of the attack on the stems and that of the blighted tubers in the case of every variety, except for the varieties Lady Roseta and Nemere at which the smallest number of infected tubers was registered.

  5. The Transcriptome of Compatible and Incompatible Interactions of Potato (Solanum tuberosum) with Phytophthora infestans Revealed by DeepSAGE Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyetvai, Gabor; Sønderkær, Mads; Göbel, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    of the compatible and incompatible interaction were captured by DeepSAGE analysis of 44 biological samples comprising five genotypes, differing only by the presence or absence of the R1 transgene, three infection time points and three biological replicates. 30.859 unique 21 base pair sequence tags were obtained......Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most important disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum). Understanding the molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility to late blight is therefore highly relevant for developing resistant cultivars, either by marker...... interactions over the infection time course and between compatible and incompatible genotypes. Transcriptional changes were more numerous in compatible than in incompatible interactions. In contrast to incompatible interactions, transcriptional changes in the compatible interaction were observed predominantly...

  6. Melatonin Attenuates Potato Late Blight by Disrupting Cell Growth, Stress Tolerance, Fungicide Susceptibility and Homeostasis of Gene Expression in Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumin Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora infestans (P. infestans is the causal agent of potato late blight, which caused the devastating Irish Potato Famine during 1845-1852. Until now, potato late blight is still the most serious threat to potato growth and has caused significant economic losses worldwide. Melatonin can induce plant innate immunity against pathogen infection, but the direct effects of melatonin on plant pathogens are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the direct effects of melatonin on P. infestans. Exogenous melatonin significantly attenuated the potato late blight by inhibiting mycelial growth, changing cell ultrastructure, and reducing stress tolerance of P. infestans. Notably, synergistic anti-fungal effects of melatonin with fungicides on P. infestans suggest that melatonin could reduce the dose levels and enhance the efficacy of fungicide against potato late blight. A transcriptome analysis was carried out to mine downstream genes whose expression levels were affected by melatonin. The analysis of the transcriptome suggests that 66 differentially expressed genes involved in amino acid metabolic processes were significantly affected by melatonin. Moreover, the differentially expressed genes associated with stress tolerance, fungicide resistance, and virulence were also affected. These findings contribute to a new understanding of the direct functions of the melatonin on P. infestans and provide a potential ecofriendly biocontrol approach using a melatonin-based paradigm and application to prevent potato late blight.

  7. Age-related Resistance and the Defense Signaling Pathway of Ph-3 Gene Against Phytophthora infestans in Tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Rashad Ali Shah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance (R genes against plant pathogens often have age-related resistance (ARR effects. However, the mechanism involved in this phenomenon remains unknown. In this paper, Solanum lycopersicum ‘CLN2037B’ and S. pimpinellifolium ‘L3708’ harboring the Ph-3 gene, as well as S. habrochaites ‘LA2099’, ‘LA1777’ and ‘LA1033’ harboring quantitative trait loci (QTLs, were tested to investigate age-related resistance against late blight (LB; caused by Phytophthora infestans in the three-leaf stage of the plants. The results demonstrated that the QTL-related LB resistance showed the same age-related resistance as the Ph-3-mediated resistance at the six- and nine-leaf stages compared with the three-leaf stage. This indicated that there is a common defense mechanism in tomatoes against P. infestans via ARR. In addition, we combined ethylene (ET, salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA mutants with virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS to study the Ph-3-dependent resistance signaling pathway. The results showed that ethylene and salicylic acid, but not jasmonic acid, are involved in the LB resistance mediated by the Ph-3 gene.

  8. Resistance of solanum species to phytophthora infestans evaluated in the detached-leaf and whole-plant assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, K.P.; Saleem, M.Y.; Asghar, M.

    2012-01-01

    The reaction of 82 tomato genotypes belonging to 8 Solanum and a Lycopersicon species against Phytophthora infestans causing late blight was determined using detached-leaf and whole-plant assays. None of the test genotypes was immune or highly resistant. Of the 82 commercial and wild genotypes only TMS-2 (male-sterile and characterized by indeterminate growth) belonging to Lycopersicon esculentum was resistant with severity index of 2.4 in the detached-leaf assay on 0-5 scale (where 5 was highly susceptible) and percent disease index (%DI) of 23.3% under the whole-plant assay. Among the remaining genotypes, 41 were susceptible and 40 were highly susceptible under the detached-leaf assay, while 18 were susceptible and 63 were highly susceptible under the whole-plant assay. However, there was a significant difference in %DI for genotypes under the whole-plant assay. The response of whole-plants to inoculation with P. infestans in the detached-leaf assay was similar in all cases. The overall screening results indicate that TMS-2 is a good source of resistance and it can be useful for the development of tomato hybrid cultivars resistant to late blight. (author)

  9. Expresión de efectores RXLR en el linaje clonal EC-1 de Phytophthora infestans en Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Izarra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available La papa (Solanum tuberosum L. es en nuestros días uno de los cultivos alimenticios más importantes. Esta es propensa a la enfermedad de Tizón Tardío, causada por el oomiceto patógeno Phytophthora infestans, el cual secreta cientos de efectores que actúan como factores de virulencia. Poco se conoce sobre la diversidad de genes de virulencia de las cepas pertenecientes al linaje de reproducción clonal EC-1. En el presente estudio, mediante el secuenciamiento del transcriptoma de la interacción de la papa y P. infestans durante los primeros días después de la infección en las hojas de papa, se identificó la expresión diferencial de genes efectores tipo RXLR en dos cepas de P. infestans EC-1, siendo confirmados por qRT-PCR. Estas cepas, aisladas de papas cultivadas en el centro de los Andes peruanos, tienen diferentes patrones de virulencia. Los genes efectores, fueron silenciados en una cepa, para Avr-vnt1 en POX109 y para el homólogo Avh9.1 en POX067, pero expresados en la otra. Los resultados de transcriptoma fueron comparados con tres cepas adicionales del linaje EC-1. La información del repertorio de los efectores del patógeno y su expresión podrían ser informativos para el mejoramiento genético de la resistencia. El descubrimiento de efectores silenciados en las poblaciones del patógeno pueden guiar al uso de genes R específicos en los programas de mejoramiento genético. Por ejemplo, en el contexto de los Andes, donde el linaje clonal EC-1 predomina, el gen Rpi-vnt1 podría no ser recomendado.

  10. Phytophthora effector targets a novel component of small RNA pathway in plants to promote infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yongli; Shi, Jinxia; Zhai, Yi; Hou, Yingnan; Ma, Wenbo

    2015-05-05

    A broad range of parasites rely on the functions of effector proteins to subvert host immune response and facilitate disease development. The notorious Phytophthora pathogens evolved effectors with RNA silencing suppression activity to promote infection in plant hosts. Here we report that the Phytophthora Suppressor of RNA Silencing 1 (PSR1) can bind to an evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein containing the aspartate-glutamate-alanine-histidine-box RNA helicase domain in plants. This protein, designated PSR1-Interacting Protein 1 (PINP1), regulates the accumulation of both microRNAs and endogenous small interfering RNAs in Arabidopsis. A null mutation of PINP1 causes embryonic lethality, and silencing of PINP1 leads to developmental defects and hypersusceptibility to Phytophthora infection. These phenotypes are reminiscent of transgenic plants expressing PSR1, supporting PINP1 as a direct virulence target of PSR1. We further demonstrate that the localization of the Dicer-like 1 protein complex is impaired in the nucleus of PINP1-silenced or PSR1-expressing cells, indicating that PINP1 may facilitate small RNA processing by affecting the assembly of dicing complexes. A similar function of PINP1 homologous genes in development and immunity was also observed in Nicotiana benthamiana. These findings highlight PINP1 as a previously unidentified component of RNA silencing that regulates distinct classes of small RNAs in plants. Importantly, Phytophthora has evolved effectors to target PINP1 in order to promote infection.

  11. Transcriptional programming and functional interactions within the Phytophthora sojae RXLR effector repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qunqing; Han, Changzhi; Ferreira, Adriana O; Yu, Xiaoli; Ye, Wenwu; Tripathy, Sucheta; Kale, Shiv D; Gu, Biao; Sheng, Yuting; Sui, Yangyang; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Zhengguang; Cheng, Baoping; Dong, Suomeng; Shan, Weixing; Zheng, Xiaobo; Dou, Daolong; Tyler, Brett M; Wang, Yuanchao

    2011-06-01

    The genome of the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae contains nearly 400 genes encoding candidate effector proteins carrying the host cell entry motif RXLR-dEER. Here, we report a broad survey of the transcription, variation, and functions of a large sample of the P. sojae candidate effectors. Forty-five (12%) effector genes showed high levels of polymorphism among P. sojae isolates and significant evidence for positive selection. Of 169 effectors tested, most could suppress programmed cell death triggered by BAX, effectors, and/or the PAMP INF1, while several triggered cell death themselves. Among the most strongly expressed effectors, one immediate-early class was highly expressed even prior to infection and was further induced 2- to 10-fold following infection. A second early class, including several that triggered cell death, was weakly expressed prior to infection but induced 20- to 120-fold during the first 12 h of infection. The most strongly expressed immediate-early effectors could suppress the cell death triggered by several early effectors, and most early effectors could suppress INF1-triggered cell death, suggesting the two classes of effectors may target different functional branches of the defense response. In support of this hypothesis, misexpression of key immediate-early and early effectors severely reduced the virulence of P. sojae transformants.

  12. Efecto de algunos aceites esenciales sobre el crecimiento de Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary en condiciones de laboratorio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrillo Yazmid Adriana

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Entre los factores más limitantes del cultivo de papa se encuentra
    Phytophthora infestans, agente causal de la llamada “gota”.
    El control químico de esta enfermedad representa entre el 7 y
    el 10% de los costos totales del cultivo, y tiene un alto impacto
    ambiental por la contaminación que ocasiona. La búsqueda
    y aplicación de prácticas alternativas para el control de este
    patógeno es importante para disminuir tanto la utilización de
    fungicidas como los costos de producción del cultivo. Numerosos
    estudios realizados in vitro demuestran que algunos aceites
    esenciales tienen propiedades fungicidas y fungistáticas sobre
    diferentes patógenos. Por ello, el objetivo del presente estudio
    consistio en la evaluacion de ocho aceites esenciales extraidos
    de algunas especies aromaticas de la familia Lamiaceae sobre
    el crecimiento de P. infestans en condiciones de laboratorio. Se
    evaluaron diferentes metodologías de aplicación de los productos
    en estudio, encontrándose que las mas apropiadas son aquellas
    en que el aceite ejerce un efecto volátil. Los aceites esenciales
    fueron Origanum vulgare, Mentha piperita, Salvia officinalis,
    Ocimum basilicum, Rosmarinus officinalis, Origanum majorana,
    Thymus vulgaris y Pogostemon cablin se evaluaron en
    su fase volatil, a traves de su efecto sobre dos aislamientos
    de P. infestans (A13 y A15. Los aceites que mostraron efecto
    inhibitorio sobre el crecimiento de P. infestans fueron los de T.
    vulgaris y M. piperita, los cuales redujeron el crecimiento del
    hongo en 92,1 y 89,9%, respectivamente; y por ello pueden ser
    considerados promisorios para ser evaluados en campo.

  13. A propósito de la introducción de aislamientos de Phytophthora infestans para investigación en Colombia Sorne thoughts concerning the import of the mating type A2 of Phytophthora infestans into Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Dominguez Celsa

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Phitophthora infestans es un patógeno heterotálico que requiere dos tipos de apareamiento, A 1 y A2, para que haya reproducción sexual. El tipo A 1 se encontraba distribuido en todas las zonas productoras de papa del mundo; pero, al final de los años 1970s el tipo A2 salió de México (su centro de origen, hacia Europa y al resto del mundo. Como en Colombia no se conocía la composición de las poblaciones de este patógeno, dos grupos de investigación de la Universidad Nacional iniciaron su estudio. El grupo de la Sede Bogotá optó por la importación del tipo A2 para realizar los trabajos de investigación. El presente comunicado es una reflexión sobre los riesgos y los cuidados que se deben tener al importar un patógeno que no está
    presente en el país.Phytophthora infestans is an heterothallic pathogen that requires the presence oftwo mating types, A1 and A2, for sexual reproduction. The A1 type had a worldwide distribution, but at the end of the 70s the A2 migrated from Mexico (the center of origin to Europe and from there to the rest of the world. Since in Colombia there was no information conceming the composition of the population of this pathogen, two research groups from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia initiated studies to determine the composition of the population of this pathogen. The group from Bogota imported the A2 type. The present work contains some thoughts on the risk involved when importing alien and exotic pathogens.

  14. Partial resistance of tomatoes against Phytophthora infestans, the late blight fungus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkensteen, L.J.

    1973-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the source of inoculum of the late blight fungus on tomatoes is the late blight fungus on potato crops. In regions of Europe mentioned, where tomatoes are grown in the open, P. infestans on tomatoes is the main source of inoculum. Especially in

  15. Proteomics analysis suggests broad functional changes in potato leaves triggered by phosphites and a complex indirect mode of action against Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sanghyun; Borza, Tudor; Peters, Rick D; Coffin, Robert H; Al-Mughrabi, Khalil I; Pinto, Devanand M; Wang-Pruski, Gefu

    2013-11-20

    Phosphite (salts of phosphorous acid; Phi)-based fungicides are increasingly used in controlling oomycete pathogens, such as the late blight agent Phytophthora infestans. In plants, low amounts of Phi induce pathogen resistance through an indirect mode of action. We used iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to investigate the effects of phosphite on potato plants before and after infection with P. infestans. Ninety-three (62 up-regulated and 31 down-regulated) differentially regulated proteins, from a total of 1172 reproducibly identified proteins, were identified in the leaf proteome of Phi-treated potato plants. Four days post-inoculation with P. infestans, 16 of the 31 down-regulated proteins remained down-regulated and 42 of the 62 up-regulated proteins remained up-regulated, including 90% of the defense proteins. This group includes pathogenesis-related, stress-responsive, and detoxification-related proteins. Callose deposition and ultrastructural analyses of leaf tissues after infection were used to complement the proteomics approach. This study represents the first comprehensive proteomics analysis of the indirect mode of action of Phi, demonstrating broad effects on plant defense and plant metabolism. The proteomics data and the microscopy study suggest that Phi triggers a hypersensitive response that is responsible for induced resistance of potato leaves against P. infestans. Phosphie triggers complex functional changes in potato leaves that are responsible for the induced resistance against Phytophthora infestans. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Plant Proteomics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of day-length and isolates of Phytophthora infestans on field resistance to late blight of potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihovilovich, E; Munive, S; Bonierbale, M

    2010-04-01

    Main and interaction effects of day-length and pathogen isolate on the reaction and expression of field resistance to Phytophthora infestans were analyzed in a sample of standard clones for partial resistance to potato late blight, and in the BCT mapping population derived from a backcross of Solanum berthaultii to Solanum tuberosum. Detached leaves from plants grown in field plots exposed to short- and long day-length conditions were independently inoculated with two P. infestans isolates and incubated in chambers under short- and long photoperiods, respectively. Lesion growth rate (LGR) was used for resistance assessment. Analysis of variance revealed a significant contribution of genotype x isolate x day-length interaction to variation in LGR indicating that field resistance of genotypes to foliar late blight under a given day-length depended on the infecting isolate. An allele segregating from S. berthaultii with opposite effects on foliar resistance to late blight under long- and short day-lengths, respectively, was identified at a quantitative trait locus (QTL) that mapped on chromosome 1. This allele was associated with positive (decreased resistance) and negative (increased resistance) additive effects on LGR, under short- and long day-length conditions, respectively. Disease progress on whole plants inoculated with the same isolate under field conditions validated the direction of its effect in short day-length regimes. The present study suggests the occurrence of an isolate-specific QTL that displays interaction with isolate behavior under contrasting environments, such as those with different day-lengths. This study highlights the importance of exposing genotypes to a highly variable population of the pathogen under contrasting environments when stability to late blight resistance is to be assessed or marker-assisted selection is attempted for the manipulation of quantitative resistance to late blight.

  17. SENSIBILIDAD IN VITRO DE PHYTOPHTHORA INFESTANS AL EXTRACTO DE FIQUE (Furcraea gigantea vent. Y FUNGICIDAS SISTEMICOS SENSIBILIDADE IN VITRO DE PHYTOPHTHORA INFESTANS AO EXTRATO DA CULTURA DO FIQUE (Furcraea Gigantea Vent. E FUNGICIDAS SISTEMICOS IN VITRO SENSITIVITY OF PHYTOPHTHORA INFESTANS TO FIQUE EXTRACT (Furcraea gigantea vent. AND SYSTEMIC FUNGICIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAVID E ALVAREZ S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Con el objeto de evaluar tratamientos alternativos para el manejo de tizón tardío de la papa causada por Phytophthora infestans, se estudió la respuesta de sensibilidad in vitro del patógeno al bioinsumo de fique (Furcraea gigantea Vent, comparándolo con los productos comerciales Ridomil-Gold® y Curzate®. Para esto, se utilizó un diseño irrestrictamente al azar con arreglo factorial, en donde el factor A correspondió a los tratamientos antes nombrados y el factor B a las concentraciones: 10, 100, 1.000, 10.000, 100.000 µg.mL-1 adicionadas al medio de cultivo. La sensibilidad del aislamiento se evaluó mediante la escala de Shattock y se calculó la concentración efectiva cincuenta (EC50. Los resultados mostraron diferencias significativas (PObjetivou-se avallaros tratamentos alternativos para o controle da requeima da batata causada por Phytophthora infestans, estodou-se a resposta da sensibilidade in vitro do patógeno de bio-produtos de fique (Furcraea gigantea Vent em comparação com produtos comerciais, Ridomil Gold ® e Curzate ®. Para isso, foi utilizado um desenho irrestrito ao acaso, com arranjo fatorial, onde o fator A correspondeu aos tratamentos antes apontados, e o fator B ás concentrações: 10, 100, 1.000, 10.000, 100.000 µg.mL-1 adicionadas ao meio de cultivo. A sensibilidade do isolamento foi avaliada pela escala Shattock e calculou-se a concentração efetiva (EC50. Os resultados mostraram diferenças significativas (PIn order to evaluate alternative treatments for management of potato late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans, the response of the pathogen in vitro sensitivity to bio-products of fique (Furcraea gigantea Vent were studied and compared with commercial products Ridomil -Gold ® and Curzate ®. For this, a randomized completely design with factorial arrangement was used, where the A factor did corresponds to the above named treatments and B factor at concentrations: 10, 100,1,000, 10

  18. Rpi-blb2-Mediated Hypersensitive Cell Death Caused by Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 Requires SGT1, but not EDS1, NDR1, Salicylic Acid-, Jasmonic Acid-, or Ethylene-Mediated Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Keun Oh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Potato Rpi-blb2 encodes a protein with a coiled-coil-nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (CC-NBS-LRR motif that recognizes the Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 effector and triggers hypersensitive cell death (HCD. To better understand the components required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in plants, we used virus-induced gene silencing to repress candidate genes in Rpi-blb2-transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants and assayed the plants for AVRblb2 effector. Rpi-blb2 triggers HCD through NbSGT1-mediated pathways, but not NbEDS1- or NbNDR1-mediated pathways. In addition, the role of salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA, and ethylene (ET in Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD were analyzed by monitoring of the responses of NbICS1-, NbCOI1-, or NbEIN2-silenced or Rpi-blb2::NahG-transgenic plants. Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2 was not associated with SA accumulation. Thus, SA affects Rpi-blb2-mediated resistance against P. infestans, but not Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2. Additionally, JA and ET signaling were not required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in N. benthamiana. Taken together, these findings suggest that NbSGT1 is a unique positive regulator of Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2, but EDS1, NDR1, SA, JA, and ET are not required.

  19. A temporal assessment of nematode community structure and diversity in the rhizosphere of cisgenic Phytophthora infestans-resistant potatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Vilma; Phelan, Sinead; Mullins, Ewen

    2016-12-01

    Nematodes play a key role in soil processes with alterations in the nematode community structure having the potential to considerably influence ecosystem functioning. As a result fluctuations in nematode diversity and/or community structure can be gauged as a 'barometer' of a soil's functional biodiversity. However, a deficit exists in regards to baseline knowledge and on the impact of specific GM crops on soil nematode populations and in particular in regard to the impact of GM potatoes on the diversity of nematode populations in the rhizosphere. The goal of this project was to begin to address this knowledge gap in regards to a GM potato line, cisgenically engineered for resistance to Phytophthora infestans (responsible organism of the Irish potato famine causing late blight disease). For this, a 3 year (2013, 2014, 2015) field experimental study was completed, containing two conventional genotypes (cvs. Desiree and Sarpo Mira) and a cisgenic genotype (cv. Desiree + Rpi-vnt1). Each potato genotype was treated with different disease management strategies (weekly chemical applications and corresponding no spray control). Hence affording the opportunity to investigate the temporal impact of potato genotype, disease management strategy (and their interaction) on the potato rhizosphere nematode community. Nematode structure and diversity were measured through established indices, accounts and taxonomy with factors recording a significant effect limited to the climatic conditions across the three seasons of the study and chemical applications associated with the selected disease management strategy. Based on the metrics studied, the cultivation of the cisgenic potato genotype exerted no significant effect (P > 0.05) on nematode community diversity or structure. The disease management treatments led to a reduction of specific trophic groups (e.g. Predacious c-p = 4), which of interest appeared to be counteracted by a potato genotype with vigorous growth phenotype

  20. Genomic analyses of dominant U.S. clonal lineages of Phytophthora infestans reveals a shared common ancestry for clonal lineages US11 and US18 and a lack of recently shared ancestry among all other U.S. lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    The populations of the potato and tomato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, in the US are well known for emerging repeatedly as novel clonal lineages. These successions of dominant clones have historically been named US1-US24, in order of appearance, since their first characterization usi...

  1. Polyethylene mulch modifies greenhouse microclimate and reduces infection of phytophthora infestans in tomato and Pseudoperonospora cubensis in cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtienberg, D; Elad, Y; Bornstein, M; Ziv, G; Grava, A; Cohen, S

    2010-01-01

    The individual and joint effects of covering the soil with polyethylene mulch before planting and fungicides commonly used by organic growers on tomato late blight (caused by Phytophthora infestans) were studied in three experiments conducted from 2002 to 2005. Application of fungicides resulted in inconsistent and insufficient late blight suppression (control efficacy +/- standard error of 34.5 +/- 14.3%) but the polyethylene mulch resulted in consistent, effective, and highly significant suppression (control efficacy of 83.6 +/- 5.5%) of the disease. The combined effect of the two measures was additive. In a second set of three experiments carried out between 2004 and 2006, it was found that the type of polyethylene mulch used (bicolor aluminized, clear, or black) did not affect the efficacy of late blight suppression (control efficacy of 60.1 to 95.8%) and the differences in the effects among the different polyethylene mulches used were insignificant. Next, the ability of the mulch to suppress cucumber downy mildew (caused by Pseudoperonospora cubensis) was studied in four experiments carried out between 2006 and 2008. The mulch effectively suppressed cucumber downy mildew but the effect was less substantial (control efficacy of 34.9 +/- 4.8%) than that achieved for tomato late blight. The disease-suppressing effect of mulch appeared to come from a reduction in leaf wetness duration, because mulching led to reductions in both the frequency of nights when dew formed and the number of dew hours per night when it formed. Mulching also reduced relative humidity in the canopy, which may have reduced sporulation.

  2. Lysobacter capsici AZ78 produces cyclo(L-Pro-L-Tyr), a 2,5-diketopiperazine with toxic activity against sporangia of Phytophthora infestans and Plasmopara viticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puopolo, G; Cimmino, A; Palmieri, M C; Giovannini, O; Evidente, A; Pertot, I

    2014-10-01

    To investigate low molecular weight compounds produced in vitro by Lysobacter capsici AZ78 and their toxic activity against sporangia of plant pathogenic oomycetes. Assays carried out in vitro showed that L. capsici AZ78 drastically inhibits the growth of plant pathogenic oomycetes. Accordingly, the preventive application of culture filtrates of L. capsici AZ78 on grapevine and tomato plants reduced the infections, respectively, caused by Plasmopara (Pl.) viticola and Phytophthora infestans. The subsequent chemical analysis of the culture filtrates of L. capsici AZ78 by spectroscopic (essentially 1D and 2D (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR and ESI MS spectra) and optical methods led to the identification of the 2,5-diketopiperazine cyclo(L-Pro-L-Tyr) that inhibited the development of P. infestans sporangia in vitro and on tomato leaves. Furthermore, a genomic region with high sequence identity with genes coding for a hybrid polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase was detected in L. capsici AZ78. Lysobacter capsici AZ78 produces cyclo(L-Pro-L-Tyr) in vitro that was effective in killing the sporangia of P. infestans and Pl. viticola in vitro. Moreover, this low molecular weight compound prevents the occurrence of late blight lesions when applied on tomato leaves. The application of L. capsici AZ78 cells or its own culture filtrates effectively controls both P. infestans and Pl. viticola. Cyclo(L-Pro-L-Tyr) produced by L. capsici AZ78 is toxic against sporangia of both these oomycetes. These data enforce the potential in the use of Lysobacter members for the control of plant pathogenic oomycetes and provide the basis for the development of new low-impact fungicides based on cyclo(L-Pro-L-Tyr). © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. The Population Structure of Phytophthora infestans from the Toluca Valley of Central Mexico Suggests Genetic Differentiation Between Populations from Cultivated Potato and Wild Solanum spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flier, Wilbert G; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Kroon, Laurens P N M; Sturbaum, Anne K; van den Bosch, Trudy B M; Garay-Serrano, Edith; Lozoya-Saldaña, Hector; Fry, William E; Turkensteen, Lod J

    2003-04-01

    ABSTRACT The population structure of Phytophthora infestans in the Toluca Valley of central Mexico was assessed using 170 isolates collected from cultivated potatoes and the native wild Solanum spp., S. demissum and S. xendinense. All isolates were analyzed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) multi-locus fingerprint genotype. Isolate samples were monomorphic for mtDNA haplotype because all isolates tested were of the Ia haplotype. A total of 158 multilocus AFLP genotypes were identified among the 170 P. infestans isolates included in this study. P. infestans populations sampled in the Toluca Valley in 1997 were highly variable and almost every single isolate represented a unique genotype based on the analysis of 165 AFLP marker loci. Populations of P. infestans collected from the commercial potato-growing region in the valley, the subsistence potato production area along the slopes of the Nevado de Toluca, and the native Solanum spp. on the forested slopes of the volcano showed a high degree of genetic diversity. The number of polymorphic loci varied from 20.0 to 62.4% for isolates collected from the field station and wild Solanum spp. On average, 81.8% (135) of the AFLP loci were polymorphic. Hetero-zygosity varied between 7.7 and 19.4%. Significant differentiation was found at the population level between strains originating from cultivated potatoes and wild Solanum spp. (P = 0.001 to 0.022). Private alleles were observed in individual isolates collected from all three populations, with numbers of unique dominant alleles varying from 9 to 16 for isolates collected from commercial potato crops and native Solanum spp., respectively. Four AFLP markers were exclusively found present in isolates collected from S. demissum. Indirect estimation of gene flow between populations indicated restricted gene flow between both P. infestans populations from cultivated potatoes and wild Solanum hosts. There was no evidence

  4. Distinct regions of the Phytophthora essential effector Avh238 determine its function in cell death activation and plant immunity suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Qunqing; Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Wu, Jiawei; Wang, Haonan; Wang, Yang; Lin, Long; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Wang, Yuanchao

    2017-04-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete effectors to manipulate host innate immunity, thus facilitating infection. Among the RXLR effectors highly induced during Phytophthora sojae infection, Avh238 not only contributes to pathogen virulence but also triggers plant cell death. However, the detailed molecular basis of Avh238 functions remains largely unknown. We mapped the regions responsible for Avh238 functions in pathogen virulence and plant cell death induction using a strategy that combines investigation of natural variation and large-scale mutagenesis assays. The correlation between cellular localization and Avh238 functions was also evaluated. We found that the 79 th residue (histidine or leucine) of Avh238 determined its cell death-inducing activity, and that the 53 amino acids in its C-terminal region are responsible for promoting Phytophthora infection. Transient expression of Avh238 in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed that nuclear localization is essential for triggering cell death, while Avh238-mediated suppression of INF1-triggered cell death requires cytoplasmic localization. Our results demonstrate that a representative example of an essential Phytophthora RXLR effector can evolve to escape recognition by the host by mutating one nucleotide site, and can also retain plant immunosuppressive activity to enhance pathogen virulence in planta. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Characterisation of cell death inducing Phytophthora capsici CRN effectors suggests diverse activities in the host nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco eStam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant-Microbe interactions are complex associations that feature recognition of Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns by the plant immune system and dampening of subsequent responses by pathogen encoded secreted effectors. With large effector repertoires now identified in a range of sequenced microbial genomes, much attention centres on understanding their roles in immunity or disease. These studies not only allow identification of pathogen virulence factors and strategies, they also provide an important molecular toolset suited for studying immunity in plants. The Phytophthora intracellular effector repertoire encodes a large class of proteins that translocate into host cells and exclusively target the host nucleus. Recent functional studies have implicated the CRN protein family as an important class of diverse effectors that target distinct subnuclear compartments and modify host cell signalling. Here, we characterised three necrosis inducing CRNs and show that there are differences in the levels of cell death. We show that only expression of CRN20_624 has an additive effect on PAMP induced cell death but not AVR3a induced ETI. Given their distinctive phenotypes, we assessed localisation of each CRN with a set of nuclear markers and found clear differences in CRN subnuclear distribution patterns. These assays also revealed that expression of CRN83_152 leads to a distinct change in nuclear chromatin organisation, suggesting a distinct series of events that leads to cell death upon over-expression. Taken together, our results suggest diverse functions carried by CRN C-termini, which can be exploited to identify novel processes that take place in the host nucleus and are required for immunity or susceptibility.

  6. Effect of partially purified components of zoospores and mycelia of phytophthora infestans on uptake of 3H-leucine by potato tuber disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Norio; Tomiyama, Kohei; Doke, Noriyuki

    1980-01-01

    The zoosporial component of Phytophthora infestans, which was previously reported to cause reduction of 3 H-leucine uptake by potato tuber disks, was partially purified. Precipitate (A-fraction) was obtained by homogenizing zoospores with acetate buffer at pH 4.5 and centrifuging at 20,000 x g, and the A-fraction was suspended in borate buffer at pH 8.8, boiled for 1 hr and then centrifuged at 20,000 x g, giving the precipitate (B-fraction) and supernatant (C-fraction). Ten ml of 10 mM tris-HCl buffer containing 1 mM CaCl 2 at pH 7.4 was used to suspend A and B-fraction. The buffer was used as a control. A, B and C fractions obtained from 5 - 6 x 10 6 zoosprores reducted uptake of 3 H-leucine by the tuber disks of potato cv. Rishiri, but the inhibition rates caused by these fractions differed markedly. However, very high correlation was found between inhibition rates of 3 H-leucine uptake and sugar contents of these fractions. There was no difference in the inhibition rates between the zoosporial components of incompatible and compatible races, when the activities were expressed in terms of the sugar contents. The mycelial components of P. infestans extracted by the modified method of Lisker and Kuc which was used to extract phytoalexin elicitor from that of P. infestans, also had the same effect as the zoosporial components (A, B, and C-fraction) on 3 H-leucine uptake by the disks. C-fraction containing 15 μg of sugar per ml sufficed to inhibit 3 H-leucine uptake at the maximum rate, and the maximum rate of inhibition was attained within 2 hr after the zoosporial component (C-fraction containing 30 μg sugar/ml) was administered to the disks. (author)

  7. Effect of Temperature on Growth and Sporulation of US-22, US-23, and US-24 Clonal Lineages of Phytophthora infestans and Implications for Late Blight Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl Johnson, Anna C; Frost, Kenneth E; Rouse, Douglas I; Gevens, Amanda J

    2015-04-01

    Epidemics of late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, have been studied by plant pathologists and regarded with great concern by potato and tomato growers since the Irish potato famine in the 1840s. P. infestans populations have continued to evolve, with unique clonal lineages arising which differ in pathogen fitness and pathogenicity, potentially impacting epidemiology. In 2012 and 2013, the US-23 clonal lineage predominated late blight epidemics in most U.S. potato and tomato production regions, including Wisconsin. This lineage was unknown prior to 2009. For isolates of three recently identified clonal lineages of P. infestans (US-22, US-23, and US-24), sporulation rates were experimentally determined on potato and tomato foliage and the effect of temperature on lesion growth rate on tomato was investigated. The US-22 and US-23 isolates had greater lesion growth rates on tomato than US-24 isolates. Sporulation rates for all isolates were greater on potato than tomato, and the US-23 isolates had greater sporulation rates on both tomato and potato than the US-22 and US-24 isolates. Experimentally determined correlates of fitness were input to the LATEBLIGHT model and epidemics were simulated using archived Wisconsin weather data from four growing seasons (2009 to 2012) to investigate the effect of isolates of these new lineages on late blight epidemiology. The fast lesion growth rates of US-22 and US-23 isolates resulted in severe epidemics in all years tested, particularly in 2011. The greater sporulation rates of P. infestans on potato resulted in simulated epidemics that progressed faster than epidemics simulated for tomato; the high sporulation rates of US-23 isolates resulted in simulated epidemics more severe than simulated epidemics of isolates of the US-22 and US-24 isolates and EC-1 clonal lineages on potato and tomato. Additionally, US-23 isolates consistently caused severe simulated epidemics when lesion growth rate and sporulation

  8. Phytophthora viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guohong; Hillman, Bradley I

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora sp. is a genus in the oomycetes, which are similar to filamentous fungi in morphology and habitat, but phylogenetically more closely related to brown algae and diatoms and fall in the kingdom Stramenopila. In the past few years, several viruses have been characterized in Phytophthora species, including four viruses from Phytophthora infestans, the late blight pathogen, and an endornavirus from an unnamed Phytophthora species from Douglas fir. Studies on Phytophthora viruses have revealed several interesting systems. Phytophthora infestans RNA virus 1 (PiRV-1) and PiRV-2 are likely the first members of two new virus families; studies on PiRV-3 support the establishment of a new virus genus that is not affiliated with established virus families; PiRV-4 is a member of Narnaviridae, most likely in the genus Narnavirus; and Phytophthora endornavirus 1 (PEV1) was the first nonplant endornavirus at the time of reporting. Viral capsids have not been found in any of the above-mentioned viruses. PiRV-1 demonstrated a unique genome organization that requires further examination, and PiRV-2 may have played a role in late blight resurgence in 1980s-1990s. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Selection and validation of potato candidate genes for maturity corrected resistance to Phytophthora infestans based on differential expression combined with SNP association and linkage mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meki Shehabu Muktar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Late blight of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, is one of the most important bottlenecks of potato production worldwide. Cultivars with high levels of durable, race unspecific, quantitative resistance are part of a solution to this problem. However, breeding for quantitative resistance is hampered by the correlation between resistance and late plant maturity, which is an undesirable agricultural attribute. The objectives of our research are (i the identification of genes that condition quantitative resistance to P. infestans not compromised by late plant maturity and (ii the discovery of diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers to be used as molecular tools to increase efficiency and precision of resistance breeding. Twenty two novel candidate genes were selected based on comparative transcript profiling by SuperSAGE (serial analysis of gene expression in groups of plants with contrasting levels of maturity corrected resistance (MCR. Reproducibility of differential expression was tested by quantitative real time PCR and allele specific pyrosequencing in four new sets of genotype pools with contrasting late blight resistance levels, at three infection time points and in three independent infection experiments. Reproducibility of expression patterns ranged from 28% to 97%. Association mapping in a panel of 184 tetraploid cultivars identified SNPs in five candidate genes that were associated with MCR. These SNPs can be used in marker-assisted resistance breeding. Linkage mapping in two half-sib families (n = 111 identified SNPs in three candidate genes that were linked with MCR. The differentially expressed genes that showed association and/or linkage with MCR putatively function in phytosterol synthesis, fatty acid synthesis, asparagine synthesis, chlorophyll synthesis, cell wall modification and in the response to pathogen elicitors.

  10. Distribution of rishitin and lubimin in potato-tuber tissue infected by an incompatible race of Phytophthora infestans and the site where rishitin is synthesized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Toshio; Tomiyama, Kohei; Kinukawa, Masaru

    1975-01-01

    Cut surface of potato tuber (R 1 -cultivar) was inoculated with an incompatible race of Phytophthora infestans. Then the slices prepared from the infected tissue were analyzed for their rishitin and lubimin content. Most of rishitin and lubimin was found in a zone in which the cells became brown with only a trace in the healthy tissue adjacent to the brown zone. However, the amount of lubimin was very low as compared with that of rishitin. In the inoculation fluid within the hole made in the tuber tissue, a large amount of rishitin and lubimin was found. In this case, lubimin was found in greater amount than rishitin during the early period of infection, but later the amount of rishitin exceeded that of lubimin. It was demonstrated by incorporation of acetate-2- 14 C into rishitin that rishitin was synthesized mostly in the adjacent healthy tissue which had not been invaded by the parasite. Rishitin synthesis was especially active in the first several healthy cell layers neighbouring the brown tissue. Since, at this time, hyphal development has already stopped, these cells were never invaded by the parasite and did never turn brown. Rishitin seemed not to be synthesized in the browned tissue. It is concluded that the rishitin sythesized in the adjacent healthy cells is transported to the brown cells and accumulates there. It also diffuses and accumulates outside the brown cells. (auth.)

  11. Evaluation de la résistance de certaines variétés de pomme de terre biologique au mildiou Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferjaoui, S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the Resistance of some Varieties of Biological Potato to the Mildew Phytophthora infestans. To control the mildew, in particular in biological productions, the varietal resistance of potato could be an advantage to associate with other cultural measurements. For this purpose, sixteen varieties potentially interesting in conventional and biological production were tested with regard to the mildew. Eleven varieties were subscribed in the list A (Alaska, Arinda, Baraka, Fabula, Liseta, Mondial, Platina, Safrane, Santana, Spunta and Timate and five are in the process of evaluation (Carréra, Cicéro, Derby, Vivaldi, and Voyager. It seemed that the mildew affected all the tested varieties. However, some of them appeared more tolerant than others. Indeed, the Derby and Voyager varieties revealed to be able to delay the starting of the disease of one month. Cicéro, Vivaldi and Timate could delay the development of mildew disease of twelve days, relatively to its appearance on susceptible varieties. Furthermore, the foliar level of destruction remained very limited compared to that on susceptible varieties and not exceed 10% for Timate. The varieties Fabula, Liséta, Carréra, Mondial, Spunta, Platina, Safrane, Arinda, Santana and Baraka showed an early and fast starting of the epidemy. In addition, the tolerance or varietal resistance could not resolve the problem when tubers are affected, since a relatively weak rate of leaves contamination is enough to cause a very important economic loss on the tubers.

  12. The RxLR effector Avh241 from Phytophthora sojae requires plasma membrane localization to induce plant cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoli; Tang, Junli; Wang, Qunqing; Ye, Wenwu; Tao, Kai; Duan, Shuyi; Lu, Chenchen; Yang, Xinyu; Dong, Suomeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2012-10-01

    • The Phytophthora sojae genome encodes hundreds of RxLR effectors predicted to manipulate various plant defense responses, but the molecular mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Here we have characterized in detail the P. sojae RxLR effector Avh241. • To determine the function and localization of Avh241, we transiently expressed it on different plants. Silencing of Avh241 in P. sojae, we determined its virulence during infection. Through the assay of promoting infection by Phytophthora capsici to Nicotiana benthamiana, we further confirmed this virulence role. • Avh241 induced cell death in several different plants and localized to the plant plasma membrane. An N-terminal motif within Avh241 was important for membrane localization and cell death-inducing activity. Two mitogen-activated protein kinases, NbMEK2 and NbWIPK, were required for the cell death triggered by Avh241 in N. benthamiana. Avh241 was important for the pathogen's full virulence on soybean. Avh241 could also promote infection by P. capsici and the membrane localization motif was not required to promote infection. • This work suggests that Avh241 interacts with the plant immune system via at least two different mechanisms, one recognized by plants dependent on subcellular localization and one promoting infection independent on membrane localization. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Control biológico del Tizón Tardío Phytophthora infestans en papa Solanum tuberosum a través de consorcios microbianos formados por hongos nativos del género Trichoderma sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Bustamante Gavilanes, Adriana Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Esta investigación evalúo la eficiencia de consorcios microbianos formados por hongos nativos del género Trichoderma sp. como biocontroladores del tizón tardío Phytophthora infestans en papa Solanum tuberosum. En las pruebas de antagonismo las cepas del género Trichoderma sp. inhibieron en promedio entre 83% y 87% al patógeno. En base a los resultados obtenidos en el ensayo de campo mostró que el tratamiento T3: Trichoderma harzianum+ Trichoderma sp. + Trichoderma atroviride es más efectivo ...

  14. The aspartic proteinase family of three Phytophthora species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Phytophthora species are oomycete plant pathogens with such major social and economic impact that genome sequences have been determined for Phytophthora infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum. Pepsin-like aspartic proteinases (APs) are produced in a wide variety of species (from bacteria to humans) and contain conserved motifs and landmark residues. APs fulfil critical roles in infectious organisms and their host cells. Annotation of Phytophthora APs would provide invaluable information for studies into their roles in the physiology of Phytophthora species and interactions with their hosts. Results Genomes of Phytophthora infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum contain 11-12 genes encoding APs. Nine of the original gene models in the P. infestans database and several in P. sojae and P. ramorum (three and four, respectively) were erroneous. Gene models were corrected on the basis of EST data, consistent positioning of introns between orthologues and conservation of hallmark motifs. Phylogenetic analysis resolved the Phytophthora APs into 5 clades. Of the 12 sub-families, several contained an unconventional architecture, as they either lacked a signal peptide or a propart region. Remarkably, almost all APs are predicted to be membrane-bound. Conclusions One of the twelve Phytophthora APs is an unprecedented fusion protein with a putative G-protein coupled receptor as the C-terminal partner. The others appear to be related to well-documented enzymes from other species, including a vacuolar enzyme that is encoded in every fungal genome sequenced to date. Unexpectedly, however, the oomycetes were found to have both active and probably-inactive forms of an AP similar to vertebrate BACE, the enzyme responsible for initiating the processing cascade that generates the Aβ peptide central to Alzheimer's Disease. The oomycetes also encode enzymes similar to plasmepsin V, a membrane-bound AP that cleaves effector proteins of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum during

  15. Efecto Antagónico in vitro de Actinomicetos Aislados de Purines de Chipaca (Bidens pilosa L. Frente a Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary In vitro Antagonistic Effect of Actinomycetes Isolated from Chipaca (Bidens pilosa L. Purins Against Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudy Astrid Fonseca Ardila

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió el efecto inhibidor de los actinomicetos presentes en purines o extractos fermentados de plantas de chipaca (Bidens pilosa L., sobre el crecimiento de Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary, causante del tizón tardío de la papa. Se elaboraron cuatro purines de flores, raíces, hojas-tallos y su mezcla. De estos purines se obtuvieron 25 aislamientos de actinomicetos, cada uno de los cuales se enfrentó con P. infestans en placas de medio de cultivo, utilizando la técnica de anillos de Gauze y estableciendo las concentraciones iniciales de esporas mediante conteos microscópicos en cámara de Neubauer. Los actinomicetos no crecieron en el purin de flores debido, posiblemente, a que en él no se utiliza suelo rizosférico o porque su pH (9 es mayor que el rango normal de crecimiento de estos microorganismos ( pH 6 -; 8. Se evidenció inhibición del crecimiento del oomycete por parte de 8 aislamientos de actinomicetos con porcentajes de inhibición entre 33,3 - 77,8%, provenientes de los purines de raíces, tallos-hojas y mezcla de partes de la planta. La mayor inhibición se obtuvo en los aislamientos AC001, AC010, AC011 y AC025 con conteos de 0,4, 6,0, 3,0, y 3,6 x10(5 esporas mL-1.Purins or liquid fermented extracts of chipaca (Bidens pilosa L. were prepared to establish the inhibitory effect of the actinomycetes found in such biopharmaceutical preparations on the growth of Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary, the causative of potato late blight disease. Four purins made from flowers, roots, leaf-steams and a mixture of them were prepared; 25 actinomycete isolates were obtained from these purins and their ability to resist challenge by P. infestans was ascertained in medium plates using the ring Gauze technique and establishing initial concentrations of spores by microscopic counting in Neubauer chamber. Actinomycetes did not grow in flower purin as rhizosphere soil was not used in its preparation or because this particular pH (9

  16. Efficient disruption and replacement of an effector gene in the oomycete Phytophthora sojae using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yufeng; Tyler, Brett M

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora sojae is an oomycete pathogen of soybean. As a result of its economic importance, P. sojae has become a model for the study of oomycete genetics, physiology and pathology. The lack of efficient techniques for targeted mutagenesis and gene replacement have long hampered genetic studies of pathogenicity in Phytophthora species. Here, we describe a CRISPR/Cas9 system enabling rapid and efficient genome editing in P. sojae. Using the RXLR effector gene Avr4/6 as a target, we observed that, in the absence of a homologous template, the repair of Cas9-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in P. sojae was mediated by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), primarily resulting in short indels. Most mutants were homozygous, presumably as a result of gene conversion triggered by Cas9-mediated cleavage of non-mutant alleles. When donor DNA was present, homology-directed repair (HDR) was observed, which resulted in the replacement of Avr4/6 with the NPT II gene. By testing the specific virulence of several NHEJ mutants and HDR-mediated gene replacements in soybean, we have validated the contribution of Avr4/6 to recognition by soybean R gene loci, Rps4 and Rps6, but also uncovered additional contributions to resistance by these two loci. Our results establish a powerful tool for the study of functional genomics in Phytophthora, which provides new avenues for better control of this pathogen. © 2015 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY PUBLISHED BY JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD AND BSPP.

  17. RESISTENCIA AL TIZÓN TARDÍO (Phytophthora infestans EN CLONES PROMISORIOS DE PAPA EN COSTA RICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Barquero

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Se determinó la resistencia al tizón tardío presente en 83 genotipos de papa, provenientes de diferentes cruces y fusión de protoplastos de líneas de mejoramiento con las especies silves- tres Solanum bulbocastanum, S. circaeifolium, S. okadae, S. laxissimum, S. berthaultii, S. pinnatisectum y S. commersonii. Los materiales fueron evaluados en el campo, y en el labora- torio se realizó pruebas de foliolos separados, utilizando como inóculo una raza compleja (1- 11 de P. infestans. Los genotipos provenientes de las hibridaciones somáticas o cruces con las especies silvestres S. bulbocastanum, S. circaei-folium y S. okadae fueron los que presentaron los valores más bajos del área bajo la curva de desarrollo de la enfermedad: 60, 80 y 79, res- pectivamente. Las variedades Alpha, Waych'a,Pimpernell y Granola, utilizadas como testigos, presentaron los valores más altos del área bajo la curva 477, 474, 466 y 427, respectivamente.

  18. Genetic analysis of environmental strains of the plant pathogen Phytophthora capsici reveals heterogeneous repertoire of effectors and possible effector evolution via genomic island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, María Josefina; Pascuan, Cecilia; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a virulent oomycete pathogen of many vegetable crops. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the recognition of the RXLR effector AVR3a1 of P. capsici (PcAVR3a1) triggers a hypersensitive response and plays a critical role in mediating non-host resistance. Here, we analyzed the occurrence of PcAVR3a1 in 57 isolates of P. capsici derived from globe squash, eggplant, tomato and bell pepper cocultivated in a small geographical area. The occurrence of PcAVR3a1 in environmental strains of P. capsici was confirmed by PCR in only 21 of these pathogen isolates. To understand the presence-absence pattern of PcAVR3a1 in environmental strains, the flanking region of this gene was sequenced. PcAVR3a1 was found within a genetic element that we named PcAVR3a1-GI (PcAVR3a1 genomic island). PcAVR3a1-GI was flanked by a 22-bp direct repeat, which is related to its site-specific recombination site. In addition to the PcAVR3a1 gene, PcAVR3a1-GI also encoded a phage integrase probably associated with the excision and integration of this mobile element. Exposure to plant induced the presence of an episomal circular intermediate of PcAVR3a1-GI, indicating that this mobile element is functional. Collectively, these findings provide evidence of PcAVR3a1 evolution via mobile elements in environmental strains of Phytophthora. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Las poblaciones de Phytophthora infestans presentes en papa en el altiplano Cundiboyacense en 1996 son monomórficas para la enzima glucosa-6-fosfato Isomerasa Populations of Phytophthora infestans present on potato in the Cundinamarca and Boyacá plateau in 1996 are monomorphic for glucose-6-phosphate isomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualtero Cúellar Elsa Janeth

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available La gota de la papa. causada por Phytophthora infestans. es responsable, en gran medida. de la disminución de la producción de este cultivo en el altiplano Cundiboyacense. Hasta el momento, el control de la gota se ha basado, principalmente, en la aplicación de fungicidas. La observación
    de una mayor variabilidad genética en las poblaciones del patógeno en varios caracteres, incluyendo la sensibilidad a fungicidas. ha mostrado la necesidad de conocer la estructura genética de las poblaciones locales: por esto se realizó una caracterización aloenzimática de las poblaciones de P infestans en Cundinamarca y Boyacá a través de glucosa-6-fosfato isomerasa (GPI lo cual permitió determinar su naturaleza clonal. En efecto todos los aislamientos locales evaluados presentaron genotipo 100/100 para GPI, es decir. fueron homocigotos monomórficos. El aislamiento Ro presentó un genotipo 86/100 que, al ser comparado
    con aislamientos de Estados Unidos, corresponde al linaje US-1. El aislamiento MT2 presentó un genotipo 84/100. Estos aislamientos corresponden a poblaciones heterocigotas que pueden ser el resultado de la reproducción sexual. El aislamiento HIN presentó un genotipo 100/100 coincidiendo con los aislamientos locales: este aislamiento es del tipo de apareamiento A1, y por comparación con aislamientos de Estados Unidos, corresponde al linaje US-6. este linaje representa una de las primeras migraciones de México a Estados Unidos, Europa y luego al resto del mundo anteriores a la migración del tipo A2. Los resultados de los análisis indicaron que las poblaciones locales no presentan diversidad, siendo por tanto de origen clonal; estos resultados están de acuerdo con la evaluación de las mismas poblaciones por  sensibilidad a metalaxil y tipo de apareamiento (González, 1997. Las poblaciones de P infestans de las localidades muestreadas en el altiplano Cundiboyacense son clonales y están constituidas por un s

  20. A paralogous decoy protects Phytophthora sojae apoplastic effector PsXEG1 from a host inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhenchuan; Zhu, Lin; Song, Tianqiao; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qi; Xia, Yeqiang; Qiu, Min; Lin, Yachun; Li, Haiyang; Kong, Liang; Fang, Yufeng; Ye, Wenwu; Wang, Yan; Dong, Suomeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Tyler, Brett M; Wang, Yuanchao

    2017-02-17

    The extracellular space (apoplast) of plant tissue represents a critical battleground between plants and attacking microbes. Here we show that a pathogen-secreted apoplastic xyloglucan-specific endoglucanase, PsXEG1, is a focus of this struggle in the Phytophthora sojae -soybean interaction. We show that soybean produces an apoplastic glucanase inhibitor protein, GmGIP1, that binds to PsXEG1 to block its contribution to virulence. P. sojae , however, secretes a paralogous PsXEG1-like protein, PsXLP1, that has lost enzyme activity but binds to GmGIP1 more tightly than does PsXEG1, thus freeing PsXEG1 to support P. sojae infection. The gene pair encoding PsXEG1 and PsXLP1 is conserved in many Phytophthora species, and the P. parasitica orthologs PpXEG1 and PpXLP1 have similar functions. Thus, this apoplastic decoy strategy may be widely used in Phytophthora pathosystems. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. A Phytophthora sojae effector PsCRN63 forms homo-/hetero-dimers to suppress plant immunity via an inverted association manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Meixiang; Shen, Danyu; Liu, Tingli; Chen, Yanyu; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2016-05-31

    Oomycete pathogens produce a large number of effectors to promote infection. Their mode of action are largely unknown. Here we show that a Phytophthora sojae effector, PsCRN63, suppresses flg22-induced expression of FRK1 gene, a molecular marker in pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). However, PsCRN63 does not suppress upstream signaling events including flg22-induced MAPK activation and BIK1 phosphorylation, indicating that it acts downstream of MAPK cascades. The PsCRN63-transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed increased susceptibility to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pst) DC3000 and oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The callose deposition were suppressed in PsCRN63-transgenic plants compared with the wild-type control plants. Genes involved in PTI were also down-regulated in PsCRN63-transgenic plants. Interestingly, we found that PsCRN63 forms an dimer that is mediated by inter-molecular interactions between N-terminal and C-terminal domains in an inverted association manner. Furthermore, the N-terminal and C-terminal domains required for the dimerization are widely conserved among CRN effectors, suggesting that homo-/hetero-dimerization of Phytophthora CRN effectors is required to exert biological functions. Indeed, the dimerization was required for PTI suppression and cell death-induction activities of PsCRN63.

  2. An effector of the Irish potato famine pathogen antagonizes a host autophagy cargo receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdas, Yasin F; Belhaj, Khaoula; Maqbool, Abbas; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Pandey, Pooja; Petre, Benjamin; Tabassum, Nadra; Cruz-Mireles, Neftaly; Hughes, Richard K; Sklenar, Jan; Win, Joe; Menke, Frank; Findlay, Kim; Banfield, Mark J; Kamoun, Sophien; Bozkurt, Tolga O

    2016-01-01

    Plants use autophagy to safeguard against infectious diseases. However, how plant pathogens interfere with autophagy-related processes is unknown. Here, we show that PexRD54, an effector from the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, binds host autophagy protein ATG8CL to stimulate autophagosome formation. PexRD54 depletes the autophagy cargo receptor Joka2 out of ATG8CL complexes and interferes with Joka2's positive effect on pathogen defense. Thus, a plant pathogen effector has evolved to antagonize a host autophagy cargo receptor to counteract host defenses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10856.001 PMID:26765567

  3. Population Genetics of Phytophthora infestans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Melanie Sarah

    a high diversity of lineages, with different strains appearing from field to field. Different strains were also tested for their resistance to the fungicide metalaxyl, and it was shown that there is potential for linking genetic markers to resistance. In a pilot study it was then tested whether P...

  4. Carbohydrate-related enzymes of important Phytophthora plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Henk; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) form particularly interesting targets to study in plant pathogens. Despite the fact that many CAZymes are pathogenicity factors, oomycete CAZymes have received significantly less attention than effectors in the literature. Here we present an analysis of the CAZymes present in the Phytophthora infestans, Ph. ramorum, Ph. sojae and Pythium ultimum genomes compared to growth of these species on a range of different carbon sources. Growth on these carbon sources indicates that the size of enzyme families involved in degradation of cell-wall related substrates like cellulose, xylan and pectin is not always a good predictor of growth on these substrates. While a capacity to degrade xylan and cellulose exists the products are not fully saccharified and used as a carbon source. The Phytophthora genomes encode larger CAZyme sets when compared to Py. ultimum, and encode putative cutinases, GH12 xyloglucanases and GH10 xylanases that are missing in the Py. ultimum genome. Phytophthora spp. also encode a larger number of enzyme families and genes involved in pectin degradation. No loss or gain of complete enzyme families was found between the Phytophthora genomes, but there are some marked differences in the size of some enzyme families. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluación de la reacción de nueve genotipos de papa (Solanum tuberosumsubsp. andigena al ataque de Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betancourth G. Carlos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    El presente trabajo se realizó en el municipio de Pasto, departamento de Nariño, Colombia, a 2.710 msnm. El objetivo fue evaluar la reacción de los clones de papa Blanca, Pintada, Rosada tipo Capiro, Roja Guata, Roja Redonda y Roja Loca y tres variedades mejoradas: Parda Suprema, Roja Nariño y Betina, al ataque de la gota (Phytophthora infestans. Se utilizó un diseño de bloques al azar con cuatro repeticiones y nueve tratamientos. Para la variable severidad los mejores genotipos fueron Blanca, Pintada, Parda Suprema y Betina con un promedio de 19,72; 21,99; 23,15 y 23,62%, respectivamente. El mejor rendimiento fue obtenido por los genotipos Blanca, Pintada, Parda Suprema, Betina y Roja Loca con 29,61; 24,66; 25,71; 27,12 y 28,05 t•ha-1, en su orden.

  6. The Activation of Phytophthora Effector Avr3b by Plant Cyclophilin is Required for the Nudix Hydrolase Activity of Avr3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Jing, Maofeng; Huang, Jie; Yang, Jin; Xia, Yeqiang; Kong, Liang; Ye, Wenwu; Xiong, Qin; Qiao, Yongli; Dong, Suomeng; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2015-08-01

    Plant pathogens secrete an arsenal of effector proteins to impair host immunity. Some effectors possess enzymatic activities that can modify their host targets. Previously, we demonstrated that a Phytophthora sojae RXLR effector Avr3b acts as a Nudix hydrolase when expressed in planta; and this enzymatic activity is required for full virulence of P. sojae strain P6497 in soybean (Glycine max). Interestingly, recombinant Avr3b produced by E. coli does not have the hydrolase activity unless it was incubated with plant protein extracts. Here, we report the activation of Avr3b by a prolyl-peptidyl isomerase (PPIase), cyclophilin, in plant cells. Avr3b directly interacts with soybean cyclophilin GmCYP1, which activates the hydrolase activity of Avr3b in a PPIase activity-dependent manner. Avr3b contains a putative Glycine-Proline (GP) motif; which is known to confer cyclophilin-binding in other protein substrates. Substitution of the Proline (P132) in the putative GP motif impaired the interaction of Avr3b with GmCYP1; as a result, the mutant Avr3bP132A can no longer be activated by GmCYP1, and is also unable to promote Phytophthora infection. Avr3b elicits hypersensitive response (HR) in soybean cultivars producing the resistance protein Rps3b, but Avr3bP132A lost its ability to trigger HR. Furthermore, silencing of GmCYP1 rendered reduced cell death triggered by Avr3b, suggesting that GmCYP1-mediated Avr3b maturation is also required for Rps3b recognition. Finally, cyclophilins of Nicotiana benthamiana can also interact with Avr3b and activate its enzymatic activity. Overall, our results demonstrate that cyclophilin is a "helper" that activates the enzymatic activity of Avr3b after it is delivered into plant cells; as such, cyclophilin is required for the avirulence and virulence functions of Avr3b.

  7. Mitochondrial genomics in the Genus Phytophthora with a focus on Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank N. Martin; Paul Richardson

    2008-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of Phytophthora infestans, P. ramorum and P. sojae have been sequenced and comparative genomics has provided an opportunity to examine the processes involved with genome evolution in the genus Phytophthora. This approach can also be useful in assessing intraspecific...

  8. Population genetics of Phytophthora infestans in Denmark reveals dominantly clonal populations and specific alleles linked to metalaxyl-M resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, M. S.; Nielsen, Bent Jørgen; Schmidt, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    population of P. infestans was characterized over the course of the 2013 growing season, as was the population genetic structure, using simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotypes and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based mitochondrial haplotyping of over 80 isolates. Both mating types A1 and A2 were present...... in most fields, but tests for recombination showed that clonal reproduction dominates in Danish populations. Genotype was not linked to haplotype and no differentiation was observed at the haplotype level, but rather between fields. Resistance phenotypes were linked to specific SSR alleles, demonstrating...

  9. Effect of infection by Phytophthora infestans and treatment with its zoosporial components on uptake of 3H-leucine and protein synthesis potato tuber tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Norio; Tomiyama, Kohei; Doke, Noriyuki

    1978-01-01

    Both sides of aged disks of potato tubers were inoculated with incompatible race 0 or compatible race 1 of P. infestans. The uptake of radioactivity from 3 H-leucine into the disks was greatly reduced by the infection with the incompatible race, but the ratio of incorporated radioactivity in the acid soluble fraction of the disks to total radioactivity in the 20,000 x g supernatant was increased by the infection with the incompatible race 0. In case of the compatible race 1, the infection had less effect on the incorporation ratio of the radioactivity into the acid insoluble fraction than the case of the race 0. The results suggested that the reduction in 3 H-leucine uptake may be due to alteration of the physiological activity of host plasma membrane, instead of the reduction of metabolic activity. The treatment of tuber disks with the insoluble fraction of the zoosporial homogenate of race 0 or race 1 greatly reduced the uptake of 3 H-leucine by the disks. The supernatant fraction of the zoosporial homogenate also reduced the uptake, but the effect was lost by dialysis. The results suggest that some substances in the insoluble components of the zoosporial homogenate of P. infestans may be at least one cause of the reduction in the uptake of 3 H-leucine which begins to occur at very early period of the inoculation with race 0 or race 1 while penetration has not yet occurred. (Kobatake, H.)

  10. The Phytophthora sojae avirulence locus Avr3c encodes a multi-copy RXLR effector with sequence polymorphisms among pathogen strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suomeng Dong

    Full Text Available Root and stem rot disease of soybean is caused by the oomycete Phytophthora sojae. The avirulence (Avr genes of P. sojae control race-cultivar compatibility. In this study, we identify the P. sojae Avr3c gene and show that it encodes a predicted RXLR effector protein of 220 amino acids. Sequence and transcriptional data were compared for predicted RXLR effectors occurring in the vicinity of Avr4/6, as genetic linkage of Avr3c and Avr4/6 was previously suggested. Mapping of DNA markers in a F(2 population was performed to determine whether selected RXLR effector genes co-segregate with the Avr3c phenotype. The results pointed to one RXLR candidate gene as likely to encode Avr3c. This was verified by testing selected genes by a co-bombardment assay on soybean plants with Rps3c, thus demonstrating functionality and confirming the identity of Avr3c. The Avr3c gene together with eight other predicted genes are part of a repetitive segment of 33.7 kb. Three near-identical copies of this segment occur in a tandem array. In P. sojae strain P6497, two identical copies of Avr3c occur within the repeated segments whereas the third copy of this RXLR effector has diverged in sequence. The Avr3c gene is expressed during the early stages of infection in all P. sojae strains examined. Virulent alleles of Avr3c that differ in amino acid sequence were identified in other strains of P. sojae. Gain of virulence was acquired through mutation and subsequent sequence exchanges between the two copies of Avr3c. The results illustrate the importance of segmental duplications and RXLR effector evolution in the control of race-cultivar compatibility in the P. sojae and soybean interaction.

  11. Reducing Severity of Late Blight (Phytophthora infestans and Improving Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. Tuber Yield with Pre-Harvest Application of Calcium Nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yewubnesh Wendimu Seifu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of pre-harvest application of calcium chloride alone, calcium nitrate alone, and combined application of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate (1:1 was evaluated in reducing the severity of P. infestans and improving potato tuber yield. Pot experiment was conducted in randomized complete block design with four replications. The treatments consisted of combination of two potato varieties (Shenkola and Gera and three types of calcium nutrients (calcium chloride alone, calcium nitrate alone, and calcium chloride mixed with calcium nitrate, each at three levels (5, 10, and 15 g per liter per plant and the control treatment (0 g of calcium nutrients. In comparison to the control treatment, the application of calcium nutrients significantly decreased the severity of late blight disease and improved potato tuber yield. The effect of calcium nutrients on the severity of late blight disease and potato tuber yield differed among the two potato varieties. The maximum severity reduction (60% was noticed in the Gera potato variety with the application of calcium chloride mixed with calcium nitrate (1:1, supplied at 15 g per plant. However, the highest average tuber yield was obtained with the application of calcium nitrate at 15 g per plant, and average tuber yield was increased by 77% in both potato varieties. Hence, foliar application of either calcium nitrate alone or calcium nitrate mixed with calcium chloride was found to be more efficient than the application of calcium chloride alone. This result suggests that the nitrate ion present in the calcium nitrate may make a difference in terms of reducing the severity of late blight disease and improving potato tuber yield. The lowered severity of late blight disease and the increased tuber yield in potato plants sprayed with calcium nutrients may be because of the higher accumulation of calcium in the plant tissue.

  12. β(1,3 GLUCANASAS DE LOS ESPACIOS INTERCELULARES DE HOJAS DE TOMATE LYCOPERSICON ESCULENTUM CERACIFORME DESPUES DE INFECCIÓN CON PHYTOPHTHORA INFESTANS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto M. Zamora

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Análisis en líquido de lavado intercelular de Lycopersicon esculentum ceraciforme L1568 perteneciente al germoplasma nacional con resistencia en campo a P. infestans mostró la presencia de cuatro   β (1,3 glucanasas después de infección con el patógeno. Las plantas se inocularon con el patógeno para inducir aumento en la concentración de las proteínas PR. Después de 15 días de inoculadas, se extrajo el líquido de lavado intercelular de los foliolos de la planta utilizando agua destilada. Las proteínas extraídas se liofilizaron, se  resuspendieron en buffer, se purificaron utilizando cromatografía de intercambio iónico y electroforesis preparativa,  esto permitió la  caracterización parcial de una β (1,3  glucanasa básica con peso molecular  de 36,8 kDa y PI  9,2 y tres ácidas de  35.4, 30.1 y 7.2 kDa  con puntos isoeléctricos de 3.8; 3.6 y 5.0 respectivamente. Además se determinaron las propiedades cinéticas de cada enzima, KM, Vmax, Eo y K3 encontrando que la proteína básica no ha sido reportada en la literatura hasta ahora.

  13. Albugo-imposed changes to tryptophan-derived antimicrobial metabolite biosynthesis may contribute to suppression of non-host resistance to Phytophthora infestans in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prince, David C.; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Xu, Deyang

    2017-01-01

    -derived antimicrobial compounds enables P. infestans colonization of Arabidopsis, although to a lesser extent than Albugo-infected tissue. A. laibachii also suppresses a subset of genes regulated by salicylic acid; however, salicylic acid plays only a minor role in non-host resistance to P. infestans. CONCLUSIONS......: Albugo sp. alter tryptophan-derived metabolites and suppress elements of the responses to salicylic acid in Arabidopsis. Albugo sp. imposed alterations in tryptophan-derived metabolites may play a role in Arabidopsis non-host resistance to P. infestans. Understanding the basis of non-host resistance...

  14. Seleccion de híbridos de especies de papa por resistencia a Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary, fertilidad masculina y potencial productivo Hybrid selection of potatoe species for resistance to Phytophthora infestans (Mont de Bary, male fertility and productive potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ñustez L. Carlos Eduardo

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available En la Universidad Nacional de Colombia en Mosquera durante los años 1988 y 1989 se realizó una investigación, donde se evaluó bajo condiciones de invernadero la resistencia a P. infestans de las progenies de 51 cruzamientos (F1 y avanzados. que inclu ían en su pedigree especies silvestres,
    primitivas y/o cultivadas de papa. Luego de un primer ciclo de selección los genotipos escogidos se evaluaron en campo por
    resistencia a la enfermedad, fertilidad masculina y potencial productivo (kg/planta. En invernadero se encontró buena resistencia a razas no específicas de P. infestans en las progenies de los cruzamientos simples con phureja, que incluían las especies silvestres polyadenium, stoloniferum, iopetslum, . avilesii y okadae y susceptibilidad en los que
    tenían las silvestres -dodsii, abancayense, embosinum, canasense, gandarillasii, pampasense, marinasense yalandiae. Al final del segundo ciclo de evaluación
    en campo se seleccionaron 27 genotipos: 5 de cruzamientos simples, 9 de cruzamientos triples y 2 de cruzamientos múltiples que incluyen especies silvestres en su pedigree
    (avilesii, brachycarpum, stotontterum, iopetalum, hougasii, eceule y los 11 restantes incluyen genotipos primitivos y/o avanzados. Un excelente potencial productivo se encontró
    en genotipos del cruzamiento interéspecífico avílesíi x phureja, y en genotipos de cruzamientos triples que incluyen las especies hougasii o acaule. La fertilidad masculina
    de los genotipo evaluados osciló desde esterilidad hasta alta fertilidad.An experiment was carriet out in one of the greenhouses of the Natíonal University of Colombia located in Bogotá, between 1988 and 1989. The objetive was to evaluate. the resistance to P. infestans of the progenies of 51 crosses (F1 and advanced that included in their pedigree wild, primitive specias and/or cultivated potatoes. Then after a first cycle of selection the chosen genotypes were evaluated in

  15. Dual RNA-sequencing of Eucalyptus nitens during Phytophthora cinnamomi challenge reveals pathogen and host factors influencing compatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febe Elizabeth Meyer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damage caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands remains an important concern on forest tree species. The pathogen causes root and collar rot, stem cankers and dieback of various economically important Eucalyptus spp. In South Africa, susceptible cold tolerant Eucalyptus plantations have been affected by various Phytophthora spp. with P. cinnamomi considered one of the most virulent. The molecular basis of this compatible interaction is poorly understood. In this study, susceptible Eucalyptus nitens plants were stem inoculated with P. cinnamomi and tissue was harvested five days post inoculation. Dual RNA-sequencing, a technique which allows the concurrent detection of both pathogen and host transcripts during infection, was performed. Approximately 1% of the reads mapped to the draft genome of P. cinnamomi while 78% of the reads mapped to the Eucalyptus grandis genome. The highest expressed P. cinnamomi gene in planta was a putative crinkler effector (CRN1. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the high similarity of this P. cinnamomi CRN1 to that of Phytophthora infestans. Some CRN effectors are known to target host nuclei to suppress defense. In the host, over 1400 genes were significantly differentially expressed in comparison to mock inoculated trees, including suites of pathogenesis related (PR genes. In particular, a PR-9 peroxidase gene with a high similarity to a Carica papaya PR-9 ortholog previously shown to be suppressed upon infection by Phytophthora palmivora was down-regulated two-fold. This PR-9 gene may represent a cross-species effector target during P. cinnamomi infection. This study identified pathogenicity factors, potential manipulation targets and attempted host defense mechanisms activated by E. nitens that contributed to the susceptible outcome of the interaction.

  16. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Fahlgren

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  17. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R; Kasschau, Kristin D; Cuperus, Josh T; Press, Caroline M; Sullivan, Christopher M; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Hoyer, J Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Carrington, James C

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  18. Phytophthora Have Distinct Endogenous Small RNA Populations That Include Short Interfering and microRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Kasschau, Kristin D.; Cuperus, Josh T.; Press, Caroline M.; Sullivan, Christopher M.; Chapman, Elisabeth J.; Hoyer, J. Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.; Carrington, James C.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work. PMID:24204767

  19. Efectos de Purines de Chipaca (Bidens pilosa L. y de Microorganismos en la Incidencia y Severidad de Phytophthora infestans (Mont. De Bary en Papa Criolla (Solanum phureja Cultivada en Tenjo (Cundinamarca, Colombia / Effects of Chipaca (Bidens pilosa

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    Tomas Enrique León Sicard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available En una finca ecológica del municipio de Tenjo(Cundinamarca-Colombia se estudió el efecto de variosmateriales preparados a partir de chipaca (Bidens pilosa y deaislamientos microbianos, sobre la incidencia y severidad deP. infestans en un cultivo de papa criolla (Solanum phureja,utilizando un diseño completamente al azar (DCA consubmuestreo y ocho tratamientos: purín de flores; purín mezcla; actinomiceto AC 12 (Streptomyces sp.; mezcla de actinomicetos; aislamiento bacteriano (Bacillus subtilis; mezcla bacterias (Bacillus subtilis y Burkholderia cepacia; Hongo (Geotrichum sp. y un control (agua destilada estéril. Los resultados mostraron rápida incidencia de la enfermedad, que fue evidente a los 36 días después de la siembra (dds y alcanzó 100% de afectacióna los 52 dds sin diferencias entre tratamientos. La severidadfue estadísticamente diferente únicamente en el tratamientode “purín de flores”, que se diferenció significativamente deltratamiento control entre los 56 y 70 dds (27,8% menos lo que fortalece resultados de ensayos anteriores sobre su potencial como posible producto biocontrolador de la Gota. Resultados menores de severidad frente al control (no significativos también se obtuvieron con los tratamientos “purín mezcla” y “mezcla de actinomicetos”, entre los 60 y 87 dds / In an organic farm of Tenjo (Cundinamarca, Colombiathe effect of various materials prepared from chipaca (Bidenspilosa and microbial isolates, on the incidence and severity ofP. infestans in potato (Solanum phureja were studied usinga completely randomized design (CRD with subsampling andeight treatments: flowers slurry, mixed slurry; actinomyceteAC 12 (Streptomyces sp., mix actinomycetes; isolationbacterial (Bacillus subtilis ; mixed bacteria (Bacillus subtilisand Burkholderia cepacia; fungus (Geotrichum sp. and acontrol (sterile distilled water. The results showed rapid disease incidence, which was evident at 36 days after planting (dap

  20. Mitochondrial genome sequences reveal evolutionary relationships of the Phytophthora 1c clade species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, Erica S; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Zeng, Qiandong; Saville, Amanda C; Olarte, Rodrigo A; Carbone, Ignazio; Hu, Chia-Hui; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Samaniego, Jose A; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Ristaino, Jean B

    2015-11-01

    Phytophthora infestans is one of the most destructive plant pathogens of potato and tomato globally. The pathogen is closely related to four other Phytophthora species in the 1c clade including P. phaseoli, P. ipomoeae, P. mirabilis and P. andina that are important pathogens of other wild and domesticated hosts. P. andina is an interspecific hybrid between P. infestans and an unknown Phytophthora species. We have sequenced mitochondrial genomes of the sister species of P. infestans and examined the evolutionary relationships within the clade. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the P. phaseoli mitochondrial lineage is basal within the clade. P. mirabilis and P. ipomoeae are sister lineages and share a common ancestor with the Ic mitochondrial lineage of P. andina. These lineages in turn are sister to the P. infestans and P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineages. The P. andina Ic lineage diverged much earlier than the P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineage and P. infestans. The presence of two mitochondrial lineages in P. andina supports the hybrid nature of this species. The ancestral state of the P. andina Ic lineage in the tree and its occurrence only in the Andean regions of Ecuador, Colombia and Peru suggests that the origin of this species hybrid in nature may occur there.

  1. New Phytophthora populations: A shift from indirect to direct sporangial germination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, G.J.T.; Veloso, S.; Forch, M.G.; Latorse, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of potato- and tomato late blight, remains a serious threat for (commercial) potato and tomato production. In North Western Europe, frequent fungicide applications, mostly aimed to prevent infection, form the back bone of potato late blight control. Modern

  2. Genome sequences of Phytophthora enable translational plant disease management and accelerate research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklaus J. Grünwald

    2012-01-01

    Whole and partial genome sequences are becoming available at an ever-increasing pace. For many plant pathogen systems, we are moving into the era of genome resequencing. The first Phytophthora genomes, P. ramorum and P. sojae, became available in 2004, followed shortly by P. infestans...

  3. Evaluación preliminar del efecto que sobre algunas enzimas del suelo tienen diferentes mecanismos de control del hongo (Phytophthora infestans en un cultivo de papa (Solanum tuberosum bajo dos tipos de manejo agrícola (orgánico y convencional

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    Pedro Nel Murcia García

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó comparativamente el posible efecto diferencial que, sobre la actividad de las enzimas proteasa, fosfatasa ácida, fosfatasa alcalina y celulasa, además del pH y la materia orgánica del suelo, tuvieron los métodos de control de Phytophthora infestans tanto en la agricultura orgánica (purín de Chipaca Bidens pilosum como en la convencional (diversos fungicidas comerciales en plantas de papa (Solanum tuberosum. Igualmente, en los parámetros antes mencionados, se evaluó el efecto de un promotor fúngico utilizado como control del mismo hongo en ambas agriculturas. La investigación se dividió en una fase de campo y una de laboratorio. En la fase de campo, realizada durante siete meses de 1999, se acompañó la siembra, el desarrollo del cultivo y evolución de la enfermedad a través de la determinación de la incidencia y su severidad. En el laboratorio se determinó la actividad enzimática proteasa, fosfatasa ácida, fosfatasa alcalina, celulasa, así como también el pH y porcentaje de materia orgánica. Se encontró que en el manejo agrícola orgánico la actividad de la fosfatasa ácida, la fosfatasa alcalina y la proteasa así como también el pH fueron más influenciados por el estado de desarrollo de las plantas que por efecto del los tratamientos utilizados en el control del hongo. En el manejo agrícola convencional la actividad enzimática de las celulasas fue inhibida significativamente por los fungicidas. La actividad de las proteasas y fosfatasas ácidas fueron estimuladas por efecto de los fungicidas comerciales y por el estado de desarrollo de las plantas. Las actividades enzimáticas fosfatasa ácida, proteasa y celulasa presentaron comportamientos significativamente diferentes entre los cultivos convencional y orgánico. Para el control de la enfermedad, el uso de los fungicidas fue el tratamiento que mejores resultados presentó con una mayor producción de papa pero con mayores gastos de producción, mientras

  4. Developing a taxonomic identification system of Phytophthora species based on microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo-Múnera, Johanna; Cárdenas, Martha; Pinzón, Andrés; Castañeda, Adriana; Bernal, Adriana J; Restrepo, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora is the most important genus of the Oomycete plant pathogens. Nowadays, there are 117 described species in this genus, most of them being primary invaders of plant tissues. The different species are causal agents of diseases in a wide range of crops and plants in natural environments. In order to develop control strategies against Phytophthoraspecies, it is important to know the biology, ecology and evolutionary processes of these important pathogens. The aim of this study was to propose and validate a low cost identification system for Phytophthora species based on a set of polymorphic microsatellite (SSRs) markers. Thirty-three isolates representing Phytophthora infestans, Phytophthora andina, Phytophthora sojae, Phytophthora cryptogea, Phytophthora nicotianae, Phytophthora capsici and Phytophthora cinnamomi species were obtained, and 13 SSRs were selected as potentially transferable markers between these species. Amplification conditions, including annealing temperatures, were standardized for several markers. A subset of these markers amplified in all species, showing species-specific alleles. The adaptability and impact of the identification system in Colombia, an Andean agricultural country where different Phytophthora species co-exist in the same or in several hosts grown together, are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Phytophthora Species, New Threats to the Plant Health in Korea

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    Ik-Hwa Hyun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Given the lack of a resistant genetic pool in host plants, the introduction of exotic invasive pathogens can result in epidemics that affect a specific ecosystem and economy. Plant quarantine, which is designed to protect endemic plant resources, is a highly invaluable safeguard that should keep biosecurity with increasing international trade and global transportation. A total of 34 species of plant pathogens including Phytophthora infestans were documented as introduced from other countries into Korea from 1900 to 2010. The genus Phytophthora, classified in oomycetes, includes more than 120 species that are mostly recognized worldwide as highly invasive plant pathogens. After 2000, over 50 new species of Phytophthora were identified internationally as plant pathogens occurring in crops and forest trees. In Korea, Phytophthora is also one of the most serious plant pathogens. To date, 22 species (about one-fifth of known species of the genus have been identified and reported as plant pathogens in the country. The likelihood of new exotic Phytophthora species being introduced into Korea continues to increase, thus necessitating intensive plant quarantine inspections. As new potential threats to plant health in Korea, six Phytophthora species, namely, P. alni, P. inundata, P. kernoviae, P. pinifolia, P. quercina, and P. ramorum, are discussed in this review with focus on history, disease, biology, management, and plant quarantine issues.

  6. Nuclear DNA content of the hybrid plant pathogen Phytophthora andina determined by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianan; Presser, Jackson W; Goss, Erica M

    2016-09-01

    Phytophthora andina is a heterothallic plant pathogen of Andean solanaceous hosts and is an interspecific hybrid of P. infestans and an unknown Phytophthora species. The objective of this study was to estimate the nuclear DNA content of isolates in three clonal lineages of P. andina relative to P. infestans Twelve isolates of P. andina and six isolates of P. infestans were measured for nuclear DNA content by propidium iodide-stained flow cytometry. We found that the DNA content of P. andina was similar but slightly smaller, on average, than that of our sample of P. infestans isolates. This is consistent with P. andina being a homoploid hybrid rather than allopolyploid hybrid. Nuclear DNA content was more variable among a smaller sample of P. infestans isolates, including a putative triploid isolate from Mexico, but small differences in nuclear DNA content were also observed among P. andina isolates. Both species appear to be able to tolerate significant variation in genome size. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  7. Phytophthora cinnamomi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardham, Adrienne R; Blackman, Leila M

    2018-02-01

    Phytophthora cinnamomi is one of the most devastating plant pathogens in the world. It infects close to 5000 species of plants, including many of importance in agriculture, forestry and horticulture. The inadvertent introduction of P. cinnamomi into natural ecosystems, including a number of recognized Global Biodiversity Hotspots, has had disastrous consequences for the environment and the biodiversity of flora and fauna. The genus Phytophthora belongs to the Class Oomycetes, a group of fungus-like organisms that initiate plant disease through the production of motile zoospores. Disease control is difficult in agricultural and forestry situations and even more challenging in natural ecosystems as a result of the scale of the problem and the limited range of effective chemical inhibitors. The development of sustainable control measures for the future management of P. cinnamomi requires a comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of pathogen development and pathogenicity. The application of next-generation sequencing technologies to generate genomic and transcriptomic data promises to underpin a new era in P. cinnamomi research and discovery. The aim of this review is to integrate bioinformatic analyses of P. cinnamomi sequence data with current knowledge of the cellular and molecular basis of P. cinnamomi growth, development and plant infection. The goal is to provide a framework for future research by highlighting potential pathogenicity genes, shedding light on their possible functions and identifying suitable targets for future control measures. Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands; Kingdom Chromista; Phylum Oomycota or Pseudofungi; Class Oomycetes; Order Peronosporales; Family Peronosporaceae; genus Phytophthora. Infects about 5000 species of plants, including 4000 Australian native species. Host plants important for agriculture and forestry include avocado, chestnut, macadamia, oak, peach and pineapple. A root pathogen which causes rotting of fine

  8. Comparative structural and functional analysis of genes encoding pectin methylesterases in Phytophthora spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingora, Christina; Ewer, Jason; Ospina-Giraldo, Manuel

    2014-03-15

    We have scanned the Phytophthora infestans, P. ramorum, and P. sojae genomes for the presence of putative pectin methylesterase genes and conducted a sequence analysis of all gene models found. We also searched for potential regulatory motifs in the promoter region of the proposed P. infestans models, and investigated the gene expression levels throughout the course of P. infestans infection on potato plants, using in planta and detached leaf assays. We found that genes located on contiguous chromosomal regions contain similar motifs in the promoter region, indicating the possibility of a shared regulatory mechanism. Results of our investigations also suggest that, during the pathogenicity process, the expression levels of some of the analyzed genes vary considerably when compared to basal expression observed in in vitro cultures of non-sporulating mycelium. These results were observed both in planta and in detached leaf assays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene discovery in Triatoma infestans

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    de Burgos Nelia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triatoma infestans is the most relevant vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone of South America. Since its genome has not yet been studied, sequencing of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs is one of the most powerful tools for efficiently identifying large numbers of expressed genes in this insect vector. Results In this work, we generated 826 ESTs, resulting in an increase of 47% in the number of ESTs available for T. infestans. These ESTs were assembled in 471 unique sequences, 151 of which represent 136 new genes for the Reduviidae family. Conclusions Among the putative new genes for the Reduviidae family, we identified and described an interesting subset of genes involved in development and reproduction, which constitute potential targets for insecticide development.

  10. Use of genome sequence data in the design and testing of SSR markers for Phytophthora species

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    Cardle Linda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites or single sequence repeats (SSRs are a powerful choice of marker in the study of Phytophthora population biology, epidemiology, ecology, genetics and evolution. A strategy was tested in which the publicly available unigene datasets extracted from genome sequences of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum were mined for candidate SSR markers that could be applied to a wide range of Phytophthora species. Results A first approach, aimed at the identification of polymorphic SSR loci common to many Phytophthora species, yielded 171 reliable sequences containing 211 SSRs. Microsatellites were identified from 16 target species representing the breadth of diversity across the genus. Repeat number ranged from 3 to 16 with most having seven repeats or less and four being the most commonly found. Trinucleotide repeats such as (AAGn, (AGGn and (AGCn were the most common followed by pentanucleotide, tetranucleotide and dinucleotide repeats. A second approach was aimed at the identification of useful loci common to a restricted number of species more closely related to P. sojae (P. alni, P. cambivora, P. europaea and P. fragariae. This analysis yielded 10 trinucleotide and 2 tetranucleotide SSRs which were repeated 4, 5 or 6 times. Conclusion Key studies on inter- and intra-specific variation of selected microsatellites remain. Despite the screening of conserved gene coding regions, the sequence diversity between species was high and the identification of useful SSR loci applicable to anything other than the most closely related pairs of Phytophthora species was challenging. That said, many novel SSR loci for species other than the three 'source species' (P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum are reported, offering great potential for the investigation of Phytophthora populations. In addition to the presence of microsatellites, many of the amplified regions may represent useful molecular marker regions for other studies as

  11. The CAZyome of Phytophthora spp.: A comprehensive analysis of the gene complement coding for carbohydrate-active enzymes in species of the genus Phytophthora

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    Laird Emma W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism include Carbohydrate esterases (CE, Glycoside hydrolases (GH, Glycosyl transferases (GT, and Polysaccharide lyases (PL, commonly referred to as carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes. The CE, GH, and PL superfamilies are also known as cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE due to their role in the disintegration of the plant cell wall by bacterial and fungal pathogens. In Phytophthora infestans, penetration of the plant cells occurs through a specialized hyphal structure called appressorium; however, it is likely that members of the genus Phytophthora also use CWDE for invasive growth because hyphal forces are below the level of tensile strength exhibited by the plant cell wall. Because information regarding the frequency and distribution of CAZyme coding genes in Phytophthora is currently unknown, we have scanned the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae, and P. ramorum for the presence of CAZyme-coding genes using a homology-based approach and compared the gene collinearity in the three genomes. In addition, we have tested the expression of several genes coding for CE in cultures grown in vitro. Results We have found that P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum contain a total of 435, 379, and 310 CAZy homologs; in each genome, most homologs belong to the GH superfamily. Most GH and PL homologs code for enzymes that hydrolyze substances present in the pectin layer forming the middle lamella of the plant cells. In addition, a significant number of CE homologs catalyzing the deacetylation of compounds characteristic of the plant cell cuticle were found. In general, a high degree of gene location conservation was observed, as indicated by the presence of sequential orthologous pairs in the three genomes. Such collinearity was frequently observed among members of the GH superfamily. On the other hand, the CE and PL superfamilies showed less collinearity for some of their putative members

  12. The hidden duplication past of the plant pathogen Phytophthora and its consequences for infection

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    Martens Cindy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oomycetes of the genus Phytophthora are pathogens that infect a wide range of plant species. For dicot hosts such as tomato, potato and soybean, Phytophthora is even the most important pathogen. Previous analyses of Phytophthora genomes uncovered many genes, large gene families and large genome sizes that can partially be explained by significant repeat expansion patterns. Results Analysis of the complete genomes of three different Phytophthora species, using a newly developed approach, unveiled a large number of small duplicated blocks, mainly consisting of two or three consecutive genes. Further analysis of these duplicated genes and comparison with the known gene and genome duplication history of ten other eukaryotes including parasites, algae, plants, fungi, vertebrates and invertebrates, suggests that the ancestor of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum most likely underwent a whole genome duplication (WGD. Genes that have survived in duplicate are mainly genes that are known to be preferentially retained following WGDs, but also genes important for pathogenicity and infection of the different hosts seem to have been retained in excess. As a result, the WGD might have contributed to the evolutionary and pathogenic success of Phytophthora. Conclusions The fact that we find many small blocks of duplicated genes indicates that the genomes of Phytophthora species have been heavily rearranged following the WGD. Most likely, the high repeat content in these genomes have played an important role in this rearrangement process. As a consequence, the paucity of retained larger duplicated blocks has greatly complicated previous attempts to detect remnants of a large-scale duplication event in Phytophthora. However, as we show here, our newly developed strategy to identify very small duplicated blocks might be a useful approach to uncover ancient polyploidy events, in particular for heavily rearranged genomes.

  13. Lipidperoxidative and proteolytic processes in fungi under the influence of xenobiotica. [Botrytis cinerea; Phytophora infestans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H M; Edlich, W; Lyr, H

    1986-01-01

    As a model system for the investigation of peroxidative effects in the phytopathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea in submers culture was used. The influence was investigated of hydrogenperoxide with biochemical and cytological methods. The hyphae showed significant changes of the ultrastructure: swelling and vacuolization of mitochondria, loss of ribosomes, vesiculation of endoplasmic reticulum, degradation and lysis of the cell ribosomes, and deposition of lipid droplets on the membranes and in the cytoplasm, dependent on the concentration of the peroxide. Same effects with higher injuries of the membrane system are found in Phytophthorea infestans. A parallel investigation on fibroblasts showed similar effects: pathological changes of mitochondria, but also pycnosis in the nucleus. Comparative ultrastructure investigations were performed in cultures of Phytophthora infestans with tetrachlorcarbon and chloroneb, a specific fungicide substance with a new mode of action. Scavengers like ..cap alpha..-tocopherol and piperonyl butoxide inhibit the toxic effect of the investigated substances in various degrees. Results are discussed in regard to the effect of a lipid peroxidative and proteolytic attack in pesticides of unknown mechanism of action.

  14. The phytophthora genome initiative database: informatics and analysis for distributed pathogenomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, M; Hraber, P; Weller, J; Wu, Y; Chen, G; Inman, J; Kiphart, D; Sobral, B

    2000-01-01

    The Phytophthora Genome Initiative (PGI) is a distributed collaboration to study the genome and evolution of a particularly destructive group of plant pathogenic oomycete, with the goal of understanding the mechanisms of infection and resistance. NCGR provides informatics support for the collaboration as well as a centralized data repository. In the pilot phase of the project, several investigators prepared Phytophthora infestans and Phytophthora sojae EST and Phytophthora sojae BAC libraries and sent them to another laboratory for sequencing. Data from sequencing reactions were transferred to NCGR for analysis and curation. An analysis pipeline transforms raw data by performing simple analyses (i.e., vector removal and similarity searching) that are stored and can be retrieved by investigators using a web browser. Here we describe the database and access tools, provide an overview of the data therein and outline future plans. This resource has provided a unique opportunity for the distributed, collaborative study of a genus from which relatively little sequence data are available. Results may lead to insight into how better to control these pathogens. The homepage of PGI can be accessed at http:www.ncgr.org/pgi, with database access through the database access hyperlink.

  15. Fighting phytophthora in blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is a ubiquitous soilborne pathogen associated with root rot in many woody perennial plant species, including highbush blueberry (Vaccinium sp.). To identify genotypes with resistance to the pathogen, cultivars and advanced selections of highbush blueberry were grown in a...

  16. The anti-Phytophthora effect of selected potato-associated Pseudomonas strains: from the laboratory to the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk eGuyer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most devastating disease of potato. In organic farming, late Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most devastating disease of potato. In organic farming, late blight is controlled by repeated applications of copper-based products, which negatively impact the environment. To find alternative solutions for late blight management, we have previously isolated a large collection of bacteria from the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potatoes. Here we report the antagonistic potential of these strains when co-cultivated with P. infestans as well as with other potato pathogens. We then focused on three Pseudomonas strains and compared their protective impact against late blight to that of well-known biocontrol strains in planta using a high-throughput leaf disc assay with automated picture analysis. When sprayed on the leaves of potatoes in the greenhouse, the strains were able to survive for at least 15 days. Under field conditions, populations decreased faster but all tested strains could still be retrieved after 8 days. The most active strain in vitro, P. chlororaphis R47, was also the best protectant on leaf discs from plants grown in the greenhouse experiment, but its protection potential could not be verified in the field due to unfavourable infection conditions. However, its protective effect against P. infestans in planta, its survival in the phyllosphere as well as its ability to colonise the potato rhizosphere in very high population densities, suggest a potential for field application, e.g. in the form of tuber treatment or leaf spray.

  17. PCR Amplification of Ribosomal DNA for Species Identification in the Plant Pathogen Genus Phytophthora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristaino, Jean B.; Madritch, Michael; Trout, Carol L.; Parra, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a PCR procedure to amplify DNA for quick identification of the economically important species from each of the six taxonomic groups in the plant pathogen genus Phytophthora. This procedure involves amplification of the 5.8S ribosomal DNA gene and internal transcribed spacers (ITS) with the ITS primers ITS 5 and ITS 4. Restriction digests of the amplified DNA products were conducted with the restriction enzymes RsaI, MspI, and HaeIII. Restriction fragment patterns were similar after digestions with RsaI for the following species: P. capsici and P. citricola; P. infestans, P. cactorum, and P. mirabilis; P. fragariae, P. cinnamomi, and P. megasperma from peach; P. palmivora, P. citrophthora, P. erythroseptica, and P. cryptogea; and P. megasperma from raspberry and P. sojae. Restriction digests with MspI separated P. capsici from P. citricola and separated P. cactorum from P. infestans and P. mirabilis. Restriction digests with HaeIII separated P. citrophthora from P. cryptogea, P. cinnamomi from P. fragariae and P. megasperma on peach, P. palmivora from P. citrophthora, and P. megasperma on raspberry from P. sojae. P. infestans and P. mirabilis digests were identical and P. cryptogea and P. erythroseptica digests were identical with all restriction enzymes tested. A unique DNA sequence from the ITS region I in P. capsici was used to develop a primer called PCAP. The PCAP primer was used in PCRs with ITS 1 and amplified only isolates of P. capsici, P. citricola, and P. citrophthora and not 13 other species in the genus. Restriction digests with MspI separated P. capsici from the other two species. PCR was superior to traditional isolation methods for detection of P. capsici in infected bell pepper tissue in field samples. The techniques described will provide a powerful tool for identification of the major species in the genus Phytophthora. PMID:9501434

  18. Sequencing of the Litchi Downy Blight Pathogen Reveals It Is a Phytophthora Species With Downy Mildew-Like Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wenwu; Wang, Yang; Shen, Danyu; Li, Delong; Pu, Tianhuizi; Jiang, Zide; Zhang, Zhengguang; Zheng, Xiaobo; Tyler, Brett M; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of its downy mildew-like morphology, the litchi downy blight pathogen was previously named Peronophythora litchii. Recently, however, it was proposed to transfer this pathogen to Phytophthora clade 4. To better characterize this unusual oomycete species and important fruit pathogen, we obtained the genome sequence of Phytophthora litchii and compared it to those from other oomycete species. P. litchii has a small genome with tightly spaced genes. On the basis of a multilocus phylogenetic analysis, the placement of P. litchii in the genus Phytophthora is strongly supported. Effector proteins predicted included 245 RxLR, 30 necrosis-and-ethylene-inducing protein-like, and 14 crinkler proteins. The typical motifs, phylogenies, and activities of these effectors were typical for a Phytophthora species. However, like the genome features of the analyzed downy mildews, P. litchii exhibited a streamlined genome with a relatively small number of genes in both core and species-specific protein families. The low GC content and slight codon preferences of P. litchii sequences were similar to those of the analyzed downy mildews and a subset of Phytophthora species. Taken together, these observations suggest that P. litchii is a Phytophthora pathogen that is in the process of acquiring downy mildew-like genomic and morphological features. Thus P. litchii may provide a novel model for investigating morphological development and genomic adaptation in oomycete pathogens.

  19. Establishment of a simple and efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for Phytophthora palmivora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongliang; Navet, Natasha; Liu, Yingchao; Uchida, Janice; Tian, Miaoying

    2016-09-06

    As an agriculturally important oomycete genus, Phytophthora contains a large number of destructive plant pathogens that severely threaten agricultural production and natural ecosystems. Among them is the broad host range pathogen P. palmivora, which infects many economically important plant species. An essential way to dissect their pathogenesis mechanisms is genetic modification of candidate genes, which requires effective transformation systems. Four methods were developed for transformation of Phytophthora spp., including PEG(polyethylene glycol)/CaCl2 mediated protoplast transformation, electroporation of zoospores, microprojectile bombardment and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT). Among them, AMT has many advantages over the other methods such as easy handling and mainly generating single-copy integration in the genome. An AMT method previously reported for P. infestans and P. palmivora has barely been used in oomycete research due to low success and low reproducibility. In this study, we report a simple and efficient AMT system for P. palmivora. Using this system, we were able to reproducibly generate over 40 transformants using zoospores collected from culture grown in a single 100 mm-diameter petri dish. The generated GFP transformants constitutively expressed GFP readily detectable using a fluorescence microscope. All of the transformants tested using Southern blot analysis contained a single-copy T-DNA insertion. This system is highly effective and reproducible for transformation of P. palmivora and expected to be adaptable for transformation of additional Phytophthora spp. and other oomycetes. Its establishment will greatly accelerate their functional genomic studies.

  20. Interaction between the moss Physcomitrella patens and Phytophthora: a novel pathosystem for live-cell imaging of subcellular defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdijk, Elysa J R; DE Keijzer, Jeroen; DE Groot, Deborah; Schoina, Charikleia; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    2016-08-01

    Live-cell imaging of plant-pathogen interactions is often hampered by the tissue complexity and multicell layered nature of the host. Here, we established a novel pathosystem with the moss Physcomitrella patens as host for Phytophthora. The tip-growing protonema cells of this moss are ideal for visualizing interactions with the pathogen over time using high-resolution microscopy. We tested four Phytophthora species for their ability to infect P. patens and showed that P. sojae and P. palmivora were only rarely capable to infect P. patens. In contrast, P. infestans and P. capsici frequently and successfully penetrated moss protonemal cells, showed intracellular hyphal growth and formed sporangia. Next to these successful invasions, many penetration attempts failed. Here the pathogen was blocked by a barrier of cell wall material deposited in papilla-like structures, a defence response that is common in higher plants. Another common response is the upregulation of defence-related genes upon infection and also in moss we observed this upregulation in tissues infected with Phytophthora. For more advanced analyses of the novel pathosystem we developed a special set-up that allowed live-cell imaging of subcellular defence processes by high-resolution microscopy. With this set-up, we revealed that Phytophthora infection of moss induces repositioning of the nucleus, accumulation of cytoplasm and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but not of microtubules. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Genetic analysis of Phytophthora infestans populations in the Nordic European countries reveals high genetic variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brurberg, May Bente; Elameen, Abdelhameed; Le, Ving Hong

    2011-01-01

    different fields using nine simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Forty-nine alleles were detected among the nine SSR loci and isolates from all four Nordic countries shared the most common alleles across the loci. In total 169 multilocus genotypes (based on seven loci) were identified among 191 isolates...

  2. Phenotypic variation in Nordic populations of Phytophthora infestans in 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtinen, A; Hannukkala, A; Andersson, B

    2008-01-01

    to sporulate in the presence of this fungicide at a concentration of 1000 mg L-1. In Norway and Finland the frequencies of virulence factors and pathotypes remained nearly unchanged since the 1990s, but the mean number of virulence factors per isolate increased from 5·6 to 6·3. In Denmark and Sweden virulence...

  3. Aggressiveness of Phytophthora infestans on detached potato leaflets in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtinen, A; Andersson, B; Le, V H

    2009-01-01

    differences between the test laboratories for infection efficiency, lesion growth rate and sporulation capacity on detached leaflets. When the laboratory effect was taken into account, the differences in aggressiveness between the countries were generally small or inconsistent between the test cultivars...... and epidemiologically insignificant. By contrast, variation among isolates within countries was substantial. The magnitude of the variation depended on country and cultivar. Maximal variation for the means of the isolates was between 89 and 185 h for latent period, between 100 and 1297 sporangia mm-2 for sporulation...

  4. Invloed van minerale olie op de bestrijding van Phytophthora infestans in pootaardappelen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.G.; Bus, C.B.

    2003-01-01

    De invloed van toevoeging van olie aan een fungicide op de werking van het fungicide is afhankelijk van het gebruikte fungicide. Gezamenlijk spuiten van olie en Aviso DF, Curzate M en mogelijk ook Acrobat, verhoogt de curatieve werking van deze fungiciden. Gezamenlijk spuiten van olie en Aviso DF,

  5. On the evolution of pesticide resistance in Phytophthora infestans : an experimental evolution approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, S.

    2009-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is a serious problem for both medicine and agriculture. The initial success of such toxins is due to absence of resistant genotypes in pathogen populations before treatment. The initial low frequency of resistance may be explained by negative pleiotropic effects of

  6. The role of heterotrimeric G-proteins in development and virulence of Phytophthora infestans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latijnhouwers, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ever since the 1840s, when the disease first appeared in Europe and the United States, the threat of new outbreaks of late blight has terrified potato growers. In years when cool and wet weather conditions are prevailing, the disease is most destructive and nearly impossible to control. Decades

  7. Comparative analysis of sterol acquisition in the oomycetes Saprolegnia parasitica and Phytophthora infestans

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlin, Paul; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Ekengren, Sophia; McKee, Lauren S.; Bulone, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The oomycete class includes pathogens of animals and plants which are responsible for some of the most significant global losses in agriculture and aquaculture. There is a need to replace traditional chemical means of controlling oomycete growth with more targeted approaches, and the inhibition of sterol synthesis is one promising area. To better direct these efforts, we have studied sterol acquisition in two model organisms: the sterol-autotrophic Saprolegnia parasitica, and the sterol-heter...

  8. Inhibition of Phytophthora parasitica and P. capsici by Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Aqueous Extract of Artemisia absinthium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D; Norman, David; Brennan, Mary; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-09-01

    Application of nanoparticles for controlling plant pathogens is a rapidly emerging area in plant disease management, and nanoparticles synthesis methods that are economical and ecofriendly are extensively investigated. In this project, we investigated the potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized with aqueous extract of Artemisia absinthium against several Phytophthora spp., which cause many economically important crop diseases. In in vitro dose-response tests conducted in microtiter plates, 10 µg ml⁻¹ of AgNPs inhibited mycelial growth of P. parasitica, P. infestans, P. palmivora, P. cinnamomi, P. tropicalis, P. capsici, and P. katsurae. Detailed in vitro dose-response analyses conducted with P. parasitica and P. capsici revealed that AgNPs synthesized with A. absinthium extract were highly potent (IC50: 2.1 to 8.3 µg ml⁻¹) and efficacious (100%) in inhibiting mycelial growth, zoospore germination, germ tube elongation, and zoospore production. Interestingly, AgNP treatment accelerated encystment of zoospores. Consistent with in vitro results, in planta experiments conducted in a greenhouse revealed that AgNP treatments prevented Phytophthora infection and improved plant survival. Moreover, AgNP in in planta experiments did not produce any adverse effects on plant growth. These investigations provide a simple and economical method for controlling Phytophthora with AgNP without affecting normal plant physiology.

  9. Draft genome sequences of Phytophthora kernoviae and Phytophthora ramorum lineage EU2 from Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Sambles

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Newly discovered Phytophthora species include invasive pathogens that threaten trees and shrubs. We present draft genome assemblies for three isolates of Phytophthora kernoviae and one isolate of the EU2 lineage of Phytophthora ramorum, collected from outbreak sites in Scotland.

  10. Intracellular and extracellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate produced by Phytophthora species is important for infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shan; Chen, Linlin; Tao, Kai; Sun, Nannan; Wu, Yuren; Lu, Xiaoxue; Wang, Yuanchao; Dou, Daolong

    2013-09-01

    RxLR effectors produced by Phytophthora pathogens have been proposed to bind to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) to mediate their translocation into host cells and/or to increase their stability in planta. Since the levels of PtdIns(3)P in plants are low, we examined whether Phytophthora species may produce PtdIns(3)P to promote infection. We observed that PtdIns(3)P-specific GFP biosensors could bind to P. parasitica and P. sojae hyphae during infection of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves transiently secreting the biosensors, suggesting that the hyphae exposed PtdIns(3)P on their plasma membrane and/or secreted PtdIns(3)P. Silencing of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) genes, treatment with LY294002, or expression of PtdIns(3)P-binding proteins by P. sojae reduced the virulence of the pathogen on soybean, indicating that pathogen-synthesized PtdIns(3)P was required for full virulence. Secretion of PtdIns(3)P-binding proteins or of a PI3P-5-kinase by N. benthamiana leaves significantly increased the level of resistance to infection by P. parasitica and P. capsici. Together, our results support the hypothesis that Phytophthora species produce external PtdIns(3)P to aid in infection, such as to promote entry of RxLR effectors into host cells. Our results derived from P. sojae RxLR effector Avr1b confirm that both the N-terminus and the C-terminus of this effector can bind PtdIns(3)P.

  11. Screening Phytophthora rubi for fungicide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary results from the survey for fungicide resistance in Phytophthora were reported at the 2016 Washington Small Fruit Conference. Phytophthora was isolated from diseased plants in 28 red raspberry fields and tested against mefenoxam, the active ingredient of Ridomil. Most isolates were ident...

  12. Agro-transformation and evaluation of resistance to Phytophthora infestansin Solanum tuberosumL. variety Désirée

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Orbegozo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Oomycete Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, the causal agent of the disease known as late blight, is primarily responsible for the decreased in production performance and potato crops worldwide. The integration of the complete Rgenes sequences in the potato genome using Agro-transformation appears an alternative to be considered in the fight against this pathogen. The Rpi-blb2 gene (Rgene from the wild species Solanum bulbocastanumDunal shows a broad resistance to isolates ofP. infestans,making it an important candidate for plant breeding studies. This paper reports the integration of the Rpi-blb2gene into potato var. Désirée genome by Agrobacterium tumefaciens- mediated transformation system, the molecular characterization of 29 events transformed and whole plant infection with isolate POX67 of P. infestansfrom Peru. Désirée events [Rpi-blb2] 4 and Désirée [Rpi-blb2] 30, showed a substantial resistance to P. infestansinfection confirming complete transfer of the Rpi-blb2gene from a wild species to a cultivated species by genetic transformation.

  13. Effectoromics-based identification of cell surface receptors in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domazakis, Emmanouil; Lin, Xiao; Aguilera-Galvez, Carolina; Wouters, Doret; Bijsterbosch, Gerard; Wolters, Pieter J.; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G.A.A.

    2017-01-01

    In modern resistance breeding, effectors have emerged as tools for accelerating and improving the identification of immune receptors. Effector-assisted breeding was pioneered for identifying resistance genes (R genes) against Phytophthora infestans in potato (Solanum tuberosum). Here we show that

  14. Genome sequences of two Phytophthora species responsible for Sudden Oak Death and Soybean Root Rot provide novel insights into their evolutionary origins and mechanisms of pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, Brett M.; Tripathi, Sucheta; Aerts, Andrea; Bensasson, Douda; Dehal, Paramvir; Dubchak, Inna; Garbelotto, Matteo; Gijzen, Mark; Huang, Wayne; Ivors, Kelly; Jiang, Rays; Kamoun, Sophien; Krampis, Konstantinos; Lamour, Kurt; McDonald, Hayes; Medina, Monica; Morris, Paul; Putnam, Nik; Rash, Sam; Salamov, Asaf; Smith, Brian; Smith, Joe; Terry, Astrid; Torto, Trudy; Grigoriev, Igor; Rokhsar, Daniel; Boore, Jeffrey

    2005-12-01

    The approximately 60 species of Phytophthora are all destructive pathogens, causing rots of roots, stems, leaves and fruits of a wide range of agriculturally and ornamentally important plants (1). Some species, such as P. cinnamomi, P. parasitica and P. cactorum, each attack hundreds of different plant host species, whereas others are more restricted. Some of the crops where Phytophthora infections cause the greatest financial losses include potato, soybean, tomato, alfalfa, tobacco, peppers, cucurbits, pineapple, strawberry, raspberry and a wide range of perennial tree crops, especially citrus, avocado, almonds, walnuts, apples and cocoa, and they also heavily affect the ornamental, nursery and forestry industries. The economic damage overall to crops in the United States by Phytophthora species is estimated in the tens of billions of dollars, including the costs of control measures, and worldwide it is many times this amount (1). In the northern midwest of the U.S., P. sojae causes $200 million in annual losses to soybean alone, and worldwide causes around $1-2 billion in losses per year. P. infestans infections resulted in the Irish potato famine last century and continues to be a difficult and worsening problem for potato and tomato growers worldwide, with worldwide costs estimated at $5 billion per year.

  15. Deteksi Keberadaan Phytophthora Spp. Di Air

    OpenAIRE

    Sulistyawati, Purnamila

    2014-01-01

    The genus of Phytophthora is a destructive plants pathogen. However the existence of these species in plant tissue was hardly to detect because the fungus may also be present as resistant propagules in soil or spread through waterways. This study aimed to test the FTA card as a direct bait to obtain the DNA of Phytophthora spp and also to investigate the suitability of FTA card as a sampling method. This research used several Phytophthora baits including FTA card followed by DNA extraction a...

  16. Ecología urbana de Triatoma infestans en Argentina: asociación entre Triatoma infestans y palomares Triatoma infestans urban ecology in Argentina: association between Triatoma infestans and pigeon cotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana L. Vallvé

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudio se realizó en una área urbana de la Capital de la Provincia de San Juan, Argentina, en un barrio de 768 apartamentos distribuidos en edificios de 3 y 7 pisos que rodean una bodega central abandonada. Se capturaron 329 ejemplares de Triatoma infestans, 293 en 4 terrazas de torres de 7 pisos y 36 en el interior de la bodega, associados con numerosas palomas que colomizaban estos sitios. Los insectos se refugiaban en el guano acumulado entre bloques de cemento que cubren las terrazas y en la bodega dentro de toneles en desuso. Se identificaron dos focos principales de vectores associados con densos palomares: un 81,5% del total de triatomas colectados se halló en una de las torres y un 11% en la bodega. A los 6 meses del tratamiento insecticida, resultaron positivas terrazas en las que previamente no se habia capturado T. infestans. El perfil alimentario de los triatomas muestra un predominio de ingestas simples sobre ave; en los edificios y en la bodega el 95% de los T. infestans analizados se alimentó sólo de ave; el resto fueron ingestas simples o dobles sobre humano, perro o gato. Ningún T. infestans presentó infección con Trypanosoma cruzi.Estudo realizado em local urbano da capital da Província de San Juan, Argentina, num bairro de 768 apartamentos distribuídos em prédios de 3 e 7 andares que cingem uma adega vinícola abandonada. Foram coletados 329 exemplares de Triatoma infestans, 293 em 4 terraços das torres de 7 andares e 36 no interior da adega, associados às numerosas pombas que colonizavam esses sítios. Os insetos refugiavam-se no excremento cumulado entre os blocos de cimento que cobrem os terraços e, na adega, dentro de tonéis fora de uso. Foram identificados dois focos principais de vetores, associados com densos pombais: 81,5% do total de triatomas coletados foram apanhados em uma das torres e 11% na adega. Após 6 meses de tratamento com inseticida, foram positivos os terraços onde anteriormente não se

  17. Urban ecology of Triatoma infestans in San Juan, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallvé, S L; Rojo, H; Wisnivesky-Colli, C

    1996-01-01

    This study was performed in an urban neighborhood of the capital city of the province of San Juan, Argentina. Erected as a housing complex, the place consists of 768 flats distributed in buildings of three and seven floors each. A survey was carried out in 33% of the dwellings, enquiring about the number of Triatoma infestans found indoors, stage of the bug development-nymph or adult- and how these insects had entered their homes. Adult T.infestans were found on all floors; 163 people (64%) had found them at least once, and 130 (51%) several times. Dispersal flight seems to have been the main mechanism of infestation by adult bugs in this area, and a total of 51% of the surveyed inhabitants reported that the insects had flown into their flats.

  18. Urban ecology of Triatoma infestans in San Juan, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana L Vallvé

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed in an urban neighborhood of the capital city of the province of San Juan, Argentina. Erected as a housing complex, the place consists of 768 flats distributed in buildings of three and seven floors each. A survey was carried out in 33% of the dwellings, enquiring about the number of Triatoma infestans found indoors, stage of the bug development - nymph or adult - and how these insects had entered their homes. Adult T.infestans were found on all floors; 163 people (64% had found them at least once, and 130 (51% several times. Dispersal flight seems to have been the main mechanism of infestation by adult bugs in this area, and a total of 51% of the surveyed inhabitants reported that the insects had flown into their flats.

  19. RNA-Seq Reveals Infection-Related Gene Expression Changes in Phytophthora capsici

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Ren; Xing, Yu-Ping; Li, Yan-Peng; Tong, Yun-Hui; Xu, Jing-You

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a soilborne plant pathogen capable of infecting a wide range of plants, including many solanaceous crops. However, genetic resistance and fungicides often fail to manage P. capsici due to limited knowledge on the molecular biology and basis of P. capsici pathogenicity. To begin to rectify this situation, Illumina RNA-Seq was used to perform massively parallel sequencing of three cDNA samples derived from P. capsici mycelia (MY), zoospores (ZO) and germinating cysts with germ tubes (GC). Over 11 million reads were generated for each cDNA library analyzed. After read mapping to the gene models of P. capsici reference genome, 13,901, 14,633 and 14,695 putative genes were identified from the reads of the MY, ZO and GC libraries, respectively. Comparative analysis between two of samples showed major differences between the expressed gene content of MY, ZO and GC stages. A large number of genes associated with specific stages and pathogenicity were identified, including 98 predicted effector genes. The transcriptional levels of 19 effector genes during the developmental and host infection stages of P. capsici were validated by RT-PCR. Ectopic expression in Nicotiana benthamiana showed that P. capsici RXLR and Crinkler effectors can suppress host cell death triggered by diverse elicitors including P. capsici elicitin and NLP effectors. This study provides a first look at the transcriptome and effector arsenal of P. capsici during the important pre-infection stages. PMID:24019970

  20. Introducing the Phytophthora database: an integrated resource for detecting, monitoring, and managing Phytophthora diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly L. Ivors; Frank Martin; Michael Coffey; Izabela Makalowska; David M. Geiser; Seogchan Kang

    2008-01-01

    Its virulence and ability to spread rapidly throughout the world by various means establishes Phytophthora as one of the most important groups of plant pathogens. Discoveries of interspecific hybridization among Phytophthora species in nature, which could yield novel pathogens, further underscore the threat posed by members of this genus. The ability...

  1. Public value at risk from Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae spread in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Ben; Jones, Glyn

    2017-04-15

    Heritage gardens, heathland and woodland are increasingly under threat from the non-native tree and plant diseases Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae. However, there exist only limited literature that estimates the public non-market value that may be lost from a continued spread of Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae into these habitats. This paper therefore uses a contingent valuation survey to assess the non-extractive public use and non-use values at risk from an uncontrolled spread of these diseases in England and Wales. Results estimate that £1.446bn of public value is at risk in England and Wales per year from an uncontrolled spread of Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae. The greatest public value at risk, of £578  m/year, is from an uncontrolled spread of these diseases to heritage gardens, while the lowest public value at risk, of £386  m/year, is from disease spread to heathland. The findings of this paper should help policymakers make informed decisions as to the public resources to dedicate towards Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae control in England and Wales. In this regard, the current control programme to contain these diseases appears cost-effective in light of the public value at risk estimates produced by this paper. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phytophthora rotråte i juletrefelt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talgø, Venche; Thomsen, Iben Margrete

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora rotråte forårsaket av ulike arter av Phytophthora er et stort problem i juletreproduksjonen iUSA. I Norge er det også rapportert om flere tilfeller av skade på grunn av Phytophthora både i juletrær og klippegrønt, men så langt ikke i Danmark. I begge landene er flere arter av...... Phytophthora funnet på treaktige vekster i grøntanlegg. Vi har også sett en urovekkende spredning av Phytophthora til løvtrær i bynære skoger, vassdrag og naturområder det siste tiåret, spesielt i Norge. Både i Norge og Danmark har vi undersøkt vann i eller like ved juletreplantinger og funnet flere...... Phytophthora-arter, så dette er en skadegjører juletredyrkere må være på vakt overfor...

  3. Description of a newly discovered Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae Foci in Ibipeba, State of Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Freitas Araújo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Chagas disease transmitted by the Triatoma infestans was eradicated from Brazil in 2006. However, reports of triatomine foci threaten the control of Chagas disease. The goal of this study was to determine T. infestans foci in the City of Ibipeba, State of Bahia. Methods Triatominae specimens were collected in Ibipeba and entomologic indicators were calculated using indices of domiciliary infestation, density, and colonization. Results T. infestans foci was discovery in Ibipeba, State of Bahia. Approximately 95% of the specimens were discovered inside dwellings, of which 34% were T. infestans. This species was also discovered forming a colony in tree bark in the peridomicile. Conclusions Triatoma infestans foci in peridomestic ecotopes in Ibipeba, BA, indicate increased the risk of transmission Chagas disease.

  4. Resistance to Phytophthora in mutant lines of currant tomato and in their original forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrustaleva, V.V.; Shcherbakov, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Information on the production of currant tomato mutants is contained in a previous report. Evaluation of fruit resistance against Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary was carried out with pathotypes T 0 and T 1 . For artificial infection we used mainly a culture of T 1 (isolate 275), supplied by the Byelorussian Scientific Research Institute of Potato, Fruit and Vegetable Growing at Samokhvalovich. As inoculum for T 0 , a local population of the potato pathotype from the village of Shebantsevo, Moscow province was used. The standard variety 'Gruntovyj gribovskij 1180' was used as the control. Green fruits were taken from the first or second raceme of 20 plants. They were inoculated by spraying in plastic cuvettes with moist filter paper. The cuvettes were covered with glass and maintained at temperature of 18-20 deg. C. The results were checked 5, 9 and 12 days after inoculation. Under natural conditions, each of the 20 plants was also evaluated. As result, three lines with increased resistance to Phytophthora were selected from the original wild-type of currant tomato. Induced mutant forms were tested in the same way for resistance to Phytophthora. Data is presented from 4 years study. Of 26 mutant lines studied, we identified seven whose fruit displayed a stable and enhanced resistance to Phytophthora under both laboratory and field conditions. With regard to leaf infection of these lines, positive results were not obtained. There appears to be no direct relationship between resistance to Phytophthora of the fruit and the leaves. The mutant lines are of determinate type with early and medium ripening time. The average fruit weight is 5-33 g; in the case of the original specimen, it is only 0.9-1.7 g. The fruits have a pleasant sour-sweet taste and a thick skin. It is noteworthy that the mutant lines selected on the basis of their suitability for cultivation not only showed the resistance selected from the wild-type, but in a number of cases even turned out to

  5. Identification of cell wall-associated proteins from Phytophthora ramorum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.J.G.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Yin, Q.Y.; Koster, de C.G.; Klis, F.M.; Govers, F.; Groot, de P.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    The oomycete genus Phytophthora comprises a large group of fungal-like plant pathogens. Two Phytophthora genomes recently have been sequenced; one of them is the genome of Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death. During plant infection, extracellular proteins, either soluble

  6. Diagnostics of Tree Diseases Caused by Phytophthora austrocedri Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Vincent; Elliot, Matthew; Green, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    We present methods for the detection and quantification of four Phytophthora species which are pathogenic on trees; Phytophthora ramorum, Phytophthora kernoviae, Phytophthora lateralis, and Phytophthora austrocedri. Nucleic acid extraction methods are presented for phloem tissue from trees, soil, and pure cultures on agar plates. Real-time PCR methods are presented and include primer and probe sets for each species, general advice on real-time PCR setup and data analysis. A method for sequence-based identification, useful for pure cultures, is also included.

  7. Mitochondrial genome sequences and comparative genomics ofPhytophthora ramorum and P. sojae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Frank N.; Douda, Bensasson; Tyler, Brett M.; Boore,Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The complete sequences of the mitochondrial genomes of theoomycetes of Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae were determined during thecourse of their complete nuclear genome sequencing (Tyler, et al. 2006).Both are circular, with sizes of 39,314 bp for P. ramorum and 42,975 bpfor P. sojae. Each contains a total of 37 identifiable protein-encodinggenes, 25 or 26 tRNAs (P. sojae and P. ramorum, respectively)specifying19 amino acids, and a variable number of ORFs (7 for P. ramorum and 12for P. sojae) which are potentially additional functional genes.Non-coding regions comprise approximately 11.5 percent and 18.4 percentof the genomes of P. ramorum and P. sojae, respectively. Relative to P.sojae, there is an inverted repeat of 1,150 bp in P. ramorum thatincludes an unassigned unique ORF, a tRNA gene, and adjacent non-codingsequences, but otherwise the gene order in both species is identical.Comparisons of these genomes with published sequences of the P. infestansmitochondrial genome reveals a number of similarities, but the gene orderin P. infestans differs in two adjacent locations due to inversions.Sequence alignments of the three genomes indicated sequence conservationranging from 75 to 85 percent and that specific regions were morevariable than others.

  8. Genomic characterization of a South American Phytophthora hybrid mandates reassessment of the geographic origins of Phytophthora infestans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Michael David; Garrett Vieira, Filipe Jorge; Ho, Simon Y. W.

    2016-01-01

    outbreak remains disputed, as does the New World center of origin of the species itself. Both Mexico and South America have been proposed, generating considerable controversy. Here, we readdress the pathogen's origins using a genomic data set encompassing 71 globally sourced modern and historical samples...

  9. Temperature effect upon blood consumption in Triatoma infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Catalá

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Different blood consumption speed was observed in Triatoma infestans - nymphs and adults - exposed to 12 degrees C and 28 degrees C. Exposure to optimal temperature (28 degrees C allows the insects to consume blood at a rate of 9% per day. Significative relationship between blood amount present in the promesenteron and consumed blood was found at 28 degrees. Consumption of blood was drastically reduced at the lowest temperature. Accordingly, lack of ovaric development, oviposition and mating behaviour was observed in insects kept at 12 degrees C. Relationship between laboratory and field observations are discussed.

  10. Phytophthora obscura sp. nov., a new species of the novel Phytophthora subclade 8d

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. J. Grünwald; S. Werres; E. M. Goss; C. R. Taylor; V. J. Fieland

    2012-01-01

    A new Phytophthora species was detected (i) in the USA, infecting foliage of Kalmia latifolia, (ii) in substrate underneath Pieris, and (iii) in Germany in soil samples underneath Aesculus hippocastanum showing disease symptoms. The new...

  11. Pathogenicity variation in two west coast forest Phytophthoras, Phytophthora nemorosa and P. pseudosyringae, to bay laurel

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.E. Linzer; M. Garbelotto

    2008-01-01

    Two recently described pathogenic oomycetes, Phytophthora nemorosa and P. pseudosyringae, have overlapping host and geographic ranges in California and Oregon forests with P. ramorum, causal agent of ?sudden oak death? disease. Preliminary genetic evidence indicates P. nemorosa and P....

  12. In vitro and in vivo effect of poplar bud (Populi gemma Extracts on late blight (Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint János

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of populin extract from black poplar (Populus nigra on late blight was assessed under laboratory and field conditions. The growth rate of hyphae was found to be significantly lower after 1v/v% populin application, and no hyphae growth was detected under 3 and 6v/v% populin application. Populin also reduced the light blight severity on potato leaves under field conditions. From our results, we have concluded that populin extract can be considered as a new and environmentally-friendly alternative for the control of late blight under field conditions.

  13. Putting the Phytophthora infestans genome sequence at work: multiple novel avirulence and potato resistance gene candidates revealed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, H.

    2011-01-01

    Individual variation in milk yield response to concentrate intake and
    milking interval length
    During the last century in the Netherlands milk production per cow has almost tripled.
    Accordingly, the amount of concentrates yearly fed per cow strongly increased.
    Furthermore,

  14. Persistence of the mitochondrial lineage responsible for the Irish potato famine in extant New World Phytophthora infestans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Michael David; Ho, Simon Y W; Wales, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    )-century Europe, three from 1950s U.K. and 34 from modern populations across the New World. We use phylogenetic analyses to identify the HERB-1 lineage in modern populations from both Mexico and South America, and to demonstrate distinct mitochondrial haplotypes were present in 19(th)-century Europe...

  15. Coast live oak resistance to Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.A. McPherson; David L. Wood; Sylvia R. Mori; Pierluigi Bonello

    2012-01-01

    The oomycete Phytophthora ramorum is a plant pathogen with an unusually broad host range. Recognized in 2000 as a previously unknown and likely introduced species, this pathogen has become established in central and northern coastal California, southwestern Oregon, and Western Europe. Tree species that may be killed by stem cankers include true...

  16. Geographical distribution of Phytophthora ramorum in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    María- Luz Herrero; Brita Toppe; Trond Rafoss

    2008-01-01

    In November 2002, Phytophthora ramorum was detected for the first time in Norway. It was isolated from Rhododendron catawbiense imported earlier the same year. After the first detection, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has carried out surveys from 2003 to 2006. The surveys were first directed to nurseries and garden centres....

  17. Hot spots of Phytophthora in commercial nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina Junker; Patrick Goff; Stefan Wagner; Sabine Werres

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that nurseries are an important source for the spread of Phytophthora. Most surveys and studies focusing on the epidemiology of these pathogens in nurseries are based on sampling of symptomatic plants or on samples like water of different sources used for irrigation. There is little knowledge, however, on the survival and...

  18. Molecular phylogeography of the Chagas' disease vector Triatoma infestans in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Rosas, A R; Segura, E L; García, B A

    2011-01-01

    Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas' disease in South America between latitudes 10°S and 46°S. A multilocus microsatellite data set of 836 individuals from 27 populations of T. infestans, from all its range of distribution in Argentina, was analyzed. Our results favor the hypothesis of two independent migration events of colonization in Argentina and secondary contacts. The majority of the populations of the western provinces of Catamarca, La Rioja, San Juan and the west of Cordoba province, had almost no shared ancestry with the rest of the populations analyzed. Probably those populations, belonging to localities close to the Andean region, could have been established by the dispersal line of T. infestans that would have arrived to Argentina through the Andes, whereas most of the rest of the populations analyzed may have derived from the dispersal line of T. infestans in non-Andean lowlands. Among them, those from the provinces of Formosa, Chaco, Santiago del Estero and Santa Fe shared different percentages of ancestry and presented lower degree of genetic differentiation. The migratory movement linked to regional economies and possibly associated with passive dispersal, would allow a higher genetic exchange among these populations of T. infestans. This study, using microsatellite markers, provides a new approach for evaluating the validity of the different hypotheses concerning the evolutionary history of this species. Two major lineages of T. infestans, an Andean and non-Andean, are suggested. PMID:21224874

  19. Molecular phylogeography of the Chagas' disease vector Triatoma infestans in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Rosas, A R; Segura, E L; García, B A

    2011-07-01

    Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas' disease in South America between latitudes 10°S and 46°S. A multilocus microsatellite data set of 836 individuals from 27 populations of T. infestans, from all its range of distribution in Argentina, was analyzed. Our results favor the hypothesis of two independent migration events of colonization in Argentina and secondary contacts. The majority of the populations of the western provinces of Catamarca, La Rioja, San Juan and the west of Cordoba province, had almost no shared ancestry with the rest of the populations analyzed. Probably those populations, belonging to localities close to the Andean region, could have been established by the dispersal line of T. infestans that would have arrived to Argentina through the Andes, whereas most of the rest of the populations analyzed may have derived from the dispersal line of T. infestans in non-Andean lowlands. Among them, those from the provinces of Formosa, Chaco, Santiago del Estero and Santa Fe shared different percentages of ancestry and presented lower degree of genetic differentiation. The migratory movement linked to regional economies and possibly associated with passive dispersal, would allow a higher genetic exchange among these populations of T. infestans. This study, using microsatellite markers, provides a new approach for evaluating the validity of the different hypotheses concerning the evolutionary history of this species. Two major lineages of T. infestans, an Andean and non-Andean, are suggested.

  20. Phytophthora Genome Sequences Uncover Evolutionary Origins and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamour, Kurt H [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; Savidor, Alon [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Genome sequences of the soybean pathogen, Phytophthora sojae, and the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, suggest a photosynthetic past and reveal recent massive expansion and diversification of potential pathogenicity gene families. Abstract: Draft genome sequences of the soybean pathogen, Phytophthora sojae, and the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, have been determined. O mycetes such as these Phytophthora species share the kingdom Stramenopila with photosynthetic algae such as diatoms and the presence of many Phytophthora genes of probable phototroph origin support a photosynthetic ancestry for the stramenopiles. Comparison of the two species' genomes reveals a rapid expansion and diversification of many protein families associated with plant infection such as hydrolases, ABC transporters, protein toxins, proteinase inhibitors and, in particular, a superfamily of 700 proteins with similarity to known o mycete avirulence genes.

  1. Interacción entre poblaciones de Triatoma infestans y Triatoma sordida Interação entre população de Triatoma infestans e Triatoma sordida Population interactions between Triatoma infestans and Triatoma sordida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Esther Bar

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available Para conocer si se producía algún tipo de interacción entre poblaciones de Triatoma infestans y Triatoma sordida que convivían en una unidad experimental y explotaban el mismo recurso alimentario (ave se las estudió desde setiembre/1988 a abril/1989. La composición etaria inicial para cada especie fue: 27 N1, 7 N2, 11 N3, 3 N4, 8 N5, 4 machos y 10 hembras. La dinámica de población, el estado nutricional, la predación y la conducta gregaria, utilizados como parámetros de comparación, fueron estimados mediante censos mensuales. Triatoma infestans logró mayor éxito colonizador que T. sordida dado los valores alcanzados en: fecundidad (146 huevos/hembra, longevidad (157,8 días y mortalidad (39,4%, en comparación a los obtenidos por T. sordida: 118 huevos/hembra, 81,1 días y 54,0% respectivamente. La población de T. infestans tuvo un crecimiento de tipo exponencial, con una alta tasa de renovación ninfal, en contraposición, la población de T. sordida se extinguió tempranamente. En general, el peso promedio de los ejemplares de T. infestans se mantuvo en valores próximos al inicial, mientras que en T. sordida se redujo. Los grupos gregarios se conformaron mayoritariamente en el sector inferior de la pared 1 (próximo al hospedador, observándose mayor nivel de contagio en T. infestans. A partir de los resultados obtenidos se formula la hipótesis de la superioridad competitiva en T. infestans.Para saber se algum tipo de interação se produzia entre populações de Triatoma infestans e T. sordida que conviviam em uma unidade experimental e compartilharam o mesmo recurso alimentar (ave, foi realizado estudo que abrangeu o período de setembro de 1988 a abril de 1989. A composição etária inicial para cada espécie foi: 27 N1, 7 N2, 11 N3, 3 N4, 8 N5, 4 machos e 10 fêmeas. A dinâmica da população, o estado nutricional, a predação e a conduta gregria foram estimados mediante censos mensais. T. infestans obteve maior êxito

  2. Orbital maneuvering end effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Barnes, Wayne L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an end effector device for grasping and maneuvering objects such as berthing handles of a space telescope. The device includes a V-shaped capture window defined as inclined surfaces in parallel face plates which converge toward a retainer recess in which the handle is retained. A pivotal finger (30) meshes with a pair of pivoted fingers which rotate in counterrotation. The fingers rotate to pull a handle within the capture window into recess where latches lock handle in the recess. To align the capture window, plates may be cocked plus or minus five degrees on base. Drive means is included in the form of a motor coupled with a harmonic drive speed reducer, which provides for slow movement of the fingers at a high torque so that large articles may be handled. Novelty of the invention is believed to reside in the combined intermeshing finger structure, drive means and the harmonic drive speed reducer, which features provide the required maneuverability and strength.

  3. Phytophthora Genome Sequences Uncover Evolutionary Origins and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, Brett M.; Tripathy, Sucheta; Zhang, Xuemin; Dehal, Paramvir; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Aerts, Andrea; Arredondo, Felipe D.; Baxter, Laura; Bensasson, Douda; Beynon, JIm L.; Chapman, Jarrod; Damasceno, Cynthia M. B.; Dorrance, Anne E.; Dou, Daolong; Dickerman, Allan W.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Garbelotto, Matteo; Gijzen, Mark; Gordon, Stuart G.; Govers, Francine; Grunwald, NIklaus J.; Huang, Wayne; Ivors, Kelly L.; Jones, Richard W.; Kamoun, Sophien; Krampis, Konstantinos; Lamour, Kurt H.; Lee, Mi-Kyung; McDonald, W. Hayes; Medina, Monica; Meijer, Harold J. G.; Nordberg, Erik K.; Maclean, Donald J.; Ospina-Giraldo, Manuel D.; Morris, Paul F.; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Putnam, Nicholas J.; Rash, Sam; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Sakihama, Yasuko; Salamov, Asaf A.; Savidor, Alon; Scheuring, Chantel F.; Smith, Brian M.; Sobral, Bruno W. S.; Terry, Astrid; Torto-Alalibo, Trudy A.; Win, Joe; Xu, Zhanyou; Zhang, Hongbin; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2006-04-17

    Draft genome sequences have been determined for the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae and the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. Oömycetes such as these Phytophthora species share the kingdom Stramenopila with photosynthetic algae such as diatoms, and the presence of many Phytophthora genes of probable phototroph origin supports a photosynthetic ancestry for the stramenopiles. Comparison of the two species' genomes reveals a rapid expansion and diversification of many protein families associated with plant infection such as hydrolases, ABC transporters, protein toxins, proteinase inhibitors, and, in particular, a superfamily of 700 proteins with similarity to known oömycete avirulence genes.

  4. Susceptibility of common alder (Alnus glutinosa) seeds and seedlings to Phytophthora alni and other Phytophthora species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, M. M.; Diez, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Phytophthora alni is a highly destructive host specific pathogen to alders (Alnus spp.) spreading all over Europe. Recently this pathogen has been reported to cause diseases in common alder (Alnus glutinosa) in Spain. Seeds and seedlings of A. glutinosa were tested in vitro for their susceptibility to alder Phytophthora and other Phytophthora species. Isolates of P. alni ssp. alni, P. cinnamomi, P. citrophthora, P. nicotianae and P. palmivora were used in the experiments. Seeds and seedlings were inoculated with a zoospore suspension and uniform mycelial blocks of agar of the Phytophthora species. Susceptibility was calculated in terms of pathogen virulence on seed germination and seedling mortality 42 and 67 days after inoculation respectively. Seed germination and seedling mortality rates varied differently among the isolates used. Results implied that common alder and its seeds and seedlings are at risk to be infected by P. alni. In addition, other Phytophthora species are able to infect this kind of material showing their relative host non-specificity. This is one important finding concerning alder regeneration in infected areas, and the possibility of disease spread on this plant material. (Author) 42 refs.

  5. The role of the peridomiciliary area in the elimination of Triatoma infestans from rural Argentine communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecere María C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the origin of Triatoma infestans reinfestation and study its dynamics following spraying with deltamethrin inside and around 94 houses in three rural communities in northwestern Argentina. The effectiveness of the spraying was evaluated immediately after the houses were sprayed and two months later. In addition, five residual peridomiciliary foci were found and sprayed, as well as three preexisting ones that had not been sprayed. To monitor reinfestation, biosensors were placed in the houses and each family was also asked to capture triatomines and keep them in plastic bags; in addition, triatomines were searched for in and around houses, using an aerosol that dislodged them from their hiding places. Selective sprayings were carried out only where a colony of T. infestans was found. During the 30 months of follow-up, the percentage of houses in which any T. infestans were captured varied between 3% and 9%. In six houses, T. infestans were captured during more than one evaluation. The number of peridomiciliary areas found to be infested (19 was double the number of infested houses (9. Colonies of T. infestans were found only in the peridomiciliary areas, where the number of T. infestans captured was six times higher than in the houses. Chickens were the host most frequently associated with peridomiciliary foci. This area was the origin and principal source of reinfestation. To reduce the speed of reinfestation and the frequency with which sprayings are needed, the following environmental and chemical control methods must be combined in the peridomiciliary area: reduce the number of hiding places of triatomines; restrict the raising of birds to structures that cannot be colonized by triatomines; apply an insecticide that is less likely to be degraded by exposure to the elements, or perform a second spraying 6 to 12 months after the first; and employ a device for early detection of the presence of T

  6. Pathogenicity of Phytophthora isolates originating from several woody hosts in Bulgaria and Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubenova Aneta B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to examine the virulence of eight Phytophthora isolates belonging to three species (Phytophthora cryptogea, Phytophthora plurivora and Phytophthora quercina obtained from diverse European ecosystems (in Bulgaria, Poland and Germany towards three forest tree hosts – English oak (Quercus robur L., Turkey oak (Quercus cerris L. and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L..

  7. Triatoma melanosoma, novo status para Triatoma infestans melanosoma Martinez, Olmedo & Carcavallo, 1987 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae Triatoma melanosoma, new status for Triatoma infestans melanosoma Martinez, Olmedo & Carcavallo, 1987 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Lent

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma infestans melanosoma was described in 1987 by Martinez, Olmedo & Carcavallo. In the present work the authors make a redescription, adding new characters, and based on biological and morphological aspects raise up to the level of species and being identified as Triatoma melanosoma. A detailed morphological study of the external male genitalia was made.

  8. Phytophthora megakarya : A potential threat to the cocoa industry in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A severe black pod disease of cocoa in Ghana caused by Phytophthora megakarya was first reported in 1985, even though there is evidence that the fungus might have existed earlier. Until then, only Phytophthora palmivora which causes a less severe black pod disease was known in Ghana. P. megakarya has changed ...

  9. Molecular Profiling of the Phytophthora plurivora Secretome: A Step towards Understanding the Cross-Talk between Plant Pathogenic Oomycetes and Their Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Frank; Dalio, Ronaldo J. D.; Di Maro, Antimo; Scognamiglio, Monica; Fiorentino, Antonio; Parente, Augusto; Osswald, Wolfgang; Chambery, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying host–pathogen interactions in plant diseases is of crucial importance to gain insights on different virulence strategies of pathogens and unravel their role in plant immunity. Among plant pathogens, Phytophthora species are eliciting a growing interest for their considerable economical and environmental impact. Plant infection by Phytophthora phytopathogens is a complex process coordinated by a plethora of extracellular signals secreted by both host plants and pathogens. The characterization of the repertoire of effectors secreted by oomycetes has become an active area of research for deciphering molecular mechanisms responsible for host plants colonization and infection. Putative secreted proteins by Phytophthora species have been catalogued by applying high-throughput genome-based strategies and bioinformatic approaches. However, a comprehensive analysis of the effective secretome profile of Phytophthora is still lacking. Here, we report the first large-scale profiling of P. plurivora secretome using a shotgun LC-MS/MS strategy. To gain insight on the molecular signals underlying the cross-talk between plant pathogenic oomycetes and their host plants, we also investigate the quantitative changes of secreted protein following interaction of P. plurivora with the root exudate of Fagus sylvatica which is highly susceptible to the root pathogen. We show that besides known effectors, the expression and/or secretion levels of cell-wall-degrading enzymes were altered following the interaction with the host plant root exudate. In addition, a characterization of the F. sylvatica root exudate was performed by NMR and amino acid analysis, allowing the identification of the main released low-molecular weight components, including organic acids and free amino acids. This study provides important insights for deciphering the extracellular network involved in the highly susceptible P. plurivora-F. sylvatica interaction

  10. First Report of Widespread Wild Populations of Triatoma infestans (Reduviidae, Triatominae) in the Valleys of La Paz, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, Rosio; Waleckx, Etienne; Bosseno, Marie-France; Zoveda, Faustine; Vidaurre, Pablo; Salas, Renata; Mamani, Elio; Noireau, François; Brenière, Simone Frédérique

    2010-01-01

    Wild populations of Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease in the Southern Cone countries, may be involved in reinfestation of human dwellings, limiting the success of vector-control campaigns in Bolivia. Knowledge of the distribution of these populations remains incomplete. We report here the detection of T. infestans wild populations in large areas in the department of La Paz, Bolivia. Among 18 sylvatic areas investigated, 17 were positive with T. infestans specimens. The infection rate of captured T. infestans with Trypanosoma cruzi was 85.7% in adult specimens. These results expand the geographical distribution of wild populations of T. infestans; it may be distributed throughout the Inter-Andean Dry Forest eco-region of Bolivia. The current information allows us to propose the hypothesis that a sylvatic origin of the reinfestation is located in the valleys of La Paz. PMID:20348501

  11. Development of Phytophthora fruit rot caused by Phytophthora capsici on resistant and susceptible watermelon fruit of different ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermelon is an important crop grown in 44 states in the United States. Phytophthora fruit rot caused by Phytophthora capsici is a serious disease in the southeastern U.S., where over 50% of the watermelons are produced. The disease has resulted in severe losses to watermelon growers, especially in...

  12. Monitoring for Phytophthora ramorum and other species of Phytophthora in nurseries and urban areas in the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshi A. Wamishe; Steven N. Jeffers; Jaesoon Hwang

    2008-01-01

    Nurseries in the southeastern United States that received ornamental plants in 2004 colonized by Phytophthora ramorum and the surrounding urban areas are being monitored to determine if this pathogen has escaped and become established. At the same time, the prevalence and diversity of other species of Phytophthora are being...

  13. Inheritance and heritability of deltamethrin resistance under laboratory conditions of Triatoma infestans from Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Marinely Bustamante; Pessoa, Grasielle D'Avila Caldas; Rosa, Aline Cristine Luiz; Echeverria, Jorge Espinoza; Diotaiuti, Liléia Gonçalves

    2015-11-16

    Over the last few decades, pyrethroid-resistant in Triatoma infestans populations have been reported, mainly on the border between Argentina and Bolivia. Understanding the genetic basis of inheritance mode and heritability of resistance to insecticides under laboratory conditions is crucial for vector management and monitoring of insecticide resistance. Currently, few studies have been performed to characterize the inheritance mode of resistance to pyrethroids in T. infestans; for this reason, the present study aims to characterize the inheritance and heritability of deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans populations from Bolivia with different toxicological profiles. Experimental crosses were performed between a susceptible (S) colony and resistant (R) and reduced susceptibility (RS) colonies in both directions (♀ x ♂ and ♂ x ♀), and inheritance mode was determined based on degree of dominance (DO) and effective dominance (D(ML)). In addition, realized heritability (h(2)) was estimated based on a resistant colony, and select pressure was performed for two generations based on the diagnostic dose (10 ng. i. a. /nymph). The F1 progeny of the experimental crosses and the selection were tested by a standard insecticide resistance bioassay. The result for DO and D(ML) (Bolivia. The lethal doses (LD50) increase from one generation to another rapidly after selection pressure with deltamethrin. This suggests that resistance is an additive and cumulative factor, mainly in highly structured populations with limited dispersal capacity, such as T. infestans. This phenomenon was demonstrated for the first time for T. infestans in the present study. These results are very important for vector control strategies in problematic areas where high resistance ratios of T. infestans have been reported.

  14. Interacción entre poblaciones de Triatoma infestans y Triatoma sordida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Esther Bar

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available Para conocer si se producía algún tipo de interacción entre poblaciones de Triatoma infestans y Triatoma sordida que convivían en una unidad experimental y explotaban el mismo recurso alimentario (ave se las estudió desde setiembre/1988 a abril/1989. La composición etaria inicial para cada especie fue: 27 N1, 7 N2, 11 N3, 3 N4, 8 N5, 4 machos y 10 hembras. La dinámica de población, el estado nutricional, la predación y la conducta gregaria, utilizados como parámetros de comparación, fueron estimados mediante censos mensuales. Triatoma infestans logró mayor éxito colonizador que T. sordida dado los valores alcanzados en: fecundidad (146 huevos/hembra, longevidad (157,8 días y mortalidad (39,4%, en comparación a los obtenidos por T. sordida: 118 huevos/hembra, 81,1 días y 54,0% respectivamente. La población de T. infestans tuvo un crecimiento de tipo exponencial, con una alta tasa de renovación ninfal, en contraposición, la población de T. sordida se extinguió tempranamente. En general, el peso promedio de los ejemplares de T. infestans se mantuvo en valores próximos al inicial, mientras que en T. sordida se redujo. Los grupos gregarios se conformaron mayoritariamente en el sector inferior de la pared 1 (próximo al hospedador, observándose mayor nivel de contagio en T. infestans. A partir de los resultados obtenidos se formula la hipótesis de la superioridad competitiva en T. infestans.

  15. Interacción entre poblaciones de Triatoma infestans y Triatoma sordida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bar Maria Esther

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Para conocer si se producía algún tipo de interacción entre poblaciones de Triatoma infestans y Triatoma sordida que convivían en una unidad experimental y explotaban el mismo recurso alimentario (ave se las estudió desde setiembre/1988 a abril/1989. La composición etaria inicial para cada especie fue: 27 N1, 7 N2, 11 N3, 3 N4, 8 N5, 4 machos y 10 hembras. La dinámica de población, el estado nutricional, la predación y la conducta gregaria, utilizados como parámetros de comparación, fueron estimados mediante censos mensuales. Triatoma infestans logró mayor éxito colonizador que T. sordida dado los valores alcanzados en: fecundidad (146 huevos/hembra, longevidad (157,8 días y mortalidad (39,4%, en comparación a los obtenidos por T. sordida: 118 huevos/hembra, 81,1 días y 54,0% respectivamente. La población de T. infestans tuvo un crecimiento de tipo exponencial, con una alta tasa de renovación ninfal, en contraposición, la población de T. sordida se extinguió tempranamente. En general, el peso promedio de los ejemplares de T. infestans se mantuvo en valores próximos al inicial, mientras que en T. sordida se redujo. Los grupos gregarios se conformaron mayoritariamente en el sector inferior de la pared 1 (próximo al hospedador, observándose mayor nivel de contagio en T. infestans. A partir de los resultados obtenidos se formula la hipótesis de la superioridad competitiva en T. infestans.

  16. Variations of the External Male Genitalia in Three Populations of Triatoma infestans Klug, 1834

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pires Herton Helder Rocha

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma infestans is the triatomine that presents the greatest dispersion area in South America. However, it is not known whether the original characteristics of this insect remained in its long dispersion process. The purpose of this work was to study comparatively the external male genitalia of insects from different populations of T. infestans, two from Brazil (Minas Gerais and Bahia and one from Bolivia (Cochabamba Valley, and to investigate the correlation between the morphological and behavioral variations. Differences were observed in one of the structures of the external genitalia (endosoma process that could be used to characterize the insects from the three populations studied.

  17. Oomycetes, effectors, and all that jazz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Tolga O; Schornack, Sebastian; Banfield, Mark J; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-08-01

    Plant pathogenic oomycetes secrete a diverse repertoire of effector proteins that modulate host innate immunity and enable parasitic infection. Understanding how effectors evolve, translocate and traffic inside host cells, and perturb host processes are major themes in the study of oomycete-plant interactions. The last year has seen important progress in the study of oomycete effectors with, notably, the elucidation of the 3D structures of five RXLR effectors, and novel insights into how cytoplasmic effectors subvert host cells. In this review, we discuss these and other recent advances and highlight the most important open questions in oomycete effector biology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genome sequences of six Phytophthora species associated with forests in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studholme, D.J.; McDougal, R.L.; Sambles, C.; Hansen, E.; Hardy, G.; Grant, M.; Ganley, R.J.; Williams, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    In New Zealand there has been a long association of Phytophthora diseases in forests, nurseries, remnant plantings and horticultural crops. However, new Phytophthora diseases of trees have recently emerged. Genome sequencing has been performed for 12 Phytophthora isolates, from six species: Phytophthora pluvialis, Phytophthora kernoviae, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Phytophthora agathidicida, Phytophthora multivora and Phytophthora taxon Totara. These sequences will enable comparative analyses to identify potential virulence strategies and ultimately facilitate better control strategies. This Whole Genome Shotgun data have been deposited in DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession numbers LGTT00000000, LGTU00000000, JPWV00000000, JPWU00000000, LGSK00000000, LGSJ00000000, LGTR00000000, LGTS00000000, LGSM00000000, LGSL00000000, LGSO00000000, and LGSN00000000. PMID:26981359

  19. Effector proteins of rust fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, Benjamin; Joly, David L; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi include many species that are devastating crop pathogens. To develop resistant plants, a better understanding of rust virulence factors, or effector proteins, is needed. Thus far, only six rust effector proteins have been described: AvrP123, AvrP4, AvrL567, AvrM, RTP1, and PGTAUSPE-10-1. Although some are well established model proteins used to investigate mechanisms of immune receptor activation (avirulence activities) or entry into plant cells, how they work inside host tissues to promote fungal growth remains unknown. The genome sequences of four rust fungi (two Melampsoraceae and two Pucciniaceae) have been analyzed so far. Genome-wide analyses of these species, as well as transcriptomics performed on a broader range of rust fungi, revealed hundreds of small secreted proteins considered as rust candidate secreted effector proteins (CSEPs). The rust community now needs high-throughput approaches (effectoromics) to accelerate effector discovery/characterization and to better understand how they function in planta. However, this task is challenging due to the non-amenability of rust pathosystems (obligate biotrophs infecting crop plants) to traditional molecular genetic approaches mainly due to difficulties in culturing these species in vitro. The use of heterologous approaches should be promoted in the future.

  20. Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora gonapodyides differently colonize and contribute to decay of California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica) leaf litter in stream ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyar Aram; David M. Rizzo

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of Phytophthora species in surface waters has earned increasing attention in the past decades, in great part as a result of “stream monitoring” programs for detection and monitoring of Phytophthora ramorum and other invasive species. The potential for Phytophthora ...

  1. Genomes and virulence difference between two physiological races of Phytophthora nicotianae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Ma, Xiao; Yu, Haiqin; Fang, Dunhuang; Li, Yongping; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Wen; Dong, Yang; Xiao, Bingguang

    2016-01-01

    Black shank is a severe plant disease caused by the soil-borne pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae. Two physiological races of P. nicotianae, races 0 and 1, are predominantly observed in cultivated tobacco fields around the world. Race 0 has been reported to be more aggressive, having a shorter incubation period, and causing worse root rot symptoms, while race 1 causes more severe necrosis. The molecular mechanisms underlying the difference in virulence between race 0 and 1 remain elusive. We assembled and annotated the genomes of P. nicotianae races 0 and 1, which were obtained by a combination of PacBio single-molecular real-time sequencing and second-generation sequencing (both HiSeq and MiSeq platforms). Gene family analysis revealed a highly expanded ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family in P. nicotianae. Specifically, more RxLR effector genes were found in the genome of race 0 than in that of race 1. In addition, RxLR effector genes were found to be mainly distributed in gene-sparse, repeat-rich regions of the P. nicotianae genome. These results provide not only high quality reference genomes of P. nicotianae, but also insights into the infection mechanisms of P. nicotianae and its co-evolution with the host plant. They also reveal insights into the difference in virulence between the two physiological races.

  2. RNAi effector diversity in nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathan J Dalzell

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available While RNA interference (RNAi has been deployed to facilitate gene function studies in diverse helminths, parasitic nematodes appear variably susceptible. To test if this is due to inter-species differences in RNAi effector complements, we performed a primary sequence similarity survey for orthologs of 77 Caenorhabditis elegans RNAi pathway proteins in 13 nematode species for which genomic or transcriptomic datasets were available, with all outputs subjected to domain-structure verification. Our dataset spanned transcriptomes of Ancylostoma caninum and Oesophagostomum dentatum, and genomes of Trichinella spiralis, Ascaris suum, Brugia malayi, Haemonchus contortus, Meloidogyne hapla, Meloidogyne incognita and Pristionchus pacificus, as well as the Caenorhabditis species C. brenneri, C. briggsae, C. japonica and C. remanei, and revealed that: (i Most of the C. elegans proteins responsible for uptake and spread of exogenously applied double stranded (dsRNA are absent from parasitic species, including RNAi-competent plant-nematodes; (ii The Argonautes (AGOs responsible for gene expression regulation in C. elegans are broadly conserved, unlike those recruited during the induction of RNAi by exogenous dsRNA; (iii Secondary Argonautes (SAGOs are poorly conserved, and the nuclear AGO NRDE-3 was not identified in any parasite; (iv All five Caenorhabditis spp. possess an expanded RNAi effector repertoire relative to the parasitic nematodes, consistent with the propensity for gene loss in nematode parasites; (v In spite of the quantitative differences in RNAi effector complements across nematode species, all displayed qualitatively similar coverage of functional protein groups. In summary, we could not identify RNAi effector deficiencies that associate with reduced susceptibility in parasitic nematodes. Indeed, similarities in the RNAi effector complements of RNAi refractory and competent nematode parasites support the broad applicability of this research

  3. New role for Cdc14 phosphatase: localization to basal bodies in the oomycete phytophthora and its evolutionary coinheritance with eukaryotic flagella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey M V Ah-Fong

    Full Text Available Cdc14 protein phosphatases are well known for regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle, particularly during mitosis. Here we reveal a distinctly new role for Cdc14 based on studies of the microbial eukaryote Phytophthora infestans, the Irish potato famine agent. While Cdc14 is transcribed constitutively in yeast and animal cells, the P. infestans ortholog is expressed exclusively in spore stages of the life cycle and not in vegetative hyphae where the bulk of mitosis takes place. PiCdc14 expression is first detected in nuclei at sporulation, and during zoospore formation the protein accumulates at the basal body, which is the site from which flagella develop. The association of PiCdc14 with basal bodies was supported by co-localization studies with the DIP13 basal body protein and flagellar β-tubulin, and by demonstrating the enrichment of PiCdc14 in purified flagella-basal body complexes. Overexpressing PiCdc14 did not cause defects in growth or mitosis in hyphae, but interfered with cytoplasmic partitioning during zoosporogenesis. This cytokinetic defect might relate to its ability to bind microtubules, which was shown using an in vitro cosedimentation assay. The use of gene silencing to reveal the precise function of PiCdc14 in flagella is not possible since we showed previously that silencing prevents the formation of the precursor stage, sporangia. Nevertheless, the association of Cdc14 with flagella and basal bodies is consistent with their phylogenetic distribution in eukaryotes, as species that lack the ability to produce flagella generally also lack Cdc14. An ancestral role of Cdc14 in the flagellar stage of eukaryotes is thereby proposed.

  4. Distribution of Pyrethroid Resistant Populations of Triatoma infestans in the Southern Cone of South America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinely Bustamante Gomez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies published during the last 15 years showed the occurrence of insecticide resistance in Triatoma infestans populations. The different toxicological profiles and mechanisms of resistance to insecticides is due to a genetic base and environmental factors, being the insecticide selective pressure the best studied among the last factors. The studies on insecticide resistance on T. infestans did not consider the effect of environmental factors that may influence the distribution of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides. To fill this knowledge gap, the present study aims at studying the association between the spatial distribution of pyrethroid resistant populations of T. infestans and environmental variables.A total of 24 articles reporting on studies that evaluated the susceptibility to pyrethroids of 222 field-collected T. infestans populations were compiled. The relationship between resistance occurrence (according to different criteria with environmental variables was studied using a generalized linear model. The lethal dose that kills 50% of the evaluated population (LD50 showed a strong linear relationship with the corresponding resistance ratio (RR50. The statistical descriptive analysis of showed that the frequency distribution of the Log (LD50 is bimodal, suggesting the existence of two statistical groups. A significant model including 5 environmental variables shows the geographic distribution of high and low LD50 groups with a particular concentration of the highest LD50 populations over the region identified as the putative center of dispersion of T. infestans.The occurrence of these two groups concentrated over a particular region that coincides with the area where populations of the intermediate cytogenetic group were found might reflect the spatial heterogeneity of the genetic variability of T. infestans, that seems to be the cause of the insecticide resistance in the area, even on sylvatic populations of T. infestans

  5. PHYTOPHTHORA MEGAKARYA: A REVIEW ON ITS STATUS AS A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2015-02-23

    Feb 23, 2015 ... broom, swollen shoot virus, vascular streak dieback, and monilia ..... evidence of alternative hosts of the pathogen. Phytophthora .... efficacy of fungicide treatment. ..... or derivatives thereof, reduced necrosis of cacao leaf discs ...

  6. Evaluation of Watermelon Germplasm for Resistance to Phytophthora Blight Caused by Phytophthora capsici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Jeong Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the Phytophthora rot resistance of 514 accessions of watermelon germplasm, Citrullus lanatus var lanatus. About 46% of the 514 accessions tested were collections from Uzbekistan, Turkey, China, U.S.A., and Ukraine. Phytophthora capsici was inoculated to 45-day-old watermelon seedlings by drenching with 5 ml of sporangial suspension (10⁶ sporangia/ml. At 7 days after inoculation, 21 accessions showed no disease symptoms while 291 accessions of susceptible watermelon germplasm showed more than 60.1% disease severity. A total of 510 accessions of watermelon germplasm showed significant disease symptoms and were rated as susceptible to highly susceptible 35 days after inoculation. The highly susceptible watermelon germplasm exhibited white fungal hyphae on the lesion or damping off with water-soaked and browning symptoms. One accession (IT032840 showed moderate resistance and two accessions (IT185446 and IT187904 were resistant to P. capsici. Results suggest that these two resistant germplasm can be used as a rootstock and as a source of resistance in breeding resistant watermelon varieties against Phytophthora.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA variation of Triatoma infestans populations and its implication on the specific status of T. melanosoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A Monteiro

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence comparison of 412 base-pairs fragments of the mitochondrial cytochrome B gene was used to infer the genetic structure of nine geographical Triatoma infestans populations and their phylogenetic relationship with T. melanosoma and T. brasiliensis. T. infestans and T. melanosoma were compared by morphometry, allozyme and cytogenetic analyses, as well as subjected to reciprocal crosses, in order to clarify the taxonomic status of the latter. No differences were found to distinguish the two species and the crosses between them yielded progeny. T. infestans populations presented four haplotypes that could be separated in two clusters: one formed by the samples from Bolivia (Andes and Chaco and the other formed by samples from Argentina and Brazil. Silvatic and domestic T. infestans populations from Bolivia (Andes were genetically identical.

  8. Pathogenicity of Phytophthora species isolated from rhizosphere soil in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. Balci; S. Balci; W.L. MacDonald; K.W. Gottschalk

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenicity of seven Phytophthora species was assessed by inoculation of stem and foliar tissues of oak species (Quercus spp.) native to the eastern United States. Phytophthora cambivora, P. cinnamomi, P. citricola, P. europaea, P. quercina...

  9. Caractérisation des isolats de Phytophthora spp du verger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    31 oct. 2013 ... Characterization of Phytophthora spp isolates from cocoa orchard of Côte d'Ivoire ... cocoa black disease obtained in the main production areas of cocoa (East, Centre-West ...... Plant Pathogen Genus Phytophthora American.

  10. Primer registro de Triatoma infestans (Klug (Hemiptera: Reduviidae asociado a nidos de loros barranqueros (Cyanoliseus patagonus (Aves: Psittacidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María L. HERNÁNDEZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma infestans es el vector más importante de la enfermedad de Chagas de la Argentina. Se cita por primera vez la presencia de T. infestans (Klug (Hemiptera: Reduviidae asociado a nidos de loro barranquero Cyanoliseus patagonus (Psittasiformes: Psittacidae construidos en viviendas de adobe abandonadas. Se discuten las posibles implicancias de este hallazgo para la vigilancia entomológica del vector.

  11. A review of the Phytophthora pod rot disease situation in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of Phytophthora megakarya, which until 1985 was unknown in Ghana, has changed the status of black pod disease of cocoa in the country. Hitherto, only Phytophthora palmivora was known to be present. This paper reviews the Phytophthora pod disease situation, the origin, distribution, incidence and ...

  12. 75 FR 44936 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Phytophthora Ramorum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ...] Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Phytophthora Ramorum... interstate movement of regulated articles to prevent the spread of Phytophthora ramorum. DATES: We will... for the interstate movement of regulated articles to prevent the spread of Phytophthora ramorum...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1057 - Phytophthora palmivora; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phytophthora palmivora; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1057 Phytophthora palmivora; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Phytophthora palmivora is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on the raw agricultural commodity...

  14. Mapping the Progression of Phytophthora Ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh, T.; Li, J.; El-Askary, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    There has been a plant pathogen, Phytophthora Ramorum that has been causing trouble for the plant species in the forests of California and Oregon. Phytophthora is essentially a water mold that infects oak species like California black oak, coast live oak as well as California bay laurel (Lamsal). What this project aims to accomplish is to observe any changes in NDVI values between the years of 2002 and 1994. What the project hopes to observe is a decline of NDVI values between the two years because the infection of Phytophtora Ramorum will cause stress to the plant or kill the plant, which will lower the values of NDVI. The project will utilizes satellite data to create NDVI images over the study area and two types of change detection methods to observe the differences between the NDVI values of the two years. Preliminary results for the project, data obtained from Landsat 7 ETM+ with a resolution of 240 meters, was not able to observe any significant changes. A finer resolution to differentiate the NDVI values would be needed. In addition the best way to keep the pathogen from getting out of control is with ground level management, or complete eradication of the pathogen. These eradication methods include burning the infected host plants and spreading herbicide (Alexander). With that in mind it would be ideal to have an early detection of the pathogen infestation. Therefore another goal of the project is to continue to research if remote sensing could play a role in an early detection method for the presence of Phytophtora Ramorum.

  15. Biosynthesis of Antibiotic Leucinostatins in Bio-control Fungus Purpureocillium lilacinum and Their Inhibition on Phytophthora Revealed by Genome Mining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpureocillium lilacinum of Ophiocordycipitaceae is one of the most promising and commercialized agents for controlling plant parasitic nematodes, as well as other insects and plant pathogens. However, how the fungus functions at the molecular level remains unknown. Here, we sequenced two isolates (PLBJ-1 and PLFJ-1 of P. lilacinum from different places Beijing and Fujian. Genomic analysis showed high synteny of the two isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis indicated they were most related to the insect pathogen Tolypocladium inflatum. A comparison with other species revealed that this fungus was enriched in carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes, proteases and pathogenesis related genes. Whole genome search revealed a rich repertoire of secondary metabolites (SMs encoding genes. The non-ribosomal peptide synthetase LcsA, which is comprised of ten C-A-PCP modules, was identified as the core biosynthetic gene of lipopeptide leucinostatins, which was specific to P. lilacinum and T. ophioglossoides, as confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. Furthermore, gene expression level was analyzed when PLBJ-1 was grown in leucinostatin-inducing and non-inducing medium, and 20 genes involved in the biosynthesis of leucionostatins were identified. Disruption mutants allowed us to propose a putative biosynthetic pathway of leucinostatin A. Moreover, overexpression of the transcription factor lcsF increased the production (1.5-fold of leucinostatins A and B compared to wild type. Bioassays explored a new bioactivity of leucinostatins and P. lilacinum: inhibiting the growth of Phytophthora infestans and P. capsici. These results contribute to our understanding of the biosynthetic mechanism of leucinostatins and may allow us to utilize P. lilacinum better as bio-control agent.

  16. Existence of a sex pheromone in Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduvidae: II. Electrophysiological correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G. de Brito Sanchez

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The stimulus provided by a copulating pair of Triatoma infestans significantly affects the electrical activity of the nervous system of Triatoma infestans. Electrophysiological recordings were perfomed on stationary adult males presented with stimuli of an air current carrying odors from males, females, non-copulating pairs and mating pairs. The electrophysiological response was characterized by the low frequency occurrence of biphasic compound impulses. A significant increase in the frequency of the impulses occurred in stationary males when exposed to air currents of mating pairs, when compared to that evoked by a clean air stream. Analysis of the time course of the assays, showed that the electrophisiological activity during the copula was higher than prior to or after copula. The electrophysiological evidence presented here strongly supports the existence of pheromone(s released by one or both sexes during mating and which is perceived by male chemoreceptors located on the antennae.

  17. Influence of mating on ovarian follicle development in Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Asin

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available This works examines the influence of mating on ovarian follicle development in Triatoma infestans. The observations were carried out on both virgin and mated females, wich were killed at various times after their emergence. There was no difference in the ovarian development of both experimental groups during the first gonadotrofic cycle. By the 7th day mated females as well as virgn females showed vitellogenic oocytes. The coriogenesis and ovulation process began on the 13th day after imaginal moulting. However we could observe that egg-laying was dependent on mating. Mated females laid eggs whereas virgin females did not lay eggs. However ovarian production was significantly greater in the mated females. It is suggested that in T. infestans mating stimulates egg-laying but it does not influence the oogenesis and ovulation process.

  18. Population structure of the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, at the urban-rural interface

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Erica A.; Khatchikian, Camilo E.; Hwang, Josephine; Ancca-Juárez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Quıspe-Machaca, Victor R.; Levy, Michael Z.; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The increasing rate of biological invasions resulting from human transport or human-mediated changes to the environment have had devastating ecologic and public health consequences. The kissing bug, Triatoma infestans, has dispersed through the Peruvian city of Arequipa. The biological invasion of this insect has resulted in a public health crisis, putting thousands of residents of this city at risk of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and subsequent development of Chagas disease. Here we show t...

  19. Flight Muscle Dimorphism and Heterogeneity in Flight Initiation of Field-Collected Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Gurevitz, Juan M.; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E.

    2007-01-01

    Recent experiments demonstrated that most field-collected Triatoma infestans (Klug) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) adults from northern Argentina either never initiated flight or did so repeatedly in both sexes. This pattern could not be explained by sex, adult age, weight, weight-to-length ratio (W/L), or chance. We examined whether bugs that never initiated flight possessed developed flight muscles, and whether flight muscle mass relative to total body mass (FMR) was related to the probability of ...

  20. Differential expression profiles in the midgut of Triatoma infestans infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego S Buarque

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and is transmitted by insects from the Triatominae subfamily. To identify components involved in the protozoan-vector relationship, we constructed and analyzed cDNA libraries from RNA isolated from the midguts of uninfected and T. cruzi-infected Triatoma infestans, which are major vectors of Chagas disease. We generated approximately 440 high-quality Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs from each T. infestans midgut cDNA library. The sequences were grouped in 380 clusters, representing an average length of 664.78 base pairs (bp. Many clusters were not classified functionally, representing unknown transcripts. Several transcripts involved in different processes (e.g., detoxification showed differential expression in response to T. cruzi infection. Lysozyme, cathepsin D, a nitrophorin-like protein and a putative 14 kDa protein were significantly upregulated upon infection, whereas thioredoxin reductase was downregulated. In addition, we identified several transcripts related to metabolic processes or immunity with unchanged expressions, including infestin, lipocalins and defensins. We also detected ESTs encoding juvenile hormone binding protein (JHBP, which seems to be involved in insect development and could be a target in control strategies for the vector. This work demonstrates differential gene expression upon T. cruzi infection in the midgut of T. infestans. These data expand the current knowledge regarding vector-parasite interactions for Chagas disease.

  1. Experimental control of Triatoma infestans in poor rural villages of Bolivia through community participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardeux, Frédéric; Depickère, Stéphanie; Aliaga, Claudia; Chavez, Tamara; Zambrana, Lilian

    2015-02-01

    Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone countries. Present control strategies based on indoor and outdoor residual insecticide spraying are not sufficient to control disease transmission, particularly in Bolivia. Techniques based on the management of the human environment may be good alternatives or supplements. Social and entomological surveys were carried out in four villages of Bolivia situated in the dry inter-Andean Valleys and the Chaco region. Risk factors for house infestation by T. infestans were identified, and an eco-health intervention based on education and community participation was carried out to reduce the risks of house infestation. It consisted of implementing simple and low cost vector control techniques such as coating of mud walls, cleaning activities and removal of poultry that enter rooms to lay eggs. The eco-health intervention significantly reduced the number of infested bedrooms, the mean abundance of T. infestans in bedrooms and beds, especially in the Chaco region. Mud wall coating was well accepted and could be proposed as a supplementary tool to the National Program of Chagas Disease Control to enhance the effects of insecticide sprayings. Even if cleaning activities were still neglected, community participation proved to be effective in reducing house infestation. © The author 2015. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.

  2. An updated insight into the Sialotranscriptome of Triatoma infestans: developmental stage and geographic variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Schwarz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas disease in South America. As in all hematophagous arthropods, its saliva contains a complex cocktail that assists blood feeding by preventing platelet aggregation and blood clotting and promoting vasodilation. These salivary components can be immunologically recognized by their vector's hosts and targeted with antibodies that might disrupt blood feeding. These antibodies can be used to detect vector exposure using immunoassays. Antibodies may also contribute to the fast evolution of the salivary cocktail.Salivary gland cDNA libraries from nymphal and adult T. infestans of breeding colonies originating from different locations (Argentina, Chile, Peru and Bolivia, and cDNA libraries originating from F1 populations of Bolivia, were sequenced using Illumina technology. Coding sequences (CDS were extracted from the assembled reads, the numbers of reads mapped to these CDS, sequences were functionally annotated and polymorphisms determined.Over five thousand CDS, mostly full length or near full length, were publicly deposited on GenBank. Transcripts that were over 10-fold overexpressed from different geographical regions, or from different developmental stages were identified. Polymorphisms were mapped to derived coding sequences, and found to vary between developmental instars and geographic origin of the biological material. This expanded sialome database from T. infestans should be of assistance in future proteomic work attempting to identify salivary proteins that might be used as epidemiological markers of vector exposure, or proteins of pharmacological interest.

  3. Orbital maneuvering vehicle end effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Barnes, Wayne L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An end effector device (A) for grasping and holding an article such as a handle (18) of a space telescope is disclosed. The device includes a V-shaped capture window (74) defined as inclined surfaces (76, 78) in parallel face plates (22, 24) which converge toward a retainer recess (54) in which the handle is retained. A pivotal finger (30) meshes with a pair of pivoted fingers (26, 28) which rotate in counterrotation. The fingers rotate to pull a handle within the capture window into recess (54) where latches (50) lock handle (18) in the recess. To align the capture window, plates (22, 24) may be cocked plus or minus five degrees on base (64).

  4. SPRYSEC effector proteins in Globodera rostochiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rehman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Plant pathogens inject so-called effector molecules into the cells of a host plant to promote their growth and reproduction in these hosts. In plant parasitic nematodes, these effector molecules are produced in the salivary glands. The objective of this thesis was to identify and characterize

  5. Biocontrol of Phytophthora Blight and Anthracnose in Pepper by Sequentially Selected Antagonistic Rhizobacteria against Phytophthora capsici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Shrestha, Anupama; Kim, Du-Yeon; Park, Kyungseok; Pak, Chun Ho; Kim, Ki Deok

    2013-06-01

    We previously developed a sequential screening procedure to select antagonistic bacterial strains against Phytophthora capsici in pepper plants. In this study, we used a modified screening procedure to select effective biocontrol strains against P. capsici; we evaluated the effect of selected strains on Phytophthora blight and anthracnose occurrence and fruit yield in pepper plants under field and plastic house conditions from 2007 to 2009. We selected four potential biocontrol strains (Pseudomonas otitidis YJR27, P. putida YJR92, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens YJR102, and Novosphingobium capsulatum YJR107) among 239 bacterial strains. In the 3-year field tests, all the selected strains significantly (P anthracnose incidence in at least one of the test years, but their biocontrol activities were variable. In addition, strains YJR27, YJR92, and YJR102, in certain harvests, increased pepper fruit numbers in field tests and red fruit weights in plastic house tests. Taken together, these results indicate that the screening procedure is rapid and reliable for the selection of potential biocontrol strains against P. capsici in pepper plants. In addition, these selected strains exhibited biocontrol activities against anthracnose, and some of the strains showed plant growth-promotion activities on pepper fruit.

  6. Genetic Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs in Wild Triatoma infestans from Bolivia: Predominance of TcI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Aliaga, Claudia; Waleckx, Etienne; Buitrago, Rosio; Salas, Renata; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Noireau, François

    2012-01-01

    Background The current persistence of Triatoma infestans (one of the main vectors of Chagas disease) in some domestic areas could be related to re-colonization by wild populations which are increasingly reported. However, the infection rate and the genetic characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi strains infecting these populations are very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings Of 333 wild Triatoma infestans specimens collected from north to south of a Chagas disease endemic area in Bolivia, we characterized 234 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi using mini-exon multiplex PCR (MMPCR) and sequencing the glucose phosphate isomerase (Gpi) gene. Of the six genetic lineages (“discrete typing units”; DTU) (TcI-VI) presently recognized in T. cruzi, TcI (99.1%) was overdominant on TcIII (0.9%) in wild Andean T. infestans, which presented a 71.7% infection rate as evaluated by microscopy. In the lowlands (Bolivian Chaco), 17 “dark morph” T. infestans were analyzed. None of them were positive for parasites after microscopic examination, although one TcI stock and one TcII stock were identified using MMPCR and sequencing. Conclusions/Significance By exploring large-scale DTUs that infect the wild populations of T. infestans, this study opens the discussion on the origin of TcI and TcV DTUs that are predominant in domestic Bolivian cycles. PMID:22685616

  7. Active dispersal of Triatoma infestans and other triatomines in the Argentinean arid Chaco before and after vector control interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahan, Luciana; Gorla, David; Catalá, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Peridomestic structures are considered the main sites where Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) remain and disperse, representing the first risk factor for intradomestic invasion, even after vector control activities. This study analyzed T. infestans dispersal during vector control interventions in six rural houses of the arid Chaco (La Rioja, Argentina). Flying and walking dispersers were captured during five months of two consecutive warm seasons after insecticide spraying of intra- and peridomiciles. These data were compared with previous published data in the same scenario but without insecticide spraying in peridomiciles. Recorded climatic conditions were favorable for active dispersion during the study. Total number of T. infestans dispersers moving among domestic habitats decreased after insecticide spraying. Sylvatic triatomines T. guasayana, T. eratyrusiformis, T. garciabesi, and T. platensis, not targeted by insecticide spraying, were captured simultaneously within peridomestic areas and showed higher invasion pressure than T. infestans. Adult T. infestans peridomestic populations showed high nutritional status, indicating low dispersion probability. Some peridomiciles remained infested at the end of the study. However, no intradomiciles were recolonized. These results suggest that there is a low probability of intradomestic recolonization by active dispersion from peridomiciles during 15 months post-spraying. © 2016 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  8. Distribution of Phytophthora spp. in Field Soils Determined by Immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S A; Madden, L V; Schmitthenner, A F

    1997-01-01

    ABSTRACT Populations of Phytophthora spp. were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in field soils used for pepper and soybean production in Ohio. Soybean fields were sampled extensively (64 fields, n = 6 samples per field over 2 years) and intensively (4 fields, n = 64 samples per field in 1 year) to assess heterogeneity of P. sojae populations. Four pepper fields (n = 64), three of which had a history of Phytophthora blight (caused by P. capsici), also were sampled intensively during a 6-month period. Mean (m), variance (v), and measures of aggregation (e.g., variance-to-mean ratio [v/m]) of immunoassay values, translated to Phytophthora antigen units (PAU), were related to the disease history in each of the pepper and soybean fields. Mean PAU values for fields in which Phytophthora root rot (soybean) or blight (pepper) had been moderate to severe were higher than in fields in which disease incidence had been low or not observed. A detection threshold value of 11.3 PAU was calculated with values for 64 samples from one pepper field, all of which tested negative for Phytophthora by bioassay and ELISA. Seven of the eight intensively sampled fields contained at least some detectable Phytophthora propagules, with the percentage of positive samples ranging from 1.6 to 73.4. Mean PAU values ranged from 1 to 84 (extensive soybean field sampling), 6 to 24 (intensive soybean field sampling), and 4 to 30 (intensive pepper field sampling); however, variances ranged from 0 to 7,774 (extensive sampling), 30 to 848 (intensive soybean field sampling), and 5 to 2,401 (intensive pepper field sampling). Heterogeneity of PAU was high in most individual soybean and pepper fields, with values of v/m greater than 1, and log(v) increasing with log(m), with a slope of about 2.0. Spatial autocorrelation coefficients were not significant, indicating there was no relationship of PAU values in neighboring sampling units (i.e., field locations) of the intensively sampled

  9. Transcriptome analysis of Phytophthora litchii reveals pathogenicity arsenals and confirms taxonomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinhua; Gao, Zhaoyin; Zhang, Xinchun; Zou, Xiaoxiao; Cao, Lulu; Wang, Jiabao

    2017-01-01

    Litchi downy blight, caused by Peronophythora litchii, is one of the major diseases of litchi and has caused severe economic losses. P. litchii has the unique ability to produce downy mildew like sporangiophores under artificial culture. The pathogen had been placed in a new family Peronophytophthoraceae by some authors. In this study, the whole transcriptome of P. litchii from mycelia, sporangia, and zoospores was sequenced for the first time. A set of 23637 transcripts with an average length of 1284 bp was assembled. Using six open reading frame (ORF) predictors, 19267 representative ORFs were identified and were annotated by searching against several public databases. There were 4666 conserved gene families and various sets of lineage-specific genes among P. litchii and other four closely related oomycetes. In silico analyses revealed 490 pathogen-related proteins including 128 RXLR and 22 CRN effector candidates. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of 164 single copy orthologs from 22 species, it is validated that P. litchii is in the genus Phytophthora. Our work provides valuable data to elucidate the pathogenicity basis and ascertain the taxonomic status of P. litchii.

  10. An efficient method for zoospore production, infection and real-time quantification of Phytophthora cajani causing Phytophthora blight disease in pigeonpea under elevated atmospheric CO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mamta; Ghosh, Raju; Tarafdar, Avijit; Telangre, Rameshwar

    2015-03-25

    Phytophthora blight caused by Phytophthora cajani is an emerging disease of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) affecting the crop irrespective of cropping system, cultivar grown and soil types. Current detection and identification methods for Phytophthora species rely primarily on cultural and morphological characteristics, the assessment of which is time-consuming and not always suitable. Sensitive and reliable methods for isolation, identification, zoospore production and estimating infection severity are therefore desirable in case of Phytophthora blight of pigeonpea. In this study, protocols for isolation and identification of Phytophthora blight of pigeonpea were standardized. Also the method for zoospore production and in planta infection of P. cajani was developed. Quantification of fungal colonization by P. cajani using real-time PCR was further standardized. Phytophthora species infecting pigeonpea was identified based on mycological characters such as growth pattern, mycelium structure and sporangial morphology of the isolates and confirmed through molecular characterization (sequence deposited in GenBank). For Phytophthora disease development, zoospore suspension of 1 × 10(5) zoospores per ml was found optimum. Phytophthora specific real-time PCR assay was developed using specific primers based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 and 2. Use of real-time PCR allowed the quantitative estimation of fungal biomass in plant tissues. Detection sensitivities were within the range of 0.001 pg fungal DNA. A study to see the effect of elevated CO₂ on Phytophthora blight incidence was also conducted which indicated no significant difference in disease incidence, but incubation period delayed under elevated CO₂ as compared to ambient level. The zoospore infection method for Phytophthora blight of pigeonpea will facilitate the small and large scale inoculation experiments and thus devise a platform for rapid and reliable screening against Phytophthora blight

  11. ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachel Landry

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related sub-tasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these sub-tasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these sub-tasks were derived from the original intent

  12. PsVPS1, a dynamin-related protein, is involved in cyst germination and soybean infection of Phytophthora sojae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delong Li

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to suppress plant immunity. However, the mechanism by which oomycete pathogens deliver effector proteins during plant infection remains unknown. In this report, we characterized a Phytophthora sojae vps1 gene. This gene encodes a homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar protein sorting gene vps1 that mediates budding of clathrin-coated vesicles from the late Golgi, which are diverted from the general secretory pathway to the vacuole. PsVPS1-silenced mutants were generated using polyethylene glycol-mediated protoplast stable transformation and were viable but had reduced extracellular protein activity. The PsVPS1-silenced mutants showed impaired hyphal growth, and the shapes of the vacuoles were highly fragmented. Silencing of PsVPS1 affected cyst germination as well as the polarized growth of germinated cysts. Silenced mutants showed impaired invasion of susceptible soybean plants regardless of wounding. These results suggest that PsVPS1 is involved in vacuole morphology and cyst development. Moreover, it is essential for the virulence of P. sojae and extracellular protein secretion.

  13. Cutaneous allergic reactions to Triatoma infestans after xenodiagnosis Reações cutâneas alérgicas ao Triatoma infestans após Xenodiagnóstico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth E. Mott

    1980-12-01

    Full Text Available We determined the frequency of cutaneous allergic reactions to bites of Triatoma infestans during xenodiagnosis in a rural community where Panstrongylus megistrus is the only domestic vector of Trypanosoma cruzi. Localized urticaria or more intense cutaneous allergic reactions at 48 and 72 hours were observed in 86.7% and 82.1% respectively of the individuals in our study. Urticaria was more severe in children and older adults and in women than in men. The high frequency of reactions suggests either cutaneous reactivity to T. infestans without prior sensitization or cross reactivity between P. megistus and T. infestans. A single application of topical corticosteroid or antihistamine medication did not reduce the cutaneous reactions.A freqüência de reações cutâneas alérgicas ás picadas de Triatoma infestans após xenodiagnóstico foi determinada numa comunidade rural na qual Panstrongylus megistus é o único vetor doméstico. Urticária focal ou reações cutâneas alérgicas mais intensas foram observadas em 86.7% e em 82.1% dos participantes estudados, respectivamente ás 48 e ás 72 horas. A urticária foi mais severa em crianças e adultos idosos e mais severa em mulheres do que em homens. A alta freqüência das reações sugere a existência de reatividade cutânea ao T. infestans, sem prévia sensibilização, ou uma reatividade cruzada entre P. megistus e T. infestans. A aplicação tópica de pomada de corticosteróide ou de anti-histamínico não reduziu as reações cutâneas alérgicas.

  14. Oxysterols and Their Cellular Effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eija Nissilä

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxysterols are oxidized 27-carbon cholesterol derivatives or by-products of cholesterol biosynthesis, with a spectrum of biologic activities. Several oxysterols have cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic activities, the ability to interfere with the lateral domain organization, and packing of membrane lipids. These properties may account for their suggested roles in the pathology of diseases such as atherosclerosis, age-onset macular degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease. Oxysterols also have the capacity to induce inflammatory responses and play roles in cell differentiation processes. The functions of oxysterols as intermediates in the synthesis of bile acids and steroid hormones, and as readily transportable forms of sterol, are well established. Furthermore, their actions as endogenous regulators of gene expression in lipid metabolism via liver X receptors and the Insig (insulin-induced gene proteins have been investigated in detail. The cytoplasmic oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP homologues form a group of oxysterol/cholesterol sensors that has recently attracted a lot of attention. However, their mode of action is, as yet, poorly understood. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (ROR α and γ, and Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2 have been identified as novel oxysterol receptors, revealing new physiologic oxysterol effector mechanisms in development, metabolism, and immunity, and evoking enhanced interest in these compounds in the field of biomedicine.

  15. Avaliação de óleos essenciais de plantas aromáticas com atividade inseticida em Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae = Evaluation of essential oils with insecticidal activity in Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellem Petilim Gomes

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A doenca de Chagas e um dos maiores problemas de saude publica na America Latina. Neste trabalho, foi avaliada a acao inseticida de oleos essenciais de Anacardium humile Cymbopogon nardus, Ocimum basilicum e Eucalyptus urograndis em ninfas do 3‹ e 4‹ estadios dedesenvolvimento de Triatoma infestans por acao topica e pressao a vapor (fumigacao. Para o teste topico foram realizadas duas repeticoes cada uma com cinco ninfas de 3‹ e 4‹ estadios de desenvolvimento de T. infestans. Foi aplicado 1ƒÊL de cada concentracao na regiao dorsal de cada individuo. Para o teste de fumigacao foram utilizados potes de 2 L com tampa vedante. Os oleos essenciais de O. gratissimum e E. urograndis apresentaram atividadeinseticida para T. infestans, e A. humile e C. nardus apresentaram em media 5 e 15% de mortalidade, respectivamente. Para fumigacao, somente o oleo de E. urograndis teve efeito, com 100% de mortalidade sobre T. infestans , sendo que para os outros oleos nao foiobservado efeito de fumigacao. Esse trabalho relata pela primeira vez a acao inseticida de E. urograndis em potes fumigenos para o controle de triatomineos. Os resultados sao importantes devido a busca por novos modelos moleculares com acao inseticida em triatomineos resistentes aos inseticidas sinteticos.Chagas disease is a major public health problem in Latin America. This work aimed to evaluate the insecticide action of essential oils of Anacardium humile, Cymbopogon nardus, Ocimum basilicum and Eucalyptus urograndis on Triatoma infestans nymphs of third and fourth stages of development by topic action and steam pressure (fumigation. Two repetitions were performed at the topic test with five nymphs of third and fourth stages of development of T. infestans. It was applied 1ƒÊL of each concentration on the dorsal region of each nymph. Two-liter pots with sealing covers were used at the fumigation test. The essential oils of O. gratissimum and E. urograndis showed insecticidal

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis effectors interfering host apoptosis signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minqiang; Li, Wu; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious human public health concern. The coevolution between its pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human host complicated the way to prevent and cure TB. Apoptosis plays subtle role in this interaction. The pathogen endeavors to manipulate the apoptosis via diverse effectors targeting key signaling nodes. In this paper, we summarized the effectors pathogen used to subvert the apoptosis, such as LpqH, ESAT-6/CFP-10, LAMs. The interplay between different forms of cell deaths, such as apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis, is also discussed with a focus on the modes of action of effectors, and implications for better TB control.

  17. Epigenetic control of effectors in plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eGijzen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens display impressive versatility in adapting to host immune systems. Pathogen effector proteins facilitate disease but can become avirulence (Avr factors when the host acquires discrete recognition capabilities that trigger immunity. The mechanisms that lead to changes to pathogen Avr factors that enable escape from host immunity are diverse, and include epigenetic switches that allow for reuse or recycling of effectors. This perspective outlines possibilities of how epigenetic control of Avr effector gene expression may have arisen and persisted in plant pathogens, and how it presents special problems for diagnosis and detection of specific pathogen strains or pathotypes.

  18. Development and application of qPCR and RPA genus and species-specific detection of Phytophthora sojae and Phytophthora sansomeana root rot pathogens of soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora root rot of soybean, caused by Phytophthora sojae is one of the most important diseases in the Midwest US, causing losses of up to 44 million bushels per year. Disease may also be caused by P. sansomeana, however the prevalence and damage caused by this species is not well known, partl...

  19. A unique species in Phytophthora clade 10, Phytophthora intercalaris sp. nov., recovered from stream and irrigation water in the eastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Y.; Brazee, N. J.; Loyd, A. L.; Hong, C. X.

    2016-01-01

    A novel species of the genus Phytophthora was recovered during surveys of stream and nursery irrigation water in Maryland, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia in the USA. The novel species is heterothallic, and all examined isolates were A1 mating type. It produced rare ornamented oogonia and amphigynous antheridia when paired with A2 mating type testers of Phytophthora cinnamomi and Phytophthora cryptogea. Sporangia of this novel species were non-papillate and non-caducous. Thin-walled intercalary chlamydospores were abundant in hemp seed agar and carrot agar, while they were produced only rarely in aged cultures grown in clarified V8 juice agar. Phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region and the β-tubulin and mitochondrial cytochrome-c oxidase 1 (cox1) genes indicated that the novel species is phylogenetically close to Phytophthora gallica in Phytophthora clade 10. The novel species has morphological and molecular features that are distinct from those of other species in Phytophthora clade 10. It is formally described here as Phytophthora intercalaris sp. nov. Description of this unique clade-10 species is important for understanding the phylogeny and evolution of Phytophthora clade 10. PMID:26620125

  20. The current situation with Phytophthora ramorum in England and Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Slawson; Lynne Bennett; Nicola Parry; Charles Lane

    2006-01-01

    Since the first finding of Phytophthora ramorum in England in April 2002, an intensive campaign, supported by the European Community (EC) and national legislation, has been conducted to locate and eradicate all interceptions and outbreaks of P. ramorum. A summary of the findings made during these surveys is presented, along with an...

  1. Factors Affecting Onset of Sporulation in Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    To elucidate the sporulation potential of the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, on rhododendron, we conducted a series of experiments looking at the relationship between moisture period, lesion size, and onset of sporangia production. Inoculations were performed using P. ramorum isol...

  2. Phytophthora ramorum detection surveys for forests in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. W. Oak; W. D. Smith; B.M. Tkacz

    2006-01-01

    Diseases caused by Phytophthora ramorum in forest landscapes of North America are presently confined to areas of the Pacific coast in the states of CA and OR. However, the vulnerability of other ecosystems is suggested by the discovery in Europe and the U.K. of disease in hosts which are abundant in oak-dominated ecosystems of eastern North America;...

  3. Chemistry of coast live oak response to Phytophthora ramorum infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances S. Ockels; Alieta Eyles; Brice A. McPherson; David L. Wood; Pierluigi Bonello

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid 1990s, Phytophthora ramorum has been responsible for the widespread mortality of tanoaks, as well as several oak species throughout California and Oregon forests. However, not all trees die, even in areas with high disease pressure, suggesting that some trees may be resistant to the pathogen. The apparent resistance to P....

  4. Consequences of Phytophthora ramorum infection in coast live oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice McPherson; David L. Wood; Sylvia R. Mori; Pavel Svihra; Richard B. Standiford; N. Maggi. Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Sudden oak death, caused by Phytophthora ramorum, has infected and killed large numbers of oaks (Quercus spp.) and tanoaks (Lithocarpus densiflorus) in California since the mid 1990s. Since March 2000 we have been investigating the interactions between patterns of disease progression and...

  5. Interactions between biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas and Phytophthora species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, H.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas bacteria produce a wide variety of antimicrobial metabolites, including soap-like compounds referred to as biosurfactants. The results of this thesis showed that biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas bacteria are effective in controlling Phytophthora foot rot

  6. Evolutionary relationships within the Phytophthora cactorum species complex in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pánek, Matěj; Fér, Tomáš; Mráček, Jaroslav; Tomšovský, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The Phytophthora cactorum species complex in Europe is composed of P. cactorum, Phytophthora hedraiandra, and a hybrid species Phytophthora × serendipita. Evolutionary analyses using the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method were carried out on 133 isolates from 19 countries. The AFLP data were complemented by sequence analysis of three genes (ITS region of ribosomal RNA gene, phenolic acid decarboxylase - Pheca I, and Cytochrome oxidase - Cox I), morphometric analysis and cardinal temperature data. The high proportion of clonal genotypes, low gene flow among groups, which was defined by the structure analysis, and low Nei's gene diversity confirms the homothallic life cycle of the groups. On the other hand, the ITS, Cox I and Pheca I sequence data support occasional hybridization between species. The structure K = 5 grouping revealed two groups of hybrid origin (C2 and F). While the C2 group resembles P. × serendipita, the F group includes Finnish isolates characterized by high oogonial abortion rates and slow growth. The morphological characters routinely used in identification of Phytophthora species are not useful for delimitation of species from the P. cactorum complex. Therefore, we discuss the status of P. hedraiandra as a separate species. The epitypification of P. cactorum is proposed. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Field management of Phytophthora blight disease of cocoyam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta L). is an important edible tuber crop, but taro leaf blight caused by Phytophthora colocasiae has been the greatest constraint to cocoyam production in Nigeria since 2009. Field trials were conducted to determine the effect of fungicides and the spray regimes on leaf growth, disease incidence, ...

  8. Recovery of Phytophthora ramorum in plant tissue with mixed infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was performed to investigate the frequency with which P. ramorum would be isolated from host tissue co-infected with P. ramorum as well as an indigenous Phytophthora species or P. kernoviae. Three separate experiments were tested in a similar manner using different combinations of pathog...

  9. Genetic transformation of Phytophthora ramorum with the jellyfish GFP gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Calmin; M. Riedel; L. Belbahri; S. Wagner; S. Werres; F. Lefort

    2009-01-01

    The important quarantine organism Phytophthora ramorum has been dramatically increasing its host range in the past years and most of the studies concerning P. ramorum focus on these issues. Very little is known about the latency period. For sampling and analyzing potentially infected plant material,...

  10. Gene expression in the tanoak-Phytophthora ramorum interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Hayden; Matteo Garbelotto; Hardeep Fai; Brian Knaus; Richard Cronn; Jessica W. Wright

    2012-01-01

    Disease processes are dynamic, involving a suite of gene expression changes in both the host and the pathogen, all within a single tissue. As such, they lend themselves well to transcriptomic analysis. Here we focus on a generalist invasive pathogen (Phytophthora ramorum) and its most susceptible California Floristic Province native host, tanoak (...

  11. Monitoring Phytophthora ramorum distribution in streams within California watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.K. Murphy; C. Lee; Y. Valachovic; J. Bienapfl; W. Mark; A. Jirka; D.R. Owen; T.F. Smith; D.M. Rizzo

    2008-01-01

    One hundred-thirteen sites were established in perennial watercourses and sampled for 1 to 3 years between 2004 and 2006 to monitor for presence of Phytophthora ramorum throughout coastal central and northern California watersheds as well as portions of the Sierra Nevada mountain range (Murphy and others 2006). The majority of the monitored...

  12. Susceptibility of Australian plant species to Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylie Ireland; Daniel H& uuml; berli; Bernard Dell; Ian Smith; David Rizzo; Giles. Hardy

    2010-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum is an invasive plant pathogen causing considerable and widespread damage in nurseries, gardens, and natural woodland ecosystems of the United States and Europe, and is classified as a Category 1 pest in Australia. It is of particular interest to Australian plant biosecurity as, like P. cinnamomi; it has...

  13. Phytophthora stricta isolated from Rhododendron maximum in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    During a survey in October 2013, in the Michaux State Forest in Pennsylvania , necrotic Rhododendron maximum leaves were noticed on mature plants alongside a stream. Symptoms were nondescript necrotic lesions at the tips of mature leaves. Colonies resembling a Phytophthora sp. were observed from c...

  14. Molecular analysis of Phytophthora species found in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oszako Tomasz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens of Phytophthora genus are common not only in forest nurseries and stands, but also in water courses. Species of Phytophthora spread with plants for plantings (and soil attached to them and with water courses as well, attacking the plants growing in riparian ecosystems. Several specialized organisms damaging only one tree species were identified like P. alni on alders or P. quercina on oaks. Some Phytophthora species can develop on several hosts like P. plurivora and P. cactorum on oaks, beeches, alders, ashes and horse chestnuts. Other oomycetes like P. gallica species was found for the first time in Poland in water used for plant watering in forest nursery. Species P. lacustris and P. gonapodyides were found in superficial water. Phytophthora species P. polonica was identified in the declining alder stands for the first time in the world, and P. taxon hungarica and P. megasperma were found in the rhizosphere of seriously damaged ash stands for the first time in Poland. The most often isolated species were P. plurivora (clade 2 with frequency 37% and P. lacustris with frequency 33% (clade 6. The best represented clade 6 revealed the occurrence of 6 species: P. gonapodyides, P. lacustris, P. megasperma, P. sp. raspberry, P. taxon hungarica and P. taxon oak soil.

  15. Summer survival of Phytophthora ramorum in California bay laurel leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth J. Fichtner; David M. Rizzo; Shannon C. Lynch; Jennifer Davidson; Gerri Buckles; Jennifer Parker

    2008-01-01

    Sudden oak death manifests as non-lethal foliar lesions on bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), which support sporulation and survival of Phytophthora ramorum in forest ecosystems. Infected bay laurel leaves are more likely to abscise than uninfected leaves, resulting in an accumulation of inoculum at the forest floor. The pathogen survives the dry...

  16. First report of Phytophthora ramorum infecting grand fir in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.L. Riley; G.A. Chastagner

    2011-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum was detected on grand fir in 2003 and 2005 in a Christmas tree plantation near Los Gatos, CA, in association with infected California bay laurel. Isolates derived from stem lesions were used to inoculate grand fir seedlings in two tests. Isolations from lesions on inoculated plants were positive for P. ramorum...

  17. First report of Phytophthora ramorum infecting mistletoe in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.L. Riley; G.A. Chastagner

    2011-01-01

    In 2005 and 2006, white fir and Douglas-fir growing in a Christmas tree plantation near Los Gatos, CA, under a black walnut tree infected with mistletoe tested positive for Phytophthora ramorum, the cause of Sudden Oak Death. Isolation from a symptomatic mistletoe inflorescence stalk was positive for P. ramorum. In 2007,...

  18. Phytophthora ramorum regulatory program: present, past, and future direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash Hebbar; Scott Pfister; Stacy Scott; Anthony Man-Son-Hing; Russ Bulluck

    2013-01-01

    Sudden oak death (SOD), caused by Phytophthora ramorum, is lethal to tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S.H. Oh), and threatens this species throughout its range in Oregon. The disease was first discovered in coastal southwest Oregon forests in July 2001. Since then an interagency team...

  19. Studies of tissue colonization in Rhododendron by Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko Riedel; Stefan Wagner; Monika Götz; Lassaad Belbahri; Francois Lefort; Sabine Werres

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge on latency is of great importance to prevent the spread of Phytophthora ramorum with healthy looking plant material. To learn more about the tissue colonisation in Rhododendron, histological studies with epifluorescence microscopy have been started. Epifluorescence images showing P. ramorum structures in different...

  20. The maturation and germination of Phytophthora ramorum Chlamydospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron L. Smith; Everett M. Hansen

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydospores are a distinctive feature of Phytophthora ramorum. They are formed quickly in agar, and within colonized leaves. We followed their development and maturation in vitro and in vivo, and studied conditions affecting their germination. Cell walls of mature P. ramorum chlamydospores...

  1. Resistance to Phytophthora cinnamomi in the Genus Abies

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Frampton; Fikret Isik; Mike Benson; Jaroslav Kobliha; Jan Stjskal

    2012-01-01

    A major limiting factor for the culture of true firs as Christmas trees is their susceptibility to Oomycete species belonging to the genus Phytophthora. In North Carolina alone, the Fraser fir (Abies fraseri [Pursh] Poir.) Christmas tree industry loses 6 to 7 million dollars annually to root rot primarily caused by ...

  2. Histology of Phytophthora ramorum in Notholithocarpus densiflorus bark tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molly Botts Giesbrecht; Everett M. Hansen; Peter Kitin

    2011-01-01

    Colonisation of Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. and Arn.) Rehder tissues by Phytophthora ramorum Werres, De Cock & Man in't Veld is not well understood. The pathogen is able to colonise nearly all tissues of this host but it is unclear how a tree is ultimately killed. In this research,

  3. Production of Phytophthora infestans-resistant potato (Solanum tuberosum) utilising Ensifer adhaerens OV14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Toni; Doohan, Fiona; Mullins, Ewen

    2012-01-01

    their gene transfer efficiencies. In this study we set out to identify alternative bacteria species that could (a) utilize vir genes for genetic transformation and (b) substitute for A. tumefaciens in existing transformation protocols, without a prerequisite for protocol modifications. To this end we...... isolated a collection (n=751) of plant-associated bacteria from the rhizosphere of commercially grown crops. Based on various screens, including plant transformation with the open-source vector pCAMBIA5105, we identified a strain of the bacterium Ensifer adhaerens with the capacity to transform both......Based on the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation commodity crop improvement through genetic engineering is the fastest adopted crop technology in the world (James 2010). However, the complexity of the Agrobacterium patent landscape remains a challenge for non-patent holders who...

  4. The relationship between anatomical and morphological characteristics of green tomato fruit and their susceptibility to late blight (Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Horodecka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the studies carried out in 1983-1985 was to determine the relationships between the degree of susceptibility of green tomato fruit to late blight and several of the anatomical and morphological features of these fruits. It was found that in the studied material representing a wide range of susceptibility (from various degrees of resistance to susceptible the extent of infection was dependent on the covering layer thickness (with cuticle and number of hairs on the skin.

  5. A Gene Expressed during Sexual and Asexual Sporulation in Phytophthora infestans is a Member of the Puf Family of Translational Regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2003-01-01

    and persisted in mature oospores. Expression was also observed in hyphal tips just prior to asexual sporulation, in sporangiophores, in mature sporangia, and in zoospores. The signal quickly disappeared once spores made the transition to hyphae after germination. Nutrient limitation did not induce the gene...

  6. Two novel species representing a new clade and cluster of Phytophthora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Copes, Warren E; Hong, Chuanxue

    2014-01-01

    Phytophthora stricta sp. nov. and Phytophthora macilentosa sp. nov. are described based on morphological, physiological and molecular characters in this study. Phytophthora stricta represents a previously unknown clade in the rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based phylogeny. Phytophthora macilentosa, along with nine other species, consistently forms a high temperature-tolerant cluster within ITS clade 9. These observations are supported by the sequence analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene. Both species are heterothallic and all examined isolates are A1 mating type. Phytophthora stricta produces nonpapillate and slightly caducous sporangia. This species is named after its characteristic constrictions on sporangiophores. Phytophthora macilentosa produces nonpapillate and noncaducous sporangia, which are mostly elongated obpyriform with a high length to breadth ratio. Both species were recovered from irrigation water of an ornamental plant nursery in Mississippi, USA and P. stricta was also recovered from stream water in Virginia, USA. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermal inactivation of Phytophthora capsici oospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxeberria, Aitzol; Mendarte, Sorkunde; Larregla, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a major fungal plant pathogen that causes root and crown rot of pepper crops and its oospores are the most resistant propagules. To evaluate the effect of different temperature regimes and exposure times on the survival of P. capsici oospores. Thermal inactivation treatments simulated field conditions, through the use of different constant and cycling temperature regimes, in moistened sterilized soil (15-53 °C) and sterilized water (45-53 °C). The plasmolysis method evaluated oospore viability. Relationships between oospores viability and exposure time were statistically determined by linear regression. Interpolation was used to calculate the estimated times required to kill a determined percentage of the population. The required time to reduce P. capsici oospores viability decreased with increasing temperatures. Times required to kill 100% of oospores were 199-22-6.6-4.7-1.0 hours at 40-45-47.5-50-53°C respectively in moistened soil and 31-1.0-0.2 hours at 45-50-53 °C in water. Oospores were scarcely affected at temperatures ≤ 35 °C. With 1,680 hours at 15-35 °C, oospores survival in soil ranged from 88 to 36%. The 4 hours-40 °C regime killed 100% of oospores after 28days, while the 5 hours-35°C regime after 70 days killed only 75%. Time required to achieve total oospores death was remarkably shortened in water when compared with moistened soil. The developed models can be used to predict survival values at any exposure time with constant temperatures ranging from 40 to 53 °C in moistened soil and from 45 to 53 °C in water. The weakening of P. capsici oospores under sublethal heating, is a useful observation that can be applied for pathogen control with solarization. Copyright © 2010 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluación de la b-cipermetrina para el control de Triatoma infestans Evaluation of beta-cypermethrin for control of Triatoma infestans

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    Eduardo Nicolás Zerba

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se evaluó en el laboratorio y en el campo el efecto insecticida sobre Triatoma infestans, vector de la enfermedad de Chagas, del nuevo piretroide ß-cipermetrina, y se comparó con el de la deltametrina. La comparación de las dosis letales 50 (DL50 de ambos piretroides indicó que la ß-cipermetrina es más efectiva en ninfas y la deltametrina, en adultos. La evaluación de la concentración letal 50 (CL50 de las dos formulaciones floables de ambos insecticidas depositados sobre distintos soportes mostró que su efectividad en vidrio es similar. En cerámica, la deltametrina es ligeramente más efectiva. Los dos insecticidas floables se evaluaron en 100 viviendas infestadas de la provincia de Santiago del Estero, Argentina. La deltametrina floable se aplicó a una concentración superficial de 25 mg/m² y la ß-cipermetrina, de 50 mg/m². Las concentraciones superficiales reales de ambos productos se analizaron por medio de papeles de filtro colocados en paredes y techos. El análisis por cromatografía de gases mostró buena coincidencia con las concentraciones previstas. Asimismo, se realizaron evaluaciones entomológicas 60, 90, 180 y 365 días después de los tratamientos. Solo en la última evaluación se encontró 10% de infestación en peridomicilios de viviendas tratadas con ß-cipermetrina y 7% en las viviendas tratadas con deltametrina (6% en el peridomicilio y 1% en el domicilio. Los resultados indican que la efectividad de la ß-cipermetrina para controlar a T. infestans cuando se aplica a una concentración de 50 mg/m² es similar a la de la deltametrina cuando esta se administra a una concentración de 25 mg/m².This study assessed the insecticidal effect in the laboratory and in the field of the new pyrethroid ß-cypermethrin against Triatoma infestans, the vector of Chagas' disease, and compared it with that of deltamethrin. Comparison of the 50% lethal dosis (LD50 of both pyrethroids showed that

  9. ELISA and ImmunoStrip® for detection of Phytophthora ramorum, P. kernoviae, and other Phytophthora species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco J. Avila; Barbara Schoedel; Z. Gloria Abad; Michael D. Coffey; Cheryl Blomquist

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop improved tools for the detection of Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae for field and the laboratory use. ImmunoStrip® and ELISA were selected as the test formats for development. Presently, the diagnosis of sudden oak death (SOD) in the national survey of P. ramorum ...

  10. Phytophthora betacei, a new species within Phytophthora clade 1c causing late blight on Solanum betaceum in Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mideros, M.F.; Turissini, D.A.; Guayazán, N.; Ibarra-Avila, H.; Danies, G.; Cárdenas, M.; Myers, K.; Tabima, J.; Goss, E.M.; Bernal, A.; Lagos, L.E.; Grajales, A.; Gonzalez, L.N.; Cooke, D.E.L.; Fry, W.E.; Grünwald, N.; Matute, D.R.; Restrepo, S.

    2018-01-01

    Over the past few years, symptoms akin to late blight disease have been reported on a variety of crop plants in South America. Despite the economic importance of these crops, the causal agents of the diseases belonging to the genus Phytophthora have not been completely characterized. In this study,

  11. Factors limiting the domestic density of Triatoma infestans in north-west Argentina: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, M C; Gürtler, R E; Chuit, R; Cohen, J E

    1998-01-01

    Reported are the environmental and demographic risk factors associated with the domestic infestation and density of Triatoma infestans in three heavily infested rural villages in Santiago del Estero Province, Argentina. In a one-factor unadjusted analysis, the number of T. infestans captured per person-hour was associated significantly and negatively with the use of domestic insecticides by householders, type of thatch used in the roofs and the age of the house; and positively with the following: degree of cracking of the indoor walls and presence of hens nesting indoors. In one model, using multiple linear regression and a backward stepwise elimination procedure, most of the variation in the overall abundance of T. infestans was explained by insecticide use and the presence of hens nesting indoors; in another model using the same procedure it was explained by insecticide use, bug density in 1988 and previous spraying with deltamethrin in 1985. Variations in bug density per capture stratum (household goods, beds, walls and roof) were explained by the bug density in other strata and by one or two of the following risk factors: hens nesting indoors, type of roof, presence of cracks in the walls and number of people living in the house. Bug density might be locally controlled by the availability of refuges in the roofs and walls, by the presence of hens nesting indoors and by the use of domestic insecticides. Certain local materials, such as a grass known as simbol, could be successfully used in rural housing improvement programmes aimed at reducing the availability of refuges for insects in the roof.

  12. Fungal flora of the digestive tract of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae from Argentina Flora fúngica de tractos digestivos en Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae en Argentina

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    G. A. Marti

    Full Text Available A survey of the fungal microbiota of the digestive tract of Triatoma infestans (Klug (Hemiptera: Reduviidae adults was carried out. Insects captured in the field from different provinces in Argentina, as well as individuals reared in artificial colonies, were used for dissection. Axenic cultures of the fungal species were identified and were deposited with mycological collections at La Plata , Argentina. A total of 33 fungal species, with the exception of three that were mycelia sterilia, belonging to 11 genera were identified. Thirty two species belonged to Ascomycota (Eurotiomycetes and Sordariomycetes and one to Zygomycota (Zygomycetes. The genera with the greatest number of species were Penicillium (15, Aspergillus (5, and Cladosporium (2. Among the isolated fungi, some of the species were entomopathogenic or pathogens of humans and other animals.En el presente estudio se realizó un relevamiento de la flora fúngica microbiana en tractos digestivos de adultos de Triatoma infestans (Klug (Hemiptera: Reduviidae. Se disecaron insectos capturados del campo en diferentes provincias Argentinas, así como también se utilizaron individuos de una colonia artificial. Fueron realizados cultivos axénicos de las especies fúngicas aisladas, los que fueron identificados y luego depositados en las colecciones de hongos entomopatógenos del CEPAVE La Plata , Argentina. Fueron identificadas 33 especies fúngicas perteneciente a 11 géneros. Treinta y dos especies pertenecen a Ascomycota (Eurotiomycetes y Sordariomycetes y una a Zygomycota (Zygomycetes. Los géneros con mayor número de especies fueron Penicillium (15, Aspergillus (5, y Cladosporium (2. Entre los aislamientos fúngicos, algunas de las especies encontradas son entomopatogénicas o patógenas de humanos y otros animales.

  13. Evolutionary and dispersal history of Triatoma infestans, main vector of Chagas disease, by chromosomal markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzera, Francisco; Ferreiro, María J; Pita, Sebastián; Calleros, Lucía; Pérez, Ruben; Basmadjián, Yester; Guevara, Yenny; Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Panzera, Yanina

    2014-10-01

    Chagas disease, one of the most important vector-borne diseases in the Americas, is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted to humans by insects of the subfamily Triatominae. An effective control of this disease depends on elimination of vectors through spraying with insecticides. Genetic research can help insect control programs by identifying and characterizing vector populations. In southern Latin America, Triatoma infestans is the main vector and presents two distinct lineages, known as Andean and non-Andean chromosomal groups, that are highly differentiated by the amount of heterochromatin and genome size. Analyses with nuclear and mitochondrial sequences are not conclusive about resolving the origin and spread of T. infestans. The present paper includes the analyses of karyotypes, heterochromatin distribution and chromosomal mapping of the major ribosomal cluster (45S rDNA) to specimens throughout the distribution range of this species, including pyrethroid-resistant populations. A total of 417 specimens from seven different countries were analyzed. We show an unusual wide rDNA variability related to number and chromosomal position of the ribosomal genes, never before reported in species with holocentric chromosomes. Considering the chromosomal groups previously described, the ribosomal patterns are associated with a particular geographic distribution. Our results reveal that the differentiation process between both T. infestans chromosomal groups has involved significant genomic reorganization of essential coding sequences, besides the changes in heterochromatin and genomic size previously reported. The chromosomal markers also allowed us to detect the existence of a hybrid zone occupied by individuals derived from crosses between both chromosomal groups. Our genetic studies support the hypothesis of an Andean origin for T. infestans, and suggest that pyrethroid-resistant populations from the Argentinean-Bolivian border are most likely the result of

  14. Phytophthora capsici-tomato interaction features dramatic shifts in gene expression associated with a hemi-biotrophic lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant-microbe interactions feature complex signal interplay between pathogens and their hosts. Phytophthora species comprise a destructive group of fungus-like plant pathogens, collectively affecting a wide range of plants important to agriculture and natural ecosystems. Despite the availability of genome sequences of both hosts and microbes, little is known about the signal interplay between them during infection. In particular, accurate descriptions of coordinate relationships between host and microbe transcriptional programs are lacking. Results Here, we explore the molecular interaction between the hemi-biotrophic broad host range pathogen Phytophthora capsici and tomato. Infection assays and use of a composite microarray allowed us to unveil distinct changes in both P. capsici and tomato transcriptomes, associated with biotrophy and the subsequent switch to necrotrophy. These included two distinct transcriptional changes associated with early infection and the biotrophy to necrotrophy transition that may contribute to infection and completion of the P. capsici lifecycle Conclusions Our results suggest dynamic but highly regulated transcriptional programming in both host and pathogen that underpin P. capsici disease and hemi-biotrophy. Dynamic expression changes of both effector-coding genes and host factors involved in immunity, suggests modulation of host immune signaling by both host and pathogen. With new unprecedented detail on transcriptional reprogramming, we can now explore the coordinate relationships that drive host-microbe interactions and the basic processes that underpin pathogen lifestyles. Deliberate alteration of lifestyle-associated transcriptional changes may allow prevention or perhaps disruption of hemi-biotrophic disease cycles and limit damage caused by epidemics. PMID:23799990

  15. Relação entre Triatoma infestans, aves domésticas e o homem num povoado de Santiago del Estero, Argentina The relationship between Triatoma infestans, poultry, and humans in a rural settlement in Santiago del Estero, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia P. Gajate

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Determinou-se a associação entre Triatoma infestans, aves domésticas e o homem no povoado de Trinidad, Santiago del Estero, Argentina. Para coletar triatomíneos foram realizadas quatro amostragens no peridomicílio de seis casas, utilizando-se o método de captura hora/homem (dezembro de 1991 a outubro de 1992. Os anexos foram classificados em antrópicos (onde o homem realiza atividades cotidianas e não-antrópicos. Além disso, determinou-se o perfil alimentar dos barbeiros. De um total de 134 ecótopos investigados, 21% tinham T. infestans; 22% possuíam aves domésticas; e 54% eram antrópicos. Em 25% destes ecótopos foram encontradas aves e T. infestans simultaneamente. As aves foram os únicos animais domésticos associados com o T. infestans, sendo que esta relação só ocorreu nos ecótopos antrópicos. A proporção de ingestas em aves (61/146 foi altamente significativa. Em Trinidad não há galinheiros, utilizando-se, assim, os anexos entrópicos do peridomicílio como local para se construir os ninhos para as aves. tanto pelos elementos usados na preparação dos ninhos como pelo uso posterior dos mesmos, poder-se-ia estabelecer um fluxo periódico de barbeiros do intradomicílio para o peridomicílio, e vice-versa, através do transporte passivo. Esta relação estreita entre Triatoma infestans, aves domésticas e o homem, encontrada nos ecótopos antrópicos, onde também existem outros reservatórios de T. cruzi, como os cães, favorece a manutenção de colônias de barbeiros domiciliares e a transmissão da doença de Chagas ao homem.An association was determined between Triatona infestans, poultry, and humans in Trinidad, in the Province of Santiago del Estero, Argentina. To collect triatomines, four samples were taken at the area immediately surrounding six houses by the one hour/man capture method (December 1991 - October 1992. Peridomiciliary ecotopes were classified as arthropic (where humans carry out daily

  16. Phytophthora Root and Crown Rot on Apples in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Nakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora is a genus of Oomycota responsible for some of the most serious diseases with great economic impact (Judelson and Blanco, 2005. While 54 species were found in the 20th century (Erwin and Ribeiro, 1996 another 51-54 new species have been identified(Brasier, 2008 since the year 2000. They are spread worldwide and have broad range of host plants – fruit trees, citrus, forest and park species. Phytophthora can cause serious damages in orchards and nurseries of apples, cherries, etc. In Bulgaria they have been found first on young apples and cherries (1998-1999 in Plovdiv region (Nakova, 2003. Surveys have been done for discovering disease symptoms in Plovdiv and Kjustendil regions. Isolates have been obtained from infected plant material (roots and stem bases applying baiting bioassay (green apples, variety Granny Smith and/or PARP 10 selective media. Phytophthora strains were identified based on standard morphology methods – types of colonies on PDA, CMA, V 8, type and size of sporangia, oogonia and antheridia, andoospores. Cardial temperatures for their growth were tested on CMA and PDA.For molecular studies, DNA was extracted from mycelium using the DNA extraction kit.DNA was amplified using universal primers ITS 6 and ITS 4. Amplification products concentrations were estimated by comparison with the standard DNA. Sequencing was done at the Scottish Crop Research Institute (SCRI, Dundee, Scotland. Phytophthora root and crown rot symptoms first appear in early spring. Infected trees show bud break delay, have small chlorotic leaves, and branches die all of a sudden. Later symptoms are found in August-September. Leaves of the infected trees show reddish discoloration and drop down. Both symptoms are connected with lesions (wet, necrotic in appearance at stem bases of the trees.Disease spread was 2-3% in most gardens, only in an apple orchard in Bjaga (Plovdiv region it was up to 8-10%. Morphologically, the isolates acquired from

  17. New structures for goat corrals to control peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae in the Gran Chaco of Argentina

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    David Eladio Gorla

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Goat production is an important economic activity for rural communities in the Gran Chaco of Argentina. Goat corrals are important for the survival of peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans. This study evaluated the impact of modifying the traditional structure of goat corrals on T. infestans populations and goat productivity in the region of Los Llanos (La Rioja. Thirty-nine experimental corrals were constructed and 57 traditional corrals were used as controls. We evaluated the infestations of the control and experimental corrals for five years following construction of the structures. The results showed that the new structures did not prevent the colonization, although it enhanced the detection of infestation at low densities of T. infestans. No significant difference was found in T. infestans population abundance between control and experimental corrals, probably because of the different detectability in the two types of structures, especially among the small nymphs. Although goat productivity average was higher in experimental than in control corrals, no significant difference was found because of high variability. The new structures can be used as a complement to promote the development of rural communities. Acceptability and adoption of the new corrals by the owners was high, as the enclosures offered better protection for the goats, increased growth of kids and facilitated herd handling.

  18. Effects of Non-Susceptible Hosts on the Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi of the Vector Triatoma infestans: an Experimental Model

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    Vázquez Diego P

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested experimentally the effects of the presence of non-susceptible hosts on the infection with Trypanosoma cruzi of the vector Triatoma infestans. The experiment consisted in two treatments: with chickens, including two chickens (non-susceptible hosts and two infected guinea pigs (susceptible hosts, and without chickens, including only two infected guinea pigs. The hosts were held unrestrained in individual metal cages inside a closed tulle chamber. A total of 200 uninfected T. infestans third instar nymphs were liberated in each replica, collected on day 14, and examined for infection and blood meal sources on day 32-36. The additional presence of chickens relative to infected guinea pigs: (a significantly modified the spatial distribution of bugs; (b increased significantly the likelihoods of having a detectable blood meal on any host and molting to the next instar; (c did not affect the bugs' probability of death by predation; and (d decreased significantly the overall percentage of T. infestans infected with T. cruzi. The bugs collected from inside or close to the guinea pigs' cages showed a higher infection rate (71-88% than those collected from the chickens' cages (22-32%. Mixed blood meals on chickens and guinea pigs were detected in 12-21% of bugs. Although the presence of chickens would decrease the overall percentage of infected bugs in short term experiments, the high rate of host change of T. infestans would make this difference fade out if longer exposure times had been provided.

  19. Determinants of the domiciliary density of Triatoma infestans, vector of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, R E; Cecere, M C; Rubel, D N; Schweigmann, N J

    1992-01-01

    In two heavily infested rural villages of Santiago del Estero, Argentina, where no indoor-spraying with residual insecticides had ever been carried out by official control services, we studied the influence of roof and wall structure, domestic use of insecticide, family size and the number of domestic dogs, on the domiciliary density of Triatoma infestans (Klug). Bug density was significantly associated with (1) the interaction between insecticide use and type of roof, (2) the structure of indoor walls, (3) the number of dogs sharing sleeping areas of people (room-mate dogs), and (4) the number of people plus room-mate dogs, but not with just the number of people resident in the house. The interaction between insecticide use and a roof made of 'simbol', a locally available grass (Pennisetum sp.), also reflected a younger age structure of domestic bug populations. In infested houses, the density of bugs infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas was significantly correlated with overall bug density. Our data suggest that the application of environmental management measures by the affected people, such as plastering of walls and modification of roofs, coupled with keeping dogs away from bedrooms and application of insecticides, should limit the domestic population density of T. infestans and thus reduce the transmission of T. cruzi to people.

  20. Towards an indigenous dwelling that limits the domestic infestation by Triatoma infestans

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    Maria Auxiliadora Arrom

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Paraguayan State has a pending debt with indigenous people regarding public policies to combat extreme poverty, in addition to serious health problems, such as Chagas disease with Triatoma infestans as its vector. Objective: To determine the characteristics of an improved dwelling that limits the domestic infestation by Triatoma infestans from the indigenous perspective. Methodology: A descriptive study with a quantitative and qualitative approach was conducted. The instruments of data collection were: household survey, focus groups, and in-depth interviews with key actors. Results: Household heads of 270 dwelling were surveyed, of which 85% (230 had nonresistant or solid or waste materials in at least one of the components or at all. 86.3% (233 of the heads of household indicated that they wanted to improve them, and the lack of sufficient income for the household could be considered the main limitation. Conclusions: When projecting graphically the ideal or improved housing, from their perspective, the studied indigenous families showed that the housing of the Mennonites and the so-called Paraguayans (non-indigenous Paraguayan population inhabiting the same area gathered the physical characteristics that set the boundaries to limit the accommodation of the vector, and were adequate for the environment.

  1. TAL effectors and the executor R genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junli; Yin, Zhongchao; White, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are bacterial type III secretion proteins that function as transcription factors in plants during Xanthomonas/plant interactions, conditioning either host susceptibility and/or host resistance. Three types of TAL effector associated resistance (R) genes have been characterized-recessive, dominant non-transcriptional, and dominant TAL effector-dependent transcriptional based resistance. Here, we discuss the last type of R genes, whose functions are dependent on direct TAL effector binding to discrete effector binding elements in the promoters. Only five of the so-called executor R genes have been cloned, and commonalities are not clear. We have placed the protein products in two groups for conceptual purposes. Group 1 consists solely of the protein from pepper, BS3, which is predicted to have catalytic function on the basis of homology to a large conserved protein family. Group 2 consists of BS4C-R, XA27, XA10, and XA23, all of which are relatively short proteins from pepper or rice with multiple potential transmembrane domains. Group 2 members have low sequence similarity to proteins of unknown function in closely related species. Firm predictions await further experimentation on these interesting new members to the R gene repertoire, which have potential broad application in new strategies for disease resistance.

  2. TAL effectors and the executor R genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junli eZhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcription activation-like (TAL effectors are bacterial type III secretion proteins that function as transcription factors in plants during Xanthomonas/plant interactions, conditioning either host susceptibility and/or host resistance. Three types of TAL effector associated resistance (R genes have been characterized - recessive, dominant non-transcriptional and dominant TAL effector-dependent transcriptional based resistance. Here, we discuss the last type of R genes, whose functions are dependent on direct TAL effector binding to discrete effector binding elements in the promoters. Only five of the so-called executor R genes have been cloned, and commonalities are not clear. We have placed the protein products in two groups for conceptual purposes. Group 1 consists solely of the protein from pepper, BS3, which is predicted to have catalytic function on the basis of homology to a large conserved protein family. Group 2 consists of BS4C-R, XA27, XA10, and XA23, all of which are relatively short proteins from pepper or rice with multiple potential transmembrane domains. Group 2 members have low sequence similarity to proteins of unknown function in closely related species. Firm predictions await further experimentation on these interesting new members to the R gene repertoire, which have potential broad application in new strategies for disease resistance.

  3. Occurrence of Phytophthora plurivora and other Phytophthora species in oak forests of southern Poland and their association with site conditions and the health status of trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowiak, R; Stępniewska, H; Bilański, P; Kolařík, M

    2014-11-01

    Phytophthora plurivora and other Phytophthora species are known to be serious pathogens of forest trees. Little is known, however, about the presence of P. plurivora in Polish oak forests and their role in oak decline. The aims of this study were to identify P. plurivora in healthy and declining Quercus robur stands in southern Poland and to demonstrate the relationship between different site factors and the occurrence of P. plurivora. In addition, the virulence of P. plurivora and other Phytophthora species was evaluated through inoculations using 2-year-old oak seedlings. Rhizosphere soil was investigated from 39 oak stands representing different healthy tree statuses. The morphology and DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial cox1 gene were used for identifications. P. plurivora, an oak fine root pathogen, was isolated from rhizosphere soil samples in 6 out of 39 stands. Additionally, Phytophthora cambivora, Phytophthora polonica and Phytophthora rosacearum-like were also obtained from several stands. The results showed a significant association between the presence of P. plurivora and the health status of oak trees. Similar relationships were also observed for all identified Phytophthora species. In addition, there was evidence for a connection between the presence of all identified Phytophthora species and some site conditions. Phytophthora spp. occurred more frequently in declining stands and in silt loam and sandy loam soils with pH ≥ 3.66. P. plurivora and P. cambivora were the only species capable of killing whole plants, producing extensive necrosis on seedling stems.

  4. SCR96, a small cysteine-rich secretory protein of Phytophthora cactorum, can trigger cell death in the Solanaceae and is important for pathogenicity and oxidative stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Ren; Li, Yan-Peng; Li, Qi-Yuan; Xing, Yu-Ping; Liu, Bei-Bei; Tong, Yun-Hui; Xu, Jing-You

    2016-05-01

    Peptides and small molecules produced by both the plant pathogen Phytophthora and host plants in the apoplastic space mediate the relationship between the interplaying organisms. Various Phytophthora apoplastic effectors, including small cysteine-rich (SCR) secretory proteins, have been identified, but their roles during interaction remain to be determined. Here, we identified an SCR effector encoded by scr96, one of three novel genes encoding SCR proteins in P. cactorum with similarity to the P. cactorum phytotoxic protein PcF. Together with the other two genes, scr96 was transcriptionally induced throughout the developmental and infection stages of the pathogen. These genes triggered plant cell death (PCD) in the Solanaceae, including Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato. The scr96 gene did not show single nucleotide polymorphisms in a collection of P. cactorum isolates from different countries and host plants, suggesting that its role is essential and non-redundant during infection. Homologues of SCR96 were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. A stable protoplast transformation protocol was adapted for P. cactorum using green fluorescent protein as a marker. The silencing of scr96 in P. cactorum caused gene-silenced transformants to lose their pathogenicity on host plants and these transformants were significantly more sensitive to oxidative stress. Transient expression of scr96 partially recovered the virulence of gene-silenced transformants on plants. Overall, our results indicate that the P. cactorum scr96 gene encodes an important virulence factor that not only causes PCD in host plants, but is also important for pathogenicity and oxidative stress tolerance. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  5. Hidden sylvatic foci of the main vector of Chagas disease Triatoma infestans: threats to the vector elimination campaign?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo A Ceballos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Establishing the sources of reinfestation after residual insecticide spraying is crucial for vector elimination programs. Triatoma infestans, traditionally considered to be limited to domestic or peridomestic (abbreviated as D/PD habitats throughout most of its range, is the target of an elimination program that has achieved limited success in the Gran Chaco region in South America.During a two-year period we conducted semi-annual searches for triatomine bugs in every D/PD site and surrounding sylvatic habitats after full-coverage spraying of pyrethroid insecticides of all houses in a well-defined rural area in northwestern Argentina. We found six low-density sylvatic foci with 24 T. infestans in fallen or standing trees located 110-2,300 m from the nearest house or infested D/PD site detected after insecticide spraying, when house infestations were rare. Analysis of two mitochondrial gene fragments of 20 sylvatic specimens confirmed their species identity as T. infestans and showed that their composite haplotypes were the same as or closely related to D/PD haplotypes. Population studies with 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci and wing geometric morphometry consistently indicated the occurrence of unrestricted gene flow between local D/PD and sylvatic populations. Mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite sibship analyses in the most abundant sylvatic colony revealed descendents from five different females. Spatial analysis showed a significant association between two sylvatic foci and the nearest D/PD bug population found before insecticide spraying.Our study shows that, despite of its high degree of domesticity, T. infestans has sylvatic colonies with normal chromatic characters (not melanic morphs highly connected to D/PD conspecifics in the Argentinean Chaco. Sylvatic habitats may provide a transient or permanent refuge after control interventions, and function as sources for D/PD reinfestation. The occurrence of sylvatic foci of T. infestans in

  6. The oomycete broad-host-range pathogen Phytophthora capsici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamour, Kurt H; Stam, Remco; Jupe, Julietta; Huitema, Edgar

    2012-05-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a highly dynamic and destructive pathogen of vegetables. It attacks all cucurbits, pepper, tomato and eggplant, and, more recently, snap and lima beans. The disease incidence and severity have increased significantly in recent decades and the molecular resources to study this pathogen are growing and now include a reference genome. At the population level, the epidemiology varies according to the geographical location, with populations in South America dominated by clonal reproduction, and populations in the USA and South Africa composed of many unique genotypes in which sexual reproduction is common. Just as the impact of crop loss as a result of P. capsici has increased in recent decades, there has been a similar increase in the development of new tools and resources to study this devastating pathogen. Phytophthora capsici presents an attractive model for understanding broad-host-range oomycetes, the impact of sexual recombination in field populations and the basic mechanisms of Phytophthora virulence. Kingdom Chromista; Phylum Oomycota; Class Oomycetes; Order Peronosporales; Family Peronosporaceae; Genus Phytophthora; Species capsici. Symptoms vary considerably according to the host, plant part infected and environmental conditions. For example, in dry areas (e.g. southwestern USA and southern France), infection on tomato and bell or chilli pepper is generally on the roots and crown, and the infected plants have a distinctive black/brown lesion visible at the soil line (Fig. 1). In areas in which rainfall is more common (e.g. eastern USA), all parts of the plant are infected, including the roots, crown, foliage and fruit (Fig. 1). Root infections cause damping off in seedlings, whereas, in older plants, it is common to see stunted growth, wilting and, eventually, death. For tomatoes, it is common to see significant adventitious root growth just above an infected tap root, and the stunted plants, although severely compromised, may not die

  7. Interactions between biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas and Phytophthora species

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, H.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas bacteria produce a wide variety of antimicrobial metabolites, including soap-like compounds referred to as biosurfactants. The results of this thesis showed that biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas bacteria are effective in controlling Phytophthora foot rot disease of black pepper in Vietnam and promote root and shoot development of the ‘King of Spices’. Biosurfactant-producing P. fluorescens strain SS101 was also effective in controlling tomato late blight caused by P...

  8. Infectivity and sporulation potential of Phytophthora kernoviae to select North American native plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. J. Fichtner; D. M. Rizzo; S. A. Kirk; J. F. Webber

    2011-01-01

    Phytophthora kernoviae exhibits comparable epidemiology to Phytophthora ramorum in invaded UK woodlands. Because both pathogens have an overlapping geographic range in the UK and often concurrently invade the same site, it is speculated that P. kernoviae may also invade North American (NA) forests...

  9. Efficacy of commercial algaecides to manage species of Phytophthora in suburban waterways

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Curtis Colburn; Steven N. Jeffers

    2010-01-01

    Many commercial algaecides contain copper compounds as active ingredients. Phytophthora spp. and other oomycetes are known to be sensitive to copper-based fungicides. Therefore, algaecides registered to manage algae in natural waterways and irrigation waters also might be effective for mitigating or even eradicating Phytophthora ...

  10. Fungicides reduce Rhododendron root rot and mortality caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, but not by P. plurivora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhododendron root rot, caused by several Phytophthora species, can cause devastating losses in nursery-grown plants. Most research on chemical control of root rot has focused on Phytophthora cinnamomi. However, it is unknown whether treatments recommended for P. cinnamomi are also effective for othe...

  11. Sporulation of Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae on asymptomatic foliage and fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Denman; E. Moralejo; S.A. Kirk; E. Orton; A. Whybrow

    2008-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae are newly discovered invasive Phytophthoras causing leaf necrosis, shoot tip dieback (mostly on ornamental and forest understorey host species) and bleeding cankers on tree trunks of a wide range of plant species. Both pathogens are now present in south-west England....

  12. Resistance to Phytophthora cinnamomi among seedlings from backcross families of hybrid american chestnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven N. Jeffers; Inga M. Meadows; Joseph B. James; Paul H. Sisco

    2012-01-01

    American chestnut (Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh.) once was a primary hardwood species in forests of the eastern United States. Sometime during the late 18th century, it is speculated that Phytophthora cinnamomi, which causes Phytophthora root rot (PRR) on many woody plant species, was introduced to the southeast region of...

  13. Variation in density and diversity of species of Phytophthora in two forest stream networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaesoon Hwang; Steven N. Jeffers; Steven W. Oak

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring occurrence and distribution of Phytophthora species, including Phytophthora ramorum, in forest ecosystems can be achieved in several ways including sampling symptomatic plants, infested soils, and infested streams. Collecting plant and soil samples can be laborious and time consuming due to the distance surveyors...

  14. Introduction of filtration systems in container nurseries for nonchemical elimination of Phytophthora spp. from irrigation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsten Ufer; Heinrich Beltz; Thomas Brand; Katrin Kaminski; Ralf Lüttmann; Martin Posner; Stefan Wagner; Sabine Werres; Hans-Peter Wessels

    2006-01-01

    In a 3-year project the elimination of Phytophthora spp. from the recirculation water with different kinds of filtration systems will be tested under commercial conditions in container nurseries. First results indicate that the filtration systems eliminate Phytophthora spp. from the water.

  15. Fungicide rotation schemes for managing Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon across southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southeastern states produce about 50% of the watermelons in the United States (U.S.) where conditions are optimal for development of Phytophthora fruit rot prevail. Phytophthora fruit rot significantly limits watermelon production by causing serious yield losses to growers before and after harvest. ...

  16. Microbial- and isothiocyanate-mediated control of Phytophthora and Pythium species

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.F. Cohen; E. Yamamoto; E. Condeso; B.L. Anacker; N. Rank; M. Mazzola

    2008-01-01

    Plant pathogens of the oomycete lineage share common susceptibilities to many biotic and abiotic stresses. We are investigating the potential of antagonistic bacteria, isothiocyanates, and mycophagous amoebae to control diseases caused by Phytophthora spp., including the etiologic agent of sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum (...

  17. Phylogenetic Analysis of Phytophthora Species Based on Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, L.P.N.M.; Bakker, F.T.; Bosch, van den G.B.M.; Bonants, P.J.M.; Flier, W.G.

    2004-01-01

    A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the genus Phytophthora was performed, 113 isolates from 48 Phytophthora species were included in this analysis. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on regions of mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1; NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1) and nuclear gene

  18. Validation of the bait test with Rhododendron leaves for Phytophthora diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina Junker; Sabine Werres

    2017-01-01

    Bait tests are very helpful for diagnosis of Phytophthora in for example soil, substrate, water, sediment, and rootball samples (Werres and others 2014). By attracting the motile zoospores of the Phytophthora species with the baits these pathogens can be separated from other organisms. Bait tests are simple and cost...

  19. Phytophthora database 2.0: update and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bongsoo; Martin, Frank; Geiser, David M; Kim, Hye-Seon; Mansfield, Michele A; Nikolaeva, Ekaterina; Park, Sook-Young; Coffey, Michael D; Russo, Joseph; Kim, Seong H; Balci, Yilmaz; Abad, Gloria; Burgess, Treena; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Seogchan

    2013-12-01

    The online community resource Phytophthora database (PD) was developed to support accurate and rapid identification of Phytophthora and to help characterize and catalog the diversity and evolutionary relationships within the genus. Since its release in 2008, the sequence database has grown to cover 1 to 12 loci for ≈2,600 isolates (representing 138 described and provisional species). Sequences of multiple mitochondrial loci were added to complement nuclear loci-based phylogenetic analyses and diagnostic tool development. Key characteristics of most newly described and provisional species have been summarized. Other additions to improve the PD functionality include: (i) geographic information system tools that enable users to visualize the geographic origins of chosen isolates on a global-scale map, (ii) a tool for comparing genetic similarity between isolates via microsatellite markers to support population genetic studies, (iii) a comprehensive review of molecular diagnostics tools and relevant references, (iv) sequence alignments used to develop polymerase chain reaction-based diagnostics tools to support their utilization and new diagnostic tool development, and (v) an online community forum for sharing and preserving experience and knowledge accumulated in the global Phytophthora community. Here we present how these improvements can support users and discuss the PD's future direction.

  20. Embryology of Triatoma infestans (KLUG, (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, a Chagas' disease vector Embriología del Triatoma infestans, vector de la enfermedad de Chagas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Fichera

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the embryogenesis of T. infestans (Hemiptera, Reduviidae. Morphological parameters of growth sequences from oviposition until hatching (12-14 d 28ºC were established. Five periods, as percent of time of development (TD, were characterized from oviposition until hatching. The most important morphological features were: 1 formation of blastoderm within 7% of TD; 2 germ band and gastrulation within 30% of TD; 3 nerve cord, limb budding, thoracic and abdominal segmentation and formation of body cavity within 50% of TD; 4 nervous system and blastokinesis end, and development of embryonic cuticle within 65% of TD; 5 differentiation of the mouth parts, fat body, and Malphigian tubules during final stage and completion of embryo at day 12 to day 14 around hatching. These signals were chosen as appropriate morphological parameters which should enable the evaluation of embryologic modifications due to the action/s of different insecticidesEn este estudio se caracterizó el desarrollo embrionario del T. infestans (Hemiptera Reduviidae. Se establecieron parámetros morfológicos secuenciales de crecimiento desde la oviposición hasta la eclosión, (12-14 d 28ºC. Cinco períodos de crecimiento fueron determinados y expresados como fracciones porcentuales del tiempo total del desarrollo (TD hasta la eclosión. Los eventos morfológicos mas importantes fueron: 1 La formación del blastodermo hasta el 7% del TD; 2 La aparición de la banda germinativa y su gastrulación transcurridos un 30% del TD; 3 El comienzo de la formación del cordón nervioso, de las extremidades, la segmentación torácica y abdominal y la formación del mixocele cuando la embriogénesis alcanzó el 50% del TD; 4 La terminación de la blastoquinesis, el desarrollo completo del sistema nervioso y la aparición de la cutícula embrionaria hasta el 65% del TD; 5 En la etapa final de la embriogenesis se observó la diferenciación del aparato mandibular, el cuerpo graso

  1. Transcription profiling and identification of infection-related genes in Phytophthora cactorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Ren; Huang, Shen-Xin; Zhang, Ye; Sheng, Gui-Lin; Zhang, Bo-Yue; Li, Qi-Yuan; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Jing-You

    2018-04-01

    Phytophthora cactorum, an oomycete pathogen, infects more than 200 plant species within several plant families. To gain insight into the repertoire of the infection-related genes of P. cactorum, Illumina RNA-Seq was used to perform a global transcriptome analysis of three life cycle stages of the pathogen, mycelia (MY), zoospores (ZO) and germinating cysts with germ tubes (GC). From over 9.8 million Illumina reads for each library, 18,402, 18,569 and 19,443 distinct genes were identified for MY, ZO and GC libraries, respectively. Furthermore, the transcriptome difference among MY, ZO and GC stages was investigated. Gene ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses revealed diverse biological functions and processes. Comparative analysis identified a large number of genes that are associated with specific stages and pathogenicity, including 166 effector genes. Of them, most of RXLR and NLP genes showed induction while the majority of CRN genes were down-regulated in GC, the important pre-infection stage, compared to either MY or ZO. And 14 genes encoding small cysteine-rich (SCR) secretory proteins showed differential expression during the developmental stages and in planta. Ectopic expression in the Solanaceae indicated that SCR113 and one elicitin PcINF1 can trigger cell death on Nicotiana benthamiana, tobacco (N. tabacum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves. Neither conserved domain nor homologues of SCR113 in other organisms can be identified. Collectively, our study provides a comprehensive examination of gene expression across three P. cactorum developmental stages and describes pathogenicity-related genes, all of which will help elucidate the pathogenicity mechanism of this destructive pathogen.

  2. Effect of CO2 enhancement on beech (Fagus sylvatica L. seedling root rot due to Phytophthora plurivora and Phytophthora cactorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkaczyk Miłosz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change is associated with higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2. The ongoing changes are likely to have significant, direct or indirect effects on plant diseases caused by many biotic agents such as phytopathogenic fungi. This study results showed that increased CO2 concentration did not stimulate the growth of 1-year-old beech Fagus sylvatica L seedlings but it activated pathogenic Phytophthora species (P. plurivora and P. cactorum which caused significant reduction in the total number of fine roots as well as their length and area. The results of the greenhouse experiment indicated that pathogens once introduced into soil survived in pot soil, became periodically active (in sufficient water conditions and were able to damage beech fine roots. However, the trees mortality was not observed during the first year of experiment. DNA analyses performed on soil and beech tissue proved persistence of introduced Phytophthora isolates.

  3. Small homologous blocks in phytophthora genomes do not point to an ancient whole-genome duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooff, Jolien J E; Snel, Berend; Seidl, Michael F

    2014-05-01

    Genomes of the plant-pathogenic genus Phytophthora are characterized by small duplicated blocks consisting of two consecutive genes (2HOM blocks) and by an elevated abundance of similarly aged gene duplicates. Both properties, in particular the presence of 2HOM blocks, have been attributed to a whole-genome duplication (WGD) at the last common ancestor of Phytophthora. However, large intraspecies synteny-compelling evidence for a WGD-has not been detected. Here, we revisited the WGD hypothesis by deducing the age of 2HOM blocks. Two independent timing methods reveal that the majority of 2HOM blocks arose after divergence of the Phytophthora lineages. In addition, a large proportion of the 2HOM block copies colocalize on the same scaffold. Therefore, the presence of 2HOM blocks does not support a WGD at the last common ancestor of Phytophthora. Thus, genome evolution of Phytophthora is likely driven by alternative mechanisms, such as bursts of transposon activity.

  4. Diversity of Phytophthora Species from Declining Mediterranean Maquis Vegetation, including Two New Species, Phytophthora crassamura and P. ornamentata sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanu, Bruno; Linaldeddu, Benedetto T.; Deidda, Antonio; Jung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Mediterranean basin is recognized as a global biodiversity hotspot accounting for more than 25,000 plant species that represent almost 10% of the world’s vascular flora. In particular, the maquis vegetation on Mediterranean islands and archipelagos constitutes an important resource of the Mediterranean plant diversity due to its high rate of endemism. Since 2009, a severe and widespread dieback and mortality of Quercus ilex trees and several other plant species of the Mediterranean maquis has been observed in the National Park of La Maddalena archipelago (northeast Sardinia, Italy). Infected plants showed severe decline symptoms and a significant reduction of natural regeneration. First studies revealed the involvement of the highly invasive wide-host range pathogen Phytophthora cinnamomi and several fungal pathogens. Subsequent detailed research led to a better understanding of these epidemics showing that multiple Phytophthora spp. were involved, some of them unknown to science. In total, nine Phytophthora species were isolated from rhizosphere soil samples collected from around symptomatic trees and shrubs including Asparagus albus, Cistus sp., Juniperus phoenicea, J. oxycedrus, Pistacia lentiscus and Rhamnus alaternus. Based on morphological characters, growth-temperature relations and sequence analysis of the ITS and cox1 gene regions, the isolates were identified as Phytophthora asparagi, P. bilorbang, P. cinnamomi, P. cryptogea, P. gonapodyides, P. melonis, P. syringae and two new Clade 6 taxa which are here described as P. crassamura sp. nov. and P. ornamentata sp. nov. Pathogenicity tests supported their possible involvement in the severe decline that is currently threatening the Mediterranean maquis vegetation in the La Maddalena archipelago. PMID:26649428

  5. Post-control surveillance of Triatoma infestans and Triatoma sordida with chemically-baited sticky traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas de Arias, Antonieta; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Acosta, Nidia; López, Elsa; González, Nilsa; Zerba, Eduardo; Tarelli, Guillermo; Masuh, Héctor

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease prevention critically depends on keeping houses free of triatomine vectors. Insecticide spraying is very effective, but re-infestation of treated dwellings is commonplace. Early detection-elimination of re-infestation foci is key to long-term control; however, all available vector-detection methods have low sensitivity. Chemically-baited traps are widely used in vector and pest control-surveillance systems; here, we test this approach for Triatoma spp. detection under field conditions in the Gran Chaco. Using a repeated-sampling approach and logistic models that explicitly take detection failures into account, we simultaneously estimate vector occurrence and detection probabilities. We then model detection probabilities (conditioned on vector occurrence) as a function of trapping system to measure the effect of chemical baits. We find a positive effect of baits after three (odds ratio [OR] 5.10; 95% confidence interval [CI(95)] 2.59-10.04) and six months (OR 2.20, CI(95) 1.04-4.65). Detection probabilities are estimated at p ≈ 0.40-0.50 for baited and at just p ≈ 0.15 for control traps. Bait effect is very strong on T. infestans (three-month assessment: OR 12.30, CI(95) 4.44-34.10; p ≈ 0.64), whereas T. sordida is captured with similar frequency in baited and unbaited traps. Chemically-baited traps hold promise for T. infestans surveillance; the sensitivity of the system at detecting small re-infestation foci rises from 12.5% to 63.6% when traps are baited with semiochemicals. Accounting for imperfect detection, infestation is estimated at 26% (CI(95) 16-40) after three and 20% (CI(95) 11-34) after six months. In the same assessments, traps detected infestation in 14% and 8.5% of dwellings, whereas timed manual searches (the standard approach) did so in just 1.4% of dwellings only in the first survey. Since infestation rates are the main indicator used for decision-making in control programs, the approach we present may help improve T

  6. Incoordination, Paralysis and Recovery after Pyrethroid Treatment on Nymphs III of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl A Alzogaray

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of poisoning for deltamethrin and cis-permethrin on nymphs III of Triatoma infestans were described. The time required for incoordination and paralysis were determined. Deltamethrin was equal or more rapid in the onset of the first effect (accordingly to dose, and cis-permethrin in the onset of the second one. There were no significant differences between incoordination doses 50% (IncD50s at different times for the two pyrethroids. They showed equivalent incoordination power, but the nymphs treated with deltamethrin recovered slightly more rapid and in greater amount than the nymphs treated with cis-permethrin. The recovery was inhibited by the simultaneus application of piperonyl butoxide. This result suggests that biotransformation by mixed-function microsomal oxidases are involved in the process of recovery

  7. Avaliação de óleos essenciais de plantas aromáticas com atividade inseticida em Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae Evaluation of essential oils with insecticidal activity in Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Favero

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Chagas é um dos maiores problemas de saúde pública na América Latina. Neste trabalho, foi avaliada a ação inseticida de óleos essenciais de Anacardium humile Cymbopogon nardus, Ocimum basilicum e Eucalyptus urograndis em ninfas do 3° e 4° estádios de desenvolvimento de Triatoma infestans por ação tópica e pressão a vapor (fumigação. Para o teste tópico foram realizadas duas repetições cada uma com cinco ninfas de 3° e 4° estádios de desenvolvimento de T. infestans. Foi aplicado 1µL de cada concentração na região dorsal de cada indivíduo. Para o teste de fumigação foram utilizados potes de 2 L com tampa vedante. Os óleos essenciais de O. gratissimum e E. urograndis apresentaram atividade inseticida para T. infestans, e A. humile e C. nardus apresentaram em média 5 e 15% de mortalidade, respectivamente. Para fumigação, somente o óleo de E. urograndis teve efeito, com 100% de mortalidade sobre T. infestans, sendo que para os outros óleos não foi observado efeito de fumigação. Esse trabalho relata pela primeira vez a ação inseticida de E. urograndis em potes fumígenos para o controle de triatomíneos. Os resultados são importantes devido à busca por novos modelos moleculares com ação inseticida em triatomíneos resistentes aos inseticidas sintéticos.Chagas disease is a major public health problem in Latin America. This work aimed to evaluate the insecticide action of essential oils of Anacardium humile, Cymbopogon nardus, Ocimum basilicum and Eucalyptus urograndis on Triatoma infestans nymphs of third and fourth stages of development by topic action and steam pressure (fumigation. Two repetitions were performed at the topic test with five nymphs of third and fourth stages of development of T. infestans. It was applied 1µL of each concentration on the dorsal region of each nymph. Two-liter pots with sealing covers were used at the fumigation test. The essential oils of O. gratissimum and E

  8. Putative Panmixia in Restricted Populations of Trypanosoma cruzi Isolated from Wild Triatoma infestans in Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabe, Christian; Buitrago, Rosio; Bremond, Philippe; Aliaga, Claudia; Salas, Renata; Vidaurre, Pablo; Herrera, Claudia; Cerqueira, Frédérique; Bosseno, Marie-France; Waleckx, Etienne; Breniere, Simone Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is subdivided into six discrete typing units (DTUs; TcI–TcVI) of which TcI is ubiquitous and genetically highly variable. While clonality is the dominant mode of propagation, recombinant events play a significant evolutive role. Recently, foci of wild Triatoma infestans have been described in Bolivia, mainly infected by TcI. Hence, for the first time, we evaluated the level of genetic exchange within TcI natural potentially panmictic populations (single DTU, host, area and sampling time). Seventy-nine TcI stocks from wild T. infestans, belonging to six populations were characterized at eight microsatellite loci. For each population, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), linkage disequilibrium (LD), and presence of repeated multilocus genotypes (MLG) were analyzed by using a total of seven statistics, to test the null hypothesis of panmixia (H0). For three populations, none of the seven statistics allowed to rejecting H0; for another one the low size did not allow us to conclude, and for the two others the tests have given contradictory results. Interestingly, apparent panmixia was only observed in very restricted areas, and was not observed when grouping populations distant of only two kilometers or more. Nevertheless it is worth stressing that for the statistic tests of "HWE", in order to minimize the type I error (i. e. incorrect rejection of a true H0), we used the Bonferroni correction (BC) known to considerably increase the type II error ( i. e. failure to reject a false H0). For the other tests (LD and MLG), we did not use BC and the risk of type II error in these cases was acceptable. Thus, these results should be considered as a good indicator of the existence of panmixia in wild environment but this must be confirmed on larger samples to reduce the risk of type II error. PMID:24312410

  9. Putative panmixia in restricted populations of Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from wild Triatoma infestans in Bolivia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Barnabe

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is subdivided into six discrete typing units (DTUs; TcI-TcVI of which TcI is ubiquitous and genetically highly variable. While clonality is the dominant mode of propagation, recombinant events play a significant evolutive role. Recently, foci of wild Triatoma infestans have been described in Bolivia, mainly infected by TcI. Hence, for the first time, we evaluated the level of genetic exchange within TcI natural potentially panmictic populations (single DTU, host, area and sampling time. Seventy-nine TcI stocks from wild T. infestans, belonging to six populations were characterized at eight microsatellite loci. For each population, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE, linkage disequilibrium (LD, and presence of repeated multilocus genotypes (MLG were analyzed by using a total of seven statistics, to test the null hypothesis of panmixia (H0. For three populations, none of the seven statistics allowed to rejecting H0; for another one the low size did not allow us to conclude, and for the two others the tests have given contradictory results. Interestingly, apparent panmixia was only observed in very restricted areas, and was not observed when grouping populations distant of only two kilometers or more. Nevertheless it is worth stressing that for the statistic tests of "HWE", in order to minimize the type I error (i. e. incorrect rejection of a true H0, we used the Bonferroni correction (BC known to considerably increase the type II error ( i. e. failure to reject a false H0. For the other tests (LD and MLG, we did not use BC and the risk of type II error in these cases was acceptable. Thus, these results should be considered as a good indicator of the existence of panmixia in wild environment but this must be confirmed on larger samples to reduce the risk of type II error.

  10. A new tactic for Triatoma infestans control: fabrics impregnated with beta-cypermethrin Telas impregnadas de beta-cipermetrina: una nueva táctica para el control de Triatoma infestans

    OpenAIRE

    Edgardo Wood; Susana A. de Licastro; Norma Casabé; María Inés Picollo; Raúl Alzogaray; Eduardo Nicolás Zerba

    1999-01-01

    Triatoma infestans is the most important vector of Chagas’ disease in Argentina. Experiences from Argentine national campaigns have shown indoor spraying to control triatomine bugs is both expensive and difficult. An alternative control method may be the use of pyrethroid- impregnated fabrics (PIFs), which could be both a practical and cheap complement to conventional control measures. In this study, a formulation of emulsifiable concentrate of beta-cypermethrin [a-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl-...

  11. Exocarp Properties and Transcriptomic Analysis of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) Fruit Expressing Age-Related Resistance to Phytophthora capsici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Kaori; Carr, Kevin M; Colle, Marivi; Mansfeld, Ben N; Grumet, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Very young cucumber (Cucumis sativus) fruit are highly susceptible to infection by the oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. As the fruit complete exponential growth, at approximately 10-12 days post pollination (dpp), they transition to resistance. The development of age-related resistance (ARR) is increasingly recognized as an important defense against pathogens, however, underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Peel sections from cucumber fruit harvested at 8 dpp (susceptible) and 16 dpp (resistant) showed equivalent responses to inoculation as did whole fruit, indicating that the fruit surface plays an important role in defense against P. capsici. Exocarp from 16 dpp fruit had thicker cuticles, and methanolic extracts of peel tissue inhibited growth of P. capsici in vitro, suggesting physical or chemical components to the ARR. Transcripts specifically expressed in the peel vs. pericarp showed functional differentiation. Transcripts predominantly expressed in the peel were consistent with fruit surface associated functions including photosynthesis, cuticle production, response to the environment, and defense. Peel-specific transcripts that exhibited increased expression in 16 dpp fruit relative to 8 dpp fruit, were highly enriched (Pfunctions. Specific transcripts included genes associated with potential physical barriers (i.e., cuticle), chemical defenses (flavonoid biosynthesis), oxidative stress, penetration defense, and molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered or effector-triggered (R-gene mediated) pathways. The developmentally regulated changes in gene expression between peels from susceptible- and resistant- age fruits suggest programming for increased defense as the organ reaches full size.

  12. Four different Phytophthora species that are able to infect Scots pine seedlings in laboratory conditions

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    Tkaczyk Miłosz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate susceptibility of young Scots pine seedlings to four Phytophthora species: Phytophthora cactorum, Phytophthora cambivora, Phytophthora plurivora and Phytophthora pini; seven-day-old seedlings of Scots pine (15 seedlings per experiment were infected using agar plugs of the respective species. Control group also consisted of 15 seedlings and was inoculated with sterile agar plugs. Results unambiguously show that after 4.5 days, all seedlings show clear signs of infection and display severe symptoms of tissue damage and necrosis. Moreover, three and two seedlings in the P. cactorum and P. cambivora infected seedlings groups, respectively, collapsed. The length of largest necrosis measured 13.4±3.90 mm and was caused by P. cactorum. To rule out any putative contamination or infection by secondary pathogens, re-isolations of pathogens from infection sites were performed and were positive in 100% of plated pieces of infected seedlings. All re-isolations were, however, negative in the case of the control group. Detailed microscopic analyses of infected tissues of young seedlings confirmed the presence of numerous Phytophthora species inside and on the surface of infected seedlings. Therefore, our results suggest Phytophthora spp. and mainly P. cactorum and P. cambivora as aggressive pathogens of Scots pine seedlings and highlight a putative involvement of these species in the damping off of young Scots pine seedlings frequently observed in forest nurseries.

  13. Susceptibility and resistance to deltamethrin of wild and domestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Reduviidae: Triatominae in Bolivia: new discoveries

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    Stéphanie Depickère

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bolivia is a high-endemic country for Chagas disease, for which the principal vector is Triatoma infestans (Triatominae. This is a mainly domestic species that is also found in the wild environment. Recently, an increasing number of studies have shown the importance of Triatominae resistance to insecticides, especially in Bolivia. Data regarding the susceptibility/resistance of wild and domestic populations of T. infestans to deltamethrin are presented. For the first time, domestic populations of the department of Santa Cruz were tested, showing low resistance. Although most of the wild populations were found to be susceptible to deltamethrin, three populations from three departments showed a mortality rate of less than 100%. This result is emphasised here.

  14. Phytophthora Species in Rivers and Streams of the Southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamler, Rio A; Sanogo, Soumalia; Goldberg, Natalie P; Randall, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Phytophthora species were isolated from rivers and streams in the southwestern United States by leaf baiting and identified by sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The major waterways examined included the Rio Grande River, Gila River, Colorado River, and San Juan River. The most prevalent species identified in rivers and streams were Phytophthora lacustris and P. riparia, both members of Phytophthora ITS clade 6. P. gonapodyides, P. cinnamomi, and an uncharacterized Phytophthora species in clade 9 were also recovered. In addition, six isolates recovered from the Rio Grande River were shown to be hybrids of P. lacustris × P. riparia Pathogenicity assays using P. riparia and P. lacustris failed to produce any disease symptoms on commonly grown crops in the southwestern United States. Inoculation of Capsicum annuum with P. riparia was shown to inhibit disease symptom development when subsequently challenged with P. capsici, a pathogenic Phytophthora species. Many Phytophthora species are significant plant pathogens causing disease on a large variety of crops worldwide. Closer examinations of streams, rivers, and forest soils have also identified numerous Phytophthora species that do not appear to be phytopathogens and likely act as early saprophytes in aquatic and saturated environments. To date, the Phytophthora species composition in rivers and streams of the southwestern United States has not been evaluated. This article details a study to determine the identity and prevalence of Phytophthora species in rivers and streams located in New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and Texas. Isolated species were evaluated for pathogenicity on crop plants and for their potential to act as biological control agents. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Host Adaptation and Speciation through Hybridization and Polyploidy in Phytophthora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertier, Lien; Leus, Leen; D’hondt, Liesbet; de Cock, Arthur W. A. M.; Höfte, Monica

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that interspecific hybridization is a common event in phytophthora evolution. Yet, the fundamental processes underlying interspecific hybridization and the consequences for its ecological fitness and distribution are not well understood. We studied hybridization events in phytophthora clade 8b. This is a cold-tolerant group of plant pathogenic oomycetes in which six host-specific species have been described that mostly attack winter-grown vegetables. Hybrid characterization was done by sequencing and cloning of two nuclear (ITS and Ypt1) and two mitochondrial loci (Cox1 and Nadh1) combined with DNA content estimation using flow cytometry. Three different mtDNA haplotypes were recovered among the presumed hybrid isolates, dividing the hybrids into three types, with different parental species involved. In the nuclear genes, additivity, i.e. the presence of two alleles coming from different parents, was detected. Hybrid isolates showed large variations in DNA content, which was positively correlated with the additivity in nuclear loci, indicating allopolyploid hybridization followed by a process of diploidization. Moreover, indications of homeologous recombination were found in the hybrids by cloning ITS products. The hybrid isolates have been isolated from a range of hosts that have not been reported previously for clade 8b species, indicating that they have novel pathogenic potential. Next to this, DNA content measurements of the non-hybrid clade 8b species suggest that polyploidy is a common feature of this clade. We hypothesize that interspecific hybridization and polyploidy are two linked phenomena in phytophthora, and that these processes might play an important and ongoing role in the evolution of this genus. PMID:24386473

  16. Antifungal Effect of Plant Essential Oils on Controlling Phytophthora Species

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    Jahanshir Amini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, antifungal activity of essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Ocimum basilicum and two fungicides Mancozeb and Metalaxyl-Mancozeb in six different concentrations were investigated for controlling three species of Phytophthora, including P. capsici, P. drechsleri and P. melonis on pepper, cucumber and melon under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, respectively. Under the in vitro condition, the median effective concen- tration (EC₅₀ values (ppm of plant essential oils and fungicides were measured. In greenhouse, soil infested with Phytophthora species was treated by adding 50 ml of essential oils and fungicides (100 ppm. Disease severity was determined after 28 days. Among two tested plant essential oils, C. citratus had the lowest EC₅₀ values for inhibition of the mycelial growth of P. capsici (31.473, P. melonis (33.097 and P. drechsleri (69.112, respectively. The mean EC₅₀ values for Metalaxyl-Mancozeb on these pathogens were 20.87, 20.06 and 17.70, respectively. Chemical analysis of plant essential oils by GC-MS showed that, among 42 compounds identified from C. citratus, two compounds β-geranial (α-citral (39.16% and z-citral (30.95% were the most abundant. Under the greenhouse condition, Metalaxyl-Mancozeb caused the greatest reduction in disease severity, 84.2%, 86.8% and 92.1% on melon, cucumber, and pepper, respectively. The C. citratus essential oil reduced disease severity from 47.4% to 60.5% compared to the untreated control (p≤0.05. Essential oils of O. basilicum had the lowest effects on the pathogens under in vitro and greenhouse conditions. These results show that essential oils may contribute to the development of new antifungal agents to protect the crops from Phytophthora diseases.

  17. Methods for Detection of Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi on Raspberry

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    Mirjana Koprivica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi (Wilcox & Duncan, a causal agent of raspberry root rot, is a serious soil-borne pathogen listed by EPPO as an A2 quarantine pest. Root samples were collected from badly diseased raspberry plants showing a variety of characteristic and often dramatic symptoms during surveys carried out in western Serbia in 2002. Identification of the causal agent was performed in collaboration work with the Scottish Crop Research Institute (S.C.R.I., Dundee, UK. Necrotic roots were plated on selective French bean agar (incorporating ampicilin, ryfamicin, bavistin and hymexasol. Detection of isolates was based on cultural and morphological features compared with referent cultures. DNA was extracted directly from the sampled roots using extraction buffer (200 mM Tris- HCl pH 8.5, 250 mM NaCl, 25 mM EDTA, 0.5% SDS, purified by multi spin separation columns [Thistle Scientific (Axygen] or in 24:1 mixture of chlorophorm- iso-amyl alcohol and amplified by nested PCR (ITS4 and DC6 for first round, DC1and DC5 for second round. Diluted DNA extracts were also amplified by conventional PCR with modified ”universal” Phytophthora primers (ITS 6, ITS 7 and ITS 8, Cooke et al., 2000 and digested with Msp1. Digestion patterns of the universal primers PCR product from infected roots matched those of Scottish strains. P. fragariae var. rubi occured on 8 out of 14 sites. Our results indicate that nested PCR (ITS4 and DC6 for first round, DC1 and DC5 for second round or digestion of the ”universal” Phytophthora primers PCR product for detection of P. fragariae var. rubi are more sensitive and less time-consuming and therefore recommended for use.

  18. Potential sources of Triatoma infestans reinfesting peridomiciles identified by morphological characterization in Los Llanos, La Rioja, Argentina

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    María Laura Hernández

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Triatoma infestans in habitats treated with insecticides constitutes a frequent problem in endemic areas. Basing our study on the hypothesis that descendants of a residual population should be more similar to the pre-treatment population than to any other, we compared the indications of two quantitative morphological approaches. This study seeks to find the origin of 247 T. infestans from three populations found in two chicken coops and a goat corral after treatment with insecticides. The results obtained by quantitative morphology suggest that the T. infestans found between three-34 months after the application of insecticides formed mixed populations with insects derived from residual foci and neighbouring habitats. Our analyses also showed the presence of a phenotype which does not resemble neither the pre-treatment phenotype nor the one from neighbouring populations, suggesting the presence of a particular post-treatment phenotype. The heads size showed some variations in males from different populations and remained unchanged in females, which reinforces the hypothesis of an intraspecific competition for food with priority for females. This article presents, for the first time, the combined analysis of geometric morphometry of heads and antennal phenotypes to identify the composition of reinfesting populations.

  19. Evaluación del efecto insecticida de tierra de diatomeas sobre Triatoma infestans (Hemíptera, Reduviidae

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    Mariana L Bilbao

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El Triatoma infestans es el principal vector de la enfermedad de Chagas en Argentina. La tierra de diatomeas (TD es un producto natural que se comercializa actualmente con fines insecticidas y que produce la muerte por deshidratación. Se evaluó la eficacia insecticida de TD al 60% de pureza, proveniente del yacimiento La Iglesiana (San Juan, Argentina sobre ninfas V y adultos de T.infestans. Se ensayaron dos dosis: 112,5 g/m2 (T1 y 225 g/m2 (T2, con cuatro réplicas por tratamiento, con cinco ejemplares, incluyendo los controles (TC en el laboratorio. Se contaron los individuos vivos y muertos durante cinco días. No se encontró diferencias en la mortalidad (ANOVA, p>0,05 en los adultos (T1: 40%, T2: 25% y TC: 30% ni en las ninfas V (T1: 10%, T2: 15% y TC: 10%. Se concluye que la tierra de diatomeas del yacimiento La Iglesiana, en las condiciones de laboratorio evaluadas, no posee capacidad insecticida sobre T.infestans.

  20. Triatoma infestans Calreticulin: Gene Cloning and Expression of a Main Domain That Interacts with the Host Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Katherine; Collazo, Norberto; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Molina, María Carmen; Rosas, Carlos; Peña, Jaime; Pizarro, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Cattan, Pedro E; Apt, Werner; Ferreira, Arturo

    2017-02-08

    Triatoma infestans is an important hematophagous vector of Chagas disease, a neglected chronic illness affecting approximately 6 million people in Latin America. Hematophagous insects possess several molecules in their saliva that counteract host defensive responses. Calreticulin (CRT), a multifunctional protein secreted in saliva, contributes to the feeding process in some insects. Human CRT (HuCRT) and Trypanosoma cruzi CRT (TcCRT) inhibit the classical pathway of complement activation, mainly by interacting through their central S domain with complement component C1. In previous studies, we have detected CRT in salivary gland extracts from T. infestans We have called this molecule TiCRT. Given that the S domain is responsible for C1 binding, we have tested its role in the classical pathway of complement activation in vertebrate blood. We have cloned and characterized the complete nucleotide sequence of CRT from T. infestans , and expressed its S domain. As expected, this S domain binds to human C1 and, as a consequence, it inhibits the classical pathway of complement, at its earliest stage of activation, namely the generation of C4b. Possibly, the presence of TiCRT in the salivary gland represents an evolutionary adaptation in hematophagous insects to control a potential activation of complement proteins, present in the massive blood meal that they ingest, with deleterious consequences at least on the anterior digestive tract of these insects. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  1. Macrogeographic and microgeographic genetic structure of the Chagas' disease vector Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) from Catamarca, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Rosas, Alicia R; Segura, Elsa L; Fichera, Laura; García, Beatriz Alicia

    2008-07-01

    The genetic structure in populations of the Chagas' disease vector Triatoma infestans from six localities belonging to areas under the same insecticide treatment conditions of Catamarca province (Argentina) was examined at macrogeographical and microgeographical scales. A total of 238 insects were typed for 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci. The average observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.319 to 0.549 and from 0.389 to 0.689, respectively. The present results confirm that populations of T. infestans are highly structured. Spatial genetic structure was detectable at macrogeographical and microgeographical levels. Comparisons of the levels of genetic variability between two temporal samples were carried out to assess the impact of the insecticide treatment. The genetic diversity of the population was not significantly affected after insecticide use since different genetic parameters (allele number, observed and expected heterozygosities) remained stable. However, loss of low frequency alleles and not previously found alleles were detected. The effective population size (N(e)) estimated was substantially lower in the second temporal sample than in the first; nevertheless, it is possible that the size of the remnant population after insecticide treatment was still large enough to retain the genetic diversity. Very few individuals did not belong to the local T. infestans populations as determined by assignment analyses, suggesting a low level of immigration in the population. The results of the assignment and first-generation migrant tests suggest male-biased dispersal at microgeographical level.

  2. The peri-urban interface and house infestation with Triatoma infestans in the Argentine Chaco: an underreported process?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael M Provecho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peri-urban infestations with triatomine bugs, their sources and their dynamics have rarely been investigated. Here, we corroborated the reported occurrence of Triatoma infestans in a peri-urban area and in neighbouring rural houses in Pampa del Indio, in the Argentine Chaco, and identified its putative sources using spatial analysis and demographic questionnaires. Peri-urban householders reported that 10% of their premises had triatomines, whereas T. infestans was collected by timed manual searches or community-based surveillance in only nine (3% houses. Trypanosoma cruzi-infected T. infestans and Triatoma sordida were collected indoors only in peri-urban houses and were infected with TcV and TcI, respectively. The triatomines fed on chickens, cats and humans. Peri-urban infestations were most frequent in a squatter settlement and particularly within the recently built mud houses of rural immigrants, with large-sized households, more dogs and cats and more crowding. Several of the observed infestations were most likely associated with passive bug transport from other sources and with active bug dispersal from neighbouring foci. Thus, the households in the squatter settlement were at a greater risk of bug invasion and colonisation. In sum, the incipient process of domestic colonisation and transmission, along with persistent rural-to-urban migratory flows and unplanned urbanisation, indicate the need for active vector surveillance and control actions at the peri-urban interface of the Gran Chaco.

  3. Infestacion domestica por triatoma infestans y prevalencia de seropositivos al Trypanosoma cruzi en un area rural del nordeste argentino

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    M. Esther Bar

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Se llevó a cabo un estúdio epidemiológicopara obtener unpanorama general de la transmisión doméstica del Trypanosoma cruzi en áreas rurales del Departamento San Miguel, Conientes, Argentina. Se investigaron 100 viviendas precarias, 50,0% de las mismas resultó infestado por Triatoma infestans y 1,0% por T. sórdida, citãndose por primera vez para la provinda de Comentes la colonización domiciliaria de esta especie. El 23,1% de T. infestans estaba infectado por T. cruzi. La seroprevalencia de 388 pacientes analizados por hemaglutinacíôn indirecta e inmunofluorescencia indirecta fue 23,4%, destacándose el alto índice (12,9% constatado en menores de 10 anos. Losporcentajes de seropositividad aumentaron con la edad, alcanzándose 50,0% de infectados entre los 31-40 anos. La infestación doméstica por T. infestans, la prevalencia humana de seropositivos al T. cruzi y las condiciones deprecariedad en que se desenvuelve la vida de los pobladores revelan la vigência de la endemia chagãsica en el área estudiada.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Repetitive DNA between the Main Vectors of Chagas Disease: Triatoma infestans and Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Sebastián; Mora, Pablo; Vela, Jesús; Palomeque, Teresa; Sánchez, Antonio; Panzera, Francisco; Lorite, Pedro

    2018-04-24

    Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis affects six to seven million people worldwide, mostly in Latin America. This disease is transmitted by hematophagous insects known as "kissing bugs" (Hemiptera, Triatominae), with Triatoma infestans and Rhodnius prolixus being the two most important vector species. Despite the fact that both species present the same diploid chromosome number (2 n = 22), they have remarkable differences in their total DNA content, chromosome structure and genome organization. Variations in the DNA genome size are expected to be due to differences in the amount of repetitive DNA sequences. The T. infestans genome-wide analysis revealed the existence of 42 satellite DNA families. BLAST searches of these sequences against the R. prolixus genome assembly revealed that only four of these satellite DNA families are shared between both species, suggesting a great differentiation between the Triatoma and Rhodnius genomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) location of these repetitive DNAs in both species showed that they are dispersed on the euchromatic regions of all autosomes and the X chromosome. Regarding the Y chromosome, these common satellite DNAs are absent in T. infestans but they are present in the R. prolixus Y chromosome. These results support a different origin and/or evolution in the Y chromosome of both species.

  5. Deltamethrin Binding to Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Lipoproteins. Analysis by Solvent Bar Microextraction Coupled to Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulbecco, A B; Mijailovsky, S J; Girotti, J R; Juárez, M P

    2015-11-01

    The binding of deltamethrin (DLM) to the hemipteran Triatoma infestans (Klug) hemolymph lipoproteins was evaluated in vitro. After DLM incubation with the insect hemolymph, lipoproteins were fractioned by ultracentrifugation. DLM binding was analyzed by a microextractive technique-solvent bar microextraction-a solventless methodology to extract DLM from each lipoprotein fraction. This is a novel use of the technique applied to extract an insecticide from an insect fluid. Capillary gas chromatography with microelectron capture detection was used to detect DLM bound by the T. infestans hemolymph lipoproteins and to identify the preferred DLM carrier. We show that Lp and VHDLp I lipoproteins are mainly responsible for DLM transport in T. infestans, both in DLM-resistant and DLM-susceptible bugs. Our results also indicate that DLM amounts transported are not related to DLM susceptibility. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Elemental variations in the germinating fungus Phytophthora palmivora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzolini, A.P.; Sealock, R.M.; Legge, G.J.F.; Grant, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured the elemental variations between zoospores and germinating cystospores of the fungus Phytophthora palmivora, using a scanning proton microprobe. Averaged over a number of individual cells, our results indicate that the level of Ca is much lower in germinating cystospores than in zoospores. The levels of S, Cl, and Zn also appear to be lower, and the level of K appears to be higher. The spatial distribution of elements within the germinating cystospore is very similar for P, S, Cl, K, Mn, Fe, and Cu, but significantly different for Ca and Zn. (orig.)

  7. Elemental variations in the germinating fungus Phytophthora palmivora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolini, A. P.; Grant, B. R.; Sealock, R. M.; Legge, G. J. F.

    1991-03-01

    We have measured the elemental variations between zoospores and germinating cystospores of the fungus Phytophthora palmivora, using a scanning proton microprobe. Averaged over a number of individual cells, our results indicate that the level of Ca is much lower in germinating cystospores than in zoospores. The levels of S, Cl, and Zn also appear to be lower, and the level of K appears to be higher. The spatial distribution of elements within the germinating cystospore is very similar for P, S, Cl, K, Mn, Fe, and Cu, but significantly different for Ca and Zn.

  8. Effectors from Wheat Rust Fungi Suppress Multiple Plant Defense Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sowmya R; Yin, Chuntao; Kud, Joanna; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Mahoney, Aaron K; Xiao, Fangming; Hulbert, Scot H

    2017-01-01

    Fungi that cause cereal rust diseases (genus Puccinia) are important pathogens of wheat globally. Upon infection, the fungus secretes a number of effector proteins. Although a large repository of putative effectors has been predicted using bioinformatic pipelines, the lack of available high-throughput effector screening systems has limited functional studies on these proteins. In this study, we mined the available transcriptomes of Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis to look for potential effectors that suppress host hypersensitive response (HR). Twenty small (wheat, confirming its activity in a homologous system. Overall, this study provides the first evidence for the presence of effectors in Puccinia species suppressing multiple plant defense responses.

  9. Spatial and temporal distribution of house infestation by Triatoma infestans in the Toro Toro municipality, Potosi, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza Echeverria, Jorge; Rodriguez, Antonio Nogales; Cortez, Mirko Rojas; Diotaiuti, Liléia Gonçalves; Gorla, David E

    2017-02-02

    Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Trypanosoma cruzi in Bolivia. The species is present both in domestic and peridomestic structures of rural areas, and in wild ecotopes of the Andean valleys and the Great Chaco. The identification of areas persistently showing low and high house infestation by the vector is important for the management of vector control programs. This study aimed at analyzing the temporal and spatial distribution of house infestation by T. infestans in the Toro Toro municipality (Potosi, Bolivia) between 2009 and 2014, and its association with environmental variables. House infestation and T. infestans density were calculated from entomological surveys of houses in the study area, using a fixed-time effort sampling technique. The spatial heterogeneity of house infestation was evaluated using the SatScan statistic. Association between house infestation with Bioclim variables (Worldclim database) and altitude was analyzed using a generalized linear model (GLM) with a logit link. Model selection was based on the Akaike information criteria after eliminating collinearity between variables using the variable inflation factor. The final model was used to create a probability map of house infestation for the Toro Toro municipality. A total of 73 communities and 16,489 house evaluation events were analyzed. Presence of T. infestans was recorded on 480 house evaluation events, giving an overall annual infestation of 2.9% during the studied period (range 1.5-5.4% in 2009 and 2012). Vector density remained at about 1.25 insects/ house. Infestation was highly aggregated in five clusters, including 11 communities. Relative risk of infestation within these clusters was 1.7-3.9 times the value for the regional average. Four environmental variables were identified as good descriptors of house infestation, explaining 57% of house infestation variability. The model allowed the estimation of a house infestation surface for the Toro Toro municipality. This

  10. Susceptibility to deltamethrin of wild and domestic populations of Triatoma infestans of the Gran Chaco and the Inter-Andean Valleys of Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Marinely Bustamante; D'Avila, Grasielle Caldas Pessoa; Orellana, Ana Lineth Garcia; Cortez, Mirko Rojas; Rosa, Aline Cristine Luiz; Noireau, François; Diotaiuti, Liléia Gonçalves

    2014-11-14

    The persistence of Triatoma infestans and the continuous transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Inter-Andean Valleys and in the Gran Chaco of Bolivia are of great significance. Coincidentally, it is in these regions the reach of the vector control strategies is limited, and reports of T. infestans resistance to insecticides, including in wild populations, have been issued. This study aims to characterize the susceptibility to deltamethrin of wild and domestic populations of T. infestans from Bolivia, in order to better understand the extent of this relevant problem. Susceptibility to deltamethrin was assessed in nine, wild and domestic, populations of T. infestans from the Gran Chaco and the Inter-Andean Valleys of Bolivia. Serial dilutions of deltamethrin in acetone (0.2 μL) were topically applied in first instar nymphs (F1, five days old, fasting, weight 1.2 ± 0.2 mg). Dose response results were analyzed with PROBIT version 2, determining the lethal doses, slope and resistance ratios (RR). Qualitative tests were also performed. Three wild T. infestans dark morph samples of Chaco from the Santa Cruz Department were susceptible to deltamethrin with RR50 of Bolivia are less susceptible.

  11. Slow sand filters effectively reduce Phytophthora after a pathogen switch from Fusarium and a simulated pump failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eric; Oki, Lorence R

    2013-09-15

    Slow sand filtration has been shown to effectively reduce Phytophthora zoospores in irrigation water. This experiment tested the reduction of Phytophthora colony forming units (CFUs) by slow sand filtration systems after switching the pathogen contaminating plant leachate from Fusarium to Phytophthora and the resilience of the system to a short period without water, as might be caused by a pump failure. The slow sand filtration system greatly reduced Phytophthora CFUs and transmission after switching the pathogens. In addition, Phytophthora reduction by the slow sand filter was equally effective before and after the simulated pump failure. Reduction of Fusarium was not seen by the SSFs, before or after the simulated pump failure. The results suggest that slow sand filters are effective at reducing larger organisms, such as Phytophthora zoospores, even after a pump failure or a change in pathogens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Zoospore exudates from Phytophthora nicotianae affect immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; McDowell, John M; Hong, Chuanxue

    2017-01-01

    Zoospore exudates play important roles in promoting zoospore communication, homing and germination during plant infection by Phytophthora. However, it is not clear whether exudates affect plant immunity. Zoospore-free fluid (ZFF) and zoospores of P. nicotianae were investigated comparatively for effects on resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 and mutants that affect signaling mediated by salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA): eds16 (enhanced disease susceptibility16), pad4 (phytoalexin deficient4), and npr1 (nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1). Col-0 attracted more zoospores and had severe tissue damage when flooded with a zoospore suspension in ZFF. Mutants treated with ZFF alone developed disease symptoms similar to those inoculated with zoospores and requirements of EDS16 and PAD4 for plant responses to zoospores and the exudates was apparent. Zoospore and ZFFs also induced expression of the PR1 and PDF1.2 marker genes for defense regulated by SA and JA, respectively. However, ZFF affected more JA defense signaling, down regulating PR1 when SA signaling or synthesis is deficient, which may be responsible for Arabidopsis mutant plants more susceptible to infection by high concentration of P. nicotianae zoospores. These results suggest that zoospore exudates can function as virulence factors and inducers of plant immune responses during plant infection by Phytophthora.

  13. Zoospore exudates from Phytophthora nicotianae affect immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Kong

    Full Text Available Zoospore exudates play important roles in promoting zoospore communication, homing and germination during plant infection by Phytophthora. However, it is not clear whether exudates affect plant immunity. Zoospore-free fluid (ZFF and zoospores of P. nicotianae were investigated comparatively for effects on resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 and mutants that affect signaling mediated by salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA: eds16 (enhanced disease susceptibility16, pad4 (phytoalexin deficient4, and npr1 (nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1. Col-0 attracted more zoospores and had severe tissue damage when flooded with a zoospore suspension in ZFF. Mutants treated with ZFF alone developed disease symptoms similar to those inoculated with zoospores and requirements of EDS16 and PAD4 for plant responses to zoospores and the exudates was apparent. Zoospore and ZFFs also induced expression of the PR1 and PDF1.2 marker genes for defense regulated by SA and JA, respectively. However, ZFF affected more JA defense signaling, down regulating PR1 when SA signaling or synthesis is deficient, which may be responsible for Arabidopsis mutant plants more susceptible to infection by high concentration of P. nicotianae zoospores. These results suggest that zoospore exudates can function as virulence factors and inducers of plant immune responses during plant infection by Phytophthora.

  14. Defective zoospore encystment and suppressed cyst germination of Phytophthora palmivora caused by transient leaching treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksterhuis, J; Deacon, J W

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of encysting zoospores of Phytophthora palmivora during leaching conditions was studied. Zoospores encysted and germinated successfully on polycarbonate membranes after mechanical agitation. Transient (10 min) leaching treatments with nutrient-free buffer underneath the membranes

  15. Disease Severity Rating of Chile Pepper Plants Inoculated with Phytophthora Capsici Collected in Taiwan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The data are the phenotypic host reactions of a recombinant inbred line population of Capsicum annuum developed to differentiate races of Phytophthora capsici. The...

  16. A test system to quantify inoculum in runoff from Phytophthora ramorum-infected plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina. Shishkoff

    2010-01-01

    Foliar hosts of Phytophthora ramorum are often susceptible to root infection, but the epidemiological significance of such infections is unknown. We used a standardized test system to study inoculum in runoff from root-infected Viburnum tinus cuttings.

  17. AFLPs detect low genetic diversity for Phytophthora nemorosa and P. pseudosyringae in the US and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel E. Linzer; David M. Rizzo; Santa Olga Cacciola; Matteo Garbelotto

    2009-01-01

    In California and Oregon, two recently described oomycete forest pathogens, Phytophthora nemorosa and P. pseudosyringae, overlap in their host and geographic ranges with the virulent P. ramorum, causal agent of "sudden oak death." Epidemiological observations, namely broader geographic...

  18. Kaliumfosfiet helpt kalanchoë tegen phytophthora (interview met Filip van Noort)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neefjes, H.; Noort, van F.R.

    2009-01-01

    Toevoegen van plantversterker kaliumfosfiet maakt kalanchoë weerbaar tegen phytophthora. Onderzoek bij WUR Glastuinbouw heeft dit aangetoond in een deel van een proef. De praktijk is voorzichtig met het middel

  19. Is stump sprout treatment necessary to effectively control Phytophthora ramorum in California's wildlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yana Valachovic; Richard Cobb; David Rizzo; Brendan Twieg; Chris Lee; Radoslaw Glebocki

    2013-01-01

    In California, wildland hosts that support sporulation of Phytophthora ramorum, such as California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt.) and tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S.H. Oh), also develop prolific basal sprouts following...

  20. Microbiota Characterization of Compost Using Omics Approaches Opens New Perspectives for Phytophthora Root Rot Control

    OpenAIRE

    Blaya, Josefa; Marhuenda, Frutos C.; Pascual, Jose A.; Ros, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora root rot caused by Phytophthora nicotianae is an economically important disease in pepper crops. The use of suppressive composts is a low environmental impact method for its control. Although attempts have been made to reveal the relationship between microbiota and compost suppressiveness, little is known about the microorganisms associated with disease suppression. Here, an Ion Torrent platform was used to assess the microbial composition of composts made of different agro-indus...

  1. Repeat-containing protein effectors of plant-associated organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl H. Mesarich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Many plant-associated organisms, including microbes, nematodes, and insects, deliver effector proteins into the apoplast, vascular tissue, or cell cytoplasm of their prospective hosts. These effectors function to promote colonization, typically by altering host physiology or by modulating host immune responses. The same effectors however, can also trigger host immunity in the presence of cognate host immune receptor proteins, and thus prevent colonization. To circumvent effector-triggered immunity, or to further enhance host colonization, plant-associated organisms often rely on adaptive effector evolution. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that several effectors of plant-associated organisms are repeat-containing proteins (RCPs that carry tandem or non-tandem arrays of an amino acid sequence or structural motif. In this review, we highlight the diverse roles that these repeat domains play in RCP effector function. We also draw attention to the potential role of these repeat domains in adaptive evolution with regards to RCP effector function and the evasion of effector-triggered immunity. The aim of this review is to increase the profile of RCP effectors from plant-associated organisms.

  2. Multiple origins of downy mildews and mito-nuclear discordance within the paraphyletic genus Phytophthora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Robin A.; Mehl, Heather K.; Blomquist, Cheryl L.; McRoberts, Neil; Rizzo, David M.

    2018-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships between thirteen species of downy mildew and 103 species of Phytophthora (plant-pathogenic oomycetes) were investigated with two nuclear and four mitochondrial loci, using several likelihood-based approaches. Three Phytophthora taxa and all downy mildew taxa were excluded from the previously recognized subgeneric clades of Phytophthora, though all were strongly supported within the paraphyletic genus. Downy mildews appear to be polyphyletic, with graminicolous downy mildews (GDM), brassicolous downy mildews (BDM) and downy mildews with colored conidia (DMCC) forming a clade with the previously unplaced Phytophthora taxon totara; downy mildews with pyriform haustoria (DMPH) were placed in their own clade with affinities to the obligate biotrophic P. cyperi. Results suggest the recognition of four additional clades within Phytophthora, but few relationships between clades could be resolved. Trees containing all twenty extant downy mildew genera were produced by adding partial coverage of seventeen additional downy mildew taxa; these trees supported the monophyly of the BDMs, DMCCs and DMPHs but suggested that the GDMs are paraphyletic in respect to the BDMs or polyphyletic. Incongruence between nuclear-only and mitochondrial-only trees suggests introgression may have occurred between several clades, particularly those containing biotrophs, questioning whether obligate biotrophic parasitism and other traits with polyphyletic distributions arose independently or were horizontally transferred. Phylogenetic approaches may be limited in their ability to resolve some of the complex relationships between the “subgeneric” clades of Phytophthora, which include twenty downy mildew genera and hundreds of species. PMID:29529094

  3. Membrane-based oligonucleotide array developed from multiple markers for the detection of many Phytophthora species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Djama, Zeinab Robleh; Coffey, Michael D; Martin, Frank N; Bilodeau, Guillaume J; Radmer, Lorien; Denton, Geoff; Lévesque, C André

    2013-01-01

    Most Phytophthora spp. are destructive plant pathogens; therefore, effective monitoring and accurate early detection are important means of preventing potential epidemics and outbreaks of diseases. In the current study, a membrane-based oligonucleotide array was developed that can detect Phytophthora spp. reliably using three DNA regions; namely, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the 5' end of cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene (cox1), and the intergenic region between cytochrome c oxidase 2 gene (cox2) and cox1 (cox2-1 spacer). Each sequence data set contained ≈250 sequences representing 98 described and 15 undescribed species of Phytophthora. The array was validated with 143 pure cultures and 35 field samples. Together, nonrejected oligonucleotides from all three markers have the ability to reliably detect 82 described and 8 undescribed Phytophthora spp., including several quarantine or regulated pathogens such as Phytophthora ramorum. Our results showed that a DNA array containing signature oligonucleotides designed from multiple genomic regions provided robustness and redundancy for the detection and differentiation of closely related taxon groups. This array has the potential to be used as a routine diagnostic tool for Phytophthora spp. from complex environmental samples without the need for extensive growth of cultures.

  4. Pyrosequencing of environmental soil samples reveals biodiversity of the Phytophthora resident community in chestnut forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Andrea; Bruni, Natalia; Tomassini, Alessia; Franceschini, Selma; Vettraino, Anna Maria

    2013-09-01

    Pyrosequencing analysis was performed on soils from Italian chestnut groves to evaluate the diversity of the resident Phytophthora community. Sequences analysed with a custom database discriminated 15 pathogenic Phytophthoras including species common to chestnut soils, while a total of nine species were detected with baiting. The two sites studied differed in Phytophthora diversity and the presence of specific taxa responded to specific ecological traits of the sites. Furthermore, some species not previously recorded were represented by a discrete number of reads; among these species, Phytophthora ramorum was detected at both sites. Pyrosequencing was demonstrated to be a very sensitive technique to describe the Phytophthora community in soil and was able to detect species not easy to be isolated from soil with standard baiting techniques. In particular, pyrosequencing is an highly efficient tool for investigating the colonization of new environments by alien species, and for ecological and adaptive studies coupled with biological detection methods. This study represents the first application of pyrosequencing for describing Phytophthoras in environmental soil samples. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Manipulation of host membranes by bacterial effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Hyeilin; Sreelatha, Anju; Orth, Kim

    2011-07-18

    Bacterial pathogens interact with host membranes to trigger a wide range of cellular processes during the course of infection. These processes include alterations to the dynamics between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton, and subversion of the membrane-associated pathways involved in vesicle trafficking. Such changes facilitate the entry and replication of the pathogen, and prevent its phagocytosis and degradation. In this Review, we describe the manipulation of host membranes by numerous bacterial effectors that target phosphoinositide metabolism, GTPase signalling and autophagy.

  6. Diatomaceous earth and oil enhance effectiveness of Metarhizium anisopliae against Triatoma infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Christian; Rodrigues, Juscelino; Rocha, Luiz F N

    2012-04-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi, especially Metarhizium anisopliae, have potential for integrated control of peridomestic triatomine bugs. However, the high susceptibility of these vectors to fungal infection at elevated ambient humidities decreases in the comparatively dry conditions that often prevail in their microhabitats. A formulation adapted to this target pest that induces high and quick mortality can help to overcome these drawbacks. In the present study diatomaceous earth, which is used against pests of stored grains or as an additive to mycoinsecticides, delayed but did not reduce in vitro germination of M. anisopliae s.l. IP 46 conidia after >24h agitation without affecting viability, and did not hamper the survival of Triatoma infestans nymphs exposed to treated surfaces. The settling behavior of nymphs on a treated surface in choice tests depended on the concentration of diatomaceous earth and ambient light level. Conidia formulated with diatomaceous earth and a vegetable oil synergized the insecticidal effect of the fungus in nymphs, and quickly killed all treated insects, even at 75% relative humidity (LT(90) 8.3 days) where unformulated conidia caused only 25% mortality after a 25 days exposure. The improved performance of a combined oil and desiccant dust formulation of this Metarhizium isolate raises the likelihood for its successful mycoinsecticidal use for triatomine control and, apparently, against other domestic insect pests. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Interaction between Didelphis albiventris and Triatoma infestans in relation to Trypanosoma cruzi transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás J. Schweigmann

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to prove if a high Trypanosoma cruzi prevalence of opossums might be reached with few potential infective contacts. One non-infected Didelphis albiventris to T. cruzi and 10 infected nymphs of Triatoma infestans were left together during 23 hr in a device that simulated a natural opossum burrow. Twenty-six replicates were perfomed using marsupials and triatomines only once. Potentially infective contacts occurred in all the trials. From the 26 opossums used in trials, 54% did not eat any bug. Of the 260 bugs used, 21% were predated. In the 25 trials involving 205 surving bugs, 36 % of them did not feed. In 15/25 cases, maior ou igual a 60% of the triatomines were able to feed. The parasitological follow-up of 24 opossums showed that among 10 that had eaten bugs, 4 turned out infected and among the 14 that had not predate, 3 (21% became positive. In sum, 7/24 (29% of the marsupials acquired the infection after the experiment. This infection rate was similar to the prevalences found for the opossum population of Santiago del Estero, Argentina, suggesting that the prevalences observed in the field might be reached if each marsupial would encounter infected bugs just once in its lifetime.

  8. Selection of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae Isolates to Control Triatoma infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Christian

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty three isolates of Beauveria bassiana and 13 isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae were tested on third instar nymphs of Triatoma infestans, a serious vector of Chagas disease. Pathogenicity tests at saturated humidity showed that this insect is very susceptible to fungal infection. At lower relative humidity (50%, conditions expected in the vector microhabitat, virulence was significantly different among isolates. Cumulative mortality 15 days after treatment varied from 17.5 to 97.5%, and estimates of 50% survival time varied from 6 to 11 days. Maintaining lower relative humidity, four B. bassiana and two M. anisopliae isolates were selected for analysis of virulence at different conidial concentrations and temperatures. Lethal concentrations sufficient to kill 50% of insects (LC50 varied from 7.1x105 to 4.3x106 conidia/ml, for a B. bassiana isolate (CG 14 and a M. anisopliae isolate (CG 491 respectively. Most isolates, particularly B. bassiana isolates CG 24 and CG 306, proved to be more virulent at 25 and 30°C, compared to 15 and 20°C. The differential virulence at 50% humidity observed among some B. bassiana isolates was not correlated to phenetic groups in cluster analysis of RAPD markers. In fact, the B. bassiana isolates analyzed presented a high homogeneity (> 73% similarity.

  9. Residual infestation and recolonization during urban Triatoma infestans Bug Control Campaign, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbu, Corentin M; Buttenheim, Alison M; Pumahuanca, Maria-Luz Hancco; Calderón, Javier E Quintanilla; Salazar, Renzo; Carrión, Malwina; Rospigliossi, Andy Catacora; Chavez, Fernando S Malaga; Alvarez, Karina Oppe; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan; Náquira, César; Levy, Michael Z

    2014-12-01

    Chagas disease vector control campaigns are being conducted in Latin America, but little is known about medium-term or long-term effectiveness of these efforts, especially in urban areas. After analyzing entomologic data for 56,491 households during the treatment phase of a Triatoma infestans bug control campaign in Arequipa, Peru, during 2003-2011, we estimated that 97.1% of residual infestations are attributable to untreated households. Multivariate models for the surveillance phase of the campaign obtained during 2009-2012 confirm that nonparticipation in the initial treatment phase is a major risk factor (odds ratio [OR] 21.5, 95% CI 3.35-138). Infestation during surveillance also increased over time (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.15-2.09 per year). In addition, we observed a negative interaction between nonparticipation and time (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-0.99), suggesting that recolonization by vectors progressively dilutes risk associated with nonparticipation. Although the treatment phase was effective, recolonization in untreated households threatens the long-term success of vector control.

  10. Residual Infestation and Recolonization during Urban Triatoma infestans Bug Control Campaign, Peru1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttenheim, Alison M.; Pumahuanca, Maria-Luz Hancco; Calderón, Javier E. Quintanilla; Salazar, Renzo; Carrión, Malwina; Rospigliossi, Andy Catacora; Chavez, Fernando S. Malaga; Alvarez, Karina Oppe; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan; Náquira, César; Levy, Michael Z.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease vector control campaigns are being conducted in Latin America, but little is known about medium-term or long-term effectiveness of these efforts, especially in urban areas. After analyzing entomologic data for 56,491 households during the treatment phase of a Triatoma infestans bug control campaign in Arequipa, Peru, during 2003–2011, we estimated that 97.1% of residual infestations are attributable to untreated households. Multivariate models for the surveillance phase of the campaign obtained during 2009–2012 confirm that nonparticipation in the initial treatment phase is a major risk factor (odds ratio [OR] 21.5, 95% CI 3.35–138). Infestation during surveillance also increased over time (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.15–2.09 per year). In addition, we observed a negative interaction between nonparticipation and time (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53–0.99), suggesting that recolonization by vectors progressively dilutes risk associated with nonparticipation. Although the treatment phase was effective, recolonization in untreated households threatens the long-term success of vector control. PMID:25423045

  11. Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Party S07.02.09: Phytophthoras in forests and natural ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.M. Goheen; S.J. Frankel

    2009-01-01

    The fourth meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Party S07.02.09, Phytophthoras in Forests and Natural Ecosystems provided a forum for current research on Phytophthora species worldwide. Seventy-eight submissions describing papers and posters on recent developments in Phytophthora diseases of trees and natural ecosystems in...

  12. Fibre optic sensor on robot end effector for flexible assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung, K.L.; Lau, W.S.; Choi, C.K.; Shan, Y.Y.

    1995-01-01

    A fibre optic sensor system was constructed for use on robot end effectors for flexible assembly. The sensor detected the deviations between robot end effector and the workpiece. The signal was fed back to robot controller to shift the end effector until the centre of end effector and the centre of workpiece were aligned at the correct orientation. Then workpiece can be grasped symmetrically. Sensor fusion concept was used to guard against sensor system failure. Fuzzy linguistic variable and control rule concept were introduced in the sensor integration. The experimental setup for the sensor integrated system was shown. The accuracy was also discussed

  13. Changes associated with laboratory rearing in antennal sensilla patterns of Triatoma infestans, Rhodnius prolixus, and Rhodnius pallescens (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalá SS

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined changes in the array of antennal sensilla of three species of Triatominae (Triatoma infestans, Rhodnius prolixus, and R. pallescens following their establishment for different periods in laboratory culture. In each case, the laboratory colonies were compared with conspecific samples taken directly from the field, by quantitative analysis of the sensilla arrays on the three distal segments of the antenna in terms of the densities of three types of chemoreceptors (basiconics and thick and thin walled trichoids and one type of mechanoreceptor (bristles. Sensilla densities were compared by ANOVA or non-parametric tests, and by multivariate discriminant analysis. Strains of the same species reared in different laboratories showed significant differences in their sensilla arrays, especially when compared to field-collected material from the same geographic origin. A Bolivian strain of T. infestans reared in the laboratory for 15 years and fed at monthly intervals, showed greatest differences from its conspecific wild forms, especially in terms of reductions in the number of chemoreceptors. By contrast, an Argentine strain of T. infestans reared for 25 years in the laboratory and fed weekly, showed a relative increase in the density of mechanoreceptors. A Colombian strain of R. prolixus reared for 20 years and fed weekly or fortnightly, showed only modest differences in the sensilla array when compared to its wild populations from the same area. However, a Colombian strain of R. pallescens reared for 12 years and fed fortnightly, did show highly significant reductions in one form of chemoreceptor compared to its conspecific wild populations. For all populations, multivariate analysis clearly discriminated between laboratory and field collected specimens, suggesting that artificial rearing can lead to modifications in the sensory array. This not only supports the idea of morphological plasticity in these species, but also suggests caution in

  14. Infection of Phytophthora palmivora from Soil in Cocoa Plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Purwantara

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora palmivora causes serious losses on cocoa in Indonesia and world-wide. The research aimed to assess the potential of soil as source of inocula for Phytophthora diseases in cocoa. Soil samples were baited using a healthy cocoa pod tissue, and the pathogen was isolated for morphological and molecular identification. Baiting technique was successfully used to detect the presence of P. palmivora in soil samples, and this was confirmed by morphological and molecular identification. P. palmivora can be detected in soil in all year around in wet areas indicating that soil is a massive and consistent source of inocula. Surveys conducted on the soil of Amazonian, Amelonado and Trinitario blocks of various ages showed that P. palmivora can be found in old and young cocoa blocks, even as young as 3 or 4 years. P. palmivora infection from soil to the pods appears to be mainly through contact or rain splash. Baiting with whole healthy pods exposed at different heights above undisturbed litter and above bare soil showed that the infection still occurred at 100 cm above the soil, even though it decreased gradually with the height. Infection from litter was not different to that from bare soil, indicating that the litter layer is not acting physically as a shield preventing rain from splashing the inocula up from wet soil to the pods. However, in tests for the possibility of P. palmivora carried through air convection, no pod was found to be infected, suggesting that the pathogen was not carried through convective accend of aerosol droplets from soil surface up to pods in the canopy.Key words : Theobroma cacao, pod rot, stem canker, baiting.

  15. The eco-epidemiology of Triatoma infestans in the temperate Monte Desert ecoregion of mid-western Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Carbajal-de-la-Fuente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The eco-epidemiological status of Chagas disease in the Monte Desert ecoregion of western Argentina is largely unknown. We investigated the environmental and socio-demographic determinants of house infestation with Triatoma infestans, bug abundance, vector infection with Trypanosoma cruzi and host-feeding sources in a well-defined rural area of Lavalle Department in the Mendoza province. METHODS Technical personnel inspected 198 houses for evidence of infestation with T. infestans, and the 76 houses included in the current study were re-inspected. In parallel with the vector survey, an environmental and socio-demographic survey was also conducted. Univariate risk factor analysis for domiciliary infestation was carried out using Firth penalised logistic regression. We fitted generalised linear models for house infestation and bug abundance. Blood meals were tested with a direct ELISA assay, and T. cruzi infection was determined using a hot-start polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting the kinetoplast minicircle (kDNA-PCR. FINDINGS The households studied included an aged population living in precarious houses whose main economic activities included goat husbandry. T. infestans was found in 21.2% of 198 houses and in 55.3% of the 76 re-inspected houses. Peridomestic habitats exhibited higher infestation rates and bug abundances than did domiciles, and goat corrals showed high levels of infestation. The main host-feeding sources were goats. Vector infection was present in 10.2% of domiciles and 3.2% of peridomiciles. Generalised linear models showed that peridomestic infestation was positively and significantly associated with the presence of mud walls and the abundance of chickens and goats, and bug abundance increased with the number of all hosts except rabbits. MAIN CONCLUSIONS We highlight the relative importance of specific peridomestic structures (i.e., goat corrals and chicken coops associated with construction materials and host

  16. Two previously unknown Phytophthora species associated with brown rot of Pomelo (Citrus grandis fruits in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Puglisi

    Full Text Available Two distinct Phytophthora taxa were found to be associated with brown rot of pomelo (Citrus grandis, a new disease of this ancestral Citrus species, in the Vinh Long province, Mekong River Delta area, southern Vietnam. On the basis of morphological characters and using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI as barcode genes, one of the two taxa was provisionally named as Phytophthora sp. prodigiosa, being closely related to but distinct from P. insolita, a species in Phytophthora Clade 9, while the other one, was closely related to but distinct from the Clade 2 species P. meadii and was informally designated as Phytophthora sp. mekongensis. Isolates of P. sp. prodigiosa and P. sp. mekongensis were also obtained from necrotic fibrous roots of Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana rootstocks grafted with 'King' mandarin (Citrus nobilis and from trees of pomelo, respectively, in other provinces of the Mekong River Delta, indicating a widespread occurrence of both Phytophthora species in this citrus-growing area. Koch's postulates were fulfilled via pathogenicity tests on fruits of various Citrus species, including pomelo, grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi, sweet orange (Citrus x sinensis and bergamot (Citrus x bergamia as well as on the rootstock of 2-year-old trees of pomelo and sweet orange on 'Carrizo' citrange (C. sinensis 'Washington Navel' x Poncirus trifoliata. This is the first report of a Phytophthora species from Clade 2 other than P. citricola and P. citrophthora as causal agent of fruit brown rot of Citrus worldwide and the first report of P. insolita complex in Vietnam. Results indicate that likely Vietnam is still an unexplored reservoir of Phytophthora diversity.

  17. Two previously unknown Phytophthora species associated with brown rot of Pomelo (Citrus grandis) fruits in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Ivana; De Patrizio, Alessandro; Schena, Leonardo; Jung, Thomas; Evoli, Maria; Pane, Antonella; Van Hoa, Nguyen; Van Tri, Mai; Wright, Sandra; Ramstedt, Mauritz; Olsson, Christer; Faedda, Roberto; Magnano di San Lio, Gaetano; Cacciola, Santa Olga

    2017-01-01

    Two distinct Phytophthora taxa were found to be associated with brown rot of pomelo (Citrus grandis), a new disease of this ancestral Citrus species, in the Vinh Long province, Mekong River Delta area, southern Vietnam. On the basis of morphological characters and using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) as barcode genes, one of the two taxa was provisionally named as Phytophthora sp. prodigiosa, being closely related to but distinct from P. insolita, a species in Phytophthora Clade 9, while the other one, was closely related to but distinct from the Clade 2 species P. meadii and was informally designated as Phytophthora sp. mekongensis. Isolates of P. sp. prodigiosa and P. sp. mekongensis were also obtained from necrotic fibrous roots of Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana) rootstocks grafted with 'King' mandarin (Citrus nobilis) and from trees of pomelo, respectively, in other provinces of the Mekong River Delta, indicating a widespread occurrence of both Phytophthora species in this citrus-growing area. Koch's postulates were fulfilled via pathogenicity tests on fruits of various Citrus species, including pomelo, grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi), sweet orange (Citrus x sinensis) and bergamot (Citrus x bergamia) as well as on the rootstock of 2-year-old trees of pomelo and sweet orange on 'Carrizo' citrange (C. sinensis 'Washington Navel' x Poncirus trifoliata). This is the first report of a Phytophthora species from Clade 2 other than P. citricola and P. citrophthora as causal agent of fruit brown rot of Citrus worldwide and the first report of P. insolita complex in Vietnam. Results indicate that likely Vietnam is still an unexplored reservoir of Phytophthora diversity.

  18. CRN13 candidate effectors from plant and animal eukaryotic pathogens are DNA-binding proteins which trigger host DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Garcés, Diana; Camborde, Laurent; Pel, Michiel J C; Jauneau, Alain; Martinez, Yves; Néant, Isabelle; Leclerc, Catherine; Moreau, Marc; Dumas, Bernard; Gaulin, Elodie

    2016-04-01

    To successfully colonize their host, pathogens produce effectors that can interfere with host cellular processes. Here we investigated the function of CRN13 candidate effectors produced by plant pathogenic oomycetes and detected in the genome of the amphibian pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (BdCRN13). When expressed in Nicotiana, AeCRN13, from the legume root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, increases the susceptibility of the leaves to the oomycete Phytophthora capsici. When transiently expressed in amphibians or plant cells, AeCRN13 and BdCRN13 localize to the cell nuclei, triggering aberrant cell development and eventually causing cell death. Using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments in plant cells, we showed that both CRN13s interact with nuclear DNA and trigger plant DNA damage response (DDR). Mutating key amino acid residues in a predicted HNH-like endonuclease motif abolished the interaction of AeCRN13 with DNA, the induction of DDR and the enhancement of Nicotiana susceptibility to P. capsici. Finally, H2AX phosphorylation, a marker of DNA damage, and enhanced expression of genes involved in the DDR were observed in A. euteiches-infected Medicago truncatula roots. These results show that CRN13 from plant and animal eukaryotic pathogens promotes host susceptibility by targeting nuclear DNA and inducing DDR. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Effects of Phytophthora cinnamomi isolate, inoculum delivery method, flood, and drought on vigor, disease severity and mortality of blueberry plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four studies evaluated the effect of Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates, inoculum delivery methods, and flood and drought conditions on vigor, disease severity scores, and survival of blueberry plants grown in pots in the greenhouse. Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates were obtained from blueberry plants ...

  20. Using single strand conformational polymorphisms (SSCP) to identify Phytophthora species in Oregon forests affected by sudden oak death

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Hansen; C. Hesse; P. Reeser; W. Sutton; L. Winton

    2006-01-01

    Phytophthora species are abundant in streams, widespread in soils and occasionally found in diseased plants in the tanoak forests of southwestern Oregon. It is time-consuming and expensive to identify hundreds of isolates to species using morphology or internal transribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. We modified a published Phytophthora...

  1. Fungicide rotation schemes for managing Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon across Southeastern United States (NC, SC, and GA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora capsici has been documented as a pathogen on a wide variety of vegetable crops in the family Solanaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, and plants belonging to 23 other families. Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelons caused by P. capsici is particularly severe in southeastern U.S where optima...

  2. Phytophthora terminalis sp. nov. and Phytophthora occultans sp. nov., two invasive pathogens of ornamental plants in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man In 't Veld, Willem A; Rosendahl, Karin C H M; van Rijswick, Patricia C J; Meffert, Johan P; Westenberg, Marcel; van de Vossenberg, Bart T L H; Denton, Geoff; van Kuik, Fons A J

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade several Phytophthora strains were isolated from diseased Pachysandra terminalis plants suffering stem base and root rot, originating from the Netherlands and Belgium. All isolates were homothallic and had a felt-like colony pattern, produced semi-papillate sporangia, globose oogonia and had a maximum growth at ~ 27 C. Several additional Phytophthora strains were isolated from diseased Buxus sempervirens plants, originating from the Netherlands and Belgium, which had sustained stem base and root rot; similar strains also were isolated from Acer palmatum, Choisya ternata and Taxus in the United Kingdom. All isolates were homothallic and had a stellate colony pattern, produced larger semi-papillate sporangia and smaller globose oogonia than the isolates from Pa. terminalis and had a maximum growth temperature of ~ 30 C. Phylogenetic analyses of both species using the internal transcribed spacer region of the nuc rDNA (ITS), mt cytochrome oxidases subunit I gene (CoxI) and nuc translation elongation factor 1-α gene (TEF1α) revealed that all sequences of each species were identical at each locus and unique to that species, forming two distinct clusters in subclade 2a. Sequence analysis of partial β-tubulin genes showed that both taxa share an identical sequence that is identical to that of Ph. himalsilva, a species originating from Asia, suggesting a common Asian origin. Pathogenicity trials demonstrated disease symptoms on their respective hosts, and re-isolation and re-identification of the inoculated pathogens confirmed Koch's postulates. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  3. Nematode effector proteins: an emerging paradigm of parasitism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytonematodes use a stylet and secreted effectors to invade host tissues and extract nutrients to support their growth and development. The molecular function of nematode effectors is currently the subject of intense investigation. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of nematode ...

  4. Effector-Triggered Self-Replication in Coupled Subsystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komáromy, Dávid; Tezcan, Meniz; Schaeffer, Gaël; Marić, Ivana; Otto, Sijbren

    2017-11-13

    In living systems processes like genome duplication and cell division are carefully synchronized through subsystem coupling. If we are to create life de novo, similar control over essential processes such as self-replication need to be developed. Here we report that coupling two dynamic combinatorial subsystems, featuring two separate building blocks, enables effector-mediated control over self-replication. The subsystem based on the first building block shows only self-replication, whereas that based on the second one is solely responsive toward a specific external effector molecule. Mixing the subsystems arrests replication until the effector molecule is added, resulting in the formation of a host-effector complex and the liberation of the building block that subsequently engages in self-replication. The onset, rate and extent of self-replication is controlled by the amount of effector present. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Tissue specific heterogeneity in effector immune cell response

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    Saba eTufail

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Post pathogen invasion, migration of effector T-cell subsets to specific tissue locations is of prime importance for generation of robust immune response. Effector T cells are imprinted with distinct ‘homing codes’ (adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors during activation which regulate their targeted trafficking to specific tissues. Internal cues in the lymph node microenvironment along with external stimuli from food (vitamin A and sunlight (vitamin D3 prime dendritic cells, imprinting them to play centrestage in the induction of tissue tropism in effector T cells. B cells as well, in a manner similar to effector T cells, exhibit tissue tropic migration. In this review, we have focused on the factors regulating the generation and migration of effector T cells to various tissues alongwith giving an overview of tissue tropism in B cells.

  6. Phytophthora community structure analyses in Oregon nurseries inform systems approaches to disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Jennifer L; Knaus, Brian J; Fieland, Valerie J; Lewis, Carrie; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2014-10-01

    Nursery plants are important vectors for plant pathogens. Understanding what pathogens occur in nurseries in different production stages can be useful to the development of integrated systems approaches. Four horticultural nurseries in Oregon were sampled every 2 months for 4 years to determine the identity and community structure of Phytophthora spp. associated with different sources and stages in the nursery production cycle. Plants, potting media, used containers, water, greenhouse soil, and container yard substrates were systematically sampled from propagation to the field. From 674 Phytophthora isolates recovered, 28 different species or taxa were identified. The most commonly isolated species from plants were Phytophthora plurivora (33%), P. cinnamomi (26%), P. syringae (19%), and P. citrophthora (11%). From soil and gravel substrates, P. plurivora accounted for 25% of the isolates, with P. taxon Pgchlamydo, P. cryptogea, and P. cinnamomi accounting for 18, 17, and 15%, respectively. Five species (P. plurivora, P. syringae, P. taxon Pgchlamydo, P. gonapodyides, and P. cryptogea) were found in all nurseries. The greatest diversity of taxa occurred in irrigation water reservoirs (20 taxa), with the majority of isolates belonging to internal transcribed spacer clade 6, typically including aquatic opportunists. Nurseries differed in composition of Phytophthora communities across years, seasons, and source within the nursery. These findings suggest likely contamination hazards and target critical control points for management of Phytophthora disease using a systems approach.

  7. Phytophthora pseudopolonica sp. nov., a new species recovered from stream water in subtropical forests of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Wen; Zhao, Wen-Xia; Huai, Wen-Xia

    2017-09-01

    A new species of the genus Phytophthora was isolated from stream water in the subtropical forests of China during a survey of forest Phytophthora from 2011 to 2013. This new species is formally described here and named Phytophthora pseudopolonica sp. nov. This new homothallic species is distinct from other known Phytophthora species in morphology and produces nonpapillate and noncaducous sporangia with internal proliferation. Spherical hyphal swellings and thin-walled chlamydospores are abundant when the species is kept in sterile water. The P. pseudopolonica sp. nov. forms smooth oogonia with paragynous and sometimes amphigynous antheridia. The optimum growth temperature of the species is 30 °C in V8-juice agar with β-sitosterol, yet it barely grows at 5 °C and 35 °C. Based on sequences of the internal transcribed spacer and the combined β-tubulin and elongation factor 1α gene sequence data, isolates of the new species cluster together into a single branch and are close to Phytophthora polonicabelonging to clade 9.

  8. Multiple Phytophthora species associated with a single riparian ecosystem in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jan H; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J; Gryzenhout, Marieka

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of Phytophthora spp. in rivers and riparian ecosystems has received considerable international attention, although little such research has been conducted in South Africa. This study determined the diversity of Phytophthora spp. within a single river in Gauteng province of South Africa. Samples were collected over 1 y including biweekly river baiting with Rhododendron indicum leaves. Phytophthora isolates were identified with phylogenetic analyses of sequences for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (coxI) gene. Eight Phytophthora spp. were identified, including a new taxon, P. taxon Sisulu-river, and two hybrid species from Cooke's ITS clade 6. Of these, species from Clade 6 were the most abundant, including P. chlamydospora and P. lacustris. Species residing in Clade 2 also were encountered, including P. multivora, P. plurivora and P. citrophthora. The detection of eight species in this investigation of Phytophthora diversity in a single riparian river ecosystem in northern South Africa adds to the known diversity of this genus in South Africa and globally. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  9. Metabarcoding Analysis of Phytophthora Diversity Using Genus-Specific Primers and 454 Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigigallo, Maria I; Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Cacciola, Santa O; Faedda, Roberto; Sanzani, Simona M; Cooke, David E L; Schena, L

    2016-03-01

    A metabarcoding method based on genus-specific primers and 454 pyrosequencing was utilized to investigate the genetic diversity of Phytophthora spp. in soil and root samples of potted plants, from eight nurseries. Pyrosequencing enabled the detection of 25 Phytophthora phylotypes distributed in seven different clades and provided a much higher resolution than a corresponding cloning/Sanger sequencing approach. Eleven of these phylotypes, including P. cactorum, P. citricola s.str., P. palmivora, P. palmivora-like, P. megasperma or P. gonapodyides, P. ramorum, and five putative new Phytophthora species phylogenetically related to clades 1, 2, 4, 6, and 7 were detected only with the 454 pyrosequencing approach. We also found an additional 18 novel records of a phylotype in a particular nursery that were not detected with cloning/Sanger sequencing. Several aspects confirmed the reliability of the method: (i) many identical sequence types were identified independently in different nurseries, (ii) most sequence types identified with 454 pyrosequencing were identical to those from the cloning/Sanger sequencing approach and/or perfectly matched GenBank deposited sequences, and (iii) the divergence noted between sequence types of putative new Phytophthora species and all other detected sequences was sufficient to rule out sequencing errors. The proposed method represents a powerful tool to study Phytophthora diversity providing that particular attention is paid to the analysis of 454 pyrosequencing raw read sequences and to the identification of sequence types.

  10. The residual efficacy of a cypermethrin pour-on formulation applied on goats on the mortality and blood intake of Triatoma infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Amelotti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease in the Gran Chaco region of South America. As a frequent blood meal source for triatomine bugs, domestic goats play a key role in the eco-epidemiology of Chagas disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mortality and blood intake of T. infestans fed on goats that had been treated with different doses of pour-on insecticide. Third-instar nymphs were fed on goats that had been treated with 0 cc, 5 cc, 10 cc or 15 cc of a pour-on formulation of cypermethrin. The exposure of T. infestans to animals treated at different post-application intervals revealed a residual activity of the insecticide. The mortality rate in the treated groups was higher than in the control groups until 30 days post-insecticide application (p = 0.03, except in the group treated with 5 cc, in which no mortality was detected after seven days of insecticide application. Rainfall affected the triatomicide effect, reducing the time of residual activity. The cypermethrin pour-on treatment decreased the blood intake of T. infestans. Thirty days after the cypermethrin application, nymph mortality was 16% (± 13 with both doses (10 cc and 15 cc. The 15 cc dose did not result in higher insect mortality or increased persistence compared to the 10 cc dose.

  11. Toxicity, repellency and flushing out in Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae exposed to the repellents DEET and IR3535

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    Mercedes M.N. Reynoso

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available DEET and IR3535 are insect repellents present worldwide in commercial products; their efficacy has been mainly evaluated in mosquitoes. This study compares the toxicological effects and the behavioral responses induced by both repellents on the blood-sucking bug Triatoma infestans Klug (Hemiptera: Reduviidae, one of the main vectors of Chagas disease. When applied topically, the Median Lethal Dose (72 h for DEET was 220.8 µg/insect. Using IR3535, topical application of 500 µg/insect killed no nymphs. The minimum concentration that produced repellency was the same for both compounds: 1,15 µg/cm2. The effect of a mixture DEET:IR3535 1:1 was similar to that of their pure components. Flushing out was assessed in a chamber with a shelter containing groups of ten nymphs. The repellents were aerosolized on the shelter and the number of insects leaving it was recorded for 60 min. During that time, 0.006 g/m3 of the positive control tetramethrin flushed out 76.7% of the nymphs, while 1.76 g/m3 of DEET or IR3535 flushed out 30 and 0%, respectively. The concentrations required for both compounds to produce toxicity or flushing out are too high to have any practical applications. However, they showed a promising repellency. Additional research should be done to evaluate their possible use for personal protection against T. infestans bites.

  12. Triatoma infestans colonizando em domicílios da Baixada Fluminense, Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

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    Mário B. Aragão

    1971-06-01

    Full Text Available Nos municípios de Duque de Caxias e Nova Iguaçu, que fazem parte do Grande Rio de Janeiro, foram encontrados domicílios infestados pelo T. infestans. Em duas locdades do Município de Duque de Caxias (Amapá e Piranema foram encontrados T. infestans infectados por flagelados morfologicamente indistinguíveis do Trypanosoma cruzi, sendo de notar que alguns dêsses insetos foram coletados em uma casa em que os moradores nunca tinham estado em zona afetada pela doença de Chagas. Os autores concluam que a infestação deve ser recente e discutem o problema dêsse triatomíneo estar proliferando num clima opôsto ao de sua área de dispersão e numa região onde os triatomíneos silvestres, que penetram nos domicílios, não conseguem formar colônias.

  13. Susceptibilidad y resistencia de Triatoma infestans y Panstrongylus herreri a los insecticidas piretroides, Perú 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Yon F

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron los niveles de susceptibilidad de triatominos a piretroides con la técnica de la OMS, usando papeles impregnados al 0,1% de ingrediente activo de los siguientes insecticidas: alfacipermetrina, betaciflutrina, ciflutrina, cipermetrina y deltametrina, se emplearon lotes de triatominos de los estadios ninfa V y adultos de Triatoma infestans y Panstrongylus herreri. Se registraron los porcentajes de mortalidad después de las 24 horas de exposición a papeles impregnados con insecticidas, observando que la mayor parte de la población de triatominos de ambas especies era sensibles a los insecticidas. Sólo en algunos casos, se hallaron los niveles de resistencia en los estadios de ninfa V en la especie P. herreri en 2 localidades de la provincia de Jaén, departamento de Cajamarca, asimismo en adultos y ninfas V de T. infestans en especímenes capturados en el valle de Vítor, departamento de Arequipa.

  14. Hemi-nested PCR and RFLP methodologies for identifying blood meals of the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Dawn M; Gomez-Puerta, Luis A; Mead, Daniel G; Pinto, Jesus; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Calderon, Maritza; Bern, Caryn; Gilman, Robert H; Cama, Vitaliano A

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted by hematophagous reduviid bugs within the subfamily Triatominae. These vectors take blood meals from a wide range of hosts, and their feeding behaviors have been used to investigate the ecology and epidemiology of T. cruzi. In this study we describe two PCR-based methodologies that amplify a fragment of the 16S mitochondrial rDNA, aimed to improve the identification of blood meal sources for Triatoma infestans: a.--Sequence analyses of two heminested PCRs that allow the identification of mammalian and avian species, and b.--restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis from the mammalian PCR to identify and differentiate multi-host blood meals. Findings from both methodologies indicate that host DNA could be detected and the host species identified in samples from laboratory reared and field collected triatomines. The implications of this study are two-fold. First, these methods can be used in areas where the fauna diversity and feeding behavior of the triatomines are unknown. Secondly, the RFLP method led to the identification of multi-host DNA from T. infestans gut contents, enhancing the information provided by this assay. These tools are important contributions for ecological and epidemiological studies of vector-borne diseases.

  15. Biological Control of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma infestans with the Entomopathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana Combined with an Aggregation Cue: Field, Laboratory and Mathematical Modeling Assessment.

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    Lucas Forlani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Current Chagas disease vector control strategies, based on chemical insecticide spraying, are growingly threatened by the emergence of pyrethroid-resistant Triatoma infestans populations in the Gran Chaco region of South America.We have already shown that the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana has the ability to breach the insect cuticle and is effective both against pyrethroid-susceptible and pyrethroid-resistant T. infestans, in laboratory as well as field assays. It is also known that T. infestans cuticle lipids play a major role as contact aggregation pheromones. We estimated the effectiveness of pheromone-based infection boxes containing B. bassiana spores to kill indoor bugs, and its effect on the vector population dynamics. Laboratory assays were performed to estimate the effect of fungal infection on female reproductive parameters. The effect of insect exuviae as an aggregation signal in the performance of the infection boxes was estimated both in the laboratory and in the field. We developed a stage-specific matrix model of T. infestans to describe the fungal infection effects on insect population dynamics, and to analyze the performance of the biopesticide device in vector biological control.The pheromone-containing infective box is a promising new tool against indoor populations of this Chagas disease vector, with the number of boxes per house being the main driver of the reduction of the total domestic bug population. This ecologically safe approach is the first proven alternative to chemical insecticides in the control of T. infestans. The advantageous reduction in vector population by delayed-action fungal biopesticides in a contained environment is here shown supported by mathematical modeling.

  16. Blood meal sources of wild and domestic Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in Bolivia: connectivity between cycles of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, Rosio; Bosseno, Marie-France; Depickère, Stéphanie; Waleckx, Etienne; Salas, Renata; Aliaga, Claudia; Barnabé, Christian; Brenière, Simone Frédérique

    2016-04-18

    Chagas disease is a major public health problem in Latin America. Its etiologic agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, is mainly transmitted through the contaminated faeces of blood-sucking insects called triatomines. Triatoma infestans is the main vector in various countries in South America and recently, several foci of wild populations of this species have been described in Bolivia and other countries. These wild populations are suspected of affecting the success of insecticide control campaigns being carried out in South America. To assess the risk that these T. infestans populations pose to human health, it is helpful to determine blood meal sources. In the present work, blood meals were identified in various Bolivian wild T. infestans populations and in three specific areas, in both wild and intra-peridomestic populations to assess the links between wild and domestic cycles of T. cruzi transmission. PCR-HDA and sequencing of Cytb gene were used to identify these blood meal sources. Fourteen vertebrate species were identified as wild blood meal sources. Of those, the most prevalent species were two Andean endemic rodents, Octodontomys gliroides (36%) and Galea musteloides (30%), while humans were the third most prevalent source (18.7%). Of 163 blood meals from peridomestic areas, more than half were chickens, and the others were generally domestic animals or humans. Interestingly, blood from wild animals was identified in triatomines captured in the peridomestic and domestic environment, and blood from domestic animals was found in triatomines captured in the wild, revealing links between wild and domestic cycles of T. cruzi transmission. The current study suggests that wild T. infestans attack humans in the wild, but is also able to bite humans in domestic settings before going back to its natural environment. These results support the risk to human health posed by wild populations of T. infestans.

  17. TAL effectors specificity stems from negative discrimination.

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    Basile I M Wicky

    Full Text Available Transcription Activator-Like (TAL effectors are DNA-binding proteins secreted by phytopathogenic bacteria that interfere with native cellular functions by binding to plant DNA promoters. The key element of their architecture is a domain of tandem-repeats with almost identical sequences. Most of the polymorphism is located at two consecutive amino acids termed Repeat Variable Diresidue (RVD. The discovery of a direct link between the RVD composition and the targeted nucleotide allowed the design of TAL-derived DNA-binding tools with programmable specificities that revolutionized the field of genome engineering. Despite structural data, the molecular origins of this specificity as well as the recognition mechanism have remained unclear. Molecular simulations of the recent crystal structures suggest that most of the protein-DNA binding energy originates from non-specific interactions between the DNA backbone and non-variable residues, while RVDs contributions are negligible. Based on dynamical and energetic considerations we postulate that, while the first RVD residue promotes helix breaks--allowing folding of TAL as a DNA-wrapping super-helix--the second provides specificity through a negative discrimination of matches. Furthermore, we propose a simple pharmacophore-like model for the rationalization of RVD-DNA interactions and the interpretation of experimental findings concerning shared affinities and binding efficiencies. The explanatory paradigm presented herein provides a better comprehension of this elegant architecture and we hope will allow for improved designs of TAL-derived biotechnological tools.

  18. Phytophthora species recovered from the Connecticut River Valley in Massachusetts, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazee, Nicholas J; Wick, Robert L; Hulvey, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Little is currently known about the assemblage of Phytophthora species in northeastern North America, representing a gap in our understanding of species incidence. Therefore, Phytophthora species were surveyed at 20 sites in Massachusetts, with 16 occurring in the Connecticut River Valley. Many of the sampled waterways were adjacent to active agricultural lands, yet were buffered by mature floodplain forests composed of Acer, Platanus, Populus and Ulmus. Isolates were recovered with three types of baits (rhododendron leaves, pear, green pepper) in 2013 and water filtration in 2014. Overall, 457 isolates of Phytophthora were recovered and based on morphological characters and rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), β-tubulin (β-tub) and cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (cox1) sequences, 18 taxa were identified, including three new species: P. taxon intercalaris, P. taxon caryae and P. taxon pocumtuck. In addition, 49 isolates representing five species of Phytopythium also were identified. Water filtration captured a greater number of taxa (18) compared to leaf and fruit baits (12). Of the three bait types rhododendron leaves yielded the greatest number of isolates and taxa, followed by pear and green pepper, respectively. Despite the proximity to agricultural lands, none of the Phytophthora species baited are considered serious pathogens of vegetable crops in the region. However, many of the recovered species are known woody plant pathogens, including four species in the P. citricola s.l. complex that were identified: P. plurivora, P. citricola III, P. pini and a putative novel species, referred to here as P. taxon caryae. An additional novel species, P. taxon pocumtuck, is a close relative of P. borealis based on cox1 sequences. The results illustrate a high level of Phytophthora species richness in the Connecticut River Valley and that major rivers can serve as a source of inoculum for pathogenic Phytophthora species in the northeast. © 2016 by The Mycological

  19. System for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burry, D.B.; Williams, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    A system and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot. 12 figures

  20. Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase Activity in Stem of Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) Infected by Phytophthora capsici L.

    OpenAIRE

    KOC, Esra; USTUN, Ayşen Sulun

    2012-01-01

    In this study, PAL activity in stems of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants infected by the root rot pathogen Phytophthora capsici-22 in a resistant (PM-702) and two susceptible (Kahramanmaraş-Hot (KM-Hot) and Demre-8) cultivar were studied. The response of the PAL activity in the resistant cultivar was faster and higher than in the susceptible cultivars (p < 0.01). The increase in production of  PAL upon Phytophthora capsici-22 were higher in the infected plants compared to the non-in...

  1. Zoosporic Tolerance to pH Stress and Its Implications for Phytophthora Species in Aquatic Ecosystems▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Ping; Moorman, Gary W.; Lea-Cox, John D.; Ross, David S.; Richardson, Patricia A.; Hong, Chuanxue

    2009-01-01

    Phytophthora species, a group of destructive plant pathogens, are commonly referred to as water molds, but little is known about their aquatic ecology. Here we show the effect of pH on zoospore survival of seven Phytophthora species commonly isolated from irrigation reservoirs and natural waterways and dissect zoospore survival strategy. Zoospores were incubated in a basal salt liquid medium at pH 3 to 11 for up to 7 days and then plated on a selective medium to determine their survival. The ...

  2. Non-host Plant Resistance against Phytophthora capsici Is Mediated in Part by Members of the I2 R Gene Family in Nicotiana spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Shimada-Beltrán, Harumi; Sevillano-Serrano, Jacobo; Moffett, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The identification of host genes associated with resistance to Phytophthora capsici is crucial to developing strategies of control against this oomycete pathogen. Since there are few sources of resistance to P. capsici in crop plants, non-host plants represent a promising source of resistance genes as well as excellent models to study P. capsici - plant interactions. We have previously shown that non-host resistance to P. capsici in Nicotiana spp. is mediated by the recognition of a specific P. capsici effector protein, PcAvr3a1 in a manner that suggests the involvement of a cognate disease resistance (R) genes. Here, we have used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and transgenic tobacco plants expressing dsRNA in Nicotiana spp. to identify candidate R genes that mediate non-host resistance to P. capsici . Silencing of members of the I2 multigene family in the partially resistant plant N. edwardsonii and in the resistant N. tabacum resulted in compromised resistance to P. capsici . VIGS of two other components required for R gene-mediated resistance, EDS1 and SGT1 , also enhanced susceptibility to P. capsici in N. edwardsonii , as well as in the susceptible plants N. benthamiana and N. clevelandii . The silencing of I2 family members in N. tabacum also compromised the recognition of PcAvr3a1. These results indicate that in this case, non-host resistance is mediated by the same components normally associated with race-specific resistance.

  3. Contrasting microsatellite diversity in the evolutionary lineages of Phytophthora lateralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettraino, AnnaMaria; Brasier, Clive M; Webber, Joan F; Hansen, Everett M; Green, Sarah; Robin, Cecile; Tomassini, Alessia; Bruni, Natalia; Vannini, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Following recent discovery of Phytophthora lateralis on native Chamaecyparis obtusa in Taiwan, four phenotypically distinct lineages were discriminated: the Taiwan J (TWJ) and Taiwan K (TWK) in Taiwan, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) in North America and Europe and the UK in west Scotland. Across the four lineages, we analysed 88 isolates from multiple sites for microsatellite diversity. Twenty-one multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were resolved with high levels of diversity of the TWK and PNW lineages. No alleles were shared between the PNW and the Taiwanese lineages. TWK was heterozygous at three loci, whereas TWJ isolates were homozygous apart from one isolate, which exhibited a unique allele also present in the TWK lineage. PNW lineage was heterozygous at three loci. The evidence suggests its origin may be a yet unknown Asian source. North American and European PNW isolates shared all their alleles and also a dominant MLG, consistent with a previous proposal that this lineage is a recent introduction into Europe from North America. The UK lineage was monomorphic and homozygous at all loci. It shared its alleles with the PNW and the TWJ and TWK lineages, hence a possible origin in a recent hybridisation event between a Taiwan lineage and PNW cannot be ruled out. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Novel Phytophthora sojae Resistance Rps12 Gene Mapped to a Genomic Region That Contains Several Rps Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Dipak K; Abeysekara, Nilwala S; Cianzio, Silvia R; Robertson, Alison E; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdemann, which causes Phytophthora root rot, is a widespread pathogen that limits soybean production worldwide. Development of Phytophthora resistant cultivars carrying Phytophthora resistance Rps genes is a cost-effective approach in controlling this disease. For this mapping study of a novel Rps gene, 290 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (F7 families) were developed by crossing the P. sojae resistant cultivar PI399036 with the P. sojae susceptible AR2 line, and were phenotyped for responses to a mixture of three P. sojae isolates that overcome most of the known Rps genes. Of these 290 RILs, 130 were homozygous resistant, 12 heterzygous and segregating for Phytophthora resistance, and 148 were recessive homozygous and susceptible. From this population, 59 RILs homozygous for Phytophthora sojae resistance and 61 susceptible to a mixture of P. sojae isolates R17 and Val12-11 or P7074 that overcome resistance encoded by known Rps genes mapped to Chromosome 18 were selected for mapping novel Rps gene. A single gene accounted for the 1:1 segregation of resistance and susceptibility among the RILs. The gene encoding the Phytophthora resistance mapped to a 5.8 cM interval between the SSR markers BARCSOYSSR_18_1840 and Sat_064 located in the lower arm of Chromosome 18. The gene is mapped 2.2 cM proximal to the NBSRps4/6-like sequence that was reported to co-segregate with the Phytophthora resistance genes Rps4 and Rps6. The gene is mapped to a highly recombinogenic, gene-rich genomic region carrying several nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-like genes. We named this novel gene as Rps12, which is expected to be an invaluable resource in breeding soybeans for Phytophthora resistance.

  5. A Novel Phytophthora sojae Resistance Rps12 Gene Mapped to a Genomic Region That Contains Several Rps Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak K Sahoo

    Full Text Available Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdemann, which causes Phytophthora root rot, is a widespread pathogen that limits soybean production worldwide. Development of Phytophthora resistant cultivars carrying Phytophthora resistance Rps genes is a cost-effective approach in controlling this disease. For this mapping study of a novel Rps gene, 290 recombinant inbred lines (RILs (F7 families were developed by crossing the P. sojae resistant cultivar PI399036 with the P. sojae susceptible AR2 line, and were phenotyped for responses to a mixture of three P. sojae isolates that overcome most of the known Rps genes. Of these 290 RILs, 130 were homozygous resistant, 12 heterzygous and segregating for Phytophthora resistance, and 148 were recessive homozygous and susceptible. From this population, 59 RILs homozygous for Phytophthora sojae resistance and 61 susceptible to a mixture of P. sojae isolates R17 and Val12-11 or P7074 that overcome resistance encoded by known Rps genes mapped to Chromosome 18 were selected for mapping novel Rps gene. A single gene accounted for the 1:1 segregation of resistance and susceptibility among the RILs. The gene encoding the Phytophthora resistance mapped to a 5.8 cM interval between the SSR markers BARCSOYSSR_18_1840 and Sat_064 located in the lower arm of Chromosome 18. The gene is mapped 2.2 cM proximal to the NBSRps4/6-like sequence that was reported to co-segregate with the Phytophthora resistance genes Rps4 and Rps6. The gene is mapped to a highly recombinogenic, gene-rich genomic region carrying several nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR-like genes. We named this novel gene as Rps12, which is expected to be an invaluable resource in breeding soybeans for Phytophthora resistance.

  6. Uncovering the Legionella genus effector repertoire - strength in diversity and numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, David; Amaro, Francisco; Zusman, Tal; Lifshitz, Ziv; Cohen, Ofir; Gilbert, Jack A; Pupko, Tal; Shuman, Howard A; Segal, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Infection by the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila relies on the translocation of ~300 virulence proteins, termed effectors, which manipulate host-cell processes. However, almost no information exists regarding effectors in other Legionella pathogens. Here we sequenced, assembled and characterized the genomes of 38 Legionella species, and predicted their effector repertoire using a previously validated machine-learning approach. This analysis revealed a treasure trove of 5,885 predicted effectors. The effector repertoire of different Legionella species was found to be largely non-overlapping, and only seven core-effectors were shared among all species studied. Species-specific effectors had atypically low GC content, suggesting exogenous acquisition, possibly from their natural protozoan hosts. Furthermore, we detected numerous novel conserved effector domains, and discovered new domain combinations, which allowed inferring yet undescribed effector functions. The effector collection and network of domain architectures described here can serve as a roadmap for future studies of effector function and evolution. PMID:26752266

  7. Effector-triggered immunity: from pathogen perception to robust defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haitao; Tsuda, Kenichi; Parker, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    In plant innate immunity, individual cells have the capacity to sense and respond to pathogen attack. Intracellular recognition mechanisms have evolved to intercept perturbations by pathogen virulence factors (effectors) early in host infection and convert it to rapid defense. One key to resistance success is a polymorphic family of intracellular nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) receptors that detect effector interference in different parts of the cell. Effector-activated NLRs connect, in various ways, to a conserved basal resistance network in order to transcriptionally boost defense programs. Effector-triggered immunity displays remarkable robustness against pathogen disturbance, in part by employing compensatory mechanisms within the defense network. Also, the mobility of some NLRs and coordination of resistance pathways across cell compartments provides flexibility to fine-tune immune outputs. Furthermore, a number of NLRs function close to the nuclear chromatin by balancing actions of defense-repressing and defense-activating transcription factors to program cells dynamically for effective disease resistance.

  8. Robotic end-effector for rewaterproofing shuttle tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouchehri, Davoud; Hansen, Joseph M.; Wu, Cheng M.; Yamamoto, Brian S.; Graham, Todd

    1992-11-01

    This paper summarizes work by Rockwell International's Space Systems Division's Robotics Group at Downey, California. The work is part of a NASA-led team effort to automate Space Shuttle rewaterproofing in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center and the ferry facility at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility. Rockwell's effort focuses on the rewaterproofing end-effector, whose function is to inject hazardous dimethylethyloxysilane into thousands of ceramic tiles on the underside of the orbiter after each flight. The paper has five sections. First, it presents background on the present manual process. Second, end-effector requirements are presented, including safety and interface control. Third, a design is presented for the five end-effector systems: positioning, delivery, containment, data management, and command and control. Fourth, end-effector testing and integrating to the total system are described. Lastly, future applications for this technology are discussed.

  9. Sobrevivência e ocorrência de muda em Triatoma infestans Klug (Hemiptera, Reduviidae após choque de temperatura Survival and molting occurrence in Triatoma infestans Klug (Hemiptera, Reduviidae after temperature shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia C.C. Rodrigues

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available A sobrevivência e a ocorrência de mudas em espécimes de Triatoma infestans foram estudados num período de 30 dias após choques de temperatura. Foi demonstrado que choques hipertérmico e hipotérmico interferem nesses processos, na dependência da temperatura do choque, tempo de sua duração, fase de desenvolvimento e sexo dos espécimes. Dentre as situações experimentais utilizadas, o choque a 0°C por 12 h pareceu produzir a ação mais deletéria, porém choques a 40°C e 0°C mesmo por uma hora são admitidos como afetando o desenvolvimento hormonal que controla a muda. Casos de aumento de sobrevivência pós-choque são sugeridos como tendo sido favorecidos por ação de proteínas de choque térmico.Survival and molting occurrence were studied in specimens of Triatoma infestans over 30 days after temperature shocks. Hyperthermal and hypotermal shocks could be found to affect both survival and molting incidence as a function of temperature and period of the developement phase and sex of the specimens. Considering the various test conditions, the shock at 0°C for 12 h was found to elicit the most deleterious effect, whereas shocks at 40°C and 0°C even for 1 h are interpreted as affecting the hormonal balance which controls molting. Cases of a rise in post-shock survival are suggested to have been favored by heat-shock protein action.

  10. Characterization of the largest effector gene cluster of Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brefort

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the genome of the biotrophic plant pathogen Ustilago maydis, many of the genes coding for secreted protein effectors modulating virulence are arranged in gene clusters. The vast majority of these genes encode novel proteins whose expression is coupled to plant colonization. The largest of these gene clusters, cluster 19A, encodes 24 secreted effectors. Deletion of the entire cluster results in severe attenuation of virulence. Here we present the functional analysis of this genomic region. We show that a 19A deletion mutant behaves like an endophyte, i.e. is still able to colonize plants and complete the infection cycle. However, tumors, the most conspicuous symptoms of maize smut disease, are only rarely formed and fungal biomass in infected tissue is significantly reduced. The generation and analysis of strains carrying sub-deletions identified several genes significantly contributing to tumor formation after seedling infection. Another of the effectors could be linked specifically to anthocyanin induction in the infected tissue. As the individual contributions of these genes to tumor formation were small, we studied the response of maize plants to the whole cluster mutant as well as to several individual mutants by array analysis. This revealed distinct plant responses, demonstrating that the respective effectors have discrete plant targets. We propose that the analysis of plant responses to effector mutant strains that lack a strong virulence phenotype may be a general way to visualize differences in effector function.

  11. Functional heterogeneity of human effector CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Hiroshi; Naruto, Takuya; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-02-09

    Effector CD8(+) T cells are believed to be terminally differentiated cells having cytotoxic activity and the ability to produce effector cytokines such as INF-γ and TNF-α. We investigated the difference between CXCR1(+) and CXCR1(-) subsets of human effector CD27(-)CD28(-)CD8(+) T cells. The subsets expressed cytolytic molecules similarly and exerted substantial cytolytic activity, whereas only the CXCR1(-) subset had IL-2 productivity and self-proliferative activity and was more resistant to cell death than the CXCR1(+) subset. These differences were explained by the specific up-regulation of CAMK4, SPRY2, and IL-7R in the CXCR1(-) subset and that of pro-apoptotic death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) in the CXCR1(+) subset. The IL-2 producers were more frequently found in the IL-7R(+) subset of the CXCR1(-) effector CD8(+) T cells than in the IL-7R(-) subset. IL-7/IL-7R signaling promoted cell survival only in the CXCR1(-) subset. The present study has highlighted a novel subset of effector CD8(+) T cells producing IL-2 and suggests the importance of this subset in the homeostasis of effector CD8(+) T cells.

  12. Eye colour as a genetic marker for fertility and fecundity of Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834 Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pires Herton Helder Rocha

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Eye colour of Triatoma infestans is controlled at a single autosomal locus, with black-eye as the dominant gene and red-eye as the recessive. Inheritance of these characters follows a classical Mendelian system, enabling eye colour to be used as a marker for studies of mating frequency. We found no significant differences in oviposition rates and egg hatching rates irrespective of parental phenotypes. Different mating schedules between red-eye and black-eye parents showed that eye colour did not affect mating competence. Females mated with a single male or with different males together or in succession produced similar numbers of fertile eggs, with the eye colour of the offspring reflecting exposure to the different males. We conclude that although a single mating can provide sufficient sperm for the whole reproductive life of the female, multiple matings can result in balanced assortative sperm usage from the spermatheca.

  13. Germination of Phytophthora ramorum chlamydospores: a comparison of separation method and chlamydospore age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin P. Shaffer; Jennifer L. Parke

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum characteristically produces large amounts of chlamydospores in vitro, but the role of these propagules in the disease cycle remains unclear. Germination is difficult to observe and quantify if chlamydospores are not free of mycelium, and the low frequency of germination commonly reported suggests that...

  14. Longevity of active Phytophthora ramorum in terminal tree hosts following the removal of primary sporulating hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby Wylder; Mick Biddle; Anna Harris; Joan Webber

    2017-01-01

    The Forestry Commission-managed forest estate located in Plym, Devon (southwest England) was one of the first locations in late summer 2009 to have stands of Larix kaempferi (Japanese larch) confirmed as infected with Phytophthora ramorum (EU1 lineage). The 398 ha forest had a high proportion (>30%) of

  15. The effect of salinity on the growth, sporulation and infection of Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora ramorum, a threat to Eastern U.S. forests, has been found in waterways outside the boundaries of infested ornamental nurseries. Very little is known about what factors are conducive to its survival and sporulation in water. This study examined the effect of salt on growth, sporulation,...

  16. Virulence, sporulation, and elicitin production in three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora ramorum populations are clonal and consist of three lineages. Recent studies have shown that the clonal lineages may have varying degrees of aggressiveness on some host species, such as Quercus rubra. In this study, we examined virulence, sporulation and elicitin production of five P. ...

  17. Temperature effects on the onset of sporulation by Phytophthora ramorum on rhododendron Cunningham’s White

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of temperature and moist period on the onset of sporangia production by Phytophthora ramorum on Rhododendron ‘Cunningham’s White’ was examined with misted detached leaves held in humid chambers. Following wound-inoculation with sporangia, leaves were preincubated at 20°C for either 24 or...

  18. Effect of plant sterols and tannins on Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The acquisition of plant sterols, mediated via elicitins, is required for growth and sporulation of Phytophthora spp. In this paper, we looked at the interaction between elicitins, sterols, and tannins. When ground leaf tissue was added to growth media, P. ramorum growth and sporulation was greates...

  19. Sporulation capacity of Phytophthora ramorum on northern red oak and chestnut oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branches from six 2 to 3-year old northern red and chestnut oak seedlings were dip-inoculated with ca. 5,000 sporangia per milliliter of Phytophthora ramorum isolate Pr-6 and incubated at 100 percent relative humidity in dew chambers for 6 days. Three plants were then used to assess sporangia produ...

  20. Differences in virulence and sporulation of Phytophthora kernoviae isolates originating from two distinct geographical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora kernoviae has only been isolated from the United Kingdom (U.K.) and New Zealand. To understand what differences may exist between isolates from these two distinct geographical regions, virulence studies on three host plants and sporulation on host leaves were conducted on select isolat...

  1. Infectivity and sporulation of Phytophthora ramorum on northern red oak and chestnut oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branches from northern red and chestnut oak seedlings were dip-inoculated with 5,000 sporangia per milliliter of Phytophthora ramorum and incubated at 100 percent relative humidity in dew chambers for 6 days. Three plants were then used to assess sporangia production, while the other three plants w...

  2. Assessment of potential economic and environmental impacts caused by Phytophthora ramorum in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hella Kehlenbeck

    2008-01-01

    Economic and environmental impacts of Phytophthora ramorum in Europe were evaluated within the European Union framework 6 project on ?Risk Analysis for P. ramorum a pathogen threat to Europe? (RAPRA). Impact assessment was conducted according to three different scenarios: 1. ?Nursery System? - describes losses occurring in...

  3. Relationship between field resistance to Phytophthora ramorum and constitutive phenolic chemistry of coast live oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.M. Nagle; B.A. McPherson; D.L. Wood; M. Garbelotto; A.O. Conrad; S. Opiyo; P. Bonello

    2012-01-01

    Sudden oak death, caused by Phytophthora ramorum, has resulted in high levels of coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia Nee (CLO) mortality. However, some CLO survive in areas with high disease pressure and may thus be resistant. We tested the hypothesis that such field resistant trees contain constitutively higher levels of...

  4. Attraction of ambrosia and bark beetles to coast live oaks infected by Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice A. McPherson; Nadir Erbilgin; David L. Wood; Pavel Svihra; Andrew J. Storer; Richard B. Standiford

    2008-01-01

    Sudden oak death, caused by Phytophthora ramorum (Werres, de Cock & Man in?t Veld), has killed thousands of oaks (Quercus spp.) in coastal California forests since the mid-1990s. Bark and ambrosia beetles that normally colonize dead or severely weakened trees selectively tunnel into the bleeding cankers that are the first...

  5. Metabolite profiling to predict resistance to Phytophthora ramorum in natural populations of coast live oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Conrad; B. Mcpherson; D. Wood; S. Opiyo; S. Mori; P. Bonello

    2013-01-01

    Sudden oak death, caused by the invasive oomycete pathogen Phytophthora ramorum, continues to shape the dynamics of coastal populations of oak (Quercus spp.) and tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S.H. Oh) in California and tanoak in southwestern Oregon. Over the...

  6. Impacts of Phytophthora ramorum on oaks and tanoaks in Marin County, California forests since 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice A. McPherson; David L. Wood; Maggi Kelly; Sylvia R. Mori; Pavel Svihra; Andrew J. Storer; Richard B. Standiford

    2010-01-01

    The forests of Marin County were among the first in coastal California to be affected by the Phytophthora ramorum epidemic. Although initially observed in 1994 in tanoaks (Lithocarpus densiflorus) and 1995 in coast live oaks (Quercus agrifolia), it is evident from studies of disease progression that the...

  7. Phytophthora ramorum in coast live oak: search for resistance and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.A. McPherson; D.L. Wood; S.R. Mori; A. Conrad; P. Bonello

    2013-01-01

    Despite the presence of Phytophthora ramorum in northern and central California forests since at least 1994, asymptomatic coast live oaks (Quercus agrifolia Née) still remain in heavily infested stands. Coast live oak infection and mortality rates of 5 percent y-1 and 3 percent y-1, respectively, observed in long-term...

  8. The response of saprotrophic beetles to coast live oaks infected with Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice A. McPherson; Nadir Ebilgin; David L. Wood; Pavel Svihra; Andrew J. Storer; Richard B. Standiford

    2006-01-01

    Saprotro phic ambrosia and bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) tunnel into the bark overlying cankers caused by Phytophthora ramorum in coast live oaks, Quercus agrifolia. These insects are characteristically reported to colonize freshly dead or moribund trees (Furniss and Carolin, 1977). However, the initial attacks by these...

  9. Vegetation response following Phytophthora ramorum eradication treatments in southwest Oregon forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen Michaels Goheen; Everett Hansen; Alan Kanaskie; Wendy Sutton; Paul Reeser

    2008-01-01

    Sudden oak death, caused by Phytophthora ramorum, was identified in late July 2001 in forest stands in Curry County on the southwest Oregon coast where it was killing tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) and infecting Pacific rhododendron (Rhododendron macrophyllum) and evergreen huckleberry (Vaccinium...

  10. Eradication of Phytophthora ramorum from Oregon forests: status after 6 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Kanaskie; Ellen Goheen; Nancy Osterbauer; Mike McWilliams; Everett Hansen; Wendy Sutton

    2008-01-01

    Sudden oak death (SOD), caused by Phytophthora ramorum, was first discovered in Oregon forests in July 2001. Since then an interagency team has been working with landowners to eradicate the pathogen by cutting and burning all infected and nearby host plants. During the first two years of the eradication effort, all host vegetation within 15 to 30 m...

  11. Four years experience with filtration systems in commercial nurseries for eliminating Phytophthora species from recirculation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Ufer; M. Posner; H.-P. Wessels; S. Wagner; K. Kaminski; T. Brand; Werres S.

    2008-01-01

    In a four year project, three different filtration systems were tested under commercial nursery conditions to eliminate Phytophthora spp. from irrigation water. Five nurseries were involved in the project. Slow sand filtration systems were tested in three nurseries. In the fourth nursery, a filtration system with lava grains (Shieer® Bio filtration)...

  12. Innovation and dedication underpin management of sudden oak death (Phytophthora ramorum) in California and Oregon forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Frankel

    2017-01-01

    This special issue of Forest Phytophthoras serves as part of the proceedings from the Sixth Sudden Oak Death Science Symposium held June 21 -23, 2016 at Fort Mason Center in San Francisco, CA, USA. The symposium marked almost 16 years to the day that David Rizzo (UC Davis) and Matteo Garbelotto (UC Berkeley) identified the cause of sudden oak death to be a previously...

  13. Extended abstract on the potential for Phytophthora ramorum to infest finished compost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Swain; Matteo Garbelotto

    2006-01-01

    The survival rate of Phytophthora ramorum was assessed when introduced at high rates into composts of varying provenance and curing time, produced by both "turned windrow" and "forced air static pile" techniques. Survival in some compost media was high and statistically indistinguishable from positive controls (P

  14. New technologies to detect and monitor Phytophthora ramorum in plant, soil, and water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Russell; Nathan McOwen; Robert Bohannon

    2013-01-01

    The focus of our research efforts has been to develop methods to quickly identify plants, soil, and water samples infested with Phytophthora spp., and to rapidly confirm the findings using novel isothermal DNA technologies suitable for field use. These efforts have led to the development of a rapid Immunostrip® that reliably detects...

  15. Effects of environmental variables on the survival of Phytophthora ramorum in bay laurel leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.V. DiLeo; R.M. Bostock; D.M. Rizzo

    2008-01-01

    Bay laurel (Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt.) is the primary reservoir host of Phytophthora ramorum Werres, De Cock & Man n?t Veld in coastal California woodlands. Non-lethal foliar lesions on bay laurel trees support the majority of pathogen sporulation during the winter et season and appear to provide the...

  16. Survival and chlamydospore production of Phytophthora ramorum in California bay laurel leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Fichtner; D. Rizzo; S. Lynch; D. Rizzo; G. Buckles; J. Parke

    2009-01-01

    Sudden oak death manifests as non-lethal foliar lesions on bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), which support sporulation and survival of Phytophthora ramorum in forest ecosystems. The pathogen survives the dry summers in a proportion of attached bay leaves, but the propagules responsible for survival are...

  17. Host phenology and leaf effects on susceptibility of California bay laurel to Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven F. Johnston; Michael F. Cohen; Tamas Torok; Ross K. Meentemeyer; Nathan E. Rank

    2016-01-01

    Spread of the plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum, causal agent of the forest disease sudden oak death, is driven by a few competent hosts that support spore production from foliar lesions. The relationship between traits of a principal foliar host, California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), and susceptibility to

  18. Pathways of spread of Phytophthora ramorum in a simulated nursery setting: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt Heungens; Bjorn Gehesqui& egrave; re; Kris Van Poucke; Annelies Vercauteren; Martine. Maes

    2013-01-01

    European phytosanitary measures as applied to nurseries require that potential host plants within a radius of 2 m of a Phytophthora ramorum-infected plant must be destroyed and that remaining host plants within a radius of 10 m cannot be traded until they are inspected and found to be pest free at further specific inspections. Despite the wide...

  19. Ethanol attracts scolytid beetles to Phytophthora ramorum cankers on coast live oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick G. Kelsey; Maia M. Beh; David C. Shaw; Daniel K. Manter

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol in sapwood was analyzed along vertical transects, through small spot cankers and larger basal cankers, of Phytophthora ramorum-infected stems of Quercus agrifolia at three sites in California. Trees with large basal cankers, known to attract scolytid beetles, had a 4.3 times higher ethanol level than trees with spot cankers...

  20. Ethanol attracts scolytid beetles to Phytophthora ramorum cankers on coast live oak [Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick G. Kelsey; Maia Beh; Dave Shaw; Daniel K. Manter

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection of coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia Née) stems by Phytophthora ramorum results in the formation of a canker visible initially at the bark surface by the release of a dark red to black colored exudate referred to as "bleeding." Bark and ambrosia beetles are often attracted to diseased trees within...

  1. Use of microsatellite markers derived from whole genome sequence data for identifying polymorphism in Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Ivors; Matteo Garbelotto; Ineke De Vries; Peter Bonants

    2006-01-01

    Investigating the population genetics of Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death (SOD), is critical to understanding the biology and epidemiology of this important phytopathogen. Raw sequence data (445,000 reads) of P. ramorum was provided by the Joint Genome Institute. Our objective was to develop and utilize...

  2. Phytophthora ramorum and sudden oak death in California: III. preliminary studies in pathogen genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo Garbelotto; David M. Rizzo; Katie Hayden; Monica Meija-Chang; Jennifer M. Davidson; Steven Tjosvold

    2002-01-01

    Sudden oak death (SOD) has been shown to be caused by a new species of Phytophthora, P. ramorum. A basic understanding of the genetics of P. ramorum is critical to any management strategy. We have initiated a number of studies to examine species concepts, population biology and mating behavior of the pathogen....

  3. Collateral damage: fire and Phytophthora ramorum interact to increase mortality in coast redwood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret R. Metz; J. Morgan Varner; Kerri M. Frangioso; Ross K. Meentemeyer; David M. Rizzo

    2013-01-01

    Invading species can alter ecosystems by impacting the frequency, severity, and consequences of endemic disturbance regimes (Mack and D'Antonio 1998). Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of the emergent disease sudden oak death (SOD), is an invasive pathogen causing widespread tree mortality in coastal forests of California and Oregon. In...

  4. Susceptibility to Phytophthora ramorum in California bay laurel, a key foliar host of sudden oak death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian L. Anacker; Nathan E. Rank; Daniel Hüberli; Matteo Garbelotto; Sarah Gordon; Rich Whitkus; Tami Harnik; Matthew Meshriy; Lori Miles; Ross K. Meentemeyer

    2008-01-01

    Sudden oak death, caused by the water mold Phytophthora ramorum, is a plant disease responsible for the death of hundreds of thousands of oak and tanoak trees. Some foliar hosts play a major role in the epidemiology of this disease. Upon infection by P. ramorum, these foliar hosts express non-fatal leaf lesions from which large...

  5. Tracking populations and new infections of Phytophthora ramorum in southern Oregon forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Britt; Simone Prospero; Niklaus Grünwald; Alan Kanaskie; Everett Hansen

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of Phytophthora ramorum in southern Oregon forests in 2001, newly infested areas are located each year. We tracked the spread and dispersal using DNA fingerprinting. While among site genetic variance was low, we did find changes in genotype presence and frequency at the site level. These genotypic differences allowed us to...

  6. Anaerobic soil disinfestation reduces survival and infectivity of Phytophthora nicotianae chlamydospores in pepper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora nicotianae is the principal causal agent of root and crown rot disease of pepper plants in Extremadura (western Spain), a spring-summer crop in this region. Preplant soil treatment by anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) may effectively control plant pathogens in many crop production sys...

  7. Molecular characterization of natural hybrids of Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonants, P.J.M.; Hagenaar-de Weerdt, M.; Man in 't Veld, W.A.; Baayen, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    Hybrid isolates of Phytophthora nicotianae x P. cactorum from five different hosts (Cyclamen, Lavandula, Lewisia, Primula, and Spathiphyllum spp.) were identified by their atypical morphology and their well-defined heterozygous isozyme patterns. The hybrid nature of these isolates was tested by

  8. Clonal expansion of the Belgian Phytophthora ramorum populations based on new microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Vercauteren; I. De Dobbelaere; N. J. Grünwald; P. Bonants; E. Van Bockstaele; M. Maes; K. Heungens

    2010-01-01

    Co-existence of both mating types A1 and A2 within the EU1 lineage of Phytophthora ramorum has only been observed in Belgium, which begs the question whether sexual reproduction is occurring. A collection of 411 Belgian P. ramorum isolates was established during a 7-year survey. Our main objectives were genetic characterization of this population to test for sexual...

  9. Draft genome sequences of seven isolates of Phytophthora ramorum EU2 from Northern Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes de la Mata Saez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we present draft-quality genome sequence assemblies for the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum genetic lineage EU2. We sequenced genomes of seven isolates collected in Northern Ireland between 2010 and 2012. Multiple genome sequences from P. ramorum EU2 will be valuable for identifying genetic variation within the clonal lineage that can be useful for tracking its spread.

  10. Efficacy of management tools for control of Phytophthora plurivora leaf spot of Rhododendron, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted as part of the IR-4 Ornamental Horticulture program to evaluate fungicides and biopesticides for management of leaf spot of Rhododendron caused by Phytophthora plurivora. The experiment was conducted by treating two-year old Rhododendron plants with fungicides on September 2...

  11. The Phytophthora species assemblage and diversity in riparian alder ecosystems of western Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Laura Lee; Sutton, Wendy; Reeser, Paul; Hansen, Everett M

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora species were systematically sampled, isolated, identified and compared for presence in streams, soil and roots of alder (Alnus species) dominated riparian ecosystems in western Oregon. We describe the species assemblage and evaluate Phytophthora diversity associated with alder. We recovered 1250 isolates of 20 Phytophthora species. Only three species were recovered from all substrates (streams, soil, alder roots): P. gonapodyides, the informally described "P. taxon Pgchlamydo", and P. siskiyouensis. P. alni ssp. uniformis along with five other species not previously recovered in Oregon forests are included in the assemblage: P.citricola s.l., P. gregata, P. gallica, P. nicotianae and P. parsiana. Phytophthora species diversity was greatest in downstream riparian locations. There was no significant difference in species diversity comparing soil and unwashed roots (the rhizosphere) to stream water. There was a difference between the predominating species from the rhizosphere compared to stream water. The most numerous species was the informally described "P. taxon Oaksoil", which was mainly recovered from, and most predominant in, stream water. The most common species from riparian forest soils and alder root systems was P. gonapodyides. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  12. Comparing methods for inducing root rot of Rhododendron with Phytophthora cinnamomi and P. plurivora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root rot, caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi and P. plurivora in containerized Rhododendron, can cause significant losses in the nursery industry. Studies commonly use a 48 h flooding event to stimulate root infection. While flooding rarely occurs in container nurseries, plants may sit in a shallow pu...

  13. Effects of temperature on germination of sporangia, infection and protein secretion by Phytophthora kernoviae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora kernoviae has been reported to cause bleeding stem lesions and foliar necrosis on a wide range of species, with little knowledge of the optimal conditions for infection. Detached Rhododendron ponticum leaves were inoculated with six different isolates of P. kernoviae sporangia and set ...

  14. Whole genome sequences of the raspberry and strawberry pathogens Phytophthora rubi and P. fragariae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora rubi and P. fragariae are two closely related oomycete plant pathogens that exhibit strong morphological and physiological similarities, but are specialized to infect different hosts of economic importance, namely raspberry and strawberry. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of t...

  15. Nonchemical, cultural management strategies to suppress phytophthora root rot in northern highbush blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora cinnamomi causes root rot of highbush blueberry and decreases plant growth, yield, and profitability for growers. Fungicides can suppress root rot, but cannot be used in certified organic production systems and fungicide resistance may develop. Alternative, non-chemical, cultural manag...

  16. Efficient Genome Editing in the Oomycete Phytophthora sojae Using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yufeng; Cui, Linkai; Gu, Biao; Arredondo, Felipe; Tyler, Brett M

    2017-02-06

    Phytophthora is a filamentous fungus-like microorganism, but belongs to the oomycetes, in the kingdom Stramenopila. Phytophthora species are notorious as plant destroyers, causing multibillion-dollar damage to agriculture and natural ecosystems worldwide annually. For a long time, genome editing has been unattainable in oomycetes, because of their extremely low rate of homologous recombination. The recent implementation of the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) system in the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae, an experimental model for oomycetes, has opened up a powerful new research capability for the oomycete community. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in P. sojae, including single guide RNA (sgRNA) design and construction, efficient gene replacement, and mutant-screening strategies. This protocol should be generally applicable for most culturable oomycetes. We also describe an optimized transformation method that is useful for other Phytophthora spp. including P. capsici and P. parasitica. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Population structure and genetic diversity of Phytophthora nicotianae from tobacco in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black shank caused by Phytophthora nicotianae occurs worldwide and is responsible for significant yield loss in tobacco production in Georgia. Management of the disease has primarily relied on utilization of tobacco cultivars with resistance to race 0 of the pathogen and application of the fungicide...

  18. Interaction of Trichoderma asperellum with Phytophthora ramorum inoculum soil populations and enzyme secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriya Sharma; Wolfgang Schweigkofler; Karen Suslow; Timothy L. Widmer

    2017-01-01

    There is a continuing desire to investigate the potential of biological control to manage the spread of Phytophthora ramorum. A specific isolate of Trichoderma asperellum has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing P. ramorum soil populations to non-detectable levels. This study was conducted...

  19. Marine Phytophthora species can hamper conservation and restoration of vegetated coastal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govers, Laura L.; Man in 't Veld, Willem A.; Meffert, Johan P.; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; van Rijswick, Patricia C. J.; Heusinkveld, Jannes H. T.; Orth, Robert J.; van Katwijk, Marieke M.; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora species are potent pathogens that can devastate terrestrial plants, causing billions of dollars of damage yearly to agricultural crops and harming fragile ecosystems worldwide. Yet, virtually nothing is known about the distribution and pathogenicity of their marine relatives. This is

  20. Evaluation of watermelon varieties for tolerance to powdery mildew and Phytophthora fruit rot, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    This experiment was conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory farm in Charleston, SC. The soil was Yonges loamy fine sand. This study was undertaken to determine the performance of seeded and seedless commercial watermelon varieties for tolerance to powdery mildew (PM) and Phytophthora fruit rot as...

  1. Isolation and Pathogenicity of Phytophthora Species from Poplar Plantations in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Milenković

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available During a survey in three declining and three healthy poplar plantations in Serbia, six different Phytophthora species were obtained. Phytophthora plurivora was the most common, followed by P. pini, P. polonica, P. lacustris, P. cactorum, and P. gonapodyides. Pathogenicity of all isolated species to four-month and one-year-old cuttings of Populus hybrid clones I-214 and Pánnonia, respectively, was tested using both a soil infestation and stem inoculation test. Isolates of P. polonica, P. × cambivora, P. cryptogea, and P. × serendipita from other host plants were included as a comparison. In the soil infestation test, the most aggressive species to clone I-214 were P. plurivora, P. × serendipita, and P. pini. On clone Pánnonia, P. gonapodyides and P. pini were the most aggressive, both causing 100% mortality, followed by P. cactorum, P. × cambivora, and P. polonica. In the underbark inoculation test, the susceptibility of both poplar clones to the different Phytophthora species was largely similar, as in the soil infestation test, with the exception of P. polonica, which proved to be only weakly pathogenic to poplar bark. The most aggressive species to clone I-214 was P. pini, while on clone Pánnonia, the longest lesions and highest disease incidence were caused by P. gonapodyides. Phytophthora cactorum and P. plurivora were pathogenic to both clones, whereas P. × cambivora showed only weak pathogenicity. The implications of these findings and possible pathways of dispersion of the pathogens are discussed.

  2. Marine Phytophthora species can hamper conservation and restoration of vegetated coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govers, Laura L; Man In 't Veld, Willem A; Meffert, Johan P; Bouma, Tjeerd J; van Rijswick, Patricia C J; Heusinkveld, Jannes H T; Orth, Robert J; van Katwijk, Marieke M; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2016-08-31

    Phytophthora species are potent pathogens that can devastate terrestrial plants, causing billions of dollars of damage yearly to agricultural crops and harming fragile ecosystems worldwide. Yet, virtually nothing is known about the distribution and pathogenicity of their marine relatives. This is surprising, as marine plants form vital habitats in coastal zones worldwide (i.e. mangrove forests, salt marshes, seagrass beds), and disease may be an important bottleneck for the conservation and restoration of these rapidly declining ecosystems. We are the first to report on widespread infection of Phytophthora and Halophytophthora species on a common seagrass species, Zostera marina (eelgrass), across the northern Atlantic and Mediterranean. In addition, we tested the effects of Halophytophthora sp. Zostera and Phytophthora gemini on Z. marina seed germination in a full-factorial laboratory experiment under various environmental conditions. Results suggest that Phytophthora species are widespread as we found these oomycetes in eelgrass beds in six countries across the North Atlantic and Mediterranean. Infection by Halophytophthora sp. Zostera, P. gemini, or both, strongly affected sexual reproduction by reducing seed germination sixfold. Our findings have important implications for seagrass ecology, because these putative pathogens probably negatively affect ecosystem functioning, as well as current restoration and conservation efforts. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Dual RNA-seq of the plant pathogen phytophthora ramorum and its tanoak host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Hayden; Matteo Garbelotto; Brian J. Knaus; Richard C. Cronn; Hardeep Rai; Jessica W. Wright

    2014-01-01

    Emergent diseases are an ever-increasing threat to forests and forest ecosystems and necessitate the development of research tools for species that often may have few preexisting resources. We sequenced the mRNA expressed by the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum and its most susceptible forest host, tanoak, within the same tissue at two time points after...

  4. Susceptibility to Phytophthora ramorum and inoculum production potential of some common eastern forest understory plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul W. Tooley; Marsha Browning

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-five plant species (21 genera, 14 families), which comprise a portion of the understory in forests of the Eastern United States, were evaluated for susceptibility to infection by Phytophthora ramorum. The degree to which P. ramorum is able to form sporangia and chlamydospores was also assessed on...

  5. Evaluation of molecular markers for Phytophthora ramorum detection and identification using a standardized library of isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.N. Martin; M. Coffey; R. Hamelin; P. Tooley; M. Garbelotto; K. Hughes; T. Kubisiak

    2008-01-01

    A number of molecular diagnostic procedures for detection of Phytophthora ramorum have been reported in the literature. In an effort to evaluate the specificity of 10 of these techniques a standardized DNA library for 317 isolates was assembled that included 60 described species as well as 22 taxonomically unclassified isolates. These were sent blind...

  6. Understanding the role of L-type lectin receptor kinases in Phytophthora resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract

    Phytophthora pathogens are notorious for causing severe damage to many agriculturally and ornamentally important plants. Effective plant resistance depends largely on the capacity to perceive pathogens and to activate rapid defence. Cytoplasmic resistance

  7. Effectiveness of fungicides in protecting Douglas-fir shoots from infection by Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.A. Chastagner; E.M. Hansen; K.L. Riley; W. Sutton

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of 20 systemic and contact fungicides in protecting Douglas-fir seedlings from infection by Phytophthora ramorum was determined. Some systemic products were applied about a week prior to bud break, while most treatments were applied just after bud break. In addition to the fungicides, two surfactants were included in the post-bud...

  8. Sudden Oak Death, Phytophthora ramorum: A Persistent Threat to Oaks and Other Tree Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.J. Frankel; K.M. Palmieri

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the status and management of sudden oak death and “sudden larch death” in the urban and wildland forests of California, Oregon, and the UK. The causal pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, was discovered in all three locations over a decade ago; however, efforts to contain and eliminate infestations have been unsuccessful. These less...

  9. Sudden oak death and Phytophthora ramorum: a summary of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    John T. Kliejunas

    2010-01-01

    Sudden oak death and Phytophthora ramorum, both first recognized about a decade ago, have been the subject of hundreds of scientific and popular press articles. This document presents a comprehensive, concise summary of sudden oak death and P. ramorum research findings and management activities. Topics covered include...

  10. Forecasting oak decline caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi in Andalusia: Identification of priority areas for intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duque Lazo, Joaquin; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael Maria; Van Gils, Hein; Groen, T.A.

    2018-01-01

    Since the mid-20th century, trees in the Andalusian oak dehesa and forests have exhibited stress that often ends in the death of the tree. These events have been associated with Phytophthora cinnamomi, a soil-borne root pathogen, which causes root rot, bark cankers, decay and mortality – known as

  11. Genes for and molecular markers linked with resistance to Phytophthora fragariae in strawberry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weg, van de W.E.; Henken, B.; Haymes, K.M.; Nijs, den A.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    A gene-for-gene model is presented which explains interactions between cultivars of strawberry and races of Phytophthora fragariae var. fragariae, the causal agent of red core (red stele) root rot. The model allows the constitution of a universal differential set of strawberry genotypes and the

  12. Methods for screening Port-Orford-cedar for resistance to Phytophthora lateralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett M. Hansen; Paul Reeser; Wendy Sutton; Richard A. Sniezko

    2012-01-01

    Port-Orford-cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murray) Parl.) (POC) is an economically and ecologically valuable tree in the forests of southwest Oregon and northern California and in the horticultural trade worldwide. Phytophthora lateralis, the aggressive, invasive cause of POC root disease, was introduced to the native...

  13. The epidemiology of Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae at two historic gardens in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Elliot; T.R. Meagher; C. Harris; K. Searle; B.V. Purse; A. Schlenzig

    2013-01-01

    This study looked at the factors that facilitated the spread of Phytophthora ramorum andP. kernoviae at two locations in the west of Scotland. Spore traps, river baiting, bait plants, and soil sampling were used to both confirm the presence of, and measure the amount of, inoculum in the environment in order...

  14. Genetic epidemiology of the Sudden Oak Death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Mascheretti; P.J.P. Croucher; M. Kozanitas; L. Baker; M. Garbelotto

    2009-01-01

    A total of 669 isolates of Phytophthora ramorum, the pathogen responsible for Sudden Oak Death, were collected from 34 Californian forests and from the ornamental plant-trade. Seven microsatellite markers revealed 82 multilocus genotypes (MGs) of which only three were abundant (>10%). Iteratively collapsing based upon minimum ΦST, yielded five meta-samples and five...

  15. Detection of Phytophthora ramorum at retail nurseries in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven N. Jeffers; Jaesoon Hwang; Yeshi A. Wamishe; Steven W. Oak

    2010-01-01

    Many nursery plants are known to be hosts of Phytophthora ramorum or to be associated with this pathogen. These plants can be infected or merely infested by P. ramorum and with or without symptoms. The pathogen has been detected most frequently on container-grown nursery plants, and occasionally has been found in the container...

  16. PIXE studies of changes in host mineral compositions of plants due to Phytophthora Cinnamomi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papper, C.S.; Chaudhri, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to study the effect of the disease due to Phytophthora Cinnamomi on the vegetation in Wilson's Promontory, the mineral compositions of tolerant and susceptible plants in both healthy and diseased areas have been compared, using proton-induced x-ray emission analysis

  17. First results with a lab-on-a-chip system for a fast Phytophthora diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonja Horatzek; Stephan König; Stefan Wagner; Sabine Werres; Lydia Schwenkbier; Karina Weber; Jörg. Weber

    2013-01-01

    For Phytophthora spp. that are quarantine or regulated organisms, highly specific and sensitive diagnostic tools are recommended for surveys and monitoring. Furthermore, these diagnostic techniques should give results within a short time and should be not be too expensive. The techniques currently used for routine diagnosis of ...

  18. Activity of some aminoglycoside antibiotics against true fungi, Phytophthora and Pythium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H B; Kim, Y; Kim, J C; Choi, G J; Park, S-H; Kim, C-J; Jung, H S

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the in vitro antifungal and antioomycete activities of some aminoglycosides against true fungi and Phytophthora and Pythium species and to evaluate the potential of the antibiotics against Phytophthora late blight on plants. Antifungal and antioomycete activities of aminoglycoside antibiotics (neomycin, paromomycin, ribostamycin and streptomycin) and a paromomycin-producing strain (Streptomyces sp. AMG-P1) against Phytophthora and Pythium species and 10 common fungi were measured in potato dextrose broth (PDB) and on seedlings in pots. Paromomycin was the most active against Phytophthora and Pythium species with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 1-10 microg ml(-1) in PDB, but displayed low to moderate activities towards other common fungi at the same concentration. Paromomycin also showed potent in vivo activity against red pepper and tomato late blight diseases with 80 and 99% control value, respectively, at 100 microg ml(-1). In addition, culture broth of Streptomyces sp. AMG-P1 as a paromomycin producer exhibited high in vivo activity against late blight at 500 microg freeze-dried weight per millilitre. Among tested aminoglycoside antibiotics, paromomycin was the most active against oomycetes both in vitro and in vivo. Data from this study show that aminoglycoside antibiotics have in vitro and in vivo activities against oomycetes, suggesting that Streptomyces sp. AMG-P1 may be used as a biocontrol agent against oomycete diseases.

  19. Recommended industry best management practices for the prevention of Phytophthora ramorum introduction in nursery operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Suslow

    2008-01-01

    The following industry recommended best management practices (BMPs), designed for growers and/or interstate shippers of host and associated host plants of Phytophthora ramorum, consists of biosecurity guidelines created by and for nursery growers in order to reduce the risks associated with P. ramorum. The control of P....

  20. Chemical control of Phytophthora ramorum causing foliar disease in hardy nursery stock in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judith Turner; Philip Jennings; Sam McDonough; Debbie Liddell; Jackie Stonehouse

    2006-01-01

    A range of fungicides have been tested for activity against P. ramorum using both in vitro and in vivo tests. All fungicides had proven activity against Phytophthora species and either had full approval for use on hardy ornamental nursery stock in the United Kingdom, or could be used under the Revised Long Term Arrangements for Extension of Use (2002...

  1. Natural outbreaks of Phytophthora ramorum in the U.K.—current status and monitoring update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judith Turner; Philip Jennings; Gilli Humphries; Steve Parker; Sam McDonough; Jackie Stonehouse; David Lockley; David Slawson

    2008-01-01

    To date (February 2007) there have been 160 outbreaks of Phytophthora ramorum in gardens or woodlands in the U.K. Current EU policy requires that appropriate measures be taken to contain P. ramorum in such situations. In the U.K., the measures have either been aimed at eradication, through destruction of infected plants, or at...

  2. Seasonal symptom expression, laboratory detection success, and sporulation potential of Phytophthora ramorum on rhododendron and camellia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve A. Tjosvold; David L. Chambers; Cheryl L. Blomquist

    2008-01-01

    Camellias and rhododendrons are important nursery and landscape plants and are known to be highly susceptible hosts of the quarantined plant pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum Werres, de Cock & Man In?t Veld. Nursery inspection can not always occur during optimal conditions for the disease and its detection. The goals of this research were to (1)...

  3. Evaluation of fungicide rotations for management of Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    The experiment was conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory farm in Charleston, SC. The soil was Yonges loamy fine sand. For the past 6 years, the field has been infested with Phytophthora capsici. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with four replications. Five-week-old seedli...

  4. Phytophthora ramorum detections in Canada: Evidence for migration within North America and from Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.M. Goss; M. Larsen; A. Vercauteren; S. Werres; K. Heungens; N.J. Grünwald

    2011-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, the cause of sudden oak death on oak and ramorum blight on woody ornamentals, has been reported in ornamental nurseries on the West Coast of North America from British Columbia to California. Long-distance migration of P. ramorum has occurred via the nursery trade, and shipments of host plants are known to...

  5. Interactions of Phytophthora capsici with Resistant and Susceptible Pepper Roots and Stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Amara R; Smart, Christine D

    2015-10-01

    Using host resistance is an important strategy for managing pepper root and crown rot caused by Phytophthora capsici. An isolate of P. capsici constitutively expressing a gene for green fluorescent protein was used to investigate pathogen interactions with roots, crowns, and stems of Phytophthora-susceptible bell pepper 'Red Knight', Phytophthora-resistant bell pepper 'Paladin', and Phytophthora-resistant landrace Criollos de Morelos 334 (CM-334). In this study, the same number of zoospores attached to and germinated on roots of all cultivars 30 and 120 min postinoculation (pi), respectively. At 3 days pi, significantly more secondary roots had necrotic lesions on Red Knight than on Paladin and CM-334 plants. By 4 days pi, necrotic lesions had formed on the taproot of Red Knight but not Paladin or CM-334 plants. Although hyphae were visible in the crowns and stems of all Red Knight plants observed at 4 days pi, hyphae were observed in crowns of only a few Paladin and in no CM-334 plants, and never in stems of either resistant cultivar at 4 days pi. These results improve our understanding of how P. capsici infects plants and may contribute to the use of resistant pepper cultivars for disease management and the development of new cultivars.

  6. A Rapid Diagnostic Test to Distinguish Between American and European Populations of Phytophthora ramorum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, L.P.N.M.; Verstappen, E.C.P.; Kox, L.F.F.; Flier, W.G.; Bonants, P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A new devastating disease in the United States, commonly known as Sudden Oak Death, is caused by Phytophthora ramorum. This pathogen, which previously was described attacking species of Rhododendron and Viburnum in Germany and the Netherlands, has established itself in forests on the central coast

  7. The Effect of Low Oxygen Stress on Phytophthora cinnamomi Infection and Disease of Cork Oak Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel A. Jacobs; James D. MacDonald; Alison M. Berry; Laurence R. Costello

    1997-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands root disease was quantified in cork oak (Quercus suber L.) roots subjected to low oxygen (hypoxia) stress. Seedling root tips were inoculated with mycelial plugs of the fungus and incubated in ≤1, 3-4, or 21 percent oxygen for 5 days. Ninety-four percent of roots...

  8. Survival of Phytophthora ramorum in Rhododendron root balls and in rootless substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Vercauteren; M. Riedel; M. Maes; S. Werres; K. Heungens

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the survival of Phytophthora ramorum in the root ball of Rhododendron container plants as well as in different rootless forest substrates and a horticultural potting medium. Following inoculation of the root balls, the aboveground plant parts stayed symptomless, whilst the pathogen could be recovered with a...

  9. The effects of Phytophthora ramorum infection on hydraulic conductivity and tylosis formation in tanoak sapwood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley R. Collins; Jennifer L. Parke; Barb Lachenbruch; Everett M. Hansen

    2009-01-01

    Tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. and Arn.) Rehder) is highly susceptible to sudden oak death, a disease caused by the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum Werres, De Cock & Man in’t Veld. Symptoms include a dying crown, bleeding cankers, and, eventually, death of infected trees. The cause of mortality is not well understood, but recent research indicates that...

  10. Application of rapid onsite PCR (TaqMan) for Phytophthora ramorum under U.S. conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelvin Hughes; Jenny Tomlinson; Neil Boonham; Kelly Ivors; Matteo Garbelotto; Ian Barker

    2006-01-01

    Currently, diagnosis of Phytophthora ramorum involves sending samples to a laboratory for traditional isolation and morphological characterisation, and/or PCR analysis. This can take as long as 2 weeks from sampling to final diagnosis. However, the Plant Health Group, Central Science Laboratory, has produced on-site DNA extraction and real-time PCR (...

  11. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a reporter gene for the plant pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko Riedel; Gautier Calmin; Lassaad Belbahri; Francois Lefort; Monika Gotz; Stefan Wagner; Sabine. Werres

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic Phytophthora ramorum strains that produce green fluorescent protein (GFP) constitutively were obtained after stable DNA integration using a polyethylene glycol and CaCl2-based transformation protocol. Green fluorescent protein production was studied in developing colonies and in different propagules of the pathogen...

  12. Detection and identification of Phytophthora fragariae Hickman by the polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonants, P.; Hagenaar-de Weerdt, M.; Gent-Pelzer, van M.; Lacourt, I.; Cooke, D.; Duncan, J.

    1997-01-01

    Phytophthora fragariae Hickman, which causes strawberry red stele and raspberry root rot, is a quarantine organism for which specific and sensitive detection methods are required to test the health of planting material. Sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions of the ribosomal gene

  13. Climate-Host Mapping of Phytophthora ramorum, causal agent of sudden oak death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger Magarey; Glenn Fowler; Manuel Colunga; Bill Smith; Ross Meentemeyer

    2008-01-01

    We modeled Phytophthora ramorum infection using the North Carolina State University- Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Plant Pest Forecasting System (NAPPFAST) for the conterminous United States. Our infection model is based on a temperature-moisture response function. The model parameters were: leaf wetness, minimum temperature, optimum...

  14. Suppression of Phytophthora ramorum infestations through silvicultural treatment in California's north coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yana Valachovic; Chris Lee; Brendan Twieg; David Rizzo; Richard Cobb; Radoslaw Glebocki

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, three forested sites infested with Phytophthora ramorum in Humboldt County, California were subjected to different combinations of treatments designed to reduce inoculum and control spread. One treatment, consisting of removal of all California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt.) and tanoak...

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF NATURAL ESSENTIAL OILS ON THE GROWTH OF PHYTOPHTHORA SPP. ISOLATED FROM PELARGONIUM CUTTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelina Machura

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ornamental plants play an important role in human life. Plants positively influence the psyche and improve the well-being of people around them. They produce oxygen, provide a barrier to dust and noise, lower the temperature and increase air humidity, thereby positively impacting the microclimate. The unmatched appeal of pelargonium, ease of cultivation and care, abundance of flowering from spring to late autumn and its decorative qualities make it a universal application. The aim of the study was to isolate the microorganisms that inhabit the cuttings of pelargonium, identify fungal isolates, investigate the pathogenicity of selected isolates and evaluate the influence of certain essential oils (Carum carvi L. essential oils, Citrus limon L. essential oils, Citrus reticulatae aetheroleum essential oils, essential oil of tea tree in in vitro circumstances on the linear growth of the mycelium: Phytophthora cryptogea, Phytophthora nicotianae var. nicotianae. Previcur Energy 840 SL was used as a standard chemical protection. The most numerous isolated fungi were: Phytophthora, Botrytis, Cylindrocladium, Alternaria and Cylindrocarpon. The highest efficiency in relation to Phytophthora cryptogea characterized the Citrus limon L. essential oils (concentration 0.1% and 1% and Carum carvi L. essential oil (concentration 1%.

  16. A systems approach for detecting sources of Phytophthora contamination in nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer L. Parke; Niklaus Grünwald; Carrie Lewis; Val Fieland

    2010-01-01

    Nursery plants are also important long-distance vectors of non-indigenous pathogens such as P. ramorum and P. kernoviae. Pre-shipment inspections have not been adequate to ensure that shipped plants are free from Phytophthora, nor has this method informed growers about sources of contamination in their...

  17. Phytophthora community structure analyses in Oregon nurseries inform systems approaches to disease management

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Parke; B.J. Knaus; V.J. Fieland; C. Lewis; N.J. Grünwald

    2014-01-01

    Nursery plants are important vectors for plant pathogens. Understanding what pathogens occur in nurseries in different production stages can be useful to the development of integrated systems approaches. Four horticultural nurseries in Oregon were sampled every 2 months for 4 years to determine the identity and community structure of Phytophthora...

  18. Host-seeking behavior and dispersal of Triatoma infestans, a vector of Chagas disease, under semi-field conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Castillo-Neyra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease affects millions of people in Latin America. The control of this vector-borne disease focuses on halting transmission by reducing or eliminating insect vector populations. Most transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, involves insects living within or very close to households and feeding mostly on domestic animals. As animal hosts can be intermittently present it is important to understand how host availability can modify transmission risk to humans and to characterize the host-seeking dispersal of triatomine vectors on a very fine scale. We used a semi-field system with motion-detection cameras to characterize the dispersal of Triatoma infestans, and compare the behavior of vector populations in the constant presence of hosts (guinea pigs, and after the removal of the hosts. The emigration rate - net insect population decline in original refuge - following host removal was on average 19.7% of insects per 10 days compared to 10.2% in constant host populations (p = 0.029. However, dispersal of T. infestans occurred in both directions, towards and away from the initial location of the hosts. The majority of insects that moved towards the original location of guinea pigs remained there for 4 weeks. Oviposition and mortality were observed and analyzed in the context of insect dispersal, but only mortality was higher in the group where animal hosts were removed (p-value <0.01. We discuss different survival strategies associated with the observed behavior and its implications for vector control. Removing domestic animals in infested areas increases vector dispersal from the first day of host removal. The implications of these patterns of vector dispersal in a field setting are not yet known but could result in movement towards human rooms.

  19. Analysing deltamethrin susceptibility and pyrethroid esterase activity variations in sylvatic and domestic Triatoma infestans at the embryonic stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Luis Santo-Orihuela

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to study the deltamethrin susceptibility of eggs from Triatoma infestans populations and the contribution of pyrethroid esterases to deltamethrin degradation. Insects were collected from sylvatic areas, including Veinte de Octubre and Kirus-Mayu (Bolivia and from domiciliary areas, including El Palmar (Bolivia and La Pista (Argentina. Deltamethrin susceptibility was determined by dose-response bioassays. Serial dilutions of deltamethrin (0.0005-1 mg/mL were topically applied to 12-day-old eggs. Samples from El Palmar had the highest lethal dose ratio (LDR value (44.90 compared to the susceptible reference strain (NFS, whereas the Veinte de Octubre samples had the lowest value (0.50. Pyrethroid esterases were evaluated using 7-coumaryl permethrate (7-CP on individually homogenised eggs from each population and from NFS. The El Palmar and La Pista samples contained 40.11 and 36.64 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively, and these values were statistically similar to NFS (34.92 pmol/min/mg protein and different from Kirus-Mayu and Veinte de Octubre (27.49 and 22.69 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. The toxicological data indicate that the domestic populations were resistant to deltamethrin, but no statistical contribution of 7-CP esterases was observed. The sylvatic populations had similar LDR values to NFS, but lower 7-CP esterase activities. Moreover, this is the first study of the pyrethroid esterases on T. infestans eggs employing a specific substrate (7-CP.

  20. Biological and epidemiological aspects of the quarantine pathogen Phytophthora ramorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Ginetti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora ramorum is a quarantine pathogen that causes leaf blight and shoot dieback of the crown, bark cankers and death on a number of both ornamental and forest trees, especially in North America and northern Europe, where it has produced severe outbreaks.In Italy it was first reported in 2002, on Rhodondendron yakushimanum in a Piedmont nursery; after that it seemed to have disappeared, only to re-emerge in 2013 when numerous isolates were detected on batches of Viburnum tinus plants growing in some nurseries in the Pistoia area (Tuscany, which is an important district in the trade of nursery plants world-wide. This work reports on a number of laboratory tests that were carried out on isolates from infected plant samples. The micromorphological and macromorphological characteristics of the pathogen growing on carrot agar (CA, corn meal agar (CMA, malt extract agar (MEA potato dextrose agar, and V8 agar with added PARPNH (see text were determined, as was the growth rate at 10º, 15º, 20º, 25°, 30º, 32º and 35ºC. Molecular analysis was employed to identify the isolates more precisely. Inoculation trials under the bark were also carried out to ascertain the isolate virulence and the Koch’s Postulates.The Plant Protection Service of the Tuscan Region (SFR, Servizio Fitosanitario Regionale was alerted as soon as the pathogen infection was detected and it took the prescribed steps to eradicate the infection in the field and prevent the recurrence of an epidemic.