WorldWideScience

Sample records for phytochrome interacting factor

  1. 14-3-3 Proteins Participate in Light Signaling through Association with PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Adams

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available 14-3-3 proteins are regulatory proteins found in all eukaryotes and are known to selectively interact with phosphorylated proteins to regulate physiological processes. Through an affinity purification screening, many light-related proteins were recovered as 14-3-3 candidate binding partners. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that the 14-3-3 kappa isoform (14-3-3κ could bind to PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3 and CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1. Further analysis by in vitro pull-down assay confirmed the interaction between 14-3-3κ and PIF3. Interruption of putative phosphorylation sites on the 14-3-3 binding motifs of PIF3 was not sufficient to inhibit 14-3-3κ from binding or to disturb nuclear localization of PIF3. It was also indicated that 14-3-3κ could bind to other members of the PIF family, such as PIF1 and PIF6, but not to LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED1 (HFR1. 14-3-3 mutants, as well as the PIF3 overexpressor, displayed longer hypocotyls, and a pif3 mutant displayed shorter hypocotyls than the wild-type in red light, suggesting that 14-3-3 proteins are positive regulators of photomorphogenesis and function antagonistically with PIF3. Consequently, our results indicate that 14-3-3 proteins bind to PIFs and initiate photomorphogenesis in response to a light signal.

  2. A Small GTPase Activator Protein Interacts with Cytoplasmic Phytochromes in Regulating Root Development*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Ho; Cho, Man-Ho; Kim, Tae-Lim; Yoo, Jihye; Kim, Jeong-Il; Han, Yun-Jeong; Song, Pill-Soon; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Bhoo, Seong Hee; Hahn, Tae-Ryong

    2010-01-01

    Phytochromes enable plants to sense light information and regulate developmental responses. Phytochromes interact with partner proteins to transmit light signals to downstream components for plant development. PIRF1 (phytochrome-interacting ROP guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (RopGEF 1)) functions as a light-signaling switch regulating root development through the activation of ROPs (Rho-like GTPase of plant) in the cytoplasm. In vitro pulldown and yeast two-hybrid assays confirmed the interaction between PIRF1 and phytochromes. PIRF1 interacted with the N-terminal domain of phytochromes through its conserved PRONE (plant-specific ROP nucleotide exchanger) region. PIRF1 also interacted with ROPs and activated them in a phytochrome-dependent manner. The Pr form of phytochrome A enhanced the RopGEF activity of PIRF1, whereas the Pfr form inhibited it. A bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis demonstrated that PIRF1 was localized in the cytoplasm and bound to the phytochromes in darkness but not in light. PIRF1 loss of function mutants (pirf1) of Arabidopsis thaliana showed a longer root phenotype in the dark. In addition, both PIRF1 overexpression mutants (PIRF1-OX) and phytochrome-null mutants (phyA-211 and phyB-9) showed retarded root elongation and irregular root hair formation, suggesting that PIRF1 is a negative regulator of phytochrome-mediated primary root development. We propose that phytochrome and ROP signaling are interconnected through PIRF1 in regulating the root growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:20551316

  3. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Jutta C; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L; Quail, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5'-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation.

  4. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Jutta C.; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L.; Quail, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5′-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation. PMID:27379152

  5. Thermoperiodic control of hypocotyl elongation depends on auxin-induced ethylene signaling that controls downstream PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bours, Ralph; Kohlen, Wouter; Bouwmeester, Harro J; van der Krol, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    We show that antiphase light-temperature cycles (negative day-night temperature difference [-DIF]) inhibit hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This is caused by reduced cell elongation during the cold photoperiod. Cell elongation in the basal part of the hypocotyl under -DIF was restored by both 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC; ethylene precursor) and auxin, indicating limited auxin and ethylene signaling under -DIF. Both auxin biosynthesis and auxin signaling were reduced during -DIF. In addition, expression of several ACC Synthase was reduced under -DIF but could be restored by auxin application. In contrast, the reduced hypocotyl elongation of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling mutants could not be complemented by auxin, indicating that auxin functions upstream of ethylene. The PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORS (PIFs) PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 were previously shown to be important regulators of hypocotyl elongation. We now show that, in contrast to pif4 and pif5 mutants, the reduced hypocotyl length in pif3 cannot be rescued by either ACC or auxin. In line with this, treatment with ethylene or auxin inhibitors reduced hypocotyl elongation in PIF4 overexpressor (PIF4ox) and PIF5ox but not PIF3ox plants. PIF3 promoter activity was strongly reduced under -DIF but could be restored by auxin application in an ACC Synthase-dependent manner. Combined, these results show that PIF3 regulates hypocotyl length downstream, whereas PIF4 and PIF5 regulate hypocotyl length upstream of an auxin and ethylene cascade. We show that, under -DIF, lower auxin biosynthesis activity limits the signaling in this pathway, resulting in low activity of PIF3 and short hypocotyls.

  6. Expression Patterns of OsPIL11, a Phytochrome-Interacting Factor in Rice, and Preliminary Analysis of Its Roles in Light Signal Transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; PENG Wei-feng; LIU Qian-qian; ZHOU Jin-jun; LIANG Wei-hong; XIE Xian-zhi

    2012-01-01

    The expression patterns of OsPlL11,one of six putative phytochrome-interacting factors,were analyzed in different organs of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).The expression of OsPIL 11 was organ-specific and was regulated by leaf development,abscisic acid (ABA),jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA).To further explore the role of OsPlL 11 in plant light signal transduction,a plant expression vector of OsPIL11 was constructed and introduced into tobacco.When grown under continuous red light,OsPIL11-overexpressed transgenic tobacco exhibited shorter hypocotyls and larger cotyledons and leaves compared to wild-type seedlings.When grown under continuous far-red light,however,transgenic and wild-type seedlings showed similar phenotypes.These results indicate that OsPIL11 is involved in red light induced de-etiolation,but not in far-red light induced de-etiolation in transgenic tobacco,which lays the foundation for dissecting the function of OsPIL 11 in phytochrome-mediated light signal transduction in rice.

  7. LEAFY COTYLEDON1-CASEIN KINASE I-TCP15-PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 Network Regulates Somatic Embryogenesis by Regulating Auxin Homeostasis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ling; Hu, Qin; Li, Yaoyao; Xu, Jiao; Ma, Yizan; Zhu, Longfu; Yang, Xiyan; Zhang, Xianlong

    2015-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is an efficient tool for the propagation of plant species and also, a useful model for studying the regulatory networks in embryo development. However, the regulatory networks underlying the transition from nonembryogenic callus to somatic embryos during SE remain poorly understood. Here, we describe an upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) CASEIN KINASE I gene, GhCKI, which is a unique key regulatory factor that strongly affects SE. Overexpressing GhCKI halted the formation of embryoids and plant regeneration because of a block in the transition from nonembryogenic callus to somatic embryos. In contrast, defective GhCKI in plants facilitated SE. To better understand the mechanism by which GhCKI regulates SE, the regulatory network was analyzed. A direct upstream negative regulator protein, cotton LEAFY COTYLEDON1, was identified to be targeted to a cis-element, CTTTTC, in the promoter of GhCKI. Moreover, GhCKI interacted with and phosphorylated cotton CINCINNATA-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF transcription factor15 by coordinately regulating the expression of cotton PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4, finally disrupting auxin homeostasis, which led to increased cell proliferation and aborted somatic embryo formation in GhCKI-overexpressing somatic cells. Our results show a complex process of SE that is negatively regulated by GhCKI through a complex regulatory network. PMID:26491146

  8. LEAFY COTYLEDON1-CASEIN KINASE I-TCP15-PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 Network Regulates Somatic Embryogenesis by Regulating Auxin Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ling; Hu, Qin; Li, Yaoyao; Xu, Jiao; Ma, Yizan; Zhu, Longfu; Yang, Xiyan; Zhang, Xianlong

    2015-12-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is an efficient tool for the propagation of plant species and also, a useful model for studying the regulatory networks in embryo development. However, the regulatory networks underlying the transition from nonembryogenic callus to somatic embryos during SE remain poorly understood. Here, we describe an upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) CASEIN KINASE I gene, GhCKI, which is a unique key regulatory factor that strongly affects SE. Overexpressing GhCKI halted the formation of embryoids and plant regeneration because of a block in the transition from nonembryogenic callus to somatic embryos. In contrast, defective GhCKI in plants facilitated SE. To better understand the mechanism by which GhCKI regulates SE, the regulatory network was analyzed. A direct upstream negative regulator protein, cotton LEAFY COTYLEDON1, was identified to be targeted to a cis-element, CTTTTC, in the promoter of GhCKI. Moreover, GhCKI interacted with and phosphorylated cotton CINCINNATA-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF transcription factor15 by coordinately regulating the expression of cotton PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4, finally disrupting auxin homeostasis, which led to increased cell proliferation and aborted somatic embryo formation in GhCKI-overexpressing somatic cells. Our results show a complex process of SE that is negatively regulated by GhCKI through a complex regulatory network.

  9. Calcium requirement of phytochrome-mediated fern-spore germination: no direct phytochrome-calcium interaction in the phytochrome-initiated transduction chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuerlein, R.; Wayne, R.; Roux, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    Phytochrome-mediated germination of fern spores of Dryopteris paleacea Sw. was initiated by a saturating red-light (R) irradiation after 20 h of imbibition. For its realization external Ca2+ was required, with a threshold at a submicromolar concentration, and an optimum was reached around 10(-4) M. At concentrations > or = 10(-1) M only a reduced response was obtained, based probably on an unspecific osmotic or ionic effect. The germination response was inhibited by La3+, an antagonist of Ca2+. From these results it is concluded that Ca2+ influx from the medium into the spores may be an important event in phytochrome-mediated germination. In the absence of Ca2+ the R-stimulated system remained capable of responding to Ca2+, added as late as 40 h after R. Moreover, Ca2+ was effective even if added after the active form of phytochrome, Pfr, had been abolished by far-red (FR) 24 h after R. Thus, the primary effect of Pfr, that initiates the transduction chain, does not require calcium. "Coupling" of Pfr to subsequent dark reactions has been investigated by R-FR irradiations with various dark intervals. The resulting "escape kinetics" were characterized by a lag phase (6 h) and half-maximal escape from FR reversibility (19 h). These kinetics were not significantly changed by the presence or absence of calcium. Thus, direct interaction of Pfr and calcium is not a step in the transduction chain initiated by the active form of phytochrome.

  10. Regulation of Phytochrome Interacting Factors (PIFs) on Plant Growth and Development%光敏色素互作因子(PIFs)对植物生长发育的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘教文; 赵术珍; 张烨; 李长生; 王玉红; 王兴军

    2014-01-01

    Phytochrome interacting factors ( PIFs ) belonging to Arabidopsis basic helix -loop -helix ( bHLH) transcription factors subgroup 15 are key regulators in light signal transduction .Light -activated phytochromes regulate plant growth and development by promoting the degradation of PIFs and directly or indi -rectly inhibiting their DNA binding activity .Studies showed that PIFs played important roles in the regulation of seed germination, seedling morphogenesis , shade avoidance , circadian clock, phytohormone biosynthesis and signal transduction .PIFs have broader roles than previously expected and work as a cellular signaling hub that integrates multiple signals to orchestrate the transcriptional network of plants .%光敏色素相互作用因子( PIFs)属于拟南芥bHLH转录因子家族的第15亚族,是光信号响应过程中的关键负调控因子。光激活的光敏色素通过促进PIFs蛋白降解,直接或间接抑制它们与DNA的结合,从而实现光对植物生长发育的调控。研究发现PIFs在调控种子萌发、幼苗形态建成、避荫反应、昼夜节律以及各种植物激素响应过程中起着重要作用。此外,PIFs作为细胞信号传导的“枢纽”具有更为广泛的作用,能够整合不同信号,精细调控整个转录网络。

  11. Light-activated phytochrome A and B interact with members of the SPA family to promote photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis by reorganizing the COP1/SPA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheerin, David J; Menon, Chiara; zur Oven-Krockhaus, Sven; Enderle, Beatrix; Zhu, Ling; Johnen, Philipp; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Huq, Enamul; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes function as red/far-red photoreceptors in plants and are essential for light-regulated growth and development. Photomorphogenesis, the developmental program in light, is the default program in seed plants. In dark-grown seedlings, photomorphogenic growth is suppressed by the action of the CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1)/SUPPRESSOR OF phyA-105 (SPA) complex, which targets positive regulators of photomorphogenic growth for degradation by the proteasome. Phytochromes inhibit the COP1/SPA complex, leading to the accumulation of transcription factors promoting photomorphogenesis; yet, the mechanism by which they inactivate COP1/SPA is still unknown. Here, we show that light-activated phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) interact with SPA1 and other SPA proteins. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy analyses show that SPAs and phytochromes colocalize and interact in nuclear bodies. Furthermore, light-activated phyA and phyB disrupt the interaction between COP1 and SPAs, resulting in reorganization of the COP1/SPA complex in planta. The light-induced stabilization of HFR1, a photomorphogenic factor targeted for degradation by COP1/SPA, correlates temporally with the accumulation of phyA in the nucleus and localization of phyA to nuclear bodies. Overall, these data provide a molecular mechanism for the inactivation of the COP1/SPA complex by phyA- and phyB-mediated light perception. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  12. The molecular mechanisms of phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs) in phy-tohormone signaling transduction%光敏色素作用因子PIFs参与植物激素信号转导的分子机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任小芸; 吴美琴; 陈建民; 张冬平; 高勇

    2016-01-01

    Phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs) belonging to basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription fac-tors family, play an important role in plant growth and development. As the hubs of signal network in plant, PIFs integrate multiple plant hormone signals to regulate the transcriptional network. Existing research shows that PIFs can not only affect the synthesis of GA, ABA and IAA, but also regulate signal transmission of GA, BR, JA, IAA, ABA and ethylene. This review summarizes the research progress of function of PIFs in plant homone, and provides help for the further study of PIFs.%光敏色素作用因子(PIFs)属于bHLH 转录因子家族,在植物的生长发育中起到重要调节作用。作为一个关键的胞内信号调控组分, PIFs扮演着整合不同激素信号通路“枢纽”的角色。现有研究表明, PIFs能影响GA、ABA、IAA等激素的合成,调控GA、BR、JA、IAA、ABA、乙烯等激素的信号传递。本文重点阐述PIFs在植物激素信号中调控功能的研究进展,以期为进一步探索PIFs的功能及机制提供帮助。

  13. The phytochrome-interacting vascular plant one-zinc finger1 and VOZ2 redundantly regulate flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Yukiko; Mukougawa, Keiko; Uemoto, Mitsuhiro; Yokofuji, Akira; Suzuri, Ryota; Nishitani, Aiko; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2012-08-01

    The timing of the transition to flowering in plants is regulated by various environmental factors, including daylength and light quality. Although the red/far-red photoreceptor phytochrome B (phyB) represses flowering by indirectly regulating the expression of a key flowering regulator, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), the mechanism of phyB signaling for flowering is largely unknown. Here, we identified two Arabidopsis thaliana genes, VASCULAR PLANT ONE-ZINC FINGER1 (VOZ1) and VOZ2, which are highly conserved throughout land plant evolution, as phyB-interacting factors. voz1 voz2 double mutants, but neither single mutant, showed a late-flowering phenotype under long-day conditions, which indicated that VOZ1 and VOZ2 redundantly promote flowering. voz1 voz2 mutations suppressed the early-flowering phenotype of the phyB mutant, and FT expression was repressed in the voz1 voz2 mutant. Green fluorescent protein-VOZ2 signal was observed in the cytoplasm, and interaction of VOZ proteins with phyB was indicated to occur in the cytoplasm under far-red light. However, VOZ2 protein modified to localize constitutively in the nucleus promoted flowering. In addition, the stability of VOZ2 proteins in the nucleus was modulated by light quality in a phytochrome-dependent manner. We propose that partial translocation of VOZ proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus mediates the initial step of the phyB signal transduction pathway that regulates flowering.

  14. Photosynthetic photon flux density and phytochrome B interact to regulate branching in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hongwen; Abernathy, Scott D; White, Richard H; Finlayson, Scott A

    2011-11-01

    Branching is regulated by environmental signals including phytochrome B (phyB)-mediated responses to the ratio of red to far red light. While the mechanisms associated with phytochrome regulation of branching are beginning to be elucidated, there is little information regarding other light signals, including photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and how it influences phytochrome-mediated responses. This study shows that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) branching is modified by both varying PPFD and phyB status and that significant interactions occur between these variables. While phyB deficiency decreased branching when the PPFD was low, the effect was suppressed by high PPFD and some branching aspects were actually promoted. Photosynthesis measurements showed that PPFD may influence branching in phyB-deficient plants at least partially through a specific signalling pathway rather than directly through energy effects on the shoot. The expression of various genes in unelongated buds of phyB-deficient and phyB-sufficient plants grown under high and low PPFD demonstrated potential roles for several hormones, including auxin, cytokinins and ABA, and also showed imperfect correlation between expression of the branching regulators BRC1 and BRC2 and bud fate. These results may implicate additional undiscovered bud autonomous mechanisms and/or components contributing to bud outgrowth regulation by environmental signals.

  15. Holophytochrome-Interacting Proteins in Physcomitrella: Putative Actors in Phytochrome Cytoplasmic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, Anna Lena; Mailliet, Katharina; Hughes, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes are the principle photoreceptors in light-regulated plant development, primarily acting via translocation of the light-activated photoreceptor into the nucleus and subsequent gene regulation. However, several independent lines of evidence indicate unambiguously that an additional cytoplasmic signaling mechanism must exist. Directional responses in filament tip cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens are steered by phy4 which has been shown to interact physically with the blue light receptor phototropin at the plasma membrane. This complex might perceive and transduce vectorial information leading to cytoskeleton reorganization and finally a directional growth response. We developed yeast two-hybrid procedures using photochemically functional, full-length phy4 as bait in Physcomitrella cDNA library screens and growth assays under different light conditions, revealing Pfr-dependent interactions possibly associated with phytochrome cytoplasmic signaling. Candidate proteins were then expressed in planta with fluorescent protein tags to determine their intracellular localization in darkness and red light. Of 14 candidates, 12 were confirmed to interact with phy4 in planta using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We also used database information to study their expression patterns relative to those of phy4. We discuss the likely functional characteristics of these holophytochrome-interacting proteins (HIP's) and their possible roles in signaling.

  16. Holophytochrome-interacting proteins in Physcomitrella: putative actors in phytochrome cytoplasmic signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena eErmert

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes are the principle photoreceptors in light-regulated plant development, primarily acting via translocation of the light-activated photoreceptor into the nucleus and subsequent gene regulation. However, several independent lines of evidence indicate unambiguously that an additional cytoplasmic signaling mechanism must exist. Directional responses in filament tip cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens are steered by phy4 which has been shown to interact physically with the blue light receptor phototropin at the plasma membrane. This complex might perceive and transduce vectorial information leading to cytoskeleton reorganization and finally a directional growth response. We developed yeast two-hybrid procedures using photochemically-functional, full-length phy4 as bait in Physcomitrella cDNA library screens and growth assays under different light conditions, revealing Pfr-dependent interactions possibly associated with phytochrome cytoplasmic signaling. Candidate proteins were then expressed in planta with fluorescent protein tags to determine their intracellular localization in darkness and red light. Of 14 candidates, 12 were confirmed to interact with phy4 in planta using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We discuss the roles these putative holophytochrome-interacting proteins (HIP's might have in signaling.

  17. Complex and shifting interactions of phytochromes regulate fruit development in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Suresh Kumar; Sharma, Sulabha; Santisree, Parankusam; Kilambi, Himabindu Vasuki; Appenroth, Klaus; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2014-07-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is a complex metabolic process regulated by a genetical hierarchy. A subset of this process is also modulated by light signalling, as mutants encoding negative regulators of phytochrome signal transduction show higher accumulation of carotenoids. In tomato, phytochromes are encoded by a multi-gene family, namely PHYA, PHYB1, PHYB2, PHYE and PHYF; however, their contribution to fruit development and ripening has not been examined. Using single phytochrome mutants phyA, phyB1 and phyB2 and multiple mutants phyAB1, phyB1B2 and phyAB1B2, we compared the on-vine transitory phases of ripening until fruit abscission. The phyAB1B2 mutant showed accelerated transitions during ripening, with shortest time to fruit abscission. Comparison of transition intervals in mutants indicated a phase-specific influence of different phytochrome species either singly or in combination on the ripening process. Examination of off-vine ripened fruits indicated that ripening-specific carotenoid accumulation was not obligatorily dependent upon light and even dark-incubated fruits accumulated carotenoids. The accumulation of transcripts and carotenoids in off-vine and on-vine ripened mutant fruits indicated a complex and shifting phase-dependent modulation by phytochromes. Our results indicate that, in addition to regulating carotenoid levels in tomato fruits, phytochromes also regulate the time required for phase transitions during ripening.

  18. The Phytochrome-Interacting VASCULAR PLANT ONE–ZINC FINGER1 and VOZ2 Redundantly Regulate Flowering in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Yukiko; Mukougawa, Keiko; Uemoto, Mitsuhiro; Yokofuji, Akira; Suzuri, Ryota; Nishitani, Aiko; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    The timing of the transition to flowering in plants is regulated by various environmental factors, including daylength and light quality. Although the red/far-red photoreceptor phytochrome B (phyB) represses flowering by indirectly regulating the expression of a key flowering regulator, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), the mechanism of phyB signaling for flowering is largely unknown. Here, we identified two Arabidopsis thaliana genes, VASCULAR PLANT ONE–ZINC FINGER1 (VOZ1) and VOZ2, which are highly conserved throughout land plant evolution, as phyB-interacting factors. voz1 voz2 double mutants, but neither single mutant, showed a late-flowering phenotype under long-day conditions, which indicated that VOZ1 and VOZ2 redundantly promote flowering. voz1 voz2 mutations suppressed the early-flowering phenotype of the phyB mutant, and FT expression was repressed in the voz1 voz2 mutant. Green fluorescent protein–VOZ2 signal was observed in the cytoplasm, and interaction of VOZ proteins with phyB was indicated to occur in the cytoplasm under far-red light. However, VOZ2 protein modified to localize constitutively in the nucleus promoted flowering. In addition, the stability of VOZ2 proteins in the nucleus was modulated by light quality in a phytochrome-dependent manner. We propose that partial translocation of VOZ proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus mediates the initial step of the phyB signal transduction pathway that regulates flowering. PMID:22904146

  19. Differential interactions of phytochrome A (Pr vs. Pfr) with monoclonal antibodies probed by a surface plasmon resonance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natori, Chihoko; Kim, Jeong-Il; Bhoo, Seong Hee; Han, Yun-Jeong; Hanzawa, Hiroko; Furuya, Masaki; Song, Pill-Soon

    2007-01-01

    Phytochromes are red- and far-red light-reversible photoreceptors for photomorphogenesis in plants. Phytochrome A is a dimeric chromopeptide that mediates very low fluence and high irradiance responses. To analyze the surface properties of phytochrome A (phyA), the epitopes of 21 anti-phyA monoclonal antibodies were determined by variously engineered recombinant phyA proteins and the dissociation constants of seven anti-phyA monoclonal antibodies with phyA were measured using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based resonant mirror biosensor (IAsys). Purified oat phyA was immobilized on the sensor surface using a carboxymethyl dextran cuvette in advance, and the interactions of each chosen monoclonal antibody against phyA in either red light absorbing form (Pr) or far-red light absorbing form (Pfr) at different concentrations were monitored. The binding profiles were analyzed using the FAST Fit program of IAsys. The resultant values of dissociation constants clearly demonstrated the differential affinities between the phyA epitopes and the monoclonal antibodies dependent upon Pr vs. Pfr conformations. Monoclonal antibody mAP20 preferentially recognized the epitope at amino acids 653-731 in the Pr form, whereas mAA02, mAP21 and mAR07/mAR08 displayed preferential affinities for the Pfr's surfaces at epitopes 494-601 (the hinge region between the N- and C-terminal domains), 601-653 (hinge in PASI domain), and 772-1128 (C-terminal domain), respectively. The N-terminal extension (1-74) was not recognized by mAP09 and mAP15, suggesting that the N-terminal extreme is not exposed in the native conformation of phyA. On the other hand, the C-terminal domain becomes apparently exposed on Pr-to-Pfr phototransformation, suggesting an inter-domain cross-talk. The use of surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy offers a new approach to study the surface properties of phytochromes associated with the photoreversible structural changes, as well as for the study of protein

  20. Red Light-Induced Phytochrome Relocation into the Nucleus in Adiantum capillus-veneris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidenori Tsuboi; Sachihiko Nakamura; Eberhard Sch(a)fer; Masamitsu Wada

    2012-01-01

    Phytochromes in seed plants are known to move into nuclei in a red light-dependent manner with or without interacting factors.Here,we show phytochrome relocation to the nuclear region in phytochrome-dependent Adiantum capillus-veneris spore germination by partial spore-irradiation experiments.The nuclear or non-nuclear region of imbibed spores was irradiated with a microbeam of red and/or far-red light and the localization of phytochrome involved in spore germination was estimated from the germination rate.The phytochrome for spore germination existed throughout whole spore under darkness after imbibition,but gradually migrated to the nuclear region following red light irradiation.Intracellular distribution of PHY-GUS fusion proteins expressed in germinated spores by particle bombardment showed the migration of Acphy2,but not Acphy1,into nucleus in a red light-dependent manner,suggesting that Acphy2 is the photoreceptor for fern spore germination.

  1. Bottom-up Assembly of the Phytochrome Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lamas, Maximiliano; Lorenzo, Christian D.; Cerdán, Pablo D.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed sophisticated systems to monitor and rapidly acclimate to environmental fluctuations. Light is an essential source of environmental information throughout the plant’s life cycle. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana possesses five phytochromes (phyA-phyE) with important roles in germination, seedling establishment, shade avoidance, and flowering. However, our understanding of the phytochrome signaling network is incomplete, and little is known about the individual roles of phytochromes and how they function cooperatively to mediate light responses. Here, we used a bottom-up approach to study the phytochrome network. We added each of the five phytochromes to a phytochrome-less background to study their individual roles and then added the phytochromes by pairs to study their interactions. By analyzing the 16 resulting genotypes, we revealed unique roles for each phytochrome and identified novel phytochrome interactions that regulate germination and the onset of flowering. Furthermore, we found that ambient temperature has both phytochrome-dependent and -independent effects, suggesting that multiple pathways integrate temperature and light signaling. Surprisingly, none of the phytochromes alone conferred a photoperiodic response. Although phyE and phyB were the strongest repressors of flowering, both phyB and phyC were needed to confer a flowering response to photoperiod. Thus, a specific combination of phytochromes is required to detect changes in photoperiod, whereas single phytochromes are sufficient to respond to light quality, indicating how phytochromes signal different light cues. PMID:27820825

  2. The protein phosphatase 7 regulates phytochrome signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Genoud

    Full Text Available The psi2 mutant of Arabidopsis displays amplification of the responses controlled by the red/far red light photoreceptors phytochrome A (phyA and phytochrome B (phyB but no apparent defect in blue light perception. We found that loss-of-function alleles of the protein phosphatase 7 (AtPP7 are responsible for the light hypersensitivity in psi2 demonstrating that AtPP7 controls the levels of phytochrome signaling. Plants expressing reduced levels of AtPP7 mRNA display reduced blue-light induced cryptochrome signaling but no noticeable deficiency in phytochrome signaling. Our genetic analysis suggests that phytochrome signaling is enhanced in the AtPP7 loss of function alleles, including in blue light, which masks the reduced cryptochrome signaling. AtPP7 has been found to interact both in yeast and in planta assays with nucleotide-diphosphate kinase 2 (NDPK2, a positive regulator of phytochrome signals. Analysis of ndpk2-psi2 double mutants suggests that NDPK2 plays a critical role in the AtPP7 regulation of the phytochrome pathway and identifies NDPK2 as an upstream element involved in the modulation of the salicylic acid (SA-dependent defense pathway by light. Thus, cryptochrome- and phytochrome-specific light signals synchronously control their relative contribution to the regulation of plant development. Interestingly, PP7 and NDPK are also components of animal light signaling systems.

  3. Dynamic antagonism between phytochromes and PIF family basic helix-loop-helix factors induces selective reciprocal responses to light and shade in a rapidly responsive transcriptional network in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leivar, Pablo; Tepperman, James M; Cohn, Megan M; Monte, Elena; Al-Sady, Bassem; Erickson, Erika; Quail, Peter H

    2012-04-01

    Plants respond to shade-modulated light signals via phytochrome (phy)-induced adaptive changes, termed shade avoidance. To examine the roles of Phytochrome-Interacting basic helix-loop-helix Factors, PIF1, 3, 4, and 5, in relaying such signals to the transcriptional network, we compared the shade-responsive transcriptome profiles of wild-type and quadruple pif (pifq) mutants. We identify a subset of genes, enriched in transcription factor-encoding loci, that respond rapidly to shade, in a PIF-dependent manner, and contain promoter G-box motifs, known to bind PIFs. These genes are potential direct targets of phy-PIF signaling that regulate the primary downstream transcriptional circuitry. A second subset of PIF-dependent, early response genes, lacking G-box motifs, are enriched for auxin-responsive loci, and are thus potentially indirect targets of phy-PIF signaling, mediating the rapid cell expansion induced by shade. Comparing deetiolation- and shade-responsive transcriptomes identifies another subset of G-box-containing genes that reciprocally display rapid repression and induction in response to light and shade signals. These data define a core set of transcriptional and hormonal processes that appear to be dynamically poised to react rapidly to light-environment changes via perturbations in the mutually antagonistic actions of the phys and PIFs. Comparing the responsiveness of the pifq and triple pif mutants to light and shade confirms that the PIFs act with overlapping redundancy on seedling morphogenesis and transcriptional regulation but that each PIF contributes differentially to these responses.

  4. Oat Phytochrome Is Biologically Active in Transgenic Tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, M. T.; Quail, P. H.

    1989-08-01

    To determine the functional homology between phytochromes from evolutionarily divergent species, we used the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter to express a monocot (oat) phytochrome cDNA in a dicot plant (tomato). Immunoblot analysis shows that more than 50% of the transgenic tomato plants synthesize the full-length oat phytochrome polypeptide. Moreover, leaves of light-grown transgenic plants contain appreciably less oat phytochrome than leaves from dark-adapted plants, and etiolated R1 transgenic seedlings have higher levels of spectrally active phytochrome than wild-type tomato seedlings in direct proportion to the level of immunochemically detectable oat polypeptide present. These data suggest that the heterologous oat polypeptide carries a functional chromophore, allowing reversible photoconversion between the two forms of the molecule, and that the far-red absorbing form (Pfr) is recognized and selectively degraded by the Pfr-specific degradative machinery in the dicot cell. The overexpression of oat phytochrome has pleiotropic, phenotypic consequences at all major phases of the life cycle. Adult transgenic tomato plants expressing high levels of the oat protein tend to be dwarfed, with dark green foliage and fruits. R1 transgenic seedlings have short hypocotyls with elevated anthocyanin contents. We conclude that a monocot phytochrome can be synthesized and correctly processed to a biologically active form in a dicot cell, and that the transduction pathway components that interact with the photoreceptor are evolutionarily conserved.

  5. Chlorophyll formation and phytochrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raven, C.W.

    1973-01-01

    The rôle of phytochrome in the regeneration of protochlorophyll (Pchl) in darkness following short exposures to light, as well as in the accumulation of chlorophyll- a (Chl- a ) in continuous light in previously dark-grown seedlings of pea, bean,

  6. Chlorophyll formation and phytochrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raven, C.W.

    1973-01-01

    The rôle of phytochrome in the regeneration of protochlorophyll (Pchl) in darkness following short exposures to light, as well as in the accumulation of chlorophyll- a (Chl- a ) in continuous light in previously dark-grown seedlings of pea, bean, and maize has been the subject of the present investi

  7. Spectral properties of phytochrome Agp2 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens are specifically modified by a compound of the cell extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Alexander; Molina, Isabel; Oberpichler, Inga; Michael, Norbert; Lamparter, Tilman

    2008-10-16

    Phytochromes are widely distributed photoreceptors that are converted by light between the red absorbing Pr and the far-red absorbing Pfr form. The soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens contains two phytochromes, Agp1 and Agp2, which act as light-regulated histidine kinases. Whereas most phytochromes are stable in the Pr form, Agp2 and few other phytochromes convert into Pfr in darkness. We have shown in a previous publication that the spectral properties of recombinant Agp2 are modified by compounds of the cell extract from an Agrobacterium agp1(-)/agp2(-) double knockout mutant. In the present work we performed concentration series which show that the interaction is specific and that the modifying factor has a concentration of ca. 0.2 microM. We have also performed a series of mixing experiments with the truncated protein Agp2-M2, which consists of the N-terminal chromophore module (501 amino acids). The cell extract inhibited the photoconversion of Agp2-M2 in an unspecific way. In concentration series, this negative effect was less pronounced when lower concentrations of Agp2-M2 were used. In the presence of excess Agp2-M2 apoprotein, the cell extract did no longer modify the spectral properties of Agp2. The data suggest that the factor of the cell extract interacts specifically with the N-terminal moiety of Agp2.

  8. Lack of influence of low temperature, light and growth substances on phytochrome resynthesis in coleoptiles of irradiated oat seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kopcewicz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoconversion of phytochrome PR into the PFR form causes at the same time the destruction of the initial large fraction of phytochrome found in the coleoptiles of etiolated oat seedlings. Factors such as low temperature, light of different wavelengths or growth substances are not capable of preventing the progressive destruction and restore the synthesis of phytochrome. Thus an abnormally high level of phytochrome is found only in etiolated seedlings. Such seedlings, on the other hand, are characterized by a very high rate of elongation growth. The role of phytochrome in the control of deetiolation of seedlings is discussed.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy of phytochromes and phytochrome-related photoreceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Velázquez Escobar, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    In dieser Arbeit wurde ein integrierter schwingungsspektroskopischer Ansatz zur Untersuchung der Mechanismen der Licht-induzierten Prozesse in Phytochromen angewandt. Diese Photorezeptor-Proteine binden ein offenkettiges Tetrapyrrol als Cofaktor. Hauptsächlich als kanonische (Pflanzen), prototypische (Bakterien, Pilze), Bathy-Phytochrome (Bakterien) und Cyanobakteriochrome (Cyanobakterien) klassifiziert, regulieren Phytochrome diverse biologische Prozesse (z. B. Blühverhalten, Phototaxis und ...

  10. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M; Quail, Peter H; Monte, Elena

    2016-05-06

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation.

  11. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, L.H.

    1990-07-01

    Plants utilize light as a source of information in photomorphogenesis and of free energy in photosynthesis, two processes that are interrelated in that the former serves to increase the efficiency with which plants can perform the latter. Only one pigment involved in photomorphogenesis has been identified unequivocally, namely phytochrome. The thrust of this proposal is to investigate this pigment and its mode(s) of action in photosynthetically competent plants. Our long term objective is to characterize phytochrome and its functions in photosynthetically competent plants from molecular, biochemical and cellular perspectives. It is anticipated that others will continue to contribute indirectly to these efforts at the physiological level. The ultimate goal will be to develop this information from a comparative perspective in order to learn whether the different phytochromes have significantly different physicochemical properties, whether they fulfill independent functions and if so what these different functions are, and how each of the different phytochromes acts at primary molecular and cellular levels.

  12. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter H. Quail

    2007-01-01

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent comprehensive studies in Arabidopsis that have identified the genome-wide set of phy-regulated genes that respond rapidly to red-light signals upon first exposure of dark-grown seedlings, and have tested the functional relevance to normal seedling photomorphogenesis of an initial subset of these genes. The data: (a) reveal considerable complexity in the channeling of the light signals through the different phy-family members (phyA to phyE) to responsive genes; (b) identify a diversity of transcription-factor-encoding genes as major early, if not primary, targets of phy signaling, and, therefore, as potentially important regulators in the transcriptional-network hierarchy; and (c) identify auxin-related genes as the dominant class among rapidly-regulated, hormone-related genes. However, reverse-genetic functional profiling of a selected subset of these genes reveals that only a limited fraction are necessary for optimal phy-induced seedling deetiolation.

  13. Synthetic Studies in Phytochrome Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Peter A; Adel Odeh, Imad M; Buddhu, Subhas C; Cai, Guolin; Rajeswari, Sundaramoorthi; Fry, Douglas; Zheng, Wanjun; Desimone, Robert W; Guo, Jiasheng; Coutts, Lisa D; Hauck, Sheila I; Leung, Sam H; Ghosh, Indranath; Pippin, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    An account is given of the author's several approaches to the synthesis of the parent chromophore of phytochrome (1), a protein-bound linear tetrapyrrole derivative that controls photomorphogenesis in higher plants. These studies culminated in enantioselective syntheses of both 2R- and 2S-phytochromobilin (4), as well as several (13)C-labeled derivatives designed to probe the site of Z,E-isomerization during photoexcitation. When reacted in vitro, synthetic 2R-4 and recombinant-derived phytochrome apoprotein N-C produced a protein-bound chromophore with identical difference spectra to naturally occurring 1.

  14. Structure of the biliverdin cofactor in the Pfr state of bathy and prototypical phytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salewski, Johannes; Escobar, Francisco Velazquez; Kaminski, Steve; von Stetten, David; Keidel, Anke; Rippers, Yvonne; Michael, Norbert; Scheerer, Patrick; Piwowarski, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Ringsdorf, Simone; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Lamparter, Tilman; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2013-06-07

    Phytochromes act as photoswitches between the red- and far-red absorbing parent states of phytochromes (Pr and Pfr). Plant phytochromes display an additional thermal conversion route from the physiologically active Pfr to Pr. The same reaction pattern is found in prototypical biliverdin-binding bacteriophytochromes in contrast to the reverse thermal transformation in bathy bacteriophytochromes. However, the molecular origin of the different thermal stabilities of the Pfr states in prototypical and bathy bacteriophytochromes is not known. We analyzed the structures of the chromophore binding pockets in the Pfr states of various bathy and prototypical biliverdin-binding phytochromes using a combined spectroscopic-theoretical approach. For the Pfr state of the bathy phytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the very good agreement between calculated and experimental Raman spectra of the biliverdin cofactor is in line with important conclusions of previous crystallographic analyses, particularly the ZZEssa configuration of the chromophore and its mode of covalent attachment to the protein. The highly homogeneous chromophore conformation seems to be a unique property of the Pfr states of bathy phytochromes. This is in sharp contrast to the Pfr states of prototypical phytochromes that display conformational equilibria between two sub-states exhibiting small structural differences at the terminal methine bridges A-B and C-D. These differences may mainly root in the interactions of the cofactor with the highly conserved Asp-194 that occur via its carboxylate function in bathy phytochromes. The weaker interactions via the carbonyl function in prototypical phytochromes may lead to a higher structural flexibility of the chromophore pocket opening a reaction channel for the thermal (ZZE → ZZZ) Pfr to Pr back-conversion.

  15. Phytochrome and greening in etioplasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraak, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the role played by phytochrome (P) in the development of etioplasts into chloroplasts.

    Previously dark-grown maize seedlings are not as sensitive as pea seedlings to very low fluences of red light (R) with regard to induction of rapid chlorophyll (Chl)

  16. Temperature Effects on Agrobacterium Phytochrome Agp1

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Njimona; Tilman Lamparter

    2014-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely distributed biliprotein photoreceptors with a conserved N-terminal chromophore-binding domain. Most phytochromes bear a light-regulated C-terminal His kinase or His kinase-like region. We investigated the effects of light and temperature on the His kinase activity of the phytochrome Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. As in earlier studies, the phosphorylation activity of the holoprotein after far-red irradiation (where the red-light absorbing Pr form dominates) was s...

  17. Modulation of phytochrome signaling networks for improved biomass accumulation using a bioenergy crop model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mockler, Todd C. [Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-11-07

    Plant growth and development, including stem elongation, flowering time, and shade-avoidance habits, are affected by wavelength composition (i.e., light quality) of the light environment. the molecular mechanisms underlying light perception and signaling pathways in plants have been best characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana where dozens of genes have been implicated in converging, complementary, and antagonistic pathways communicating light quality cues perceived by the phytochrome (red/far-red) cryptochrome (blue) and phototropin (blue) photorecptors. Light perception and signaling have been studied in grasses, including rice and sorghum but in much less detail than in Arabidopsis. During the course of the Mocker lab's DOE-funded wrok generating a gene expression atlas in Brachypodium distachyon we observed that Brachypodium plants grown in continuous monochromatic red light or continuous white light enriched in far-red light accumulated significantly more biomass and exhibited significantly greater seed yield than plants grown in monochromatic blue light or white light. This phenomenon was also observed in two other grasses, switchgrass and rice. We will systematically manipulate the expression of genes predicted to function in Brachypodium phytochrome signaling and assess the phenotypic consequences in transgenic Brachypodium plants in terms of morphology, stature, biomass accumulation, and cell wall composition. We will also interrogate direct interactions between candidate phytochrome signaling transcription factors and target promoters using a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid system. Brachypodium distachyon has emerged as a model grass species and is closely related to candidate feedstock crops for bioethanol production. Identification of genes capable of modifying growth characteristics of Brachypodium, when misexpressed, in particular increasing biomass accumulation, by modulating photoreceptor signaling will provide valuable candidates for

  18. MAS NMR study of the photoreceptor phytochrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohmer, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Plants, algae and bacteria respond to light in various manners. The effect of light on the growth of plants is called photomorphogenesis and is regulated by the photoreceptor protein named phytochrome. Phytochrome is formed in the dark in its inactive red-absorbing (Pr) state and transformed upon ab

  19. Characterization of recombinant phytochrome from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis

    OpenAIRE

    Lamparter, Tilman; Mittmann, Franz; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Börner, Thomas; Hartmann, Elmar; Hughes, Jon

    1997-01-01

    The complete sequence of the Synechocystis chromosome has revealed a phytochrome-like sequence that yielded an authentic phytochrome when overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In this paper we describe this recombinant Synechocystis phytochrome in more detail. Islands of strong similarity to plant phytochromes were found throughout the cyanobacterial sequence whereas C-terminal homologies identify it as a likely sensory histidine kinase, a family to which plant phytochromes are related. An ≈300 ...

  20. Characterization of tobacco expressing functional oat phytochrome. Domains responsible for the rapid degradation of Pfr are conserved between monocots and dicots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, J.R.; Vierstra, R.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)); Hershey, H.P. (E.I.du Pont de Nemours and Co., Wilmington, DE (United States))

    1991-07-01

    Constitutive expression of a chimeric oat phytochrome gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) results in the accumulation of a functional 124-kilodalton photoreceptor that markedly alters the phenotype of light-grown tobacco. Here, we provide a detailed phenotypic and biochemical characterization of homozygous tobacco expressing high levels of oat phytochrome. Phenotypic changes include a substantial inhibition of stem elongation, decreased apical dominance, increased leaf chlorophyll content, and delayed leaf senescence. Oat phytochrome synthesized in tobacco is indistinguishable from that present in etiolated oats, having photoreversible difference spectrum maxima at 665 and 730 nanometers, exhibiting negligible dark reversion of phytochrome - far red-absorbing from (Pfr) to phytochrome - red-absorbing form (Pr), and existing as a dimer with an apparent size of approximately 300 kilodaltons. Heterodimers between the oat and tobacco chromoproteins were detected. Endogenous tobacco phytochrome and transgenically expressed oat phytochrome are rapidly degraded in vivo upon photoconversion of Pr to Pfr. Breakdown of both oat and tobacco Pfr is associated with the accumulation of ubiquitin-phytochrome conjugates, suggesting that degradation occurs via the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. This result indicates that the factors responsible for selective recognition of Pfr by the ubiquitin pathway are conserved between monocot and dicot phytochromes. More broadly, it demonstrates that the domains(s) within a plant protein responsible for its selective breakdown can be recognized by the degradation machinery of heterologous species.

  1. High Resolution Structure of Deinococcus Bacteriophytochrome Yields New Insights into Phytochrome Architecture and Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Jeremiah R.; Zhang, Junrui; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Forest, Katrina T. (NWU); (UW)

    2010-03-08

    Phytochromes are red/far red light photochromic photoreceptors that direct many photosensory behaviors in the bacterial, fungal, and plant kingdoms. They consist of an N-terminal domain that covalently binds a bilin chromophore and a C-terminal region that transmits the light signal, often through a histidine kinase relay. Using x-ray crystallography, we recently solved the first three-dimensional structure of a phytochrome, using the chromophore-binding domain of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome assembled with its chromophore, biliverdin IX{alpha}. Now, by engineering the crystallization interface, we have achieved a significantly higher resolution model. This 1.45 {angstrom} resolution structure helps identify an extensive buried surface between crystal symmetry mates that may promote dimerization in vivo. It also reveals that upon ligation of the C3{sup 2} carbon of biliverdin to Cys{sup 24}, the chromophore A-ring assumes a chiral center at C2, thus becoming 2(R),3(E)-phytochromobilin, a chemistry more similar to that proposed for the attached chromophores of cyanobacterial and plant phytochromes than previously appreciated. The evolution of bacterial phytochromes to those found in cyanobacteria and higher plants must have involved greater fitness using more reduced bilins, such as phycocyanobilin, combined with a switch of the attachment site from a cysteine near the N terminus to one conserved within the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA domain. From analysis of site-directed mutants in the D. radiodurans phytochrome, we show that this bilin preference was partially driven by the change in binding site, which ultimately may have helped photosynthetic organisms optimize shade detection. Collectively, these three-dimensional structural results better clarify bilin/protein interactions and help explain how higher plant phytochromes evolved from prokaryotic progenitors.

  2. Residues clustered in the light-sensing knot of phytochrome B are necessary for conformer-specific binding to signaling partner PIF3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise A Kikis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The bHLH transcription factor, Phytochrome Interacting Factor 3 (PIF3, interacts specifically with the photoactivated, Pfr, form of Arabidopsis phytochrome B (phyB. This interaction induces PIF3 phosphorylation and degradation in vivo and modulates phyB-mediated seedling deetiolation in response to red light. To identify missense mutations in the phyB N-terminal domain that disrupt this interaction, we developed a yeast reverse-hybrid screen. Fifteen individual mutations identified in this screen, or in previous genetic screens for Arabidopsis mutants showing reduced sensitivity to red light, were shown to also disrupt light-induced binding of phyB to PIF3 in in vitro co-immunoprecipitation assays. These phyB missense mutants fall into two general classes: Class I (eleven mutants containing those defective in light signal perception, due to aberrant chromophore attachment or photoconversion, and Class II (four mutants containing those normal in signal perception, but defective in the capacity to transduce this signal to PIF3. By generating a homology model for the three-dimensional structure of the Arabidopsis phyB chromophore-binding region, based on the crystal structure of Deinococcus radiodurans phytochrome, we predict that three of the four Class II mutated phyB residues are solvent exposed in a cleft between the presumptive PAS and GAF domains. This deduction suggests that these residues could be directly required for the physical interaction of phyB with PIF3. Because these three residues are also necessary for phyB-imposed inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in response to red light, they are functionally necessary for signal transfer from photoactivated phyB, not only to PIF3 and other related bHLH transcription factors tested here, but also to other downstream signaling components involved in regulating seedling deetiolation.

  3. Conformational heterogeneity of the Pfr chromophore in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; von Stetten, David; Günther-Lütkens, Mina; Keidel, Anke; Michael, Norbert; Lamparter, Tilman; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Hughes, Jon; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Yang, Yang; Heyne, Karsten; Mroginski, Maria A; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are biological photoreceptors that can be reversibly photoconverted between a dark and photoactivated state. The underlying reaction sequences are initiated by the photoisomerization of the tetrapyrrole cofactor, which in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes are a phytochromobilin (PΦB) and a phycocyanobilin (PCB), respectively. The transition between the two states represents an on/off-switch of the output module activating or deactivating downstream physiological processes. In addition, the photoactivated state, i.e., Pfr in canonical phytochromes, can be thermally reverted to the dark state (Pr). The present study aimed to improve our understanding of the specific reactivity of various PΦB- and PCB-binding phytochromes in the Pfr state by analysing the cofactor structure by vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy revealed two Pfr conformers (Pfr-I and Pfr-II) forming a temperature-dependent conformational equilibrium. The two sub-states-found in all phytochromes studied, albeit with different relative contributions-differ in structural details of the C-D and A-B methine bridges. In the Pfr-I sub-state the torsion between the rings C and D is larger by ca. 10° compared to Pfr-II. This structural difference is presumably related to different hydrogen bonding interactions of ring D as revealed by time-resolved IR spectroscopic studies of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. The transitions between the two sub-states are evidently too fast (i.e., nanosecond time scale) to be resolved by NMR spectroscopy which could not detect a structural heterogeneity of the chromophore in Pfr. The implications of the present findings for the dark reversion of the Pfr state are discussed.

  4. Conformational heterogeneity of the Pfr chromophore in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eVelazquez Escobar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes are biological photoreceptors that can be reversibly photoconverted between a dark and photoactivated state. The underlying reaction sequences are initiated by the photoisomerisation of the tetrapyrrole cofactor, which in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes are a phytochromobilin (PB and a phycocyanobilin (PCB, respectively. The transition between the two states represents an on/off-switch of the output module activating or deactivating downstream physiological processes. In addition, the photoactivated state, i.e. Pfr in canonical phytochromes, can be thermally reverted to the dark state (Pr. The present study aimed to improve our understanding of the specific reactivity of various PB- and PCB-binding phytochromes in the Pfr state by analyzing the cofactor structure by vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Resonance Raman (RR spectroscopy revealed two Pfr conformers (Pfr-I and Pfr-II forming a temperature-dependent conformational equilibrium. The two sub-states - found in all phytochromes studied, albeit with different relative contributions - differ in structural details of the C-D and A-B methine bridges. In the Pfr-I sub-state the torsion between the rings C and D is larger by ca. 10o compared to Pfr-II. This structural difference is presumably related to different hydrogen bonding interactions of ring D as revealed by time-resolved IR spectroscopic studies of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. The transitions between the two sub-states are evidently too fast (i.e., nanosecond time scale to be resolved by NMR spectroscopy which could not detect a structural heterogeneity of the chromophore in Pfr. The implications of the present findings for the dark reversion of the Pfr state are discussed.

  5. Light-induced import of the chromoprotein, phytochrome, into mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlin, B. S.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Mitochondria extracted from plants that were irradiated with actinic light in vivo have associated with them the chromoprotein, phytochrome. This phytochrome retains its native subunit size of 124 kDa after proteolytic treatment of the mitochondria with trypsin and chymotrypsin. This result suggests that phytochrome is not exposed on the outer surface of the outer mitochondrial membrane. Phytochrome, so protected, is not found to be associated with mitochondria derived from unirradiated plants. The possibility that the photoactivation of phytochrome induces a conformational change in its structure which facilitates its transport into the mitochondrion is discussed.

  6. Phytochrome, plant growth and flowering

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R. W.; Bagnall, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Attempts to use artificially lit cabinets to grow plants identical to those growing in sunlight have provided compelling evidence of the importance of light quality for plant growth. Changing the balance of red (R) to far-red (FR) radiation, but with a fixed photosynthetic input can shift the phytochrome photoequilibrium in a plant and generate large differences in plant growth. With FR enrichment the plants elongate, and may produce more leaf area and dry matter. Similar morphogenic responses are also obtained when light quality is altered only briefly (15-30 min) at the end-of-the-day. Conversely, for plants grown in natural conditions the response of plant form to selective spectral filtering has again shown that red and far-red wavebands are important as found by Kasperbauer and coworkers. Also, where photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) of sunlight have been held constant, the removal of far-red alone alters plant growth. With FR depletion plants grown in sunlight are small, more branched and darker green. Here we examine the implications for plant growth and flowering when the far-red composition of incident radiation in plant growth chambers is manipulated.

  7. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee-Hong; Jiménez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N; van Baren, Marijke J; Price, Dana C; Wei, Chia-Lin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Lagarias, J Clark; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2014-11-04

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. Expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.

  8. Chromopeptides from phytochrome. The structure and linkage of the PR form of the phytochrome chromophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagarias, J. Clark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Rapoport, Henry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1980-07-01

    The isolation and chromatographic purification of chromophore-containing peptides from the PR form of phytochrome treated with pepsin and thermolysin are described. From the amino acid sequence and 1H NMR spectral analysis of phytochromobiliundeca peptide (2), the structure of the PR phytochrome chromophore and the nature of the thioether linkage joining pigment to peptide have been established. Furthermore, confirmatory evidence was obtained from similar analysis of phytochromobilioctapeptide (3). The implications of this structural assignment with respect to the mechanism of the PR to PFR phototransformation are considered.

  9. Engineering of bacterial phytochromes for in vivo imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhusha, Vladislav; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Kaberniuk, Andrii A.; Baloban, Mikhail

    2017-03-01

    Genetically encoded probes with absorbance and fluorescence spectra within a near-infrared tissue transparency window are preferable for deep-tissue imaging. On the basis of bacterial phytochromes we engineered several types of near-infrared absorbing probes for photoacoustic tomography and fluorescent probes for purely optical imaging. They can be used as protein and cell labels and as building blocks for biosensors. The probes enabled imaging of tumors and metastases, protein-protein interactions, RNA visualization, detection of apoptosis, cellular metabolites, signaling pathways and cell proliferation. The developed probes allow non-invasive visualization of biological processes across scales, from super-resolution microscopy to tissue and whole-body animal imaging.

  10. In vivo measurement of phytochrome in tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, J J

    1977-04-01

    Presence of phytochrome in two kinds of tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), the yellow lutescent strain and cherry tomatoes (L. esculentum Mill. var. cerasiformecv. Red Cherry), was established by measuring the absorption difference spectra of the whole fruit after irradiation with red and with far red light. Phytochrome content was determined in yellow lutescent tomatoes and decreased gradually during the ripening period.

  11. Mechanism for the selective conjugation of ubiquitin to phytochrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierstra, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand at the molecular level how phytochrome functions and how intracellular proteins are degraded. Phytochrome is marked for degradation by covalent attachment of ubiquitin. Ubiquitin-phytochrome conjugates (UbP) were characterized with respect to formation kinetics, subcellular localization and site of ubiquitin attachment. UbP appears to be a general phenomenon during phytochrome degradation in a variety of species. UbP was isolated from oat seedlings and characterized. Residues 747-830 of phytochrome have been identified as a possible attachment site for ubiquitin. By placing the gene for etiolated phytochrome in tobacco we have created a transgenic system for over expressing phytochrome. The effects of this over expression are described, and it appears that tobacco degrades this foreign protein through formation of UbP. We have created a series of site-directed mutants of the oat phytochrome gene, and are in the process of characterizing them to determine sequence requirements for ubiquination. 8 refs., 1 fig. (MHB)

  12. Light-induced conformational changes of the chromophore and the protein in phytochromes: bacterial phytochromes as model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerer, Patrick; Michael, Norbert; Park, Jung Hee; Nagano, Soshichiro; Choe, Hui-Woog; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Borucki, Berthold; Krauss, Norbert; Lamparter, Tilman

    2010-04-26

    Recombinant phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens are used as model phytochromes for biochemical and biophysical studies. In biliverdin binding phytochromes the site for covalent attachment of the chromophore lies in the N-terminal region of the protein, different from plant phytochromes. The issue which stereochemistry the chromophore adopts in the so-called Pr and Pfr forms is addressed by using a series of locked chromophores which form spectrally characteristic adducts with Agp1 and Agp2. Studies on light-induced conformational changes of Agp1 give an insight into how the intrinsic histidine kinase is modulated by light. Comparison of the crystal structure of an Agp1 fragment with other phytochrome crystal structures supports the idea that a light induced rearrangement of subunits within the homodimer modulates the activity of the kinase.

  13. Phytochrome Control of Germination of Rumex crispus L. Seeds Induced by Temperature Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylorson, R B; Hendricks, S B

    1972-12-01

    High germination of curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) seeds is evident after suitable imbibition and temperature shift treatment, but germination at constant temperatures fails without an input of far red-absorbing form of phytochrome. Preliminary imbibitions at high temperatures (30 C) sharply reduce germination induced by temperature shifts. High germination may be restored by low energies of red radiation, or by brief far red adequate for the photosteady state. Prolonged far red during imbibition also nullifies temperature shift-induced germination. After prolonged far red, high germination may be restored by red radiation of an energy dependent upon the duration of the far red treatment. The evidence supports the conclusion that dark germination induced by temperature shifts arises from the interaction of pre-existent far red-absorbing form of phytochrome in the mature seeds with the temperature shift.

  14. Temperature effects on Agrobacterium phytochrome Agp1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Njimona

    Full Text Available Phytochromes are widely distributed biliprotein photoreceptors with a conserved N-terminal chromophore-binding domain. Most phytochromes bear a light-regulated C-terminal His kinase or His kinase-like region. We investigated the effects of light and temperature on the His kinase activity of the phytochrome Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. As in earlier studies, the phosphorylation activity of the holoprotein after far-red irradiation (where the red-light absorbing Pr form dominates was stronger than that of the holoprotein after red irradiation (where the far red-absorbing Pfr form dominates. Phosphorylation activities of the apoprotein, far red-irradiated holoprotein, and red-irradiated holoprotein decreased when the temperature increased from 25 °C to 35 °C; at 40 °C, almost no kinase activity was detected. The activity of a holoprotein sample incubated at 40 °C was nearly completely restored when the temperature returned to 25 °C. UV/visible spectroscopy indicated that the protein was not denatured up to 45 °C. At 50 °C, however, Pfr denatured faster than the dark-adapted sample containing the Pr form of Agp1. The Pr visible spectrum was unaffected by temperatures of 20-45 °C, whereas irradiated samples exhibited a clear temperature effect in the 30-40 °C range in which prolonged irradiation resulted in the photoconversion of Pfr into a new spectral species termed Prx. Pfr to Prx photoconversion was dependent on the His-kinase module of Agp1; normal photoconversion occurred at 40 °C in the mutant Agp1-M15, which lacks the C-terminal His-kinase module, and in a domain-swap mutant in which the His-kinase module of Agp1 is replaced by the His-kinase/response regulator module of the other A. tumefaciens phytochrome, Agp2. The temperature-dependent kinase activity and spectral properties in the physiological temperature range suggest that Agp1 serves as an integrated light and temperature sensor in A. tumefaciens.

  15. Temperature effects on Agrobacterium phytochrome Agp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njimona, Ibrahim; Lamparter, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely distributed biliprotein photoreceptors with a conserved N-terminal chromophore-binding domain. Most phytochromes bear a light-regulated C-terminal His kinase or His kinase-like region. We investigated the effects of light and temperature on the His kinase activity of the phytochrome Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. As in earlier studies, the phosphorylation activity of the holoprotein after far-red irradiation (where the red-light absorbing Pr form dominates) was stronger than that of the holoprotein after red irradiation (where the far red-absorbing Pfr form dominates). Phosphorylation activities of the apoprotein, far red-irradiated holoprotein, and red-irradiated holoprotein decreased when the temperature increased from 25 °C to 35 °C; at 40 °C, almost no kinase activity was detected. The activity of a holoprotein sample incubated at 40 °C was nearly completely restored when the temperature returned to 25 °C. UV/visible spectroscopy indicated that the protein was not denatured up to 45 °C. At 50 °C, however, Pfr denatured faster than the dark-adapted sample containing the Pr form of Agp1. The Pr visible spectrum was unaffected by temperatures of 20-45 °C, whereas irradiated samples exhibited a clear temperature effect in the 30-40 °C range in which prolonged irradiation resulted in the photoconversion of Pfr into a new spectral species termed Prx. Pfr to Prx photoconversion was dependent on the His-kinase module of Agp1; normal photoconversion occurred at 40 °C in the mutant Agp1-M15, which lacks the C-terminal His-kinase module, and in a domain-swap mutant in which the His-kinase module of Agp1 is replaced by the His-kinase/response regulator module of the other A. tumefaciens phytochrome, Agp2. The temperature-dependent kinase activity and spectral properties in the physiological temperature range suggest that Agp1 serves as an integrated light and temperature sensor in A. tumefaciens.

  16. Phytochrome Transformation and Action in Seeds of Rumex crispus L. during Secondary Dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylorson, R B; Hendricks, S B

    1973-11-01

    Promotion of germination by red light fails after prolonged dark imbibition of Rumex crispus L. seeds, indicative of a secondary dormancy. The degree and rate of inception of the dormancy increases with increasing temperature. Following establishment of the dormancy, germination response to red light can be restored by either prolonged cold treatment or brief high temperature shifts. Loss of phytochrome was not a factor in the initial establishment of the dormancy. When the seeds are in secondary dormancy, the chromophore of phytochrome can be transformed to the far red-absorbing form, but the far red-absorbing form cannot induce germination. The responses to changes in temperature suggested dependence of germination on order left arrow over right arrow disorder transitions in components of the seeds.

  17. Novel Photodynamics in Phytochrome & Cyanobacteriochrome Photosensory Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Delmar

    2015-03-01

    The photodynamics of recently characterized phytochrome and cyanobacteriochrome photoreceptors are discussed. Phytochromes are red/far-red photosensory proteins that utilize the photoisomerization of a linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore to detect the red to far-red light ratio. Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are distantly related cyanobacterial photosensors with homologous bilin-binding GAF domains, but exhibit greater spectral diversity. The excited-state mechanisms underlying the initial photoisomerization in the forward reactions of the cyanobacterial photoreceptor Cph1 from Synechocystis, the RcaE CBCR from Fremyella diplosiphon, and Npr6012g4 CBCR from Nostoc punctiforme were contrasted via multipulse pump-dump-probe transient spectroscopy. A rich excited-state dynamics are resolved involving a complex interplay of excited-state proton transfer, photoisomerization, multilayered inhomogeneity, and reactive intermediates, and Le Chatelier redistribution. NpR6012g4 exhibits a high quantum yield for its forward photoreaction (40%) that was ascribed to the activity of hidden, productive ground-state intermediates via a ``second chance initiation dynamics'' (SCID) mechanism. This work was supported by a grant from the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy (DOE DE-FG02-09ER16117).

  18. Phytochrome from green plants: Assay, purification, and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quail, P.H. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant and Soil Biology Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA (United States). Plant Gene Expression Center)

    1991-06-10

    This funding period was directed at developing an in-depth molecular analysis of the low-abundance, 118,000 M{sub r} green-tissue phytochrome that had at that time been relatively recently identified as being distinct from the better characterized 124,000 M{sub r} phytochrome abundant in etiolated tissue. The specific objectives as stated in the original proposal were: (1) To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to the 118,000 M{sub r} green-tissue phytochrome. (2) To develop additional and improved procedures to permit progress toward the ultimate goal of purifying green-tissue phytochrome to homogeneity. (3) To initiate an alternative approach to determining the structural properties of green-tissue phytochrome by isolating and sequencing cDNA cones representing the 118,000 M{sub r} green-tissue polypeptide in Avena. This approach is based on and will test hypothesis that the 118,000 M{sub r} polypeptide is encoded by a gene(s) distinct from those encoding etiolated-tissue 124,000 M{sub r} phytochrome. (4) To utilize any such 118,000 M{sub r} phytochrome specific cDNA clones as hybridization probes to begin to investigate the structure, organization, and regulation of the corresponding gene(s) in Avena. (5) To begin to investigate the possible presence in other higher plant and algal species of sequences homologous to the 118,000 M{sub r} Avena polypeptide using the Avena clones at hybridization probes. Most of these objectives have been accomplished, at least in principle, although the major breakthrough establishing that phytochrome is encoded by a multigene family came from the use of Arabidopsis rather than Avena. Similarly, much of the characterization subsequent to this discovery has been performed in Arabidopsis and rise as model dicot and monocot systems, respectively, rather than Avena. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Phytochrome from Green Plants: Properties and biological Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quail, Peter H.

    2014-07-25

    Plants constantly monitor the light environment for informational light signals used to direct adaptational responses to the prevailing conditions. One major such response, the Shade-Avaoidance Response (SAR), triggered when plants sense the presence of competing neighbors, results in enhanced channeling of photosynthetically-fixed carbon into stem elongation at the expense of deposition in reproductive tissues. This response has been selected against in many modern food crops to ensure maximum edible yield (e.g. seeds). Converse enhancement of the SAR, with consequent increased carbon channeling into vegetative cellulose, could contribute to the generation of crops with improved yield of tissues suitable for cellulosic biofuel production. The signal for this response is light enriched in far-red wavelengths. This signal is produced by sunlight filtered through, or reflected from, neighboring vegetation, as a result of preferential depletion of red photons through chlorophyll absorption. The plant phytochrome (phy) photoreceptor system (predominantly phyB) senses this signal through its capacity to switch reversibly, in milliseconds, between two molecular states: the biologically inactive Pr (red-light-absorbing) and biologically active Pfr (far-red-light-absorbing) conformers. The photoequilibrium established between these two conformers in light-grown plants is determined by the ratio of red-to-far-red wavelengths in the incoming signal. The levels of Pfr then dictate the recipient plant’s growth response: high levels suppress elongation growth; low levels promote elongation growth. Studies on seedling deetiolation have advanced our understanding considerably in recent years, of the mechanism by which the photoactivated phy molecule transduces its signal into cellular growth responses. The data show that a subfamily of phy-interacting bHLH transcription factors (PIFs) promote skotomorphogenic seedling development in post-germinative darkness, but that the phy

  20. Abscisic Acid, High-Light, and Oxidative Stress Down-Regulate a Photosynthetic Gene via a Promoter Motif Not Involved in Phytochrome-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto J. Staneloni; María José Rodriguez-Batiller; Jorge J. Casal

    2008-01-01

    In etiolated seedlings, light perceived by phytochrome promotes the expression of light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein of photosystem Ⅱ (Lhcb) genes. However, excess of photosynthetically active radiation can reduce Lhcb expression. Here, we investigate the convergence and divergence of phytochrome, high-light stress and abscisic acid (ABA)signaling, which could connect these processes. Etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings bearing an Lhcb promoter fused to a reporter were exposed to continuous far-red light to activate phytochrome and not photosynthesis, and treated with ABA. We identified a cis-acting region of the promoter required for down-regulation by ABA. This region contains a CCAC sequence recently found to be necessary for ABI4-binding to an Lhcb promoter. However, we did not find a G-box-binding core motif often associated with the ABI4-binding site in genes promoted by light and repressed by ABI4. Mutations involving this motif also impaired the responses to reduced water potential, the response to high photosynthetic light and the response to methyl viologen but not the response to low temperature or to Norflurazon. We propose a model based on current and previous findings, in which hydrogen peroxide produced in the chloroplasts under high light conditions interacts with the ABA signaling network to regulate Lhcb expression. Since the mutation that affects high-light and methyl viologen responses does not affect phytochrome-mediated responses, the regulation by retrograde and phytochrome signaling can finally be separated at the target promoter level.

  1. Evidence for involvement of phytochrome in tumor development on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of nonpathogenic tumorous growths on tomato plants by red and far-red radiation was studied using leaf discs floated on water and irradiated from beneath. It was found that red light (600-700 nanometers) was required for the induction of tumors on tomato (Lycopersicon hirsutum Humb. & Bonpl. Plant Introduction LA 1625), while both blue (400-500 nanometers) and green (500-600 nanometers) light had little effect on tumor development. Detailed studies with red light demonstrated that tumor development increased with increasing photon flux and duration, though duration was the more significant factor. It was observed that tumor development could be prevented by the addition of far-red irradiance to red irradiance or by providing far-red irradiance immediately following red irradiance. The effectiveness of red and far-red irradiance in the regulation of tumor development indicates phytochrome involvement in this response. These findings should provide additional insight into the multiplicity of physiological factors regulating the development of nonpathogenic tumorous growths in plants.

  2. Phytochrome-mediated regulation of plant respiration and photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Eprintsev, Alexander T; Fedorin, Dmitry N; Popov, Vasily N

    2014-02-01

    The expression of genes encoding various enzymes participating in photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism is regulated by light via the phytochrome system. While many photosynthetic, photorespiratory and some respiratory enzymes, such as the rotenone-insensitive NADH and NADPH dehydrogenases and the alternative oxidase, are stimulated by light, succinate dehydrogenase, subunits of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, cytochrome oxidase and fumarase are inhibited via the phytochrome mechanism. The effect of light, therefore, imposes limitations on the tricarboxylic acid cycle and on the mitochondrial electron transport coupled to ATP synthesis, while the non-coupled pathways become activated. Phytochrome-mediated regulation of gene expression also creates characteristic distribution patterns of photosynthetic, photorespiratory and respiratory enzymes across the leaf generating different populations of mitochondria, either enriched by glycine decarboxylase (in the upper part) or by succinate dehydrogenase (in the bottom part of the leaf).

  3. The phytochrome B/phytochrome C heterodimer is necessary for phytochrome C-mediated responses in rice seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianzhi Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PhyC levels have been observed to be markedly lower in phyB mutants than in Arabidopsis or rice wild type etiolated seedlings, but the mechanism of this phenomenon has not been fully elucidated. RESULTS: In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which phyB affects the protein concentration and photo-sensing abilities of phyC and demonstrated that rice phyC exists predominantly as phyB/phyC heterodimers in etiolated seedlings. PHYC-GFP protein was detected when expressed in phyA phyC mutants, but not in phyA phyB mutants, suggesting that phyC requires phyB for its photo-sensing abilities. Interestingly, when a mutant PHYB gene that has no chromophore binding site, PHYB(C364A, was introduced into phyB mutants, the phyC level was restored. Moreover, when PHYB(C364A was introduced into phyA phyB mutants, the seedlings exhibited de-etiolation under both far-red light (FR and red light (R conditions, while the phyA phyB mutants were blind to both FR and R. These results are the first direct evidence that phyC is responsible for regulating seedling de-etiolation under both FR and R. These findings also suggest that phyB is indispensable for the expression and function of phyC, which depends on the formation of phyB/phyC heterodimers. SIGNIFICANCE: The present report clearly demonstrates the similarities and differences in the properties of phyC between Arabidopsis and rice and will advance our understanding of phytochrome functions in monocots and dicots.

  4. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, John Z; Mullen, Jack L; Correll, Melanie J; Hangarter, Roger P

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  5. Labile phytochrome and photoperiodic flower induction in Pharbitis nil Chois. The irreversible phytochrome hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Cymerski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seedlings of Pharbitis nil cultivated under non-inductive conditions of white light were subjected to generative induction applying one 16-hour-long period of inductive night. During the eighth hour the night was interrupted with 1 min of red light pulse which completely inhibited the flowering. Treating the plants with KCN blocked the inhibiting effect of red light. Because KCN lowers considerably the rate of destruction of labile Pfd in some plant systems, it seems probable that red light night-break irradiation (without KCN, which blocked the flowering, leads also to the accumulation of unknown Pfd destruction products (irreversible phytochrome. It also suggests that it is not the labile PfrI itself but the products of its irreversible transformation that could be active in the photoperiodic control of flowering.

  6. Interaction of Restin with transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Yousheng; LU; Fan; QI; Yinxin; WANG; Ruihua; ZHANG; Jia

    2005-01-01

    Restin, a member of melanoma-associated antigen superfamily gene, was first cloned from differentiated leukemia cell induced by all trans-retinoic acid, and was able to inhibit cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanism was not clear. Since Restin was localized in cell nucleus, and its homolog member, Necdin (neuronal growth suppressor factor), could interact with transcription factors p53 and E2F1, we proposed that Restin might also function as Necdin through interacting with some transcription factors. In this study, transcription factors p53, AP1,ATFs and E2Fs were cloned and used in the mammalian two-hybrid system to identify their interaction with Restin. The results showed that only ATF3 had a strong interaction with Restin. It is interesting to know that ATF3 was an important transcription factor for G1 cell cycle initiation in physiological stress response. It was possible that the inhibition of cell proliferation by Restin might be related with the inhibition of ATF3 activity.

  7. Phytochrome-mediated Carotenoids Biosynthesis in Ripening Tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R L; Jen, J J

    1975-09-01

    Red light induced and far red light inhibited carotenoid biosynthesis in ripening tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) when compared to controls kept in the dark. Red illumination following far red illumination reversed the inhibitory action of far red light on carotenoid biosynthesis, suggesting a phytochrome-mediated process. Quantitation of individual carotenoids favored the hypothesis of two separate carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in tomatoes.

  8. Systematic analysis of how phytochrome B dimerization determines its specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klose, Cornelia; Venezia, Filippo; Hussong, Andrea; Kircher, Stefan; Schäfer, Eberhard; Fleck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are red/far-red-light detecting photoreceptors that regulate plant growth and development. They photo-interconvert between an inactive Pr (red-light absorbing) and a physiologically active Pfr (far-red-light absorbing) form, acting as light-controlled molecular switches. Although the

  9. My Path from Chemistry to Phytochrome and Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Elaine M.

    2016-01-01

    I summarize my scientific journey from my first interest in science to my career investigating how plants use the phytochrome photoreceptor to regulate what genes they express. I then describe how this work led to an understanding of how circadian rhythms function in plants and to the discovery of CCA1, a component of the plant central oscillator. PMID:27014288

  10. Growth factor interactions in bone regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, D.H.R.; Creemers, L.B.; Alblas, J.; Lu, L.; Verbout, A.J.; Yaszemski, M.J.; Dhert, W.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Growth factor interactions in bone regeneration. Diederik H R Kempen, Laura B Creemers, Jacqueline Alblas, Lichun Lu, Abraham J Verbout, Michael J Yaszemski and Wouter J A Dhert 1 Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center , Utrecht, The Netherlands . AbstractBuy the PDF Pubmed abstract

  11. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, Marian; Dijk, van Aalt-Jan; Immink, Richard G.H.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger p

  12. Growth factor interactions in bone regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, D.H.R.; Creemers, L.B.; Alblas, J.; Lu, L.; Verbout, A.J.; Yaszemski, M.J.; Dhert, W.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Growth factor interactions in bone regeneration. Diederik H R Kempen, Laura B Creemers, Jacqueline Alblas, Lichun Lu, Abraham J Verbout, Michael J Yaszemski and Wouter J A Dhert 1 Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center , Utrecht, The Netherlands . AbstractBuy the PDF Pubmed abstract Ge

  13. Analysis of Interaction Factors Between Two Piles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ming; CHEN Long-zhu

    2008-01-01

    A rigorous analytical method is presented for calculating the interaction factor between two identical piles subjected to vertical loads. Following the technique proposed by Muki and Sternberg, the problem is decomposed into an extended soil mass and two fictitious piles characterized respectively by Young's modulus of the soil and that of the difference between the pile and soil. The unknown axial forces along fictitious piles are determined by solving a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind, which imposes the compatibility condition that the axial strains of the fictitious piles are equal to those corresponding to the centroidal axes of the extended soil. The real pile forces and displacements can subequally be calculated based on the determined fictitious pile forces, and finally, the desired pile interaction factors may be obtained. Results confirm the validity of the proposed approach and portray the influence of the governing parameters on the pile interaction.

  14. Phytochromes play a role in phototropism and gravitropism in Arabidopsis roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Melanie J.; Coveney, Katrina M.; Raines, Steven V.; Mullen, Jack L.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Kiss, John Z.

    2003-05-01

    Phototropism as well as gravitropism plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB mediate the positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. In blue-light-based negative phototropism, phyA and phyAB (but not phyB) were inhibited in the response relative to the WT. In root gravitropism, phyB and phyAB (but not phyA) were inhibited in the response compared to the WT. The differences observed in tropistic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in roots and that phytochrome plays a key role in plant development by integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  15. Global Quantitative Modeling of Chromatin Factor Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is the driver of gene regulation, yet understanding the molecular interactions underlying chromatin factor combinatorial patterns (or the “chromatin codes”) remains a fundamental challenge in chromatin biology. Here we developed a global modeling framework that leverages chromatin profiling data to produce a systems-level view of the macromolecular complex of chromatin. Our model ultilizes maximum entropy modeling with regularization-based structure learning to statistically dissect dependencies between chromatin factors and produce an accurate probability distribution of chromatin code. Our unsupervised quantitative model, trained on genome-wide chromatin profiles of 73 histone marks and chromatin proteins from modENCODE, enabled making various data-driven inferences about chromatin profiles and interactions. We provided a highly accurate predictor of chromatin factor pairwise interactions validated by known experimental evidence, and for the first time enabled higher-order interaction prediction. Our predictions can thus help guide future experimental studies. The model can also serve as an inference engine for predicting unknown chromatin profiles — we demonstrated that with this approach we can leverage data from well-characterized cell types to help understand less-studied cell type or conditions. PMID:24675896

  16. Phytochrome and endogenous gibberellin-like substances in etiolated and irradiated oat seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kopcewicz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The level of gibberellin-like substances was investigated in oat coleoptiles with different stationary states of phytochrome and in leaf segments which had been etiolated and irradiated with red light. Etiolated coleoptiles and leaves containing maximum amounts of the PR form of phytochrome were characterized by an increased level of bound gibberellins. Irradiation with red light resulting in the photoconversion of phytochrome into the Pt R form caused the appearance of a high content of free gibberellins. It seems that the releasing the hormones from bound forms correlated with the formation of phytochrome PFR may be an important aspect of the mechanism of phytochrome action in the processes of seedling deetiolation. The interrelation between phytochrome and plant hormones in the control of photomorphogenesis of young monocotyledonous seedlings is also discussed.

  17. Surface Delta Interaction and g factors

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Xiaofei

    2015-01-01

    Using an attractive surface delta interaction we obtain wave functions for 2 neutrons (or neutron holes) in the model space of 2 orbits (l=4, j=7/2) and (l=2, j=5/2). If we take the single particle energies to be degenerate we find that the g factors for I=2, 4 and 6 are all the same -namely the orbital g factor of the single nucleon. For a free neutron this quantity zero all 2particle or 2 hole g factors are equal to zero as well.. Only the orbital part of the g -factors contribute - the spin part cancels out. We then consider the effects of introducing a single energy splititng between the 2 orbits.

  18. Molecular dissection of the roles of phytochrome in photoperiodic flowering in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osugi, Asami; Itoh, Hironori; Ikeda-Kawakatsu, Kyoko; Takano, Makoto; Izawa, Takeshi

    2011-11-01

    Phytochromes mediate the photoperiodic control of flowering in rice (Oryza sativa), a short-day plant. Recent molecular genetics studies have revealed a genetic network that enables the critical daylength response of florigen gene expression. Analyses using a rice phytochrome chromophore-deficient mutant, photoperiod sensitivity5, have so far revealed that within this network, phytochromes are required for expression of Grain number, plant height and heading date7 (Ghd7), a floral repressor gene in rice. There are three phytochrome genes in rice, but the roles of each phytochrome family member in daylength response have not previously been defined. Here, we revealed multiple action points for each phytochrome in the critical daylength response of florigen expression by using single and double phytochrome mutant lines of rice. Our results show that either phyA alone or a genetic combination of phyB and phyC can induce Ghd7 mRNA, whereas phyB alone causes some reduction in levels of Ghd7 mRNA. Moreover, phyB and phyA can affect Ghd7 activity and Early heading date1 (a floral inducer) activity in the network, respectively. Therefore, each phytochrome gene of rice has distinct roles, and all of the phytochrome actions coordinately control the critical daylength response of florigen expression in rice.

  19. Adaptive evolution in the GAF domain of phytochromes in gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yan, Boqian; Chen, Guopei; Su, Yingjuan; Wang, Ting

    2010-04-01

    The GAF domain of phytochrome is essential for photoconversion and signal transduction. In gymnosperms, it exists in all members of the phytochrome family that experience gene duplication. Maximum-likelihood models of codon substitution can provide a framework for constructing likelihood ratio tests of changes in selective pressure and make clear predictions about patterns of genetic change following gene duplication. In this study, 68 gymnosperm GAF sequences were analyzed to identify lineages and sites under positive selection. Our results indicate that (1) positive selection at a few sites (3.6%), rather than relaxation of selective constraints, has played a major role in the evolution of the gymnosperm GAF domain; (2) strong positive selective pressure tends to occur in the recent PHYP lineages of cogeneric species, but is absent in old lineages consisting of distantly related species; and (3) the selective pressure indicated by the omega ratio varies greatly among lineages and sites in the GAF domain.

  20. Fluorescence of Phytochrome Adducts with Synthetic Locked Chromophores*

    OpenAIRE

    Zienicke, Benjamin; Chen, Li-Yi; Khawn, Htoi; Hammam, Mostafa A. S.; Kinoshita, Hideki; Reichert, Johannes; Ulrich, Anne S.; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman

    2010-01-01

    We performed steady state fluorescence measurements with phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and three mutants in which photoconversion is inhibited. These proteins were assembled with the natural chromophore biliverdin (BV), with phycoerythrobilin (PEB), which lacks a double bond in the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge, and with synthetic bilin derivatives in which the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge is locked. All PEB and locked chromophore adducts are photoinactive...

  1. A computational approach to discovering the functions of bacterial phytochromes by analysis of homolog distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparter, Tilman

    2006-03-16

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors, discovered in plants, that control a wide variety of developmental processes. They have also been found in bacteria and fungi, but for many species their biological role remains obscure. This work concentrates on the phytochrome system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a non-photosynthetic soil bacterium with two phytochromes. To identify proteins that might share common functions with phytochromes, a co-distribution analysis was performed on the basis of protein sequences from 138 bacteria. A database of protein sequences from 138 bacteria was generated. Each sequence was BLASTed against the entire database. The homolog distribution of each query protein was then compared with the homolog distribution of every other protein (target protein) of the same species, and the target proteins were sorted according to their probability of co-distribution under random conditions. As query proteins, phytochromes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Deinococcus radiodurans and Synechocystis PCC 6803 were chosen along with several phytochrome-related proteins from A. tumefaciens. The Synechocystis photosynthesis protein D1 was selected as a control. In the D1 analyses, the ratio between photosynthesis-related proteins and those not related to photosynthesis among the top 150 in the co-distribution tables was > 3:1, showing that the method is appropriate for finding partner proteins with common functions. The co-distribution of phytochromes with other histidine kinases was remarkably high, although most co-distributed histidine kinases were not direct BLAST homologs of the query protein. This finding implies that phytochromes and other histidine kinases share common functions as parts of signalling networks. All phytochromes tested, with one exception, also revealed a remarkably high co-distribution with glutamate synthase and methionine synthase. This result implies a general role of bacterial phytochromes in ammonium

  2. Interactions of transcription factors with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakel, Harm

    2011-01-01

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating transcription initiation by directing the recruitment and activity of the general transcription machinery and accessory factors. It is now well established that many of the effects exerted by TFs in eukaryotes are mediated through interactions with a host of coregulators that modify the chromatin state, resulting in a more open (in case of activation) or closed conformation (in case of repression). The relationship between TFs and chromatin is a two-way street, however, as chromatin can in turn influence the recognition and binding of target sequences by TFs. The aim of this chapter is to highlight how this dynamic interplay between TF-directed remodelling of chromatin and chromatin-adjusted targeting of TF binding determines where and how transcription is initiated, and to what degree it is productive.

  3. Phytochrome-controlled level of growth substances in etiolated oat seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kopcewicz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation with red light of coleoptiles and leaves of etiolated oat seedlings, causing photoconversion of phytochrome mainly into Pfr, leads to the release of free auxins and free gibberellins from conjugated forms. The effect of red light is reversible by far-red light irradiation. A correlation between the photostationary state of phytochrome and endogenous abscisic acid content was not found.

  4. Nerve growth factor interactions with mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritas, S K; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Saggini, A; Pantalone, A; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Cerulli, G; Conti, P

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are involved in neurogenic inflammation where there is vasodilation and plasma protein extravasion in response to this stimulus. Nerve growth factor (NGF), identified by Rita Levi Montalcini, is a neurotrophin family compound which is important for survival of nociceptive neurons during their development. Therefore, NGF is an important neuropeptide which mediates the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. It also exerts its proinflammatory action, not only on mast cells but also in B and T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils. Human mast cells can be activated by neuropeptides to release potent mediators of inflammation, and they are found throughout the body, especially near blood vessels, epithelial tissue and nerves. Mast cells generate and release NGF after degranulation and they are involved in iperalgesia, neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. NGF is also a potent degranulation factor for mast cells in vitro and in vivo, promoting differentiation and maturation of these cells and their precursor, acting as a co-factor with interleukin-3. In conclusion, these studies are focused on cross-talk between neuropeptide NGF and inflammatory mast cells.

  5. An integrative model for phytochrome B mediated photomorphogenesis: from protein dynamics to physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Rausenberger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants have evolved various sophisticated mechanisms to respond and adapt to changes of abiotic factors in their natural environment. Light is one of the most important abiotic environmental factors and it regulates plant growth and development throughout their entire life cycle. To monitor the intensity and spectral composition of the ambient light environment, plants have evolved multiple photoreceptors, including the red/far-red light-sensing phytochromes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed an integrative mathematical model that describes how phytochrome B (phyB, an essential receptor in Arabidopsis thaliana, controls growth. Our model is based on a multiscale approach and connects the mesoscopic intracellular phyB protein dynamics to the macroscopic growth phenotype. To establish reliable and relevant parameters for the model phyB regulated growth we measured: accumulation and degradation, dark reversion kinetics and the dynamic behavior of different nuclear phyB pools using in vivo spectroscopy, western blotting and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP technique, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The newly developed model predicts that the phyB-containing nuclear bodies (NBs (i serve as storage sites for phyB and (ii control prolonged dark reversion kinetics as well as partial reversibility of phyB Pfr in extended darkness. The predictive power of this mathematical model is further validated by the fact that we are able to formalize a basic photobiological observation, namely that in light-grown seedlings hypocotyl length depends on the total amount of phyB. In addition, we demonstrate that our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with quantitative data concerning phyB levels and the corresponding hypocotyl lengths. Hence, we conclude that the integrative model suggested in this study captures the main features of phyB-mediated photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

  6. The aurea mutant of tomato is deficient in spectrophotometrically and immunochemically detectable phytochrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, B M; Jones, A M; Adamse, P; Koornneef, M; Kendrick, R E; Quail, P H

    1987-03-01

    The aurea locus mutant (au (w)) of tomato contains less than 5% of the level of phytochrome in wild-type tissue as measured by in vivo difference spectroscopy. Immunoblot analysis using antibodies directed against etiolated-oat phytochrome demonstrates that crude extracts of etiolated mutant tissue are deficient in a major immunodetectable protein (116 kDa) normally present in the parent wild type. Analyses of wild-type tissue extracts strongly indicate that the 116-kDa protein is phytochrome by showing that this protein: a) is degraded more rapidly in vitro after a brief far-red irradiation than after a brief red irradiation (Vierstra RD, Quail PH, Planta 156: 158-165, 1982); b) contains a covalently bound chromophore as detected by Zn-chromophore fluorescence on nitrocellulose blots; and c) has an apparent molecular mass comparable to phytochrome from other species on size exclusion chromatography under non-denaturing conditions. The demonstration that the aurea mutant is deficient in this 116-kDa phytochrome indicates that the lack of spectrally detectable phytochrome in this mutant is the result of a lesion which affects the abundance of the phytochrome molecule as opposed to its spectral integrity.

  7. A factor from spinach leaves interacting with chlorophylls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, Willemke

    1967-01-01

    A factor has been isolated from spinach leaves that interacts with chlorophyll. This interaction is measurable as an increased light sensitivity and fluorescence capacity of the pigment in an aqueous medium. The factor is probably a protein. Interaction was also observed with bacteriochlorophyll an

  8. PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 regulates root phototropism and gravitropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalandro, Hernán E; De Simone, Silvia N; Bergmann-Honsberger, Ariane; Schepens, Isabelle; Fankhauser, Christian; Casal, Jorge J

    2008-01-01

    Light promotes the expression of PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 (PKS1) in the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, but the function of PKS1 in this organ is unknown. Unilateral blue light induced a negative root phototropic response mediated by phototropin 1 in wild-type seedlings. This response was absent in pks1 mutants. In the wild type, unilateral blue light enhanced PKS1 expression in the subapical region of the root several hours before bending was detectable. The negative phototropism and the enhanced PKS1 expression in response to blue light required phytochrome A (phyA). In addition, the pks1 mutation enhanced the root gravitropic response when vertically oriented seedlings were placed horizontally. The negative regulation of gravitropism by PKS1 occurred even in dark-grown seedlings and did not require phyA. Blue light also failed to induce negative phototropism in pks1 under reduced gravitational stimulation, indicating that the effect of pks1 on phototropism is not simply the consequence of the counteracting effect of enhanced gravitropism. We propose a model where the background level of PKS1 reduces gravitropism. After a phyA-dependent increase in its expression, PKS1 positively affects root phototropism and both effects contribute to negative curvature in response to unilateral blue light.

  9. Stress responsive gene CIPK14 is involved in phytochrome A-mediated far-red light inhibition of greening in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we show that CIPK14,a stress responsive CBL-interacting protein kinase gene,is involved in phytochrome A-mediated far-red light inhibition of greening in Arabidopsis seedlings. The CIPK14-impairment mutant cipk14 grown in continuous far-red (FR) light did not show greening when exposed to white light illumination for 15 h. By contrast, the FR-grown phytochrome A null mutant phyA greened within 0.5 h of exposure to white light. Although greening of Col-4 (wild-type) was not completely abolished by FR, it exhibited a significantly decreased greening capacity compared with that of phyA. Further analyses demonstrated that the expression of protochlorophyllide reductase (POR) genes was correlated with the greening ability of the genotypes. In addition, CIPK14 appeared to be regulated by both the circadian clock and PhyA. Taken together, these results suggest that CIPK14 plays a role in PhyA-mediated FR inhibition of seedling greening, and that a Ca-related kinase may be involved in a previously undefined branch point in the phytochrome A signaling pathway.

  10. Interactions of anthropogenic stress factors on phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donat P. Häder

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton are the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Their biomass production and CO2 sequestration equals that of all terrestrial plants taken together. Phytoplankton productivity is controlled by a number of environmental factors, many of which currently undergo substantial changes due to anthropogenic global climate change. Light availability is an absolute requirement for photosynthesis, but excessive visible and UV radiation impair productivity. Increasing temperatures enhance stratification, decrease the depth of the upper mixing layer exposing the cells to higher solar radiation, and reduce nutrient upward transport from deeper layers. At the same time, stratospheric ozone depletion exposes phytoplankton to higher solar UV-B radiation especially in polar and mid latitudes. Terrestrial runoff carrying sediments and dissolved organic matter into coastal waters leads to eutrophication while reducing UV penetration. All these environmental forcings are known to affect physiological and ecological processes of primary producers. Ocean acidification due to increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations changes the seawater chemistry; it reduces calcification in phytoplankton, macroalgae and many zoological taxa and enhances UV-induced damage. Ocean warming results in changing species composition and favors blooms of toxic prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton; it moderates UV-induced damage of the photosynthetic apparatus because of higher repair rates. Increasing pollution from crude oil spills, persistent organic pollutants, heavy metal as well as industrial and household wastewaters affect phytoplankton, which is augmented by solar UV radiation. In view of the fact that extensive analyses of the impacts of multiple stressors are scarce, here we review reported findings on the impacts of anthropogenic stressors on phytoplankton with an emphasis on their interactive effects and a prospect for future studies.

  11. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways coverage to antogonistically regulate a light-induced transcription network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde and photosensory-receptor signaling has remained undefined. Here, we show that the phytochrome (phy) and retrograde signaling pathways converge a...

  12. A computational approach to discovering the functions of bacterial phytochromes by analysis of homolog distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamparter Tilman

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytochromes are photoreceptors, discovered in plants, that control a wide variety of developmental processes. They have also been found in bacteria and fungi, but for many species their biological role remains obscure. This work concentrates on the phytochrome system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a non-photosynthetic soil bacterium with two phytochromes. To identify proteins that might share common functions with phytochromes, a co-distribution analysis was performed on the basis of protein sequences from 138 bacteria. Results A database of protein sequences from 138 bacteria was generated. Each sequence was BLASTed against the entire database. The homolog distribution of each query protein was then compared with the homolog distribution of every other protein (target protein of the same species, and the target proteins were sorted according to their probability of co-distribution under random conditions. As query proteins, phytochromes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Deinococcus radiodurans and Synechocystis PCC 6803 were chosen along with several phytochrome-related proteins from A. tumefaciens. The Synechocystis photosynthesis protein D1 was selected as a control. In the D1 analyses, the ratio between photosynthesis-related proteins and those not related to photosynthesis among the top 150 in the co-distribution tables was > 3:1, showing that the method is appropriate for finding partner proteins with common functions. The co-distribution of phytochromes with other histidine kinases was remarkably high, although most co-distributed histidine kinases were not direct BLAST homologs of the query protein. This finding implies that phytochromes and other histidine kinases share common functions as parts of signalling networks. All phytochromes tested, with one exception, also revealed a remarkably high co-distribution with glutamate synthase and methionine synthase. This result implies a general role of

  13. Tissue- and isoform-specific phytochrome regulation of light-dependent anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Phytochromes regulate light- and sucrose-dependent anthocyanin synthesis and accumulation in many plants. Mesophyll-specific phyA alone has been linked to the regulation of anthocyanin accumulation in response to far-red light in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, multiple mesophyll-localized phytochromes were implicated in the photoregulation of anthocyanin accumulation in red-light conditions. Here, we report a role for mesophyll-specific phyA in blue-light-dependent regulation of anthocyanin l...

  14. Biochemische Untersuchungen mit dem prokaryotischen Phytochrom Agp1 aus Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    OpenAIRE

    Noack, Steffi

    2010-01-01

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors with a bilin chromophore in which light triggers the conversion between the red-absorbing form Pr and the far-red-absorbing form Pfr. The soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens has two phytochromes, Agp1 and Agp2, with antagonistic properties. In darkness, Agp1 converts slowly from Pfr to Pr, whereas Agp2 converts slowly from Pr to Pfr. Photoconversion is initiated by a change of the stereochemistry of the chromophore which induces structural changes of the p...

  15. Structural basis for the photoconversion of a phytochrome to the activated Pfr form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulijasz, Andrew T; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Cornilescu, Claudia C; Zhang, Junrui; Rivera, Mario; Markley, John L; Vierstra, Richard D

    2010-01-14

    Phytochromes are a collection of bilin-containing photoreceptors that regulate numerous photoresponses in plants and microorganisms through their ability to photointerconvert between a red-light-absorbing, ground state (Pr) and a far-red-light-absorbing, photoactivated state (Pfr). Although the structures of several phytochromes as Pr have been determined, little is known about the structure of Pfr and how it initiates signalling. Here we describe the three-dimensional solution structure of the bilin-binding domain as Pfr, using the cyanobacterial phytochrome from Synechococcus OSB'. Contrary to predictions, light-induced rotation of the A pyrrole ring but not the D ring is the primary motion of the chromophore during photoconversion. Subsequent rearrangements within the protein then affect intradomain and interdomain contact sites within the phytochrome dimer. On the basis of our models, we propose that phytochromes act by propagating reversible light-driven conformational changes in the bilin to altered contacts between the adjacent output domains, which in most phytochromes direct differential phosphotransfer.

  16. Influence of growth regulators and respiration inhibitors on dark transformation of phytochrome in coleoptiles of oat seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kopcewicz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation with red light leads to the formation of an unstable, undergoing gradual destruction, physiologically active PFR form of phytochrome in the coleoptiles of oat seedlings. Growth substances: IAA, GA3, kinetin, ABA, ethrel as well acetylcholine do not influence the nature and rate of phytochrome dark transformation. Inhibitors of energy-producing processes such as KCN, 2,4-DNP, DCCD and antimycin A inhibit the process of dark destruction of the PFR form of phytochrome.

  17. Phytochrome from Agrobacterium tumefaciens has unusual spectral properties and reveals an N-terminal chromophore attachment site

    OpenAIRE

    Lamparter, Tilman; Michael, Norbert; Mittmann, Franz; Esteban, Berta

    2002-01-01

    Phytochromes are photochromic photoreceptors with a bilin chromophore that are found in plants and bacteria. The soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens contains two genes that code for phytochrome-homologous proteins, termed Agrobacterium phytochrome 1 and 2 (Agp1 and Agp2). To analyze its biochemical and spectral properties, Agp1 was purified from the clone of an E. coli overexpressor. The protein was assembled with the chromophores phycocyanobilin and biliverdin, which is the putative nat...

  18. Effective Factors in Interactions within Japanese EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftoon, Parviz; Ziafar, Meisam

    2013-01-01

    Classroom interactional patterns depend on some contextual, cultural and local factors in addition to the methodologies employed in the classroom. In order to delineate such factors, the focus of classroom interaction research needs to shift from the observables to the unobservables like teachers' and learners' psychological states and cultural…

  19. Phytochrome B promotes branching in Arabidopsis by suppressing auxin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Reddy, Srirama; Finlayson, Scott A

    2014-03-01

    Many plants respond to competition signals generated by neighbors by evoking the shade avoidance syndrome, including increased main stem elongation and reduced branching. Vegetation-induced reduction in the red light:far-red light ratio provides a competition signal sensed by phytochromes. Plants deficient in phytochrome B (phyB) exhibit a constitutive shade avoidance syndrome including reduced branching. Because auxin in the polar auxin transport stream (PATS) inhibits axillary bud outgrowth, its role in regulating the phyB branching phenotype was tested. Removing the main shoot PATS auxin source by decapitation or chemically inhibiting the PATS strongly stimulated branching in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) deficient in phyB, but had a modest effect in the wild type. Whereas indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels were elevated in young phyB seedlings, there was less IAA in mature stems compared with the wild type. A split plate assay of bud outgrowth kinetics indicated that low auxin levels inhibited phyB buds more than the wild type. Because the auxin response could be a result of either the auxin signaling status or the bud's ability to export auxin into the main shoot PATS, both parameters were assessed. Main shoots of phyB had less absolute auxin transport capacity compared with the wild type, but equal or greater capacity when based on the relative amounts of native IAA in the stems. Thus, auxin transport capacity was unlikely to restrict branching. Both shoots of young phyB seedlings and mature stem segments showed elevated expression of auxin-responsive genes and expression was further increased by auxin treatment, suggesting that phyB suppresses auxin signaling to promote branching.

  20. The multiple interactions between growth factors and microenvironment in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Cell, growth factors and extracellular matrices (ECMs) coexist in a dynamic tissue envi- ronment. A knowledge of multiple interactions among them is highly important for effectively raising the biological activities of growth factors, regulating cell life cycle, designing and preparing exogenous mat- rices to control growth factors release in tissue or organ regeneration by engineering means. This paper addresses the characteristics and functions of growth factors, interactions between growth factors and ECMs, the manners and correlative signaling of growth factors acting on cells, and briefly summarizes the biomimetic requisites for controlled release mat- rices, hoping to provide a useful reference for co- rrelative research in tissue engineering.

  1. The Clock Protein CCA1 and the bZIP Transcription Factor HY5 Physically Interact to Regulate Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos Andronis; Simon Barak; Stephen M.Knowles; Shoji Sugano; Elaine M.Tobin

    2008-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates the expression of an array of Arabidopsis genes such as those encoding the LIGHT-HARVESTING CHLOROPHYLL A/B (Lhcb) proteins. We have previously studied the promoters of two of these Arabidopsis genes-Lhcb1*1 and Lhcb1*3-and identified a sequence that binds the clock protein CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1). This sequence, designated CCAl-binding site (CBS), is necessary for phytochrome and circadian responsiveness of these genes. In close proximity to this sequence, there exists a G-box core element that has been shown to bind the bZIP transcription factor HY5 in other light-regulated plant promoters. In the present study, we examined the importance of the interaction of transcription factors binding the CBS and the G-box core element in the control of normal circadian rhythmic expression of Lhcb genes. Our results show that HY5 is able to specifically bind the G-box element in the Lhcb promoters and that CCA1 can alter the binding activity of HY5. We further show that CCA1 and HY5 can physically interact and that they can act synergistically on transcription in a yeast reporter gene assay. An absence of HY5 leads to a shorter period of Lhcb1*1 circadian expression but does not affect the circadian expression of CATALASE3 (CAT3), whose promoter lacks a G-box element. Our results suggest that interaction of the HY5 and CCA1 proteins on Lhcb promoters is necessary for normal circadian expression of the Lhcb genes.

  2. Detection of phytochrome-like genes from Rhazya stricta (Apocynaceae) using de novo genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Jamal S M; Baeshen, Nabih A; Shokry, Ahmed M; Gadalla, Nour O; Edris, Sherif; Mutwakil, Mohammed H; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Atef, Ahmed; Al-Kordy, Magdy A; Abuzinadah, Osama A; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Jansen, Robert K; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Phytochrome-like genes in the wild plant species Rhazya stricta Decne were characterized using a de novo genome assembly of next generation sequence data. Rhazya stricta contains more than 100 alkaloids with multiple pharmacological properties, and leaf extracts have been used to cure chronic rheumatism, to treat tumors, and in the treatment of several other diseases. Phytochromes are known to be involved in the light-regulated biosynthesis of some alkaloids. Phytochromes are soluble chromoproteins that function in the absorption of red and far-red light and the transduction of intracellular signals during light-regulated plant development. De novo assembly of the nuclear genome of R. stricta recovered 45,641 contigs greater than 1000bp long, which were used in constructing a local database. Five sequences belonging to Arabidopsis thaliana phytochrome gene family (i.e., AtphyABCDE) were used to identify R. stricta contigs with phytochrome-like sequences using BLAST. This led to the identification of three contigs with phytochrome-like sequences covering AtphyA-, AtphyC- and AtphyE-like full-length genes. Annotation of the three sequences showed that each contig consists of one phytochrome-like gene with three exons and two introns. BLASTn and BLASTp results indicated that RsphyA mRNA and protein sequences had homologues in Wrightia coccinea and and Solanum tuberosum, respectively. RsphyC-like mRNA and protein sequence were homologous to Vitis vinifera and Vitis riparia. RsphyE-like mRNA coding and protein sequences were homologous to Ipomoea nil. Multiple-sequence alignment of phytochrome proteins indicated a homology with 30 sequences from 23 different species of flowering plants. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that each R. stricta phytochrome gene is related to the same phytochrome gene of other flowering plants. It is proposed that the absence of phyB gene in R. stricta is due to RsphyA gene taking over the role of phyB.

  3. Growth Factor Interactions in Bone Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, Diederik H. R.; Creemers, Laura B.; Alblas, Jacqueline; Lu, Lichun; Verbout, Abraham J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Dhert, Wouter J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Bone regeneration is a complex process regulated by a large number of bioactive molecules. Many growth factors and cytokines involved in the natural process of bone healing have been identified and tested as potential therapeutic candidates to enhance the regeneration process. Although many of these

  4. Tissue factor residues that putatively interact with membrane phospholipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Ke

    Full Text Available Blood clotting is initiated by the two-subunit enzyme consisting of the plasma protease, factor VIIa (the catalytic subunit, bound to the integral membrane protein, tissue factor (the regulatory subunit. Molecular dynamics simulations have predicted that certain residues in the tissue factor ectodomain interact with phosphatidylserine headgroups to ensure optimal positioning of the tissue factor/factor VIIa complex relative to its membrane-bound protein substrates, factors IX and X. In this study, we individually mutated to alanine all the putative phosphatidylserine-interactive residues in the tissue factor ectodomain and measured their effects on tissue factor cofactor function (activation of factors IX and X by tissue factor/factor VIIa, and clotting of plasma. Some tissue factor mutants exhibited decreased activity in all three assays, with the most profound defects observed from mutations in or near the flexible loop from Lys159 to Gly164. The decreased activity of all of these tissue factor mutants could be partially or completely overcome by increasing the phosphatidylserine content of tissue factor-liposomes. Additionally, yeast surface display was used to screen a random library of tissue factor mutants for enhanced factor VIIa binding. Surprisingly, mutations at a single amino acid (Lys165 predominated, with the Lys165→Glu mutant exhibiting a 3-fold enhancement in factor VIIa binding affinity. Our studies reveal the functional contributions of residues in the C-terminal half of the tissue factor ectodomain that are implicated in interacting with phosphatidylserine headgroups to enhance tissue factor cofactor activity, possibly by allosterically modulating the conformation of the adjacent substrate-binding exosite region of tissue factor.

  5. [Parodontitis pathogenetic factors, their interaction and effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipiani, Nana V; Iverieli, M; Mosemgvdlishvili, N; Kipiani, Nino V; Jafaridze, S

    2014-03-01

    Induced by microbial intervention oxidative stress causes electronic transport disorder in gingival cells mitochondrias as well as decrease of energogenesis and increase of lipoperoxidation. In oral cavity local immunity is decreased in parodontitis, that is related with immunoglobulin A deficiency and lysozyme activity decrease. Against this background, microbial factors damaging effect on periodont is intensified. In parodontitis the free nitric oxide (NO) content decrease in gingival tissues and its appearance in saliva is related with transformation of NO into toxic peroxinitrite, that on its turn enhances oxidation, parodontal injury, cell degra dation and necrosis. Nitrooxide defficiency in gingival mucosal cells is characterized by decreased protein P-53 expression and terminal differentiation disorder of the cells. Mitochodria related energogenesis disorder in gums causes inhibition of their cell regeneration, which together with apoptotic changes is characterized with parodontal tissue destruction and depletion.

  6. Active and silent chromophore isoforms for phytochrome Pr photoisomerization: An alternative evolutionary strategy to optimize photoreaction quantum yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoisomerization of a protein bound chromophore is the basis of light sensing of many photoreceptors. We tracked Z-to-E photoisomerization of Cph1 phytochrome chromophore PCB in the Pr form in real-time. Two different phycocyanobilin (PCB ground state geometries with different ring D orientations have been identified. The pre-twisted and hydrogen bonded PCBa geometry exhibits a time constant of 30 ps and a quantum yield of photoproduct formation of 29%, about six times slower and ten times higher than that for the non-hydrogen bonded PCBb geometry. This new mechanism of pre-twisting the chromophore by protein-cofactor interaction optimizes yields of slow photoreactions and provides a scaffold for photoreceptor engineering.

  7. Human cytomegalovirus IE2 protein interacts with transcription activating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jinping(徐进平); YE; Linbai(叶林柏)

    2002-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE86 Cdna was cloned into Pgex-2T and fusion protein GST-IE86 was expressed in E. Coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay indicated that fusion protein GST-IE86 with molecular weight of 92 ku is soluble in the supernatant of cell lysate. Protein GST and fusion protein GST-IE86 were purified by affinity chromatography. The technology of co-separation and specific affinity chromatography was used to study the interactions of HCMV IE86 protein with some transcriptional regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors. The results indicated that IE86 interacts separately with transcriptional factor TFIIB and promoter DNA binding transcription trans-activating factors SP1, AP1 and AP2 to form a heterogenous protein complex. These transcriptional trans-activating factors, transcriptional factor and IE86 protein were adsorbed and retained in the affinity chromatography simultaneously. But IE86 protein could not interact with NF-Кb, suggesting that the function of IE86 protein that can interact with transcriptional factor and transcriptional trans-activating factors has no relevance to protein glycosylation. IE86 protein probably has two domains responsible for binding transcriptional trans-activating regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors respectively, thus activating the transcription of many genes. The interactions accelerated the assembly of the transcriptional initiation complexes.

  8. Red light-induced acidification by pea leaf epidermal cells is regulated by more than one phytochrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, J.T.M.; Staal, M; Prins, H.B A

    2000-01-01

    Leaves of pea (Pisum sativum L.) grown in red light develop normally, provided that functional phytochrome B is present. In the chromophore mutant pcd2 and in the phytochrome B mutant 1v the leaves remain small. Although some chlorophyll development takes place, the leaf size of red light-grown muta

  9. Phenotypic Characterization of Transgenic Miscanthus sinensis Plants Overexpressing Arabidopsis Phytochrome B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ok-Jin Hwang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes are dimeric pigment proteins with reversible photochromism between red and far-red light-absorbing forms. They are photoreceptors that regulate various aspects of plant growth and development and have been used for biotechnological applications to improve agricultural performance of crops. Miscanthus species have been suggested as one of the most promising energy crops. In this paper, Arabidopsis phytochrome B (PHYB gene was introduced into Miscanthus sinensis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method that we developed recently, with the herbicide resistance gene (BAR as a selection marker. After putative transgenic plants were selected using the herbicide resistance assay, genomic integration of the transgene was confirmed by genomic PCR and Southern blot analysis, and transgene expression was validated by Northern blot analysis. Compared to nontransformed control plants, transgenic plants overexpressing PHYB showed phenotypes with increased phytochrome B function, which includes increased chlorophyll content, decreased plant height, and delayed flowering. Therefore, these results suggest that Arabidopsis phytochrome B is functional in M. sinensis and provide a method to develop Miscanthus varieties with enhanced agricultural performance using phytochromes.

  10. Intramolecular co-action of two independent photosensory modules in the fern phytochrome 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegae, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Fern phytochrome3/neochrome1 (phy3/neo1) is a chimeric photoreceptor composed of a phytochrome-chromophore binding domain and an almost full-length phototropin. phy3 thus contains two different light-sensing modules; a red/far-red light receptor phytochrome and a blue light receptor phototropin. phy3 induces both red light- and blue light-dependent phototropism in phototropin-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana (phot1 phot2) seedlings. The red-light response is dependent on the phytochrome module of phy3, and the blue-light response is dependent on the phototropin module. We recently showed that both the phototropin-sensing module and the phytochrome-sensing module mediate the blue light-dependent phototropic response. Particularly under low-light conditions, these two light-sensing modules cooperate to induce the blue light-dependent phototropic response. This intramolecular co-action of two independent light-sensing modules in phy3 enhances light sensitivity, and perhaps allowed ferns to adapt to the low-light canopy conditions present in angiosperm forests.

  11. Prevention of Action of Far-Red-Absorbing Phytochrome in Rumex crispus L. Seeds by Ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylorson, R B

    1984-02-01

    Phytochrome-enhanced germination of curled dock (Rumex crispus L.) seeds is further stimulated by pretreatments in solutions of 0.5 to 2 molar methanol and 0.03 to >/= 0.3 molar 2-propanol during a 2-day 20 degrees C imbibition. Similar pretreatments in 0.1 molar ethanol, acetaldehyde, and n-propanol inhibit phytochrome-enhanced germination. If exposure to ethanol is delayed until 16 hours after a red irradiation, seeds escape the ethanol inhibition indicating a mechanism other than toxicity. The rate of escape from ethanol inhibition roughly parallels the escape from phytochrome control in seeds held in water only, indicating possible ethanol effects on phytochrome. It was found that ethanol pretreatment prevents the far-red absorbing form of phytochrome (Pfr) from acting but does not accelerate dark decay or prevent transformation. Ethanol inhibition may be prevented if ethanol pretreatment is at 10 degrees C instead of 20 degrees C, or may be overcome by transferring ethanol-pretreated seeds to 10 degrees C in water. Similarly, ethanol inhibition can be overcome by a 2-hour 40 degrees C temperature shift concluding the pretreatment. It is proposed that the ethanol causes perturbations at a membrane which prevent Pfr from acting.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor interaction with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, De-Hao; Elzey, Sherrie; Delrio, Frank W.; Keene, Athena M.; Tyner, Katherine M.; Clogston, Jeffrey D.; Maccuspie, Robert I.; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zachariah, Michael R.; Hackley, Vincent A.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The native TNF used in this study exists in the active homotrimer configuration prior to conjugation. After binding to AuNPs, the maximum surface density of TNF is (0.09 +/- 0.02) nm-2 with a binding constant of 3 × 106 (mol L-1)-1. Dodecyl sulfate ions induce desorption of monomeric TNF from the AuNP surface, indicating a relatively weak intermolecular binding within the AuNP-bound TNF trimers. Anti-TNF binds to both TNF-conjugated and citrate-stabilized AuNPs, showing that non-specific binding is significant. Based on the number of anti-TNF molecules adsorbed, a substantially higher binding affinity was observed for the TNF-conjugated surface. The inclusion of thiolated polyethylene glycol (SH-PEG) on the AuNPs inhibits the binding of anti-TNF, and the amount of inhibition is related to the number ratio of surface bound SH-PEG to TNF and the way in which the ligands are introduced. This study highlights the challenges in quantitatively characterizing complex hybrid nanoscale conjugates, and provides insight on TNF-AuNP formation and activity.We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  13. What Makes Sports Fans Interactive? Identifying Factors Affecting Chat Interactions in Online Sports Viewing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsam Ko

    Full Text Available Sports fans are able to watch games from many locations using TV services while interacting with other fans online. In this paper, we identify the factors that affect sports viewers' online interactions. Using a large-scale dataset of more than 25 million chat messages from a popular social TV site for baseball, we extract various game-related factors, and investigate the relationships between these factors and fans' interactions using a series of multiple regression analyses. As a result, we identify several factors that are significantly related to viewer interactions. In addition, we determine that the influence of these factors varies according to the user group; i.e., active vs. less active users, and loyal vs. non-loyal users.

  14. Fluorescence of Phytochrome Adducts with Synthetic Locked Chromophores*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienicke, Benjamin; Chen, Li-Yi; Khawn, Htoi; Hammam, Mostafa A. S.; Kinoshita, Hideki; Reichert, Johannes; Ulrich, Anne S.; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    We performed steady state fluorescence measurements with phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and three mutants in which photoconversion is inhibited. These proteins were assembled with the natural chromophore biliverdin (BV), with phycoerythrobilin (PEB), which lacks a double bond in the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge, and with synthetic bilin derivatives in which the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge is locked. All PEB and locked chromophore adducts are photoinactive. According to fluorescence quantum yields, the adducts may be divided into four different groups: wild type BV adducts exhibiting a weak fluorescence, mutant BV adducts with about 10-fold enhanced fluorescence, adducts with locked chromophores in which the fluorescence quantum yields are around 0.02, and PEB adducts with a high quantum yield of around 0.5. Thus, the strong fluorescence of the PEB adducts is not reached by the locked chromophore adducts, although the photoconversion energy dissipation pathway is blocked. We therefore suggest that ring D of the bilin chromophore, which contributes to the extended π-electron system of the locked chromophores, provides an energy dissipation pathway that is independent on photoconversion. PMID:21071442

  15. Fluorescence of phytochrome adducts with synthetic locked chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienicke, Benjamin; Chen, Li-Yi; Khawn, Htoi; Hammam, Mostafa A S; Kinoshita, Hideki; Reichert, Johannes; Ulrich, Anne S; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman

    2011-01-14

    We performed steady state fluorescence measurements with phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and three mutants in which photoconversion is inhibited. These proteins were assembled with the natural chromophore biliverdin (BV), with phycoerythrobilin (PEB), which lacks a double bond in the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge, and with synthetic bilin derivatives in which the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge is locked. All PEB and locked chromophore adducts are photoinactive. According to fluorescence quantum yields, the adducts may be divided into four different groups: wild type BV adducts exhibiting a weak fluorescence, mutant BV adducts with about 10-fold enhanced fluorescence, adducts with locked chromophores in which the fluorescence quantum yields are around 0.02, and PEB adducts with a high quantum yield of around 0.5. Thus, the strong fluorescence of the PEB adducts is not reached by the locked chromophore adducts, although the photoconversion energy dissipation pathway is blocked. We therefore suggest that ring D of the bilin chromophore, which contributes to the extended π-electron system of the locked chromophores, provides an energy dissipation pathway that is independent on photoconversion.

  16. TFinDit: transcription factor-DNA interaction data depository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the crucial steps in regulation of gene expression is the binding of transcription factor(s to specific DNA sequences. Knowledge of the binding affinity and specificity at a structural level between transcription factors and their target sites has important implications in our understanding of the mechanism of gene regulation. Due to their unique functions and binding specificity, there is a need for a transcription factor-specific, structure-based database and corresponding web service to facilitate structural bioinformatics studies of transcription factor-DNA interactions, such as development of knowledge-based interaction potential, transcription factor-DNA docking, binding induced conformational changes, and the thermodynamics of protein-DNA interactions. Description TFinDit is a relational database and a web search tool for studying transcription factor-DNA interactions. The database contains annotated transcription factor-DNA complex structures and related data, such as unbound protein structures, thermodynamic data, and binding sequences for the corresponding transcription factors in the complex structures. TFinDit also provides a user-friendly interface and allows users to either query individual entries or generate datasets through culling the database based on one or more search criteria. Conclusions TFinDit is a specialized structural database with annotated transcription factor-DNA complex structures and other preprocessed data. We believe that this database/web service can facilitate the development and testing of TF-DNA interaction potentials and TF-DNA docking algorithms, and the study of protein-DNA recognition mechanisms.

  17. Duplication, divergence and persistence in the Phytochrome photoreceptor gene family of cottons (Gossypium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdukarimov Abdusattor

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytochromes are a family of red/far-red photoreceptors that regulate a number of important developmental traits in cotton (Gossypium spp., including plant architecture, fiber development, and photoperiodic flowering. Little is known about the composition and evolution of the phytochrome gene family in diploid (G. herbaceum, G. raimondii or allotetraploid (G. hirsutum, G. barbadense cotton species. The objective of this study was to obtain a preliminary inventory and molecular-evolutionary characterization of the phytochrome gene family in cotton. Results We used comparative sequence resources to design low-degeneracy PCR primers that amplify genomic sequence tags (GSTs for members of the PHYA, PHYB/D, PHYC and PHYE gene sub-families from A- and D-genome diploid and AD-genome allotetraploid Gossypium species. We identified two paralogous PHYA genes (designated PHYA1 and PHYA2 in diploid cottons, the result of a Malvaceae-specific PHYA gene duplication that occurred approximately 14 million years ago (MYA, before the divergence of the A- and D-genome ancestors. We identified a single gene copy of PHYB, PHYC, and PHYE in diploid cottons. The allotetraploid genomes have largely retained the complete gene complements inherited from both of the diploid genome ancestors, with at least four PHYA genes and two genes encoding PHYB, PHYC and PHYE in the AD-genomes. We did not identify a PHYD gene in any cotton genomes examined. Conclusions Detailed sequence analysis suggests that phytochrome genes retained after duplication by segmental duplication and allopolyploidy appear to be evolving independently under a birth-and-death-process with strong purifying selection. Our study provides a preliminary phytochrome gene inventory that is necessary and sufficient for further characterization of the biological functions of each of the cotton phytochrome genes, and for the development of 'candidate gene' markers that are potentially useful for

  18. Assembly of synthetic locked chromophores with Agrobacterium phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2

    OpenAIRE

    Inomata, Katsuhiko; Noack, Steffi; Hammam, Mostafa A. S.; Khawn, Htoi; Kinoshita, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors with a bilin chromophore in which light triggers the conversion between the red-absorbing form Pr and the far-red-absorbing form Pfr. Agrobacterium tumefaciens has two phytochromes, Agp1 and Agp2, with antagonistic properties: in darkness, Agp1 converts slowly from Pfr to Pr, whereas Agp2 converts slowly from Pr to Pfr. In a previous study, we have assembled Agp1 with synthetic locked chromophores 15Za, 15Zs, 15Ea, and 15Es in which the C15=C16 double bond is f...

  19. Human Factors Issues for Interaction with Bio-Inspired Swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    subtle leaders of fish schools. Pheromone trails also suggest a way to support human interaction as has been explored to a limited extent... Human Factors issues for Interaction with Bio-Inspired Swarms Michael Lewis*, Michael Goodrich**, Katia Sycara+, Mark Steinberg++ * School of...Enabling a human to control such bio-inspired systems is a considerable challenge due to the limitations of each individual robot and the sheer

  20. Factors associated with social interaction anxiety among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z W; Lam, L T; Jin, J

    2011-12-01

    To investigate potential risk factors for social anxiety, particularly social interaction anxiety among the Chinese adolescents. A cross-sectional health survey was conducted in Guangzhou city of the Guangdong Province where high school students aged 13 to 18 years were recruited. The sample was selected from all high schools in the city using a 2-stage random cluster sampling technique. Social interaction anxiety was assessed using the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale. Information collected in the survey included: demographics, self-perception on school performance, relationship with teachers and peers, satisfaction with self-image, achievements, and parenting style of the mother. The parent-child relationship, specifically the relationship between respondents and their mothers, was assessed using the mother attachment subscale of the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment. Self-esteem was assessed using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The multiple linear regression technique was applied to investigate associations between selected potential risk factors and social interaction anxiety, with adjustments for cluster sampling. Lower family income, lower self-esteem, and hostility were significantly associated with social interaction anxiety among adolescents. Variables identified as risk factors of anxiety disorder in the literature, such as gender, were not associated with social interaction anxiety in this sample. These results were consistent with those of other studies conducted mainly in the United States and Europe. Regarding non-significant results related to gender, they need viewing in the context of parenting styles of Chinese mothers.

  1. Phytochrome from Agrobacterium tumefaciens has unusual spectral properties and reveals an N-terminal chromophore attachment site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparter, Tilman; Michael, Norbert; Mittmann, Franz; Esteban, Berta

    2002-09-03

    Phytochromes are photochromic photoreceptors with a bilin chromophore that are found in plants and bacteria. The soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens contains two genes that code for phytochrome-homologous proteins, termed Agrobacterium phytochrome 1 and 2 (Agp1 and Agp2). To analyze its biochemical and spectral properties, Agp1 was purified from the clone of an E. coli overexpressor. The protein was assembled with the chromophores phycocyanobilin and biliverdin, which is the putative natural chromophore, to photoactive holoprotein species. Like other bacterial phytochromes, Agp1 acts as light-regulated His kinase. The biliverdin adduct of Agp1 represents a previously uncharacterized type of phytochrome photoreceptor, because photoreversion from the far-red absorbing form to the red-absorbing form is very inefficient, a feature that is combined with a rapid dark reversion. Biliverdin bound covalently to the protein; blocking experiments and site-directed mutagenesis identified a Cys at position 20 as the binding site. This particular position is outside the region where plant and some cyanobacterial phytochromes attach their chromophore and thus represents a previously uncharacterized binding site. Sequence comparisons imply that the region around Cys-20 is a ring D binding motif in phytochromes.

  2. Factor selection and structural identification in the interaction ANOVA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Justin B; Bondell, Howard D

    2013-03-01

    When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of an analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times, these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also to equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This article introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example.

  3. Factor Selection and Structural Identification in the Interaction ANOVA Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Justin B.; Bondell, Howard D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post-hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey’s Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This paper introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example. PMID:23323643

  4. Recombinant phytochrome of the moss Ceratodon purpureus: heterologous expression and kinetic analysis of Pr-->Pfr conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, M; Lamparter, T; Hughes, J; Hartmann, E; Remberg, A; Braslavsky, S; Schaffner, K; Gärtner, W

    1998-12-01

    The phytochrome-encoding gene Cerpu;PHY;2 (CP2) of the moss Ceratodon purpureus was heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a polyhistidine-tagged apoprotein and assembled with phytochromobilin (P phi B) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). Nickel-affinity chromatography yielded a protein fraction containing approximately 80% phytochrome. The holoproteins showed photoreversibility with both chromophores. Difference spectra gave maxima at 644/716 nm (red-absorbing phytochrome [Pr]/far-red-absorbing phytochrome [Pfr]) for the PCB adduct, and 659/724 nm for the P phi B-adduct, the latter in close agreement with values for phytochrome extracted from Ceratodon itself, implying that P phi B is the native chromophore in this moss species. Immunoblots stained with the antiphytochrome antibody APC1 showed that the recombinant phytochrome had the same molecular size as phytochrome from Ceratodon extracts. Further, the mobility of recombinant CP2 holophytochrome on native size-exclusion chromatography was similar to that of native oat phytochrome, implying that CP2 forms a dimer. Kinetics of absorbance changes during the Pr-->Pfr photoconversion of the PCB adduct, monitored between 620 and 740 nm in the microsecond range, revealed the rapid formation of a red-shifted intermediate (I700), decaying with a time constant of approximately 110 microseconds. This is similar to the behavior of phytochromes from higher plants when assembled with the same chromophore. When following the formation of the Pfr state, two major processes were identified (with time constants of 3 and 18 ms) that are followed by slow reactions in the range of 166 ms and 8 s, respectively, albeit with very small amplitudes.

  5. Identification of photo-inactive phytochrome A in etiolated seedlings and photo-active phytochrome B in green leaves of the aurea mutant of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R; López-Juez, E; Nagatani, A; Furuya, M

    1993-12-01

    The contents of spectrophotometrically measurable phytochrome A (PhyA) and phytochrome B (PhyB) and the corresponding immunochemically detectable apoproteins (PHYA and PHYB) were examined in dark- and light-grown tissues of the aurea mutant of tomato and its wild-type (WT). The amount of PHYA in etiolated aurea seedlings was found to be about 20% of that in the WT; this PHYA showed no photo-reversible changes in absorbance, no downregulation of the level of PHYA in light-grown seedlings, and no differential proteolysis of Pr and Pfr species in vitro which was seen in the case of the WT. By contrast, the amount of PHYB in aurea seedlings was not significantly different from that in WT seedlings. Phytochrome isolated from green leaves of the aurea mutant and purified by ion-exchange chromatography showed a red/far-red reversible spectral change, and its elution profile during chromatography was essentially similar to that of PHYB. The results indicate that aurea is a mutant that is deficient in photoactive PhyA at the etiolated stage, when it contains a spectrally inactive PHYA. However, the mutant contains spectrally active PhyB in its green tissue as does the WT.

  6. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Complex Material Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    Complex material behavior is represented by a single equation of product form to account for interaction among the various factors. The factors are selected by the physics of the problem and the environment that the model is to represent. For example, different factors will be required for each to represent temperature, moisture, erosion, corrosion, etc. It is important that the equation represent the physics of the behavior in its entirety accurately. The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the external launch tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points - the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation, the data used were obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated. The problem lies in how to represent the divot weight with a single equation. A unique solution to this problem is a multi-factor equation of product form. Each factor is of the following form (1 xi/xf)ei, where xi is the initial value, usually at ambient conditions, xf the final value, and ei the exponent that makes the curve represented unimodal that meets the initial and final values. The exponents are either evaluated by test data or by technical judgment. A minor disadvantage may be the selection of exponents in the absence of any empirical data. This form has been used successfully in describing the foam ejected in simulated space environmental conditions. Seven factors were required

  7. [Role of phytochrome in organ formation processes in Cucumis sativus L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoeva, M I; Marovskaia, E F

    2013-01-01

    The role of phytochrome B in the organogenesis process in the apical and axillary shoot meristems during early ontogenesis stages in cucumber Cucumis sativus L. at photoperiods (day/night) 10/14, 16/8 h, and continuous light in comparison with wild type plants and phytochrome B-deficient mutant (lh-mutant) was investigated. In mutant phytochrome B, deficiency caused inhibition of initiation of leaves both in the leading shoot and off-shoots and increased the number of flower buds (IV stage of organogenesis). With continuous light, the number of off-shoots and flowers during stage IV of organogenesis in wild-type plants increased twofold in comparison with the mutant. Short-term temperature drops did not induce floral ontogenesis in mutants but increased the number of off-shoots in both experimental variants during a long photoperiod and continuous light situations. We propose that phytochrome B, by increasing the compactness of chromatin, may facilitate coordination of ontogenesis processes with changing environmental conditions.

  8. Integration of Phytochrome and Cryptochrome Signals Determines Plant Growth during Competition for Light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Mieke; Keuskamp, Diederik H.; Bongers, Franca J.; Hornitschek, Patricia; Gommers, Charlotte M M; Reinen, Emilie; Martínez-Cerón, Carmen; Fankhauser, Christian; Pierik, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Plants in dense vegetation perceive their neighbors primarily through changes in light quality. Initially, the ratio between red (R) and far-red (FR) light decreases due to reflection of FR by plant tissue well before shading occurs. Perception of low R:FR by the phytochrome photoreceptors induces

  9. Overexpression of homologous phytochrome genes in tomato: exploring the limits in photoperception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husaineid, S.H.; Kok, R.A.; Schreuder, M.E.L.; Plas, van der L.H.W.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Transgenic tomato [Lycopersicon esculentum (=Solanum lycopersicum)] lines overexpressing tomato PHYA, PHYB1, or PHYB2, under control of the constitutive double-35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) have been generated to test the level of saturation in individual phytochrome-signalling p

  10. Ca2+ transport in plant cells and mechanisms of transformation of phytochrome-induced photosignals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotovski, Igor D.

    1995-01-01

    The recent data on the influence of phytochrome on the efficiency of Ca2+ translocation across the membranes of oat protoplasts are given. Ca2+ uptake in the protoplasts was shown to be influenced by the red light (R) illumination. This effect was reverted by the following far-red light (FR) illumination. To elucidate the sensitivity to phytochrome-controlling action the screening between the mechanisms of Ca2+ transport across the plasma membranes of oat protoplasts, Na+/Ca2+ and Ca2+/H+ exchangers, Ca2+-pump and Ca2+-channel was done. It was established that phytochrome modulated the activity of Na+/Ca2+-exchanger and Ca2+-pump. The light-mediated oscillations of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration in the oat protoplasts were demonstrated using fluorescence probe quin2 loaded into the cells and laser monitoring of fluorescence signal. The evidences were obtained that the oscillations were not the result of the elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration and had no connection with Ca2+ pool of mitochondria. The possibility of the relation between the Ca2+ oscillations and phosphoinositide metabolism in plant cell membranes is analyzed. The mechanisms of transformation of primary phytochrome signal into biological effects were discussed.

  11. Shedding (far-red) light on phytochrome mechanisms and responses in land plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Possart, A.; Fleck, C.; Hiltbrunner, A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to monitor ambient light conditions, plants rely on functionally diversified photoreceptors. Among these, phytochromes perceive red (R) and far-red (FR) light. FR light does not constitute a photosynthetic energy source; it however influences adaptive and developmental processes. In seed pl

  12. Minimal domain of bacterial phytochrome required for chromophore binding and fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zakharova, Natalia I.; Emelyanov, Alexander V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) are used to study various biological processes. Recently, a series of near-infrared (NIR) FPs based on bacterial phytochromes was developed. Finding ways to improve NIR FPs is becoming progressively important. By applying rational design and molecular evolution we have engineered R. palustris bacterial phytochrome into a single-domain NIR FP of 19.6 kDa, termed GAF-FP, which is 2-fold and 1.4-fold smaller than bacterial phytochrome-based NIR FPs and GFP-like proteins, respectively. Engineering of GAF-FP involved a substitution of 15% of its amino acids and a deletion of the knot structure. GAF-FP covalently binds two tetrapyrrole chromophores, biliverdin (BV) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). With the BV chromophore GAF-FP absorbs at 635 nm and fluoresces at 670 nm. With the PCB chromophore GAF-FP becomes blue-shifted and absorbs at 625 nm and fluoresces at 657 nm. The GAF-FP structure has a high tolerance to small peptide insertions. The small size of GAF-FP and its additional absorbance band in the violet range has allowed for designing a chimeric protein with Renilla luciferase. The chimera exhibits efficient non-radiative energy transfer from luciferase to GAF-FP, resulting in NIR bioluminescence. This study opens the way for engineering of small NIR FPs and NIR luciferases from bacterial phytochromes.

  13. Probing the photoreaction mechanism of phytochrome through analysis of resonance Raman vibrational spectra of recombinant analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andel, F; Murphy, J T; Haas, J A; McDowell, M T; van der Hoef, I; Lugtenburg, J; Lagarias, J C; Mathies, R A

    2000-03-14

    Resonance Raman spectra of native and recombinant analogues of oat phytochrome have been obtained and analyzed in conjunction with normal mode calculations. On the basis of frequency shifts observed upon methine bridge deuteration and vinyl and C(15)-methine bridge saturation of the chromophore, intense Raman lines at 805 and 814 cm(-)(1) in P(r) and P(fr), respectively, are assigned as C(15)-hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP) wags, lines at 665 cm(-)(1) in P(r) and at 672 and 654 cm(-)(1) in P(fr) are assigned as coupled C=C and C-C torsions and in-plane ring twisting modes, and modes at approximately 1300 cm(-)(1) in P(r) are coupled N-H and C-H rocking modes. The empirical assignments and normal mode calculations support proposals that the chromophore structures in P(r) and P(fr) are C(15)-Z,syn and C(15)-E,anti, respectively. The intensities of the C(15)-hydrogen out-of-plane, C=C and C-C torsional, and in-plane ring modes in both P(r) and P(fr) suggest that the initial photochemistry involves simultaneous bond rotations at the C(15)-methine bridge coupled to C(15)-H wagging and D-ring rotation. The strong nonbonded interactions of the C- and D-ring methyl groups in the C(15)-E,anti P(fr) chromophore structure indicated by the intense 814 cm(-1) C(15) HOOP mode suggest that the excited state of P(fr) and its photoproduct states are strongly coupled.

  14. Agrobacterium phytochrome as an enzyme for the production of ZZE bilins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparter, Tilman; Michael, Norbert

    2005-06-14

    Photoconversion of phytochrome from the red-absorbing form Pr to the far-red-absorbing form Pfr is initiated by a Z to E isomerization around the ring C-ring D connecting double bond; the chromophore undergoes a ZZZ to ZZE isomerization. In vivo, phytochrome chromophores are covalently bound to the protein, but several examples of noncovalent in vitro adducts have been reported which also undergo Pr to Pfr photoconversion. We show that free biliverdin or phycocyanobilin, highly enriched in the ZZE isomer, can easily be obtained from chromophores bound in a noncovalent manner to Agrobacterium phytochrome Agp1, and used for spectral assays. Photoconversion of free biliverdin in a methanol/HCl solution from ZZE to ZZZ proceeded with a quantum yield of 1.8%, but was negligible in neutral methanol solution, indicating that this process is proton-dependent. The ZZE form of biliverdin and phycocyanobilin were tested for their ability to assemble with Agp1 and cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1, respectively. In both cases, a Pfr-like adduct was formed but the chromophore was bound in a noncovalent manner to the protein. Agp1 Pfr undergoes dark reversion to Pr; the same feature was found for the noncovalent ZZE adduct. After dark reversion, the chromophore became covalently bound to the protein. In analogy, the PCB chromophore became covalently bound to Cph1 upon irradiation with strong far-red light which initiated ZZE to ZZZ isomerization. Agrobacterium Agp2 belongs to a yet small group of phytochromes which also assemble in the Pr form but convert from Pr to Pfr in darkness. When the Agp2 apoprotein was assembled with the ZZE form of biliverdin, the formation of the final adduct was accelerated compared to the formation of the ZZZ control, indicating that the ZZE chromophore fits directly into the chromophore pocket of Agp2.

  15. Mechanism of Cph1 phytochrome assembly from stopped-flow kinetics and circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, Berthold; Otto, Harald; Rottwinkel, Gregor; Hughes, Jonathan; Heyn, Maarten P; Lamparter, Tilman

    2003-11-25

    The kinetics and mechanism of the autocatalytic assembly of holo-Cph1 phytochrome (from Synechocystis) from the apoprotein and the bilin chromophores phycocyanobilin (PCB) and phycoerythrobilin (PEB) were investigated by stopped flow and circular dichroism. At 1:1 stoichiometry, pH 7.9, and 10 degrees C, SVD analysis of the kinetic data for PCB revealed three spectral components involving three transitions with time constants tau(1) approximately 150 ms, tau(2) approximately 2.5 s, and tau(3) approximately 50 s. Tau(1) was associated with a major red shift and transfer of oscillator strength from the Soret region to the 680 nm region. When the sulfhydryl group of cysteine 259 was blocked with iodoacetamide, preventing the formation of a covalent adduct, a noncovalent red-shifted complex (680 nm) was formed with a time constant of 200 ms. Tau(1) could thus be assigned to the formation of a noncovalent complex. The absorption changes during tau(1) are due to the formation of the extended conformation of the linear tetrapyrrole and to its protonation in the binding pocket. From the concentration and pH dependence of the kinetics we obtained a value of 1.5 microM for the K(D) of this noncovalent complex and a value of 8.4 for the pK(a) of the proton donor. The tau(2) component was associated with a blue shift of about 25 nm and was attributed to the formation of the covalent bond (P(r)), accompanied with the loss of the 3-3' double bond to ring A. Tau(3) was due to photoconversion to P(fr). For PEB, which is not photochromic, the formation of the noncovalent complex is faster (tau(1) = 70 ms), but the covalent bond formation is about 80 times slower (tau(2) = 200 s) than with the natural chromophore PCB. The CD spectra of the PCB adduct in the 250-800 nm range show that the chromophore geometries in P(r) and P(fr) are similar to those in plant phytochrome. The opposite rotational strengths of P(r) and P(fr) in the longest wavelength band suggest that the

  16. A Light-Independent Allele of Phytochrome B Faithfully Recapitulates Photomorphogenic Transcriptional Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hu; Yi-Shin Su; J. Clark Lagarias

    2009-01-01

    Dominant gain-of-function alleles of Arabidopsis phytochrome B were recently shown to confer lightindependent, constitutive photomorphogenic (cop) phenotypes to transgenic plants (Su and Lagarias, 2007). In the present study, comparative transcription profiling experiments were performed to assess whether the pattern of gene expression regulated by these alleles accurately reflects the process of photomorphogenesis in wild-type Arabidopsis. Wholegenome transcription profiles of dark-grown phyAphyB seedlings expressing the Y276H mutant of phyB (YHB) revealed that YHB reprograms about 13% of the Arabidopsis transcriptome in a light-independent manner. The YHB-regulated transcriptome proved qualitatively similar to but quantitatively greater than those of wild-type seedlings grown under 15 or 50 μmol m-2 m-1 continuous red light (Rc). Among the 2977 genes statistically significant two-fold (SSTF) regulated by YHB in the absence of light include those encoding components of the photosynthetic apparatus, tetrapyrrole/pigment biosynthetic pathways, and early light-responsive signaling factors. Approximately 80% of genes SSTF regulated by Rc were also YHB-regulated. Expression of a notable subset of 346 YHB-regulated genes proved to be strongly attenuated by Rc, indicating compensating regulation by phyC-E and/or other Rc-dependent processes. Since the majority of these 346 genes are regulated by the circadian clock, these results suggest that phyA- and phyB-independent light signaling pathway(s) strongly influence clock output. Together with the unique plastid morphology of dark-grown YHB seedlings, these analyses indicate that the YHB mutant induces constitutive photomorphogenesis via faithful reconstruction of phyB signaling pathways in a light-independent fashion.

  17. Time courses for phytochrome-induced enzyme levels in phenylpropanoid metabolism (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, naringenin-chalcone synthase) compared with time courses for phytochrome-mediated end-product accumulation (anthocyanin, quercetin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brödenfeldt, R; Mohr, H

    1988-12-01

    Time course for changes in the levels of enzymes characteristic of general phenylpropanoid metabolism (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) and of the flavonoid-glycoside branch pathway (naringenin-chalcone synthase, CHS; EC 2.3.1.74) were measured in the cotyledons of mustard (Sinapis alba L.) seedlings and compared with the rates of accumulation of related end products (anthocyanin and quercetin). Induction of enzyme levels and of end-product accumulation was carried out with red and far-red (FR) light, operating via phytochrome. The data are compatible with the concept that the phytochrome-mediated appearance of enzymes such as PAL and CHS is indeed a prerequisite for the appearance of anthocyanins and flavonols. However, there is no close correlation between enzyme levels and the rates of synthesis of end products which could justify the identification of specific rate-limiting enzymes. Rather, the data indicate that there is a second phytochrome-dependent step, beyond enzyme induction, where the actual rate of flavonoid accumulation is determined. Anthocyanin and quercetin accumulation respond differently to light. However, the relative action of continuous FR, red light pulses and 'stored phytochrome signal' is the same in both cases. This indicates that the mode of operation of phytochrome is the same in both cases. The two syntheses differ only in the degree of responsiveness towards phytochrome. The time course for changes in CHS levels in continuous FR, i.e. under conditions of phytochrome photosteady state, is similar to the time course for PAL levels whereas the time courses in darkness, following transfer from FR to darkness, are totally different. In the case of CHS, a transient rise is observed whereas, with PAL, an instantaneous drop in enzyme level occurs after transfer from FR to darkness. It is concluded that the 'stored phytochrome signal' operates in darkness in the case of CHS but not in the case of PAL.

  18. Risk factors for potential drug interactions in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Gonzalez Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz; Petersen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacoepidemiologic Database, OPED) covering prescriptions to all inhabitants in the county of Funen, Denmark. All individuals exposed to concurrent use of two or more drugs (polypharmacy) were identified. Combinations of drugs with potential interactions were registered and classified as major, moderate, or minor......, depending on the severity of outcome and the quality of documentation. A two-level random coefficient logistic regression model was used to investigate factors related to potential drug interactions. Results: One-third of the population was exposed to polypharmacy, and 6% were exposed to potential drug...

  19. Phytochrome-mediated induction of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in the cotyledons of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lercari, B; Sodi, F; Fastami, C

    1982-01-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5.) induction in cotyledons from 96-h dark-grown Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. was studied in response to continuous light and hourly light pulses (blue, red, far red). The increases of PAL promoted by blue and red pulses are reversed completely by immediately following 758 nm irradiations. The response to continuous red light could be substituted for by hourly 6-min red light pulses. The effect of continuous red treatments is mainly due to a multiple induction effect of phytochrome. In contrast to red light, hourly light pulses with far red and blue, light can only partially substitute for continuous irradiation. The continuous blue response could be due to a combination of a multiple induction response and of a high irradiance response of phytochrome. The continuous far red response, could represent a high irradiance response of phytochrome. Dichromatic irradiations indicate that phytochrome is the photoreceptor controlling the light response (PAL) in tomato seedlings.

  20. Complete genome sequence of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. NIES-3756, a potentially useful strain for phytochrome-based bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Yuu; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Katayama, Mitsunori; Misawa, Naomi; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Shimura, Yohei; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kawachi, Masanobu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Eki, Toshihiko; Kanesaki, Yu

    2016-01-20

    To explore the diverse photoreceptors of cyanobacteria, we isolated Nostoc sp. strain NIES-3756 from soil at Mimomi-Park, Chiba, Japan, and determined its complete genome sequence. The Genome consists of one chromosome and two plasmids (total 6,987,571 bp containing no gaps). The NIES-3756 strain carries 7 phytochrome and 12 cyanobacteriochrome genes, which will facilitate the studies of phytochrome-based bioengineering. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Probabilistic Usage of the Multi-Factor Interaction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2008-01-01

    A Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to predict the insulating foam mass expulsion during the ascending of a space vehicle. The exponents in the MFIM are evaluated by an available approach which consists of least squares and an optimization algorithm. These results were subsequently used to probabilistically evaluate the effects of the uncertainties in each participating factor in the mass expulsion. The probabilistic results show that the surface temperature dominates at high probabilities and the pressure which causes the mass expulsion at low probabil

  2. Interacting Factors Associated with Adult Male Drowning in New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Croft

    Full Text Available i to identify factors that contribute to the global trend of the higher incidence of male drowning relative to females, and; ii to explore relationships between such factors from mortality data in New Zealand.Drownings from 1983 to 2012 were examined for: Age, Ethnicity, Site, Activity, Buoyancy and Alcohol. Conditional frequency tables presented as mosaic plots were used to assess the interactions of these factors.Alcohol was involved in a high proportion of Accidental Immersion drownings (61% and was highest for males aged 20-24 years. When alcohol was involved there were proportionally more incidences where a life jacket was Available But Not Worn and less incidences where a life jacket was Worn. Many 30-39 year old males drowned during underwater activities (e.g., snorkeling, diving. Older men (aged +55 years old had a high incidence of drowning while boating. Different ethnicities were over-represented in different age groups (Asian men aged 25-29, and European men aged 65-74 and when involved in different activities.Numerous interacting factors are responsible for male drownings. In New Zealand, drowning locations and activities differ by age and ethnicity which require targeted intervention strategies.

  3. Spin g -factor due to electronic interactions in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Natália; Alves, Van Sérgio; Marino, E. C.; Nascimento, Leonardo; Nascimento, Leandro O.; Morais Smith, C.

    2017-06-01

    The gyromagnetic factor is an important physical quantity relating the magnetic-dipole moment of a particle to its spin. The electron spin g -factor in vacuo is one of the best model-based theoretical predictions ever made, showing agreement with the measured value up to ten parts per trillion [J. Schwinger, Phys. Rev. 73, 416 (1948), 10.1103/PhysRev.73.416; R. S. Van Dyck, Jr. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 26 (1987), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.59.26; D. Hanneke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 120801 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.120801; T. Aoyama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 111807 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.111807]. However, for electrons in a material the g -factor is modified with respect to its value in vacuo because of environment interactions. Here, we show how interaction effects lead to the spin g -factor correction in graphene by considering the full electromagnetic interaction in the framework of pseudo-QED [A. Kovner et al., Phys. Rev. B 42, 4748 (1990), 10.1103/PhysRevB.42.4748; N. Dorey et al., Nucl. Phys. B 386, 614 (1992), 10.1016/0550-3213(92)90632-L; S. Teber, Phys. Rev. D 86, 025005 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevD.86.025005; S. Teber, Phys. Rev. D 89, 067702 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.067702; E. C. Marino, Nucl. Phys. B 408, 551 (1993), 10.1016/0550-3213(93)90379-4]. We compare our theoretical prediction with experiments performed on graphene deposited on SiO2 and SiC, and we find a very good agreement between them.

  4. Jasmonic acid enhancement of anthocyanin accumulation is dependent on phytochrome A signaling pathway under far-red light in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Jia, Kun-Peng; Lian, Hong-Li; Yang, Xu; Li, Ling; Yang, Hong-Quan

    2014-11-07

    Anthocyanins are critical for plants. It is shown that the expression of genes encoding the key enzymes such as dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), UDP-Glc: flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT), and leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (LDOX) in anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway is regulated by MYB75, a R2R3 MYB transcription factor. The production of anthocyanin is known to be promoted by jasmonic acid (JA) in light but not in darkness. The photoreceptors cryptochrome 1 (CRY1), phytochrome B (phyB), and phytochrome A (phyA) are also shown to mediate light promotion of anthocyanin accumulation, respectively, whereas their downstream factor COP1, a master negative regulator of photomorphogensis, represses anthocyanin accumulation. However, whether JA coordinates with photoreceptors in the regulation of anthocyanin accumulation is unknown. Here, we show that under far-red light, JA promotes anthocyanin accumulation in a phyA signaling pathway-dependent manner. The phyA mutant is hyposensitive to jasmonic acid analog methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) under far-red light. The dominant mutant of MYB75, pap1-D, accumulates significantly higher levels of anthocyanin than wild type under far-red light, whereas knockdown of MYBs (MYB75, MYB90, MYB113, and MYB114) through RNAi significantly reduces MeJA promotion of anthocyanin accumulation. The phyA pap1-D double mutant shows reduced responsiveness to MeJA, similar to phyA mutant under far-red light. In darkness, a mutant allele of cop1, cop1-4, shows enhanced responsiveness to MeJA, but pap1-D mutant is barely responsive to MeJA. Upon MeJA application, the cop1-4 pap1-D double mutant accumulates considerably higher levels of anthocyanin than cop1-4 in darkness. Protein studies indicate that MYB75 protein is stabilized by white light and far-red light. Further gene expression studies suggest that MeJA promotes the expression of DFR, UF3GT, and LDOX genes in a phyA- and MYB75-dependent manner under far-red light. Our findings suggest

  5. Arabidopsis Phytochrome D Is Involved in Red Light-Induced Negative Gravitropism of Hypocotyles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-ping; HOU Pei; ZHENG Xu; SONG Mei-fang; SU Liang; YANG Jian-ping

    2014-01-01

    The phytochrome gene family, which is in Arabidopsis thaliana, consists of phytochromes A-E (phyA to phyE), regulates plant responses to ambient light environments. PhyA and phyB have been characterized in detail, but studies on phyC to phyE have reported discrepant functions. In this study, we show that phyD regulates the Arabidopsis gravitropic response by inhibiting negative gravitropism of hypocotyls under red light condition. PhyD had only a limited effect on the gravitropic response of roots in red light condition. PhyD also enhanced phyB-regulated gravitropic responses in hypocotyls. Moreover, the regulation of hypocotyl gravitropic responses by phyD was dependent upon the red light lfuence rate.

  6. cis-4-Cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboximide: Inhibitor of phytochrome-promoted seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, J D; Oaks, A

    1980-06-01

    cis-4-Cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboximide (CHDC) inhibits the germination of light-requiring seeds in both light and darkness but has no effect upon the germination of non-light-requiring seeds. In lettuce seeds, CHDC inhibits the action of far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome in breaking dormancy. This inhibition can be overcome by benzyladenine and red light together, but not by a combination of red light and gibberellic acid. Gibberellic acid-induced germination of lettuce seeds in darkness is inhibited also by CHDC. Embryos isolated from dark-imbibed lettuce seeds germinate on the inhibitor. CHDC was thought to be an "analogue" of cycloheximide, but it does not inhibit protein synthesis in lettuce seeds. Our results lead us to conclude that CHDC inhibits germination of seeds that require red light to break dormancy and interferes with some aspect of metabolism that is stimulated by far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome.

  7. Actions of gibberellic Acid and phytochrome on the germination of grand rapids lettuce seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidaver, W; Hsiao, A I

    1974-02-01

    Red light and gibberellic acid were about equally effective in promoting germination of Grand Rapids lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds. With initial far red light treatment more than 80% remained dormant in subsequent dark storage. After 2 days of dark storage, red light effectively promoted germination, while gibberellic acid action was weak. With between 2 and 10 days of dark storage, gibberellic acid had little effect, while promotion by red light decreased slowly and finally disappeared. After 10 days of dark storage, both gibberellic acid and red light were required for germination. The dark storage treatment interferes with phytochrome-independent germination processes and cannot be overcome by added gibberellic acid. However, storage may also decrease the effectiveness of endogenous gibberellins. Phytochrome-dependent germination seems to require only low levels of endogenous gibberellin activity or the addition of gibberellic acid. Gibberellins and red light appear to act on germination by regulation of sequential sites of a branched-looped pathway.

  8. Reversibly switchable photoacoustic tomography using a genetically encoded near-infrared phytochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Kaberniuk, Andrii A.; Li, Lei; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lidai; Li, Guo; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging of genetically encoded probes has revolutionized biomedical studies by providing valuable information about targeted biological processes. Here, we report a novel imaging technique, termed reversibly switchable photoacoustic tomography (RS-PAT), which exhibits large penetration depth, high detection sensitivity, and super-resolution. RS-PAT combines advanced photoacoustic imaging techniques with, for the first time, a nonfluorescent photoswitchable bacterial phytochrome. This bacterial phytochrome is the most near-infrared shifted genetically encoded probe reported so far. Moreover, this bacterial phytochrome is reversibly photoconvertible between its far-red and near-infrared light absorption states. Taking maximum advantage of the powerful imaging capability of PAT and the unique photochemical properties of the phytochrome, RS-PAT has broken through both the optical diffusion limit for deep-tissue imaging and the optical diffraction limit for super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, with RS-PAT we have achieved an unprecedented detection sensitivity of ~2 μM, or as few as ~20 tumor cells, at a centimeter depth. Such high sensitivity is fully demonstrated in our study by monitoring tumor growth and metastasis at whole-body level with ~100 μm resolution. Moreover, our microscopic implementation of RS-PAT is capable of imaging mammalian cells with a sub-diffraction lateral resolution of ~140 nm and axial resolution of ~400 nm, which are respectively ~2-fold and ~75-fold finer than those of our conventional photoacoustic microscopy. Overall, RS-PAT is a new and promising imaging technology for studying biological processes at different length scales.

  9. Altered Phytochrome Regulation of Greening in an aurea Mutant of Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken-Dror, S; Horwitz, B A

    1990-04-01

    A brief pulse of red light accelerates chlorophyll accumulation upon subsequent transfer of dark-grown tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) seedlings to continuous white light. Such potentiation of greening was compared in wild type and an aurea mutant W616. This mutant has been the subject of recent studies of phytochrome phototransduction; its dark-grown seedlings are deficient in phytochrome, and light-grown plants have yellow-green leaves. The rate of greening was slower in the mutant, but the extent (relative to the dark control) of potentiation by the red pulse was similar to that in the wild type. In the wild type, the fluence-response curve for potentiation of greening indicates substantial components in the VLF (very low fluence) and LF (low fluence) ranges. Far-red light could only partially reverse the effect of red. In the aurea mutant, only red light in the LF range was effective, and the effect of red was completely reversed by far-red light. When grown in total darkness, aurea seedlings are also deficient in photoconvertible PChl(ide). Upon transfer to white light, the aurea mutant was defective in both the abundance and light regulation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding polypeptide(s) [LHC(II)]. The results are consistent with the VLF response in greening being mediated by phytochrome. Furthermore, the data support the hypothesis that light modulates LHC(II) levels through its control of the synthesis of both chlorophyll and its LHC(II) apoproteins. Some, but not all, aspects of the aurea phenotype can be accounted for by the deficiency in photoreception by phytochrome.

  10. Far-red light-insensitive, phytochrome A-deficient mutants of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tuinen, A; Kerckhoffs, L H; Nagatani, A; Kendrick, R E; Koornneef, M

    1995-01-20

    We have selected two recessive mutants of tomato with slightly longer hypocotyls than the wild type, one under low fluence rate (3 mumol/m2/s) red light (R) and the other under low fluence rate blue light. These two mutants were shown to be allelic and further analysis revealed that hypocotyl growth was totally insensitive to far-red light (FR). We propose the gene symbol fri (far-red light insensitive) for this locus and have mapped it on chromosome 10. Immunochemically detectable phytochrome A polypeptide is essentially absent in the fri mutants as is the bulk spectrophotometrically detectable labile phytochrome pool in etiolated seedlings. A phytochrome B-like polypeptide is present in normal amounts and a small stable phytochrome pool can be readily detected by spectrophotometry in the fri mutants. Inhibition of hypocotyl growth by a R pulse given every 4 h is quantitatively similar in the fri mutants and wild type and the effect is to a large extent reversible if R pulses are followed immediately by a FR pulse. After 7 days in darkness, both fri mutants and the wild type become green on transfer to white light, but after 7 days in FR, the wild-type seedlings that have expanded their cotyledons lose their capacity to green in white light, while the fri mutants de-etiolate. Adult plants of the fri mutants show retarded growth and are prone to wilting, but exhibit a normal elongation response to FR given at the end of the daily photoperiod. The inhibition of seed germination by continuous FR exhibited by the wild type is normal in the fri mutants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Functional analyses of the Physcomitrella patens phytochromes in regulating chloroplast avoidance movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenaka, Hidetoshi; Kadota, Akeo

    2007-09-01

    Red light-induced chloroplast movement in Physcomitrella patens (Pp) is mediated by dichroic phytochrome in the cytoplasm. To analyze the molecular function of the photoreceptor in the cytoplasm, we developed a protoplast system in which chloroplast photomovement was exclusively dependent on the expression of phytochrome cDNA constructs introduced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) transformation. YFP was fused to the phytochrome constructs and their expression was detected by fluorescence. The chloroplast avoidance response was induced in the protoplasts expressing a YFP fusion of PHY1-PHY3, but not of PHY4 or YFP alone. Phy::yfp fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. No change in the location of phy1::yfp or phy2::yfp was revealed before and after photomovement. When phy1::yfp and phy2::yfp were targeted to the nucleus by fusing a nuclear localization signal to the constructs, red light avoidance was not induced. To determine the domains of PHY2 essential for avoidance response, various partially-deleted PHY2::YFP constructs were tested. The N-terminal extension domain (NTE) was found to be necessary but the C-terminal histidine kinase-related domain (HKRD) was dispensable. An avoidance response was not induced under expression of phytochrome N-terminal half domain [deleting both the PAS (Per, Arnt, Sim)-related domain (PRD) and HKRD]. GUS fusion of this N-terminal half domain, reported to be fully functional in Arabidopsis for several phyA- and phyB-regulated responses was not effective in chloroplast avoidance movement. Domain requirement and GUS fusion effect were also confirmed in PHY1. These results indicate that Pp phy1-Pp phy3 in the cytoplasm mediate chloroplast avoidance movement, and that NTE and PRD, but not HKRD, are required for their function.

  12. Assembly of synthetic locked chromophores with agrobacterium phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Katsuhiko; Noack, Steffi; Hammam, Mostafa A S; Khawn, Htoi; Kinoshita, Hideki; Murata, Yasue; Michael, Norbert; Scheerer, Patrick; Krauss, Norbert; Lamparter, Tilman

    2006-09-22

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors with a bilin chromophore in which light triggers the conversion between the red-absorbing form Pr and the far-red-absorbing form Pfr. Agrobacterium tumefaciens has two phytochromes, Agp1 and Agp2, with antagonistic properties: in darkness, Agp1 converts slowly from Pfr to Pr, whereas Agp2 converts slowly from Pr to Pfr. In a previous study, we have assembled Agp1 with synthetic locked chromophores 15Za, 15Zs, 15Ea, and 15Es in which the C15=C16 double bond is fixed in either the E or Z configuration and the C14-C15 single bond is fixed in either the syn (s) or anti (a) conformation. In the present study, the locked chromophores 5Za and 5Zs were used for assembly with Agp1; in these chromophores, the C4=C5 double bond is fixed in the Z configuration, and the C5-C6 single bond is fixed in either the syn or anti conformation. All locked chromophores were also assembled with Agp2. The data showed that in both phytochromes the Pr chromophore adopts a C4=C5 Z C5-C6 syn C15=C16 Z C14-C15 anti stereochemistry and that in the Pfr chromophore the C15=C16 double bond has isomerized to the E configuration, whereas the C14-C15 single bond remains in the anti conformation. Photoconversion shifted the absorption maxima of the 5Zs adducts to shorter wavelengths, whereas the 5Za adducts were shifted to longer wavelengths. Thus, the C5-C6 single bond of the Pfr chromophore is rather in an anti conformation, supporting the previous suggestion that during photoconversion of phytochromes, a rotation around the ring A-B connecting single bond occurs.

  13. Diatom Phytochromes Reveal the Existence of Far-Red-Light-Based Sensing in the Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Jaubert, Marianne; Enomoto, Gen; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Raniello, Raffaella; Thaler, Michael; Malviya, Shruti; Bernardes, Juliana Silva; Rappaport, Fabrice; Gentili, Bernard; Huysman, Marie J J; Carbone, Alessandra; Bowler, Chris; d'Alcalà, Maurizio Ribera; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Falciatore, Angela

    2016-03-01

    The absorption of visible light in aquatic environments has led to the common assumption that aquatic organisms sense and adapt to penetrative blue/green light wavelengths but show little or no response to the more attenuated red/far-red wavelengths. Here, we show that two marine diatom species, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, possess a bona fide red/far-red light sensing phytochrome (DPH) that uses biliverdin as a chromophore and displays accentuated red-shifted absorbance peaks compared with other characterized plant and algal phytochromes. Exposure to both red and far-red light causes changes in gene expression in P. tricornutum, and the responses to far-red light disappear in DPH knockout cells, demonstrating that P. tricornutum DPH mediates far-red light signaling. The identification of DPH genes in diverse diatom species widely distributed along the water column further emphasizes the ecological significance of far-red light sensing, raising questions about the sources of far-red light. Our analyses indicate that, although far-red wavelengths from sunlight are only detectable at the ocean surface, chlorophyll fluorescence and Raman scattering can generate red/far-red photons in deeper layers. This study opens up novel perspectives on phytochrome-mediated far-red light signaling in the ocean and on the light sensing and adaptive capabilities of marine phototrophs. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  14. Phytochrome intermediates and action spectra for light perception by dry seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, M R; Frankland, B

    1984-03-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that far-red irradiation of dry Lactuca sativa L. seeds results in inhibition of subsequent germination. Although red has no effect on dry seeds, a red irradiation following a farred irradiation reverses the effect of far-red. This phenomenon is most noticeable in seeds with artificially raised levels of phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. Qualitatively similar results have been found for the seeds of Plantago major L., Sinapis arvensis L., and Bromus sterilis L. Action spectra studies on Plantago seeds show that the action peaks for promotion and inhibition of germination of hydrated seeds are at 660 and 730 nanometers, respectively. The action spectrum for inhibition of subsequent germination following irradiation of dry seeds is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that for hydrated seeds, with an action peak at 730 nanometers, indicating absorption by phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. However, the action spectrum for the reversal of this far-red effect on dry seeds has a broad peak at 680 nanometers and subsidiary peaks at 650 and 600 nanometers. It is proposed that this effect is due to light absorption by the phytochrome intermediate complex meta-Fa, and that the action spectrum reflects the in vivo absorption properties of this intermediate.

  15. Conditional involvement of constitutive photomorphogenic1 in the degradation of phytochrome A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrieux, Dimitry; Trevisan, Martine; Fankhauser, Christian

    2013-04-01

    All higher plants possess multiple phytochrome photoreceptors, with phytochrome A (phyA) being light labile and other members of the family being relatively light stable (phyB-phyE in Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]). phyA also differs from other members of the family because it enables plants to deetiolate in far-red light-rich environments typical of dense vegetational cover. Later in development, phyA counteracts the shade avoidance syndrome. Light-induced degradation of phyA favors the establishment of a robust shade avoidance syndrome and was proposed to be important for phyA-mediated deetiolation in far-red light. phyA is ubiquitylated and targeted for proteasome-mediated degradation in response to light. Cullin1 and the ubiquitin E3 ligase constitutive photomorphogenic1 (COP1) have been implicated in this process. Here, we systematically analyze the requirement of cullins in this process and show that only CULLIN1 plays an important role in light-induced phyA degradation. In addition, the role of COP1 in this process is conditional and depends on the presence of metabolizable sugar in the growth medium. COP1 acts with SUppressor of phytochrome A (SPA) proteins. Unexpectedly, the light-induced decline of phyA levels is reduced in spa mutants irrespective of the growth medium, suggesting a COP1-independent role for SPA proteins.

  16. Conditional Involvement of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 in the Degradation of Phytochrome A1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrieux, Dimitry; Trevisan, Martine; Fankhauser, Christian

    2013-01-01

    All higher plants possess multiple phytochrome photoreceptors, with phytochrome A (phyA) being light labile and other members of the family being relatively light stable (phyB–phyE in Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]). phyA also differs from other members of the family because it enables plants to deetiolate in far-red light-rich environments typical of dense vegetational cover. Later in development, phyA counteracts the shade avoidance syndrome. Light-induced degradation of phyA favors the establishment of a robust shade avoidance syndrome and was proposed to be important for phyA-mediated deetiolation in far-red light. phyA is ubiquitylated and targeted for proteasome-mediated degradation in response to light. Cullin1 and the ubiquitin E3 ligase CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1) have been implicated in this process. Here, we systematically analyze the requirement of cullins in this process and show that only CULLIN1 plays an important role in light-induced phyA degradation. In addition, the role of COP1 in this process is conditional and depends on the presence of metabolizable sugar in the growth medium. COP1 acts with SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME A (SPA) proteins. Unexpectedly, the light-induced decline of phyA levels is reduced in spa mutants irrespective of the growth medium, suggesting a COP1-independent role for SPA proteins. PMID:23391578

  17. Quaternary organization of a phytochrome dimer as revealed by cryoelectron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Li, H.; Zhang, J.; Vierstra, R. D.

    2010-06-15

    Phytochromes are a collection of dimeric photoreceptors that direct a diverse array of responses in plants and microorganisms through photoconversion between a red light-absorbing ground state Pr, and a far-red light-absorbing photoactivated state Pfr. Photoconversion from Pr to Pfr is initiated by a light-driven rotation within the covalently attached bilin, which then triggers a series of protein conformational changes in the binding pocket. These movements ultimately affect an appended output module, which often has reversible protein kinase activity. Propagation of the light signal from the bilin to the output module likely depends on the dimerization interface but its architecture and response to phototransformation remain unclear. Here, we used single particle cryoelectron microscopy to determine the quaternary arrangement of the phytochrome dimer as Pr, using the bacteriophytochrome (BphP) from Deinococcus radiodurans. Contrary to the long-standing view that the two monomers are held together solely via their C-terminal region, we provide unambiguous evidence that the N-terminal bilin-binding region of BphP also provides a dimerization interface with the C-terminal kinase domain appearing as a more flexible appendage. The BphP monomers dimerize in parallel with the polypeptides intimately twisting around each other in a right-handed fashion. Based on this electron microscopic picture, we propose that the light-driven conformational changes transmitted from the chromophore to the output module along the spine of this extensive dimer interface is the central feature underpinning phytochrome signaling.

  18. The room temperature crystal structure of a bacterial phytochrome determined by serial femtosecond crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Petra; Takala, Heikki; Claesson, Elin; Henry, Léocadie; Dods, Robert; Lehtivuori, Heli; Panman, Matthijs; Pande, Kanupriya; White, Thomas; Nakane, Takanori; Berntsson, Oskar; Gustavsson, Emil; Båth, Petra; Modi, Vaibhav; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Zook, James; Berntsen, Peter; Pandey, Suraj; Poudyal, Ishwor; Tenboer, Jason; Kupitz, Christopher; Barty, Anton; Fromme, Petra; Koralek, Jake D.; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Spence, John; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S.; Boutet, Sebastien; Nango, Eriko; Moffat, Keith; Groenhof, Gerrit; Ihalainen, Janne; Stojković, Emina A.; Schmidt, Marius; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes are a family of photoreceptors that control light responses of plants, fungi and bacteria. A sequence of structural changes, which is not yet fully understood, leads to activation of an output domain. Time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) can potentially shine light on these conformational changes. Here we report the room temperature crystal structure of the chromophore-binding domains of the Deinococcus radiodurans phytochrome at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure was obtained by serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography from microcrystals at an X-ray free electron laser. We find overall good agreement compared to a crystal structure at 1.35 Å resolution derived from conventional crystallography at cryogenic temperatures, which we also report here. The thioether linkage between chromophore and protein is subject to positional ambiguity at the synchrotron, but is fully resolved with SFX. The study paves the way for time-resolved structural investigations of the phytochrome photocycle with time-resolved SFX. PMID:27756898

  19. Phytochromes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens: difference spectroscopy with extracts of wild type and knockout mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberpichler, Inga; Molina, Isabel; Neubauer, Olivia; Lamparter, Tilman

    2006-01-23

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors that occur in plants, fungi and bacteria, among others in the phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We constructed single and double knockout mutants of the two A. tumefaciens phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2. In liquid culture, the double mutant revealed a reduced growth rate, whereas the growth rates of the single mutants did not differ significantly from that of the wild type. Using these mutants, we analyzed the spectral properties of native A. tumefaciens phytochromes. A wild-type A. tumefaciens cell contains about 10 molecules of Agp1 and about 19 molecules of Agp2. Dark conversion of native Agp1 and Agp2 proceeds from Pfr to Pr and from Pr to Pfr, respectively, as has already been reported for the recombinant proteins. The spectral properties of recombinant and native Agp2 were significantly different. Mixing experiments with extracts from the double mutant and recombinant Agp2 imply that the spectral properties of Agp2 are modulated by components of the extract.

  20. Protein interactions of the transcription factor Hoxa1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hox proteins are transcription factors involved in crucial processes during animal development. Their mode of action remains scantily documented. While other families of transcription factors, like Smad or Stat, are known cell signaling transducers, such a function has never been squarely addressed for Hox proteins. Results To investigate the mode of action of mammalian Hoxa1, we characterized its interactome by a systematic yeast two-hybrid screening against ~12,200 ORF-derived polypeptides. Fifty nine interactors were identified of which 45 could be confirmed by affinity co-purification in animal cell lines. Many Hoxa1 interactors are proteins involved in cell-signaling transduction, cell adhesion and vesicular trafficking. Forty-one interactions were detectable in live cells by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation which revealed distinctive intracellular patterns for these interactions consistent with the selective recruitment of Hoxa1 by subgroups of partner proteins at vesicular, cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Conclusions The characterization of the Hoxa1 interactome presented here suggests unexplored roles for Hox proteins in cell-to-cell communication and cell physiology.

  1. Phytochrome as molecular machine: revealing chromophore action during the Pfr --> Pr photoconversion by magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Thierry; Lang, Christina; Bongards, Christian; Gupta, Karthick Babu Sai Sankar; Neugebauer, Johannes; Hughes, Jon; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Matysik, Jörg

    2010-03-31

    The cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 can be photoconverted between two thermally stable states, Pr and Pfr. The photochemically induced Pfr --> Pr back-reaction has been followed at low temperature by magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, allowing two intermediates, Lumi-F and Meta-F, to be trapped. Employing uniformly (13)C- and (15)N-labeled open-chain tetrapyrrole chromophores, all four states-Pfr, Lumi-F, Meta-F, and Pr-have been structurally characterized. In the first step, the double bond photoisomerization forming Lumi-F occurs. The second step, the transformation to Meta-F, is driven by the release of the mechanical tension. This process leads to the break of the hydrogen bond of the ring D nitrogen to Asp-207 and triggers signaling. The third step is protonically driven allowing the hydrogen-bonding interaction of the ring D nitrogen to be restored. Compared to the forward reaction, the order of events is changed, probably caused by the different properties of the hydrogen bonding partners of N24, leading to the directionality of the photocycle.

  2. Temperature can interact with landscape factors to affect songbird productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, W Andrew; Thompson, Frank R; Reidy, Jennifer L; Faaborg, John

    2013-04-01

    Increased temperatures and more extreme weather patterns associated with global climate change can interact with other factors that regulate animal populations, but many climate change studies do not incorporate other threats to wildlife in their analyses. We used 20 years of nest-monitoring data from study sites across a gradient of habitat fragmentation in Missouri, USA, to investigate the relative influence of weather variables (temperature and precipitation) and landscape factors (forest cover and edge density) on the number of young produced per nest attempt (i.e., productivity) for three species of songbirds. We detected a strong forest cover × temperature interaction for the Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) on productivity. Greater forest cover resulted in greater productivity because of reduced brood parasitism and increased nest survival, whereas greater temperatures reduced productivity in highly forested landscapes because of increased nest predation but had no effect in less forested landscapes. The Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) exhibited a similar pattern, albeit with a marginal forest cover × temperature interaction. By contrast, productivity of the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) was not influenced by landscape effects or temperature. Our results highlight a potential difficulty of managing wildlife in response to global change such as habitat fragmentation and climate warming, as the habitat associated with the greatest productivity for flycatchers was also that most negatively influenced by high temperatures. The influence of high temperatures on nest predation (and therefore, nest predators) underscores the need to acknowledge the potential complexity of species' responses to climate change by incorporating a more thorough consideration of community ecology in the development of models of climate impacts on wildlife.

  3. Transcription factors mediate long-range enhancer-promoter interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolis, Ilias K; McKay, Daniel J; Mantouvalou, Eva; Lomvardas, Stavros; Merika, Menie; Thanos, Dimitris

    2009-12-01

    We examined how remote enhancers establish physical communication with target promoters to activate gene transcription in response to environmental signals. Although the natural IFN-beta enhancer is located immediately upstream of the core promoter, it also can function as a classical enhancer element conferring virus infection-dependent activation of heterologous promoters, even when it is placed several kilobases away from these promoters. We demonstrated that the remote IFN-beta enhancer "loops out" the intervening DNA to reach the target promoter. These chromatin loops depend on sequence-specific transcription factors bound to the enhancer and the promoter and thus can explain the specificity observed in enhancer-promoter interactions, especially in complex genetic loci. Transcription factor binding sites scattered between an enhancer and a promoter can work as decoys trapping the enhancer in nonproductive loops, thus resembling insulator elements. Finally, replacement of the transcription factor binding sites involved in DNA looping with those of a heterologous prokaryotic protein, the lambda repressor, which is capable of loop formation, rescues enhancer function from a distance by re-establishing enhancer-promoter loop formation.

  4. Participation of labile and stabile phytochrome in the control of chlorophyll accumulation during the deetiolation of oat seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Cymerski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the phytochrome system on the accumulation rate of chlorophyll-a and b in 96-hour-old oat seedlings during the first 3 hours of white light action was investigated. It was established that initial irradiation with red light stimulated the accumulation rate of both forms of chlorophyll. This effect depended on the level of the PFR form of phytochrome obtained during the initial irradiation and it reached the treshold value in the case of about 20% of PFR in relation to PR in etiolated seedlings. Far red light stimulated only the accumulation of chlorophyll-a. The effect of red light was reversible if far red light was applied directly after red light. The reversibility diminished gradually together with the extension of the dark period between red and far red light, disappearing completely after 6 hours. The results suggest the participation of two pools of phytochrome - a labile and a stabile one - in the reaction stimulating chlorophyll accumulation. A model of labile phytochrome action through the destruction products of phytochrome is proposed.

  5. The evolution of gymnosperms redrawn by phytochrome genes: the Gnetatae appear at the base of the gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marion; Schneider-Poetsch, Hansjörg A W

    2002-06-01

    Gymnosperms possess two to four phytochrome types which apparently are the result of successive gene duplications in the genomes of their common ancestors. Phytochromes are nuclear-encoded proteins whose genes, contrary to chloroplast, mitochondrion, and rRNA genes, have hitherto rarely been used to examine gymnosperm phylogenies. Since the individual phytochrome gene types implied phylogenies that were not completely congruent to one another, conflicting branching orders were sorted by the number of gene lineages present in a taxon. The Gnetatae (two gene types) branched at the base of all gymnosperms, a position supported by bootstrap sampling (distance and character state trees, maximum likelihood). The Gnetatae were followed by Ginkgo, Cycadatae, and Pinaceae (three gene types) and the remaining conifers (four gene types). Therefore, in phytochrome trees, the most ancient branch of the conifers (Pinatae) seems to be the Pinaceae. The next split appears to have separated Araucariaceae plus Podocarpaceae from the Taxaceae/Taxodiaceae/Cupressaceae group. Structural arrangements in the plastid genomes (Raubeson and Jansen 1992) corroborate the finding that there is no close connection between Pinaceae and Gnetatae as suggested by some publications. The analyses are based on 60 phytochrome genes (579 positions in an alignment of PCR fragments) from 28 species. According to rough divergence time estimates, the last common ancestor of gymnosperms and angiosperms is likely to have existed in the Carboniferous.

  6. Phytochromes Regulate SA and JA Signaling Pathways in Rice and Are Required for Developmentally Controlled Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Zhi Xie; Yan-Jiu Xue; Jin-Jun Zhoua; Bin Zhang; Hong Chang; Makoto Takano

    2011-01-01

    Old leaves of wild-type rice plants (Oryza sativa L. Cv. Nipponbare)are more resistant to blast fungus (Mag-naporthe grisea)than new leaves. In contrast, both old and new leaves of the rice phytochrome triple mutant (phyAphyB-phyC)are susceptible to blast fungus. We demonstrate that pathogenesis-related class 1 (PR1)proteins are rapidly and strongly induced during M. Grisea infection and following exogenous jasmonate (JA)or salicylic acid (SA)exposure in the old leaves, but not in the new leaves of the wild-type. In contrast, the accumulation of PR1 proteins was significantly attenuated in old and new leaves of the phyAphyBphyC mutant. These results suggest that phytochromes are required for the induction of PR1 proteins in rice. Basal transcription levels of Prla and PRlb were substantially higher in the wild-type as compared to the phyAphyBphyC mutant, suggesting that phytochromes also are required for basal expression of PR1 genes. Moreover, the transcript levels of genes known to function in SA-or JA-dependent defense pathways were regulated by leaf age and functional phytochromes. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that phytochromes are required in rice for age-related resistance to M, grisea and may indirectly increase PR1 gene expression by regulating SA-and JA-dependent defense pathways.

  7. Biphasic fluence-response curves for phytochrome-mediated kalanchoë seed germination : sensitization by gibberellic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethy, R; Dedonder, A; De Petter, E; Van Wiemeersch, L; Fredericq, H; De Greef, J; Steyaert, H; Stevens, H

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curves for the effect of two red pulses separated by 24 hours on the germination of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Vesuv seeds, incubated on gibberellic acid (GA(3)) are biphasic for suboptimal concentrations. The response in the low fluence range corresponds with a classical red/far-red reversible phytochrome mediated reaction. GA(3) induces an additional response in the very low fluence range, which is also phytochrome mediated. The sensitivity to phytochrome-far-red absorbing form (Pfr), however, is increased about 20,000-fold, so that even far-red fluences become saturating. Both in the very low and low fluence response range, the maximal responses induced by saturating fluences are modulated by the GA(3) concentration. GA(3) having no direct influence on the phytochrome phototransformations, alters the Pfr requirement and determines the responding seed population fraction in the very low and low fluence range. The effet of GA(3) appears to be on the transduction chain of the phytochrome signal.

  8. Interaction of Rheumatoid Factor with Immobilized ss-DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lian-yong; LU Jing; YU Yao-ting

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid factors(RFs) are the characteristic autoantibodies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recent researches in our laboratory showed that the immobilized single-stranded DNA(ss-DNA) immunoadsorbent can selectively remove RFs from the serum of patients. In the present paper are studied the modification of argininine, tryptophan, lysine residues and carboxyl terminus of IgGRF, which was separated from patients′ serum, with 1,2-cyclohexanedione(CHD), N-bromosuccinimide(NBS), pyridoxal 5′-phosphate(PP) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide(EDC) respectively, and their effects on the adsorption capacity of the immobilized ss-DNA immunoadsorbent for IgGRF. After the specific modification, the corresponding adsorption capacities of the adsorbents were changed from 48%, 46%, 44% and 54% to 84%, 14%, 21% and 81%, respectively. These results indicate that the electrostatic or ionic-bonding is essential for the interaction between ss-DNA and IgGRF.

  9. How Genetic and Other Biological Factors Interact with Smoking Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierut, Laura; Cesarini, David

    2015-09-01

    Despite clear links between genes and smoking, effective public policy requires far richer measurement of the feedback between biological, behavioral, and environmental factors. The Kavli HUMAN Project (KHP) plans to exploit the plummeting costs of data gathering and to make creative use of new technologies to construct a longitudinal panel data set that would compare favorably to existing longitudinal surveys, both in terms of the richness of the behavioral measures and the cost-effectiveness of the data collection. By developing a more comprehensive approach to characterizing behavior than traditional methods, KHP will allow researchers to paint a much richer picture of an individual's life-cycle trajectory of smoking, alcohol, and drug use, and interactions with other choices and environmental factors. The longitudinal nature of KHP will be particularly valuable in light of the increasing evidence for how smoking behavior affects physiology and health. The KHP could have a transformative impact on the understanding of the biology of addictive behaviors such as smoking, and of a rich range of prevention and amelioration policies.

  10. Thioredoxin interacting protein inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Michael R; Rogers, Lynette K; Liu, Yusen; Welty, Stephen E; Tipple, Trent E

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is required for proper lung development and is transcriptionally regulated in alveolar epithelial cells by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Previous findings in a newborn mouse model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) suggest that thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip) is a novel regulator of VEGF expression. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that Txnip negatively regulates VEGF through effects on HIF-mediated gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the levels of VEGF and Txnip protein in the lungs of 1 day-old newborn and E19 embryos and detected a significant inverse correlation. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship, we studied the effects of Txnip overexpression on HIF-mediated transcription using murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells. Overexpression of Txnip inhibited HIF-mediated reporter activity in both hypoxia and room air. Suppression of HIF activity by Txnip appeared to be independent of the ability of Txnip to bind to thioredoxin. Thus, our studies support a model in which Txnip is a potentially critical regulator of HIF-mediated gene transcription in the murine lung. Alterations in Txnip expression could alter lung VEGF expression in prematurely born human infants and contribute to the development of BPD. PMID:20692333

  11. Crystal Structure of Deinococcus Phytochrome in the Photoactivated State Reveals a Cascade of Structural Rearrangements during Photoconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgie, E Sethe; Zhang, Junrui; Vierstra, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    Phytochromes are photochromic photoreceptors responsible for a myriad of red/far-red light-dependent processes in plants and microorganisms. Interconversion is initially driven by photoreversible isomerization of bilin, but how this alteration directs the photostate-dependent changes within the protein to actuate signaling is poorly understood. Here, we describe the structure of the Deinococcus phytochrome photosensory module in its near complete far-red light-absorbing Pfr state. In addition to confirming the 180° rotation of the D-pyrrole ring, the dimeric structure clearly identifies downstream rearrangements that trigger large-scale conformational differences between the dark-adapted and photoactivated states. Mutational analyses verified the importance of residues surrounding the bilin in Pfr stabilization, and protease sensitivity assays corroborated photostate alterations that propagate along the dimeric interface. Collectively, these data support a cooperative "toggle" model for phytochrome photoconversion and advance our understanding of the allosteric connection between the photosensory and output modules.

  12. Expression and Protein Interaction Analyses Reveal Combinatorial Interactions of LBD Transcription Factors During Arabidopsis Pollen Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mirim; Kim, Min-Jung; Pandey, Shashank; Kim, Jungmook

    2016-11-01

    LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) transcription factor gene family members play key roles in diverse aspects of plant development. LBD10 and LBD27 have been shown to be essential for pollen development in Arabidopsis thaliana. From the previous RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data set of Arabidopsis pollen, we identified the mRNAs of LBD22, LBD25 and LBD36 in addition to LBD10 and LBD27 in Arabidopsis pollen. Here we conducted expression and cellular analysis using GFP:GUS (green fluorescent protein:β-glucuronidase) reporter gene and subcellular localization assays using LBD:GFP fusion proteins expressed under the control of their own promoters in Arabidopsis. We found that these LBD proteins display spatially and temporally distinct and overlapping expression patterns during pollen development. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down assays demonstrated that protein-protein interactions occur among the LBDs exhibiting overlapping expression during pollen development. We further showed that LBD10, LBD22, LBD25, LBD27 and LBD36 interact with each other to form heterodimers, which are localized to the nucleus in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Taken together, these results suggest that combinatorial interactions among LBD proteins may be important for their function in pollen development in Arabidopsis.

  13. Elucidating photoinduced structural changes in phytochromes by the combined application of resonance Raman spectroscopy and theoretical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroginski, M. A.; von Stetten, D.; Kaminski, S.; Escobar, F. Velazquez; Michael, N.; Daminelli-Widany, G.; Hildebrandt, P.

    2011-05-01

    Phytochromes constitute a family of red-light sensing photoreceptors in plants and microorganisms. The photoactive cofactor is an open-chain methine-bridged tetrapyrrole that, upon light absorption, undergoes a double bond isomerisation followed by series thermal relaxation processes which eventually lead to the functional structural change of the protein. Resonance Raman spectroscopy has contributed significantly to the understanding of the molecular functioning of these proteins although both the experiments and the interpretation of the spectra represent a considerable challenge. This account is dedicated to describe achievements, potential and limitations of combined resonance Raman spectroscopic and theoretical approaches for elucidating cofactor structures in phytochromes. Experimental approaches are discussed paying specific attention on strategies to overcome unwanted photochemical and photophysical processes when probing the various states of the photoinduced reaction cycle of phytochromes. The most comprehensive set of experimental data on phytochromes, including engineered protein variants and adducts formed with isotopically labelled tetrapyrroles, has been obtained by resonance Raman spectroscopy with near-infrared excitation that also allows probing phytochrome crystals without photo-induced destruction. Quantum mechanical calculations of Raman spectra of model compounds represent a first approximation for determining the methine bridge geometry of the protein-bound tetrapyrroles and constitute the basis for the identification of marker bands for specific structural properties such as the protonation state of the cofactor. Drawbacks of this theoretical method that inevitably neglects the protein environment have become evident with the first determinations of three-dimensional structures of phytochromes. These structural models can now be used for employing hybrid methods that combine quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics calculations of the

  14. The Crystal Structures of the N-terminal Photosensory Core Module of Agrobacterium Phytochrome Agp1 as Parallel and Anti-parallel Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Soshichiro; Scheerer, Patrick; Zubow, Kristina; Michael, Norbert; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman; Krauß, Norbert

    2016-09-23

    Agp1 is a canonical biliverdin-binding bacteriophytochrome from the soil bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum that acts as a light-regulated histidine kinase. Crystal structures of the photosensory core modules (PCMs) of homologous phytochromes have provided a consistent picture of the structural changes that these proteins undergo during photoconversion between the parent red light-absorbing state (Pr) and the far-red light-absorbing state (Pfr). These changes include secondary structure rearrangements in the so-called tongue of the phytochrome-specific (PHY) domain and structural rearrangements within the long α-helix that connects the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase, and FhlA (GAF) and the PHY domains. We present the crystal structures of the PCM of Agp1 at 2.70 Å resolution and of a surface-engineered mutant of this PCM at 1.85 Å resolution in the dark-adapted Pr states. Whereas in the mutant structure the dimer subunits are in anti-parallel orientation, the wild-type structure contains parallel subunits. The relative orientations between the PAS-GAF bidomain and the PHY domain are different in the two structures, due to movement involving two hinge regions in the GAF-PHY connecting α-helix and the tongue, indicating pronounced structural flexibility that may give rise to a dynamic Pr state. The resolution of the mutant structure enabled us to detect a sterically strained conformation of the chromophore at ring A that we attribute to the tight interaction with Pro-461 of the conserved PRXSF motif in the tongue. Based on this observation and on data from mutants where residues in the tongue region were replaced by alanine, we discuss the crucial roles of those residues in Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion.

  15. Interaction factors for two elliptical embedded cracks with a wide range of aspect ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisaburo Azuma

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The value of stress intensity factor may be increased through the interaction of multiple cracks that are in close proximity to one another. We investigated the interaction factors of two equal elliptical cracks with a wide range of aspect ratios. Finite element analysis for a linear elastic solid was used to obtain the interaction factor for embedded cracks in an infinite model subjected to remote tension loading. Relationships between interaction factors and dimensionless distances between the cracks were discussed. The results demonstrated that the interaction factors depend on the crack aspect ratio, whose effect is related to the dimensionless distance. Thus, it is suggested that interaction factors can be reasonably characterized using different dimensionless distances depending on the aspect ratio. Finally, we provide a simple empirical formula for obtaining the interaction factors for embedded cracks.

  16. The human enhancer blocker CTC-binding factor interacts with the transcription factor Kaiso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Kelly, Kevin F; Filion, Guillaume J P; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Magdinier, Frédérique; Menoni, Hervé; Nordgaard, Curtis L; Daniel, Juliet M; Gilson, Eric

    2005-12-30

    CTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a DNA-binding protein of vertebrates that plays essential roles in regulating genome activity through its capacity to act as an enhancer blocker. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify protein partners of CTCF that could regulate its activity. Using full-length CTCF as bait we recovered Kaiso, a POZ-zinc finger transcription factor, as a specific binding partner. The interaction occurs through a C-terminal region of CTCF and the POZ domain of Kaiso. CTCF and Kaiso are co-expressed in many tissues, and CTCF was specifically co-immunoprecipitated by several Kaiso monoclonal antibodies from nuclear lysates. Kaiso is a bimodal transcription factor that recognizes methylated CpG dinucleotides or a conserved unmethylated sequence (TNGCAGGA, the Kaiso binding site). We identified one consensus unmethylated Kaiso binding site in close proximity to the CTCF binding site in the human 5' beta-globin insulator. We found, in an insulation assay, that the presence of this Kaiso binding site reduced the enhancer-blocking activity of CTCF. These data suggest that the Kaiso-CTCF interaction negatively regulates CTCF insulator activity.

  17. Assembly of Agrobacterium phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 with doubly locked bilin chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Katsuhiko; Khawn, Htoi; Chen, Li-Yi; Kinoshita, Hideki; Zienicke, Benjamin; Molina, Isabel; Lamparter, Tilman

    2009-03-31

    The natural chromophore of most bacterial and fungal phytochromes is biliverdin (BV), which is incorporated in a covalent manner into the protein. Upon photoconversion between the red light-absorbing form Pr and the far-red light-absorbing form Pfr, the stereochemistry of the chromophore around the C15 methine bridge changes from Z anti to E anti. Recombinant phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens were assembled with a set of synthetic chromophores, including 2,18-Et-BV, 3,18-Et-BV, and the doubly locked 5Ea15Ea-BV, 5Es15Ea-BV, 5Za15Ea-BV, and 5Zs15Ea-BV. In all chromophores, covalent bond formation is restricted. As shown by spectral changes and desalting column separation, all chromophores are bound to Agp1 and Agp2. Adducts with 2,18-Et-BV and 3,18-Et-BV undergo normal photoconversion between Pr and Pfr. As opposed to typical phytochromes, the BV-Agp2 adduct converts from Pr to Pfr in darkness. However, the 2,18-Et-BV-Agp2 and 3,18-Et-BV-Agp2 adducts can undergo dark conversion from Pr to Pfr and Pfr to Pr, showing that ring A of the chromophore has a direct impact on the direction of dark conversion. The doubly locked chromophores were designed to probe for the stereochemistry of the C5 methine bridge in the Pfr form. The adducts with 5Es15Ea-BV and 5Zs15Ea-BV absorbed in the blue spectral range only. Therefore, the C5 E syn and Z syn stereochemistries are unlikely for the Pfr chromophore of Agp1 and Agp2. According to our spectra, the Agp2 chromophore most likely adopts an E anti stereochemistry at its C5 methine bridge. Thus, during Pr to Pfr conversion, the C5 methine bridge of the chromophore might undergo a Hula-twist isomerization. In Agp1, the Pfr chromophore is most likely in the C5 Z anti stereochemistry. We propose that the stereochemistry of the C5 methine bridge might differ between different phytochromes, most particularly in the Pfr form.

  18. cis-4-Cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboximide: Inhibitor of phytochrome-promoted seed germination

    OpenAIRE

    BEWLEY, J. DEREK; Oaks, Ann

    1980-01-01

    cis-4-Cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboximide (CHDC) inhibits the germination of light-requiring seeds in both light and darkness but has no effect upon the germination of non-light-requiring seeds. In lettuce seeds, CHDC inhibits the action of far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome in breaking dormancy. This inhibition can be overcome by benzyladenine and red light together, but not by a combination of red light and gibberellic acid. Gibberellic acid-induced germination of lettuce seeds in darkness is ...

  19. Phytochrome and Seed Germination. I. Temperature Dependence and Relative P(FR) Levels in the Germination of Dark-germinating Tomato Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, A L; Yaniv, Z; Smith, P

    1967-03-01

    Germination of the dark-germinating seeds of 3 varieties of tomato is controlled by the phytochrome system. Germination is inhibited by far red radiation and repromoted by red applied after far red. At low temperatures, 17 to 20 degrees , a single, low energy far red irradiation is sufficient to inhibit germination in all 3 varieties. At higher temperatures far red is less effective in the inhibition of the germination of the tomato seeds. The phytochrome fraction present as P(FR) in the dark-germinating seeds of the Ace variety is about 40% of the total phytochrome present.

  20. Evolutionary aspects of functional and pseudogene members of the phytochrome gene family in Scots pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Maria Rosario

    2008-08-01

    According to the neutral theory of evolution, mutation and genetic drift are the only forces that shape unconstrained, neutral, gene evolution. Thus, pseudogenes (which often evolve neutrally) provide opportunities to obtain direct estimates of mutation rates that are not biased by selection, and gene families comprising functional and pseudogene members provide useful material for both estimating neutral mutation rates and identifying sites that appear to be under positive or negative selection pressures. Conifers could be very useful for such analyses since they have large and complex genomes. There is evidence that pseudogenes make significant contributions to the size and complexity of gene families in pines, although few studies have examined the composition and evolution of gene families in conifers. In this work, I examine the complexity and rates of mutation of the phytochrome gene family in Pinus sylvestris and show that it includes not only functional genes but also pseudogenes. As expected, the functional PHYO does not appear to have evolved neutrally, while phytochrome pseudogenes show signs of unconstrained evolution.

  1. Shedding (far-red) light on phytochrome mechanisms and responses in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possart, Anja; Fleck, Christian; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    In order to monitor ambient light conditions, plants rely on functionally diversified photoreceptors. Among these, phytochromes perceive red (R) and far-red (FR) light. FR light does not constitute a photosynthetic energy source; it however influences adaptive and developmental processes. In seed plants, phytochrome A (phyA) acts as FR receptor and mediates FR high irradiance responses (FR-HIRs). It exerts a dual role by promoting e.g. germination and seedling de-etiolation in canopy shade and by antagonising shade avoidance growth. Even though cryptogam plants such as mosses and ferns do not have phyA, they show FR-induced responses. In the present review we discuss the mechanistic basis of phyA-dependent FR-HIRs as well as their dual role in seed plants. We compare FR responses in seed plants and cryptogam plants and conclude on different potential concepts for the detection of canopy shade. Scenarios for the evolution of FR perception and responses are discussed.

  2. Heterogeneous photodynamics of the pfr state in the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter W; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Lagarias, J Clark; Larsen, Delmar S

    2014-07-22

    Femtosecond photodynamics of the Pfr form of the red/far-red phytochrome N-terminal PAS-GAF-PHY photosensory core module of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 (termed Cph1Δ) from Synechocystis were resolved with visible broadband transient absorption spectroscopy. Multiphasic generation dynamics via global target analysis revealed parallel evolution of two pathways with distinct excited- and ground-state kinetics. These measurements resolved two subpopulations: a majority subpopulation with fast excited-state decay and slower ground-state dynamics, corresponding to previous descriptions of Pfr dynamics, and a minority subpopulation with slower excited-state decay and faster ground-state primary dynamics. Both excited-state subpopulations generated the isomerized, red-shifted Lumi-Ff photoproduct (715 nm); subsequent ground-state evolution to a blue-shifted Meta-Fr population (635 nm) proceeded on 3 ps and 1.5 ns time scales for the two subpopulations. Meta-Fr was spectrally similar to a recently described photoinactive fluorescent subpopulation of Pr ((Fluor)Pr). Thus, the reverse Pfr to Pr photoconversion of Cph1Δ involves minor structural deformation of Meta-Fr to generate the fluorescent, photochemically refractory form of Pr, with slower subsequent equilibration with the photoactive Pr subpopulation ((Photo)Pr).

  3. Subpicosecond midinfrared spectroscopy of the Pfr reaction of phytochrome Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Christian; Gross, Ruth; Wolf, Matthias M N; Diller, Rolf; Michael, Norbert; Lamparter, Tilman

    2008-04-15

    Phytochromes are light-sensing pigments found in plants and bacteria. For the first time, the P(fr) photoreaction of a phytochrome has been subject to ultrafast infrared vibrational spectroscopy. Three time constants of 0.3 ps, 1.3 ps, and 4.0 ps were derived from the kinetics of structurally specific marker bands of the biliverdin chromophore of Agp1-BV from Agrobacterium tumefaciens after excitation at 765 nm. VIS-pump-VIS-probe experiments yield time constants of 0.44 ps and 3.3 ps for the underlying electronic-state dynamics. A reaction scheme is proposed including two kinetic steps on the S(1) excited-state surface and the cooling of a vibrationally hot P(fr) ground state. It is concluded that the upper limit of the E-Z isomerization of the C(15) = C(16) methine bridge is given by the intermediate time constant of 1.3 ps. The reaction scheme is reminiscent of that of the corresponding P(r) reaction of Agp1-BV as published earlier.

  4. Initial characterization of shade avoidance response suggests functional diversity between Populus phytochrome B genes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Allen, Sara M [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Shade avoidance signaling in higher plants involves perception of the incident red/far-red (R/FR) light by phytochromes and the modulation of downstream transcriptional networks to regulate developmental plasticity in relation to heterogeneous light environments. In this study, we characterized the expression and functional features of Populus phytochrome (PHY) gene family as well as the transcriptional responses of Populus to the changes in R/FR light. Expression data indicated that PHYA is the predominant PHY in the dark grown Populus seedling whereas PHYBs are most abundant in mature tissue types. Out of three Populus PHYs, PHYA is light labile and localized to cytosol in dark whereas both PHYB1 and PHYB2 are light stable and are localized to nucleus in mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed in Arabidopsis, PHYB1 rescued Arabidopsis phyB mutant phenotype whereas PHYB2 did not, suggesting functional diversification between these two gene family members. However, phenotypes of transgenic Populus lines with altered expression of PHYB1, PHYB2 or both and the expression of candidate shade response genes in these transgenic lines suggest that PHYB1 and PHYB2 may have distinct yet overlapping functions. The RNAseq results and analysis of Populus exposed to enriched-FR light indicate that genes associated in cell wall modification and brassinosteroid signaling were induced under far red light. Overall our data indicate that Populus transcriptional responses are at least partially conserved with Arabidopsis.

  5. The altered gravitropic response of the lazy-2 mutant of tomato is phytochrome regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiser, J C; Lomax, T L

    1993-06-01

    Shoots of the lazy-2 (lz-2) gravitropic mutant of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) have a normal gravitropic response when grown in the dark, but grow downward in response to gravity when grown in the light. Experiments were undertaken to investigate the nature of the light induction of the downward growth of lz-2 shoots. Red light was effective at causing downward growth of hypocotyls of lz-2 seedlings, whereas treatment with blue light did not alter the dark-grown (wild-type) gravity response. Downward growth of lz-2 seedlings is greatest 16 h after a 1-h red light irradiation, after which the seedlings begin to revert to the dark-grown phenotype. lz-2 seedlings irradiated with a far-red light pulse immediately after a red light pulse exhibited no downward growth. However, continuous red or far-red light both resulted in downward growth of lz-2 seedlings. Thus, the light induction of downward growth of lz-2 appears to involve the photoreceptor phytochrome. Fluence-response experiments indicate that the induction of downward growth of lz-2 by red light is a low-fluence phytochrome response, with a possible high-irradiance response component.

  6. Real-time tracking of phytochrome's ring D orientational changes during Pr photoisomerization: Two Pr isoforms with different photoisomerization yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González L.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes' ring D orientational changes are tracked during Z-to-E photoisomerization by polarization resolved femtosecond visible pump-infrared probe spectroscopy. Two distinct Pr isoforms Pr-I and Pr-II exhibit photoisomerization yields of 3% and 29%, respectively.

  7. Initial-state interactions, factorization, and the Drell-Yan process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodwin, G.T.; Brodsky, S.J.; Lepage, G.P.

    1981-12-01

    It is shown that initial state interactions violate the factorization conjecture for the Drell-Yan process order by order in perturbation theory. Also, the effects of elastic and inelastic initial state interactions on the observed cross sections are discussed.

  8. Factors Correlated with the Interactional Diversity of Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Willis A.

    2016-01-01

    This study used data from the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) to examine how student background characteristics, student engagement, and institutional characteristics correlate with the frequency of interactional diversity among community college students. Given the current lack of research on interactional diversity among…

  9. The Factors Influencing Young Children's Social Interaction in Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Mee

    2015-01-01

    When technology integration is accomplished successfully in early childhood education settings, children tend to interact more with one another and exchange information related to computer tasks as well as the overall classroom on-going curriculum themes. Therefore, to explore how young children are interacting in computer areas when using…

  10. Epidermal growth factor induces changes of interaction between epidermal growth factor receptor and actin in intact cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Song; Haixing Xuan; Qishui Lin

    2008-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a cyto-skeleton-binding protein. Although purified EGFR can interact with actins in vitro and normally at least 10% of EGFR exist in the insoluble cytoskeleton fraction of A431 cells, interaction of cytosolic EGFR with actin can only be visualized by fluorescence resonance energy transfer when epidermal growth factor presents in the cell medium. Results indicate that the correct orientation between EGFR and actin is important in the signal transduction process.

  11. The Human Factors of Graphic Interaction: Tasks and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    representation an interaction technique diagram. Our diagrams are not as detailed as the Labanotation [HUTC70], but unlike that notation they represent more...Conference Proceedings on Data Handling Devices (1970), 8. HUTC70 Hutchinson, A., " Labanotation ", Theatre Arts Books, New York (1970). IRVI76 Irving

  12. Personality Factors and Expectation Effects in Teacher-Student Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert S.

    Although the effect of teacher expectations on student performance has been well documented, little research has focused on the effect of teacher personality styles on student-teacher interactions. To investigate the effect of teachers' locus of control and their expectations of their own effectiveness on student success, 77 female college…

  13. Plant integrity: an important factor in plant-pathogen interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowska, Elzbieta Zofia; Llorente, Briardo; Cvitanich, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    the hemibiotrophic oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Furthermore, in the Sarpo Mira–P. infestans interactions, the plant’s meristems, the stalks or both, seem to be associated with the development of the hypersensitive response and both the plant’s roots and shoots contain antimicrobial compounds when...

  14. Mutual interactions between P53 and growth factors in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asschert, JGW; Vellenga, E; De Jong, S; De Vries, EGE

    1998-01-01

    The function of p53 armour suppressor protein is determined by various intrinsic properties of the protein. The effect of p53 DNA-binding, and platein-protein interactions are determined by the conformation of the protein. Thus p53 fulfils its role in cell cycle control and the onset of apoptotic ce

  15. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq, and histone modifications (ChIP-seq. We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg.

  16. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Chun; Xiao, Shu; Xie, Dan; Cao, Xiaoyi; Song, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Ting; He, Chuan; Zhong, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq), DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq), and histone modifications (ChIP-seq). We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs) for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq) and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg).

  17. Phytochrome controlled, long-day photoperiod-inducible protein in rice leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new protein in the leaves of NK58S and NK58 (Oryza sativa L. subsp. japonica), which can be induced by 10 d-long-day photoperiod (14 h light/d) and cannot be induced by 10 d-short-day photoperiod (10 h light/d), has been found by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The protein,whose molecular weight and isoelectric point are 36 ku and pH 5.2 respectively, is found to be controlled by phytochrome as shown by the experiment of red light induction-far red light reversion.The existence of this protein in both NK58S and NK58 reflects that some of the responses of NK58S and NK58 might be similar in response to long-day photoperiod, a mild stress.

  18. PHYTOCHROME C is an essential light receptor for photoperiodic flowering in the temperate grass, Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Daniel P; Ream, Thomas S; Minevich, Gregory; Hobert, Oliver; Amasino, Richard M

    2014-09-01

    We show that in the temperate grass, Brachypodium distachyon, PHYTOCHROME C (PHYC), is necessary for photoperiodic flowering. In loss-of-function phyC mutants, flowering is extremely delayed in inductive photoperiods. PHYC was identified as the causative locus by utilizing a mapping by sequencing pipeline (Cloudmap) optimized for identification of induced mutations in Brachypodium. In phyC mutants the expression of Brachypodium homologs of key flowering time genes in the photoperiod pathway such as GIGANTEA (GI), PHOTOPERIOD 1 (PPD1/PRR37), CONSTANS (CO), and florigen/FT are greatly attenuated. PHYC also controls the day-length dependence of leaf size as the effect of day length on leaf size is abolished in phyC mutants. The control of genes upstream of florigen production by PHYC was likely to have been a key feature of the evolution of a long-day flowering response in temperate pooid grasses.

  19. A semi-supervised method for predicting transcription factor-gene interactions in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Ernst

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available While Escherichia coli has one of the most comprehensive datasets of experimentally verified transcriptional regulatory interactions of any organism, it is still far from complete. This presents a problem when trying to combine gene expression and regulatory interactions to model transcriptional regulatory networks. Using the available regulatory interactions to predict new interactions may lead to better coverage and more accurate models. Here, we develop SEREND (SEmi-supervised REgulatory Network Discoverer, a semi-supervised learning method that uses a curated database of verified transcriptional factor-gene interactions, DNA sequence binding motifs, and a compendium of gene expression data in order to make thousands of new predictions about transcription factor-gene interactions, including whether the transcription factor activates or represses the gene. Using genome-wide binding datasets for several transcription factors, we demonstrate that our semi-supervised classification strategy improves the prediction of targets for a given transcription factor. To further demonstrate the utility of our inferred interactions, we generated a new microarray gene expression dataset for the aerobic to anaerobic shift response in E. coli. We used our inferred interactions with the verified interactions to reconstruct a dynamic regulatory network for this response. The network reconstructed when using our inferred interactions was better able to correctly identify known regulators and suggested additional activators and repressors as having important roles during the aerobic-anaerobic shift interface.

  20. Factors Affecting Peptide Interactions with Surface-Bound Microgels

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Effects of electrostatics and peptide size on peptide interactions with surface-bound microgels were investigated with ellipsometry, confocal microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results show that binding of cationic poly-L-lysine (pLys) to anionic, covalently immobilized, poly(ethyl acrylate-co-methacrylic acid) microgels increased with increasing peptide net charge and microgel charge density. Furthermore, peptide release was facilitated by decreasing either microgel or peptide ch...

  1. The Essential factors in Interactive Oral English Teaching Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苑庆春

    2008-01-01

    Practice makes perfect, and this is true of spoken English. Thus a successful oral English class means the excellent interchange, i.e. the active involvement of all the members in class in which more spoken English is exercised. This article mainly focuses on the preparations prior to the class which deserve to be well considered so as to result in the active and effective interaction in oral English class.

  2. Phytochrome A and B Regulate Primary Metabolism in Arabidopsis Leaves in Response to Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Han

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary metabolism is closely linked to plant productivity and quality. Thus, a better understanding of the regulation of primary metabolism by photoreceptors has profound implications for agricultural practices and management. This study aims at identifying the role of light signaling in the regulation of primary metabolism, with an emphasis on starch. We first screened seven cryptochromes and phytochromes mutants for starch phenotype. The phyAB mutant showed impairment in starch accumulation while its biomass, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, and leaf anatomy were unaffected, this deficiency being present over the whole vegetative growth period. Mutation of plastidial nucleoside diphosphate kinase-2 (NDPK2, acting downstream of phytochromes, also caused a deficit in starch accumulation. Besides, the glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase small subunit (APS1 was down-regulated in phyAB. Those results suggest that PHYAB affect starch accumulation through NDPK2 and APS1. Then, we determined changes in starch and primary metabolites in single phyA, single phyB, double phyAB grown in light conditions differing in light intensity and/or light spectral content. PHYA is involved in starch accumulation in all the examined light conditions, whereas PHYB only exhibits a role under low light intensity (44 ± 1 μmol m-2 s-1 or low R:FR (11.8 ± 0.6. PCA analysis of the metabolic profiles in the mutants and wild type (WT suggested that PHYB acts as a major regulator of the leaf metabolic status in response to light intensity. Overall, we propose that PHYA and PHYB signaling play essential roles in the control of primary metabolism in Arabidopsis leaves in response to light.

  3. Factors influencing flow steadiness in laminar boundary layer shock interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumuklu, Ozgur; Levin, Deborah A.; Gimelshein, Sergey F.; Austin, Joanna M.

    2016-11-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method has been used to model laminar shock wave boundary interactions of hypersonic flow over a 30/55-deg double-wedge and "tick-shaped" model configurations studied in the Hypervelocity Expansion Tube facility and T-ADFA free-piston shock tunnel, respectively. The impact of thermochemical effects on these interactions by changing the chemical composition from nitrogen to air as well as argon for a stagnation enthalpy of 8.0 MJ/kg flow are investigated using the 2-D wedge model. The simulations are found to reproduce many of the classic features related to Edney Type V strong shock interactions that include the attached, oblique shock formed over the first wedge, the detached bow shock from the second wedge, the separation zone, and the separation and reattachment shocks that cause complex features such as the triple point for both cases. However, results of a reacting air flow case indicate that the size of the separation length, and the movement of the triple point toward to the leading edge is much less than the nitrogen case.

  4. Interactions of climatic factors affecting milk yield and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, A.K.; Rodriguez, L.A.; Wilcox, C.J.; Collider, R.J.; Bachman, K.C.; Martin, F.G.

    1988-01-01

    Objectives were to evaluate effects of interactions of maximum temperature, minimum relative humidity, and solar radiation on milk yield and constituent traits. Effects of climate variables and their interactions were significant but small in most cases. Second order regression models were developed for several variables. Six were examined in detail: Holstein and Jersey milk yields, Holstein fat and Feulgen-DNA reflectance percent, and Jersey protein percent and yield. Maximum temperature had greatest influence on each response, followed by minimum relative humidity and solar radiation. Optimum conditions for milk production were at maximum temperatures below 19. 4/degree/C, increasing solar radiation, and minimum relative humidity between 33.4 and 78.2% (cool sunny days, moderate humidity). Maximum Holstein fat percent of 3.5% was predicted for maximum temperatures below 30.8/degree/C, minimum relative humidity below 89%, and solar radiation below 109 Langleys; actual mean Holstein fat percent was 3. 35%. Optimum climatic conditions for Jersey protein percent were at maximum temperature of 10.6/degree/C with solar radiation at 300 Langleys and relative humidity at 16% (cool sunny days, low humidity). Because noteworthy interactions existed between climate effects, response surface methodology was suitable for determining optimum climatic conditions for milk production.

  5. Personality and Situational Factors Influencing the Advertising Sales Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfo, Lauranell; Rogus, Mary T.

    Focusing on situational and personality factors as predictors of two common types of sales behavior (the customer-oriented/marketing approach, and the adversarial/bottom-line approach), a study conducted a national survey of advertising sales people and media buyers in the summer and fall of 1987. A total of 3669 questionnaires were sent to…

  6. Situational and Personality Factors: Interactive Effects on Attitude - Active Consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Stan L.; Warner, Lyle G.

    1975-01-01

    An examination of the combined effect of a situational factor, disclosure, and two personality variables, "need for approval" and "inner-other directedness" on attitude - action relationships with respect to marijuana related attitudes and behavior of college students. Subjects with different personality characteristics were found to respond…

  7. Psychopathy and Violence: The Importance of Factor Level Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Zach; Kosson, David S.

    2008-01-01

    The power of scales based on the Psychopathy Checklist (PCL; R. D. Hare, 1980) for prediction of violent behavior is well established. Although evidence suggests that this relationship is chiefly due to the impulsive and antisocial lifestyle component (Factor 2), the predictive power of psychopathy for violence may also reflect the multiplicative…

  8. Lactate, a Neglected Factor for Diabetes and Cancer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Dong, Yunzhou; Atefi, Mohammad; Liu, Yanjun; Elshimali, Yahya; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2016-01-01

    Increasing body of evidence suggests that there exists a connection between diabetes and cancer. Nevertheless, to date, the potential reasons for this association are still poorly understood and currently there is no clinical evidence available to direct the proper management of patients presenting with these two diseases concomitantly. Both cancer and diabetes have been associated with abnormal lactate metabolism and high level of lactate production is the key biological property of these diseases. Conversely, high lactate contribute to a higher insulin resistant status and a more malignant phenotype of cancer cells, promoting diabetes and cancer development and progression. In view of associations between diabetes and cancers, the role of high lactate production in diabetes and cancer interaction should not be neglected. Here, we review the available evidence of lactate's role in different biological characteristics of diabetes and cancer and interactive relationship between them. Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind metabolic remodeling of diabetes- and cancer-related signaling would endow novel preventive and therapeutic approaches for diabetes and cancer treatment.

  9. Pathologically Relevant Prelamin A Interactions with Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Arantza; Rodríguez, Clara I

    2016-01-01

    LMNA-linked laminopathies are a group of rare human diseases caused by mutations in LMNA or by disrupted posttranslational processing of its largest encoded isoform, prelamin A. The accumulation of mutated or immature forms of farnesylated prelamin A, named progerin or prelamin A, respectively, dominantly disrupts nuclear lamina structure with toxic effects in cells. One hypothesis is that aberrant lamin filament networks disrupt or "trap" proteins such as transcription factors, thereby interfering with their normal activity. Since laminopathies mainly affect tissues of mesenchymal origin, we tested this hypothesis by generating an experimental model of laminopathy by inducing prelamin A accumulation in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We provide detailed protocols for inducing and detecting prelamin A accumulation in hMSCs, and describe the bioinformatic analysis and in vitro assays of transcription factors potentially affected by prelamin A accumulation.

  10. Factors Mediating the Interactions between Adviser and Advisee during the Master's Thesis Project: A Quantitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Jr., Jose Florencio; Lehmann, Angela Valeria Levay; Fleith, Denise De Souza

    2005-01-01

    Building on previous studies centred on the interaction between adviser and advisee in masters thesis projects, in which a qualitative approach was used, the present study uses factor analysis to identify the factors that determine either a successful or unsuccessful outcome for the masters thesis project. There were five factors relating to the…

  11. Learning with Interactive Whiteboards: Determining the Factors on Promoting Interactive Whiteboards to Students by Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Eylem; Güler, Çetin; Çelik, H. Eray; Tatli, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which might affect the intention to use interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by university students, using Technology Acceptance Model by the structural equation modeling approach. The following hypothesis guided the current study: H1. There is a positive relationship between IWB…

  12. Mutant screen distinguishes between residues necessary for light-signal perception and signal transfer by phytochrome B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshito Oka

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The phytochromes (phyA to phyE are a major plant photoreceptor family that regulate a diversity of developmental processes in response to light. The N-terminal 651-amino acid domain of phyB (N651, which binds an open tetrapyrrole chromophore, acts to perceive and transduce regulatory light signals in the cell nucleus. The N651 domain comprises several subdomains: the N-terminal extension, the Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS-like subdomain (PLD, the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA (GAF subdomain, and the phytochrome (PHY subdomain. To define functional roles for these subdomains, we mutagenized an Arabidopsis thaliana line expressing N651 fused in tandem to green fluorescent protein, beta-glucuronidase, and a nuclear localization signal. A large-scale screen for long hypocotyl mutants identified 14 novel intragenic missense mutations in the N651 moiety. These new mutations, along with eight previously identified mutations, were distributed throughout N651, indicating that each subdomain has an important function. In vitro analysis of the spectral properties of these mutants enabled them to be classified into two principal classes: light-signal perception mutants (those with defective spectral activity, and signaling mutants (those normal in light perception but defective in intracellular signal transfer. Most spectral mutants were found in the GAF and PHY subdomains. On the other hand, the signaling mutants tend to be located in the N-terminal extension and PLD. These observations indicate that the N-terminal extension and PLD are mainly involved in signal transfer, but that the C-terminal GAF and PHY subdomains are responsible for light perception. Among the signaling mutants, R110Q, G111D, G112D, and R325K were particularly interesting. Alignment with the recently described three-dimensional structure of the PAS-GAF domain of a bacterial phytochrome suggests that these four mutations reside in the vicinity of the phytochrome light-sensing knot.

  13. Interactivity and content as factors of enjoyment in interactive fictions / Interactividad y contenido como factores de disfrute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Ribes Guàrdia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A report is made of the conclusions of an experimental research whose objectives are: 1.- to explore the relationship between interactivity, content and enjoyment; 2.- to observe the relationship between enjoyment and the concepts of entertainment, pleasure and gratification, and 3.- to find out whether there is a relationship between enjoyment and the manifest intention of posterior consumption, the desire to pay per view and the success forecast of such fiction on television. 310 participants were assigned to one four experimental situations derived from the combination between the variables: modality of fiction (interactive or non-interactive and content (happy or tragic ending. The results show that: a.- the content exerts a greater influence on the enjoyment of the narrative than does interactivity; b.- the concepts of enjoyment, entertainment and gratification, although related, describe different aspects of the consumption experience and that 3. enjoyment is linked to the desire for ensuing consumption. Se reportan las conclusiones obtenidas de una investigación experimental que tiene por objetivos: 1.- explorar la relación entre interactividad, contenido y disfrute en la recepción de ficciones interactivas; 2.- observar el vínculo del disfrute con los conceptos de entretenimiento, agrado y gratificación, y 3.- indagar sobre la relación entre disfrute e intención manifiesta de consumo posterior, voluntad de pago por visión o predicción de éxito de las ficciones interactivas en televisión. 310 participantes fueron sometidos a cuatro situaciones experimentales derivadas de la combinación entre las variables modalidad de la ficción (interactiva o no interactiva y contenido (final feliz o trágico. Los resultados señalan que: a.- el contenido ejerce superior impacto en el disfrute de la narrativa que la interactividad; b.- los conceptos de disfrute, entretenimiento y gratificación, aunque relacionados, describen distintos

  14. A Temporarily Red Light-Insensitive Mutant of Tomato Lacks a Light-Stable, B-Like Phytochrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tuinen, A.; Kerckhoffs, LHJ.; Nagatani, A.; Kendrick, R. E.; Koornneef, M.

    1995-07-01

    We have selected four recessive mutants in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) that, under continuous red light (R), have long hypocotyls and small cotyledons compared to wild type (WT), a phenotype typical of phytochrome B (phyB) mutants of other species. These mutants, which are allelic, are only insensitive to R during the first 2 days upon transition from darkness to R, and therefore we propose the gene symbol tri (temporarily red light insensitive). White light-grown mutant plants have a more elongated growth habit than that of the WT. An immunochemically and spectrophotometrically detectable phyB-like polypeptide detectable in the WT is absent or below detection limits in the tri1 mutant. In contrast to the absence of an elongation growth response to far-red light (FR) given at the end of the daily photoperiod (EODFR) in all phyB-deficient mutants so far characterized, the tri1 mutant responds to EODFR treatment. The tri1 mutant also shows a strong response to supplementary daytime far-red light. We propose that the phyB-like phytochrome deficient in the tri mutants plays a major role during de-etiolation and that other light-stable phytochromes can regulate the EODFR and shade-avoidance responses in tomato.

  15. Vector interaction model of factors of retailers` competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.O. Zagornaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to develop scientific and methodical approach to the modeling and analysis of complex elements, settings, and the phase trajectories of competition in the market. Development of basic principles of the theory of competition reflects complexity of economic trends in processes at the level of enterprises, industries, markets.The results of the analysis. Despite the large number of methods and computational procedures to situation diagnostic in competitive market there is a need for a dynamic approach as basic element of axiomatic theory of competition. The author adapted such categories as mass, strength, impact, energy in relation to the process of the competitive dynamics of the market. It is possible to reveal the nature of the vector process of interaction between participants of competition, to assess the competitive dynamics of vector in the context of market operators resellers.It is important to note that the dynamic component of competitive analysis will require fundamental review of existing methods and models for assessing the competitiveness of enterprises, investigation of the nature of competition in time. Such a poorly studied category as competitive behavior, which will generate an appropriate analytical tools as part of the competitive dynamics of the theory of competition is analyzed as well. Despite the isolation of selected categories of competition, competitive, competitive advantage, competitive position, they are related to dynamics categories of. The author formed fundamentally new basis vector approach to the study of competition dynamics.Conclusions and directions of further researches. Thus, on theoretical level the author highlighted the dynamic component in the basis of axiomatic theory of competition through comparative analysis of the main elements of dynamic approach to the study of competitive processes. The system of coordinates company's competitiveness

  16. Anatomia foliar de microtomateiros fitocromo-mutantes e ultra-estrutura de cloroplastos Leaf anatomy of micro-tomato phytochrome-mutants and chloroplast ultra-structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyrandir Cabral de Melo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plantas fitocromo-mutantes têm sido utilizadas com o intuito de caracterizar isoladamente, dentre os demais fotorreceptores, a ação dos fitocromos sobre eventos ligados à fotomorfogênese. Raros são os estudos que relatam a ação dos fitocromos sobre aspectos estruturais, embora sejam fundamentais à compreensão do desenvolvimento das plantas. Neste trabalho, objetivou-se analisar características ultraestruturais de cloroplastos e aspectos anatômicos foliares dos microtomateiros (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Micro-Tom fitocromo-mutantes aurea (subexpressa fitocromos, hp1 e atroviolacea (ambos supra-responsivos a eventos mediados por fitocromo em plantas em estágio de floração. Observou-se que os fitocromos são responsáveis pela expressão de muitas características anatômicas da epiderme foliar, assim como do mesofilo e da ultraestrutura dos cloroplastos.Phytochrome-mutant plants have been used for phytochrome action characterization among all photoreceptors, in events of photomorphogenesis. Studies relating the phytochrome action on structural aspects, which are fundamental to the comprehension of plant development, are rare. The objective of this work was to analyze chloroplast ultra structure and leaf anatomical characteristics of micro-tomatos (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Micro-Tom phytochrome-mutants aurea (sub express phytochrome, hp1 and atroviolacea (both super express phytochrome events-mediated in plants in the flowering stage. The results show that phytochromes are responsible for the expression of many characteristics of leaf epidermis, mesophyll and chloroplast ultra-structure.

  17. Intersection of participation and environmental factors: a complex interactive process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreau, Luc; Boschen, Kathryn

    2010-09-01

    The objective was to review contemporary and historical rehabilitation-focused literature on conceptualizations of the environment, broadly defined, and environmental measures. Data sources included historical nonempirical American-based literature from 1935 to the present and descriptive and empirical rehabilitation articles worldwide, retrieved from computerized databases predominantly from past 10 years depicting a participation-environment association. Literature selection required relevance to 3 combined topics: physical disability rehabilitation, participation/community integration, and impact of environmental barriers and facilitators. The ultimate focus was on spinal cord injury for recent literature and measures reviewed. Data extraction was based on author-assessed relevance to both participation and environmental considerations. Nonempirical literature from last three quarters of a century suggests an environmental impact on participation, focusing on "person-environment fit." Recent empirical evidence supports environmental contributions to participation, but the magnitude of the contribution is low. Despite the obvious theoretic impact of the environment, scientific demonstration of environmental contribution to participation restriction or facilitation has yet to be achieved. Participation-environment interaction could be illustrated better by (1) taking into account critical elements in environmental measures (eg, comprehensiveness of approach to environment, scales describing spectrum of environmental influence, subjective vs objective perspectives), (2) addressing the concept of participation in a dimension-specific approach, and (3) avoiding environmental features in construction of participation measures.

  18. Tumor interactions with soluble factors and the nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voss Melanie J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the genomic era of cancer research, the development of metastases has been attributed to mutations in the tumor that enable the cells to migrate. However, gene analyses revealed that primary tumors and metastases were in some cases genetically identical and the question was raised whether metastasis formation might be an inherent feature of certain tumor cells. In contradiction to this view, the last decade of cancer research has brought to light, that tumor cell migration, similar to leukocyte and fibroblast migration, is a highly regulated process. The nervous system plays an important role in this regulation, at least in two respects: firstly, neurotransmitters are known to regulate the migratory activity of tumor cells, and secondly, nerve fibers are used as routes for perineural invasion. We also summarize here the current knowledge on the innervation of tumors. Such a process might establish a neuro-neoplastic synapse, with the close interaction of tumor cells and nerve cells supporting metastasis formation.

  19. Temporal factors affecting somatosensory-auditory interactions in speech processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki eIto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Speech perception is known to rely on both auditory and visual information. However, sound specific somatosensory input has been shown also to influence speech perceptual processing (Ito et al., 2009. In the present study we addressed further the relationship between somatosensory information and speech perceptual processing by addressing the hypothesis that the temporal relationship between orofacial movement and sound processing contributes to somatosensory-auditory interaction in speech perception. We examined the changes in event-related potentials in response to multisensory synchronous (simultaneous and asynchronous (90 ms lag and lead somatosensory and auditory stimulation compared to individual unisensory auditory and somatosensory stimulation alone. We used a robotic device to apply facial skin somatosensory deformations that were similar in timing and duration to those experienced in speech production. Following synchronous multisensory stimulation the amplitude of the event-related potential was reliably different from the two unisensory potentials. More importantly, the magnitude of the event-related potential difference varied as a function of the relative timing of the somatosensory-auditory stimulation. Event-related activity change due to stimulus timing was seen between 160-220 ms following somatosensory onset, mostly around the parietal area. The results demonstrate a dynamic modulation of somatosensory-auditory convergence and suggest the contribution of somatosensory information for speech processing process is dependent on the specific temporal order of sensory inputs in speech production.

  20. Protein-Protein Interactions in the Regulation of WRKY Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjun Chi; Yan Yang; Yuan Zhou; Jie Zhou; Baofang Fan; Jing-Quan Yu; Zhixiang Chen

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor,SPF1,from sweet potato.Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth,development,and responses to biotic and abiotic stress.Despite the functional diversity,almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TrGACC/T W-box sequences and,therefore,mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors.Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling,transcription,and chromatin remodeling.Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors.It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes.In this review,we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute,at different levels,to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  1. Social interaction of children with visual impairment: Risk and protective factors

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić Vesna; Stanimirović Dragana; Anđelković Marija; Eškirović Branka

    2013-01-01

    Social interaction affects emotional, cognitive and other aspects of child development. Visual analyzer plays an important role in establishing and maintaining relationships with others. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the effects of visual impairment and other risk and protective factors on social interaction and related aspects of psychological life in visually impaired and low vision children. Most of the analyzed studies point out visual impairment as a factor which has...

  2. Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A; Roth, Frederick P; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M

    2014-04-11

    Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases.

  3. Spectroscopic detection of a phytochrome-like photoreceptor in the myxomycete Physarum polycephalum and the kinetic mechanism for the photocontrol of sporulation by Pfr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparter, T; Marwan, W

    2001-06-01

    Sporulation of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum (Myxomycetales) can be triggered by the far-red/red reversible Physarum phytochrome. Physarum plasmodia were analyzed with a purpose-built dual-wavelength photometer that is designed for phytochrome measurements. A photoreversible absorbance change at 670 nm was monitored after actinic red (R) and far-red (FR) irradiation of starved plasmodia, confirming the occurrence of a phytochrome-like photoreceptor in Physarum spectroscopically. These signals were not found in growing plasmodia, suggesting the Physarum phytochrome to be synthesized during starvation, which makes the cells competent for the photoinduction of sporulation. The photoconversion rates by R and FR light were similar in the phytochromes of Physarum and etiolated oat shoots. In dark-grown Physarum plasmodia that had not been preexposed to any light only R induced a detectable absorbance change while FR did not. This indicates that most (at least 90%) of the photoreversible pigment occurs in the red-absorbing form. Since the effectiveness of FR in triggering sporulation was enhanced by preirradiation with R, it is concluded that at least part of the Pr can be photoconverted to the active Pfr photoreceptor species. We propose a kinetic mechanism for the photocontrol of sporulation by photoconversion of Pfr, which may also hold for the high-irradiance response to FR in Arabidopsis and Cuscuta.

  4. Blue light is required for survival of the tomato phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant and the expression of four nuclear genes coding for plastidic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelmüller, R; Kendrick, R E

    1991-02-01

    When dark-grown aurea mutant tomato seedlings which lack more than 95% of the phytochrome present in isogenic wild-type seedlings are kept in white or blue light, four nuclear-encoded transcripts coding for plastidic proteins (the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein of photosystem I and II [cab-PSII], plastocyanin and subunit 2 of photosystem I) are present in comparable amounts. These transcript levels in red light are strongly reduced in aurea seedlings when compared with those of wild type. Thus, blue light is required for normal expression of these genes in the mutant, while red light alone is not sufficient. Red light-grown aurea seedlings are very sensitive to blue light, even 10 minutes of blue light every day suffices to cause a measurable increase in cab-PSII transcript level. The action of blue light on the expression of cab-PSII in the mutant is under phytochrome control. After 8 days of blue light, phytochrome is almost as effective in inducing cab-PSII mRNA as in the isogenic wild type, whereas after 8 days of red light, only a small phytochrome response was observed in the mutant. It is concluded that blue light sensitizes the mutant to the residual phytochrome which allows normal gene expression and survival of the mutant under daylight conditions.

  5. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen eSong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2, photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive homogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that dehydration indeed leads to motional and electronic structural changes of the bilin chromophore and its binding pocket and is not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in previous MAS NMR and

  6. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of (13)C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, (13)C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS (13)C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely

  7. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis by Shade Relies on Specific Subsets of Antagonistic Transcription Factors and Cofactors1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Toledo-Ortiz, Gabriela; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Cifuentes-Esquivel, Nicolas; Halliday, Karen J.; Martinez-García, Jaime F.; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are photosynthetic pigments essential for the protection against excess light. During deetiolation, their production is regulated by a dynamic repression-activation module formed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) and LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5). These transcription factors directly and oppositely control the expression of the gene encoding PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY), the first and main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. Antagonistic modules also regulate the responses of deetiolated plants to vegetation proximity and shade (i.e. to the perception of far-red light-enriched light filtered through or reflected from neighboring plants). These responses, aimed to adapt to eventual shading from plant competitors, include a reduced accumulation of carotenoids. Here, we show that PIF1 and related photolabile PIFs (but not photostable PIF7) promote the shade-triggered decrease in carotenoid accumulation. While HY5 does not appear to be required for this process, other known PIF antagonists were found to modulate the expression of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PSY gene and the biosynthesis of carotenoids early after exposure to shade. In particular, PHYTOCHROME-RAPIDLY REGULATED1, a transcriptional cofactor that prevents the binding of true transcription factors to their target promoters, was found to interact with PIF1 and hence directly induce PSY expression. By contrast, a change in the levels of the transcriptional cofactor LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR RED1, which also binds to PIF1 and other PIFs to regulate shade-related elongation responses, did not impact PSY expression or carotenoid accumulation. Our data suggest that the fine-regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in response to shade relies on specific modules of antagonistic transcriptional factors and cofactors. PMID:26082398

  8. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf

    2010-10-21

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/. © The Author(s) 2010.

  9. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  10. The Impact of Interactive Factors on Romanian Students’ Understanding of Place Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina Tanase

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Students’ mathematics learning is influenced by school factors (i.e., teachers’ knowledge of content, pedagogy, students, and curriculum and nonschool factors (parental involvement, expectations, and teaching techniques. This study looks holistically at the way these factors impact the learning of mathematics of first-grade Romanian students, examining the interactions between teachers, students, and their parents, as well as the interactions between parents and their children. Findings reveal that successful mathematics learning occurs when teachers and parents meet frequently to discuss the mathematics teaching and learning that takes place at school and at home.

  11. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Evaluating Continuous Smooth Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from launch external tanks. The MFIM has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points the initial and final points. They are selected so that the MFIM will generate a common curve to fit the individual point data. The results show that the approach used generates the continuous curve.

  12. Comparisons of treatment means when factors do not interact in two-factorial studies

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Jiawei

    2011-05-06

    Scientists in the fields of nutrition and other biological sciences often design factorial studies to test the hypotheses of interest and importance. In the case of two-factorial studies, it is widely recognized that the analysis of factor effects is generally based on treatment means when the interaction of the factors is statistically significant, and involves multiple comparisons of treatment means. However, when the two factors do not interact, a common understanding among biologists is that comparisons among treatment means cannot or should not be made. Here, we bring this misconception into the attention of researchers. Additionally, we indicate what kind of comparisons among the treatment means can be performed when there is a nonsignificant interaction among two factors. Such information should be useful in analyzing the experimental data and drawing meaningful conclusions.

  13. Analyses of in vivo interactions between transcription factors and the archaeal RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Julie E; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2015-09-15

    Transcription factors regulate the activities of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at each stage of the transcription cycle. Many basal transcription factors with common ancestry are employed in eukaryotic and archaeal systems that directly bind to RNAP and influence intramolecular movements of RNAP and modulate DNA or RNA interactions. We describe and employ a flexible methodology to directly probe and quantify the binding of transcription factors to RNAP in vivo. We demonstrate that binding of the conserved and essential archaeal transcription factor TFE to the archaeal RNAP is directed, in part, by interactions with the RpoE subunit of RNAP. As the surfaces involved are conserved in many eukaryotic and archaeal systems, the identified TFE-RNAP interactions are likely conserved in archaeal-eukaryal systems and represent an important point of contact that can influence the efficiency of transcription initiation.

  14. The terminal phycobilisome emitter, LCM: A light-harvesting pigment with a phytochrome chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kun; Ding, Wen-Long; Höppner, Astrid; Zhao, Cheng; Zhang, Lun; Hontani, Yusaku; Kennis, John T M; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2015-12-29

    Photosynthesis relies on energy transfer from light-harvesting complexes to reaction centers. Phycobilisomes, the light-harvesting antennas in cyanobacteria and red algae, attach to the membrane via the multidomain core-membrane linker, L(CM). The chromophore domain of L(CM) forms a bottleneck for funneling the harvested energy either productively to reaction centers or, in case of light overload, to quenchers like orange carotenoid protein (OCP) that prevent photodamage. The crystal structure of the solubly modified chromophore domain from Nostoc sp. PCC7120 was resolved at 2.2 Å. Although its protein fold is similar to the protein folds of phycobiliproteins, the phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore adopts ZZZssa geometry, which is unknown among phycobiliproteins but characteristic for sensory photoreceptors (phytochromes and cyanobacteriochromes). However, chromophore photoisomerization is inhibited in L(CM) by tight packing. The ZZZssa geometry of the chromophore and π-π stacking with a neighboring Trp account for the functionally relevant extreme spectral red shift of L(CM). Exciton coupling is excluded by the large distance between two PCBs in a homodimer and by preservation of the spectral features in monomers. The structure also indicates a distinct flexibility that could be involved in quenching. The conclusions from the crystal structure are supported by femtosecond transient absorption spectra in solution.

  15. Phytochrome and temperature control of seed germination in Muntingia calabura L. (Elaeocarpaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idalina T. de A. Leite

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The temperature range of germination of seeds of Muntingia calabura L. was 15-35° C and the optimum temperature at 35° C where more seeds germinated at short period. The fluence response curves demonstrated the involvement of phytochrome in the control of germination through the low fluence response. The effect of photoperiod showed that the species need long daily exposures to white light and that shade light inhibited completely seed germination, confirming as pioneer species that colonized only large gaps in the forest.As sementes de Muntingia calabura L. germinam nas temperaturas de 15 a 35C sendo a temperatura ótima de 35C onde maior número de sementes germinam em menor período. A curva de fluência-resposta demonstra que o fitocromo controla a germinação de sementes através da resposta de fluência baixa. A resposta da semente ao fotoperíodo e à completa inibição pela luz de sombreamento indicam que a espécies coloniza somente clareiras grandes de florestas, confirmando a espécie como pioneira.

  16. Phytochrome RNAi enhances major fibre quality and agronomic traits of the cotton Gossypium hirsutum L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim Y.; Buriev, Zabardast T.; Saha, Sukumar; Jenkins, Johnie N.; Abdukarimov, Abdusattor; Pepper, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous improvement of fibre quality, early-flowering, early-maturity and productivity in Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) is a challenging task for conventional breeding. The influence of red/far-red light ratio on the fibre length prompted us to examine the phenotypic effects of RNA interference (RNAi) of the cotton PHYA1 gene. Here we show a suppression of up to ~70% for the PHYA1 transcript, and compensatory overexpression of up to ~20-fold in the remaining phytochromes in somatically regenerated PHYA1 RNAi cotton plants. Two independent transformants of three generations exhibited vigorous root and vegetative growth, early-flowering, significantly improved upper half mean fibre length and an improvement in other major fibre characteristics. Small decreases in lint traits were observed but seed cotton yield was increased an average 10-17% compared with controls. RNAi-associated phenotypes were heritable and transferable via sexual hybridization. These results should aid in the development of early-maturing and productive Upland cultivars with superior fibre quality.

  17. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bogetti-Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug interactions (contraindicated/severe (n=64 and those with non-severe drug-drug interactions (moderate/minor/absent (n=117. Additional socio-demographic, clinical and caregiver data were included. Potential drug-drug interactions were identified using Micromedex Drug Reax 2.0® database. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were enrolled, including 57 men (31.5% and 124 women (68.5% with a mean age of 80.11±8.28 years. One hundred and seven (59.1% patients in our population had potential drug-drug interactions, of which 64 (59.81% were severe/contraindicated. The main severe potential drug-drug interactions were caused by the combinations citalopram/anti-platelet (11.6%, clopidogrel/omeprazole (6.1%, and clopidogrel/aspirin (5.5%. Depression, the use of a higher number of medications, dementia severity and caregiver burden were the most significant factors associated with severe potential drug-drug interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Older people with dementia experience many severe potential drug-drug interactions. Anti-depressants, antiplatelets, anti-psychotics and omeprazole were the drugs most commonly involved in these interactions. Despite their frequent use, anti-dementia drugs were not involved in severe potential drug-drug interactions. The number and type of medications taken, dementia severity and depression in patients in addition to caregiver burden should be considered to avoid possible drug interactions in this population.

  18. Sequence motifs in MADS transcription factors responsible for specificity and diversification of protein-protein interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein families with high sequence similarity, such as the plant MADS domain transcription factor family. In comparison to the situation in mammalian species, this important family of transcription regulators has expanded enormously in plant species and contains over 100 members in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that determine protein-protein interaction specificity for the Arabidopsis MADS domain transcription factor family, using an integrated computational and experimental approach. Plant MADS proteins have highly similar amino acid sequences, but their dimerization patterns vary substantially. Our computational analysis uncovered small sequence regions that explain observed differences in dimerization patterns with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, we show the usefulness of the method for prediction of MADS domain transcription factor interaction networks in other plant species. Introduction of mutations in the predicted interaction motifs demonstrated that single amino acid mutations can have a large effect and lead to loss or gain of specific interactions. In addition, various performed bioinformatics analyses shed light on the way evolution has shaped MADS domain transcription factor interaction specificity. Identified protein-protein interaction motifs appeared to be strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. We also provide evidence that mutations in these motifs can be a source for sub- or neo-functionalization. The analyses presented here take us a step forward in understanding protein-protein interactions and the interplay between protein sequences and

  19. Skyrme-Model $\\pi NN$ Form Factor and Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Holzwarth, G

    1997-01-01

    We apply the strong $\\pi NN$ form factor, which emerges from the Skyrme model, in the two-nucleon system using a one-boson-exchange (OBE) model for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. Deuteron properties and phase parameters of NN scattering are reproduced well. In contrast to the form factor of monopole shape that is traditionally used in OBE models, the Skyrme form factor leaves low momentum transfers essentially unaffected while it suppresses the high-momentum region strongly. It turns out that this behavior is very appropriate for models of the NN interaction and makes possible to use a soft pion form factor in the NN system. As a consequence, the $\\pi N$ and the $NN$ systems can be described using the same soft $\\pi NN$ form factor, which is impossible with the monopole.

  20. Influence of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on the Interaction of Recombinant Factor VIIa with Activated Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Kjalke, Marianne; Runge, Marx; Rojkjaer, Rasmus; Steinbruchel, Daniel; Johansson, Pär I

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) interacts preferentially with coated platelets characterized by a high exposure of phosphatidyl serine (PS), FV, FVIII, FIX, and FX binding, and fibrinogen. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is known to impair platelet function. In this study, the influence of CPB on formation of coated platelets and the interaction of rFVIIa with the platelets were studied. Blood was either exposed to a closed CPB circuit or obtained from patients undergoing CPB-assisted cardiac s...

  1. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Bogetti-Salazar; Cesar González-González; Teresa Juárez-Cedillo; Sergio Sánchez-García; Oscar Rosas-Carrasco

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug inte...

  2. The synergy factor: a statistic to measure interactions in complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combarros Onofre

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One challenge in understanding complex diseases lies in revealing the interactions between susceptibility factors, such as genetic polymorphisms and environmental exposures. There is thus a need to examine such interactions explicitly. A corollary is the need for an accessible method of measuring both the size and the significance of interactions, which can be used by non-statisticians and with summarised, e.g. published data. The lack of such a readily available method has contributed to confusion in the field. Findings The synergy factor (SF allows assessment of binary interactions in case-control studies. In this paper we describe its properties and its novel characteristics, e.g. in calculating the power to detect a synergistic effect and in its application to meta-analyses. We illustrate these functions with real examples in Alzheimer's disease, e.g. a meta-analysis of the potential interaction between a BACE1 polymorphism and APOE4: SF = 2.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.5–4.2; p = 0.0001. Conclusion Synergy factors are easy to use and clear to interpret. Calculations may be performed through the Excel programmes provided within this article. Unlike logistic regression analysis, the method can be applied to datasets of any size, however small. It can be applied to primary or summarised data, e.g. published data. It can be used with any type of susceptibility factor, provided the data are dichotomised. Novel features include power estimation and meta-analysis.

  3. Genetic Dissection of Morphometric Traits Reveals That Phytochrome B Affects Nucleus Size and Heterochromatin Organization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basten L. Snoek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Microscopically visible chromatin is partitioned into two major components in Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei. On one hand, chromocenters are conspicuous foci of highly condensed “heterochromatic” domains that contain mostly repeated sequences. On the other hand, less condensed and gene-rich “euchromatin” emanates from these chromocenters. This differentiation, together with the dynamic nature of chromatin compaction in response to developmental and environmental stimuli, makes Arabidopsis a powerful system for studying chromatin organization and dynamics. Heterochromatin dynamics can be monitored by measuring the Heterochromatin Index, i.e., the proportion of nuclei displaying well-defined chromocenters, or the DNA fraction of chromocenters (relative heterochromatin fraction. Both measures are composite traits, thus their values represent the sum of effects of various underlying morphometric properties. We exploited genetic variation between natural occurring accessions to determine the genetic basis of individual nucleus and chromocenter morphometric parameters (area, perimeter, density, roundness, and heterogeneity that together determine chromatin compaction. Our novel reductionist genetic approach revealed quantitative trait loci (QTL for all measured traits. Genomic colocalization among QTL was limited, which suggests a complex genetic regulation of chromatin compaction. Yet genomic intervals of QTL for nucleus size (area and perimeter both overlap with a known QTL for heterochromatin compaction that is explained by natural polymorphism in the red/far-red light and temperature receptor Phytochrome B. Mutant analyses and genetic complementation assays show that Phytochrome B is a negative regulator of nucleus size, revealing that perception of climatic conditions by a Phytochrome-mediated hub is a major determinant for coordinating nucleus size and heterochromatin compaction.

  4. Sterically locked synthetic bilin derivatives and phytochrome Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens form photoinsensitive Pr- and Pfr-like adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Katsuhiko; Hammam, Mostafa A S; Kinoshita, Hideki; Murata, Yasue; Khawn, Htoi; Noack, Steffi; Michael, Norbert; Lamparter, Tilman

    2005-07-01

    Phytochrome photoreceptors undergo reversible photoconversion between the red-absorbing form, Pr, and the far-red-absorbing form, Pfr. The first step in the conversion from Pr to Pfr is a Z to E isomerization around the C15=C16 double bond of the bilin chromophore. We prepared four synthetic biliverdin (BV) derivatives in which rings C and D are sterically locked by cyclizing with an additional carbon chain. In these chromophores, which are termed 15Za, 15Zs, 15Ea, and 15Es, the C15=C16 double bond is in either the Z or E configuration and the C14-C15 single bond in either the syn or anti conformation. The chromophores were assembled with Agrobacterium phytochrome Agp1, which incorporates BV as natural chromophore. All locked BV derivatives bound covalently to the protein and formed adducts with characteristic spectral properties. The 15Za adduct was spectrally similar to the Pr form and the 15Ea adduct similar to the Pfr form of the BV adduct. Thus, the chromophore of Agp1 adopts a C15=C16 Z configuration and a C14-C15 anti conformation in the Pr form and a C15=C16 E configuration and a C14-C15 anti conformation in the Pfr form. Both the 15Zs and the 15Es adducts absorbed only in the blue region of the visible spectra. All chromophore adducts were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography and histidine kinase activity to probe for protein conformation. In either case, the 15Za adduct behaved like the Pr and the 15Ea adduct like the Pfr form of Agp1. Replacing the natural chromophore by a locked 15Ea derivative can thus bring phytochrome holoprotein in the Pfr form in darkness. In this way, physiological action of Pfr can be studied in vivo and separated from Pr/Pfr cycling and other light effects.

  5. A Rice Phytochrome A in Arabidopsis: The Role of the N-terminus under red and far-red light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julia Kneissl; Tomoko Shinomura; Masaki Furuya; Cordelia Bolle

    2008-01-01

    The phytochrome (phy)A and phyB photoreceptors mediate three photobiological response modes in plants;whereas phyA can mediate the very-Iow-fluence response (VLFR), the high-irradiance response (HIR) and, to some extent, the low fluence response (LFR), phyB and other type Ⅱ phytochromes only mediate the LFR. To investigate to what level a rice phyA can complement for Arabidopsis phyA or phyB function and to evaluate the role of the serine residues in the first 20 amino acids of the N-terminus of phyA, we examined VLFRo LFR, and HIR responses in phyB and phyAphyB mutant plants transformed with rice PHYA cDNA or a mutant rice PHYA cDNA in which the first 10 serine residues were mutated to alanines (phyA SA). Utilizing mutants without endogenous phyB allowed the evaluation of red-light-derived responses sensed by the rice phyA. In summary, the WT rice phyA could complement VLFR and LFR responses such as inhibition of hypocotyl elongation under pulses of FR or continuous R light, induction of flowering and leaf expansion, whereas the phyA SA was more specific for HIR responses (e.g. inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and anthocyanin accumulation under continuous far-red light). As the N-terminal serines can no longer be phosphorylated in the phyA SA mutant, this suggests a role for phosphorylation discriminating between the different phyA-dependent responses. The efficacy of the rice phyA expressed in Arabidopsis was dependent upon the developmental age of the plants analyzed and on the physiological response, suggesting a stage-dependent downstream modulation of phytochrome signaling.

  6. Simplified method to predict mutual interactions of human transcription factors based on their primary structure

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2011-07-05

    Background: Physical interactions between transcription factors (TFs) are necessary for forming regulatory protein complexes and thus play a crucial role in gene regulation. Currently, knowledge about the mechanisms of these TF interactions is incomplete and the number of known TF interactions is limited. Computational prediction of such interactions can help identify potential new TF interactions as well as contribute to better understanding the complex machinery involved in gene regulation. Methodology: We propose here such a method for the prediction of TF interactions. The method uses only the primary sequence information of the interacting TFs, resulting in a much greater simplicity of the prediction algorithm. Through an advanced feature selection process, we determined a subset of 97 model features that constitute the optimized model in the subset we considered. The model, based on quadratic discriminant analysis, achieves a prediction accuracy of 85.39% on a blind set of interactions. This result is achieved despite the selection for the negative data set of only those TF from the same type of proteins, i.e. TFs that function in the same cellular compartment (nucleus) and in the same type of molecular process (transcription initiation). Such selection poses significant challenges for developing models with high specificity, but at the same time better reflects real-world problems. Conclusions: The performance of our predictor compares well to those of much more complex approaches for predicting TF and general protein-protein interactions, particularly when taking the reduced complexity of model utilisation into account. © 2011 Schmeier et al.

  7. Effects of platelet-activating factor on the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Luciana T; Folly, Evelize; Gomes, Marta T; Alviano, Daniela S; Alviano, Celuta S; Silva-Filho, Fernando C; Atella, Geórgia C; Lopes, Angela H

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with Rhodnius prolixus. The parasites (epimastigotes) were treated with PAF and/or WEB 2086 (PAF antagonist) for 1 h prior to the interaction experiments. PAF stimulated both in vivo and ex vivo interactions between T. cruzi and R. prolixus while WEB 2086 abrogated these effects. PAF-treated epimastigotes also showed an increase in surface negativity and in the amount of surface sialic acid. Neither of these effects was observed when the epimastigotes were treated with neuraminidase following PAF treatment. In the ex vivo interaction experiments, the number of epimastigotes bound to the midguts of the insects was reduced when the epimastigotes had been treated with neuraminidase. We conclude that PAF modulates the interaction of T. cruzi with R. prolixus by altering the amount of sialyl residues at the surface of the parasite.

  8. MITOMI: a microfluidic platform for in vitro characterization of transcription factor-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockel, Sylvie; Geertz, Marcel; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2012-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) consist of transcription factors (TFs) that determine the level of gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences. Mapping all TF-DNA interactions and elucidating their dynamics is a major goal to generate comprehensive models of GRNs. Measuring quantitative binding affinities of large sets of TF-DNA interactions requires the application of novel tools and methods. These tools need to cope with the difficulties related to the facts that TFs tend to be expressed at low levels in vivo, and often form only transient interactions with both DNA and their protein partners. Our approach describes a high-throughput microfluidic platform with a novel detection principle based on the mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions (MITOMI). MITOMI allows the detection of transient and low-affinity TF-DNA interactions in high-throughput.

  9. Effects of biotic and abiotic factors on the temporal dynamic of bat-fruit interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurindo, Rafael de Souza; Gregorin, Renato; Tavares, Davi Castro

    2017-08-01

    Mutualistic interactions between animals and plants vary over time and space based on the abundance of fruits or animals and seasonality. Little is known about this temporal dynamic and the influence of biotic and abiotic factors on the structure of interaction networks. We evaluated changes in the structure of network interactions between bats and fruits in relation to variations in rainfall. Our results suggest that fruit abundance is the main variable responsible for temporal changes in network attributes, such as network size, connectance, and number of interactions. In the same way, temperature positively affected the abundance of fruits and bats. An increase in temperature and alterations in rainfall patterns, due to human induced climate change, can cause changes in phenological patterns and fruit production, with negative consequences to biodiversity maintenance, ecological interactions, and ecosystem functioning.

  10. Pleiohomeotic interacts with the core transcription elongation factor Spt5 to regulate gene expression in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Harvey

    Full Text Available The early elongation checkpoint regulated by Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb is a critical control point for the expression of many genes. Spt5 interacts directly with RNA polymerase II and has an essential role in establishing this checkpoint, and also for further transcript elongation. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Spt5 interacts both physically and genetically with the Polycomb Group (PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (Pho, and the majority of Pho binding sites overlap with Spt5 binding sites across the genome in S2 cells. Our results indicate that Pho can interact with Spt5 to regulate transcription elongation in a gene specific manner.

  11. Interaction between viral RNA silencing suppressors and host factors in plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Kenji S; Masuta, Chikara

    2014-08-01

    To elucidate events in the molecular arms race between the host and pathogen in evaluating plant immunity, a zigzag model is useful for uncovering aspects common to different host-pathogen interactions. By analogy of the steps in virus-host interactions with the steps in the standard zigzag model outlined in recent papers, we may regard RNA silencing as pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) against viruses, RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) as effectors to overcome host RNA silencing and resistance gene (R-gene)-mediated defense as effector-triggered immunity (ETI) recognizing RSSs as avirulence proteins. However, because the standard zigzag model does not fully apply to some unique aspects in the interactions between a plant host and virus, we here defined a model especially designed for viruses. Although we simplified the phenomena involved in the virus-host interactions in the model, certain specific interactive steps can be explained by integrating additional host factors into the model. These host factors are thought to play an important role in maintaining the efficacy of the various steps in the main pathway of defense against viruses in this model for virus-plant interactions. For example, we propose candidates that may interact with viral RSSs to induce the resistance response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Unique Computational Algorithm to Simulate Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model Complex Material Point Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2010-01-01

    The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the launch external tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points--the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation, the data used was obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated.

  13. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Maël; Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Rípodas, Carolina; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Crespi, Martin; Gamas, Pascal; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, Maria Eugenia; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants.

  14. Phytochrome controls achene germination in Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae by very low fluence response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Amaral-Baroli

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Achene without ornament of the tegument were light insensitive with germination under all tested light conditions. Achene with verrucose ornament of the tegument presented low germination under darkness and high germination under light conditions. By pre-incubation at 36° C for remotion of pre-existing Pfr and by comparison of results of counting of dark germinating achenes at the end of experiment and daily under dim green safe light (0.001mumol m-2 s-1 nm-1 we concluded that germination was controlled by phytochrome through very low fluence response.Aquênios sem ornamento do tegumento são insensíveis à luz com ocorrência de germinação sob todas as condições de luz testadas. Aquênios com ornamento verrucoso do tegumento apresentou baixa germinação sob escuro e alta germinação sob luz. A pré-incubação a 36° C para a remoção de Fve pré-existente e pela comparação dos resultados de contagem no final do experimento de aquênios que germinam no escuro e diárias sob luz verde de segurança (0.001mimol m-2s-1nm-1 concluimos que a germinação de Bidens pilosa é controlada pelo fitocromo através da resposta de fluência baixa.

  15. Heterotrimeric G-protein is involved in phytochrome A-mediated cell death of Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wei; Wenbin Zhou; Guangzhen Hu; Jiamian Wei; Hongquan Yang; Jirong Huang

    2008-01-01

    The heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein) has been demonstrated to mediate various signaling pathways in plants. However,its role in phytochrome A (phyA) signaling remains elusive. In this study,we discover a new phyA-mediated phenotype designated far-red irradiation (FR) preconditioned cell death,which occurs only in the hypocotyls of FR-grown seedlings following exposure to white light (WL). The cell death is mitigated in the Ga mutant gpal but aggravated in the Gβ mutant agbl in comparison with the wild type (WT),indicative of antagonistic roles of GPAI and AGB1 in the phyA-mediated cell-death pathway. Further investigation indicates that FR-induced accumulation of nonphotoconvertible protochlorophyllide (Pchlide633),which generates reactive oxygen species (ROS)on exposure to WL,is required for FR-preconditioned cell death. Moreover,ROS is mainly detected in chloroplasts using the fluorescent probe. Interestingly,the application of H2O2 to dark-grown seedlings results in a phenotype similar to FR-preconditioned cell death. This reveals that ROS is a critical mediator for the cell death. In addition,we observe that agbl is more sensitive to H2O2 than WT seedlings,indicating that the G-protein may also modify the sensitivity of the seedlings to ROS stress. Taking these results together,we infer that the G-protein may be involved in the phyA signaling pathway to regulate FR-preconditioned cell death of Arabidopsis hypocotyls.Apossible mechanism underlying the involvement of the G-protein in phyA signaling is discussed in this study.

  16. A Short Amino-Terminal Part of Arabidopsis Phytochrome A Induces Constitutive Photomorphogenic Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    András Viczián; (E)va (A)dám; Iris Wolf; János Bindics; Stefan Kircher; Marc Heijde; Roman UIm; Eberhard Sch(a)fer; Ferenc Nagy

    2012-01-01

    Phytochrome A (phyA) is the dominant photoreceptor of far-red light sensing in Arabidopsis thaliana.phyA accumulates at high levels in the cytoplasm of etiolated seedlings,and light-induced phyA signaling is mediated by a complex regulatory network.This includes light- and FHY1/FHL protein-dependent translocation of native phyA into the nucleus in vivo.It has also been shown that a short N-terminal fragment of phyA (PHYA406) is sufficient to phenocopy this highly regulated cellular process in vitro.To test the biological activity of this N-terminal fragment of phyA in planta,we produced transgenic phyA-201 plants expressing the PHYA406-YFP (YELLOW FLUORESCENT PROTEIN)-DD,PHYA406-YFP-DD-NLS (nuclear localization signal),and PHYA406-YFP-DD-NES (nuclear export signal) fusion proteins.Here,we report that PHYA406-YFP-DD is imported into the nucleus and this process is partially light-dependent whereas PHYA406-YFP-DD-NLS and PHYA406-YFP-DD-NES display the expected constitutive localization patterns.Our results show that these truncated phyA proteins are light-stable,they trigger a constitutive photomorphogenic-like response when localized in the nuclei,and neither of them induces proper phyA signaling.We demonstrate that in vitro and in vivo PHYA406 Pfr and Pr bind COP1,a general repressor of photomorphogenesis,and co-localize with it in nuclear bodies.Thus,we conclude that,in planta,the truncated PHYA406 proteins inactivate COP1 in the nuclei in a light-independent fashion.

  17. Recombinant phytochrome of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (CP2): fluorescence spectroscopy and photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sineshchekov, V; Koppel, L; Hughes, J; Lamparter, T; Zeidler, M

    2000-07-01

    The recombinant phytochrome of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (CP2) expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and reconstituted with phycocyanobilin (PCB) was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. The pigment had an emission maximum at 670 nm at low temperature (85 K) and at 667 nm at room temperature (RT) and an excitation maximum at 650-652 nm at 85 K (excitation spectra could not be measured at RT). Both spectra had a half-band width of approx. 30-35 nm at 85 K. The fluorescence intensity revealed a steep temperature dependence with an activation energy of fluorescence decay (Ea) of 5.9-6.4 and 12.6-14.7 kJ mol(-1) in the interval from 85 to 210 K and from 210 to 275 K, respectively. The photochemical properties of CP2/PCB were characterised by the extent of the red-induced (lambda(a) = 639 nm) Pr conversion into the first photoproduct lumi-R at 85 K (gamma1) of approximately 0.07 and into Pfr at RT (gamma2) of approximately 0.7. From these characteristics, CP2/PCB can be attributed to the Pr" photochemical type with gamma1 < or = 0.05, which comprises the minor phyA fraction (phyA"), phyB, Adiantum phy1 and Synechocystis Cph1 in contrast to the major phyA' fraction (Pr' type with gamma1 = 0.5). Within the Pr" type, it is closer to phyA" than to phyB and Cph1.

  18. Resonance Raman analysis of the Pr and Pfr forms of phytochrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, S P; Lagarias, J C; Mathies, R A

    1990-12-18

    Resonance Raman vibrational spectra of the Pr and Pfr forms of oat phytochrome have been obtained at room temperature. When Pr is converted to Pfr, new bands appear in the C = C and C = N stretching region at 1622, 1599, and 1552 cm-1, indicating that a major structural change of the chromophore has occurred. The Pr to Pfr conversion results in an 11 cm-1 lowering of the N-H rocking band from 1323 to 1312 cm-1. Normal mode calculations correlate this frequency drop with a Z----E isomerization about the C15 = C16 bond. A line at 803 cm-1 in Pr is replaced by an unusually intense mode at 814 cm-1 in Pfr. Calculations on model tetrapyrrole chromophores suggest that these low-wavenumber modes are hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP) wagging vibrations of the bridging C15 methine hydrogen and that both the intensity and frequency of the C15 HOOP mode are sensitive to the geometry around the C14-C15 and C15 = C16 bonds. The large intensity of the 814-cm-1 mode in Pfr indicates that the chromophore is highly distorted from planarity around the C15 methine bridge. If the Pr----Pfr conversion does involve a C15 = C16 Z----E isomerization, then the intensity of the C15 HOOP mode in Pfr argues that the chromophore has an E,anti conformation. On the basis of a comparison with the vibrational calculations, the low frequency (803 cm-1) and the reduced intensity of the C15 HOOP mode in Pr suggest that the chromophore in Pr adopts the C15-Z,syn conformation.

  19. Effects of interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors on moose resource selection and environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Heng; Fryxell, John M; Liu, Hui; Dou, Hongliang; Ma, Yingjie; Jiang, Guangshun

    2017-01-27

    Resource selection of herbivores is a complex ecological process that operates in relation to biological or non-biological factors, which may affect the feeding and movement, and subsequently their spatial distribution and environmental stress. Here, we estimated moose (Alces alces cameloides) resource selection for habitat variables and the effect of interspecific interactions related to roe deer (Capreolus pygargus bedfordi) on its population distribution and environmental stress in the Khingan Mountain region of northeast China at local and regional scales. Different response patterns of moose resource selection, spatial distribution, and environmental stress to interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors were shown at the two scales. A general ecological chain, response of moose to interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors, was exhibited at the regional scale, and at the local scale, heterogeneous responses, linkages of habitat selection and environmental stress of moose population might be driven by different interspecific interaction patterns. Our study firstly suggested that moose resource selection, food availability, diet quality, population density and environmental stress indicators were impacted by interactions with the distribution of other sympatric herbivore species and showed differences in ecological response chains at various spatial scales. These findings are useful for sympatric herbivore assembly conservation, habitat quality monitoring and management.

  20. Urban form and psychosocial factors : Do they interact for leisure-time walking?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenackers, Mariëlle A.; Kamphuis, Carlijn B M; Prins, Richard G.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Burdorf, Alex; Van Lenthe, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This cross-sectional study uses an adaptation of a social-ecological model on the hierarchy of walking needs to explore direct associations and interactions of urban-form characteristics and individual psychosocial factors for leisure-time walking. METHODS: Questionnaire data (n = 736)

  1. Contextual Predictive Factors of Child Sexual Abuse: The Role of Parent-Child Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Clemencia; Pinzon-Rondon, Angela Maria; Botero, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of child sexual abuse in the Colombian coasts, as well as to assess the role of parent-child interactions on its occurrence and to identify factors from different environmental levels that predict it. Methods: This cross-sectional study explores the results of 1,089 household interviews responded by mothers.…

  2. Contextual Predictive Factors of Child Sexual Abuse: The Role of Parent-Child Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Clemencia; Pinzon-Rondon, Angela Maria; Botero, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of child sexual abuse in the Colombian coasts, as well as to assess the role of parent-child interactions on its occurrence and to identify factors from different environmental levels that predict it. Methods: This cross-sectional study explores the results of 1,089 household interviews responded by mothers.…

  3. Estimating interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors efficiency of sampling designs within a cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large prospective cohorts originally assembled to study environmental risk factors are increasingly exploited to study gene-environment interactions. Given the cost of genetic studies in large numbers of subjects, being able to select a sub-sample for genotyping that contains most of the information...

  4. Transitioning Transfer Students: Interactive Factors that Influence First-Year Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingchu; Williams, James E.; Vieweg, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the diverse patterns of interactive factors that influence transfer students' first-year retention at a midsize four-year university. The population for this study consisted of five cohorts totaling 1,713 full-time, degree-seeking transfer students. Sequential sets of logistic regression analyses on blocks of variables were…

  5. Factors Associated with Social Interactions between Deaf Children and Their Hearing Peers: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, Georgina; Oakes, Peter M.; Alexander, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that deaf children can have marked social difficulties compared with their hearing peers. Factors that influence these social interactions need to be reviewed to inform interventions. A systematic search of 5 key databases and 3 specialized journals identified 14 papers that met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of…

  6. Interactions among Ecological Factors That Explain the Psychosocial Quality of Life of Children with Complex Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Thurston

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To explore the associations and interactions among ecological factors and explain the psychosocial quality of life of children with complex needs. Methods. In this cross-sectional survey consenting parents were identified by the Children's Treatment Network. Families were eligible if the child from 0 to 19 years, resided in Simcoe/York, and there were multiple family needs. Regression analysis was used to explore associations and interactions. n=429. Results. Younger children, without conduct disorder, without hostile and punitive parenting and with low adverse family impact demonstrated the highest levels of psychosocial quality of life. Statistically significant interactions between processes of care and parent variables highlight the complexity of real life situations. Conclusions. It is not possible to fully understand the child's psychosocial quality of life in complex needs families by considering only simple associations between ecological factors. A multitude of factors and interactions between these factors are simultaneously present and the care of these families requires a holistic approach.

  7. The role of phytochrome A and gibberellins in growth under long and short day conditions: Studies in hybrid aspen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, M.E. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology

    2000-07-01

    This thesis addresses questions concerning the regulation of growth and, specifically, the cessation of growth in response to short days in deciduous tree species. The model tree used in the studies was hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. x P. tremuloides Michx.). We have exploited the possibility of transforming this species to modulate the level of expression of target genes using over-expression and antisense techniques. The target genes in the studies were the photoreceptor phytochrome A (phyA) and gibberellin 20-oxidase (GA 20-oxidase), the latter being a highly regulated enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of gibberellins (GAs). The photoreceptor phyA has been implicated in photoperiodic regulation of growth, while GAs may regulate the physiological response further downstream. The endogenous expression of these genes has been investigated in parallel with studies of various plants with ectopic and reduced levels of expression. The main focus has been on the early stages of induction of growth cessation and its physiological and molecular mechanisms. Studies of hybrid aspen plants with an increased or reduced expression of phyA, show this receptor to mediate the photoperiodic regulation of growth. Plants with ectopic expression could not stop growing despite drastically shortened photoperiods, while the antisense plants showed the reverse phenotype, with a higher sensitivity resulting in earlier cessation of growth. The role of GAs in growth inhibition was also addressed using plants with a reduction in GA levels. These plants showed early cessation of growth and dormancy, and thus an increased sensitivity toward daylength. Conversely, plants with increased rates of GA biosynthesis showed increased growth and stopped growing much later. Furthermore, increases in GA biosynthesis, resulting in high levels of GAs have a major impact on growth. Plants with high GA levels have increased elongation and diameter growth, due to higher rates of cell production in the

  8. Recent advances in the structural molecular biology of Ets transcription factors: interactions, interfaces and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Gileadi, Opher

    2014-02-01

    The Ets family of eukaryotic transcription factors is based around the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain. Although their DNA-binding selectivity is biochemically and structurally well characterized, structures of homodimeric and ternary complexes point to Ets domains functioning as versatile protein-interaction modules. In the present paper, we review the progress made over the last decade to elucidate the structural mechanisms involved in modulation of DNA binding and protein partner selection during dimerization. We see that Ets domains, although conserved around a core architecture, have evolved to utilize a variety of interaction surfaces and binding mechanisms, reflecting Ets domains as dynamic interfaces for both DNA and protein interaction. Furthermore, we discuss recent advances in drug development for inhibition of Ets factors, and the roles structural biology can play in their future.

  9. Neural cell adhesion molecule differentially interacts with isoforms of the fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Claus; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2011-10-26

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) can be activated through direct interactions with various fibroblast growth factors or through a number of cell adhesion molecules, including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We produced recombinant proteins comprising the ligand-binding immunoglobulin-like modules 2 and 3 of FGFR1b, FGFR1c, FGFR2b, FGFR2c, FGFR3b, FGFR3c, and FGFR4, and found that all FGFR isoforms, except for FGFR4, interacted with NCAM. The binding affinity of NCAM-FGFR interactions was considerably higher for splice variant 'b' than for splice variant 'c'. We suggest that the expression pattern of various FGFR isoforms determines the cell context-specific effects of NCAM signaling through FGFR.

  10. Interaction of gravity with other environmental factors in growth and development: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, T

    1999-01-01

    The life of plants and other organisms is governed by the constant force of gravity on earth. The mechanism of graviperception, signal transduction, and gravireaction is one of the major themes in space biology. When gravity controls each step of the life cycle such as growth and development, it does not work alone but operates with the interaction of other environmental factors. In order to understand the role of gravity in regulation of the life cycle, such interactions also should be clarified. Under microgravity conditions in space, various changes are brought about in the process of growth and development. Some changes would be advantageous to organisms, but others would be unfavorable. For overcoming such disadvantages, it may be required to exploit some other environmental factors which substitute for gravity in some properties. In terrestrial plants, gravity can be replaced by light under certain conditions. The gravity-substituting factors may play a principal role in future space development.

  11. Inflammatory Mediators and Angiogenic Factors in Choroidal Neovascularization: Pathogenetic Interactions and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Campa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Choroidal neovascularization (CNV is a common and severe complication in heterogeneous diseases affecting the posterior segment of the eye, the most frequent being represented by age-related macular degeneration. Although the term may suggest just a vascular pathological condition, CNV is more properly definable as an aberrant tissue invasion of endothelial and inflammatory cells, in which both angiogenesis and inflammation are involved. Experimental and clinical evidences show that vascular endothelial growth factor is a key signal in promoting angiogenesis. However, many other molecules, distinctive of the inflammatory response, act as neovascular activators in CNV. These include fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor, tumor necrosis factor, interleukins, and complement. This paper reviews the role of inflammatory mediators and angiogenic factors in the development of CNV, proposing pathogenetic assumptions of mutual interaction. As an extension of this concept, new therapeutic approaches geared to have an effect on both the vascular and the extravascular components of CNV are discussed.

  12. Trading direct for indirect defense? Phytochrome B inactivation in tomato attenuates direct anti-herbivore defenses whilst enhancing volatile-mediated attraction of predators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortés, Leandro E.; Weldegergis, Berhane T.; Boccalandro, Hernán E.; Dicke, Marcel; Ballaré, Carlos L.

    2016-01-01

    Under conditions of competition for light, which lead to the inactivation of the photoreceptor phytochrome B (phyB), the growth of shade-intolerant plants is promoted and the accumulation of direct anti-herbivore defenses is down-regulated. Little is known about the effects of phyB on emissions o

  13. Trading direct for indirect defense? Phytochrome B inactivation in tomato attenuates direct anti-herbivore defenses whilst enhancing volatile-mediated attraction of predators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortés, Leandro E.; Weldegergis, Berhane T.; Boccalandro, Hernán E.; Dicke, Marcel; Ballaré, Carlos L.

    2016-01-01

    Under conditions of competition for light, which lead to the inactivation of the photoreceptor phytochrome B (phyB), the growth of shade-intolerant plants is promoted and the accumulation of direct anti-herbivore defenses is down-regulated. Little is known about the effects of phyB on emissions o

  14. Choice of tracks, microtubules and/or actin filaments for chloroplast photo-movement is differentially controlled by phytochrome and a blue light receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Wada, M; Kadota, A

    2001-01-01

    Light induced chloroplast movement has been studied as a model system for photoreception and actin microfilament (MF)-based intracellular motilities in plants. Chloroplast photo-accumulation and -avoidance movement is mediated by phytochrome as well as blue light (BL) receptor in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Here we report the discovery of an involvement of a microtubule (MT)-based system in addition to an MF-based system in photorelocation of chloroplasts in this moss. In the dark, MTs provided tracks for rapid movement of chloroplasts in a longitudinal direction and MFs contributed the tracks for slow movement in any direction. We found that phytochrome responses utilized only the MT-based system, while BL responses had an alternative way of moving, either along MTs or MFs. MT-based systems were mediated by both photoreceptors, but chloroplasts showed movements with different velocity and pattern between them. No apparent difference in the behavior of chloroplast movement between the accumulation and avoidance movement was detected in phytochrome responses or BL responses, except for the direction of the movement. The results presented here demonstrate that chloroplasts use both MTs and MFs for motility and that phytochrome and a BL receptor control directional photo-movement of chloroplasts through the differential regulation of these motile systems.

  15. Physiological functions of phytochromes in tomato : a study using photomorphogenic mutants = [Fysiologische functies van fytochromen in tomaat : een studie gebruikmakend van fotomorfogenetische mutanten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerckhoffs, L.H.J.

    1996-01-01


    Plant morphogenesis is influenced greatly by the irradiance, quality, direction and periodicity of the ambient light. At least three different photomorphogenic photoreceptors have been distinguished: (i) the red light (R)- and far-red light (FR)- absorbing phytochromes; (ii) the UV-A and

  16. A comprehensive resource of interacting protein regions for refining human transcription factor networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuko Miyamoto-Sato

    Full Text Available Large-scale data sets of protein-protein interactions (PPIs are a valuable resource for mapping and analysis of the topological and dynamic features of interactome networks. The currently available large-scale PPI data sets only contain information on interaction partners. The data presented in this study also include the sequences involved in the interactions (i.e., the interacting regions, IRs suggested to correspond to functional and structural domains. Here we present the first large-scale IR data set obtained using mRNA display for 50 human transcription factors (TFs, including 12 transcription-related proteins. The core data set (966 IRs; 943 PPIs displays a verification rate of 70%. Analysis of the IR data set revealed the existence of IRs that interact with multiple partners. Furthermore, these IRs were preferentially associated with intrinsic disorder. This finding supports the hypothesis that intrinsically disordered regions play a major role in the dynamics and diversity of TF networks through their ability to structurally adapt to and bind with multiple partners. Accordingly, this domain-based interaction resource represents an important step in refining protein interactions and networks at the domain level and in associating network analysis with biological structure and function.

  17. Construction of 2Ⅲm-(m-κ) Designs with the Maximum Number of Clear Two-factor Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Jun Yang

    2007-01-01

    It is useful to know the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions in a 2Ⅲm-(m-k) design.This paper provides a method to construct a 2Ⅲm-(m-k) design with the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions. And it is proved that the resulting designs have more clear two-factor interactions than those constructed by Tang et al.[6]. Moreover, the designs constructed are shown to have concise grid representations.

  18. Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIT to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates by Margaret M. Hurley and...Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates Margaret M. Hurley and Michael S. Sellers Weapons and...Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ORAUW911QX-04-C

  19. Soil abiotic factors influence interactions between belowground herbivores and plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Matthias; Lu, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Root herbivores are important ecosystem drivers and agricultural pests, and, possibly as a consequence, plants protect their roots using a variety of defensive strategies. One aspect that distinguishes belowground from aboveground plant-insect interactions is that roots are constantly exposed to a set of soil-specific abiotic factors. These factors can profoundly influence root resistance, and, consequently, the outcome of the interaction with belowground feeders. In this review, we synthesize the current literature on the impact of soil moisture, nutrients, and texture on root-herbivore interactions. We show that soil abiotic factors influence the interaction by modulating herbivore abundance and behaviour, root growth and resistance, beneficial microorganisms, as well as natural enemies of the herbivores. We suggest that abiotic heterogeneity may explain the high variability that is often encountered in root-herbivore systems. We also propose that under abiotic stress, the relative fitness value of the roots and the potential negative impact of herbivory increases, which may lead to a higher defensive investment and an increased recruitment of beneficial microorganisms by the plant. At the same time, both root-feeding herbivores and natural enemies are likely to decrease in abundance under extreme environmental conditions, leading to a context- and species-specific impact on plant fitness. Only by using tightly controlled experiments that include soil abiotic heterogeneity will it be possible to understand the impact of root feeders on an ecosystem scale and to develop predictive models for pest occurrence and impact.

  20. Hierarchical Interactions of Homeodomain and Forkhead Transcription Factors in Regulating Odontogenic Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Shankar R.; Li, Xiao; Amen, Melanie A.; Florez, Sergio; Gutierrez, Diana; Cao, Huojun; Wang, Jianbo; Amendt, Brad A.

    2011-01-01

    FoxJ1 is a forkhead transcription factor expressed in multiple tissues during development and a major regulator of cilia development. FoxJ1−/− mice present with defects in odontogenesis, and we correlate these defects to hierarchical interactions between homeodomain factors Pitx2 and Dlx2 with FoxJ1 in regulating their expression through direct physical interactions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays reveal endogenous Pitx2 and Dlx2 binding to the Dlx2 promoter and Dlx2 binding to the FoxJ1 promoter as well as Dlx2 and FoxJ1 binding to the amelogenin promoter. PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 promoter is attenuated by a direct Dlx2 physical interaction with PITX2. Dlx2 autoregulates its promoter, and Dlx2 transcriptionally activates the downstream gene FoxJ1. Dlx2 and FoxJ1 physically interact and synergistically regulate both Dlx2 and FoxJ1 promoters. Dlx2 and FoxJ1 also activate the amelogenin promoter, and amelogenin is required for enamel formation and late stage tooth development. FoxJ1−/− mice maxillary and mandibular incisors are reduced in length and width and have reduced amelogenin expression. FoxJ1−/− mice show a reduced and defective ameloblast layer, revealing a biological effect of these transcription factor hierarchies during tooth morphogenesis. These transcriptional mechanisms may contribute to other developmental processes such as neuronal, pituitary, and heart development. PMID:21504905

  1. Social interaction of children with visual impairment: Risk and protective factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Social interaction affects emotional, cognitive and other aspects of child development. Visual analyzer plays an important role in establishing and maintaining relationships with others. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the effects of visual impairment and other risk and protective factors on social interaction and related aspects of psychological life in visually impaired and low vision children. Most of the analyzed studies point out visual impairment as a factor which has a negative influence on social development. Together with other negative environmental factors, visual impairment often has a negative influence on social interaction, which is an important factor of development and functioning in other areas. Thus, motor abilities, physical fitness, self-concept, and emotional development are closely related to a child's activity and participation in play activities, which may be hindered by visual impairment and the quality of communication with peers and important adults. Children with visual impairment less frequently initiate and have difficulties in maintaining social interaction. They have fewer friends, which often leads to emotional and behavioral problems. They are not accepted by peers in inclusive classrooms. Sociometric assessments indicate that they are more often in unpopular groups and have fewer opportunities to socialize with visually impaired peers. Therefore, it is important to timely recognize these children's needs and provide professional support and help for them and important people from their environment. This means providing conditions and activities which enable visually impaired children to fulfill their aims and needs in social interaction, and recognize the needs of others, i.e. develop social skills and at the same time allow their peers to get to know them and accept them better.

  2. Genetic identification of a network of factors that functionally interact with the nucleosome remodeling ATPase ISWI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giosalba Burgio

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Nucleosome remodeling and covalent modifications of histones play fundamental roles in chromatin structure and function. However, much remains to be learned about how the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors and histone-modifying enzymes is coordinated to modulate chromatin organization and transcription. The evolutionarily conserved ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factor ISWI plays essential roles in chromosome organization, DNA replication, and transcription regulation. To gain insight into regulation and mechanism of action of ISWI, we conducted an unbiased genetic screen to identify factors with which it interacts in vivo. We found that ISWI interacts with a network of factors that escaped detection in previous biochemical analyses, including the Sin3A gene. The Sin3A protein and the histone deacetylase Rpd3 are part of a conserved histone deacetylase complex involved in transcriptional repression. ISWI and the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex co-localize at specific chromosome domains. Loss of ISWI activity causes a reduction in the binding of the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex to chromatin. Biochemical analysis showed that the ISWI physically interacts with the histone deacetylase activity of the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex. Consistent with these findings, the acetylation of histone H4 is altered when ISWI activity is perturbed in vivo. These findings suggest that ISWI associates with the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex to support its function in vivo.

  3. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein interacts with hepatocyte nuclear factor

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Petrescu, Anca D.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) regulates liver type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene expression. Conversely as shown herein, L-FABP structurally and functionally also interacts with HNF4α. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between Cy3-HNF4α (donor) and Cy5-L-FABP (acceptor) as well as FRET microscopy detected L-FABP in close proximity (~80 Å) to HNF4α, binding with high affinity Kd ~250–300 nM. Circular dichroism (CD) determined that the HNF4α/L-FABP interaction alte...

  4. EFFECTS OF NEUTRINO ELECTROMAGNETIC FORM FACTORS ON NEUTRINO INTERACTION WITH FINITE TEMPERATURE ELECTRON MATTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anto Sulaksono

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The differential cross-section of neutrino interaction with dense and warm electron gasses has been calculated by takinginto account the neutrino electromagnetic form factors. The significant effect of electromagnetic properties of neutrinocan be found if the neutrino dipole moment, μ ν , is ≥ 5.10-9 μB and neutrino charge radius, Rv, is ≥ 5.10-6 MeV-1. Theimportance of the retarded correction, detailed balance and Pauli blocking factors is shown and analyzed. Many-bodyeffects on the target matter which are included via random phase approximation (RPA correlation as well as photoneffective mass are also investigated.

  5. Prevalence and factors associated with potential drug interactions among elderly in a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Riani Gotardelo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of potential drug interactions and the factors associated with them among elderly patients covered by the Family Health Strategy in the municipality of Timóteo, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional study, using stratified random sampling. A total of 273 household interviews were conducted in subjects aged 60 years or older, after obtaining informed consent, using a questionnaire containing questions related to identification, demography, health conditions and medication use. Drug interactions were identified and classified according to the software Micromedex®. Results: The overall prevalence of potential drug interactions was 55.6%, a total of 466 cases, of which 5.6% were mild, 81.6% moderate and 12.8% of greater severity. Therapeutic classes most frequently involved were anti-inflammatory drugs and especially drugs used in cardiovascular disease. The absence of hospitalization in the last four months was significantly associated with a lower chance of serious drug interactions and most patients who did not have any moderate drug interactions used only drugs prescribed by physicians. Conclusions: The prevalence of potential drug interactions was similar to that described in the literature, demonstrating the high frequency of this phenomenon among the elderly. The absence of prior hospitalization and drug prescription by physicians were associated with a lower frequency of interactions. The prescription of multiple drugs simultaneously to elderly patients can compromise the safety and health of this population, requiring, by caregivers, observation for the occurrence of potential drug interactions.

  6. STAT3-Interacting Proteins as Modulators of Transcription Factor Function: Implications to Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jennifer E; Frank, David A

    2016-04-19

    The oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 is inappropriately activated in multiple hematopoietic and solid malignancies, in which it drives the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Thus far, strategies to inhibit the function of STAT3 have focused on blocking the function of its activating kinases or sequestering its DNA binding ability. A less well-explored aspect of STAT3 function is its interaction with other proteins, which can modulate the oncogenic activity of STAT3 via its subcellular localization, DNA binding ability, and recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Herein we summarize what is currently known about STAT3-interacting proteins and describe the utility of a proteomics-based approach for successfully identifying and characterizing novel STAT3-interacting proteins that affect STAT3 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function.

  7. Emerging functions as host cell factors - an encyclopedia of annexin-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnl, Alexander; Musiol, Agnes; Raabe, Carsten A; Rescher, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Emerging infectious diseases and drug-resistant infectious agents call for the development of innovative antimicrobial strategies. With pathogenicity now considered to arise from the complex and bi-directional interplay between a microbe and the host, host cell factor targeting has emerged as a promising approach that might overcome the limitations of classical antimicrobial drug development and could open up novel and efficient therapeutic strategies. Interaction with and modulation of host cell membranes is a recurrent theme in the host-microbe relationship. In this review, we provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of the Ca2+ dependent, membrane-binding annexin protein family in pathogen-host interactions, and discuss their emerging functions as host cell derived auxiliary proteins in microbe-host interactions and host cell targets.

  8. Corticotropin-releasing factor has an anxiogenic action in the social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A J; File, S E

    1987-06-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, 100 and 300 ng) were investigated in the social interaction test of anxiety in rats. Both doses of CRF significantly decreased active social interaction without a concomitant decrease in locomotor activity. CRF also significantly increased self-grooming, an effect that was independent of the decrease in social interaction. These results indicate an anxiogenic action for CRF. Chlordiazepoxide (CDP, 5 mg/kg ip) pretreatment reversed the anxiogenic effects of icv CRF (100 ng), but CRF did not prevent the sedative effects of CDP. There were no statistically significant changes due to CRF in locomotor activity or rears or head dipping in the holeboard test. Both doses of CRF significantly increased plasma concentrations of corticosterone. The possible mechanisms of the behavioral effects of CRF are discussed.

  9. Interaction of Psychological Factors in Shaping Entrepreneurial Intention Among Computer and Electrical Engineering Students

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Chao-Tung; Lee, Jia-Ling; Liang, Chaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Numerous technopreneurs start their ventures at college age, but the entrepreneurship of computer and electrical engineering (CEE) students remains under-studied. This study analysed both the combined and interactive effects of psychological factors on the entrepreneurial intentions of CEE students. In this study, entrepreneurial intention comprised two dimensions, conviction and preparation. Regarding the direct effects, the results indicated that self-efficacy affected entrepreneurial convi...

  10. FF domains of CA150 bind transcription and splicing factors through multiple weak interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Kulkarni, Sarang; Pawson, Tony

    2004-11-01

    The human transcription factor CA150 modulates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene transcription and contains numerous signaling elements, including six FF domains. Repeated FF domains are present in several transcription and splicing factors and can recognize phosphoserine motifs in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Using mass spectrometry, we identify a number of nuclear binding partners for the CA150 FF domains and demonstrate a direct interaction between CA150 and Tat-SF1, a protein involved in the coupling of splicing and transcription. CA150 FF domains recognize multiple sites within the Tat-SF1 protein conforming to the consensus motif (D/E)(2/5)-F/W/Y-(D/E)(2/5). Individual FF domains are capable of interacting with Tat-SF1 peptide ligands in an equivalent and noncooperative manner, with affinities ranging from 150 to 500 microM. Repeated FF domains therefore appear to bind their targets through multiple weak interactions with motifs comprised of negatively charged residues flanking aromatic amino acids. The RNAPII CTD represents a consensus FF domain-binding site, contingent on generation of the requisite negative charges by phosphorylation of serines 2 and 5. We propose that CA150, through the dual recognition of acidic motifs in proteins such as Tat-SF1 and the phosphorylated CTD, could mediate the recruitment of transcription and splicing factors to actively transcribing RNAPII.

  11. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  12. Identification of the blood coagulation factor interacting sequences in staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Saotomo; Takii, Takemasa; Onozaki, Kikuo; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Hida, Shigeaki

    2017-03-25

    Staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs) are a family of exoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus. We have shown that SSL10 binds to vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors and inhibits blood coagulation induced by recalcification of citrated plasma. SSL10 was revealed to bind to coagulation factors via their γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. In this study we attempted to identify the responsible sequence of SSL10 for the interaction with coagulation factors. We prepared a series of domain swap mutants between SSL10 and its paralog SSL7 that does not interact with coagulation factors, and examined their binding activity to immobilized prothrombin using ELISA-like binding assay. The domain swap mutants that contained SSL10β1-β3 ((23)MEMKN ISALK HGKNN LRFKF RGIKI QVL(60)) bound to immobilized prothrombin, and mutants that contained SSL10β10-β12 ((174)SFYNL DLRSK LKFKY MGEVI ESKQI KDIEV NLK(207)) also retained the binding activity. On the other hand, mutants that lacked these two regions did not bind to prothrombin. These sequences, each alone, bound to prothrombin as 33 amino acid length polypeptides. These results suggest that SSL10 has two responsible sequences for the binding to prothrombin. These prothrombin-binding peptides would contribute to the development of new anticoagulants.

  13. Potential RNA polymerase II-induced interactions of transcription factor TFIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S; Lee, D K; Roeder, R G

    1993-10-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor TFIIB is required for initiation by RNA polymerase II and serves as a target of some regulatory factors. The carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB contains a large imperfect direct repeat reminiscent of the structural organization of the TATA-binding component (TBP) of TFIID, as well as sequence homology to conserved regions of bacterial sigma factors. The present study shows that the carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB, like that of TBP, is folded into a compact protease-resistant core. The TFIIB core, unlike the TBP core, is inactive in transcription but retains structural features that enable it to form a complex with promoter-bound TFIID. The protease-susceptible amino terminus appears to contain components responsible for direct interaction with RNA polymerase II (in association with TFIIF) either on the promoter (in association with TFIID) or independently. In addition, core TFIIB (but not intact TFIIB) extends the footprint of TBP on promoter DNA, suggesting that TFIIB has a cryptic DNA-binding potential. These results are consistent with a model in which TFIIB, in a manner functionally analogous to that of bacterial sigma factors, undergoes an RNA polymerase II-dependent conformational change with resultant DNA interactions during the pathway leading to a functional preinitiation complex.

  14. Aerobic exercise interacts with neurotrophic factors to predict cognitive functioning in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tatia M C; Wong, Mark Lawrence; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Lee, Jada Chia-Di; Yau, Suk-Yu; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings have suggested that aerobic exercise may have a positive effect on brain functioning, in addition to its well-recognized beneficial effects on human physiology. This study confirmed the cognitive effects of aerobic exercise on the human brain. It also examined the relationships between exercise and the serum levels of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, IGI-1, and VEGF). A total of 91 healthy teens who exercised regularly participated in this study. A between-group design was adopted to compare cognitive functioning subserved by the frontal and temporal brain regions and the serum levels of neurotrophic factors between 45 regular exercisers and 46 matched controls. The exercisers performed significantly better than the controls on the frontal and temporal functioning parameters measured. This beneficial cognitive effect was region-specific because no such positive cognitive effect on task-tapping occipital functioning was observed. With respect to the serum levels of the neurotrophic factors, a negative correlation between neurotrophic factors (BDNF and VEGF) with frontal and medial-temporal lobe function was revealed. Furthermore, the levels of BDNF and VEGF interacted with exercise status in predicting frontal and temporal lobe function. This is the first report of the interaction effects of exercise and neurotrophic factors on cognitive functioning. Herein, we report preliminary evidence of the beneficial effects of regular aerobic exercise in improving cognitive functions in teens. These beneficial effects are region-specific and are associated with the serum levels of neurotrophic factors. Our findings lay the path for future studies looking at ways to translate these beneficial effects to therapeutic strategies for adolescents.

  15. Biotic and abiotic factors investigated in two Drosophila species – evidence of both negative and positive effects of interactions on performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Michael; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard

    2017-01-01

    Multiple environmental factors acting in concert can interact and strongly influence population fitness and ecosystem composition. Studies investigating interactions usually involve only two environmental factors; most frequently a chemical and another abiotic factor such as a stressful temperatu...

  16. AKTIP/Ft1, a New Shelterin-Interacting Factor Required for Telomere Maintenance.

    KAUST Repository

    Burla, Romina

    2015-06-25

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect the ends of linear chromosomes from incomplete replication, degradation and detection as DNA breaks. Mammalian telomeres are protected by shelterin, a multiprotein complex that binds the TTAGGG telomeric repeats and recruits a series of additional factors that are essential for telomere function. Although many shelterin-associated proteins have been so far identified, the inventory of shelterin-interacting factors required for telomere maintenance is still largely incomplete. Here, we characterize AKTIP/Ft1 (human AKTIP and mouse Ft1 are orthologous), a novel mammalian shelterin-bound factor identified on the basis of its homology with the Drosophila telomere protein Pendolino. AKTIP/Ft1 shares homology with the E2 variant ubiquitin-conjugating (UEV) enzymes and has been previously implicated in the control of apoptosis and in vesicle trafficking. RNAi-mediated depletion of AKTIP results in formation of telomere dysfunction foci (TIFs). Consistent with these results, AKTIP interacts with telomeric DNA and binds the shelterin components TRF1 and TRF2 both in vivo and in vitro. Analysis of AKTIP- depleted human primary fibroblasts showed that they are defective in PCNA recruiting and arrest in the S phase due to the activation of the intra S checkpoint. Accordingly, AKTIP physically interacts with PCNA and the RPA70 DNA replication factor. Ft1-depleted p53-/- MEFs did not arrest in the S phase but displayed significant increases in multiple telomeric signals (MTS) and sister telomere associations (STAs), two hallmarks of defective telomere replication. In addition, we found an epistatic relation for MST formation between Ft1 and TRF1, which has been previously shown to be required for replication fork progression through telomeric DNA. Ch-IP experiments further suggested that in AKTIP-depleted cells undergoing the S phase, TRF1 is less tightly bound to telomeric DNA than in controls. Thus, our results collectively

  17. Factors shaping interactions among community health workers in rural Ethiopia: rethinking workplace trust and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynes, Michelle M; Stephenson, Rob; Hadley, Craig; Sibley, Lynn M

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, a shortage of skilled health workers has prompted a shift toward community-based health workers taking on greater responsibility in the provision of select maternal and newborn health services. Research in mid- and high-income settings suggests that coworker collaboration increases productivity and performance. A major gap in this research, however, is the exploration of factors that influence teamwork among diverse community health worker cadres in rural, low-resource settings. The purpose of this study is to examine how sociodemographic and structural factors shape teamwork among community-based maternal and newborn health workers in Ethiopia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with health extension workers, community health development agents, and traditional birth attendants in 3 districts of the West Gojam Zone in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. Communities were randomly selected from Maternal and Newborn Health in Ethiopia Partnership (MaNHEP) sites; health worker participants were recruited using a snowball sampling strategy. Fractional logit modeling and average marginal effects analyses were carried out to identify the influential factors for frequency of work interactions with each cadre. One hundred and ninety-four health workers participated in the study. A core set of factors-trust in coworkers, gender, and cadre-were influential for teamwork across groups. Greater geographic distance and perception of self-interested motivations were barriers to interactions with health extension workers, while greater food insecurity (a proxy for wealth) was associated with increased interactions with traditional birth attendants. Interventions that promote trust and gender sensitivity and improve perceptions of health worker motivations may help bridge the gap in health services delivery between low- and high-resource settings. Inter-cadre training may be one mechanism to increase trust and respect among diverse health workers, thereby increasing

  18. Membrane Interaction of the Factor VIIIa Discoidin Domains in Atomistic Detail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Peters, Günther H.J.;

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed membrane-mimetic model was applied to study membrane interaction and binding of the two anchoring C2-like discoidin domains of human coagulation factor VIIIa (FVIIIa), the C1 and C2 domains. Both individual domains, FVIII C1 and FVIII C2, were observed to bind the phospholipi...... binding of FVIIIa, based on the prevalent nonspecificity of ionic interactions in the simulated membrane-bound states of FVIII C1 and FVIII C2.......A recently developed membrane-mimetic model was applied to study membrane interaction and binding of the two anchoring C2-like discoidin domains of human coagulation factor VIIIa (FVIIIa), the C1 and C2 domains. Both individual domains, FVIII C1 and FVIII C2, were observed to bind the phospholipid...... membrane by partial or full insertion of their extruding loops (the spikes). However, the two domains adopted different molecular orientations in their membrane-bound states; FVIII C2 roughly was positioned normal to the membrane plane, while FVIII C1 displayed a multitude of tilted orientations...

  19. A meta-analysis of factors affecting trust in human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Peter A; Billings, Deborah R; Schaefer, Kristin E; Chen, Jessie Y C; de Visser, Ewart J; Parasuraman, Raja

    2011-10-01

    We evaluate and quantify the effects of human, robot, and environmental factors on perceived trust in human-robot interaction (HRI). To date, reviews of trust in HRI have been qualitative or descriptive. Our quantitative review provides a fundamental empirical foundation to advance both theory and practice. Meta-analytic methods were applied to the available literature on trust and HRI. A total of 29 empirical studies were collected, of which 10 met the selection criteria for correlational analysis and 11 for experimental analysis. These studies provided 69 correlational and 47 experimental effect sizes. The overall correlational effect size for trust was r = +0.26,with an experimental effect size of d = +0.71. The effects of human, robot, and environmental characteristics were examined with an especial evaluation of the robot dimensions of performance and attribute-based factors. The robot performance and attributes were the largest contributors to the development of trust in HRI. Environmental factors played only a moderate role. Factors related to the robot itself, specifically, its performance, had the greatest current association with trust, and environmental factors were moderately associated. There was little evidence for effects of human-related factors. The findings provide quantitative estimates of human, robot, and environmental factors influencing HRI trust. Specifically, the current summary provides effect size estimates that are useful in establishing design and training guidelines with reference to robot-related factors of HRI trust. Furthermore, results indicate that improper trust calibration may be mitigated by the manipulation of robot design. However, many future research needs are identified.

  20. Specific Roles of MicroRNAs in Their Interactions with Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression by modulating numerous target mRNAs expression at posttranscriptional level. Extensive studies have shown that miRNAs are critical in various important biological processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, development, and apoptosis. In terms of their importance, miRNA dysfunction has been associated with a broad range of diseases. Increased number of studies have shown that miRNAs can functionally interact with a wide spectrum of environmental factors (EFs including drugs, industrial materials, virus and bacterial pathogens, cigarette smoking, alcohol, nutrition, sleep, exercise, stress, and radiation. More importantly, the interactions between miRNAs and EFs have been shown to play critical roles in determining abnormal phenotypes and diseases. In this paper, we propose an outline of the current knowledge about specific roles of miRNAs in their interactions with various EFs and analyze the literatures detailing miRNAs-EFs interactions in the context of various of diseases.

  1. Platelets interact with tissue factor immobilized on surfaces: effects of shear rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonda, R; Lopez-Vilchez, I; Navalon, F; Pino, M; Hernandez, M R; Escolar, G; Galan, A M

    2008-01-01

    While procoagulant activities of Tissue Factor (TF) have been widely investigated, its possible pro-adhesive properties towards platelets have not been studied in detail. We explored the interaction of platelets with human Tissue Factor (hTF) firmly adsorbed on a synthetic surface of polyvinilidene difluoride (PVDF) using different shear rates. For studies at 250 and 600 s(-1), TF firmly adsorbed was exposed to flowing anticoagulated blood in flat perfusion devices. Deposition of platelets and fibrin were evaluated by morphometric, immunocytochemical and ultrastructural methods. Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) levels were also measured. Experiments at 5000 s(-1), were performed on the Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA-100) with experimental cartridges with collagen (COL) or collagen-hTF (COL + TF). Haemostatic effect of recombinant activated FVIIa (rFVIIa) was assessed in the same experimental settings. Platelet deposition on hTF reached 19.8 +/- 1.3% and 26.1 +/- 3.4% of the total surface, at 250 and 600 s(-1), respectively. Fibrin formation was significantly higher at 250 s(-1) than at 600 s(-1) (P hTF (154.09 +/- 14.69 s vs. 191.45 +/- 16.09 s COL alone; P hTF is an adhesive substrate for platelets and suggest that the von Willebrand factor could mediate these interactions. At low and intermediate shear rates, rFVIIa enhanced the procoagulant action of hTF, but this effect was not observed at very high shear rates.

  2. Interactive effects of multiple climate change factors on ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers in a temperate steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui-Jing; Shen, Ju-Pei; Sun, Yi-Fei; Wang, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Li-Mei; Yang, Zhong-Ling; Han, Hong-Yan; Wan, Shi-Qiang; He, Ji-Zheng

    2017-04-01

    Global climate change could have profound effects on belowground microbial communities and subsequently affect soil biogeochemical processes. The interactive effects of multiple co-occurring climate change factors on microbially mediated processes are not well understood. A four-factorial field experiment with elevated CO2, watering, nitrogen (N) addition and night warming was conducted in a temperate steppe of northern China. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, combined with clone library techniques, were applied to examine the effects of those climate change factors on N-related microbial abundance and community composition. Only the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria significantly increased by nitrogen addition and decreased by watering. The interactions of watering × warming on the bacterial amoA community and warming × nitrogen addition on the nosZ community were found. Redundancy analysis indicated that the ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community was affected by total N and total carbon, while the community of bacterial amoA and nosZ were significantly affected by soil pH. According to a structural equation modeling analysis, climate change influenced net primary production indirectly by altering microbial abundance and activities. These results indicated that microbial responses to the combination of chronic global change tend to be smaller than expected from single-factor global change manipulations. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A latent profile analysis of the Five Factor Model of personality: Modeling trait interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Erin L; Roesch, Scott C

    2011-12-01

    Interactions among the dimensions of the Five Factor Model (FFM) have not typically been evaluated in mental health research, with the extant literature focusing on bivariate relationships with psychological constructs of interest. This study used latent profile analysis to mimic higher-order interactions to identify homogenous personality profiles using the FFM, and also examined relationships between resultant profiles and affect, self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and coping efficacy. Participants (N = 371) completed self-report and daily diary questionnaires. A 3-profile solution provided the best fit to the data; the profiles were characterized as well-adjusted, reserved, and excitable. The well-adjusted group reported better psychological functioning in validation analyses. The reserved and excitable groups differed on anxiety, with the excitable group reporting generally higher anxiety than the reserved group. Latent profile analysis may be a parsimonious way to model personality heterogeneity.

  4. Estrogen and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampus: complexity of steroid hormone-growth factor interactions in the adult CNS.

    OpenAIRE

    SCHARFMAN, HELEN E.; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2006-01-01

    In the CNS, there are widespread and diverse interactions between growth factors and estrogen. Here we examine the interactions of estrogen and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), two molecules that have historically been studied separately, despite the fact that they seem to share common targets, effects, and mechanisms of action. The demonstration of an estrogen-sensitive response element on the BDNF gene provided an impetus to explore a direct relationship between estrogen and BDNF, ...

  5. Transcription initiation factor IID-interactive histone chaperone CIA-II implicated in mammalian spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Takashi; Horikoshi, Masami

    2003-09-12

    Histones are thought to have specific roles in mammalian spermatogenesis, because several subtypes of histones emerge that are post-translationally modified during spermatogenesis. Though regular assembly of nucleosome is guaranteed by histone chaperones, their involvement in spermatogenesis is yet to be characterized. Here we identified a histone chaperone-related factor, which we designated as CCG1-interacting factor A-II (CIA-II), through interaction with bromodomains of TAFII250/CCG1, which is the largest subunit of human transcription initiation factor IID (TFIID). We found that human CIA-II (hCIA-II) localizes in HeLa nuclei and is highly expressed in testis and other proliferating cell-containing tissues. Expression of mouse CIA-II (mCIA-II) does not occur in the germ cell-lacking testes of adult WBB6F1-W/Wv mutant mice, indicating its expression in testis to be specific to germ cells. Fractionation of testicular germ cells revealed that mCIA-II transcripts accumulate in pachytene spermatocytes but not in spermatids. In addition, the mCIA-II transcripts in testis were present as early as 4 days after birth and decreased at 56 days after birth. These findings indicate that mCIA-II expression in testis is restricted to premeiotic to meiotic stages during spermatogenesis. Also, we found that hCIA-II interacts with histone H3 in vivo and with histones H3/H4 in vitro and that it facilitates supercoiling of circular DNA when it is incubated with core histones and topoisomerase I in vitro. These data suggest that CIA-II is a histone chaperone and is implicated in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  6. Interactions between the spatial and temporal stimulus factors that influence multisensory integration in human performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A.; Fister, Juliane Krueger; Barnett, Zachary P.; Nidiffer, Aaron R.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    In natural environments, human sensory systems work in a coordinated and integrated manner to perceive and respond to external events. Previous research has shown that the spatial and temporal relationships of sensory signals are paramount in determining how information is integrated across sensory modalities, but in ecologically plausible settings, these factors are not independent. In the current study we provide a novel exploration of the impact on behavioral performance for systematic manipulations of the spatial location and temporal synchrony of a visual-auditory stimulus pair. Simple auditory and visual stimuli were presented across a range of spatial locations and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs), and participants performed both a spatial localization and simultaneity judgment task. Response times in localizing paired visual-auditory stimuli were slower in the periphery and at larger SOAs, but most importantly, an interaction was found between the two factors, in which the effect of SOA was greater in peripheral as opposed to central locations. Simultaneity judgments also revealed a novel interaction between space and time: individuals were more likely to judge stimuli as synchronous occurring in the periphery at large SOAs. The results of this study provide novel insights into (a) how the speed of spatial localization of an audiovisual stimulus is affected by location and temporal coincidence and the interaction between these two factors, and (b) how the location of a multisensory stimulus impacts judgments concerning the temporal relationship of the paired stimuli. These findings provide strong evidence for a complex interdependency between spatial location and temporal structure in determining the ultimate behavioral and perceptual outcome associated with a paired multisensory (i.e., visual-auditory) stimulus. PMID:22447249

  7. Molecular and Cellular Interactions between Mother and Fetus. Pregnancy as a Rejuvenating Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkov, V A; Silachev, D N; Jankauskas, S S; Zorova, L D; Pevzner, I B; Babenko, V A; Plotnikov, E Y; Zorov, D B

    2016-12-01

    Aging is associated with a decline of various body functions, including ability to regenerate. Over recent decades, it has been demonstrated that some of these changes could be reversed in response to factors originating from a young organism, for example, fetal stem cells or "young blood" in models of heterochronic parabiosis. Pregnancy might be considered as parabiotic model of the interaction between two organisms of different age. In this work, we analyzed and summarized data on the effects of pregnancy on the maternal organism that confirm the hypothesis that pregnancy rejuvenates the mother's organism or slows its aging.

  8. Interpersonal confidence as a factor in the prevention of disorganized interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dontsov, Aleksander I.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human communities are based on a certain set of everyday attitudes, on the coordination of the actions of “the self ” in a group, and on the regulation of social practices. The results of this study show that a number of factors act as determinants of trust/ distrust ambivalence: the multidimensionality and the dynamics of interactions among people; the high level of subjectivity in evaluating risks resulting from openness and from confidence in partners involved in an interaction; and a subject’s contradictory attitude toward the personal traits of an interacting partner (power, activity, honesty, trustworthiness. Japanese scholars have proved the necessity of taking into account quality of life (QOL as one of the determinants of the development of interpersonal confidence. The study demonstrates that people try to bring trust into their daily routines as a way of organizing conscientious, emotionally open interactions that take into account the interests of all parties. Mistrust blocks access to the emotional, intellectual, and activity-related resources supporting life and undermines faith in the possibility of virtue and morality. Yet a supplementary study (using instant diagnostics indicates that in practice respondents did not demonstrate a high level of confidence (in two cities it was 0%; in one city, it was 4.6%. In spite of emotionally positive views regarding trust, as well as constructive estimates of its moral/behavioral potential, a considerable number of respondents were not open and oriented to the interests of others. A tendency toward caution, inwardness, and constrained sincerity leads to nonconformity in one’s actions in a group and to changes in the vector of social practices from socio-partner regulation to disorganized interaction.

  9. Interactions between genes and environmental factors in asthma and atopy: new developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengler Claudia

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma and associated phenotypes are complex traits most probably caused by an interaction of multiple disease susceptibility genes and environmental factors. Major achievements have occurred in identifying chromosomal regions and polymorphisms in candidate genes linked to or associated with asthma, atopic dermatitis, IgE levels and response to asthma therapy. The aims of this review are to explain the methodology of genetic studies of multifactorial diseases, to summarize chromosomal regions and polymorphisms in candidate genes linked to or associated with asthma and associated traits, to list genetic alterations that may alter response to asthma therapy, and to outline genetic factors that may render individuals more susceptible to asthma and atopy due to environmental changes.

  10. Interaction of genetic and exposure factors in the prevalence of berylliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richeldi, L; Kreiss, K; Mroz, M M; Zhen, B; Tartoni, P; Saltini, C

    1997-10-01

    Prevalence of berylliosis, a lung disorder driven by the activation of beryllium-specific T cells, is associated with a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II marker (HLA-DPB1Glu69) and with the type of industrial exposure. We evaluated the interaction between marker and exposure in a beryllium-exposed population in which the prevalence of berylliosis was associated with machining beryllium. The presence of the marker was associated with higher prevalence (HLA-DPB1Glu69-positive machinists 25%; HLA-DPB1Glu69-negative machinists 3.2%, P = 0.05) and predicted berylliosis independent of machining history (odds ratios 11.8 and 10.1). The study shows that in berylliosis the carrier status of a genetic susceptibility factor adds to the effect of process-related risk factors.

  11. Assessment of potential drug–drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Murtaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug–drug interactions (DDIs may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug–drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug–drug interactions (pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug–drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55% or major severity (45%; established (24.2%, theoretical (18.8% or probable (57% type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001, hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001 and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001. We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs.

  12. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Muhammad Yasir Ghani; Azhar, Saira; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Khan, Tahir M

    2016-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug-drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug-drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55%) or major severity (45%); established (24.2%), theoretical (18.8%) or probable (57%) type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001), hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001) and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001). We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs.

  13. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of virulence factors in Leptosphaeria maculans during compatible and incompatible interactions with canola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humira Sonah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Leptosphaeria maculans is a hemibiotrophic fungus that causes blackleg of canola (Brassica napus, one of the most devastating diseases of this crop. In the present study, transcriptome profiling of L. maculans was performed in an effort to understand and define the pathogenicity genes that govern both the biotrophic and the necrotrophic phase of the fungus, as well as those that separate a compatible from an incompatible interaction. For this purpose, comparative RNA-seq analyses were performed on L. maculans isolate D5 at four different time points following inoculation on susceptible cultivar Topas-wild or resistant near isogenic line Topas-Rlm2. Analysis of 1.6 billion Illumina reads readily identified differentially expressed genes that were over represented by candidate secretory effector proteins, CAZymes, and other pathogenicity genes. Comparisons between the compatible and incompatible interactions led to the identification of 28 effector proteins whose chronology and level of expression suggested a role in the establishment and maintenance of biotrophy with the plant. These included all known Avr genes of isolate D5 along with eight newly characterized effectors. In addition, another 15 effector proteins were found to be exclusively expressed during the necrotrophic phase of the fungus, which supports the concept that L. maculans has a separate and distinct arsenal contributing to each phase. As for CAZymes, they were often highly expressed at 3 dpi but with no difference in expression between the compatible and incompatible interactions, indicating that other factors were necessary to determine the outcome of the interaction. However, their significantly higher expression at 11 dpi in the compatible interaction confirmed that they contributed to the necrotrophic phase of the fungus. A notable exception was LysM genes whose high expression was singularly observed on the susceptible host at 7 dpi. In the case of TFs, their higher

  14. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhaohua, E-mail: ztang@jsd.claremont.edu [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Lin, Ren-Jang [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony [Genome Damage and Stability Center, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  15. Yeast mitochondrial RNAP conformational changes are regulated by interactions with the mitochondrial transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakulic, Srdja; Wang, Liping; Cuéllar, Jorge; Guo, Qing; Velázquez, Gilberto; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Sousa, Rui; Valpuesta, José M

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial RNA polymerases (MtRNAPs) are members of the single-subunit RNAP family, the most well-characterized member being the RNAP from T7 bacteriophage. MtRNAPs are, however, functionally distinct in that they depend on one or more transcription factors to recognize and open the promoter and initiate transcription, while the phage RNAPs are capable of performing these tasks alone. Since the transcriptional mechanisms that are conserved in phage and mitochondrial RNAPs have been so effectively characterized in the phage enzymes, outstanding structure-mechanism questions concern those aspects that are distinct in the MtRNAPs, particularly the role of the mitochondrial transcription factor(s). To address these questions we have used both negative staining and cryo-EM to generate three-dimensional reconstructions of yeast MtRNAP initiation complexes with and without the mitochondrial transcription factor (MTF1), and of the elongation complex. Together with biochemical experiments, these data indicate that MTF1 uses multiple mechanisms to drive promoter opening, and that its interactions with the MtRNAP regulate the conformational changes undergone by the latter enzyme as it traverses the template strand.

  16. Chromophore incorporation, Pr to Pfr kinetics, and Pfr thermal reversion of recombinant N-terminal fragments of phytochrome A and B chromoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remberg, A; Ruddat, A; Braslavsky, S E; Gärtner, W; Schaffner, K

    1998-07-14

    N-Terminal apoprotein fragments of oat phytochrome A (phyA) of 65 kDa (amino acids 1-595) and potato phyB of 66 kDa (1-596) were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, and assembled with phytochromobilin (PthetaB; native chromophore) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). The phyA65 apoprotein from yeast showed a monoexponential assembly kinetics after an initial steep rise, whereas the corresponding apoprotein from E. coli showed only a slow monoexponential assembly. The phyB66 apoprotein incorporated either chromophore more slowly than the phyA65s, with biexponential kinetics. With all apoproteins, PthetaB was incorporated faster than PCB. The thermal stabilities of the Pfr forms of the N-terminal halves are similar to those known for the full-length recombinant phytochromes: oat phyA65 Pfr is highly stable, whereas potato phyB66 Pfr is rapidly converted into Pr. Thus, neither the C-terminal domain nor homodimer formation regulates this property. Rather, it is a characteristic of the phytochrome indicating its origin from mono- or dicots. The Pr to Pfr kinetics of the N-terminal phyA65 and phyB66 are different. The primary photoproduct I700 of phyA65-PCB decayed monoexponentially and the PthetaB analogue biexponentially, whereas the phyB66 I700 decayed monoexponentially irrespective of the chromophore incorporated. The formation of Pfr from Pr is faster with the N-terminal halves than with the full-length phytochromes, indicating an involvement of the C-terminal domain in the relatively slow protein conformational changes.

  17. Some results on 4~m2~n designs with clear two-factor interaction components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Clear effects criterion is one of the important rules for selecting optimal fractional factorial designs,and it has become an active research issue in recent years.Tang et al.derived upper and lower bounds on the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions(2fi’s) in 2n-(n-k) fractional factorial designs of resolutions III and IV by constructing a 2n-(n-k) design for given k,which are only restricted for the symmetrical case.This paper proposes and studies the clear effects problem for the asymmetrical case.It improves the construction method of Tang et al.for 2n-(n-k) designs with resolution III and derives the upper and lower bounds on the maximum number of clear two-factor interaction components(2fic’s) in 4m2n designs with resolutions III and IV.The lower bounds are achieved by constructing specific designs.Comparisons show that the number of clear 2fic’s in the resulting design attains its maximum number in many cases,which reveals that the construction methods are satisfactory when they are used to construct 4m2n designs under the clear effects criterion.

  18. Some results on 4m2n designs with clear two-factor interaction components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO ShengLi; ZHANG RunChu; LIU MinQian

    2008-01-01

    Clear effects criterion is one of the important rules for selecting optimal fractional factorial designs, and it has become an active research issue in recent years.Tang et al. derived upper and lower bounds on the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions (2fi's) in 2n-(n-k)fractional factorial designs of resolutions Ⅲ and Ⅳ by constructing a 2n-(n-k) design for given k, which are only restricted for the symmetrical case. This paper proposes and studies the clear effects problem for the asymmetrical case. It improves the construction method of Tang et al. for 2n-(n-k)designs with resolution Ⅲ and derives the upper and lower bounds on the maximum number of clear two-factor interaction components(2fic's) in 4m2n designs with resolutions Ⅲ and Ⅳ. The lower bounds are achieved by constructing specific designs. Comparisons show that the number of clear 2fic's in the resulting design attains its maximum number in many cases, which reveals that the construction methods are satisfactory when they are used to construct 4m2n designs under the clear effects criterion.

  19. The Myb-domain protein ULTRAPETALA1 INTERACTING FACTOR 1 controls floral meristem activities in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Fanny; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Blanvillain, Robert; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François; Morel, Patrice; Trehin, Christophe; Carles, Cristel C

    2016-04-01

    Higher plants continuously and iteratively produce new above-ground organs in the form of leaves, stems and flowers. These organs arise from shoot apical meristems whose homeostasis depends on coordination between self-renewal of stem cells and their differentiation into organ founder cells. This coordination is stringently controlled by the central transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS), which is both necessary and sufficient for stem cell specification in Arabidopsis thaliana ULTRAPETALA1 (ULT1) was previously identified as a plant-specific, negative regulator of WUS expression. However, molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation remain unknown. ULT1 protein contains a SAND putative DNA-binding domain and a B-box, previously proposed as a protein interaction domain in eukaryotes. Here, we characterise a novel partner of ULT1, named ULT1 INTERACTING FACTOR 1 (UIF1), which contains a Myb domain and an EAR motif. UIF1 and ULT1 function in the same pathway for regulation of organ number in the flower. Moreover, UIF1 displays DNA-binding activity and specifically binds to WUS regulatory elements. We thus provide genetic and molecular evidence that UIF1 and ULT1 work together in floral meristem homeostasis, probably by direct repression of WUS expression. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. The Interaction Effects of Meteorological Factors and Air Pollution on the Development of Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Lin, Heng-Cheng; Tsai, Chen-Dao; Huang, Hung-Kai; Lian, Ie-Bin; Chang, Chia-Chu

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the interaction effects of meteorological factors and air pollutants on the onset of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Data of ACS patients were obtained from the Taiwan ACS Full Spectrum Registry and comprised 3164 patients with a definite onset date during the period October 2008 and January 2010 at 39 hospitals. Meteorological conditions and air pollutant concentrations at the 39 locations during the 488-day period were obtained. Time-lag Poisson and logistic regression were used to explore their association with ACS incidence. One-day lag atmospheric pressure (AP), humidity, particulate matter (PM2.5, and PM10), and carbon monoxide (CO) all had significant interaction effects with temperature on ACS occurrence. Days on which high temperatures (>26 °C) and low AP (ACS. Typhoon Morakot was an example of high temperature with extremely low AP associated with higher ACS incidence than the daily average. Combinations of high concentrations of PM or CO with low temperatures (ACS. Atmospheric pollution and weather factors have synergistic effects on the incidence of ACS.

  1. Screening and identification of host factors interacting with UL14 of herpes simplex virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuqing; Xing, Junji; Wang, Shuai; Li, Meili; Zheng, Chunfu

    2011-08-01

    The UL14 protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is highly conserved in herpesvirus family. However, its exact function during the HSV-1 replication cycle is little known. In the present study, a high throughput yeast two-hybrid system was employed to screen the cellular factors interacting with UL14, and five target candidates were yielded: (1) TSC22 domain family protein 3 (TSC22D3); (2) Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 8 isoform 1(MED8); (3) Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3); (4) Arrestin beta-2 (ARRB2); (5) Cereblon (CRBN). Indirect immunofluorescent assay showed that both TSC22D3 and MED8 co-localized with UL14. Co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that UL14 could be immunoprecipitated by TSC22D3, suggesting that UL14 interacted with TSC22D3 under physiological condition. In summary, this study opened up new avenues toward delineating the function and physiological significance of UL14 during the HSV-1 replication cycle.

  2. The Interaction Effects of Meteorological Factors and Air Pollution on the Development of Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Lin, Heng-Cheng; Tsai, Chen-Dao; Huang, Hung-Kai; Lian, Ie-Bin; Chang, Chia-Chu

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction effects of meteorological factors and air pollutants on the onset of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Data of ACS patients were obtained from the Taiwan ACS Full Spectrum Registry and comprised 3164 patients with a definite onset date during the period October 2008 and January 2010 at 39 hospitals. Meteorological conditions and air pollutant concentrations at the 39 locations during the 488-day period were obtained. Time-lag Poisson and logistic regression were used to explore their association with ACS incidence. One-day lag atmospheric pressure (AP), humidity, particulate matter (PM2.5, and PM10), and carbon monoxide (CO) all had significant interaction effects with temperature on ACS occurrence. Days on which high temperatures (>26 °C) and low AP (ACS. Typhoon Morakot was an example of high temperature with extremely low AP associated with higher ACS incidence than the daily average. Combinations of high concentrations of PM or CO with low temperatures (ACS. Atmospheric pollution and weather factors have synergistic effects on the incidence of ACS. PMID:28276507

  3. Apple FLOWERING LOCUS T proteins interact with transcription factors implicated in cell growth and organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimida, Naozumi; Kidou, Shin-Ichiro; Iwanami, Hiroshi; Moriya, Shigeki; Abe, Kazuyuki; Voogd, Charlotte; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika; Kotoda, Nobuhiro

    2011-05-01

    Understanding the flowering process in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) is essential for developing methods to shorten the breeding period and regulate fruit yield. It is known that FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) acts as a transmissible floral inducer in the Arabidopsis flowering network system. To clarify the molecular network of two apple FT orthologues, MdFT1 and MdFT2, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that interact with MdFT1. We identified several transcription factors, including two members of the TCP (TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA and PROLIFERATING CELL FACTORs) family, designated MdTCP2 and MdTCP4, and an Arabidopsis thaliana VOZ1 (Vascular plant One Zinc finger protein1)-like protein, designated MdVOZ1. MdTCP2 and MdVOZ1 also interacted with MdFT2 in yeast. The expression domain of MdTCP2 and MdVOZ1 partially overlapped with that of MdFT1 and MdFT2, most strikingly in apple fruit tissue, further suggesting a potential interaction in vivo. Constitutive expression of MdTCP2, MdTCP4 and MdVOZ1 in Arabidopsis affected plant size, leaf morphology and the formation of leaf primordia on the adaxial side of cotyledons. On the other hand, chimeric MdTCP2, MdTCP4 and MdVOZ1 repressors that included the ethylene-responsive transcription factors (ERF)-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) domain motif influenced reproduction and inflorescence architecture in transgenic Arabidopsis. These results suggest that MdFT1 and/or MdFT2 might be involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and the formation of new tissues and that they might affect leaf and fruit development by interacting with TCP- and VOZ-family proteins. DDBJ accession nos. AB531019 (MdTCP2a mRNA), AB531020 (MdTCP2b mRNA), AB531021 (MdTCP4a mRNA), AB531022 (MdTCP4b mRNA) and AB531023 (MdVOZ1a mRNA). © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  4. Weak minimum aberration and maximum number of clear two-factor interactions in 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Guijun

    2005-01-01

    [1]Wu, C. F. J., Chen, Y., A graph-aided method for planning two-level experiments when certain interactions are important, Technometrics, 1992, 34: 162-175.[2]Fries, A., Hunter, W, G., Minimum aberration 2к-p designs, Technometrics, 1980, 22: 601-608.[3]Chen, H., Hedayat, A. S., 2n-l designs with weak minimum aberration, Ann. Statist., 1996, 24: 2536-2548.[4]Chen, J., Some results on 2n-к fractional factorial designs and search for minimum aberration designs, Ann.Statist., 1992, 20: 2124-2141.[5]Chen, J., Intelligent search for 213-6 and 214-7 minimum aberration designs, Statist. Sinica, 1998, 8: 1265-1270.[6]Chen, J., Sun, D. X., Wu, C. F. J., A catalogue of two-level and three-level fractional factorial designs with small runs, Internat. Statist. Rev., 1993, 61: 131-145.[7]Chen, J., Wu, C. F. J., Some results on 2n-к fractional factorial designs with minimum aberration or optimal moments, Ann. Statist., 1991, 19: 1028-1041.[8]Cheng, C. S., Mukerjee, R., Regular fractional factorial designs with minimum aberration and maximum estimation capacity, Ann. Statist., 1998, 26: 2289-2300.[9]Cheng, C. S., Steinberg, D. M., Sun, D. X., Minimum aberration and model robustness for two-level fractional factorial designs, J. Roy. Statist. Soc. Ser. B, 1999, 61: 85-93.[10]Draper, N. R., Lin, D. K. J., Capacity consideration for two-level fractional factorial designs, J. Statist. Plann.Inference, 1990, 24: 25-35.[11]Fang, K. T., Mukerjee, R., A connection between uniformity and aberration in regular fractions of two-level factorial, Biometrika, 2000, 87: 193-198.[12]Tang, B., Wu, C. F. J., Characterization of minimum aberration 2n-к designs in terms of their complementary designs, Ann. Statist., 1996, 24: 2549-2559.[13]Chen, H., Hedayat, A. S., 2n-m designs with resolution Ⅲ or Ⅳ containing clear two-factor interactions, J.Statist. Plann. Inference, 1998, 75: 147-158.[14]Tang, B., Ma, F., Ingram, D., Wang, H., Bounds on the maximum numbers of clear two factor

  5. NRC-interacting factor directs neurite outgrowth in an activity-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X-S; Fu, W-Y; Hung, K-W; Chien, W W Y; Li, Z; Fu, A K; Ip, N Y

    2015-03-19

    Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) is a zinc finger nuclear protein that was initially identified to enhance nuclear hormone receptor transcription via its interaction with nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC). NIF-1 may regulate gene transcription either by modulating general transcriptional machinery or remodeling chromatin structure through interactions with specific protein partners. We previously reported that the cytoplasmic/nuclear localization of NIF-1 is regulated by the neuronal Cdk5 activator p35, suggesting potential neuronal functions for NIF-1. The present study reveals that NIF-1 plays critical roles in regulating neuronal morphogenesis at early stages. NIF-1 was prominently expressed in the nuclei of developing rat cortical neurons. Knockdown of NIF-1 expression attenuated both neurite outgrowth in cultured cortical neurons and retinoic acid (RA)-treated Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, activity-induced Ca(2+) influx, which is critical for neuronal morphogenesis, stimulated the nuclear localization of NIF-1 in cortical neurons. Suppression of NIF-1 expression reduced the up-regulation of neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. These findings collectively suggest that NIF-1 directs neuronal morphogenesis during early developmental stages through modulating activity-dependent gene transcription.

  6. Principles for Designing Theatre with an Emphasis on Interactive Space Language Factors Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Ahmad Koochak Khoshnevis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Theater encourages intentional public gathering and Street performances. Buildings turn to backdrop and performers not only perform next to the walls but also play on the walls, whiles they forget and their safety and gravity, giving the human image to the concrete wall. In this regard, current study refers to designing of the theatre hall with an emphasis on interactive space language factors aspects. The research method is analytical- descriptive approach and its type is Applied- developing. Theoretical foundations have been collected in library base study. Thematic scope is: environment, city, space, interaction, and theater. The results shows that a theater that wants also have interactive features on your there are two general areas that each of them have their own characteristics; indoor and outdoor. The interior is the strongest part of including form of the hall the greatest impact and relationship between actors and audience. The form and layout theater seats covers space in front of building quality and out building the peripheral functions set location collection, etc.

  7. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 may interact with nuclear protein RASSF1C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xudong Chen; Zhenwu Li; Jin Zhang; Zuohua Mao; Duan Ma; Huijun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) is a 32 kDa matrix-associated Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitor consisting of a short amino-terminal region,three tandem Kunitz-type domains,and a positively charged carboxyterminal tail.Human TFPI-2 (hTFPI-2) inhibits a broad spectrum of serine proteinases (including trypsin,plasmin,plasma kallikrein,XIa,and chymotrypsin) almost exclusively via its first Kunitz-type domain,and potentially plays an important role in the regulation of extracellular matrix digestion and remodeling [1].Reduced TFPI-2 synthesis has been related to numerous pathophysiological processes such as inflammation,angiogenesis,atherosclerosis [2,3],retinal degeneration,and tumor growth/metastasis [4-6].It has been suggested that TFPI-2 is a tumor suppressor gene in some cancers [7,8].However,the specific physiological functions of hTFPI-2 in humans are unclear,particularly its interactions with other proteins.To better understand the physiological function of hTFPI-2,we used yeast two-hybrid system screening and bioinformatics analysis to identify its interacting proteins and confirm its interactions with nuclear protein RASSF1C using confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation.

  8. Dissection of the interaction between the intrinsically disordered YAP protein and the transcription factor TEAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesrouze, Yannick; Bokhovchuk, Fedir; Meyerhofer, Marco; Fontana, Patrizia; Zimmermann, Catherine; Martin, Typhaine; Delaunay, Clara; Erdmann, Dirk; Schmelzle, Tobias; Chène, Patrick

    2017-04-21

    TEAD (TEA/ATTS domain) transcription factors are the most distal effectors of the Hippo pathway. YAP (Yes-associated protein) is a coactivator protein which, upon binding to TEAD proteins, stimulates their transcriptional activity. Since the Hippo pathway is deregulated in various cancers, designing inhibitors of the YAP:TEAD interaction is an attractive therapeutic strategy for oncology. Understanding the molecular events that take place at the YAP:TEAD interface is therefore important not only to devise drug discovery approaches, but also to gain knowledge on TEAD regulation. In this report, combining single site-directed mutagenesis and double mutant analyses, we conduct a detailed analysis on the role of several residues located at the YAP:TEAD interface. Our results provide quantitative understanding of the interactions taking place at the YAP:TEAD interface and give insights into the formation of the YAP:TEAD complex and more particularly on the interaction between TEAD and the Ω-loop found in YAP.

  9. Blue-light mediated accumulation of nuclear-encoded transcripts coding for proteins of the thylakoid membrane is absent in the phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelmüller, R; Kendrick, R E; Briggs, W R

    1989-08-01

    Polyclonal antibodies against pea phytochrome detect 2 protein bands (about 116 and 120 kDa) on blots of crude protein extracts and protein of microsomal preparations of dark-grown tomato seedlings. Both protein bands are undetectable in Western blots of the aurea mutant extracts. Neither protein band is detectable after isogenic wild-type seedlings are illuminated with 3 h of red light, either in the crude extract or in the membrane fraction of the irradiated seedlings; this result is consistent with the hypothesis that both bands are phytochrome. When dark-grown wild-type seedlings are illuminated with 3 h of red light or blue light against a red light background, the transcript levels for chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins of photosystem I and II, plastocyanin, and the subunit II of photosystem I increase. In all cases, the same fluence rate of blue light is much more effective than red light alone, a result that indicates the involvement of a blue/UV-A light photoreceptor in addition to the involvement of the far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome, Pfr. The aurea mutant responds neither to red light nor to blue light. Thus, no Pfr-independent induction of the four transcripts by a blue/UV-A light photoreceptor can be measured in the aurea mutant.

  10. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Pieper, Rembert; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Townsend, Katherine; Yu, Chenggang; Yu, Xueping; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is an infectious intracellular pathogen whose virulence and resistance to antibiotics makes it a potential bioterrorism agent. Given its genetic origin as a commensal soil organism, it is equipped with an extensive and varied set of adapted mechanisms to cope with and modulate host-cell environments. One essential virulence mechanism constitutes the specialized secretion systems that are designed to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert pathogen proteins directly into the host cell's cytosol. However, the secretion systems' proteins and, in particular, their host targets are largely uncharacterized. Here, we used a combined in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach to identify B. mallei proteins required for pathogenicity. We used bioinformatics tools, including orthology detection and ab initio predictions of secretion system proteins, as well as published experimental Burkholderia data to initially select a small number of proteins as putative virulence factors. We then used yeast two-hybrid assays against normalized whole human and whole murine proteome libraries to detect and identify interactions among each of these bacterial proteins and host proteins. Analysis of such interactions provided both verification of known virulence factors and identification of three new putative virulence proteins. We successfully created insertion mutants for each of these three proteins using the virulent B. mallei ATCC 23344 strain. We exposed BALB/c mice to mutant strains and the wild-type strain in an aerosol challenge model using lethal B. mallei doses. In each set of experiments, mice exposed to mutant strains survived for the 21-day duration of the experiment, whereas mice exposed to the wild-type strain rapidly died. Given their in vivo role in pathogenicity, and based on the yeast two-hybrid interaction data, these results point to the importance of these pathogen proteins in modulating host ubiquitination pathways, phagosomal escape, and actin

  11. Regional factors interact with educational and income tax levels to influence food intake in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyndels, K; Dallongeville, J; Simon, C; Bongard, V; Wagner, A; Ruidavets, J-B; Arveiler, D; Ferrières, J; Amouyel, P; Dauchet, L

    2011-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to assess whether geographic factors affect the relationship between socioeconomic indicators and adherence to the French National Nutritional Health Programme (Programme National Nutrition Santé (PNNS)) guidelines. The MONA LISA-NUT study (2005-2007) is a cross-sectional survey of a representative sample from northern, northeastern and southwestern France. Educational level and household income tax were recorded by trained interviewers. Food intake was assessed with a 3-day food diary in 3188 subjects aged from 35-64 years. Adherence to the PNNS guidelines was assessed with a validated score (the French score of indicators of the PNNS objective (FSIPO)). Multivariate analyses were adjusted for gender, age, marital status, body mass index, energy intake and medically prescribed diets. The FSIPO score was higher in southwestern France than in the two other regions (P<0.0001). The FSIPO score was correlated with the educational level in northern and northeastern France (P<0.0001) but not in southwestern France (region-education interaction: P<0.001). This interaction was accounted for by fruit and vegetable (P<0.0001), calcium (P=0.03), saturated fatty acid (P<0.0001), and fibre (P=0.0001) components of the FSIPO score. In contrast, the income tax level and the FSIPO score were positively correlated (P<0.0001) to a similar extent in all three regions (region × income tax interaction: P=0.09). The relationship between educational level and adherence to the national nutritional health guidelines differs from one region of France to another, suggesting that nutrition education programmes should perhaps be adapted on a regional basis. In contrast, guideline adherence is correlated with income tax level independently of geographical factors, suggesting that financial constraints on food choices are uniform across France.

  12. A general pairwise interaction model provides an accurate description of in vivo transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Santolini

    Full Text Available The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs, in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM, a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting

  13. Factors influencing interactions in zoos: animal-keeper relationship, animal-public interactions and solitary animals groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Quintavalle Pastorino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Interactions that animals experience can have a significant influence on their health and welfare. These interactions can occur between animals themselves, but also between animals and keepers, and animals and the public. Human and non-human animals come into contact with each other in a variety of settings, and wherever there is contact there is the opportunity for interaction to take place. Interaction with companion animals are well known, but human–animal interaction (HAR (Hosey, 2008 also occurs in the context of farms (Hemsworth and Gonyou, 1997; Hemsworth, 2003, laboratories (Chang and Hart, 2002, zoos (Kreger and Mench, 1995 and even the wild (e.g. Cassini, 2001. This project proposes a permanent monitoring scheme to record animal-human interactions and animal-animal interactions in zoos. This will be accompanied by a survey of animal personality for welfare, husbandry, breeding programs and reintroduction purposes. The pilot project is currently based on direct monitoring of animal behaviour, use of time lapse cameras and animal personality questionnaires completed by experienced keepers. The goal of this project is to create a network between zoos to explore the aforementioned interactions to produce husbandry protocols and explore personality and behavioural traits in multiple species. We present provisional data regarding polar bear (Fasano Zoosafari, Italy, Sumatran tigers, Amur tigers and Asiatic lion (ZSL London and Whipsnade zoo interactions with humans and conspecifics. This data is collected across a broad range of environmental conditions and outlines the monitoring protocols developed to collect this data. The first year data show the great adaptability of these species to ex situ environments, low or absent negative impact of visitors’ presence and the relevance of individual personality in these interactions.

  14. Interaction of complement factor h and fibulin3 in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Wyatt

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a major cause of vision loss. It is associated with development of characteristic plaque-like deposits (soft drusen in Bruch's membrane basal to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. A sequence variant (Y402H in short consensus repeat domain 7 (SCR7 of complement factor H (CFH is associated with risk for "dry" AMD. We asked whether the eye-targeting of this disease might be related to specific interactions of CFH SCR7 with proteins expressed in the aging human RPE/choroid that could contribute to protein deposition in drusen. Yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H screens of a retinal pigment epithelium/choroid library derived from aged donors using CFH SCR7 baits detected an interaction with EFEMP1/Fibulin 3 (Fib3, which is the locus for an inherited macular degeneration and also accumulates basal to macular RPE in AMD. The CFH/Fib3 interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of native proteins. Quantitative Y2H and ELISA assays with different recombinant protein constructs both demonstrated higher affinity for Fib3 for the disease-related CFH 402H variant. Immuno-labeling revealed colocalization of CFH and Fib3 in globular deposits within cholesterol-rich domains in soft drusen in two AMD donors homozygous for CFH 402H (H/H. This pattern of labeling was quite distinct from those seen in examples of eyes with Y/Y and H/Y genotypes. The CFH 402H/Fib3 interaction could contribute to the development of pathological aggregates in soft drusen in some patients and as such might provide a target for therapeutic intervention in some forms of AMD.

  15. Nuclear import of transcription factor BR-C is mediated by its interaction with RACK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daojun Cheng

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Broad Complex (BR-C is an early ecdysone response gene in insects and contains two types of domains: two zinc finger domains for the activation of gene transcription and a Bric-a-brac/Tramtrack/Broad complex (BTB domain for protein-protein interaction. Although the mechanism of zinc finger-mediated gene transcription is well studied, the partners interacting with the BTB domain of BR-C has not been elucidated until now. Here, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using the BTB domain of silkworm BR-C as bait and identified the receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1, a scaffolding/anchoring protein, as the novel partner capable of interacting with BR-C. The interaction between BR-C and RACK1 was further confirmed by far-western blotting and pull-down assays. Importantly, the disruption of this interaction, via RNAi against the endogenous RACK1 gene or deletion of the BTB domain, abolished the nuclear import of BR-C in BmN4 cells. In addition, RNAi against the endogenous PKC gene as well as phosphorylation-deficient mutation of the predicted PKC phosphorylation sites at either Ser373 or Thr406 in BR-C phenocopied RACK1 RNAi and altered the nuclear localization of BR-C. However, when BTB domain was deleted, phosphorylation mimics of either Ser373 or Thr406 had no effect on the nuclear import of BR-C. Moreover, mutating the PKC phosphorylation sites at Ser373 and Thr406 or deleting the BTB domain significantly decreased the transcriptional activation of a BR-C target gene. Given that RACK1 is necessary for recruiting PKC to close and phosphorylate target proteins, we suggest that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation and nuclear import of BR-C is determined by its interaction with RACK1. This novel finding will be helpful for further deciphering the mechanism underlying the role of BR-C proteins during insect development.

  16. Insights into mRNP biogenesis provided by new genetic interactions among export and transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estruch Francisco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The various steps of mRNP biogenesis (transcription, processing and export are interconnected. It has been shown that the transcription machinery plays a pivotal role in mRNP assembly, since several mRNA export factors are recruited during transcription and physically interact with components of the transcription machinery. Although the shuttling DEAD-box protein Dbp5p is concentrated on the cytoplasmic fibrils of the NPC, previous studies demonstrated that it interacts physically and genetically with factors involved in transcription initiation. Results We investigated the effect of mutations affecting various components of the transcription initiation apparatus on the phenotypes of mRNA export mutant strains. Our results show that growth and mRNA export defects of dbp5 and mex67 mutant strains can be suppressed by mutation of specific transcription initiation components, but suppression was not observed for mutants acting in the very first steps of the pre-initiation complex (PIC formation. Conclusions Our results indicate that mere reduction in the amount of mRNP produced is not sufficient to suppress the defects caused by a defective mRNA export factor. Suppression occurs only with mutants affecting events within a narrow window of the mRNP biogenesis process. We propose that reducing the speed with which transcription converts from initiation and promoter clearance to elongation may have a positive effect on mRNP formation by permitting more effective recruitment of partially-functional mRNP proteins to the nascent mRNP.

  17. Transcription factor PIF4 controls the thermosensory activation of flowering

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. Vinod

    2012-03-21

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by small differences in temperature. Current climate change has already altered global plant phenology and distribution, and projected increases in temperature pose a significant challenge to agriculture. Despite the important role of temperature on plant development, the underlying pathways are unknown. It has previously been shown that thermal acceleration of flowering is dependent on the florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). How this occurs is, however, not understood, because the major pathway known to upregulate FT, the photoperiod pathway, is not required for thermal acceleration of flowering. Here we demonstrate a direct mechanism by which increasing temperature causes the bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) to activate FT. Our findings provide a new understanding of how plants control their timing of reproduction in response to temperature. Flowering time is an important trait in crops as well as affecting the life cycles of pollinator species. A molecular understanding of how temperature affects flowering will be important for mitigating the effects of climate change. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  18. Capillary Zone Electrophoresis Investigation of Interactions between Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor and Dextran Sulfate / Carrageenan Oligosaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai Ye LIANG; Yu Guang DU; Ke Yi WANG; Bing Cheng LIN

    2005-01-01

    The interactions between granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dextran sulfate / κ-carrageenan oligosa1ccharide were studied by capillary zone electrophoresis. Dextran sulfate could strongly interact with G-CSF and the complex was detected. The binding constant and stoichiometry were determined to be 1.2x106 (mol/L)-1 and 3:1, respectively. However, the interaction between κ-carrageenan oligosaccharide and G-CSF was not found.

  19. Interactions Between Genetic Variants and Breast Cancer Risk Factors in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Le Marchand, Loic; Haiman, Christopher A.; Travis, Ruth C.; Berg, Christine D.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Dostal, Lucie; Fournier, Agnes; Hankinson, Susan E.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; McCarty, Catherine A.; Overvad, Kim; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Riboli, Elio; Jose Sanchez, Maria; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Skeie, Guri; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Zhang, Shumin; Ziegler, Regina G.; Hunter, David J.; Lindstroem, Sara; Canzian, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, several genome-wide association studies have identified various genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. Relatively little is known about the possible interactions between these loci and the established risk factors for breast cancer. Methods To assess interactions between

  20. FUNCTIONAL INTERACTION OF LEXICAL AND GRAMMATICAL FACTORS IN THE ENGLISH VERB SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Sergeevna Kotova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the research conducted is revealing the peculiarities of lexical paradigmatics influence upon the usage of aspect and temporal verb forms and the opposite impact as well, i.e. the influence of aspect and temporal verb forms upon the lexical meaning of this verb groups under specific conditions of functioning. The lexical paradigmatics is considered as the system of mutually contrasted semantic features of particular verb groups. In this case, we analyze the paradigmatics in the middle language hierarchy for each language level separately. Methodology. The research is conducted synchronically on the material of the contemporary English verb system. Interaction of lexical and grammatical factors in the English verb system is examined in a functional aspect. Such consideration gives a possibility to differentiate the intrasystem phenomena and phenomena of pragmatic character and expose the system-structural mutual relations of lexical and grammatical factors. The research material is the verb as massive word group. From the point of view of interaction of lexical and grammatical factors in the functional and semantic field representing aspectuality, we get interested in the meaning which realizes in the opposition ofatelicity – telicity(telicity correlates the action with the limit, and atelicity demotes the action irrespectively to its limit. The technique applied to the analysis of lexical and grammatical factors in the English verb system is complex combining descriptive and comparative and functional methods. Results. Interrelations and interdependency of lexical and grammatical paradigmatics create particular sustainability in using the lexical unit of this paradigm with aspect and temporal verb forms. In this case, the tendencies of the language sign developing and changing are expressed in the process of the mutual substitution and interpenetration of grammatical forms primarily under the influence of paradigmatic

  1. Molecular level interaction of the human acidic fibroblast growth factor with the antiangiogenic agent, inositol hexaphosphate .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sriramoju M; Wang, Han-Min; Mohan, Sepuru K; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2010-12-21

    Acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) regulates a wide array of important biological phenomena such as angiogenesis, cell differentiation, tumor growth, and neurogenesis. Generally, FGFs are known for their strong affinity for the glycosaminoglycan heparin, as a prerequisite for recognition of a specific tyrosine kinase on the cell surface and are responsible for the cell signal transduction cascade. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a natural antioxidant and is known for its antiangiogenic role, in addition to its ability to control tumor growth. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of IP6 with the acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) using various biophysical techniques including isothermal calorimetry, circular dichroism, and multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Herein, we have reported the three-dimensional solution structure of the FGF1-IP6 complex. These data show that IP6 binds FGF1 and enhances its thermal stability. In addition, we also demonstrate that IP6 acts as an antagonist to acidic fibroblast growth factor by inhibiting its receptor binding and subsequently decreasing the mitogenic activity. The inhibition likely results in the ability of IP6 to antagonize the angiogenic and mitogenic activity of FGF1.

  2. Sex, temperament, and family context: how the interaction of early factors differentially predict adolescent alcohol use and are mediated by proximal adolescent factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Linnea R; Armstrong, Jeffrey M; Goldsmith, H Hill; Klein, Marjorie H; Strauman, Timothy J; Costanzo, Phillip; Essex, Marilyn J

    2011-03-01

    Adolescent alcohol use is common and has serious immediate and long-term ramifications. While concurrent individual and context factors are robustly associated with adolescent alcohol use, the influence of early childhood factors, particularly in interaction with child sex, are less clear. Using a prospective community sample of 362 (190 girls), this study investigated sex differences in the joint influence of distal childhood and proximal adolescent factors on Grade 10 alcohol use. All risk factors and two-way early individual-by-context interactions, and interactions of each of these with child sex, were entered into the initial regression. Significant sex interactions prompted the use of separate models for girls and boys. In addition to the identification of early (family socioeconomic status, authoritative parenting style) and proximal adolescent (mental health symptoms, deviant friends) risk factors for both girls and boys, results highlighted important sex differences. In particular, girls with higher alcohol consumption at Grade 10 were distinguished by the interaction of early temperamental disinhibition and exposure to parental stress; boys with higher alcohol consumption at Grade 10 were distinguished primarily by early temperamental negative affect. Results have implications for the timing and type of interventions offered to adolescents.

  3. Role of CBFs as Integrators of Chloroplast Redox, Phytochrome and Plant Hormone Signaling during Cold Acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman P. A. Hüner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cold acclimation of winter cereals and other winter hardy species is a prerequisite to increase subsequent freezing tolerance. Low temperatures upregulate the expression of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB1 which in turn induce the expression of COLD-REGULATED (COR genes. We summarize evidence which indicates that the integration of these interactions is responsible for the dwarf phenotype and enhanced photosynthetic performance associated with cold-acclimated and CBF-overexpressing plants. Plants overexpressing CBFs but grown at warm temperatures mimic the cold-tolerant, dwarf, compact phenotype; increased photosynthetic performance; and biomass accumulation typically associated with cold-acclimated plants. In this review, we propose a model whereby the cold acclimation signal is perceived by plants through an integration of low temperature and changes in light intensity, as well as changes in light quality. Such integration leads to the activation of the CBF-regulon and subsequent upregulation of COR gene and GA 2-oxidase (GA2ox expression which results in a dwarf phenotype coupled with increased freezing tolerance and enhanced photosynthetic performance. We conclude that, due to their photoautotrophic nature, plants do not rely on a single low temperature sensor, but integrate changes in light intensity, light quality, and membrane viscosity in order to establish the cold-acclimated state. CBFs appear to act as master regulators of these interconnecting sensing/signaling pathways.

  4. Assessment of Multifactor Gene-Environment Interactions and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Candidate Genes, Obesity, and Hormone-Related Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usset, Joseph L; Raghavan, Rama; Tyrer, Jonathan P; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Webb, Penelope; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Berchuck, Andrew; Brinton, Louise; Cunningham, Julie M; DeFazio, Anna; Doherty, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert P; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Goodman, Marc T; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Johnatty, Sharon E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne K; Larson, Melissa C; Lurie, Galina; Massuger, Leon; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Pike, Malcolm C; Ramus, Susan J; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph; Song, Honglin; Thompson, Pamela J; van den Berg, David J; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Pharoah, Paul; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L

    2016-05-01

    Many epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk factors relate to hormone exposure and elevated estrogen levels are associated with obesity in postmenopausal women. Therefore, we hypothesized that gene-environment interactions related to hormone-related risk factors could differ between obese and non-obese women. We considered interactions between 11,441 SNPs within 80 candidate genes related to hormone biosynthesis and metabolism and insulin-like growth factors with six hormone-related factors (oral contraceptive use, parity, endometriosis, tubal ligation, hormone replacement therapy, and estrogen use) and assessed whether these interactions differed between obese and non-obese women. Interactions were assessed using logistic regression models and data from 14 case-control studies (6,247 cases; 10,379 controls). Histotype-specific analyses were also completed. SNPs in the following candidate genes showed notable interaction: IGF1R (rs41497346, estrogen plus progesterone hormone therapy, histology = all, P = 4.9 × 10(-6)) and ESR1 (rs12661437, endometriosis, histology = all, P = 1.5 × 10(-5)). The most notable obesity-gene-hormone risk factor interaction was within INSR (rs113759408, parity, histology = endometrioid, P = 8.8 × 10(-6)). We have demonstrated the feasibility of assessing multifactor interactions in large genetic epidemiology studies. Follow-up studies are necessary to assess the robustness of our findings for ESR1, CYP11A1, IGF1R, CYP11B1, INSR, and IGFBP2 Future work is needed to develop powerful statistical methods able to detect these complex interactions. Assessment of multifactor interaction is feasible, and, here, suggests that the relationship between genetic variants within candidate genes and hormone-related risk factors may vary EOC susceptibility. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(5); 780-90. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Immunomodulator CD200 promotes neurotrophic activity by interacting with and activating the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Bjornsdottir, Halla; Christensen, Claus;

    2016-01-01

    in the suppression of microglia activation. We for the first time demonstrated that CD200 can interact with and transduce signaling through activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), thereby inducing neuritogenesis and promoting neuronal survival in primary neurons. CD200-induced FGFR...... phosphorylation was abrogated by CD200R, whereas FGF2-induced FGFR activation was inhibited by CD200. We also identified a sequence motif located in the first Ig-like module of CD200, likely representing the minimal CD200 binding site for FGFR. The FGFR binding motif overlaps with the CD200R binding site......, suggesting that they can compete for CD200 binding in cells that express both receptors. We propose that CD200 in neurons functions as a ligand of FGFR....

  6. Mapping interactions between mRNA export factors in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Fang Teng

    Full Text Available The TREX complex couples nuclear mRNA processing events with subsequent export to the cytoplasm. TREX also acts as a binding platform for the mRNA export receptor Nxf1. The sites of mRNA transcription and processing within the nucleus have been studied extensively. However, little is known about where TREX assembly takes place and where Nxf1 is recruited to TREX to form the export competent mRNP. Here we have used sensitized emission Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM-FRET, to produce a spatial map in living cells of the sites for the interaction of two TREX subunits, Alyref and Chtop, with Nxf1. Prominent assembly sites for export factors are found in the vicinity of nuclear speckles in regions known to be involved in transcription, splicing and exon junction complex formation highlighting the close coupling of mRNA export with mRNP biogenesis.

  7. Human telomere biology: A contributory and interactive factor in aging, disease risks, and protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Epel, Elissa S; Lin, Jue

    2015-12-04

    Telomeres are the protective end-complexes at the termini of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomere attrition can lead to potentially maladaptive cellular changes, block cell division, and interfere with tissue replenishment. Recent advances in the understanding of human disease processes have clarified the roles of telomere biology, especially in diseases of human aging and in some aging-related processes. Greater overall telomere attrition predicts mortality and aging-related diseases in inherited telomere syndrome patients, and also in general human cohorts. However, genetically caused variations in telomere maintenance either raise or lower risks and progression of cancers, in a highly cancer type-specific fashion. Telomere maintenance is determined by genetic factors and is also cumulatively shaped by nongenetic influences throughout human life; both can interact. These and other recent findings highlight both causal and potentiating roles for telomere attrition in human diseases.

  8. Transition Form Factors: A Unique Opportunity to Connect Non-Perturbative Strong Interactions to QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gothe, Ralf W. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Meson-photoproduction measurements and their reaction-amplitude analyses can establish more sensitively, and in some cases in an almost model-independent way, nucleon excitations and non-resonant reaction amplitudes. However, to investigate the strong interaction from explored — where meson-cloud degrees of freedom contribute substantially to the baryon structure — to still unexplored distance scales — where quark degrees of freedom dominate and the transition from dressed to current quarks occurs — we depend on experiments that allow us to measure observables that are probing this evolving non-perturbative QCD regime over its full range. Elastic and transition form factors are uniquely suited to trace this evolution by measuring elastic electron scattering and exclusive single-meson and double-pion electroproduction cross sections off the nucleon. These exclusive measurements will be extended to higher momentum transfers with the energy-upgraded CEBAF beam at JLab to study the quark degrees of freedom, where their strong interaction is responsible for the ground and excited nucleon state formations. After establishing unprecedented high-precision data, the imminent next challenge is a high-quality analysis to extract these relevant electrocoupling parameters for various resonances that then can be compared to state-of-the-art models and QCD-based calculations. Recent results will demonstrate the status of the analysis and of their theoretical descriptions, and an experimental and theoretical outlook will highlight what shall and may be achieved in the new era of the 12-GeV upgraded transition form factor program.

  9. Crepuscular flight activity of an invasive insect governed by interacting abiotic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yigen Chen

    Full Text Available Seasonal and diurnal flight patterns of the invasive walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis, were assessed between 2011 and 2014 in northern California, USA in the context of the effects of ambient temperature, light intensity, wind speed, and barometric pressure. Pityophthorus juglandis generally initiated flight in late January and continued until late November. This seasonal flight could be divided approximately into three phases (emergence: January-March; primary flight: May-July; and secondary flight: September-October. The seasonal flight response to the male-produced aggregation pheromone was consistently female-biased (mean of 58.9% females. Diurnal flight followed a bimodal pattern with a minor peak in mid-morning and a major peak at dusk (76.4% caught between 1800 and 2200 h. The primarily crepuscular flight activity had a Gaussian relationship with ambient temperature and barometric pressure but a negative exponential relationship with increasing light intensity and wind speed. A model selection procedure indicated that the four abiotic factors collectively and interactively governed P. juglandis diurnal flight. For both sexes, flight peaked under the following second-order interactions among the factors when: 1 temperature between was 25 and 30 °C and light intensity was less than 2000 lux; 2 temperature was between 25 and 35 °C and barometric pressure was between 752 and 762 mba (and declined otherwise; 3 barometric pressure was between 755 and 761 mba and light intensity was less than 2000 lux (and declined otherwise; and 4 temperature was ca. 30 °C and wind speed was ca. 2 km/h. Thus, crepuscular flight activity of this insect can be best explained by the coincidence of moderately high temperature, low light intensity, moderate wind speed, and low to moderate barometric pressure. The new knowledge provides physical and temporal guidelines for the application of semiochemical-based control techniques as part of an IPM

  10. Crepuscular Flight Activity of an Invasive Insect Governed by Interacting Abiotic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Seybold, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal and diurnal flight patterns of the invasive walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis, were assessed between 2011 and 2014 in northern California, USA in the context of the effects of ambient temperature, light intensity, wind speed, and barometric pressure. Pityophthorus juglandis generally initiated flight in late January and continued until late November. This seasonal flight could be divided approximately into three phases (emergence: January–March; primary flight: May–July; and secondary flight: September–October). The seasonal flight response to the male-produced aggregation pheromone was consistently female-biased (mean of 58.9% females). Diurnal flight followed a bimodal pattern with a minor peak in mid-morning and a major peak at dusk (76.4% caught between 1800 and 2200 h). The primarily crepuscular flight activity had a Gaussian relationship with ambient temperature and barometric pressure but a negative exponential relationship with increasing light intensity and wind speed. A model selection procedure indicated that the four abiotic factors collectively and interactively governed P. juglandis diurnal flight. For both sexes, flight peaked under the following second-order interactions among the factors when: 1) temperature between was 25 and 30°C and light intensity was less than 2000 lux; 2) temperature was between 25 and 35°C and barometric pressure was between 752 and 762 mba (and declined otherwise); 3) barometric pressure was between 755 and 761 mba and light intensity was less than 2000 lux (and declined otherwise); and 4) temperature was ca. 30°C and wind speed was ca. 2 km/h. Thus, crepuscular flight activity of this insect can be best explained by the coincidence of moderately high temperature, low light intensity, moderate wind speed, and low to moderate barometric pressure. The new knowledge provides physical and temporal guidelines for the application of semiochemical-based control techniques as part of an IPM program for

  11. Host-viral effects of chromatin assembly factor 1 interaction with HCMV IE2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Bau Lee; Li-Jung Juan; Chung-Fan Lee; Derick S-C Ou; Kalpana Dulal; Liang-Hao Chang; Chen-Han Ma; Chien-Fu Huang; Hua Zhu; Young-Sun Lin

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF1) consisting of p150, p60 and p48 is known to assemble histones onto newly synthesized DNA and thus maintain the chromatin structure. Here, we show that CAF1 expression was induced in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected cells, concomitantly with global chromatin decondensation. This apparent conflict was thought to result, in part, from CAF1 mislocalization to compartments of HCMV DNA synthesis through binding of its largest subunit p150 to viral immediate-early protein 2 (IE2). p150 interaction with p60 and IE2 facilitated HCMV DNA synthesis. The IE2Q548R mutation, previously reported to result in impaired HCMV growth with unknown mechanism, disrupted IE2/p150 and IE2/histones association in our study. Moreover, IE2 interaction with histones partly depends on p150, and the HCMV-induced chromatin decondensation was reduced in cells ectopically expressing the p150 mutant defective in IE2 binding. These results not only indicate that CAF1 was hijacked by IE2 to facilitate the replication of the HCMV genome, suggesting chromatin assembly plays an important role in herpesviral DNA synthesis, but also provide a model of the virus-induced chromatin instability through CAF1.

  12. DNA homologous recombination factor SFR1 physically and functionally interacts with estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Feng

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα, a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates the expression of its target genes by interacting with corepressors and coactivators. Since the first cloning of SRC1, more than 280 nuclear receptor cofactors have been identified, which orchestrate target gene transcription. Aberrant activity of ER or its accessory proteins results in a number of diseases including breast cancer. Here we identified SFR1, a protein involved in DNA homologous recombination, as a novel binding partner of ERα. Initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen, the interaction of SFR1 and ERα was confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation and mammalian one-hybrid assays. SFR1 co-localized with ERα in the nucleus, potentiated ER's ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transcriptional activity, and occupied the ER binding sites of its target gene promoters. Knockdown of SFR1 diminished ER's transcriptional activity. Manipulating SFR1 expression by knockdown and overexpression revealed a role for SFR1 in ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell proliferation. SFR1 differs from SRC1 by the lack of an intrinsic activation function. Taken together, we propose that SFR1 is a novel transcriptional modulator for ERα and a potential target in breast cancer therapy.

  13. Factors influencing gastrointestinal tract and microbiota immune interaction in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, María Carmen; Cernada, María; Neu, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Gormaz, María; Vento, Máximo

    2015-06-01

    The role of microbial colonization is indispensable for keeping a balanced immune response in life. However, the events that regulate the establishment of the microbiota, their timing, and the way in which they interact with the host are not yet fully understood. Factors such as gestational age, mode of delivery, environment, hygienic measures, and diet influence the establishment of microbiota in the perinatal period. Environmental microbes constitute the most important group of exogenous stimuli in this critical time frame. However, the settlement of a stable gut microbiota in preterm infants is delayed compared to term infants. Preterm infants have an immature gastrointestinal tract and immune system which predisposes to infectious morbidity. Neonatal microbial dynamics and alterations in early gut microbiota may precede and/or predispose to diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), late-onset sepsis or others. During this critical period, nutrition is the principal contributor for immunological and metabolic development, and microbiological programming. Breast milk is a known source of molecules that act synergistically to protect the gut barrier and enhance the maturation of the gut-related immune response. Host-microbe interactions in preterm infants and the protective role of diet focused on breast milk impact are beginning to be unveiled.

  14. Expression analysis of transcription factors from the interaction between cacao and Moniliophthora perniciosa (Tricholomataceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, M A; Hora, B T; Dias, C V; Santos, G C; Gramacho, K P; Cascardo, J C M; Gesteira, A S; Micheli, F

    2010-07-06

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is one of the most important tropical crops; however, production is threatened by numerous pathogens, including the hemibiotrophic fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa, which causes witches' broom disease. To understand the mechanisms that lead to the development of this disease in cacao, we focused our attention on cacao transcription factors (TFs), which act as master regulators of cellular processes and are important for the fine-tuning of plant defense responses. We developed a macroarray with 88 TF cDNA from previously obtained cacao-M. perniciosa interaction libraries. Seventy-two TFs were found differentially expressed between the susceptible (Catongo) and resistant (TSH1188) genotypes and/or during the disease time course--from 24 h to 30 days after infection. Most of the differentially expressed TFs belonged to the bZIP, MYB and WRKY families and presented opposite expression patterns in susceptible and resistant cacao-M. perniciosa interactions (i.e., up-regulated in Catongo and down-regulated in TSH1188). The results of the macroarray were confirmed for bZIP and WRKY TFs by real-time PCR. These differentially expressed TFs are good candidates for subsequent functional analysis as well as for plant engineering. Some of these TFs could also be localized on the cacao reference map related to witches' broom resistance, facilitating the breeding and selection of resistant cacao trees.

  15. The interactions between nerve growth factor and gonadotrophins in bovine oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunjin; Ma, Yonghe; Yi, Kangle; Wang, Chunqiang; Li, Wanhong; Liu, Zhuo; Sun, Lina; Chen, Shuxiong; Yu, Jiaxin; Li, Hongjiao; Chen, Lu; Zhou, Xu

    2014-10-01

    Nerve growth factor promotes the survival and differentiation of nervous cells and is thought to play an important role in the development of reproductive tissues. The aims of this work were to detect the presence of NGF and its receptor NTRK1 in bovine oviduct samples, and to investigate the regulatory interactions between NGF/NTRK1 and gonadotrophins in bovine oviduct epithelial cells. Both transcripts and proteins of NGF and NTRK1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting, and the corresponding proteins were specifically immunolocalized in oviduct epithelial cells. In addition, real-time PCR experiments revealed that the levels of NGF and NTRK1 mRNA in oviduct epithelial cells treated with exogenous FSH or LH were greater than those in negative control cells (PNGF significantly increased the expression of FSHR and LHR in oviduct epithelial cells via its effects on NTRK1 (PNGF/NTRK1 may have a role in regulating the function of bovine oviducts via its interactions with gonadotrophins.

  16. UTOPIAN: user-driven topic modeling based on interactive nonnegative matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jaegul; Lee, Changhyun; Reddy, Chandan K; Park, Haesun

    2013-12-01

    Topic modeling has been widely used for analyzing text document collections. Recently, there have been significant advancements in various topic modeling techniques, particularly in the form of probabilistic graphical modeling. State-of-the-art techniques such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) have been successfully applied in visual text analytics. However, most of the widely-used methods based on probabilistic modeling have drawbacks in terms of consistency from multiple runs and empirical convergence. Furthermore, due to the complicatedness in the formulation and the algorithm, LDA cannot easily incorporate various types of user feedback. To tackle this problem, we propose a reliable and flexible visual analytics system for topic modeling called UTOPIAN (User-driven Topic modeling based on Interactive Nonnegative Matrix Factorization). Centered around its semi-supervised formulation, UTOPIAN enables users to interact with the topic modeling method and steer the result in a user-driven manner. We demonstrate the capability of UTOPIAN via several usage scenarios with real-world document corpuses such as InfoVis/VAST paper data set and product review data sets.

  17. ηc elastic and transition form factors: Contact interaction and algebraic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedolla, Marco A.; Raya, Khépani; Cobos-Martínez, J. J.; Bashir, Adnan

    2016-05-01

    For the flavor-singlet heavy-quark system of charmonia in the pseudoscalar [ηc(1 S ) ] channel, we calculate the elastic (EFF) and transition form factors (TFFs) [ηc(1 S )→γ γ* ] for a wide range of photon momentum transfer squared (Q2). The framework for this analysis is provided by a symmetry-preserving Schwinger-Dyson equation and Bethe-Salpeter equation treatment of a vector×vector contact interaction. We also employ an algebraic model, developed earlier to describe the light-quark systems. It correctly correlates infrared and ultraviolet dynamics of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The contact interaction results agree with the lattice data for low Q2. For Q2≥Q02 , the results start deviating from the lattice results by more than 20%. Q02≈2.5 GeV2 for the EFF, and ≈25 GeV2 for the TFF. We also present the results for the EFF, TFF, and ηc(1 S ) parton distribution amplitude for the algebraic model. Wherever the comparison is possible, these results are in excellent agreement with the lattice, perturbative QCD, results obtained through a Schwinger-Dyson equation-Bethe-Salpeter equation study, employing refined truncations, and the experimental findings of the BABAR experiment.

  18. The length of the linker between the epidermal growth factor-like domains in factor VIIa is critical for a productive interaction with tissue factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Egon; Madsen, Jesper J; Olsen, Ole H

    2014-01-01

    Formation of the factor VIIa (FVIIa)-tissue factor (TF) complex triggers the blood coagulation cascade. Using a structure-based rationale, we investigated how the length of the linker region between the two epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains in FVIIa influences TF binding and the allosteric activity enhancement, as well as the interplay between the γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla)-containing and protease domains. Removal of two residues from the native linker was compatible with normal cofactor binding and accompanying stimulation of the enzymatic activity, as was extension by two (Gly-Ser) residues. In sharp contrast, truncation by three or four residues abolished the TF-mediated stabilization of the active conformation of FVIIa and abrogated TF-induced activity enhancement. In addition, FVIIa variants with short linkers associated 80-fold slower with soluble TF (sTF) as compared with wild-type FVIIa, resulting in a corresponding increase in the equilibrium dissociation constant. Molecular modeling suggested that the shortest FVIIa variants would have to be forced into a tense and energetically unfavorable conformation in order to be able to interact productively with TF, explaining our experimental observations. We also found a correlation between linker length and the residual intrinsic enzymatic activity of Ca2+-free FVIIa; stepwise truncation resulting in gradually higher activity with des(83–86)-FVIIa reaching the level of Gla-domainless FVIIa. The linker appears to determine the average distance between the negatively charged Gla domain and a structural element in the protease domain, presumably of opposite charge, and proximity has a negative impact on apo-FVIIa activity. PMID:25234571

  19. Root phototropism: how light and gravity interact in shaping plant form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, John Z; Correll, Melanie J; Mullen, Jack L; Hangarter, Roger P; Edelmann, Richard E

    2003-06-01

    The interactions among tropisms can be critical in determining the final growth form of plants and plant organs. We have studied tropistic responses in roots as an example of these type of interactions. While gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response in roots, phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth in this organ in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism. In the flowering plant Arabidopsis, the photosensitive pigments phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) mediate this positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. While blue-light-based negative phototropism is primarily mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors, the phyA and phyAB mutants (but not phyB) were inhibited in this response relative to the WT. The differences observed in phototropic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in plants and that phytochrome plays a key role in integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  20. Root phototropism: how light and gravity interact in shaping plant form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, John Z.; Correll, Melanie J.; Mullen, Jack L.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    The interactions among tropisms can be critical in determining the final growth form of plants and plant organs. We have studied tropistic responses in roots as an example of these type of interactions. While gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response in roots, phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth in this organ in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism. In the flowering plant Arabidopsis, the photosensitive pigments phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) mediate this positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. While blue-light-based negative phototropism is primarily mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors, the phyA and phyAB mutants (but not phyB) were inhibited in this response relative to the WT. The differences observed in phototropic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in plants and that phytochrome plays a key role in integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  1. Interactions between Social/ behavioral factors and ADRB2 genotypes may be associated with health at advanced ages in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Y.; Cheng, L. G.; Zhao, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Existing literature indicates that ADRB2 gene is associated with health and longevity, but none of previous studies investigated associations of carrying the ADRB2 minor alleles and interactions between ADRB2 genotypes and social/behavioral factors(GxE) with health outcomes at advanced...... and social/behavioral factors and various other potentially confounding factors, we develop and test an innovative three-step procedure which combines logistic regression and structural equation methods. Results: Interaction between regular exercise and carrying rs1042718 minor allele is significantly...... positive associations of interactions between social/behavioral factors and the ADRB2 genotypes with health outcomes of cognitive function and self-reported health, and negative associations of carrying rs1042718 or rs1042719 minor alleles with negative emotion, at advanced ages in China. Our findings...

  2. Imitative and Direct Learning as Interacting Factors in Life History Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullinaria, John A

    2017-01-01

    The idea that lifetime learning can have a significant effect on life history evolution has recently been explored using a series of artificial life simulations. These involved populations of competing individuals evolving by natural selection to learn to perform well on simplified abstract tasks, with the learning consisting of identifying regularities in their environment. In reality, there is more to learning than that type of direct individual experience, because it often includes a substantial degree of social learning that involves various forms of imitation of what other individuals have learned before them. This article rectifies that omission by incorporating memes and imitative learning into revised versions of the previous approach. To do this reliably requires formulating and testing a general framework for meme-based simulations that will enable more complete investigations of learning as a factor in any life history evolution scenarios. It does that by simulating imitative information transfer in terms of memes being passed between individuals, and developing a process for merging that information with the (possibly inconsistent) information acquired by direct experience, leading to a consistent overall body of learning. The proposed framework is tested on a range of learning variations and a representative set of life history factors to confirm the robustness of the approach. The simulations presented illustrate the types of interactions and tradeoffs that can emerge, and indicate the kinds of species-specific models that could be developed with this approach in the future.

  3. Effects of transforming growth interacting factor on biological behaviors of gastric carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Liang Hu; Ji-Fang Wen; De-Sheng Xiao; Hui Zhen; Chun-Yan Fu

    2005-01-01

    AIM:Transforming growth interacting factor (TGIF) is an inhibitor of both transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, the activation of MAPK pathway can prolong its half-life. However, its role in carcinogenesis is still unknown. Thus we attempted to investigate the effect of TGIF on biologic behaviors of gastric carcinoma cells.METHODS: Gastric carcinoma cell line, SGC-7901, was stably transfected with plasmid PcDNA3.1-TGIF. Western blotting and cell immunohistochemistry screening for the highly expressing clone of TGIF were employed. The growth of transfected cells was investigated by MTT and colonyformation assays, and apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry (FCM) and transmission electron microscopy.Tumorigenicity of the transfectant cells was also analyzed.RESULTS: TGIF had no effect on the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells, but cellular organelles of cells transfected with TGIF were richer than those of vector control or parental cells. Its clones were smaller than the control ones in plate efficiency, and its tumor tissues also had no obvious necrosis compared with the vector control or parental cells. Moreover, TGIF could resist TGF-β mediated growth inhibition.CONCLUSION: TGIF may induce differentiation of stomach neoplastic cells. In addition, TGIF can counteract the growth inhibition induced by TGF-β.

  4. Caenorhabditis elegans-based screen identifies Salmonella virulence factors required for conserved host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenor, Jennifer L; McCormick, Beth A; Ausubel, Frederick M; Aballay, Alejandro

    2004-06-01

    A Caenorhabditis elegans-Salmonella enterica host-pathogen model was used to identify both novel and previously known S. enterica virulence factors (HilA, HilD, InvH, SptP, RhuM, Spi4-F, PipA, VsdA, RepC, Sb25, RfaL, GmhA, LeuO, CstA, and RecC), including several related to the type III secretion system (TTSS) encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Mutants corresponding to presumptive novel virulence-related genes exhibited diminished ability to invade epithelial cells and/or to induce polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration in a tissue culture model of mammalian enteropathogenesis. When expressed in C. elegans intestinal cells, the S. enterica TTSS-exported effector protein SptP inhibited a conserved p38 MAPK signaling pathway and suppressed the diminished pathogenicity phenotype of an S. enterica sptP mutant. These results show that C. elegans is an attractive model to study the interaction between Salmonella effector proteins and components of the innate immune response, in part because there is a remarkable overlap between Salmonella virulence factors required for human and nematode pathogenesis.

  5. A cross-cultural study of relationships between daily social interaction and the five-factor model of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezlek, John B; Schütz, Astrid; Schröder-Abé, Michela; Smith, C Veronica

    2011-08-01

    Two studies, one in the United States (N = 130) and another in Germany (N = 100), examined relationships between daily social interaction and the traits of the Five-Factor Model. In both studies, student participants described their social interactions for 2 weeks using the Rochester Interaction Record. In both countries, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness were positively related to reactions to social interaction, whereas Neuroticism was unrelated to reactions to interactions. In the United States, Extraversion and Openness were positively related to reactions to interactions, whereas these factors were not related to reactions to interactions in Germany. In the United States, Extraversion was positively related to how socially active participants were, whereas none of the FFM traits was related to amount of social interaction in the German sample. In both countries, Extraversion was positively related to percent of interactions involving friends. The results highlight the importance of taking into account the sociocultural milieus within which personality unfolds. © 2011 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Trp(56) of rac1 specifies interaction with a subset of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y; Xing, J; Streuli, M; Leto, T L; Zheng, Y

    2001-12-14

    Signaling specificity of Rho GTPase pathways is achieved in part by selective interaction between members of the Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and their Rho GTPase substrates. For example, Trio, GEF-H1, and Tiam1 are a subset of GEFs that specifically activate Rac1 but not the closely related Cdc42. The Rac1 specificity of these GEFs appears to be governed by Rac1-GEF binding interaction. To understand the detailed mechanism underlying the GEF specificity issue, we have analyzed a panel of chimeras made between Rac1 and Cdc42 and examined a series of point mutants of Rac1 made at the switch I, switch II, and beta(2)/beta(3) regions for their ability to interact with and to be activated by the GEFs. The results reveal that Rac1 residues of both the switch I and switch II regions are involved in GEF docking and GEF-mediated nucleotide disruption, because mutation of Asp(38), Asn(39), Gln(61), Tyr(64), or Arg(66)/Leu(67) into Ala results in the loss of GEF binding, whereas mutation at Tyr(32), Asp(65), or Leu(70)/Ser(71) leads to the loss of GEF catalysis while retaining the binding capability. The region between amino acids 53-72 of Rac1 is required for specific recognition and activation by the GEFs, and Trp(56) in beta(3) appears to be the critical determinant. Introduction of Trp(56) to Cdc42 renders it fully responsive to the Rac-specific GEF in vitro and in cells. Further, a polypeptide derived from the beta(3) region of Rac1 including the Trp(56) residue serves as a specific inhibitor for Rac1 interaction with the GEFs. Taken together, these results indicate that Trp(56) is the necessary and sufficient determinant of Rac1 for discrimination by the subset of Rac1-specific GEFs and suggest that a compound mimicking Trp(56) action could be explored as an interfering reagent specifically targeting Rac1 activation.

  7. Regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Orazi Gabriella

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2 plays an essential role in restraining tumor progression as it may regulate, by itself or within multiprotein complexes, many proteins (mainly transcription factors involved in cell growth and apoptosis. This study takes advantage of the recent finding that HIPK2 may repress the β-catenin transcription activity. Thus, we investigated whether HIPK2 overexpression may down-regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF levels (a β-catenin target gene and the role of β-catenin in this regulation, in order to consider HIPK2 as a tool for novel anti-tumoral therapeutical approaches. Methods The regulation of VEGF expression by HIPK2 was evaluated by using luciferase assay with VEGF reporter construct, after overexpression of the β-catenin transcription factor. Relative quantification of VEGF and β-catenin mRNAs were assessed by reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analyses, following HIPK2 overexpression, while β-catenin protein levels were evaluated by western immunoblotting. Results HIPK2 overexpression in tumor cells downregulated VEGF mRNA levels and VEGF promoter activity. The VEGF downregulation was partly depending on HIPK2-mediated β-catenin regulation. Thus, HIPK2 could induce β-catenin protein degradation that was prevented by cell treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132. The β-catenin degradation was dependent on HIPK2 catalytic activity and independent of p53 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β activities. Conclusion These results suggest that VEGF might be a target of HIPK2, at least in part, through regulation of β-catenin activity. These findings support the function of HIPK2 as tumor suppressor and hypothesise a role for HIPK2 as antiangiogenic tool in tumor therapy approaches.

  8. Multiple interacting factors influence adherence, and outcomes associated with surgical safety checklists: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R Gagliardi

    Full Text Available The surgical safety checklist (SSC is meant to enhance patient safety but studies of its impact conflict. This study explored factors that influenced SSC adherence to suggest how its impact could be optimized.Participants were recruited purposively by profession, region, hospital type and time using the SSC. They were asked to describe how the SSC was adopted, associated challenges, perceived impact, and suggestions for improving its use. Grounded theory and thematic analysis were used to collect and analyse data. Findings were interpreted using an implementation fidelity conceptual framework.Fifty-one participants were interviewed (29 nurses, 13 surgeons, 9 anaesthetists; 18 small, 14 large and 19 teaching hospitals; 8 regions; 31 had used the SC for ≤12 months, 20 for 13+ months. The SSC was inconsistently reviewed, and often inaccurately documented as complete. Adherence was influenced by multiple issues. Extensive modification to accommodate existing practice patterns eliminated essential interaction at key time points to discuss patient management. Staff were often absent or not paying attention. They did not feel it was relevant to their work given limited evidence of its effectiveness, and because they were not engaged in its implementation. Organizations provided little support for implementation, training, monitoring and feedback, which are needed to overcome these, and other individual and team factors that challenged SSC adherence. Responses were similar across participants with different characteristics.Multiple processes and factors influenced SSC adherence. This may explain why, in studies evaluating SSC impact, outcomes were variable. Recommendations included continuing education, time for pilot-testing, and engaging all staff in SSC review. Others may use the implementation fidelity framework to plan SSC implementation or evaluate SSC adherence. Further research is needed to establish which SSC components can be modified

  9. [Mechanisms underlying physiological functions of food factors via non-specific interactions with biological proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Akira

    2015-01-01

      We previously reported that zerumbone, a sesquiterpene found in Zingiber zerumbet SMITH, showed notable cancer preventive effects in various organs of experimental rodents. This agent up-regulated nuclear factor-E2-related factor (Nrf2)-dependent expressions of anti-oxidative and xenobiotics-metabolizing enzymes, leading to an increased self-defense capacity. On the other hand, zerumbone markedly suppressed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, an inducible pro-inflammatory enzyme, by disrupting mRNA stabilizing processes. Binding experiments using a biotin derivative of zerumbone demonstrated that Keap1, an Nrf2 repressive protein, is one of its major binding proteins that promotes their dissociation for inducing Nrf2 transactivation. We then generated a specific antibody against zerumbone-modified proteins and found that zerumbone modified numerous cellular proteins in a non-specific manner, with global distribution of the modified proteins seen not only in cytoplasm but also the nucleus. Based on those observations, zerumbone was speculated to cause proteo-stress, a notion supported by previous findings that it increased the C-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein-dependent protein ubiquitination and also promoted aggresome formation. Interestingly, zerumbone counteracted proteo-stress and heat stress via up-regulation of the protein quality control systems (PQCs), e.g., heat shock proteins (HSPs), ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagy. Meanwhile, several phytochemicals, including ursolic acid and curcumin, were identified as marked HSP70 inducers, whereas most nutrients tested were scarcely active. Recent studies have revealed that PQCs play important roles in the prevention of many lifestyle related diseases, such as cancer, thus non-specific binding of phytochemicals to cellular proteins may be a novel and unique mechanism underlying their physiological activities.

  10. Neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone interacts with nerve growth factor (NGF receptors, preventing neuronal apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iakovos Lazaridis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, produced by neurons and glia, affects multiple processes in the brain, including neuronal survival and neurogenesis during development and in aging. We provide evidence that DHEA interacts with pro-survival TrkA and pro-death p75(NTR membrane receptors of neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF, acting as a neurotrophic factor: (1 the anti-apoptotic effects of DHEA were reversed by siRNA against TrkA or by a specific TrkA inhibitor; (2 [(3H]-DHEA binding assays showed that it bound to membranes isolated from HEK293 cells transfected with the cDNAs of TrkA and p75(NTR receptors (K(D: 7.4 ± 1.75 nM and 5.6 ± 0.55 nM, respectively; (3 immobilized DHEA pulled down recombinant and naturally expressed TrkA and p75(NTR receptors; (4 DHEA induced TrkA phosphorylation and NGF receptor-mediated signaling; Shc, Akt, and ERK1/2 kinases down-stream to TrkA receptors and TRAF6, RIP2, and RhoGDI interactors of p75(NTR receptors; and (5 DHEA rescued from apoptosis TrkA receptor positive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia in NGF null embryos and compensated NGF in rescuing from apoptosis NGF receptor positive sympathetic neurons of embryonic superior cervical ganglia. Phylogenetic findings on the evolution of neurotrophins, their receptors, and CYP17, the enzyme responsible for DHEA biosynthesis, combined with our data support the hypothesis that DHEA served as a phylogenetically ancient neurotrophic factor.

  11. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  12. Resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana L. photosynthetic apparatus to UV-B is reduced by deficit of phytochromes B and A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudyakova, Aleksandra Yu; Kreslavski, Vladimir D; Shirshikova, Galina N; Zharmukhamedov, Sergey K; Kosobryukhov, Anatoly A; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2017-03-01

    The photosynthetic responses of 25-day-old Arabidopsis phyA phyB double mutant (DM) compared with the wild type (WT) to UV-B radiation (1Wm(-2), 30min) were investigated. UV-B irradiation led to reduction of photosystem 2 (PS-2) activity and the photosynthetic rate. In plants grown under both white and red light (λm - 660nm) the reduction was greater in DM plants compared to the WT. Without UV-B irradiation a decrease in PS-2 activity was observed in DM grown under RL only. It is assumed that the lower content of UV-absorbing pigments and carotenoids observed in DM may be one of the reasons of reduced PS-2 resistance to UV-B. Higher decrease in activities under UV in DM plants grown under RL compared to DM plants grown under white light is likely due to the lack of activity of cryptochromes in plants grown under red light. Rates of post-stress recovery of photosynthetic activity of DM compared with WT plants under white and red light of low intensity were studied. Almost complete recovery of the activity was found which was not observed under dark conditions and in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor, chloramphenicol. It is assumed that phytochrome system participates in stress-protective mechanisms of the photosynthetic apparatus to UV-radiation.

  13. Synergistic and Antagonistic Action of Phytochrome (Phy A and PhyB during Seedling De-Etiolation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Su

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that Arabidopsis phytochrome (phy A and phyB are crucial photoreceptors that display synergistic and antagonistic action during seedling de-etiolation in multiple light signaling pathways. However, the functional relationship between phyA and phyB is not fully understood under different kinds of light and in response to different intensities of such light. In this work, we compared hypocotyl elongation of the phyA-211 phyB-9 double mutant with the wild type, the phyA-211 and phyB-9 single mutants under different intensities of far-red (FR, red (R, blue (B and white (W light. We confirmed that phyA and phyB synergistically promote seedling de-etiolation in B-, B plus R-, W- and high R-light conditions. The correlation of endogenous ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5 protein levels with the trend of hypocotyl elongation of all lines indicate that both phyA and phyB promote seedling photomorphogenesis in a synergistic manner in high-irradiance white light. Gene expression analyses of RBCS members and HY5 suggest that phyB and phyA act antagonistically on seedling development under FR light.

  14. Overexpression of the phytochrome B gene from Arabidopsis thaliana increases plant growth and yield of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdul Qayyum RAO; Muhammad IRFAN; Zafar SALEEM; Idrees Ahmad NASIR; Sheikh RIAZUDDIN; Tayyab HUSNAIN

    2011-01-01

    The phytochrome B (PHYB) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was introduced into cotton through Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Integration and expression of PHYB gene in cotton plants were confirmed by molecular evidence.Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in one of the transgenic lines, QCC11, was much higher than those of control and other transgenic lines. Transgenic cotton plants showed more than a two-fold increase in photosynthetic rate and more than a four-fold increase in transpiration rate and stomatal conductance. The increase in photosynthetic rate led to a 46% increase in relative growth rate and an 18% increase in net assimilation rate. Data recorded up to two generations,both in the greenhouse and in the field, revealed that overexpression ofArabidopsis thaliana PHYB gene in transgeniccotton plants resulted in an increase in the production of cotton by improving the cotton plant growth, with 35% more yield. Moreover, the presence of the Arabidopsis thaliana PHYB gene caused pleiotropic effects like semi-dwarfism,decrease in apical dominance, and increase in boll size.

  15. The shade avoidance syndrome in Arabidopsis: the antagonistic role of phytochrome a and B differentiates vegetation proximity and canopy shade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime F Martínez-García

    Full Text Available Light limitation caused by dense vegetation is one of the greatest threats to plant survival in natural environments. Plants detect such neighboring vegetation as a reduction in the red to far-red ratio (R:FR of the incoming light. The low R:FR signal, perceived by phytochromes, initiates a set of responses collectively known as the shade avoidance syndrome, intended to reduce the degree of current or future shade from neighbors by overtopping such competitors or inducing flowering to ensure seed production. At the seedling stage these responses include increased hypocotyl elongation. We have systematically analyzed the Arabidopsis seedling response and the contribution of phyA and phyB to perception of decreased R:FR, at three different levels of photosynthetically active radiation. Our results show that the shade avoidance syndrome, induced by phyB deactivation, is gradually antagonized by phyA, operating through the so-called FR-High Irradiance Response, in response to high FR levels in a range that simulates plant canopy shade. The data indicate that the R:FR signal distinguishes between the presence of proximal, but non-shading, neighbors and direct foliar shade, via a intrafamily photosensory attenuation mechanism that acts to suppress excessive reversion toward skotomorphogenic development under prolonged direct vegetation shade.

  16. Lande g-factor in semiconductor cylinder quantum dots under magnetic fields and spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaati, Abdolrasoul

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the electron effective Lande g-factor in semiconductor cylinder quantum dots is studied in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit effect and an applied magnetic field parallel to the cylinder axis. For this goal, I have obtained an analytical solution to one-particle Schrodinger equation in the presence of both magnetic field and spin-orbit interaction (SOI). Then, using the obtained energy levels, I have study the electron effective Lande g-factor. It is found that: It is found that (i) energy levels strongly depend on the combined effects of external magnetic field and spin-orbit interaction strength. (ii) The effective Lande g-factor decreases when magnetic field increases. (iii) By increasing the cylinder radius ρ, the electron g-factor decreases. (iv) By increasing the strength of SOI, the electron g-factor increases.

  17. Factor solutions of the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) in a Swedish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörtberg, Ewa; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Tillfors, Maria; Furmark, Tomas; Öst, Lars-Göran

    2017-06-01

    Culturally validated rating scales for social anxiety disorder (SAD) are of significant importance when screening for the disorder, as well as for evaluating treatment efficacy. This study examined construct validity and additional psychometric properties of two commonly used scales, the Social Phobia Scale and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale, in a clinical SAD population (n = 180) and in a normal population (n = 614) in Sweden. Confirmatory factor analyses of previously reported factor solutions were tested but did not reveal acceptable fit. Exploratory factor analyses (EFA) of the joint structure of the scales in the total population yielded a two-factor model (performance anxiety and social interaction anxiety), whereas EFA in the clinical sample revealed a three-factor solution, a social interaction anxiety factor and two performance anxiety factors. The SPS and SIAS showed good to excellent internal consistency, and discriminated well between patients with SAD and a normal population sample. Both scales showed good convergent validity with an established measure of SAD, whereas the discriminant validity of symptoms of social anxiety and depression could not be confirmed. The optimal cut-off score for SPS and SIAS were 18 and 22 points, respectively. It is concluded that the factor structure and the additional psychometric properties of SPS and SIAS support the use of the scales for assessment in a Swedish population.

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 directly interacts with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to regulate lymphangiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Coso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dysfunctional lymphatic vessel formation has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions including cancer metastasis, lymphedema, and impaired wound healing. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family is a major regulator of lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC function and lymphangiogenesis. Indeed, dissemination of malignant cells into the regional lymph nodes, a common occurrence in many cancers, is stimulated by VEGF family members. This effect is generally considered to be mediated via VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3. However, the role of specific receptors and their downstream signaling pathways is not well understood. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here we delineate the VEGF-C/VEGF receptor (VEGFR-3 signaling pathway in LECs and show that VEGF-C induces activation of PI3K/Akt and MEK/Erk. Furthermore, activation of PI3K/Akt by VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 resulted in phosphorylation of P70S6K, eNOS, PLCγ1, and Erk1/2. Importantly, a direct interaction between PI3K and VEGFR-3 in LECs was demonstrated both in vitro and in clinical cancer specimens. This interaction was strongly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases in primary small cell carcinoma of the lung in clinical specimens. Blocking PI3K activity abolished VEGF-C-stimulated LEC tube formation and migration. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that specific VEGFR-3 signaling pathways are activated in LECs by VEGF-C. The importance of PI3K in VEGF-C/VEGFR-3-mediated lymphangiogenesis provides a potential therapeutic target for the inhibition of lymphatic metastasis.

  19. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3 Directly Interacts with Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase to Regulate Lymphangiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coso, Sanja; Zeng, Yiping; Opeskin, Kenneth; Williams, Elizabeth D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dysfunctional lymphatic vessel formation has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions including cancer metastasis, lymphedema, and impaired wound healing. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family is a major regulator of lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) function and lymphangiogenesis. Indeed, dissemination of malignant cells into the regional lymph nodes, a common occurrence in many cancers, is stimulated by VEGF family members. This effect is generally considered to be mediated via VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3. However, the role of specific receptors and their downstream signaling pathways is not well understood. Methods and Results Here we delineate the VEGF-C/VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-3 signaling pathway in LECs and show that VEGF-C induces activation of PI3K/Akt and MEK/Erk. Furthermore, activation of PI3K/Akt by VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 resulted in phosphorylation of P70S6K, eNOS, PLCγ1, and Erk1/2. Importantly, a direct interaction between PI3K and VEGFR-3 in LECs was demonstrated both in vitro and in clinical cancer specimens. This interaction was strongly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases in primary small cell carcinoma of the lung in clinical specimens. Blocking PI3K activity abolished VEGF-C-stimulated LEC tube formation and migration. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that specific VEGFR-3 signaling pathways are activated in LECs by VEGF-C. The importance of PI3K in VEGF-C/VEGFR-3-mediated lymphangiogenesis provides a potential therapeutic target for the inhibition of lymphatic metastasis. PMID:22745786

  20. Microtubule-Actin Cross-Linking Factor 1: Domains, Interaction Partners, and Tissue-Specific Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryunov, Dmitry; Liem, Ronald K H

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of most eukaryotic cells is composed of three principal filamentous components: actin filaments, microtubules (MTs), and intermediate filaments. It is a highly dynamic system that plays crucial roles in a wide range of cellular processes, including migration, adhesion, cytokinesis, morphogenesis, intracellular traffic and signaling, and structural flexibility. Among the large number of cytoskeleton-associated proteins characterized to date, microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1 (MACF1) is arguably the most versatile integrator and modulator of cytoskeleton-related processes. MACF1 belongs to the plakin family of proteins, and within it, to the spectraplakin subfamily. These proteins are characterized by the ability to bridge MT and actin cytoskeletal networks in a dynamic fashion, which underlies their involvement in the regulation of cell migration, axonal extension, and vesicular traffic. Studying MACF1 functions has provided insights not only into the regulation of the cytoskeleton but also into molecular mechanisms of both normal cellular physiology and cellular pathology. Multiple MACF1 isoforms exist, composed of a large variety of alternatively spliced domains. Each of these domains mediates a specific set of interactions and functions. These functions are manifested in tissue and cell-specific phenotypes observed in conditional MACF1 knockout mice. The conditional models described to date reveal critical roles of MACF1 in mammalian skin, nervous system, heart muscle, and intestinal epithelia. Complete elimination of MACF1 is early embryonic lethal, indicating an essential role for MACF1 in early development. Further studies of MACF1 domains and their interactions will likely reveal multiple new roles of this protein in various tissues.

  1. Fractions of Rechtschaffner matrices as supersaturated designs in screening experiments aimed at evaluating main and two-factor interaction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela, R; Phan-Tan-Luu, R; Claeys-Bruno, M; Sergent, M

    2012-04-06

    Optimal fractions of resolution V design matrices proposed by Rechtschaffner in 1967 are developed and applied as supersaturated designs in screening experiments. Rechtschaffner matrices allow evaluation of all main factors and two-factor interactions, which in many real-world studies are of practical significance. However, the number of experimental runs increases rapidly with the number of factors in the matrices, which are therefore impractical for more than 5-6 factors. On the contrary, saturated fractions based on Hadamard matrices, which are commonly applied in screening studies, cannot evaluate the interaction effects. Here, a procedure for selecting the optimum fractions of Rechtschaffner matrices is presented and provides supersaturated matrices that are well adapted to a variety of problems, thus allowing the development of screening studies with a relatively small number of experiments. The procedures developed to derive the size-reduced matrices and to evaluate the active factors are discussed and compared in terms of efficiency and reliability, by means of simulation studies and application to a real problem. These fractions are the first supersaturated design matrices capable of estimating interaction effects. Additionally, one important advantage of these supersaturated matrices is that they enable development of follow-up procedures in cases of inconclusive results, by enlarging the matrix and eventually resolving the full Rechtschaffner matrix of departure when it is necessary to evaluate the active factors and their interactions.

  2. Incidence of Potential Drug-Drug Interaction and Related Factors in Hospitalized Neurological Patients in two Iranian Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Namazi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reciprocal drug interactions are among the most common causes of adverse drug reactions. We investigated the incidence and related risk factors associated with mutual drug interactions in relation to prescriptions written in the neurology wards of two major teaching hospitals in Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: Data was collected from hand-written prescriptions on a daily basis. Mutual drug interactions were identified using Lexi-Comp 2012 version 1.9.1. Type D and X drug interactions were considered as potential drug-drug interactions. The potential risk factors associated with drug-drug interactions included the patient’s age and gender, number of medications and orders, length of hospitalization and the type of neurological disorder. To determine potential drug-drug interactions, relevant interventions were suggested to the physicians or nurses and the outcome of the interventions were documented. Results: The study comprised 589 patients, of which 53% were males and 47% females, with a mean age of 56.65±18.19 SD years. A total of 4942 drug orders and 3784 medications were prescribed among which 4539 drug-drug interactions were detected, including 4118 type C, 403 type D, and 18 type X. Using a logistic regression model, the number of medications, length of hospitalization and non-vascular type of the neurological disorder were found to be significantly associated with potential drug-drug interactions. From the total interventions, 74.24% were accepted by physicians and nurses. Conclusion: Potentially hazardous reciprocal drug interactions are common among patients in neurology wards. Clinical pharmacists can play a critical role in the prevention of drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients.

  3. Investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Yesilyurt, Betul T; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Arias Perez, José Ignacio; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Spurdle, Amanda; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E; Easton, Doug F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2015-03-15

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint ) factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies.

  4. Factors affecting mito-nuclear codon usage interactions in the OXPHOS system of Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Codon usage bias varies considerably among genomes and even within the genes of the same genome.In eukaryotic organisms,energy production in the form of oxidative phosphorylation(OXPHOS)is the only process under control of both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes.Although factors affecting codon usage in a single genome have been studied,this has not occurred when both interactional genomes are involved.Consequently, we investigated whether or not other factors influence codon usage of coevolved genes.We used Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism.Our χ2 test on the number of codons of nuclear and mitochondrial genes involved in the OXPHOS system was significantly different (χ2=7945.16,P<0.01).A plot of effective number of codons against GC3s content of nuclear genes showed that few genes lie on the expected curve,indicating that codon usage was random.Correspondence analysis indicated a significant correlation between axis 1 and codon adaptation index(R=0.947,P<0.01)in every nuclear gene sequence.Thus,codon usage bias of nuclear genes appeared to be affected by translational selection.Correlation between axis 1 coordinates and GC content(R=0.814.P<0.01)indicated that the codon usage of nuclear genes was also affected by GC composition.Analysis of mitochondrial genes did not reveal a significant correlation between axis 1 and any parameter.Statistical analyses indicated that codon usages of both nDNA and mtDNA were subjected to context-dependent mutations.

  5. Genotype-Based Bayesian Analysis of Gene-Environment Interactions with Multiple Genetic Markers and Misclassification in Environmental Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Iryna Lobach; Ruzong Fan

    2012-01-01

    A key component to understanding etiology of complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, alcohol dependence, is to investigate gene-environment interactions. This work is motivated by the following two concerns in the analysis of gene-environment interactions. First, multiple genetic markers in moderate linkage disequilibrium may be involved in susceptibility to a complex disease. Second, environmental factors may be subject to misclassification. We develop a genotype based Bayesian pseudolik...

  6. Factors Which Facilitate or Impede Interpersonal Interactions and Relationships after Spinal Cord Injury: A Scoping Review with Suggestions for Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Delena Amsters; Sarita Schuurs; Kiley Pershouse; Bettina Power; Yvonne Harestad; Melissa Kendall; Pim Kuipers

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonal interactions and relationships can influence an individual’s perceptions of health and quality of life in the presence of disability. In the case of people with spinal cord injury (SCI), positive interpersonal interactions and relationships have been shown to contribute to resilience and adaptability. Understanding factors which facilitate or impede the development and maintenance of relationships after SCI may form the basis for proactive relationship support for people with SC...

  7. Interação de fatores riscos em tuberculose Interaction of factors on pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Ruffino-Netto

    1979-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se o possível sinergismo dos fatores alcoolismo e tabagismo na tuberculose pulmonar, a partir de dados de um estudo caso-controle onde 854 pessoas foram entrevistadas (sendo 427 casos-pacientes portadores de tuberculose pulmonar e 427 controles e questionadas quanto ao hábito de ingestão alcoólica e o de fumar em períodos precedendo ao diagnóstico da doença. Concluiu-se que existe pequena interação destes fatores na tuberculose pulmonar; o hábito de fumar estaria relacionado com a doença tuberculose através de sua associação com a ingestão de bebidas alcoólicas.A case-control study was made of the possible synergetic effect of smoking and alcohol drinking on pulmonary tuberculosis. Analysis of the results of 854 interviews showed that there is little interactive effect in the multiplicative sense (synergism between these factors and pulmonary tuberculosis. It is suggested that the habit of smoking may be related to pulmonary tuberculosis only through its association with that of alcohol drinking.

  8. $\\eta_{c}$ Elastic and Transition Form Factors: Contact Interaction and Algebraic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bedolla, Marco A; Cobos-Martínez, J J; Bashir, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    For the flavor-singlet heavy quark system of charmonia in the pseudoscalar ($\\eta_c(1S)$) channel, we calculate the elastic (EFF) and transition form factors (TFF) ($\\eta_c(1S) \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma^*$) for a wide range of photon momentum transfer squared ($Q^2$). The framework for this analysis is provided by a symmetry-preserving Schwinger-Dyson equation (SDE) and Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) treatment of a vector$\\times$vector contact interaction (CI). We also employ an algebraic model (AM), developed earlier to describe the light quark systems. It correctly correlates infrared and ultraviolet dynamics of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The CI results agree with the lattice data for low $Q^2$. For $Q^2 \\geqslant Q_0^2$, the results start deviating from the lattice results by more than $20 \\%$. $Q_0^2 \\thickapprox 2.5 {\\rm GeV}^2$ for the EFF and $\\thickapprox 25 {\\rm GeV}^2$ for the TFF. We also present the results for the EFF, TFF as well as $\\eta_c(1S)$ parton distribution amplitude for the AM. Wherev...

  9. Using Interactive Response Systems in Economics: utility and factors influencing students’ attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Bares López

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The European Higher Education Area (EHEA involves changing traditional methods to promote innovative teaching experiences. This paper has two main aims: a to show evidence of the use of Interactive Response Systems (IRS to identify gaps in the understanding of the course contents and b to investigate factors influencing students’ attitudes towards the use of IRS. The experience was developed through a collective tutoring session in the subject of Economics using IRS. Economics is a first-year subject in the Degree of Business Administration and Management offered by the University of Cadiz, which includes contents of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics and uses economic models to explain the function of the economy and the behaviour of economic agents. Results show that IRS technique allows detecting gaps in learning and comprehension. From our econometric estimations, we also identify two strongly significant variables affecting students’ attitudes towards IRS: gender and received explanations regarding the use of IRS. Variables such as first enrolment in the subject and the number of hours devoted to studying have a positive and significant effect on the attitude to IRS, but at a lower level of significance (from 5% to 10%.

  10. Interaction between optineurin and the bZIP transcription factor NRL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxia; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Ohishi, Kentaro; Gao, Jie; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Hikoya, Akiko; Sato, Miho; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Minoshima, Shinsei

    2014-01-01

    Although the gene encoding optineurin (OPTN) is a causative gene for glaucoma and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, it is ubiquitously expressed in all body tissues, including the retina. To study the function of OPTN in retinal ganglion cells as well as the whole retina, we previously isolated OPTN-interacting proteins and identified the gene encoding the bZIP transcription factor neural retina leucine zipper (NRL), which is a causative gene for retinitis pigmentosa. Herein, we investigated the binding between OPTN and NRL proteins in HeLaS3 cells. Co-expression of HA-tagged NRL and FLAG-tagged OPTN in HeLaS3 cells followed by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting with anti-tag antibodies demonstrated the binding of these proteins in HeLaS3 cells, which was confirmed by proximity ligation assay. NRL is the first OPTN-binding protein to show eye-specific expression. A series of partial-deletion OPTN plasmids demonstrated that the tail region (423-577 amino acids [aa]) of OPTN was necessary for binding with NRL. Immunostaining showed that Optn (rat homologue of OPTN) was expressed in rat photoreceptors and localised in the cytoplasm of photoreceptor cells. This is a novel demonstration of Optn expression in photoreceptor cells. OPTN was not detected in photoreceptor nuclei under our experimental conditions. Further analyses are necessary to elucidate the function of OPTN and the significance of its possible binding with NRL in photoreceptor cells. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  11. Predicting drug-target interactions by dual-network integrated logistic matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ming; Bryant, Stephen H.; Wang, Yanli

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we propose a dual-network integrated logistic matrix factorization (DNILMF) algorithm to predict potential drug-target interactions (DTI). The prediction procedure consists of four steps: (1) inferring new drug/target profiles and constructing profile kernel matrix; (2) diffusing drug profile kernel matrix with drug structure kernel matrix; (3) diffusing target profile kernel matrix with target sequence kernel matrix; and (4) building DNILMF model and smoothing new drug/target predictions based on their neighbors. We compare our algorithm with the state-of-the-art method based on the benchmark dataset. Results indicate that the DNILMF algorithm outperforms the previously reported approaches in terms of AUPR (area under precision-recall curve) and AUC (area under curve of receiver operating characteristic) based on the 5 trials of 10-fold cross-validation. We conclude that the performance improvement depends on not only the proposed objective function, but also the used nonlinear diffusion technique which is important but under studied in the DTI prediction field. In addition, we also compile a new DTI dataset for increasing the diversity of currently available benchmark datasets. The top prediction results for the new dataset are confirmed by experimental studies or supported by other computational research.

  12. Sequence Motifs in MADS Transcription Factors Responsible for Specificity and Diversification of Protein-Protein Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van A.D.J.; Morabito, G.; Fiers, M.A.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Angenent, G.C.; Immink, R.G.H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein famil

  13. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  14. High-resolution profiling of stationary-phase survival reveals yeast longevity factors and their genetic interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Garay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lifespan is influenced by a large number of conserved proteins and gene-regulatory pathways. Here, we introduce a strategy for systematically finding such longevity factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and scoring the genetic interactions (epistasis among these factors. Specifically, we developed an automated competition-based assay for chronological lifespan, defined as stationary-phase survival of yeast populations, and used it to phenotype over 5,600 single- or double-gene knockouts at unprecedented quantitative resolution. We found that 14% of the viable yeast mutant strains were affected in their stationary-phase survival; the extent of true-positive chronological lifespan factors was estimated by accounting for the effects of culture aeration and adaptive regrowth. We show that lifespan extension by dietary restriction depends on the Swr1 histone-exchange complex and that a functional link between autophagy and the lipid-homeostasis factor Arv1 has an impact on cellular lifespan. Importantly, we describe the first genetic interaction network based on aging phenotypes, which successfully recapitulated the core-autophagy machinery and confirmed a role of the human tumor suppressor PTEN homologue in yeast lifespan and phosphatidylinositol phosphate metabolism. Our quantitative analysis of longevity factors and their genetic interactions provides insights into the gene-network interactions of aging cells.

  15. High-resolution profiling of stationary-phase survival reveals yeast longevity factors and their genetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, Erika; Campos, Sergio E; González de la Cruz, Jorge; Gaspar, Ana P; Jinich, Adrian; Deluna, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Lifespan is influenced by a large number of conserved proteins and gene-regulatory pathways. Here, we introduce a strategy for systematically finding such longevity factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and scoring the genetic interactions (epistasis) among these factors. Specifically, we developed an automated competition-based assay for chronological lifespan, defined as stationary-phase survival of yeast populations, and used it to phenotype over 5,600 single- or double-gene knockouts at unprecedented quantitative resolution. We found that 14% of the viable yeast mutant strains were affected in their stationary-phase survival; the extent of true-positive chronological lifespan factors was estimated by accounting for the effects of culture aeration and adaptive regrowth. We show that lifespan extension by dietary restriction depends on the Swr1 histone-exchange complex and that a functional link between autophagy and the lipid-homeostasis factor Arv1 has an impact on cellular lifespan. Importantly, we describe the first genetic interaction network based on aging phenotypes, which successfully recapitulated the core-autophagy machinery and confirmed a role of the human tumor suppressor PTEN homologue in yeast lifespan and phosphatidylinositol phosphate metabolism. Our quantitative analysis of longevity factors and their genetic interactions provides insights into the gene-network interactions of aging cells.

  16. Transcription factors do it together : the hows and whys of studying protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immink, R.G.H.; Angenent, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are intrinsic to virtually every cellular process. Recent breakthroughs in techniques to study protein-interaction and the availability of fully sequenced plant genomes have attracted many plant scientists to undertake the first steps in the field of protein interactions

  17. Protonation state and structural changes of the tetrapyrrole chromophore during the Pr --> Pfr phototransformation of phytochrome: a resonance Raman spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneip, C; Hildebrandt, P; Schlamann, W; Braslavsky, S E; Mark, F; Schaffner, K

    1999-11-16

    The photoconversion of phytochrome (phytochrome A from Avena satina) from the inactive (Pr) to the physiologically active form (Pfr) was studied by near-infrared Fourier transform resonance Raman spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures, which allow us to trap the intermediate states. Nondeuterated and deuterated buffer solutions were used to determine the effect of H/D exchange on the resonance Raman spectra. For the first time, reliable spectra of the "bleached" intermediates meta-R(A) and meta-R(C) were obtained. The vibrational bands in the region 1300-1700 cm(-)(1), which is particularly indicative of structural changes in tetrapyrroles, were assigned on the basis of recent calculations of the Raman spectra of the chromophore in C-phycocyanin and model compounds [Kneip, C., Hildebrandt, P., Németh, K., Mark, F., Schaffner, K. (1999) Chem. Phys. Lett. 311, 479-485]. The experimental resonance Raman spectra Pr are compatible with the Raman spectra calculated for the protonated ZZZasa configuration, which hence is suggested to be the chromophore structure in this parent state of phytochrome. Furthermore, marker bands could be identified that are of high diagnostic value for monitoring structural changes in individual parts of the chromophore. Specifically, it could be shown that not only in the parent states Pr and Pfr but also in all intermediates the chromophore is protonated at the pyrroleninic nitrogen. The spectral changes observed for lumi-R confirm the view that the photoreaction of Pr is a Z --> E isomerization of the CD methine bridge. The subsequent thermal decay reaction to meta-R(A) includes relaxations of the CD methine bridge double bond, whereas the formation of meta-R(C) is accompanied by structural adaptations of the pyrrole rings B and C in the protein pocket. The far-reaching similarities between the chromophores of meta-R(A) and Pfr suggest that in the step meta-R(A) --> Pfr the ultimate structural changes of the protein matrix occur.

  18. Light-regulated expression of the nitrate-reductase and nitrite-reductase genes in tomato and in the phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, T W; Foyer, C; Caboche, M

    1992-08-01

    The phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum (L.) Mill) was used to investigate if phytochrome plays a role in the regulation of nitrate-reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1) and nitrite-reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.7.1) gene expression. We show that the expression of the tomato NR and NiR genes is stimulated by light and that this light response is mediated by the photoreceptor phytochrome. The red-light response of the NR and NiR genes was reduced in etiolated aurea seedlings when compared to isogenic wild-type cotyledons. The relative levels of NR mRNA and NiR transcripts and their diurnal fluctuations were identical in mature white-light-grown leaves of the wild-type and of the aurea mutant. The transcript levels for cab and RbcS (genes for the chlorophyll-a/b-binding protein of PSII and the small subunit of the enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, respectively) in aurea leaves grown in white light were indistinguishable from the respective transcript levels in the leaves of the wildtype grown under the same conditions. Despite a severe reduction in the chlorophyll content, the rate of net CO2 uptake by leaves of the aurea mutant was only slightly reduced when compared to the rate of net photosynthesis of wild-type leaves. This difference in the photosynthetic performances of wild-type and aurea mutant plants disappeared during aging of the plants. The increase in zeaxanthin and the concomitant decrease in violaxanthin in leaves of the aurea mutant compared with the same pigment levels in leaves of the wild-type indicate that the activity of the xanthophyll cycle is increased in aurea leaves as a consequence of the reduced CO2-fixation capacity of the mutant leaves.

  19. Mid-infrared picosecond pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe experiments to resolve a ground-state intermediate in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Clark, Ian P; Towrie, Michael; van Thor, Jasper J

    2009-12-24

    Multipulse picosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy has been used to study photochemical reactions of the cyanobacterial phytochrome photoreceptor Cph1. Different photophysical schemes have been discussed in the literature to describe the pathways after photoexcitation, particularly, to identify reaction phases that are linked to photoisomerisation and electronic decay in the 1566-1772 cm(-1) region that probes C=C and C=O stretching modes of the tetrapyrrole chromophore. Here, multipulse spectroscopy is employed, where, compared to conventional visible pump-mid-infrared probe spectroscopy, an additional visible pulse is incorporated that interacts with populations that are evolving on the excited- and ground-state potential energy surfaces. The time delays between the pump and the dump pulse are chosen such that the dump pulse interacts with different phases in the reaction process. The pump and dump pulses are at the same wavelength, 640 nm, and are resonant with the Pr ground state as well as with the excited state and intermediates. Because the dump pulse additionally pumps the remaining, partially recovered, and partially oriented ground-state population, theory is developed for estimating the fraction of excited-state molecules. The calculations take into account the model-dependent ground-state recovery fraction, the angular dependence of the population transfer resulting from the finite bleach that occurs with linearly polarized intense femtosecond optical excitation, and the partially oriented population for the dump field. Distinct differences between the results from the experiments that use a 1 or a 14 ps dump time favor a branching evolution from S1 to an excited state or reconfigured chromophore and to a newly identified ground-state intermediate (GSI). Optical dumping at 1 ps shows the instantaneous induced absorption of a delocalized C=C stretching mode at 1608 cm(-1), where the increased cross section is associated with the electronic ground

  20. The InterAct Project: An Examination of the Interaction of Genetic and Lifestyle Factors on the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in the EPIC Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenberg, C; Sharp, S; Forouhi, NG; Franks, P; Schulze, MB; Kerrison, N; Ekelund, U; Barroso, I; Panico, S; Tormo, M; Spranger, J; Griffin, S; van der Schouw, YT; Amiano, P; Ardanaz, E; Arriola, L; Balkau, B; Barricarte, A; Beulens, JWJ; Boeing, H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB; Buijsse, BB; Chirlaque Lopez, MD; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Crowe, FL; de Lauzon-Guillan, B; Deloukas, P; Dorronsoro, M; Drogan, DD; Froguel, P; Gonzalez, C; Grioni, S; Groop, L; Groves, C; Hainaut, P; Halkjaer, J; Hallmans, G; Hansen, T; Kaaks, R; Key, TJ; Khaw, K; Koulman, A; Mattiello, A; Navarro, C; Nilsson, P; Norat, T; Overvad, K; Palla, L; Palli, D; Pedersen, O; Peeters, PH; Quirós, JR; Ramachandran, A; Rodriguez-Suarez, L; Rolandsson, O; Romaguera, D; Romieu, I; Sacerdote, C; Sánchez, M; Sandbaek, A; Slimani, N; Sluijs, I; Spijkerman, AMW; Teucher, B; Tjonneland, A; Tumino, R; van der A, DL; Verschuren, WMM; Tuomilehto, J; Feskens, E; McCarthy, M; Riboli, E; Wareham, NJ

    2014-01-01

    Background Studying gene-lifestyle interaction may help to identify lifestyle factors that modify genetic susceptibility and uncover genetic loci exerting important subgroup effects. Adequately powered studies with prospective, unbiased, standardised assessment of key behavioural factors for gene-lifestyle studies are lacking. Objective To establish a type 2 diabetes case-cohort study designed to investigate how genetic and potentially modifiable lifestyle and behavioral factors, particularly diet and physical activity, interact in their influence on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Methods Funded by the Sixth European Framework Programme, InterAct consortium partners ascertained and verified incident cases of type 2 diabetes occurring in European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohorts between 1991 and 2007 from 8 of the 10 EPIC countries. A pragmatic, high sensitivity approach was used for case ascertainment including multiple sources at each EPIC centre, followed by diagnostic verification. Prentice-weighted Cox regression and random effects meta-analyses were used to investigate differences in diabetes incidence by age and sex. Results A total of 12,403 verified incident cases of type 2 diabetes occurred during 3.99 million person-years of follow-up of 340,234 EPIC participants eligible for InterAct. We defined a centre stratified subcohort of 16,154 individuals for comparative analyses. Individuals with incident diabetes that were randomly selected into the subcohort (n=778) were included as cases in the analyses. All prevalent diabetes cases were excluded from the study. InterAct cases were followed-up for an average of 6.9 years, 49.7% were men. Mean baseline age and age at diagnosis were 55.6 and 62.5 years, mean BMI and waist were 29.4 kg/m2 and 102.7 cm in men, and 30.1 kg/m2 and 92.8 cm in women, respectively. Risk of type 2 diabetes increased linearly with age, with an overall hazard ratio (95% CI) of 1.56 (1.48; 1

  1. Epidemiology of Down syndrome: new insight into the multidimensional interactions among genetic and environmental risk factors in the oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sujoy; Hong, Chang-Sook; Feingold, Eleanor; Ghosh, Papiya; Ghosh, Priyanka; Bhaumik, Pranami; Dey, Subrata Kumar

    2011-11-01

    Down syndrome birth is attributable to multiple maternal risk factors that include both genetic and environmental challenges, but there is limited understanding of the complicated interactions among these factors. In the present study, a case-control analysis of approximately 400 infants with or without suspected Down syndrome reported between 2003 and 2009 and their parents in and around Kolkata, India, was conducted. Maternal exposure to 2 environmental risk factors (smokeless chewing tobacco and oral contraceptive pills) was recorded, and families were genotyped with microsatellite markers to establish the origin of nondisjunction errors as well as recombination patterns of nondisjoined chromosome 21. With logistic regression models, the possible interactions among all of these risk factors, as well as with maternal age, were explored. Smokeless chewing tobacco was associated with significant risk for meiosis II nondisjunction and achiasmate (nonexchange) meiosis I error among young mothers. By contrast, the risk due to oral contraceptive pills was associated with older mothers. Study results suggest that the chewing tobacco risk factor operates independently of the maternal age effect, whereas contraceptive pill-related risk may interact with or exacerbate age-related risk. Moreover, both risk factors, when present together, exhibited a strong age-dependent effect.

  2. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Combined Social Phobia Scale and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale: Support for a Bifactor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rapson; Watson, Shaun D.

    2017-01-01

    For the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) together, this study examined support for a bifactor model, and also the internal consistency reliability and external validity of the factors in this model. Participants (N = 526) were adults from the general community who completed the SPS and SIAS. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of their ratings indicated good support for the bifactor model. For this model, the loadings for all but six items were higher on the general factor than the specific factors. The three positively worded items had negligible loadings on the general factor. The general factor explained most of the common variance in the SPS and SIAS, and demonstrated good model-based internal consistency reliability (omega hierarchical) and a strong association with fear of negative evaluation and extraversion. The practical implications of the findings for the utilization of the SPS and SIAS, and the theoretical and clinical implications for social anxiety are discussed. PMID:28210232

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Combined Social Phobia Scale and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale: Support for a Bifactor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rapson; Watson, Shaun D

    2017-01-01

    For the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) together, this study examined support for a bifactor model, and also the internal consistency reliability and external validity of the factors in this model. Participants (N = 526) were adults from the general community who completed the SPS and SIAS. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of their ratings indicated good support for the bifactor model. For this model, the loadings for all but six items were higher on the general factor than the specific factors. The three positively worded items had negligible loadings on the general factor. The general factor explained most of the common variance in the SPS and SIAS, and demonstrated good model-based internal consistency reliability (omega hierarchical) and a strong association with fear of negative evaluation and extraversion. The practical implications of the findings for the utilization of the SPS and SIAS, and the theoretical and clinical implications for social anxiety are discussed.

  4. Factors Which Facilitate or Impede Interpersonal Interactions and Relationships after Spinal Cord Injury: A Scoping Review with Suggestions for Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delena Amsters

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal interactions and relationships can influence an individual’s perceptions of health and quality of life in the presence of disability. In the case of people with spinal cord injury (SCI, positive interpersonal interactions and relationships have been shown to contribute to resilience and adaptability. Understanding factors which facilitate or impede the development and maintenance of relationships after SCI may form the basis for proactive relationship support for people with SCI. To gain a broad insight into these factors, a scoping review was undertaken. Databases were searched for English language studies published between 2000 and 2015 that informed the review question. Sixty-two (62 studies were identified. Thematic analysis was conducted on data extracted from the studies and 51 factors which may facilitate relationships and 38 factors which may impede relationships after SCI were noted. The majority of factors could be categorized as environmental or personal according to the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF. The facilitating factors included partner and social support, reciprocity in relationships, and presenting oneself positively. Impeding factors included physical environmental barriers, real and perceived social biases, and poor self-image. Factors identified may inform the provision of supportive, holistic rehabilitation for people with SCI.

  5. Factors Which Facilitate or Impede Interpersonal Interactions and Relationships after Spinal Cord Injury: A Scoping Review with Suggestions for Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsters, Delena; Schuurs, Sarita; Pershouse, Kiley; Power, Bettina; Harestad, Yvonne; Kendall, Melissa; Kuipers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonal interactions and relationships can influence an individual's perceptions of health and quality of life in the presence of disability. In the case of people with spinal cord injury (SCI), positive interpersonal interactions and relationships have been shown to contribute to resilience and adaptability. Understanding factors which facilitate or impede the development and maintenance of relationships after SCI may form the basis for proactive relationship support for people with SCI. To gain a broad insight into these factors, a scoping review was undertaken. Databases were searched for English language studies published between 2000 and 2015 that informed the review question. Sixty-two (62) studies were identified. Thematic analysis was conducted on data extracted from the studies and 51 factors which may facilitate relationships and 38 factors which may impede relationships after SCI were noted. The majority of factors could be categorized as environmental or personal according to the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The facilitating factors included partner and social support, reciprocity in relationships, and presenting oneself positively. Impeding factors included physical environmental barriers, real and perceived social biases, and poor self-image. Factors identified may inform the provision of supportive, holistic rehabilitation for people with SCI.

  6. Interactions of biotic and abiotic environmental factors in an ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, and the potential for selection mosaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeksema Jason D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic selection mosaics, in which species exert different evolutionary impacts on each other in different environments, may drive diversification in coevolving species. We studied the potential for geographic selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions by testing whether the interaction between bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don and one of its common ectomycorrhizal fungi (Rhizopogon occidentalis Zeller and Dodge varies in outcome, when different combinations of plant and fungal genotypes are tested under a range of different abiotic and biotic conditions. Results We used a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment to test the main and interactive effects of plant lineage (two maternal seed families, fungal lineage (two spore collections, soil type (lab mix or field soil, and non-mycorrhizal microbes (with or without on the performance of plants and fungi. Ecological outcomes, as assessed by plant and fungal performance, varied widely across experimental environments, including interactions between plant or fungal lineages and soil environmental factors. Conclusion These results show the potential for selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions, and indicate that these interactions are likely to coevolve in different ways in different environments, even when initially the genotypes of the interacting species are the same across all environments. Hence, selection mosaics may be equally as effective as genetic differences among populations in driving divergent coevolution among populations of interacting species.

  7. Pinus monophylla establishment in an expanding Pinus-Juniperus woodland: Environmental conditions, facilitation and interacting factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, Jeanne C. [USDA Forest Service, Reno, NV (United States). Rocky Mountain Research Station

    2001-02-01

    cause of mortality with caged transplants exhibiting life spans that were 74% longer overall than uncaged transplants. Emergence and survival of P. monophylla within the expanding woodland were dependent upon a complex set of interacting factors including growing season conditions, microhabitat characteristics, and animal species.

  8. IMPROVED PARAMETERIZATION OF WATER CLOUD MODEL FOR HYBRID-POLARIZED BACKSCATTER SIMULATION USING INTERACTION FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chauhan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The prime aim of this study was to assess the potential of semi-empirical water cloud model (WCM in simulating hybrid-polarized SAR backscatter signatures (RH and RV retrieved from RISAT-1 data and integrate the results into a graphical user interface (GUI to facilitate easy comprehension and interpretation. A predominant agricultural wheat growing area was selected in Mathura and Bharatpur districts located in the Indian states of Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan respectively to carry out the study. The three-date datasets were acquired covering the crucial growth stages of the wheat crop. In synchrony, the fieldwork was organized to measure crop/soil parameters. The RH and RV backscattering coefficient images were extracted from the SAR data for all the three dates. The effect of four combinations of vegetation descriptors (V1 and V2 viz., LAI-LAI, LAI-Plant water content (PWC, Leaf water area index (LWAI-LWAI, and LAI-Interaction factor (IF on the total RH and RV backscatter was analyzed. The results revealed that WCM calibrated with LAI and IF as the two vegetation descriptors simulated the total RH and RV backscatter values with highest R2 of 0.90 and 0.85 while the RMSE was lowest among the other tested models (1.18 and 1.25 dB, respectively. The theoretical considerations and interpretations have been discussed and examined in the paper. The novelty of this work emanates from the fact that it is a first step towards the modeling of hybrid-polarized backscatter data using an accurately parameterized semi-empirical approach.

  9. Interactions between platelet activating factor and eicosanoids during endotoxic shock in anaesthetized pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mózes

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of platelet activating factor (PAF on eicosanoid release during endotoxic shock was investigated in anaesthetized pigs receiving 5 μg kg−1 Escherichia coli endotoxin (LPS into the superior mesenteric artery over a 60 min period, by measuring plasma levels of a variety of mediators. Fifteen of the 31 animals infused with LPS and not treated with BN 52021, a PAF receptor antagonist, died within 30 min after the commencement of LPS infusion (non-survivors, while the other 16 survived the experimental period of 3 h, though in a state of shock (survivors. No alterations were observed in plasma concentrations of eicosanoids in the non-survivors. A significant, though transient, increase in eicosanoid concentrations occurred only in the survivors. Treatment with BN 52021 (4 mg kg-1, i.v. injected 5 min prior to LPS infusion, failed to exert any effect on the survival rate. However, pretreatment with BN 52021 prevented circulatory collapse in the survivors and reduced the concentration of cyclooxygenase enzyme products, without affecting LTB4 release. Exogenous administration of PAF (0.01 μg kg−1 caused hypotension and increased TXB2 levels although 6-keto PGF1α and LTB4 concentrations were unchanged. The data suggest that prostanoid formation may be secondary to PAF release in circulatory collapse evoked by LPS infusion in survivors, and give further support to the suggestion that PAF prostanoid interaction is important during endotoxic shock. However, their role in early death seems to be negligible, indicating the importance of other mediators.

  10. Neuroligin-1 induces neurite outgrowth through interaction with neurexin-1ß and activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørlund, Michelle D; Nielsen, Janne; Pankratova, Stanislava;

    2012-01-01

    the neuritogenic effect of NLGN1 in cultures of hippocampal neurons. Our results show that NLGN1, both in soluble and membrane-bound forms, induces neurite outgrowth that depends on the interaction with NRXN1ß and on activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1. In addition, we demonstrate that a synthetic...

  11. Interaction between physical and psychosocial work risk factors for low back symptoms and its consequences amongst Indonesian coal mining workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widanarko, Baiduri; Legg, Stephen; Devereux, Jason; Stevenson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the interaction between physical and psychosocial factors for low back symptoms (LBS) and its consequences (reduced activities and absenteeism) in a developing country. A sample of 1294 Indonesian coal mining workers reported occupational exposures, LBS and its consequences using a self-administered questionnaire. Respondents were placed into one of four combination exposure groups: high physical and high psychosocial (HPhyHPsy); high physical and low psychosocial (HPhyLPsy); low physical and high psychosocial (LPhyHPsy), and; low physical and low psychosocial (LPhyLPsy). The attributable proportion due to interaction between physical and psychosocial factors was examined. Individuals in the HPhyHPsy group were most likely to report LBS (OR 5.42, 95% CI 3.30-8.89), reduced activities (OR 4.89, 95% CI 3.09-7.74), and absenteeism (OR 4.96, 95% CI 3.05-8.06). Interactions between physical and psychosocial factors were present for LBS, reduced activities, and absenteeism; although for LBS and absenteeism the interactions were not significant. Current smokers were more likely to report LBS consequences. Permanent employment and night shift work increased the odds of LBS and its consequences. We conclude that interventions aimed at reducing LBS and its consequences should address both physical and psychosocial factors, with a focus on smokers, permanent employment and night shift work.

  12. Interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors for Alzheimer's disease: A reanalysis of case-control studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Duijn (Cock); D.G. Clayton (David); V. Chandra; L. Fratiglioni (Laura); A.B. Graves; A. Heyman; A.F. Jorm; E. Kokmen (Emre); K. Kondo; J.A. Mortimer; W.A. Rocca (Walter); S.L. Shalat; H. Soininen (H.); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractTo study the interaction among genetic and environmental risk factors, a reanalysis of case-control studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) was conducted based on the original data of all studies carried out to January 1, 1990. Seven studies were included in the present analysis, comprising

  13. Interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors for Alzheimer's disease: a re-analysis of case-control studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Duijn (Cock); D.G. Clayton (David); V. Chandra; L. Fratiglioni (Laura); A.B. Graves; A. Heyman; A.F. Jorm; E. Kokmen (Emre); K. Kondo; J.A. Mortimer; W.A. Rocca; S.L. Shalat; H. Soininen; A. Hofman (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractTo study the interaction among genetic and environmental risk factors, a reanalysis of case-control studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) was conducted based on the original data of all studies carried out to January 1, 1990. Seven studies were included in the present analysis, comprising

  14. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with replication protein A and maintains genome stability during replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausing, Emanuel; Mayer, Andreas; Chanarat, Sittinan

    2010-01-01

    foci. Interestingly, the DNA damage sensitivity of an rfa1 mutant was suppressed by bur1 mutation, further underscoring a functional link between these two protein complexes. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with RPA and maintains genome integrity during DNA replication stress....

  15. Factors controlling the mode of rift interaction in brittle-ductile coupled systems: A 3D numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allken, V.; Huismans, R.S.; Thieulot, C.

    2012-01-01

    The way individual faults and rift segments link up is a fundamental aspect of lithosphere extension and continental break-up. Little is known however about the factors that control the selection of the different modes of rift interaction observed in nature. Here we use state-of-the-art large deform

  16. An Empirical Study of Factors Affecting Mobile Wireless Technology Adoption for Promoting Interactive Lectures in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Chin Lay; Balakrishnan, Vimala

    2016-01-01

    Use of mobile technology is widespread, particularly among the younger generation. There is a huge potential for utilizing such technology in lecture classes with large numbers of students, serving as an interaction tool between the students and lecturers. The challenge is to identify significant adoption factors to ensure effective adoption of…

  17. Differential effects of mutations in the chromophore pocket of recombinant phytochrome on chromoprotein assembly and Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remberg, A; Schmidt, P; Braslavsky, S E; Gärtner, W; Schaffner, K

    1999-11-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was performed with the chromophore-bearing N-terminal domain of oat phytochrome A apoprotein (amino acid residues 1-595). Except for Trp366, which was replaced by Phe (W366F), all the residues exchanged are in close proximity to the chromophore-binding Cys321 (i.e. P318A, P318K, H319L, S320K, H322L and the double mutant L323R/Q324D). The mutants were characterized by their absorption maxima, and the kinetics of chromophore-binding and the Pr-->Pfr conversion. The strongest effect of mutation on the chromoprotein assembly, leading to an almost complete loss of the chromophore binding capability, was found for the exchanges of His322 by Leu (H322L) and Pro318 by Lys (P318K), whereas a corresponding alanine mutant (P318A) showed wild-type behavior. The second histidine (H319) is also involved in chromophore fixation, as indicated by a slower assembly rate upon mutation (H319L). For the other mutants, an assembly process very similar to that of the wild-type protein was found. The light-induced Pr-->Pfr conversion kinetics is altered in the mutations H319L and S320K and in the double mutant L323R/Q324D, all of which exhibited a significantly faster I700 decay and accelerated Pfr formation. P318 is also involved in the Pr-->Pfr conversion, the millisecond steps (formation of Pfr) being significantly slower for P318A. Lacking sufficient amounts of W366F, assembly kinetics could not be determined in this case, while the fully assembled mutant underwent the Pr-->Pfr conversion with kinetics similar to wild-type protein.

  18. Sequences within both the N- and C-terminal domains of phytochrome A are required for PFR ubiquitination and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, R C; Jordan-Beebe, E T; Lohman, K N; Marita, J M; Walker, J M; Gatz, C; Vierstra, R D

    1999-01-01

    Photoconversion of the plant photoreceptor phytochrome A (phyA) from its inactive Pr form to its biologically active Pfr from initiates its rapid proteolysis. Previous kinetic and biochemical studies implicated a role for the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway in this breakdown and suggested that multiple domains within the chromoprotein are involved. To further resolve the essential residues, we constructed a series of mutant PHY genes in vitro and analyzed the Pfr-specific degradation of the resulting photoreceptors expressed in transgenic tobacco. One important site is within the C-terminal half of the polypeptide as its removal stabilizes oat phyA as Pfr. Within this half is a set of conserved lysines that are potentially required for ubiquitin attachment. Substitution of these lysines did not prevent ubiquitination or breakdown of Pfr, suggesting either that they are not the attachment sites or that other lysines can be used in their absence. A small domain just proximal to the C-terminus is essential for the form-dependent breakdown of the holoprotein. Removal of just six amino acids in this domain generated a chromoprotein that was not rapidly degraded as Pfr. Using chimeric photoreceptors generated from potato PHYA and PHYB, we found that the N-terminal half of phyA is also required for Pfr-specific breakdown. Only those chimeras containing the N-terminal sequences from phyA were ubiquitinated and rapidly degraded as Pfr. Taken together, our data demonstrate that, whereas an intact C-terminal domain is essential for phyA degradation, the N-terminal domain is responsible for the selective recognition and ubiquitination of Pfr.

  19. Social anxiety in online and real-life interaction and their associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ju-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Wang, Peng-Wei; Chang, Yi-Hsin; Ko, Chih-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Social anxiety was compared between online and real-life interaction in a sample of 2,348 college students. Severity of social anxiety in both real-life and online interaction was tested for associations with depression, Internet addiction, Internet activity type (gaming versus chatting), and scores on Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS)/Behavioral Activation System (BAS) scales. The results showed that social anxiety was lower when interacting online than when interacting offline. Depression, Internet addiction, and high BIS and BAS scores were associated with high social anxiety. The social anxiety decreased more in online interaction among subjects with high social anxiety, depression, BIS, and BAS. This result suggests that the Internet has good potential as an alternative medium for delivering interventions for social anxiety. Further, the effect of BIS on social anxiety is decreased in online interaction. More attention should be paid for BIS when the treatment for social anxiety is delivered online.

  20. Connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor from airway smooth muscle interact with the extracellular matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette K; Ge, Qi; Poniris, Maree H; Boustany, Sarah; Twigg, Stephen M; Black, Judith L; Johnson, Peter R A

    2006-01-01

    Airway remodeling describes the structural changes that occur in the asthmatic airway that include airway smooth muscle hyperplasia, increases in vascularity due to angiogenesis, and thickening of the basement membrane. Our aim in this study was to examine the effect of transforming growth factor-be

  1. Structural and functional analysis of VQ motif-containing proteins in Arabidopsis as interacting proteins of WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Chi, Ying-Jun; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Jian-Ye; Wang, Fei; Fan, Baofang; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2012-06-01

    WRKY transcription factors are encoded by a large gene superfamily with a broad range of roles in plants. Recently, several groups have reported that proteins containing a short VQ (FxxxVQxLTG) motif interact with WRKY proteins. We have recently discovered that two VQ proteins from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), SIGMA FACTOR-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 and SIGMA FACTOR-INTERACTING PROTEIN2, act as coactivators of WRKY33 in plant defense by specifically recognizing the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulating the DNA-binding activity of WRKY33. In this study, we have analyzed the entire family of 34 structurally divergent VQ proteins from Arabidopsis. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assays showed that Arabidopsis VQ proteins interacted specifically with the C-terminal WRKY domains of group I and the sole WRKY domains of group IIc WRKY proteins. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified structural features of these two closely related groups of WRKY domains that are critical for interaction with VQ proteins. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of a majority of Arabidopsis VQ genes was responsive to pathogen infection and salicylic acid treatment. Functional analysis using both knockout mutants and overexpression lines revealed strong phenotypes in growth, development, and susceptibility to pathogen infection. Altered phenotypes were substantially enhanced through cooverexpression of genes encoding interacting VQ and WRKY proteins. These findings indicate that VQ proteins play an important role in plant growth, development, and response to environmental conditions, most likely by acting as cofactors of group I and IIc WRKY transcription factors.

  2. An Interaction with Ewing's Sarcoma Breakpoint Protein EWS Defines a Specific Oncogenic Mechanism of ETS Factors Rearranged in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedage, Vivekananda; Selvaraj, Nagarathinam; Nicholas, Taylor R; Budka, Justin A; Plotnik, Joshua P; Jerde, Travis J; Hollenhorst, Peter C

    2016-10-25

    More than 50% of prostate tumors have a chromosomal rearrangement resulting in aberrant expression of an oncogenic ETS family transcription factor. However, mechanisms that differentiate the function of oncogenic ETS factors expressed in prostate tumors from non-oncogenic ETS factors expressed in normal prostate are unknown. Here, we find that four oncogenic ETS (ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5), and no other ETS, interact with the Ewing's sarcoma breakpoint protein, EWS. This EWS interaction was necessary and sufficient for oncogenic ETS functions including gene activation, cell migration, clonogenic survival, and transformation. Significantly, the EWS interacting region of ERG has no homology with that of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5. Therefore, this finding may explain how divergent ETS factors have a common oncogenic function. Strikingly, EWS is fused to various ETS factors by the chromosome translocations that cause Ewing's sarcoma. Therefore, these findings link oncogenic ETS function in both prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of small peptides inhibiting the integrase-LEDGF/p75 interaction through targeting the cellular co-factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalluzzo, Claudia; Christ, Frauke; Voet, Arnout; Sharma, Ajendra; Singh, Brajendra Kumar; Zhang, Kam Y J; Lescrinier, Eveline; De Maeyer, Marc; Debyser, Zeger; Van der Eycken, Erik

    2013-10-01

    The integration of the viral DNA into the host genome is one of the essential steps in the HIV replication cycle. This process is mediated by the viral enzyme integrase (IN) and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a crucial cellular co-factor of integration that acts by tethering IN to the cellular chromatin. Recently, circular peptides were identified that bind to the C-terminal domain of IN and disrupt the interaction with LEDGF/p75. Starting from the circular peptides, we identified a short peptidic sequence able to inhibit the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction at low μM concentration through its binding to the IN binding site of LEDGF/p75. This discovery can lead to the synthesis of peptidomimetics with high anti-HIV activity targeting the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75 and not the viral protein IN.

  4. Comparing the epidermal growth factor interaction with four different cell lines: intriguing effects imply strong dependency of cellular context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Björkelund

    Full Text Available The interaction of the epidermal growth factor (EGF with its receptor (EGFR is known to be complex, and the common over-expression of EGF receptor family members in a multitude of tumors makes it important to decipher this interaction and the following signaling pathways. We have investigated the affinity and kinetics of (125I-EGF binding to EGFR in four human tumor cell lines, each using four culturing conditions, in real time by use of LigandTracer®.Highly repeatable and precise measurements show that the overall apparent affinity of the (125I-EGF - EGFR interaction is greatly dependent on cell line at normal culturing conditions, ranging from K(D ≈ 200 pM on SKBR3 cells to K(D≈8 nM on A431 cells. The (125I-EGF - EGFR binding curves (irrespective of cell line have strong signs of multiple simultaneous interactions. Furthermore, for the cell lines A431 and SKOV3, gefitinib treatment increases the (125I-EGF - EGFR affinity, in particular when the cells are starved. The (125I-EGF - EGFR interaction on cell line U343 is sensitive to starvation while as on SKBR3 it is insensitive to gefitinib and starvation.The intriguing pattern of the binding characteristics proves that the cellular context is important when deciphering how EGF interacts with EGFR. From a general perspective, care is advisable when generalizing ligand-receptor interaction results across multiple cell-lines.

  5. Exploring cultural factors in human-robot interaction: A matter of personality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, Astrid; Evers, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an experimental study to investigate task-dependence and cultural-background dependence of the personality trait attribution on humanoid robots. In Human-Robot Interaction, as well as in Human-Agent Interaction research, the attribution of personality traits towards intelligent a

  6. Transcription factors do it together : the hows and whys of studying protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immink, R.G.H.; Angenent, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are intrinsic to virtually every cellular process. Recent breakthroughs in techniques to study protein-interaction and the availability of fully sequenced plant genomes have attracted many plant scientists to undertake the first steps in the field of protein

  7. Exploring cultural factors in human-robot interaction: A matter of personality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, Astrid; Evers, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an experimental study to investigate task-dependence and cultural-background dependence of the personality trait attribution on humanoid robots. In Human-Robot Interaction, as well as in Human-Agent Interaction research, the attribution of personality traits towards intelligent a

  8. Tracking transcription factor mobility and interaction in arabidopsis roots with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clark, Natalie M.; Hinde, Elizabeth; Hinde, Elizabeth; Fisher, Adam P.; Crosti, Giuseppe; Blilou, Ikram; Gratton, Enrico; Benfey, Philip N.; Sozzani, Rosangela

    2016-01-01

    To understand complex regulatory processes in multicellular organisms, it is critical to be able to quantitatively analyze protein movement and protein-protein interactions in time and space. During Arabidopsis development, the intercellular movement of SHORTROOT (SHR) and subsequent interaction

  9. Real-time studies of the interactions between epidermal growth factor and its receptor during endocytic trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Fernandez, M L; Clarke, D T; Tobin, M J; Jones, G R

    2000-09-01

    The interactions of growth factors with cell surface receptors regulate fundamental cell processes, such as growth, differentiation and transformation. Understanding the nature of these interactions at the molecular level is of fundamental importance in cell biology. This is not only from the point of view of basic science, but also because of the repercussions such knowledge might have in understanding the mode of action of drugs in cells. Receptor mediated endocytosis has been implicated in the downregulation of the mitogenic signal. However, no data are thus far available on how growth factor/receptor interactions might control endocytic trafficking. Here we show that information on modes of binding and receptor conformational changes can be obtained using time-resolved fluorescence methods. We have found that fluorescent probes bound to epidermal growth factor (EGF) show dynamic fluorescence quenching when EGF is bound to internalising EGF receptors (EGFR). We propose that this dynamic quenching takes place because EGF-bound probes interact with tryptophan residues in the extracellular domain of the EGF-EGFR complex. Real-time accumulation of fluorescent decays has also allowed us to follow the time course of a conformational change in EGFR occurring during endocytosis, and correlate this information with endosomal trafficking and EGFR recycling.

  10. MAPK genes interact with diet and lifestyle factors to alter risk of breast cancer: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa; Giuliano, Anna R; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Stern, Mariana C; Wolff, Roger K

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are integration points for multiple biochemical signals. We evaluated 13 MAPK genes with breast cancer risk and determined if diet and lifestyle factors mediated risk. Data from 3 population-based case-control studies conducted in Southwestern United States, California, and Mexico included 4183 controls and 3592 cases. Percent Indigenous American (IA) ancestry was determined from 104 ancestry informative markers. The adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) was used to determine the significance of each gene and the pathway with breast cancer risk, by menopausal status, genetic ancestry level, and estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) strata. MAP3K9 was associated with breast cancer overall (P(ARTP) = 0.02) with strongest association among women with the highest IA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.04). Several SNPs in MAP3K9 were associated with ER+/PR+ tumors and interacted with dietary oxidative balance score (DOBS), dietary folate, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and a history of diabetes. DUSP4 and MAPK8 interacted with calories to alter breast cancer risk; MAPK1 interacted with DOBS, dietary fiber, folate, and BMI; MAP3K2 interacted with dietary fat; and MAPK14 interacted with dietary folate and BMI. The patterns of association across diet and lifestyle factors with similar biological properties for the same SNPs within genes provide support for associations.

  11. Translation initiation factor (iso) 4E interacts with BTF3, the beta subunit of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-31

    A two-hybrid screen with the translation initiation factor, eIF(iso)4E from Arabidopsis, identified a clone encoding a lipoxygenase type 2 [Freire, M.A., et al., 2000. Plant lipoxygenase 2 is a translation initiation factor-4E-binding protein. Plant Molecular Biology 44, 129-140], and three cDNA clones encoding the homologue of the mammalian BTF3 factor, the beta subunit of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC). Here we report on the interaction between the translation initiation factor eIF(iso)4E and AtBTF3. AtBTF3 protein is able to interact with the wheat initiation factors eIF4E and eIF(iso)4E. AtBTF3 contains a sequence related to the prototypic motif found on most of the 4E-binding proteins, and competes with the translation initiation factor eIF(iso)4G for eIF4(iso)4E binding, in a two hybrid interference assay. These findings provide a molecular link between the translation initiation mechanism and the emergence of the nascent polypeptide chains.

  12. The interaction between bacterial transcription factors and RNA polymerase during the transition from initiation to elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    There are three stages of transcription: initiation, elongation and termination, and traditionally there has been a clear distinction between the stages. The specificity factor sigma is completely released from bacterial RNA polymerase after initiation, and then recycled for another round of transcription. Elongation factors then associate with the polymerase followed by termination factors (where necessary). These factors dissociate prior to initiation of a new round of transcription. However, there is growing evidence suggesting that sigma factors can be retained in the elongation complex. The structure of bacterial RNAP in complex with an essential elongation factor NusA has recently been published, which suggested rather than competing for the major σ binding site, NusA binds to a discrete region on RNAP. A model was proposed to help explain the way in which both factors could be associated with RNAP during the transition from transcription initiation to elongation.

  13. Dietary Magnesium and Genetic Interactions in Diabetes and Related Risk Factors: A Brief Overview of Current Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Hruby

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional genomics has exploded in the last decade, yielding insights—both nutrigenomic and nutrigenetic—into the physiology of dietary interactions and our genes. Among these are insights into the regulation of magnesium transport and homeostasis and mechanisms underlying magnesium’s role in insulin and glucose handling. Recent observational evidence has attempted to examine some promising research avenues on interaction between genetics and dietary magnesium in relation to diabetes and diabetes risk factors. This brief review summarizes the recent evidence on dietary magnesium’s role in diabetes and related traits in the presence of underlying genetic risk, and discusses future potential research directions.

  14. [Research on potential interaction between mitochondrial DNA copy number and related factors on risk of hypertension in coal miners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J Y; Lei, L J; Qiao, N; Fan, G Q; Sun, C M; Huang, J J; Wang, T

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To investigate the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood and related factors on the risk of hypertension in coal miners. Methods: A case-control study was conducted in 378 coal miners with hypertension and 325 healthy coal miners recruited from Datong Coal Mine Group. A standard questionnaire was used to collect their general information, such as demographic characteristics, habits and occupational history. Fluorescence quantitative PCR was performed to detect the copy number of mtDNA. Logistic regression model was applied for identifying the related risk factors of hypertension and analyzing the interaction between mtDNA copy number and risk factors. Results: The prevalence of hypertension of high mtDNA copy number was lower than mtDNA copy numberin 0-5.67 group, but the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.414). Alcohol drinking (OR=1.80, 95% CI: 1.26-2.56), family history of hypertension (OR=1.74, 95% CI: 1.20- 2.50), work shifts (OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.48-0.99), education level (P=0.012) and family monthly income level (P=0.001) were related to the prevalence of hypertension. There were potential interactions between mtDNA copy number and alcohol drinking, family monthly income level, family history of hypertension, respectively. Alcohol drinking was a risk factor for hypertension [1.77 (1.25-2.50)]. Potential interactions between mtDNA copy number and alcohol drinking reduced the risk of hypertension (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 1.07-1.35). Family history of hypertension was a risk factor for hypertension [1.81(1.26-2.59)]. Potential interactions between mtDNA copy number and family history of hypertension reduced the risk of hypertension (OR=1.24, 95%CI: 1.09-1.41). Family monthly income level was a protect factor for hypertension [0.55(0.46-0.66)]. Potential interactions between mtDNA copy number and family monthly income level increased the protection role of hypertension (OR=0.90, 95% CI: 0.86-0.94). Conclusion: mt

  15. Nac1 interacts with the POZ-domain transcription factor, Miz1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Mark A; Wright, Stephanie C

    2014-06-05

    Nac1 (nucleus accumbens 1) is a POZ (poxvirus and zinc finger)-domain transcriptional repressor that is expressed at high levels in ovarian serous carcinoma. Here we identify Nac1 as a novel interacting partner of the POZ-domain transcriptional activator, Miz1 (Myc-interacting zinc-finger protein 1), and using chemical crosslinking we show that this association is mediated by a heterodimeric interaction of the Nac1 and Miz1 POZ domains. Nac1 is found in discrete bodies within the nucleus of mammalian cells, and we demonstrate the relocalization of Miz1 to these structures in transfected HeLa cells. We show that siRNA (small interfering RNA)-mediated knockdown of Nac1 in ovarian cancer cells results in increased levels of the Miz1 target gene product, p21Cip1. The interaction of Nac1 with Miz1 may thus be relevant to its mechanism of tumourigenesis in ovarian cancer.

  16. Neural cell adhesion molecule differentially interacts with isoforms of the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    -binding immunoglobulin-like modules 2 and 3 of FGFR1b, FGFR1c, FGFR2b, FGFR2c, FGFR3b, FGFR3c, and FGFR4, and found that all FGFR isoforms, except for FGFR4, interacted with NCAM. The binding affinity of NCAM-FGFR interactions was considerably higher for splice variant 'b' than for splice variant 'c'. We suggest...

  17. A Meta-Analysis of Factors Affecting Trust in Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE OCT 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND... validating metrics for the evaluation of a wide spectrum of human-robot interactions (HRI) issues (Steinfeld et al., 2006); designing human-robot...almost exclusively via subjective response, measured one time after a specific interaction. However, physiological indicators, such as oxytocin -related

  18. The interaction of ethnicity, sociocultural factors, and gender in clinical psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, K

    1996-01-01

    There is increased interest in the role that ethnicity, sociocultural factors, and gender play in research, health care delivery, and response to intervention. The impact of these factors on AIDS awareness programs, on the phenomenology of suicide and anorexia nervosa, and on clinical psychopharmacology in a homogeneous population is discussed. Risky sex practices can be related to cultural norms that stigmatize condom use and sex education; economic deprivation; and male dominance. Gender, cultural, and ethnic demographics can identify high-risk groups as well as influence effective interventions. Suicide rates and risk factors are compared in African-American, Canadian Native, and South Korean adolescents. Academic stress was a differential risk factor for the Koreans. Anorexia nervosa predominantly affects women and has cultural differences in prevalence. The homogeneous population in Hong Kong illustrates the impact of ethnicity, sociocultural factors, and gender on clinical psychopharmacology. Attention to ethnicity, sociocultural factors, and gender can individualize and improve the effectiveness of clinical psychopharmacology.

  19. An environmental analysis of genes associated with schizophrenia: hypoxia and vascular factors as interacting elements in the neurodevelopmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kastner, R; van Os, J; Esquivel, G; Steinbusch, H W M; Rutten, B P F

    2012-12-01

    Investigating and understanding gene-environment interaction (G × E) in a neurodevelopmentally and biologically plausible manner is a major challenge for schizophrenia research. Hypoxia during neurodevelopment is one of several environmental factors related to the risk of schizophrenia, and links between schizophrenia candidate genes and hypoxia regulation or vascular expression have been proposed. Given the availability of a wealth of complex genetic information on schizophrenia in the literature without knowledge on the connections to environmental factors, we now systematically collected genes from candidate studies (using SzGene), genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses, and then applied four criteria to test for a (theoretical) link to ischemia-hypoxia and/or vascular factors. In all, 55% of the schizophrenia candidate genes (n=42 genes) met the criteria for a link to ischemia-hypoxia and/or vascular factors. Genes associated with schizophrenia showed a significant, threefold enrichment among genes that were derived from microarray studies of the ischemia-hypoxia response (IHR) in the brain. Thus, the finding of a considerable match between genes associated with the risk of schizophrenia and IHR and/or vascular factors is reproducible. An additional survey of genes identified by GWAS and CNV analyses suggested novel genes that match the criteria. Findings for interactions between specific variants of genes proposed to be IHR and/or vascular factors with obstetric complications in patients with schizophrenia have been reported in the literature. Therefore, the extended gene set defined here may form a reasonable and evidence-based starting point for hypothesis-based testing of G × E interactions in clinical genetic and translational neuroscience studies.

  20. Estrogen and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampus: complexity of steroid hormone-growth factor interactions in the adult CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E; MacLusky, Neil J

    2006-12-01

    In the CNS, there are widespread and diverse interactions between growth factors and estrogen. Here we examine the interactions of estrogen and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), two molecules that have historically been studied separately, despite the fact that they seem to share common targets, effects, and mechanisms of action. The demonstration of an estrogen-sensitive response element on the BDNF gene provided an impetus to explore a direct relationship between estrogen and BDNF, and predicted that the effects of estrogen, at least in part, might be due to the induction of BDNF. This hypothesis is discussed with respect to the hippocampus, where substantial evidence has accumulated in favor of it, but alternate hypotheses are also raised. It is suggested that some of the interactions between estrogen and BDNF, as well as the controversies and implications associated with their respective actions, may be best appreciated in light of the ability of BDNF to induce neuropeptide Y (NPY) synthesis in hippocampal neurons. Taken together, this tri-molecular cascade, estrogen-BDNF-NPY, may be important in understanding the hormonal regulation of hippocampal function. It may also be relevant to other regions of the CNS where estrogen is known to exert profound effects, such as amygdala and hypothalamus; and may provide greater insight into neurological disorders and psychiatric illness, including Alzheimer's disease, depression and epilepsy.

  1. Final-state interaction correction to the electromagnetic nucleon form factors in the time-like region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Wiele, Jacques; Ong, Saro [Universite de Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay (UMR 8608), IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    We study the strong energy dependence of the proton electromagnetic form factors in the time-like region, taking into account the one-pion-exchange final-state interaction in a covariant way. This effect is quantified in terms of the corrected Dirac F{sub 1} and Pauli F{sub 2} form factors and in the commonly used electric G{sub E} and magnetic G{sub M} ones. Our results on the ratio G{sub E} /G{sub M} depend only on the values of two free parameters and allow significant comparisons with the BaBar data. (orig.)

  2. Study of Drug-Protein Covalent Interactions by Mass Spectrometry. A case study: Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Moretti, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    Study of Drug-Protein Covalent Interactions by Mass Spectrometry A case study: Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Abstract The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the human EGFR family, which is in turn composed of four members: EGFR (ErbB1), ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4. It is characterized by the presence of an extracellular ligand-binding domain, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmatic domain that is endowed with a tyrosine kinase (TK)...

  3. Interaction and Relationship Between Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene and Environmental Factors Predisposing to Essential Hypertension in Mongolian Population of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUN XU; HUA FENG; SHUANG-LIAN BAI; HAI-HUA PANG; GUI-RONG HUANG; MING-WU FANG; YONG-HONG ZHANG; ZHENG-LAI WU; CHANG-CHUN QIU; YAN-HUA WANG; WEI-JUN TONG; MING-LIANG GU; GANG WU; BATU BUREN; YONG-YUE LIU; JIAN WANG; YONG-SHAN LI

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of specific functional gene ACE (I/D) variants of the renin-angiotensin system with essential hypertension (EH) and interaction between ACE (I/D) gene and risk factors for EH in a genetically homogenous Mongolia rural population of China. Methods Individuals (n=1099) were recruited from general population of Kezuohouqi Banner in Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region. Results The association was found between ACE genotype DD plus ID and EH, with an interaction between ACE genotype DD plus ID and cigarette smoking in an additive model. Cigarette smoking index and ACE gene showed a low exposure-gene (LEG) effect on EH, with interaction indices from 7.10 to 1.16. Interaction between ACE genotype DD plus ID and alcohol drinking on EH appeared an additive model. Alcohol drinking index and ACE gene showed a low exposure-gene (LEG) effect on EH, with interaction indices from 1.66 to 1.09. BMI and ACE gene showed a low exposure-gene (LEG) effect on EH, with interaction indices from 6.15 to 2.49. Interactions between ACE genotype and WHR on EH showed a multiplicative model. In a short, there was an interaction between ACE gene and cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking and BMI on EH, especially in a low dose-exposure effect. Conclusion It is important for individuals who carry ACE D allele gene to prevent EH, and furthermore, to prevent and control coronary heart disease, in a view of population-based prevention.

  4. Systematic Analysis Reveals Elongation Factor 2 and α-Enolase as Novel Interaction Partners of AKT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Bottermann

    Full Text Available AKT2 is one of the three isoforms of the protein kinase AKT being involved in the modulation of cellular metabolism. Since protein-protein interactions are one possibility to convey specificity in signal transduction, we performed AKT2-protein interaction analysis to elucidate their relevance for AKT2-dependent cellular functions. We identified heat shock protein 90 kDa (HSP90, Cdc37, heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein (GRP78, tubulin, GAPDH, α-enolase and elongation factor 2 (EF2 as AKT2-interacting proteins by a combination of tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry in HEK293T cells. Quantitative MS-analysis using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC revealed that only HSP90 and Cdc37 interact stably with AKT2, whereas the other proteins interact with low affinity with AKT2. The interactions of AKT2 with α-enolase and EF2 were further analyzed in order to uncover the functional relevance of these newly discovered binding partners. Despite the interaction of AKT2 and α-enolase, which was additionally validated by proximity ligation assay (PLA, no significant impact of AKT on α-enolase activity was detected in activity measurements. AKT stimulation via insulin and/or inhibition with the ATP-competitive inhibitor CCT128930 did not alter enzymatic activity of α-enolase. Interestingly, the direct interaction of AKT2 and EF2 was found to be dynamically regulated in embryonic rat cardiomyocytes. Treatment with the PI3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 before stimulation with several hormones stabilized the complex, whereas stimulation alone led to complex dissociation which was analyzed in situ with PLA. Taken together, these findings point to new aspects of AKT2-mediated signal transduction in protein synthesis and glucose metabolism.

  5. Interactions Between Anandamide and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Signaling Modulate Human Amygdala Function and Risk for Anxiety Disorders: An Imaging Genetics Strategy for Modeling Molecular Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Catherine H; Drabant Conley, Emily; Bogdan, Ryan; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical models reveal that stress-induced amygdala activity and impairment in fear extinction reflect reductions in anandamide driven by corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRF1) potentiation of the anandamide catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase. Here, we provide clinical translation for the importance of these molecular interactions using an imaging genetics strategy to examine whether interactions between genetic polymorphisms associated with differential anandamide (FAAH rs324420) and CRF1 (CRHR1 rs110402) signaling modulate amygdala function and anxiety disorder diagnosis. Analyses revealed that individuals with a genetic background predicting relatively high anandamide and CRF1 signaling exhibited blunted basolateral amygdala habituation, which further mediated increased risk for anxiety disorders among these same individuals. The convergence of preclinical and clinical data suggests that interactions between anandamide and CRF1 represent a fundamental molecular mechanism regulating amygdala function and anxiety. Our results further highlight the potential of imaging genetics to powerfully translate complex preclinical findings to clinically meaningful human phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Weak minimum aberration and maximum number of clear two-factor interactions in 2m-p Ⅳ designs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guijun; LIU Minqian; ZHANG Runchu

    2005-01-01

    Both the clear effects and minimum aberration criteria are the important rules for the design selection. In this paper, it is proved that some 2m-p Ⅳ designs have weak minimum aberration, by considering the number of clear two-factor interactions in the designs.And some conditions are provided, under which a 2m-p Ⅳ design can have the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions and weak minimum aberration at the same time.Some weak minimum aberration 2m-p Ⅳ designs are provided for illustrations and two nonisomorphic weak minimum aberration 213-6 Ⅳ designs are constructed at the end of this paper.

  7. Intracellular Localization and Cellular Factors Interaction of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax Proteins: Similarities and Functional Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Romanelli

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic viruses type 1 (HTLV-1 and type 2 (HTLV-2 present very similar genomic structures but HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2. Is this difference due to their transactivating Tax proteins, Tax-1 and Tax-2, which are responsible for viral and cellular gene activation? Do Tax-1 and Tax-2 differ in their cellular localization and in their interaction pattern with cellular factors? In this review, we summarize Tax-1 and Tax-2 structural and phenotypic properties, their interaction with factors involved in signal transduction and their localization-related behavior within the cell. Special attention will be given to the distinctions between Tax-1 and Tax-2 that likely play an important role in their transactivation activity.

  8. Prediction of protein-peptide interactions: application of the XPairIt API to anthrax lethal factor and substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Margaret M.; Sellers, Michael S.

    2013-05-01

    As software and methodology develop, key aspects of molecular interactions such as detailed energetics and flexibility are continuously better represented in docking simulations. In the latest iteration of the XPairIt API and Docking Protocol, we perform a blind dock of a peptide into the cleavage site of the Anthrax lethal factor (LF) metalloprotein. Molecular structures are prepared from RCSB:1JKY and we demonstrate a reasonably accurate docked peptide through analysis of protein motion and, using NCI Plot, visualize and characterize the forces leading to binding. We compare our docked structure to the 1JKY crystal structure and the more recent 1PWV structure, and discuss both captured and overlooked interactions. Our results offer a more detailed look at secondary contact and show that both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions from peptide residues further from the enzyme's catalytic site are significant.

  9. A Meta-Analysis of Factors Influencing the Development of Trust in Automation: Implications for Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    us in social relationships and systems, • our specific expectation that partners in an interaction will carry out their fiduciary obligations and...work, it is important to understand the relationship between the terms autonomy, automation, and robot. Literature and human perception have often...performance), the factors that make up these relationships are of critical importance to the development or degradation of trust in automation. However

  10. Molecular interactions between coagulation factor IX and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohlena, Jakub

    2004-01-01

    Factor IX is an essential blood haemostatic protein, which is apparent from the observation that the absence of functional FIX is associated with the severe bleeding disorder haemophilia B. To achieve its full enzymatic activity, the serine protease precursor factor IX must first be activated into

  11. Framed School--Frame Factors, Frames and the Dynamics of Social Interaction in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to show how the Goffman frame perspective can be used in an analysis of school and education and how it can be combined, in such analysis, with the frame factor perspective. The latter emphasizes factors that are determined outside the teaching process, while the former stresses how actors organize their experiences and define…

  12. Combined and interactive effects of environmental and GWAS-identified risk factors in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Rossing, Mary Anne; Lee, Alice W

    2013-01-01

    There are several well-established environmental risk factors for ovarian cancer, and recent genome-wide association studies have also identified six variants that influence disease risk. However, the interplay between such risk factors and susceptibility loci has not been studied....

  13. True versus false parasite interactions: a robust method to take risk factors into account and its application to feline viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eléonore Hellard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple infections are common in natural host populations and interspecific parasite interactions are therefore likely within a host individual. As they may seriously impact the circulation of certain parasites and the emergence and management of infectious diseases, their study is essential. In the field, detecting parasite interactions is rendered difficult by the fact that a large number of co-infected individuals may also be observed when two parasites share common risk factors. To correct for these "false interactions", methods accounting for parasite risk factors must be used. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present paper we propose such a method for presence-absence data (i.e., serology. Our method enables the calculation of the expected frequencies of single and double infected individuals under the independence hypothesis, before comparing them to the observed ones using the chi-square statistic. The method is termed "the corrected chi-square." Its robustness was compared to a pre-existing method based on logistic regression and the corrected chi-square proved to be much more robust for small sample sizes. Since the logistic regression approach is easier to implement, we propose as a rule of thumb to use the latter when the ratio between the sample size and the number of parameters is above ten. Applied to serological data for four viruses infecting cats, the approach revealed pairwise interactions between the Feline Herpesvirus, Parvovirus and Calicivirus, whereas the infection by FIV, the feline equivalent of HIV, did not modify the risk of infection by any of these viruses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work therefore points out possible interactions that can be further investigated in experimental conditions and, by providing a user-friendly R program and a tutorial example, offers new opportunities for animal and human epidemiologists to detect interactions of interest in the field, a crucial step in the

  14. ADAM 12, a disintegrin metalloprotease, interacts with insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Z; Xu, Wei; Loechel, F

    2000-01-01

    , as yet the pregnancy-specific protease, or proteases, have not been identified. We utilized a yeast two-hybrid assay and a human placental cDNA library to investigate IGFBP-3-interacting proteins. A disintegrin and metalloprotease-12 (ADAM 12), a member of a family of metalloprotease disintegrins...... that is highly expressed in placental tissue, was identified as interacting with IGFBP-3. This interaction involved the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM 12. Unlike other members of this family of disintegrin metalloproteases that are membrane proteins, ADAM 12 exists as an alternatively spliced soluble secreted...... medium on a heparin-Sepharose column also proteolyzed IGFBP-3. The degradation pattern was similar to that seen with pregnancy serum, and the presence of ADAM 12-S in serum during pregnancy was confirmed. The data suggest that ADAM 12-S has IGFBP-3 protease activity, and it may contribute to the IGFBP-3...

  15. The interactions of mothers with eating disorders with their toddlers: identifying broader risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh-Sharvit, Shiri; Levy-Shiff, Rachel; Arnow, Katherine D; Lock, James D

    2016-08-01

    The connection between maternal eating disorders and feeding and eating problems among their children has been substantially demonstrated. This pilot study focused on the interactions between mothers with eating disorders and their toddlers in non-feeding situations. Twenty-eight dyads of mothers with prenatal eating disorders and their toddlers were compared to a case-matched control group with no eating disorder. Maternal current eating and co-occurring psychopathology, children's symptoms and mother-child interactions were measured. Mothers with eating disorders were less sensitive to their children, tried to control their children's behaviors more, and were less happy during mother-child interactions. The children in the maternal eating disorder group were rated as less responsive to their mothers and their mothers also reported more behavioral problems than those in the control group. Findings imply that maternal eating disorders may be linked with a wide range of adverse maternal and child behaviors beyond those associated with eating.

  16. Genotype-Based Bayesian Analysis of Gene-Environment Interactions with Multiple Genetic Markers and Misclassification in Environmental Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach, Iryna; Fan, Ruzong

    A key component to understanding etiology of complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, alcohol dependence, is to investigate gene-environment interactions. This work is motivated by the following two concerns in the analysis of gene-environment interactions. First, multiple genetic markers in moderate linkage disequilibrium may be involved in susceptibility to a complex disease. Second, environmental factors may be subject to misclassification. We develop a genotype based Bayesian pseudolikelihood approach that accommodates linkage disequilibrium in genetic markers and misclassification in environmental factors. Since our approach is genotype based, it allows the observed genetic information to enter the model directly thus eliminating the need to infer haplotype phase and simplifying computations. Bayesian approach allows shrinking parameter estimates towards prior distribution to improve estimation and inference when environmental factors are subject to misclassification. Simulation experiments demonstrated that our method produced parameter estimates that are nearly unbiased even for small sample sizes. An application of our method is illustrated using a case-control study of interaction between early onset of drinking and genes involved in dopamine pathway.

  17. Genotype-Based Bayesian Analysis of Gene-Environment Interactions with Multiple Genetic Markers and Misclassification in Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Lobach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A key component to understanding etiology of complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, alcohol dependence, is to investigate gene-environment interactions. This work is motivated by the following two concerns in the analysis of gene-environment interactions. First, multiple genetic markers in moderate linkage disequilibrium may be involved in susceptibility to a complex disease. Second, environmental factors may be subject to misclassification. We develop a genotype based Bayesian pseudolikelihood approach that accommodates linkage disequilibrium in genetic markers and misclassification in environmental factors. Since our approach is genotype based, it allows the observed genetic information to enter the model directly thus eliminating the need to infer haplotype phase and simplifying computations. Bayesian approach allows shrinking parameter estimates towards prior distribution to improve estimation and inference when environmental factors are subject to misclassification. Simulation experiments demonstrated that our method produced parameter estimates that are nearly unbiased even for small sample sizes. An application of our method is illustrated using a case-control study of interaction between early onset of drinking and genes involved in dopamine pathway.

  18. The interaction of AGT and NOS3 gene polymorphisms with conventional risk factors increases predisposition to hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Renata R; Santos, Paula S; Sena, Angela A S; Marangoni, Karina; Araújo, Messias A; Goulart, Luiz R

    2013-12-01

    Renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin systems are interconnected, regulating blood pressure homeostasis. We have demonstrated the interactions among polymorphisms of the angiotensinogen (AGT) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) genes and conventional risk factors affecting the hypertension occurrence. Individuals were recruited (n=192) and classified into hypertensive (HG; n=140) and normotensive (NG; n=52) groups. The genotypic distribution of the Met235Thr (AGT) and Glu298Asp (NOS3) polymorphisms demonstrated that both are independent risk factors of hypertension (p=0.02 and p=0.008, respectively). The concomitant presence of these polymorphisms in the HG group was significantly different (p=0.001) from the NG. Both gene polymorphisms presented an additive effect for the unfavourable alleles T and A, respectively, and 95% of the double mutant homozygotes were classified into the HG. Specific interactions among certain conventional factors and the presence of at least one unfavourable allele presented significant odds towards hypertension. Blood pressure homeostasis was affected by genetic polymorphisms conditioned by the T and A alleles of the AGT and NOS3 genes, respectively, which acted independently. However, their interaction with smoking, sedentariness, age and total cholesterol may have increased the predisposition to hypertension, which may explain most of the hypertension cases.

  19. Using Frequent Item Set Mining and Feature Selection Methods to Identify Interacted Risk Factors - The Atrial Fibrillation Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Haifeng; Du, Xin; Hu, Gang; Xie, Guotong; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Disease risk prediction is highly important for early intervention and treatment, and identification of predictive risk factors is the key point to achieve accurate prediction. In addition to original independent features in a dataset, some interacted features, such as comorbidities and combination therapies, may have non-additive influence on the disease outcome and can also be used in risk prediction to improve the prediction performance. However, it is usually difficult to manually identify the possible interacted risk factors due to the combination explosion of features. In this paper, we propose an automatic approach to identify predictive risk factors with interactions using frequent item set mining and feature selection methods. The proposed approach was applied in the real world case study of predicting ischemic stroke and thromboembolism for atrial fibrillation patients on the Chinese atrial fibrillation registry dataset, and the results show that our approach can not only improve the prediction performance, but also identify the comorbidities and combination therapies that have potential influences on TE occurrence for AF.

  20. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and lung branching morphogenesis. Role of polyamines and transforming growth factor ß1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Stabellini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung branching morphogenesis is a result of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, which are in turn dependent on extracellular matrix composition and cytokine regulation. Polyamines have recently been demonstrated as able to modify chick embryo skin differentiation. In this work we have examined the effects of putrescine and spermidine during chick embryo lung morphogenesis in organotypic cultures by morphological, histochemical and biochemical examination. To verify the role of polyamines, we used specific inhibitors, such as bis-cyclohexylammonium sulphate and alfa-difluoromethylornithine, and transforming growth factor ß1, an ornithine decarboxylase and polyamine stimulator. Our data show that lung morphogenesis is significantly altered following the induced mesenchymal glycosaminoglycan changes. The increase of mesenchymal glycosaminoglycans is correlated with a stimulation of lung development in the presence of polyamines, and with its inhibition when transforming growth factor ß1 is added to the culture medium. The morphometric data show a uniform increase of both the mesenchyme and epithelial branching with spermidine and putrescine stimulus, whereas the mesenchymal substance alone is significantly increased in apical-median lung sections with transforming growth factor ß1 and transforming growth factor ß1 + spermidine lung cultures. Transforming growth factor ß1 and transforming growth factor ß1 + spermidine confirm the blocking of epithelial branching formations and fibroblast activation, and show that polyamines are unable to prevent the blocking of epithelial cells due to the inhibitory effect of transforming growth factor ß1.

  1. Using ANN to predict E. coli accumulation in coves based on interaction amongst various physical, chemical and biological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D.; Mohanty, B. P.; Lesikar, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    The accumulation of Escherichia Coli (E. coli) in canals, coves and streams is the result of a number of interacting processes operating at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Fate and transport of E. coli in surface water systems is governed by different physical, chemical, and biological processes. Various models developed to quantify each of these processes occurring at different scales are not so far pooled into a single predictive model. At present, very little is known about the fate and transport of E. coli in the environment. We hypothesize that E. coli population heterogeneity in canals and coves is affected by physical factors (average stream width and/ depth, secchi depth, flow and flow severity, day since precipitation, aquatic vegetation, solar radiation, dissolved and total suspended solids etc.); chemical factors (basic water quality, nutrients, organic compounds, pH, and toxicity etc.); and biological factors (type of bacterial strain, predation, and antagonism etc.). The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) examine the interactions between E. coli and various coupled physical, chemical and biological factors; (2) examine the interactions between E. coli and toxic organic pollutants and other pathogens (viruses); and (3) evaluate qualitatively the removal efficiency of E. coli. We suggest that artificial neural networks (ANN) may be used to provide a possible solution to this problem. To demonstrate the application of the approach, we develop an ANN representing E. coli accumulation in two polluted sites at Lake Granbury in the upper part of the Brazos River in North Central Texas. The graphical structure of ANN explicitly represents cause- and-effect relationship between system variables. Each of these relationships can then be quantified independently using an approach suitable for the type and scale of information available. Preliminary results revealed that E. coli concentrations in canals show seasonal variations regardless of change

  2. Biochemical and proteomic analysis of spliceosome factors interacting with intron-1 of human papillomavirus type-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Salazar, Martha; López-Urrutia, Eduardo; Arechaga-Ocampo, Elena; Bonilla-Moreno, Raul; Martínez-Castillo, Macario; Díaz-Hernández, Job; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Martines-Juarez, Víctor; De Nova-Ocampo, Monica; Valdes, Jesús; Berumen, Jaime; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás

    2014-12-05

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6/E7 spliced transcripts are heterogeneously expressed in cervical carcinoma. The heterogeneity of the E6/E7 splicing profile might be in part due to the intrinsic variation of splicing factors in tumor cells. However, the splicing factors that bind the E6/E7 intron 1 (In-1) have not been defined. Therefore, we aimed to identify these factors; we used HeLa nuclear extracts (NE) for in vitro spliceosome assembly. The proteins were allowed to bind to an RNA/DNA hybrid formed by the In-1 transcript and a 5'-biotinylated DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the upstream exon sequence, which prevented interference in protein binding to the intron. The hybrid probes bound with the nuclear proteins were coupled to streptavidin magnetic beads for chromatography affinity purification. Proteins were eluted and identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Approximately 170 proteins were identified by MS, 80% of which were RNA binding proteins, including canonical spliceosome core components, helicases and regulatory splicing factors. The canonical factors were identified as components of the spliceosomal B-complex. Although 35-40 of the identified factors were cognate splicing factors or helicases, they have not been previously detected in spliceosome complexes that were assembled using in vivo or in vitro models.

  3. Interaction of Physical Exposures and Occupational Factors on Sickness Absence in Automotive Industry Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valirad, Fateme; Ghaffari, Mostafa; Abdi, Alireza; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Mircheraghi, Seyed Farzin; Mohammadi, Saber

    2015-04-23

    Increased sickness absence in recent years has been a trouble making issue in industrial society. Identify the causes of sickness absence and its influencing factors, is an important step to control and reduce its associated complications and costs. The aim of this study was to evaluate main factors associated with the incidence of sickness absence. In 2012, a cross-sectional study on 758 employees of a car accessories producing company was applied and relevant information about the number of days and episodes of sickness absence, Disease resulting in absence from work, personal features, occupational factors and physical exposures were collected. To determine risk factors associated with sickness absence, Logistic regression analysis was used. The most common diseases leading to sickness absence in order of frequency were Respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal disorders, gastrointestinal diseases and injuries at work. Musculoskeletal disorders increased the danger of long term absence by 4/33 times. Blue collar and shift works were the most important occupational factors associated with the incidence of sickness absence. The main physical factors that affect incidence of sickness absence were frequent bending-twisting and heavy lifting. Identifying controllable factors of sickness absence and trying to prevent and modify them such as compliance of ergonomic principals to decrease physical can be effective in reducing sickness absence.

  4. Interaction of insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin resistance-related genetic variants with lifestyle factors on postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Su Yon; Ho, Gloria; Rohan, Thomas; Strickler, Howard; Bea, Jennifer; Papp, Jeanette; Sobel, Eric; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Crandall, Carolyn

    2017-07-01

    Genetic variants and traits in metabolic signaling pathways may interact with obesity, physical activity, and exogenous estrogen (E), influencing postmenopausal breast cancer risk, but these inter-related pathways are incompletely understood. We used 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)/insulin resistance (IR) traits and signaling pathways, and data from 1003 postmenopausal women in Women's Health Initiative Observation ancillary studies. Stratifying via obesity and lifestyle modifiers, we assessed the role of IGF-I/IR traits (fasting IGF-I, IGF-binding protein 3, insulin, glucose, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance) in breast cancer risk as a mediator or influencing factor. Seven SNPs in IGF-I and INS genes were associated with breast cancer risk. These associations differed between non-obese/active and obese/inactive women and between exogenous E non-users and users. The mediation effects of IGF-I/IR traits on the relationship between these SNPs and cancer differed between strata, but only roughly 35% of the cancer risk due to the SNPs was mediated by traits. Similarly, carriers of 20 SNPs in PIK3R1, AKT1/2, and MAPK1 genes (signaling pathways-genetic variants) had different associations with breast cancer between strata, and the proportion of the SNP-cancer relationship explained by traits varied 45-50% between the strata. Our findings suggest that IGF-I/IR genetic variants interact with obesity and lifestyle factors, altering cancer risk partially through pathways other than IGF-I/IR traits. Unraveling gene-phenotype-lifestyle interactions will provide data on potential genetic targets in clinical trials for cancer prevention and intervention strategies to reduce breast cancer risk.

  5. Interaction of human mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria: its involvement in the dynamics of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is a key regulator of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). TFAM interacts with itself and forms dimers; however, the precise interaction domain in vivo has not yet been determined. We herein showed that human TFAM formed oligomers in mitochondria by in situ chemical cross-linking. We used the separated fluorescent protein, monomeric Kusabira-Green, as a reporter to monitor their self-association in mitochondria. This reporter successfully detected the TFAM-TFAM interaction in cells as fluorescent signals on mitochondria. We also found that the N-terminal high-mobility group box domain was sufficient for this interaction. The expression of the dimer-defective mutant induced enlarged mtDNA nucleoids, suggesting the importance of dimerization in the distribution of mtDNA. The reporter system also supported the association and mixture between independent nucleoids through TFAM by a cell fusion assay using hemagglutinating virus of Japan. We here, for the first time, visualized the interaction of TFAM molecules in mitochondria and proposed its implications for the dynamics of mtDNA nucleoids.

  6. Interaction, Modality, and Word Engagement as Factors in Lexical Learning in a Chinese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ruiying; Helms-Park, Rena

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the roles of collaborative output, the modality of output, and word engagement in vocabulary learning and retention by Chinese-speaking undergraduate EFL learners. The two treatment groups reconstructed a passage that they had read in one of two ways: (1) dyadic oral interaction while producing a written report (Written…

  7. Strategies and Intervening Factors Influencing Student Social Interaction and Experiential Learning in an Interdisciplinary Research Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryser, Laura; Halseth, Greg; Thien, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Faculty have long incorporated students into interdisciplinary research projects to meet increasingly common demands for collaborative research by federal funding agencies. Despite the critical role of experiential learning in building student research skills and capacity, few have explored social interaction mechanisms used to facilitate student…

  8. Interaction, Modality, and Word Engagement as Factors in Lexical Learning in a Chinese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ruiying; Helms-Park, Rena

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the roles of collaborative output, the modality of output, and word engagement in vocabulary learning and retention by Chinese-speaking undergraduate EFL learners. The two treatment groups reconstructed a passage that they had read in one of two ways: (1) dyadic oral interaction while producing a written report (Written…

  9. Psychological Impact of Unemployment: Interactive Effects of Vulnerability and Protective Factors on Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Shirley; Gilbert, Paul

    1991-01-01

    Fifty unemployed men completed measures of depressive symptomatology, sociotropic or autonomous motivation, social support, and activity. Found significant interactions between autonomy and activity but not between sociotropy and social support. Other findings suggest that psychological impact of unemployment is moderated by complex interactions…

  10. Interaction Processes as a Mediating Factor between Children's Externalized Behaviour Difficulties and Engagement in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöman, Madeleine; Granlund, Mats; Almqvist, Lena

    2016-01-01

    This study examined social interaction as a mediator between externalized behaviour difficulties and children's engagement in preschool. Data from 663 children (340 boys), aged 18-71 months, were collected at 81 Swedish preschool units in six municipalities to test a path model that included child, teacher, and child groups. The results indicated…

  11. Demographic and Instructor-Student Interaction Factors Associated with Community College Students' Intent to Persist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Yolanda F.; Hughes, Gail D.

    2014-01-01

    The classroom is the main point of contact for community college students due to their part-time status, employment, family responsibilities, and limited campus involvement. To examine the relationship between community college students' demographics and instructor interactions as they relate to intention to persist in college, researchers…

  12. Interaction Processes as a Mediating Factor between Children's Externalized Behaviour Difficulties and Engagement in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöman, Madeleine; Granlund, Mats; Almqvist, Lena

    2016-01-01

    This study examined social interaction as a mediator between externalized behaviour difficulties and children's engagement in preschool. Data from 663 children (340 boys), aged 18-71 months, were collected at 81 Swedish preschool units in six municipalities to test a path model that included child, teacher, and child groups. The results indicated…

  13. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-interacting protein (TRIP) negatively regulates the TRAF2 ubiquitin-dependent pathway by suppressing the TRAF2-sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eui-Soon; Choi, Seunga; Shin, Bongjin; Yu, Jungeun; Yu, Jiyeon; Hwang, Jung-Me; Yun, Hyeongseok; Chung, Young-Ho; Choi, Jong-Soon; Choi, Yongwon; Rho, Jaerang

    2015-04-10

    The signaling pathway downstream of TNF receptor (TNFR) is involved in the induction of a wide range of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, activation, differentiation, and apoptosis. TNFR-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a key adaptor molecule in TNFR signaling complexes that promotes downstream signaling cascades, such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. TRAF-interacting protein (TRIP) is a known cellular binding partner of TRAF2 and inhibits TNF-induced NF-κB activation. Recent findings that TRIP plays a multifunctional role in antiviral response, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and embryonic development have increased our interest in exploring how TRIP can affect the TNFR-signaling pathway on a molecular level. In our current study, we demonstrated that TRIP is negatively involved in the TNF-induced inflammatory response through the down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Here, we demonstrated that the TRAF2-TRIP interaction inhibits Lys(63)-linked TRAF2 ubiquitination by inhibiting TRAF2 E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase activity. The TRAF2-TRIP interaction inhibited the binding of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which is a cofactor of TRAF2 E3 Ub ligase, to the TRAF2 RING domain. Finally, we demonstrated that TRIP functions as a negative regulator of proinflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting TNF-induced NF-κB activation. These results indicate that TRIP is an important cellular regulator of the TNF-induced inflammatory response.

  14. A new technique for analysing interacting factors affecting biodiversity patterns: crossed-DPCoA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavoine, Sandrine; Blondel, Jacques; Dufour, Anne B; Gasc, Amandine; Bonsall, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    We developed an approach for analysing the effects of two crossed factors A and B on the functional, taxonomic or phylogenetic composition of communities. The methodology, known as crossed-DPCoA, defines a space where species, communities and the levels of the two factors are organised as a set of points. In this space, the Euclidean distance between two species-specific points is a measure of the (functional, taxonomic or phylogenetic) dissimilarity. The communities are positioned at the centroid of their constitutive species; and the levels of two factors at the centroid of the communities associated with them. We develop two versions for crossed-DPCoA, the first one moves the levels of factor B to the centre of the space and analyses the axes of highest variance in the coordinates of the levels of factor A. It is related to previous ordination approaches such as partial canonical correspondence analysis and partial non-symmetrical correspondence analysis. The second version projects all points on the orthogonal complement of the space generated by the principal axes of factor B. This second version should be preferred when there is an a priori suspicion that factor A and B are associated. We apply the two versions of crossed-DPCoA to analyse the phylogenetic composition of Central European and Mediterranean bird communities. Applying crossed-DPCoA on bird communities supports the hypothesis that allopatric speciation processes during the Quaternary occurred in open and patchily distributed landscapes, while the lack of geographic barriers to dispersal among forest habitats may explain the homogeneity of forest bird communities over the whole western Palaearctic. Generalizing several ordination analyses commonly used in ecology, crossed-DPCoA provides an approach for analysing the effects of crossed factors on functional, taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity, environmental and geographic structure of species niches, and more broadly the role of genetics on

  15. A new technique for analysing interacting factors affecting biodiversity patterns: crossed-DPCoA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Pavoine

    Full Text Available We developed an approach for analysing the effects of two crossed factors A and B on the functional, taxonomic or phylogenetic composition of communities. The methodology, known as crossed-DPCoA, defines a space where species, communities and the levels of the two factors are organised as a set of points. In this space, the Euclidean distance between two species-specific points is a measure of the (functional, taxonomic or phylogenetic dissimilarity. The communities are positioned at the centroid of their constitutive species; and the levels of two factors at the centroid of the communities associated with them. We develop two versions for crossed-DPCoA, the first one moves the levels of factor B to the centre of the space and analyses the axes of highest variance in the coordinates of the levels of factor A. It is related to previous ordination approaches such as partial canonical correspondence analysis and partial non-symmetrical correspondence analysis. The second version projects all points on the orthogonal complement of the space generated by the principal axes of factor B. This second version should be preferred when there is an a priori suspicion that factor A and B are associated. We apply the two versions of crossed-DPCoA to analyse the phylogenetic composition of Central European and Mediterranean bird communities. Applying crossed-DPCoA on bird communities supports the hypothesis that allopatric speciation processes during the Quaternary occurred in open and patchily distributed landscapes, while the lack of geographic barriers to dispersal among forest habitats may explain the homogeneity of forest bird communities over the whole western Palaearctic. Generalizing several ordination analyses commonly used in ecology, crossed-DPCoA provides an approach for analysing the effects of crossed factors on functional, taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity, environmental and geographic structure of species niches, and more broadly the role of

  16. Pharmacological manipulation of transcription factor protein-protein interactions: opportunities and obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Fontaine

    2015-01-01

    As more attempts at modulating transcription factor activity are undertaken, valuable knowledge will be accumulated on the modality of action required to modulate transcription and how these findings can be applied to developing transcription factor drugs. Key discoveries will spawn into new therapeutic approaches not only as anticancer targets but also for other indications, such as those with an inflammatory component including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and chronic liver and kidney diseases.

  17. Transcription factors, sucrose, and sucrose metabolic genes interact to regulate potato phenylpropanoid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Much remains unknown about how transcription factors and sugars regulate phenylpropanoid metabolism in tuber crops like potato (Solanum tuberosum). Based on phylogeny and protein similarity to known regulators of phenylpropanoid metabolism, 15 transcription factors were selected and their expression was compared in white, yellow, red, and purple genotypes with contrasting phenolic and anthocyanin profiles. Red and purple genotypes had increased phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) enzyme activit...

  18. Transcription factors interacting with herpes simplex virus alpha gene promoters in sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, M; Georgiev, O; Schaffner, W; Douville, P

    1995-01-01

    Interference with VP16-mediated activation of herpes virus immediate-early (or alpha) genes is thought to be the major cause of establishing viral latency in sensory neurons. This could be brought about by lack of a key activating transcription factor(s) or active repression. In this study we find that sensory neurons express all important components for VP16-mediated alpha gene induction, such as the POU transcription factor Oct-1, host cell factor (HCF) and GABP alpha/beta. However, Oct-1 and GABP alpha/beta are only present at low levels and the VP16-induced complex (VIC) appears different. We do not find protein expression of the transcription factor Oct-2, implicated by others as an alpha gene repressor. The POU factor N-Oct3 (Brn 2 or POU3F2) is also present in sensory neurons and binds viral TAATGARAT motifs with higher affinity than Oct-1, indicating that it may be a candidate repressor for competitive binding to TAATGARAT motifs. When transfected into HeLa cells, where Oct-1 and GABP alpha/beta are highly abundant, N-Oct3 represses model promoters with multimerized TAATGARAT motifs, but fails to repress complete alpha gene promoters. Taken together our findings suggest that modulation of alpha gene promoters could contribute to viral latency when low concentrations of the activating transcription factors Oct-1 and GABP alpha/beta prevail. Our data, however, refute the notion that competing Oct factors are able to block alpha gene transcription to achieve viral latency. Images PMID:8559654

  19. Características fisiológicas de microtomateiros fitocromo-mutantes Physiological characteristics of micro-tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum P. Miller phytochrome-mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyrandir Cabral de Melo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, caracterizar aspectos fisiológicos de microtomateiros (Lycopersicon esculentum P. Miller cv. Micro-Tom fitocromo-mutantes. A cultivar Micro-Tom e os mutantes aurea (deficiente na biossíntese do cromóforo dos fitocromos, atroviolacea (atv e high pigment1 (hp1;ambos superexpressam eventos mediados por fitocromos foram cultivados em condições controladas de luz e temperatura e caracterizados no estágio de floração. O mutante hp1 obteve as maiores taxas de fotossíntese potencial e de conteúdo de carotenóides. O mutante aurea manteve taxas de fotossíntese potencial similares à cultivar Micro-Tom, mesmo expressando o mais baixo conteúdo de clorofilas, e também expressou o maior conteúdo de nitrogênio entre os demais microtomateiros. Os mutantes aurea e hp1 obtiveram os menores conteúdos de açúcares solúveis totais. O mutante atv expressou o maior conteúdo de clorofilas e também a menor razão clorofila a/b.The objective of this work was to characterize physiological aspects of micro-tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum P. Miller cv. Micro-Tom phytochrome-mutants. Plants of Micro-Tom cultivar and aurea (deficient in phytochrome chromophore biosynthesis, high pigment1 (hp1 and atroviolacea (atv (both super express phytochrome events-mediated mutants were cultivated under controlled light and temperature and evaluated in flowering stage. The hp1 mutant expressed the highest rates of potential photosynthesis and also the content of total carotenoids. Aurea mutant maintained similar potential photosynthesis rates as the Micro-Tom cultivar, even containing low chlorophyll content, and expressed the highest content of nitrogen among all micro-tomatoes studied. Total soluble sugars were lower in aurea and hp1 mutants. The atv mutant expressed the highest content of chlorophylls and also the lowest rate of chlorophyll a/b.

  20. The Interaction of Language-Specific and Universal Factors During the Acquisition of Morphophonemic Alternations With Exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer-Henney, Dinah; Kügler, Frank; van de Vijver, Ruben

    2015-09-01

    Using the artificial language paradigm, we studied the acquisition of morphophonemic alternations with exceptions by 160 German adult learners. We tested the acquisition of two types of alternations in two regularity conditions while additionally varying length of training. In the first alternation, a vowel harmony, backness of the stem vowel determines backness of the suffix. This process is grounded in substance (phonetic motivation), and this universal phonetic factor bolsters learning a generalization. In the second alternation, tenseness of the stem vowel determines backness of the suffix vowel. This process is not based in substance, but it reflects a phonotactic property of German and our participants benefit from this language-specific factor. We found that learners use both cues, while substantive bias surfaces mainly in the most unstable situation. We show that language-specific and universal factors interact in learning. Copyright © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. On the application of motivation theory to human factors/ergonomics: motivational design principles for human-technology interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalma, James L

    2014-12-01

    Motivation is a driving force in human-technology interaction. This paper represents an effort to (a) describe a theoretical model of motivation in human technology interaction, (b) provide design principles and guidelines based on this theory, and (c) describe a sequence of steps for the. evaluation of motivational factors in human-technology interaction. Motivation theory has been relatively neglected in human factors/ergonomics (HF/E). In both research and practice, the (implicit) assumption has been that the operator is already motivated or that motivation is an organizational concern and beyond the purview of HF/E. However, technology can induce task-related boredom (e.g., automation) that can be stressful and also increase system vulnerability to performance failures. A theoretical model of motivation in human-technology interaction is proposed, based on extension of the self-determination theory of motivation to HF/E. This model provides the basis for both future research and for development of practical recommendations for design. General principles and guidelines for motivational design are described as well as a sequence of steps for the design process. Human motivation is an important concern for HF/E research and practice. Procedures in the design of both simple and complex technologies can, and should, include the evaluation of motivational characteristics of the task, interface, or system. In addition, researchers should investigate these factors in specific human-technology domains. The theory, principles, and guidelines described here can be incorporated into existing techniques for task analysis and for interface and system design.

  2. UHM–ULM interactions in the RBM39–U2AF65 splicing-factor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanyuk, Galina A.; Serrano, Pedro; Peralta, Eigen; Farr, Carol L.; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Geralt, Michael; Das, Debanu; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Deacon, Ashley M.; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Godzik, Adam; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Salomon, Daniel R.; Williamson, James R.

    2016-03-24

    RNA-binding protein 39 (RBM39) is a splicing factor and a transcriptional co-activator of estrogen receptors and Jun/AP-1, and its function has been associated with malignant progression in a number of cancers. The C-terminal RRM domain of RBM39 belongs to the U2AF homology motif family (UHM), which mediate protein–protein interactions through a short tryptophan-containing peptide known as the UHM-ligand motif (ULM). Here, crystal and solution NMR structures of the RBM39-UHM domain, and the crystal structure of its complex with U2AF65-ULM, are reported. The RBM39–U2AF65 interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from human cell extracts, by isothermal titration calorimetry and by NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments with the purified proteins. When compared with related complexes, such as U2AF35–U2AF65 and RBM39–SF3b155, the RBM39-UHM–U2AF65-ULM complex reveals both common and discriminating recognition elements in the UHM–ULM binding interface, providing a rationale for the known specificity of UHM–ULM interactions. This study therefore establishes a structural basis for specific UHM–ULM interactions by splicing factors such as U2AF35, U2AF65, RBM39 and SF3b155, and a platform for continued studies of intermolecular interactions governing disease-related alternative splicing in eukaryotic cells.

  3. Mammalian splicing factor SF1 interacts with SURP domains of U2 snRNP-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisci, Angela; Raleff, Flore; Bagdiul, Ivona; Raabe, Monika; Urlaub, Henning; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Krämer, Angela

    2015-12-02

    Splicing factor 1 (SF1) recognizes the branch point sequence (BPS) at the 3' splice site during the formation of early complex E, thereby pre-bulging the BPS adenosine, thought to facilitate subsequent base-pairing of the U2 snRNA with the BPS. The 65-kDa subunit of U2 snRNP auxiliary factor (U2AF65) interacts with SF1 and was shown to recruit the U2 snRNP to the spliceosome. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments of SF1-interacting proteins from HeLa cell extracts shown here are consistent with the presence of SF1 in early splicing complexes. Surprisingly almost all U2 snRNP proteins were found associated with SF1. Yeast two-hybrid screens identified two SURP domain-containing U2 snRNP proteins as partners of SF1. A short, evolutionarily conserved region of SF1 interacts with the SURP domains, stressing their role in protein-protein interactions. A reduction of A complex formation in SF1-depleted extracts could be rescued with recombinant SF1 containing the SURP-interaction domain, but only partial rescue was observed with SF1 lacking this sequence. Thus, SF1 can initially recruit the U2 snRNP to the spliceosome during E complex formation, whereas U2AF65 may stabilize the association of the U2 snRNP with the spliceosome at later times. In addition, these findings may have implications for alternative splicing decisions. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. A growth-dependent transcription initiation factor (TIF-IA) interacting with RNA polymerase I regulates mouse ribosomal RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, A; Pfleiderer, C; Rosenbauer, H; Grummt, I

    1990-09-01

    Control of mouse ribosomal RNA synthesis in response to extracellular signals is mediated by TIF-IA, a regulatory factor whose amount or activity correlates with cell proliferation. Factor TIF-IA interacts with RNA polymerase I (pol I), thus converting it into a transcriptionally active holoenzyme, which is able to initiate specifically at the rDNA promoter in the presence of the other auxiliary transcription initiation factors, designated TIF-IB, TIF-IC and UBF. With regard to several criteria, the growth-dependent factor TIF-IA behaves like a bacterial sigma factor: (i) it associates physically with pol I, (ii) it is required for initiation of transcription, (iii) it is present in limiting amounts and (iv) under certain salt conditions, it is chromatographically separable from the polymerase. In addition, evidence is presented that dephosphorylation of pol I abolishes in vitro transcription initiation from the ribosomal gene promoter without significantly affecting the polymerizing activity of the enzyme at nonspecific templates. The involvement of both a regulatory factor and post-translational modification of the transcribing enzyme provides an efficient and versatile mechanism of rDNA transcription regulation which enables the cell to adapt ribosome synthesis rapidly to a variety of extracellular signals.

  5. Extended Synaptotagmin Interaction with the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Depends on Receptor Conformation, Not Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Michel G; Herdman, Chelsea; Guillou, François; Mishra, Prakash K; Baril, Joëlle; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Moss, Tom

    2015-06-26

    We previously demonstrated that ESyt2 interacts specifically with the activated FGF receptor and is required for a rapid phase of receptor internalization and for functional signaling via the ERK pathway in early Xenopus embryos. ESyt2 is one of the three-member family of Extended Synaptotagmins that were recently shown to be implicated in the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions and in the Ca(2+) dependent regulation of these junctions. Here we show that ESyt2 is directed to the ER by its putative transmembrane domain, that the ESyts hetero- and homodimerize, and that ESyt2 homodimerization in vivo requires a TM adjacent sequence but not the SMP domain. ESyt2 and ESyt3, but not ESyt1, selectively interact in vivo with activated FGFR1. In the case of ESyt2, this interaction requires a short TM adjacent sequence and is independent of receptor autophosphorylation, but dependent on receptor conformation. The data show that ESyt2 recognizes a site in the upper kinase lobe of FGFR1 that is revealed by displacement of the kinase domain activation loop during receptor activation.

  6. Tracking transcription factor mobility and interaction in Arabidopsis roots with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Natalie M; Hinde, Elizabeth; Winter, Cara M; Fisher, Adam P; Crosti, Giuseppe; Blilou, Ikram; Gratton, Enrico; Benfey, Philip N; Sozzani, Rosangela

    2016-06-11

    To understand complex regulatory processes in multicellular organisms, it is critical to be able to quantitatively analyze protein movement and protein-protein interactions in time and space. During Arabidopsis development, the intercellular movement of SHORTROOT (SHR) and subsequent interaction with its downstream target SCARECROW (SCR) control root patterning and cell fate specification. However, quantitative information about the spatio-temporal dynamics of SHR movement and SHR-SCR interaction is currently unavailable. Here, we quantify parameters including SHR mobility, oligomeric state, and association with SCR using a combination of Fluorescent Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) techniques. We then incorporate these parameters into a mathematical model of SHR and SCR, which shows that SHR reaches a steady state in minutes, while SCR and the SHR-SCR complex reach a steady-state between 18 and 24 hr. Our model reveals the timing of SHR and SCR dynamics and allows us to understand how protein movement and protein-protein stoichiometry contribute to development.

  7. An investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L.; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A.; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R.; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M.; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J. Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Perez, José Ignacio Arias; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Spurdle, Amanda; Investigators, kConFab; Group, AOCS; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G.; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L.; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E.; Easton, Doug F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint) <1.1×10−3. None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women ≥170cm (OR=1.22, p=0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women <160cm (OR=0.83, p=0.039, pint=1.9×10−4). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR=0.85, p=2.0×10−4), and absent in women who had had just one (OR=0.96, p=0.19, pint = 6.1×10−4). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR=0.93, p=2.8×10−5), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR=1.07, p=0.14, pint = 3.4×10−4). In conclusion, recently identified breast cancer susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies. PMID:25227710

  8. NF-κB-repressing factor phosphorylation regulates transcription elongation via its interactions with 5'→3' exoribonuclease 2 and negative elongation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Sascha; Bartels, Myriam; Schweda, Aike Torben; Resch, Klaus; Pallua, Norbert; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB-repressing factor (NKRF) inhibits transcription elongation by binding to specific sequences in target promoters. Stimuli such as IL-1 have been shown to overcome this inhibitory action and enable the resumption of transcription elongation machinery by an unknown mechanism. Using mass spectrometry and in vitro phosphorylation analyses, we demonstrate that NKRF is phosphorylated within 3 different domains in unstimulated HeLa cells. Phosphoamino acid mapping and mutation analysis of NKRF further suggest that only Ser phosphorylation within aa 421-429 is regulated by IL-1 stimulation. In copurification studies, aa 421-429 is required for interactions between NKRF, 5'→3' exoribonuclease 2 (XRN2) and the negative elongation factor (NELF)-E in HeLa cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments further show that IL-1 stimulation leads to decrease in NKRF aa 421-429 phosphorylation and dissociation of NELF-E and XRN2 by concomitant resumption of transcription elongation of a synthetic reporter or the endogenous NKRF target gene, IL-8. Together, NKRF phosphorylation modulates promoter-proximal transcription elongation of NF-κB/NKRF-regulated genes via direct interactions with elongation complex in response to specific stimuli.

  9. Evolution of the interaction between Runx2 and VDR, two transcription factors involved in osteoblastogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barriga Elias H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mineralized skeleton is a major evolutionary novelty that has contributed to the impressive morphological diversifications of the vertebrates. Essential to bone biology is the solidified extracellular matrix secreted by highly specialized cells, the osteoblasts. We now have a rather complete view of the events underlying osteogenesis, from a cellular, molecular, genetic, and epigenetic perspective. Because this knowledge is still largely restricted to mammals, it is difficult, if not impossible, to deduce the evolutionary history of the regulatory network involved in osteoblasts specification and differentiation. In this study, we focused on the transcriptional regulators Runx2 and VDR (the Vitamin D Receptor that, in mammals, directly interact together and stabilize complexes of co-activators and chromatin remodellers, thereby allowing the transcriptional activation of target genes involved in extracellular matrix mineralization. Using a combination of functional, biochemical, and histological approaches, we have asked if the interaction observed between Runx2 and VDR represents a recent mammalian innovation, or if it results from more ancient changes that have occurred deep in the vertebrate lineage. Results Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in developing embryos of chick, frog and teleost fishes, we have revealed that the co-expression of Runx2 and VDR in skeletal elements has been particularly strengthened in the lineage leading to amniotes. We show that the teleost Runx2 orthologue as well as the three mammalian Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3 paralogues are able to co-immunoprecipitate with the VDR protein present in nuclear extracts of rat osteoblasts stimulated with 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. In addition, the teleost Runx2 can activate the transcription of the mammalian osteocalcin promoter in transfection experiments, and this response can be further enhanced by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Finally

  10. Interactions between genetic variants and breast cancer risk factors in the breast and prostate cancer cohort consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Le Marchand, Loïc; Haiman, Christopher A; Travis, Ruth C; Berg, Christine D; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Dostal, Lucie; Fournier, Agnes; Hankinson, Susan E; Henderson, Brian E; Hoover, Robert N; Isaacs, Claudine; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; McCarty, Catherine A; Overvad, Kim; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H M; Riboli, Elio; Sanchez, Maria José; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Skeie, Guri; Stram, Daniel O; Thun, Michael J; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Zhang, Shumin; Ziegler, Regina G; Hunter, David J; Lindström, Sara; Canzian, Federico

    2011-08-17

    Recently, several genome-wide association studies have identified various genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. Relatively little is known about the possible interactions between these loci and the established risk factors for breast cancer. To assess interactions between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and established risk factors, we prospectively collected DNA samples and questionnaire data from 8576 breast cancer case subjects and 11 892 control subjects nested within the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We genotyped 17 germline SNPs (FGFR2-rs2981582, FGFR2-rs3750817, TNRC9-rs3803662, 2q35-rs13387042, MAP3K1-rs889312, 8q24-rs13281615, CASP8-rs1045485, LSP1-rs3817198, COL1A1-rs2075555, COX11-rs6504950, RNF146-rs2180341, 6q25-rs2046210, SLC4A7-rs4973768, NOTCH2-rs11249433, 5p12-rs4415084, 5p12-rs10941679, RAD51L1-rs999737), and odds ratios were estimated by logistic regression to confirm previously reported associations with breast cancer risk. We performed likelihood ratio test to assess interactions between 17 SNPs and nine established risk factors (age at menarche, parity, age at menopause, use of hormone replacement therapy, family history, height, body mass index, smoking status, and alcohol consumption), and a correction for multiple testing of 153 tests (adjusted P value threshold = .05/153 = 3 × 10(-4)) was done. Case-case comparisons were performed for possible differential associations of polymorphisms by subgroups of tumor stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and age at diagnosis. All statistical tests were two-sided. We confirmed the association of 14 SNPs with breast cancer risk (P(trend) = 2.57 × 10(-3) -3.96 × 10(-19)). Three SNPs (LSP1-rs3817198, COL1A1-rs2075555, and RNF146-rs2180341) did not show association with breast cancer risk. After accounting for multiple testing, no statistically significant interactions were detected between the 17 SNPs and the nine risk

  11. Interactions between genetic variants in the adiponectin, adiponectin receptor 1 and environmental factors on the risk of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome traits play an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. Adipokines, key metabolic syndrome cellular mediators, when abnormal, may induce carcinogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate whether polymorphisms of important adipokines, adiponectin (ADIPOQ and its receptors, either alone or in combination with environmental factors, are implicated in colorectal cancer, a two-stage case-control study was conducted. In the first stage, we evaluated 24 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag SNPs across ADIPOQ ligand and two ADIPOQ receptors (ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2 among 470 cases and 458 controls. One SNP with promising association was then analyzed in stage 2 among 314 cases and 355 controls. In our study, ADIPOQ rs1063538 was consistently associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, with an odds ratio (OR of 1.94 (95%CI: 1.48-2.54 for CC genotype compared with TT genotype. In two-factor gene-environment interaction analyses, rs1063538 presented significant interactions with smoking status, family history of cancer and alcohol use, with ORs of 4.52 (95%CI: 2.78-7.34, 3.18 (95%CI: 1.73-5.82 and 1.97 (95%CI: 1.27-3.04 for smokers, individuals with family history of cancer or dri