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Sample records for phytobacterium xylella fastidiosa

  1. Transcriptome analysis of the phytobacterium Xylella fastidiosa growing under xylem-based chemical conditions.

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    Ciraulo, Maristela Boaceff; Santos, Daiene Souza; Rodrigues, Ana Claudia de Freitas Oliveira; de Oliveira, Marcus Vinícius; Rodrigues, Tiago; de Oliveira, Regina Costa; Nunes, Luiz R

    2010-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium responsible for important plant diseases, like citrus-variegated chlorosis (CVC) and grapevine Pierce's disease (PD). Interestingly, in vitro growth of X. fastidiosa in chemically defined media that resemble xylem fluid has been achieved, allowing studies of metabolic processes used by xylem-dwelling bacteria to thrive in such nutrient-poor conditions. Thus, we performed microarray hybridizations to compare transcriptomes of X. fastidiosa cells grown in 3G10-R, a medium that resembles grape sap, and in Periwinkle Wilt (PW), the complex medium traditionally used to cultivate X. fastidiosa. We identified 299 transcripts modulated in response to growth in these media. Some 3G10R-overexpressed genes have been shown to be upregulated in cells directly isolated from infected plants and may be involved in plant colonization, virulence and environmental competition. In contrast, cells cultivated in PW show a metabolic switch associated with increased aerobic respiration and enhanced bacterial growth rates.

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of the Phytobacterium Xylella fastidiosa Growing under Xylem-Based Chemical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela Boaceff Ciraulo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium responsible for important plant diseases, like citrus-variegated chlorosis (CVC and grapevine Pierce's disease (PD. Interestingly, in vitro growth of X. fastidiosa in chemically defined media that resemble xylem fluid has been achieved, allowing studies of metabolic processes used by xylem-dwelling bacteria to thrive in such nutrient-poor conditions. Thus, we performed microarray hybridizations to compare transcriptomes of X. fastidiosa cells grown in 3G10-R, a medium that resembles grape sap, and in Periwinkle Wilt (PW, the complex medium traditionally used to cultivate X. fastidiosa. We identified 299 transcripts modulated in response to growth in these media. Some 3G10R-overexpressed genes have been shown to be upregulated in cells directly isolated from infected plants and may be involved in plant colonization, virulence and environmental competition. In contrast, cells cultivated in PW show a metabolic switch associated with increased aerobic respiration and enhanced bacterial growth rates.

  3. Plasmid transfer by conjugation in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recombination and horizontal gene transfer have been implicated in the adaption of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) to infect a wide variety of different plant species. There is evidence that certain strains of Xf carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as ...

  4. Morphological evidence for phages in Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Civerolo Edwin L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presumptive phage particles associated with Xylella fastidiosa strain Temecula-1 grown in PW broth were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM in ultrathin sections of bacterial cell-containing low speed centrifugation pellets and in partially purified preparations from CsCl equilibrium centrifugation density gradients. Ultrathin-sectioned cell pellets contained icosahedral particles of about 45 nm in diameter. Samples collected from CsCl density gradients revealed mostly non-tailed icosahedral but also tailed particles. The icosahedral particles could be divided into two types: a large type (about 45 nm and a small type (about 30 nm. Filamentous phage-like particles (17 × 120 to 6,300 nm were also observed. The presence of different types of phage-like particles resembling to those in several bacteriophage families provides new physical evidence, in addition to X. fastidiosa genomic information, that X. fastidiosa possesses active phages. This is the first report of phage particles released in X. fastidiosa cultures.

  5. Draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa strain Stag’s Leap

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    Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa causes Pierce’s disease of grapevine. Presented here is the draft genome sequence of the Stag’s Leap strain, previously used in pathogenicity/virulence assays to evaluate grapevine germplasm bearing Pierce’s disease....

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa Strain Stag?s Leap

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J.; Wu, F.; Zheng, Z.; Deng, X.; Burbank, L. P.; Stenger, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa causes Pierce?s disease of grapevine. Presented here is the draft genome sequence of the Stag?s Leap strain, previously used in pathogenicity/virulence assays to evaluate grapevine germplasm bearing Pierce?s disease resistance and a phenotypic assessment of knockout mutants to determine gene function.

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Phenolic Compounds Against the Phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa

    OpenAIRE

    Maddox, Christina E.; Laur, Lisa M.; Tian, Li

    2010-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a pathogenic bacterium that causes diseases in many crop species, which leads to considerable economic loss. Phenolic compounds (a group of secondary metabolites) are widely distributed in plants and have shown to possess antimicrobial properties. The anti-Xylella activity of 12 phenolic compounds, representing phenolic acid, coumarin, stilbene and flavonoid, was evaluated using an in vitro agar dilution assay. Overall, these phenolic compounds were effective in inhibiti...

  8. Xylella fastidiosa esterase rather than hydroxynitrile lyase.

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    Torrelo, Guzman; Ribeiro de Souza, Fayene Zeferino; Carrilho, Emanuel; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-03-02

    In 2009, we reported that the product of the gene SCJ21.16 (XFa0032) from Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-restricted plant pathogen that causes a range of diseases in several important crops, encodes a protein (XfHNL) with putative hydroxynitrile lyase activity. Sequence analysis and activity tests indicated that XfHNL exhibits an α/β-hydrolase fold and could be classified as a member of the family of FAD-independent HNLs. Here we provide a more detailed sequence analysis and new experimental data. Using pure heterologously expressed XfHNL we show that this enzyme cannot catalyse the cleavage/synthesis of mandelonitrile and that this protein is in fact a non-enantioselective esterase. Homology modelling and ligand docking simulations were used to study the active site and support these results. This finding could help elucidate the common ancestor of esterases and hydroxynitrile lyases with an α/β -hydrolase fold. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Fractal analysis of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation

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    Moreau, A. L. D.; Lorite, G. S.; Rodrigues, C. M.; Souza, A. A.; Cotta, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the growth process of Xylella fastidiosa biofilms inoculated on a glass. The size and the distance between biofilms were analyzed by optical images; a fractal analysis was carried out using scaling concepts and atomic force microscopy images. We observed that different biofilms show similar fractal characteristics, although morphological variations can be identified for different biofilm stages. Two types of structural patterns are suggested from the observed fractal dimensions Df. In the initial and final stages of biofilm formation, Df is 2.73±0.06 and 2.68±0.06, respectively, while in the maturation stage, Df=2.57±0.08. These values suggest that the biofilm growth can be understood as an Eden model in the former case, while diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) seems to dominate the maturation stage. Changes in the correlation length parallel to the surface were also observed; these results were correlated with the biofilm matrix formation, which can hinder nutrient diffusion and thus create conditions to drive DLA growth.

  10. Biological and bacteriological characterization of the strain of Xylella fastidiosa Xf-PGAICR and detection of X. fastidiosa from leafhoppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin Chaves, Maria Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory tools are developed and optimized for the biological characterization of a strain of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf-PGAICR) isolated of guava. The testing of pathogenesis robustly has allowed the characterization of other strains of X. fastidiosa. The detection of X. fastidiosa is carried out in their insect vectors to establish the relationship with the presence of phytopathogen in the vector, the presence and dissemination of X. fastidiosa to nearby areas [es

  11. Characterization of a diffusible signaling factor from Xylella fastidiosa.

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    Beaulieu, Ellen D; Ionescu, Michael; Chatterjee, Subhadeep; Yokota, Kenji; Trauner, Dirk; Lindow, Steven

    2013-01-08

    Cell-cell signaling in Xylella fastidiosa has been implicated in the coordination of traits enabling colonization in plant hosts as well as insect vectors. This cell density-dependent signaling has been attributed to a diffusible signaling factor (DSF) produced by the DSF synthase RpfF. DSF produced by related bacterial species are unsaturated fatty acids, but that of X. fastidiosa was thought to be different from those of other taxa. We describe here the isolation and characterization of an X. fastidiosa DSF (XfDSF) as 2(Z)-tetradecenoic acid. This compound was isolated both from recombinant Erwinia herbicola expressing X. fastidiosa rpfF and from an X. fastidiosa rpfC deletion mutant that overproduces DSF. Since an rpfF mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and underexpresses the hemagglutinin-like protein-encoding genes hxfA and hxfB, we demonstrate that these traits can be restored by ca. 0.5 µM XfDSF but not by myristic acid, the fully saturated tetradecenoic acid. A phoA-based X. fastidiosa biosensor that assesses DSF-dependent expression of hxfA or hxfB revealed a high level of molecular specificity of DSF signaling. X. fastidiosa causes diseases in many important plants, including grape, where it incites Pierce's disease. Virulence of X. fastidiosa for grape is coordinated by cell-cell signaling molecules, designated DSF (Diffusible Signaling Factor). Mutants blocked in DSF production are hypervirulent for grape, suggesting that virulence is suppressed upon DSF accumulation and that disease could be controlled by artificial elevation of the DSF level in plants. In this work, we describe the isolation of the DSF produced by X. fastidiosa and the verification of its biological activity as an antivirulence factor. We also have developed X. fastidiosa DSF biosensors to evaluate the specificity of cell-cell signaling to be investigated.

  12. Xylella fastidiosa Isolates from Both subsp. multiplex and fastidiosa Cause Disease on Southern Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) Under Greenhouse Conditions.

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    Oliver, J E; Cobine, P A; De La Fuente, L

    2015-07-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited gram-negative plant pathogen that affects numerous crop species, including grape, citrus, peach, pecan, and almond. Recently, X. fastidiosa has also been found to be the cause of bacterial leaf scorch on blueberry in the southeastern United States. Thus far, all X. fastidiosa isolates obtained from infected blueberry have been classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex; however, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolates are also present in the southeastern United States and commonly cause Pierce's disease of grapevines. In this study, seven southeastern U.S. isolates of X. fastidiosa, including three X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolates from grape, one X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolate from elderberry, and three X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates from blueberry, were used to infect the southern highbush blueberry 'Rebel'. Following inoculation, all isolates colonized blueberry, and isolates from both X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex and X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa caused symptoms, including characteristic stem yellowing and leaf scorch symptoms as well as dieback of the stem tips. Two X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates from blueberry caused more severe symptoms than the other isolates examined, and infection with these two isolates also had a significant impact on host mineral nutrient content in sap and leaves. These findings have potential implications for understanding X. fastidiosa host adaptation and expansion and the development of emerging diseases caused by this bacterium.

  13. Xylella fastidiosa gene expression analysis by DNA microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Travensolo,Regiane F.; Carareto-Alves,Lucia M.; Costa,Maria V.C.G.; Lopes,Tiago J.S.; Carrilho,Emanuel; Lemos,Eliana G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa genome sequencing has generated valuable data by identifying genes acting either on metabolic pathways or in associated pathogenicity and virulence. Based on available information on these genes, new strategies for studying their expression patterns, such as microarray technology, were employed. A total of 2,600 primer pairs were synthesized and then used to generate fragments using the PCR technique. The arrays were hybridized against cDNAs labeled during reverse transcrip...

  14. EXPLOITING PATHOGEN CONFUSION STRATEGY TO ACHIEVE XYLELLA FASTIDIOSA BIOCONTROL

    OpenAIRE

    G. D'Attoma, A. Giampetruzzi, V.N. Savino, D. Boscia, P. Saldarelli.

    2016-01-01

    The recent findings of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), infecting several plant species in Italy and France, raised major concerns for its potential impact on the EU and Mediterranean agriculture. In the current EU outbreaks, olive is the predominantly affected crop, in which the bacterium has been consistently associated with a new severe syndrome, denoted “Olive Quick Decline”. So far, no effective treatments are available to cure infected plants. However, several app...

  15. Chitin utilization by the insect-transmitted bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

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    Killiny, Nabil; Prado, Simone S; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2010-09-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne bacterium that colonizes xylem vessels of a large number of host plants, including several crops of economic importance. Chitin is a polysaccharide present in the cuticle of leafhopper vectors of X. fastidiosa and may serve as a carbon source for this bacterium. Biological assays showed that X. fastidiosa reached larger populations in the presence of chitin. Additionally, chitin induced phenotypic changes in this bacterium, notably increasing adhesiveness. Quantitative PCR assays indicated transcriptional changes in the presence of chitin, and an enzymatic assay demonstrated chitinolytic activity by X. fastidiosa. An ortholog of the chitinase A gene (chiA) was identified in the X. fastidiosa genome. The in silico analysis revealed that the open reading frame of chiA encodes a protein of 351 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 40 kDa. chiA is in a locus that consists of genes implicated in polysaccharide degradation. Moreover, this locus was also found in the genomes of closely related bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas, which are plant but not insect associated. X. fastidiosa degraded chitin when grown on a solid chitin-yeast extract-agar medium and grew in liquid medium with chitin as the sole carbon source; ChiA was also determined to be secreted. The gene encoding ChiA was cloned into Escherichia coli, and endochitinase activity was detected in the transformant, showing that the gene is functional and involved in chitin degradation. The results suggest that X. fastidiosa may use its vectors' foregut surface as a carbon source. In addition, chitin may trigger X. fastidiosa's gene regulation and biofilm formation within vectors. Further work is necessary to characterize the role of chitin and its utilization in X. fastidiosa.

  16. In vitro Determination of Extracellular Proteins from Xylella fastidiosa.

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    Mendes, Juliano S; Santiago, André S; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Horta, Maria A C; de Souza, Alessandra A; Tasic, Ljubica; de Souza, Anete P

    2016-01-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes economic losses in important agricultural crops. Xylem vessel occlusion caused by biofilm formation is the major mechanism underlying the pathogenicity of distinct strains of X. fastidiosa . Here, we provide a detailed in vitro characterization of the extracellular proteins of X. fastidiosa . Based on the results, we performed a comparison with a strain J1a12, which cannot induce citrus variegated chlorosis symptoms when inoculated into citrus plants. We then extend this approach to analyze the extracellular proteins of X. fastidiosa in media supplemented with calcium. We verified increases in extracellular proteins concomitant with the days of growth and, consequently, biofilm development (3-30 days). Outer membrane vesicles carrying toxins were identified beginning at 10 days of growth in the 9a5c strain. In addition, a decrease in extracellular proteins in media supplemented with calcium was observed in both strains. Using mass spectrometry, 71 different proteins were identified during 30 days of X. fastidiosa biofilm development, including proteases, quorum-sensing proteins, biofilm formation proteins, hypothetical proteins, phage-related proteins, chaperones, toxins, antitoxins, and extracellular vesicle membrane components.

  17. Network analysis reveals why Xylella fastidiosa will persist in Europe.

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    Strona, Giovanni; Carstens, Corrie Jacobien; Beck, Pieter S A

    2017-03-06

    The insect vector borne bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was first detected in olive trees in Southern Italy in 2013, and identified as the main culprit behind the 'olive quick decline syndrome'. Since then, the disease has spread rapidly through Italy's main olive oil producing region. The epidemiology of the outbreak is largely unstudied, with the list of X. fastidiosa hosts and vectors in Europe likely incomplete, and the role humans play in dispersal unknown. These knowledge gaps have led to management strategies based on general assumptions that require, among others, local vector control and, in certain areas, the destruction of infected plants and healthy ones around them in an attempt to eradicate or halt the spreading pest. Here we show that, regardless of epidemiological uncertainties, the mere distribution of olive orchards in Southern Italy makes the chances of eradicating X. fastidiosa from the region extremely slim. Our results imply that Southern Italy is becoming a reservoir for X. fastidiosa. As a consequence, management strategies should keep the prevalence of X. fastidiosa in the region as low as possible, primarily through vector control, lest the pathogen, that has also been detected in southern France and the island of Mallorca (Spain), continues spreading through Italy and Europe.

  18. Transmission of Xylella fastidiosa to Grapevine by the Meadow Spittlebug.

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    Cornara, D; Sicard, A; Zeilinger, A R; Porcelli, F; Purcell, A H; Almeida, R P P

    2016-11-01

    There is little information available on Xylella fastidiosa transmission by spittlebugs (Hemiptera, Cercopoidea). This group of insect vectors may be of epidemiological relevance in certain diseases, so it is important to better understand the basic parameters of X. fastidiosa transmission by spittlebugs. We used grapevines as a host plant and the aphrophorid Philaenus spumarius as a vector to estimate the effect of plant access time on X. fastidiosa transmission to plants; in addition, bacterial population estimates in the heads of vectors were determined and correlated with plant infection status. Results show that transmission efficiency of X. fastidiosa by P. spumarius increased with plant access time, similarly to insect vectors in another family (Hemiptera, Cicadellidae). Furthermore, a positive correlation between pathogen populations in P. spumarius and transmission to plants was observed. Bacterial populations in insects were one to two orders of magnitude lower than those observed in leafhopper vectors, and population size peaked within 3 days of plant access period. These results suggest that P. spumarius has either a limited number of sites in the foregut that may be colonized, or that fluid dynamics in the mouthparts of these insects is different from that in leafhoppers. Altogether our results indicate that X. fastidiosa transmission by spittlebugs is similar to that by leafhoppers. In addition, the relationship between cell numbers in vectors and plant infection may have under-appreciated consequences to pathogen spread.

  19. Potential complications when developing gene deletion clones in Xylella fastidiosa.

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    Johnson, Kameka L; Cursino, Luciana; Athinuwat, Dusit; Burr, Thomas J; Mowery, Patricia

    2015-04-16

    The Gram-negative xylem-limited bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, is an important plant pathogen that infects a number of high value crops. The Temecula 1 strain infects grapevines and induces Pierce's disease, which causes symptoms such as scorching on leaves, cluster collapse, and eventual plant death. In order to understand the pathogenesis of X. fastidiosa, researchers routinely perform gene deletion studies and select mutants via antibiotic markers. Site-directed pilJ mutant of X. fastidiosa were generated and selected on antibiotic media. Mutant cultures were assessed by PCR to determine if they were composed of purely transformant cells or included mixtures of non-transformants cells. Then pure pilJ mutant and wildtype cells were mixed in PD2 medium and following incubation and exposure to kanamycin were assessed by PCR for presence of mutant and wildtype populations. We have discovered that when creating clones of targeted mutants of X. fastidiosa Temecula 1 with selection on antibiotic plates, X. fastidiosa lacking the gene deletion often persist in association with targeted mutant cells. We believe this phenomenon is due to spontaneous antibiotic resistance and/or X. fastidiosa characteristically forming aggregates that can be comprised of transformed and non-transformed cells. A combined population was confirmed by PCR, which showed that targeted mutant clones were mixed with non-transformed cells. After repeated transfer and storage the non-transformed cells became the dominant clone present. We have discovered that special precautions are warranted when developing a targeted gene mutation in X. fastidiosa because colonies that arise following transformation and selection are often comprised of transformed and non-transformed cells. Following transfer and storage the cells can consist primarily of the non-transformed strain. As a result, careful monitoring of targeted mutant strains must be performed to avoid mixed populations and confounding results.

  20. Chromosome-based genetic complementation system for Xylella fastidiosa.

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    Matsumoto, Ayumi; Young, Glenn M; Igo, Michele M

    2009-03-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited, gram-negative bacterium that causes Pierce's disease of grapevine. Here, we describe the construction of four vectors that facilitate the insertion of genes into a neutral site (NS1) in the X. fastidiosa chromosome. These vectors carry a colE1-like (pMB1) replicon and DNA sequences from NS1 flanking a multiple-cloning site and a resistance marker for one of the following antibiotics: chloramphenicol, erythromycin, gentamicin, or kanamycin. In X. fastidiosa, vectors with colE1-like (pMB1) replicons have been found to result primarily in the recovery of double recombinants rather than single recombinants. Thus, the ease of obtaining double recombinants and the stability of the resulting insertions at NS1 in the absence of selective pressure are the major advantages of this system. Based on in vitro and in planta characterizations, strains carrying insertions within NS1 are indistinguishable from wild-type X. fastidiosa in terms of growth rate, biofilm formation, and pathogenicity. To illustrate the usefulness of this system for complementation analysis, we constructed a strain carrying a mutation in the X. fastidiosa cpeB gene, which is predicted to encode a catalase/peroxidase, and showed that the sensitivity of this mutant to hydrogen peroxide could be overcome by the introduction of a wild-type copy of cpeB at NS1. Thus, this chromosome-based complementation system provides a valuable genetic tool for investigating the role of specific genes in X. fastidiosa cell physiology and virulence.

  1. Diversity of endophytic bacterial populations and their interaction with Xylella fastidiosa in citrus plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araujo, W.L.; Marcon, J.; jr. Maccheroni, W.; Elsas, van J.D.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.; Azevedo, de J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) is caused by Xylella fastidiosa, a phytopathogenic bacterium that can infect all Citrus sinensis cultivars. The endophytic bacterial communities of healthy, resistant, and CVC-affected citrus plants were studied by using cultivation as well as

  2. The Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 protein is secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles.

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    Pierce, Brittany K; Voegel, Tanja; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited plant pathogenic bacterium that causes disease in a variety of economically important agricultural crops including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Xylella fastidiosa biofilms formed in the xylem vessels of plants play a key role in early colonization and pathogenicity by providing a protected niche and enhanced cell survival. Here we investigate the role of Xylella fastidiosa PD1063, the predicted ortholog of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968, which encodes an outer membrane protein. To assess the function of the Xylella fastidiosa ortholog, we created Xylella fastidiosa mutants deleted for PD1063 and then assessed biofilm formation, cell-cell aggregation and cell growth in vitro. We also assessed disease severity and pathogen titers in grapevines mechanically inoculated with the Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 mutant. We found a significant decrease in cell-cell aggregation among PD1063 mutants but no differences in cell growth, biofilm formation, disease severity or titers in planta. Based on the demonstration that Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968 encodes an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles, we predicted that PD1063 would also be secreted in a similar manner. Using anti-PD1063 antibodies, we found PD1063 in the supernatant and secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. PD1063 purified from the supernatant, outer membrane fractions and outer membrane vesicles was 19.2 kD, corresponding to the predicted size of the processed protein. Our findings suggest Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 is not essential for development of Pierce's disease in Vitis vinifera grapevines although further research is required to determine the function of the PD1063 outer membrane protein in Xylella fastidiosa.

  3. Temperature dependent RNA metabolism in Xylella fastidiosa during cold stress and grapevine infection

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    Re-occurrence of Pierce’s disease of grapes, caused by Xylella fastidiosa, is known to be influenced by environmental factors, particularly cold temperatures during overwintering. Grapevines in colder regions are often cured of X. fastidiosa infection over the winter season, depending on cultivar, t...

  4. Identification and characterization of plasmids from Xylella fastidiosa using next generation sequencing analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa causes diseases in many economically important crops, e.g. Pierce’s disease (PD) of grapevines and blueberry bacterial leaf scorch (BBLS) disease in the U.S. Biological research on X. fastidiosa has been difficult due to its nutritional fastidiousness. Genomic research provides a ...

  5. Xylella fastidiosa in rabbiteye blueberry: A newly studied host of an old foe

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa causes a number of plant diseases, including bacterial leaf scorch of southern highbush blueberry. In Louisiana, X. fastidiosa has been detected in rabbiteye blueberry orchards, and we wanted to know if it affected yield in rabbiteye blueberry plants. We detected X...

  6. Functional characterization of the role of the PilG in Xylella fastidiosa

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    Type IV pili of Xylella fastidiosa are regulated by pilG, a chemotaxis regulator in the Pil-Chp operon involving signal transduction pathways. To elucidate the role of pilG in twitching motility and pathogenicity of X. fastidiosa, phenotypes of wild type, a pilG-mutant, and a complementary strain we...

  7. Conjugative plasmid transfer in Xylella fastidiosa is dependent on tra and trb operon functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer and recombination, leading to diversity between strains and the categorization of X. fastidiosa into multiple subspecies. Although natural transformation is shown to occur at high rates in X. fa...

  8. Model Plants for Studying the Interaction between Methylobacterium mesophilicum and Xylella fastidiosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, F.D.; Lacava, P.T.; Araújo, W.L.; Maccheroni Jr., W.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Elsas, van J.D.; Azevedo, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last few years, endophytic bacterial communities associated with citrus have been studied as key components interacting with Xylella fastidiosa. In this study, we investigated the possible interaction between the citrus endophyte Methylobacterium mesophilicum SR1.6/6 and X. fastidiosa in

  9. Model plants for studying the interaction between Methylobacterium mesophilicum and Xylella fastidiosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, FD; Lacava, PT; Gai, CS; Araujo, WL; Maccheroni, W; van Overbeek, LS; van Elsas, JD; Azevedo, JL

    Over the last few years, endophytic bacterial communities associated with citrus have been studied as key components interacting with Xylella fastidiosa. In this study, we investigated the possible interaction between the citrus endophyte Methylobacterium mesophilicum SR1.6/6 and X. fastidiosa in

  10. Xylella fastidiosa gene expression analysis by DNA microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiane F. Travensolo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa genome sequencing has generated valuable data by identifying genes acting either on metabolic pathways or in associated pathogenicity and virulence. Based on available information on these genes, new strategies for studying their expression patterns, such as microarray technology, were employed. A total of 2,600 primer pairs were synthesized and then used to generate fragments using the PCR technique. The arrays were hybridized against cDNAs labeled during reverse transcription reactions and which were obtained from bacteria grown under two different conditions (liquid XDM2 and liquid BCYE. All data were statistically analyzed to verify which genes were differentially expressed. In addition to exploring conditions for X. fastidiosa genome-wide transcriptome analysis, the present work observed the differential expression of several classes of genes (energy, protein, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, transport, degradation of substances, toxins and hypothetical proteins, among others. The understanding of expressed genes in these two different media will be useful in comprehending the metabolic characteristics of X. fastidiosa, and in evaluating how important certain genes are for the functioning and survival of these bacteria in plants.

  11. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Xylella fastidiosa Is Dependent on tra and trb Operon Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Burbank, Lindsey P.; Van Horn, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination. Natural transformation occurs at high rates in X. fastidiosa, but there also is evidence that certain strains of X. fastidiosa carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as an additional mechanism of HGT in some instances. Two operons, tra and trb, putatively encoding a conjugative type IV secretion system, are foun...

  12. Xylella fastidiosa: Host Range and Advance in Molecular Identification Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Paolo; La Porta, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    In the never ending struggle against plant pathogenic bacteria, a major goal is the early identification and classification of infecting microorganisms. Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the family Xanthmonadaceae, is no exception as this pathogen showed a broad range of vectors and host plants, many of which may carry the pathogen for a long time without showing any symptom. Till the last years, most of the diseases caused by X. fastidiosa have been reported from North and South America, but recently a widespread infection of olive quick decline syndrome caused by this fastidious pathogen appeared in Apulia (south-eastern Italy), and several cases of X. fastidiosa infection have been reported in other European Countries. At least five different subspecies of X. fastidiosa have been reported and classified: fastidiosa, multiplex, pauca, sandyi, and tashke. A sixth subspecies (morus) has been recently proposed. Therefore, it is vital to develop fast and reliable methods that allow the pathogen detection during the very early stages of infection, in order to prevent further spreading of this dangerous bacterium. To this purpose, the classical immunological methods such as ELISA and immunofluorescence are not always sensitive enough. However, PCR-based methods exploiting specific primers for the amplification of target regions of genomic DNA have been developed and are becoming a powerful tool for the detection and identification of many species of bacteria. The aim of this review is to illustrate the application of the most commonly used PCR approaches to X. fastidiosa study, ranging from classical PCR, to several PCR-based detection methods: random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), nested-PCR (N-PCR), immunocapture PCR (IC-PCR), short sequence repeats (SSRs, also called VNTR), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Amplification and sequence analysis of specific

  13. Xylella fastidiosa: Host Range and Advance in Molecular Identification Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Baldi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the never ending struggle against plant pathogenic bacteria, a major goal is the early identification and classification of infecting microorganisms. Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the family Xanthmonadaceae, is no exception as this pathogen showed a broad range of vectors and host plants, many of which may carry the pathogen for a long time without showing any symptom. Till the last years, most of the diseases caused by X. fastidiosa have been reported from North and South America, but recently a widespread infection of olive quick decline syndrome caused by this fastidious pathogen appeared in Apulia (south-eastern Italy, and several cases of X. fastidiosa infection have been reported in other European Countries. At least five different subspecies of X. fastidiosa have been reported and classified: fastidiosa, multiplex, pauca, sandyi, and tashke. A sixth subspecies (morus has been recently proposed. Therefore, it is vital to develop fast and reliable methods that allow the pathogen detection during the very early stages of infection, in order to prevent further spreading of this dangerous bacterium. To this purpose, the classical immunological methods such as ELISA and immunofluorescence are not always sensitive enough. However, PCR-based methods exploiting specific primers for the amplification of target regions of genomic DNA have been developed and are becoming a powerful tool for the detection and identification of many species of bacteria. The aim of this review is to illustrate the application of the most commonly used PCR approaches to X. fastidiosa study, ranging from classical PCR, to several PCR-based detection methods: random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR, nested-PCR (N-PCR, immunocapture PCR (IC-PCR, short sequence repeats (SSRs, also called VNTR, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Amplification and sequence analysis of

  14. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Xylella fastidiosa Is Dependent on tra and trb Operon Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Van Horn, Christopher R

    2017-11-01

    The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination. Natural transformation occurs at high rates in X. fastidiosa , but there also is evidence that certain strains of X. fastidiosa carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as an additional mechanism of HGT in some instances. Two operons, tra and trb , putatively encoding a conjugative type IV secretion system, are found in some but not all X. fastidiosa isolates, often on native plasmids. X. fastidiosa strains that carry the conjugative transfer genes can belong to different subspecies and frequently differ in host ranges. Using X. fastidiosa strain M23 ( X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa ) or Dixon ( X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex ) as the donor strain and Temecula ( X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa ) as the recipient strain, plasmid transfer was characterized using the mobilizable broad-host-range vector pBBR5pemIK. Transfer of plasmid pBBR5pemIK was observed under in vitro conditions with both donor strains and was dependent on both tra and trb operon functions. A conjugative mechanism likely contributes to gene transfer between diverse strains of X. fastidiosa , possibly facilitating adaptation to new environments or different hosts. IMPORTANCE Xylella fastidiosa is an important plant pathogen worldwide, infecting a wide range of different plant species. The emergence of new diseases caused by X. fastidiosa , or host switching of existing strains, is thought to be primarily due to the high frequency of HGT and recombination in this pathogen. Transfer of plasmids by a conjugative mechanism enables movement of larger amounts of genetic material at one time, compared with other routes of gene transfer such as natural transformation. Establishing the prevalence and functionality of this mechanism in X. fastidiosa contributes to a better understanding of HGT, adaptation, and disease emergence

  15. Evaluation of assembling methods on determination of whole genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa blueberry bacterial leaf scorch strain

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    Blueberry bacterial leaf scorch (BBLS) disease, a threat to blueberry production in the Southern USA and potentially elsewhere, is caused by Xylella fastidiosa. Efficient control of BBLS requires knowledge of the pathogen. However, this is challenging because Xylella fastidiosa is difficult to cultu...

  16. Genetic analysis of a novel Xylella fastidiosa subspecies found in the southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Jennifer J; Goldberg, Natalie P; Kemp, John D; Radionenko, Maxim; French, Jason M; Olsen, Mary W; Hanson, Stephen F

    2009-09-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of several scorch diseases, is associated with leaf scorch symptoms in Chitalpa tashkentensis, a common ornamental landscape plant used throughout the southwestern United States. For a number of years, many chitalpa trees in southern New Mexico and Arizona exhibited leaf scorch symptoms, and the results from a regional survey show that chitalpa trees from New Mexico, Arizona, and California are frequently infected with X. fastidiosa. Phylogenetic analysis of multiple loci was used to compare the X. fastidiosa infecting chitalpa strains from New Mexico, Arizona, and trees imported into New Mexico nurseries with previously reported X. fastidiosa strains. Loci analyzed included the 16S ribosome, 16S-23S ribosomal intergenic spacer region, gyrase-B, simple sequence repeat sequences, X. fastidiosa-specific sequences, and the virulence-associated protein (VapD). This analysis indicates that the X. fastidiosa isolates associated with infected chitalpa trees in the Southwest are a highly related group that is distinct from the four previously defined taxons X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (piercei), X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex, X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi, and X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca. Therefore, the classification proposed for this new subspecies is X. fastidiosa subsp. tashke.

  17. Diversity Evaluation of Xylella fastidiosa from Infected Olive Trees in Apulia (Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania M. Mang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Olive culture is very important in the Mediterranean Basin. A severe outbreak of Olive Quick Decline Syndrome (OQDS caused by Xylella fastidiosa infection was first noticed in 2013 on olive trees in the southern part of Apulia region (Lecce province, southern Italy. Studies were carried out for detection and diversity evaluation of the Apulian strain of Xylella fastidiosa. The presence of the pathogen in olive samples was detected by PCR amplifying the 16S rDNA, gyrase B subunit (gyrB and HL hypothetical protein genes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs assessment was performed to genotype X. fastidiosa. Twelve SNPs were recorded over gyrB and six SNPs were found for HL gene. Less variations were detected on 16S rDNA gene. Only gyrB and HL provided sufficient information for dividing the Apulian X. fastidiosa olive strains into subspecies. Using HL nucleotide sequences was possible to separate X. fastidiosa into subspecies pauca and fastidiosa. Whereas, nucleotide variation present on gyrB gene allowed separation of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca from the other subspecies multiplex and fastidiosa. The X. fastidiosa strain from Apulia region was included into the subspecies pauca based on three genes phylogenetic analyses.

  18. Analysis of the biofilm proteome of Xylella fastidiosa

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    Labate Carlos A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylella fastidiosa is limited to the xylem of the plant host and the foregut of insect vectors (sharpshooters. The mechanism of pathogenicity of this bacterium differs from other plant pathogens, since it does not present typical genes that confer specific interactions between plant and pathogens (avr and/or hrp. The bacterium is injected directly into the xylem vessels where it adheres and colonizes. The whole process leads to the formation of biofilms, which are considered the main mechanism of pathogenicity. Cells in biofilms are metabolically and phenotypically different from their planktonic condition. The mature biofilm stage (phase of higher cell density presents high virulence and resistance to toxic substances such as antibiotics and detergents. Here we performed proteomic analysis of proteins expressed exclusively in the mature biofilm of X. fastidiosa strain 9a5c, in comparison to planktonic growth condition. Results We found a total of 456 proteins expressed in the biofilm condition, which correspond to approximately 10% of total protein in the genome. The biofilm showed 37% (or 144 proteins different protein than we found in the planktonic growth condition. The large difference in protein pattern in the biofilm condition may be responsible for the physiological changes of the cells in the biofilm of X. fastidiosa. Mass spectrometry was used to identify these proteins, while real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction monitored expression of genes encoding them. Most of proteins expressed in the mature biofilm growth were associated with metabolism, adhesion, pathogenicity and stress conditions. Even though the biofilm cells in this work were not submitted to any stress condition, some stress related proteins were expressed only in the biofilm condition, suggesting that the biofilm cells would constitutively express proteins in different adverse environments. Conclusions We observed overexpression of proteins

  19. Xylella fastidiosa requires polygalacturonase for colonization and pathogenicity in Vitis vinifera grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, M Caroline; Greve, L Carl; Warren, Jeremy G; Labavitch, John M; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2007-04-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of Pierce's disease of grape, an economically significant disease for the grape industry. X. fastidiosa systemically colonizes the xylem elements of grapevines and is able to breach the pit pore membranes separating xylem vessels by unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that X. fastidiosa utilizes cell wall degrading enzymes to break down pit membranes, based on the presence of genes involved in plant cell wall degradation in the X. fastidiosa genome. These genes include several beta-1,4 endoglucanases, several xylanases, several xylosidases, and one polygalacturonase (PG). In this study, we demonstrated that the pglA gene encodes a functional PG. A mutant in pglA lost pathogenicity and was compromised in its ability to systemically colonize Vitis vinifera grapevines. The results indicate that PG is required for X. fastidiosa to successfully infect grapevines and is a critical virulence factor for X. fastidiosa pathogenesis in grapevine.

  20. The endophyte Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens reduces symptoms caused by Xylella fastidiosa in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacava, Paulo Teixeira; Li, Wenbin; Araújo, Welington Luiz; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Hartung, John Stephen

    2007-10-01

    Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) is a disease of the sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.)], which is caused by Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca, a phytopathogenic bacterium that has been shown to infect all sweet orange cultivars. Sweet orange trees have been occasionally observed to be infected by Xylella fastidiosa without evidencing severe disease symptoms, whereas other trees in the same grove may exhibit severe disease symptoms. The principal endophytic bacterial species isolated from such CVC-asymptomatic citrus plants is Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens. The Madagascar periwinkle [Citrus sinensis (L.)] is a model plant which has been used to study X. fastidiosa in greenhouse environments. In order to characterize the interactions of X. fastidiosa and C. flaccumfaciens, periwinkle plants were inoculated separately with C. flaccumfaciens, X. fastidiosa, and both bacteria together. The number of flowers produced by the plants, the heights of the plants, and the exhibited disease symptoms were evaluated. PCR-primers for C. flaccumfaciens were designed in order to verify the presence of this endophytic bacterium in plant tissue, and to complement an existing assay for X. fastidiosa. These primers were capable of detecting C. flaccumfaciens in the periwinkle in the presence of X. fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa induced stunting and reduced the number of flowers produced by the periwinkle. When C. flaccumfaciens was inoculated together with X. fastidiosa, no stunting was observed. The number of flowers produced by our doubly- inoculated plants was an intermediate between the number produced by the plants inoculated with either of the bacteria separately. Our data indicate that C. flaccumfaciens interacted with X. fastidiosa in C. roseus, and reduced the severity of the disease symptoms induced by X. fastidiosa. Periwinkle is considered to be an excellent experimental system by which the interaction of C. flaccumfaciens and other endophytic bacteria with X. fastidiosa can be

  1. Contribution of rpfB to cell-to-cell signal synthesis, virulence, and vector transmission of Xylella fastidiosa.

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    Almeida, Rodrigo P P; Killiny, Nabil; Newman, Karyn L; Chatterjee, Subhadeep; Ionescu, Michael; Lindow, Steven E

    2012-04-01

    In Xylella fastidiosa the fatty acid signal molecule diffusible signaling factor (DSF) is produced and sensed by components of the regulation of pathogenicity factors (rpf) cluster; lack of DSF production in RpfF mutants results in a non-vector-transmissible phenotype yet cells are hypervirulent to grape. rpfB has not been characterized in Xylella fastidiosa, although its homolog has been suggested to be required for DSF synthesis in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. We show that RpfB is involved in DSF processing in both Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas campestris, affecting the profile of DSF-like fatty acids observed in thin-layer chromatography. Although three fatty acids whose production is dependent on RpfF were detected in Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas campestris wild-type strains, their respective rpfB mutants accumulated primarily one chemical species. Although no quantifiable effect of rpfB on plant colonization by Xylella fastidiosa was found, insect colonization and transmission was reduced. Thus, RpfB apparently is involved in DSF processing, and like Xanthomonas campestris, Xylella fastidiosa also produces multiple DSF molecules. It is possible that Xylella fastidiosa coordinates host vector and plant colonization by varying the proportions of different forms of DSF signals via RpfB.

  2. RpfF-dependent regulon of Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nian; Li, Jian-Liang; Lindow, Steven E

    2012-11-01

    ABSTRACT Xylella fastidiosa regulates traits important to both virulence of grape as well as colonization of sharpshooter vectors via its production of a fatty acid signal molecule known as DSF whose production is dependent on rpfF. Although X. fastidiosa rpfF mutants exhibit increased virulence to plants, they are unable to be spread from plant to plant by insect vectors. To gain more insight into the traits that contribute to these processes, a whole-genome Agilent DNA microarray for this species was developed and used to determine the RpfF-dependent regulon by transcriptional profiling. In total, 446 protein coding genes whose expression was significantly different between the wild type and an rpfF mutant (false discovery rate genes were downregulated in the rpfF mutant compared with the wild-type strain whereas 281 genes were over-expressed. RpfF function was required for regulation of 11 regulatory and σ factors, including rpfE, yybA, PD1177, glnB, rpfG, PD0954, PD0199, PD2050, colR, rpoH, and rpoD. In general, RpfF is required for regulation of genes involved in attachment and biofilm formation, enhancing expression of hemagglutinin genes hxfA and hxfB, and suppressing most type IV pili and gum genes. A large number of other RpfF-dependent genes that might contribute to virulence or insect colonization were also identified such as those encoding hemolysin and colicin V, as well as genes with unknown functions.

  3. Xylella fastidiosa: an examination of a re-emerging plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette; Ingel, Brian; Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Cantu, Dario; Roper, Caroline

    2018-04-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram-negative bacterial plant pathogen with an extremely wide host range. This species has recently been resolved into subspecies that correlate with host specificity. This review focuses on the status of X. fastidiosa pathogenic associations in plant hosts in which the bacterium is either endemic or has been recently introduced. Plant diseases associated with X. fastidiosa have been documented for over a century, and much about what is known in the context of host-pathogen interactions is based on these hosts, such as grape and citrus, in which this pathogen has been well described. Recent attention has focused on newly emerging X. fastidiosa diseases, such as in olives. Bacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; family Xanthomonadaceae; genus Xylella; species fastidiosa. Gram-negative rod (0.25-0.35 × 0.9-3.5 μm), non-flagellate, motile via Type IV pili-mediated twitching, fastidious. Xylella fastidiosa has a broad host range that includes ornamental, ecological and agricultural plants belonging to over 300 different species in 63 different families. To date, X. fastidiosa has been found to be pathogenic in over 100 plant species. In addition, it can establish non-symptomatic associations with many plants as a commensal endophyte. Here, we list the four distinct subspecies of X. fastidiosa and some of the agriculturally relevant diseases caused by them: X. fastidiosa ssp. fastidiosa causes Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevine (Vitis vinifera); X. fastidiosa ssp. multiplex causes almond leaf scorch (ALS) and diseases on other nut and shade tree crops; X. fastidiosa ssp. pauca causes citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) (Citrus spp.), coffee leaf scorch and olive quick decline syndrome (OQDS) (Olea europaea); X. fastidiosa ssp. sandyi causes oleander leaf scorch (OLS) (Nerium oleander). Significant host specificity seemingly exists for some of the subspecies, although this could be a result of technical biases based on the limited number of

  4. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Michael; Yokota, Kenji; Antonova, Elena; Garcia, Angelica; Beaulieu, Ellen; Hayes, Terry; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Ionescu et al. Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF). We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate h...

  5. Multilocus sequence typing of Xylella fastidiosa causing Pierce's disease and oleander leaf scorch in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoli; Morano, Lisa; Bromley, Robin; Spring-Pearson, Senanu; Stouthamer, Richard; Nunney, Leonard

    2010-06-01

    Using a modified multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa based on the same seven housekeeping genes employed in a previously published MLST, we studied the genetic diversity of two subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa and X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi, which cause Pierce's disease and oleander leaf scorch, respectively. Typing of 85 U.S. isolates (plus one from northern Mexico) of X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa from 15 different plant hosts and 21 isolates of X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi from 4 different hosts in California and Texas supported their subspecific status. Analysis using the MLST genes plus one cell-surface gene showed no significant genetic differentiation based on geography or host plant within either subspecies. Two cases of homologous recombination (with X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex, the third U.S. subspecies) were detected in X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. Excluding recombination, MLST site polymorphism in X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (0.048%) and X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi (0.000%) was substantially lower than in X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex (0.240%), consistent with the hypothesis that X. fastidiosa subspp. fastidiosa and sandyi were introduced into the United States (probably just prior to 1880 and 1980, respectively). Using whole-genome analysis, we showed that MLST is more effective at genetic discrimination at the specific and subspecific level than other typing methods applied to X. fastidiosa. Moreover, MLST is the only technique effective in detecting recombination.

  6. RNA metabolism in Xylella fastidiosa during cold adaptation and survival responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastidious plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa has a reduced ability to adapt to cold temperatures, limiting persistence in perennial hosts, such as grapevine, growing in colder regions. RNA metabolism is an essential part of bacterial response to low temperature, including inducible expression of RNA...

  7. Identification of a low copy number plasmid in Xylella fastidiosa Strain Stag’s Leap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) causes Pierce’s Disease (PD) in grapevine. The Stag’s Leap strain is known for its high virulence level and is a model for PD research. Research on Xf has been difficult due to its nutritional fastidiousness. One difficult research issue is the low copy number plasmid. Plasmi...

  8. The DinJ/RelE toxin-antitoxin system suppresses virulence in Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of a number agriculturally important plant diseases, encodes multiple toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems. TA modules consist of a toxin protein co-expressed with a specific antitoxin, and are often acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Antitoxin molecules (RNA or ...

  9. The role of Xylella fastidiosa cold shock proteins in Pierce’s disease of grapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce’s disease of grapevine, caused by the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) is limited to warmer climates, and plant infection can be eliminated by cold winter conditions. Milder winters can increase the likelihood of pathogen persistence from one growing season to the next. Cold adaptat...

  10. Functional characterization of the role of rpfA in Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa coordinates virulence in grapevines via quorum sensing signal molecules that are regulated and synthesized by the rpf gene cluster (regulation of pathogenicity factors). rpfA encodes aconitate hydratase and could play a regulator role involved in virulence. To elucidate the role o...

  11. Genomic insights into Xylella fastidiosa interactions with plant and insect hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utilization of genomic data and widespread availability of genomics tools are still incipient in plant pathology. The first genome of a plant pathogen, the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, was only completed in 2000. Since then, a large number of bacterial plant pathogens have been sequenced, but much ...

  12. Draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa pear leaf scorch strain in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa pear leaf scorch strain (PLS229) isolated from pear cultivar Hengshan (Pyrus pyrifolia) in Taiwan is reported. The bacterium has a genome size of 2,733,013 bp with a G+C content of 53.1%. The PLS229 strain genome was annotated to have 3,259 open readin...

  13. Distribution of Xylella fastidiosa in Sycamore associated with low temperature and host resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.S.M. Henneberger; K.L. Stevenson; C.J. Chang

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in the field and laboratory to determine effects of low temperatures 4% on Xylella fastidiosa populations in American sycamore. Roots and shoots from naturally infected trees at two locations were collected monthly. Sap extracted from the samples was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for presence of X...

  14. Probe-based real-time PCR method for multilocus melt typing of Xylella fastidiosa strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Jeff A; Faske, Jennifer B; Ator, Rebecca A; Castañeda-Gill, Jessica M; Mitchell, Forrest L

    2012-04-01

    Epidemiological studies of Pierce's disease (PD) can be confounded by a lack of taxonomic detail on the bacterial causative agent, Xylella fastidiosa (Xf). PD in grape is caused by strains of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, but is not caused by other subspecies of Xf that typically colonize plants other than grape. Detection assays using ELISA and qPCR are effective at detecting and quantifying Xf presence or absence, but offer no information on Xf subspecies or strain identity. Surveying insects or host plants for Xf by current ELISA or qPCR methods provides only presence/absence and quantity information for any and all Xf subspecies, potentially leading to false assessments of disease threat. This study uses a series of adjacent-hybridizing DNA melt analysis probes that are capable of efficiently discriminating Xf subspecies and strain relationships in rapid real-time PCR reactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Diversity of Xylella fastidiosa host suitability among siblings from a non-traditional almond X peach cross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten F2 clones from an initial hybridization of Prunus webbii X P. persica cv Harrow Blood were evaluated under greenhouse conditions for their reaction to Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa strain M23 during two growing seasons. Clonal accessions used for the study were selected on the basis of ho...

  16. Genome-wide comparison and taxonomic relatedness of multiple Xylella fastidiosa strains reveal the occurrence of three subspecies and a new Xylella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelletti, Simone; Scortichini, Marco

    2016-10-01

    A total of 21 Xylella fastidiosa strains were assessed by comparing their genomes to infer their taxonomic relationships. The whole-genome-based average nucleotide identity and tetranucleotide frequency correlation coefficient analyses were performed. In addition, a consensus tree based on comparisons of 956 core gene families, and a genome-wide phylogenetic tree and a Neighbor-net network were constructed with 820,088 nucleotides (i.e., approximately 30-33 % of the entire X. fastidiosa genome). All approaches revealed the occurrence of three well-demarcated genetic clusters that represent X. fastidiosa subspecies fastidiosa, multiplex and pauca, with the latter appeared to diverge. We suggest that the proposed but never formally described subspecies 'sandyi' and 'morus' are instead members of the subspecies fastidiosa. These analyses support the view that the Xylella strain isolated from Pyrus pyrifolia in Taiwan is likely to be a new species. A widely used multilocus sequence typing analysis yielded conflicting results.

  17. Effect of oxygen on the growth and biofilm formation of Xylella fastidiosa in liquid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriner, Anthony D; Andersen, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterial pathogen, and is the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines and scorch diseases of many other plant species. The disease symptoms are putatively due to blocking of the transpiration stream by bacterial-induced biofilm formation and/or by the formation of plant-generated tylosis. Xylella fastidiosa has been classified as an obligate aerobe, which appears unusual given that dissolved O2 levels in the xylem during the growing season are often hypoxic (20-60 μmol L(-1)). We examined the growth and biofilm formation of three strains of X. fastidiosa under variable O2 conditions (21, 2.1, 0.21 and 0 % O2), in comparison to that of Pseudomonas syringae (obligate aerobe) and Erwinia carotovora (facultative anaerobe) under similar conditions. The growth of X. fastidiosa more closely resembled that of the facultative anaerobe, and not the obligate aerobe. Xanthomonas campestris, the closest genetic relative of X. fastidiosa, exhibited no growth in an N2 environment, whereas X. fastidiosa was capable of growing in an N2 environment in PW(+), CHARDS, and XDM2-PR media. The magnitude of growth and biofilm formation in the N2 (0 % O2) treatment was dependent on the specific medium. Additional studies involving the metabolism of X. fastidiosa in response to low O2 are warranted. Whether X. fastidiosa is classified as an obligate aerobe or a facultative anaerobe should be confirmed by gene activation and/or the quantification of the metabolic profiles under hypoxic conditions.

  18. Differential expression of genes of Xylella fastidiosa in xylem fluid of citrus and grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiangyang; Bi, Jianlong; Morse, Joseph G; Toscano, Nick C; Cooksey, Donald A

    2010-03-01

    Xylella fastidiosa causes a serious Pierce's disease (PD) in grapevine. Xylella fastidiosa cells from a PD strain were grown in a pure xylem fluid of a susceptible grapevine cultivar vs. xylem fluid from citrus, which is not a host for this strain of X. fastidiosa. When grown in grapevine xylem fluid, cells of the PD strain formed clumps and biofilm formed to a greater extent than in citrus xylem fluid, although the PD strain did grow in xylem fluid of three citrus varieties. The differential expression of selected genes of a PD X. fastidiosa strain cultured in the two xylem fluids was analyzed using a DNA macroarray. Compared with citrus xylem fluid, grapevine xylem fluid stimulated the expression of X. fastidiosa genes involved in virulence regulation, such as gacA, algU, xrvA, and hsq, and also genes involved in the biogenesis of pili and twitching motility, such as fimT, pilI, pilU, and pilY1. Increased gene expression likely contributes to PD expression in grapevine, whereas citrus xylem fluid did not support or possibly suppressed the expression of these virulence genes.

  19. Quantification of Xylella fastidiosa from Citrus Trees by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Antonio C; Vallim, Marcelo A; Semighini, Camile P; Araújo, Welington L; Goldman, Gustavo H; Machado, Marcos A

    2002-10-01

    ABSTRACT Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), a destructive disease of sweet orange cultivars in Brazil. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays constitute the principal diagnostic method for detection of these bacteria. In this work, we established a real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR) assay to quantify X. fastidiosa in naturally and artificially infected citrus. The X. fastidiosa cell number detected in the leaves increased according to the age of the leaf, and bacteria were not detected in the upper midrib section in young leaves, indicating temporal and spatial distribution patterns of bacteria, respectively. In addition, the X. fastidiosa cell number quantified in leaves of 'Pera' orange and 'Murcott' tangor reflected the susceptible and resistant status of these citrus cultivars. None of the 12 endophytic citrus bacteria or the four strains of X. fastidiosa nonpathogenic to citrus that were tested showed an increase in the fluorescence signal during QPCR. In contrast, all 10 CVC-causing strains exhibited an increase in fluorescence signal, thus indicating the specificity of this QPCR assay. Our QPCR provides a powerful tool for studies of different aspects of the Xylella-citrus interactions, and can be incorporated into breeding programs in order to select CVC-resistant plants more quickly.

  20. Evaluation of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model host for Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Elizabeth E

    2012-06-01

    The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa causes a number of plant diseases of significant economic impact. To date, progress determining mechanisms of host-plant susceptibility, tolerance, or resistance has been slow, due in large part to the long generation time and limited available genetic resources for grape, almond, and other known hosts of X. fastidiosa. To overcome many of these limitations, Arabidopsis thaliana has been evaluated as a host for X. fastidiosa. A pin-prick inoculation method has been developed to infect Arabidopsis with X. fastidiosa. Following infection, X. fastidiosa multiplies and can be detected by microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, and isolation. The ecotypes Van-0, LL-0, and Tsu-1 all allow more growth of strain X. fastidiosa Temecula than the reference ecotype Col-0. Affymetrix ATH1 microarray analysis of inoculated vs. noninoculated Tsu-1 reveals gene expression changes that differ greatly from changes seen after infection with apoplast-colonizing bacteria such as Psuedomonas syringae pvs. tomato or syringae. Many genes responsive to oxidative stress are differentially regulated, while classic pathogenesis-related genes are not induced by X. fastidiosa infection.

  1. Isolation and pathogenicity of Xylella fastidiosa from grapevine and almond in Iran

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    Naser AMANIFAR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms similar to those of Pierce’s disease (PD of grapevine and leaf scorch of almond were observed in vineyards and almond orchards in several provinces of Iran. Grafting of scions from symptomatic almond trees onto seedlings of a local almond (cv. Mamaee under greenhouse conditions resulted in the transmission of the leaf scorch agent. A number of symptomatic samples from orchard and greenhouse plants were positive for presence of Xylella fastidiosa when tested by DAS-ELISA and PCR with X. fastidiosa specific antibodies and primers. A Gram-negative bacterium similar to X. fastidiosa was isolated on ‘periwinkle wilt’ (PW medium. Selected isolates induced symptoms similar to those caused by X. fastidiosa when inoculated on Nicotiana tabacum, seedlings of almond and grapevine under greenhouse conditions. DAS-ELISA and PCR confirmed the identity of the isolated bacteria. On the basis of disease symptoms, graft transmission, isolation on specific X. fastidiosa culture medium, pathogenicity tests and positive reactions in DAS-ELISA and PCR, X. fastidiosa is associated with almond leaf scorch and Pierce’s disease in grapevine in Iran. This is the first report on the presence of X. fastidiosa in the Middle East and western Asia.

  2. Twitching motility and biofilm formation are associated with tonB1 in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cursino, Luciana; Li, Yaxin; Zaini, Paulo A; De La Fuente, Leonardo; Hoch, Harvey C; Burr, Thomas J

    2009-10-01

    A mutation in the Xylella fastidiosa tonB1 gene resulted in loss of twitching motility and in significantly less biofilm formation as compared with a wild type. The altered motility and biofilm phenotypes were restored by complementation with a functional copy of the gene. The mutation affected virulence as measured by Pierce's disease symptoms on grapevines. The role of TonB1 in twitching and biofilm formation appears to be independent of the characteristic iron-uptake function of this protein. This is the first report demonstrating a functional role for a tonB homolog in X. fastidiosa.

  3. Comparative genomic characterization of citrus-associated Xylella fastidiosa strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes Luiz R

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The xylem-inhabiting bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf is the causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD in vineyards and citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC in orange trees. Both of these economically-devastating diseases are caused by distinct strains of this complex group of microorganisms, which has motivated researchers to conduct extensive genomic sequencing projects with Xf strains. This sequence information, along with other molecular tools, have been used to estimate the evolutionary history of the group and provide clues to understand the capacity of Xf to infect different hosts, causing a variety of symptoms. Nonetheless, although significant amounts of information have been generated from Xf strains, a large proportion of these efforts has concentrated on the study of North American strains, limiting our understanding about the genomic composition of South American strains – which is particularly important for CVC-associated strains. Results This paper describes the first genome-wide comparison among South American Xf strains, involving 6 distinct citrus-associated bacteria. Comparative analyses performed through a microarray-based approach allowed identification and characterization of large mobile genetic elements that seem to be exclusive to South American strains. Moreover, a large-scale sequencing effort, based on Suppressive Subtraction Hybridization (SSH, identified 290 new ORFs, distributed in 135 Groups of Orthologous Elements, throughout the genomes of these bacteria. Conclusion Results from microarray-based comparisons provide further evidence concerning activity of horizontally transferred elements, reinforcing their importance as major mediators in the evolution of Xf. Moreover, the microarray-based genomic profiles showed similarity between Xf strains 9a5c and Fb7, which is unexpected, given the geographical and chronological differences associated with the isolation of these microorganisms. The newly

  4. The complex biogeography of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: genetic evidence of introductions and Subspecific introgression in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunney, Leonard; Ortiz, Beatriz; Russell, Stephanie A; Ruiz Sánchez, Rebeca; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee) defined a new sequence type (ST53) that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci) diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee) showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa.

  5. The complex biogeography of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: genetic evidence of introductions and Subspecific introgression in Central America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Nunney

    Full Text Available The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee defined a new sequence type (ST53 that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa.

  6. Differentiation of Xylella fastidiosa Strains via Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Environmentally Mediated Genes (MLSA-E)

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Jennifer K.; Havird, Justin C.; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Isolates of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa are genetically very similar, but studies on their biological traits have indicated differences in virulence and infection symptomatology. Taxonomic analyses have identified several subspecies, and phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes have shown broad host-based genetic differences; however, results are still inconclusive for genetic differentiation of isolates within subspecies. This study employs multilocus sequence analysis of enviro...

  7. The exopolysaccharide of Xylella fastidiosa is essential for biofilm formation, plant virulence, and vector transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Killiny, N; Hernandez Martinez, R; Korsi Dumenyo, C; Cooksey, DA; Almeida, RPP

    2013-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) synthesized by plant-pathogenic bacteria are generally essential for virulence. The role of EPS produced by the vector-transmitted bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was investigated by knocking out two genes implicated in the EPS biosynthesis, gumD and gumH. Mutant strains were affected in growth characteristics in vitro, including adhesion to surfaces and biofilm formation. In addition, different assays were used to demonstrate that the mutant strains produced significant...

  8. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ionescu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF. We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate host harboring X. fastidiosa RpfF (XfRpfF is capable of producing a variety of both saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids. However, only 2-cis unsaturated acids were found to be biologically active in X. fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa produces, and is particularly responsive to, a novel DSF species, 2-cis-hexadecanoic acid that we term XfDSF2. It is also responsive to other, even longer 2-enoic acids to which other taxa such as Xanthomonas campestris are unresponsive. The 2-enoic acids that are produced by X. fastidiosa are strongly affected by the cellular growth environment, with XfDSF2 not detected in culture media in which 2-tetradecenoic acid (XfDSF1 had previously been found. X. fastidiosa is responsive to much lower concentrations of XfDSF2 than XfDSF1. Apparently competitive interactions can occur between various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that block the function of those agonistic 2-enoic fatty acids. By altering the particular 2-enoic acids produced and the relative balance of free enoic and saturated fatty acids, X. fastidiosa might modulate the extent of DSF-mediated quorum sensing.

  9. Direct Evidence of Egestion and Salivation of Xylella fastidiosa Suggests Sharpshooters Can Be "Flying Syringes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Morgan, J Kent; Shatters, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is unique among insect-transmitted plant pathogens because it is propagative but noncirculative, adhering to and multiplying on the cuticular lining of the anterior foregut. Any inoculation mechanism for X. fastidiosa must explain how bacterial cells exit the vector's stylets via the food canal and directly enter the plant. A combined egestion-salivation mechanism has been proposed to explain these unique features. Egestion is the putative outward flow of fluid from the foregut via hypothesized bidirectional pumping of the cibarium. The present study traced green fluorescent protein-expressing X. fastidiosa or fluorescent nanoparticles acquired from artificial diets by glassy-winged sharpshooters, Homalodisca vitripennis, as they were egested into simultaneously secreted saliva. X. fastidiosa or nanoparticles were shown to mix with gelling saliva to form fluorescent deposits and salivary sheaths on artificial diets, providing the first direct, conclusive evidence of egestion by any hemipteran insect. Therefore, the present results strongly support an egestion-salivation mechanism of X. fastidiosa inoculation. Results also support that a column of fluid is transiently held in the foregut without being swallowed. Evidence also supports (but does not definitively prove) that bacteria were suspended in the column of fluid during the vector's transit from diet to diet, and were egested with the held fluid. Thus, we hypothesize that sharpshooters could be true "flying syringes," especially when inoculation occurs very soon after uptake of bacteria, suggesting the new paradigm of a nonpersistent X. fastidiosa transmission mechanism.

  10. The Secreted Protease PrtA Controls Cell Growth, Biofilm Formation and Pathogenicity in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouran, Hossein; Gillespie, Hyrum; Nascimento, Rafael; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Zaini, Paulo A; Jacobson, Aaron; Phinney, Brett S; Dolan, David; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Antonova, Elena S; Lindow, Steven E; Mellema, Matthew S; Goulart, Luiz R; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2016-08-05

    Pierce's disease (PD) is a deadly disease of grapevines caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. Though disease symptoms were formerly attributed to bacteria blocking the plant xylem, this hypothesis is at best overly simplistic. Recently, we used a proteomic approach to characterize the secretome of X. fastidiosa, both in vitro and in planta, and identified LesA as one of the pathogenicity factors of X. fastidiosa in grapevines that leads to leaf scorching and chlorosis. Herein, we characterize another such factor encoded by PD0956, designated as an antivirulence secreted protease "PrtA" that displays a central role in controlling in vitro cell proliferation, length, motility, biofilm formation, and in planta virulence. The mutant in X. fastidiosa exhibited reduced cell length, hypermotility (and subsequent lack of biofilm formation) and hypervirulence in grapevines. These findings are supported by transcriptomic and proteomic analyses with corresponding plant infection data. Of particular interest, is the hypervirulent response in grapevines observed when X. fastidiosa is disrupted for production of PrtA, and that PD-model tobacco plants transformed to express PrtA exhibited decreased symptoms after infection by X. fastidiosa.

  11. Initial crystallographic studies of a small heat-shock protein from Xylella fastidiosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Susely F. S.; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Lorite, Gabriela S.; Rosselli-Murai, Luciana K.; Pelloso, Alexandre César; Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Trivella, Daniela B. B.; Cotta, Mônica A.; Souza, Anete Pereira de; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Initial crystallographic studies of the X. fastidiosa small heat-shock protein HSP17.9 are reported. The ORF XF2234 in the Xylella fastidiosa genome was identified as encoding a small heat-shock protein of 17.9 kDa (HSP17.9). HSP17.9 was found as one of the proteins that are induced during X. fastidiosa proliferation and infection in citrus culture. Recombinant HSP17.9 was crystallized and surface atomic force microscopy experiments were conducted with the aim of better characterizing the HSP17.9 crystals. X-ray diffraction data were collected at 2.7 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P4 3 22, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.90, b = 68.90, c = 72.51 Å, and is the first small heat-shock protein to crystallize in this space group

  12. New Coffee Plant-Infecting Xylella fastidiosa Variants Derived via Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Denancé, Nicolas; Legendre, Bruno; Morel, Emmanuelle; Briand, Martial; Mississipi, Stelly; Durand, Karine; Olivier, Valérie; Portier, Perrine; Poliakoff, Françoise; Crouzillat, Dominique

    2015-12-28

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium endemic to the Americas that has recently emerged in Asia and Europe. Although this bacterium is classified as a quarantine organism in the European Union, importation of plant material from contaminated areas and latent infection in asymptomatic plants have engendered its inevitable introduction. In 2012, four coffee plants (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora) with leaf scorch symptoms growing in a confined greenhouse were detected and intercepted in France. After identification of the causal agent, this outbreak was eradicated. Three X. fastidiosa strains were isolated from these plants, confirming a preliminary identification based on immunology. The strains were characterized by multiplex PCR and by multilocus sequence analysis/typing (MLSA-MLST) based on seven housekeeping genes. One strain, CFBP 8073, isolated from C. canephora imported from Mexico, was assigned to X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa/X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi. This strain harbors a novel sequence type (ST) with novel alleles at two loci. The two other strains, CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8074, isolated from Coffea arabica imported from Ecuador, were allocated to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca. These two strains shared a novel ST with novel alleles at two loci. These MLST profiles showed evidence of recombination events. We provide genome sequences for CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8073 strains. Comparative genomic analyses of these two genome sequences with publicly available X. fastidiosa genomes, including the Italian strain CoDiRO, confirmed these phylogenetic positions and provided candidate alleles for coffee plant adaptation. This study demonstrates the global diversity of X. fastidiosa and highlights the diversity of strains isolated from coffee plants. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Identification of three potential insect vectors of Xylella fastidiosa in southern Italy

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    Toufic ELBEAINO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify potential vectors of Xylella fastidiosa in olive orchards in Puglia (southern Italy, Hemiptera insects were collected from October to December, 2013, in olive orchards with high incidences of X. fastidiosa associated with “rapid decline” symptoms. The study focused on species in the Auchenorrhyncha (sharpshooter leafhoppers and froghoppers or spittlebugs, a group that includes known vectors of X. fastidiosa.  Adults of three species, i.e. Philaenus spumarius L. (Aphrophoridae, Neophilaenus campestris Fallén (Aphrophoridae and Euscelis lineolatus Brullé (Cicadellidae were captured, from which total DNA was extracted and assayed by PCR using three sets of specific primers designed for X. fastidiosa detection. Results of PCR showed that 38 out of a total of 84 tested insects were positive for X. fastidiosa, i.e. eight (of 20 P. spumarius, 14 (of 18 N. campestris and 16 (of 46 E. lineolatus. PCR amplicons of the RNA polymerase sigma-70 factor gene from six specimens (two of each insect species were sequenced. The sequences obtained were 99.3‒99.4% identical. BlastN analyses demonstrated these sequences to be similar to those of X. fastidiosa isolates from olive OL-X and OL-G reported from Puglia, whereas they displayed distant molecular identity (always less than 98% with X. fastidiosa subspecies from other countries. The detection of X. fastidiosa in P. spumarius and, for the first time, in N. campestris and E. lineolatus (which, unlike the others, is a phloem feeder, indicates potential vectoring roles of these insects for the spread of the bacterium in Puglia. Further investigations and specific infectivity trials are required to definitively determine the roles of these insects as effective vectors of this pathogen.

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of coffee-infecting Xylella fastidiosa strains isolated from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Deibs; Alencar, Valquíria Campos; Santos, Daiene Souza; de Freitas Oliveira, Ana Cláudia; de Souza, Alessandra A; Coletta-Filho, Helvecio D; de Oliveira, Regina Souza; Nunes, Luiz R

    2015-05-01

    Strains of Xylella fastidiosa constitute a complex group of bacteria that develop within the xylem of many plant hosts, causing diseases of significant economic importance, such as Pierce's disease in North American grapevines and citrus variegated chlorosis in Brazil. X. fastidiosa has also been obtained from other host plants, in direct correlation with the development of diseases, as in the case of coffee leaf scorch (CLS)--a disease with potential to cause severe economic losses to the Brazilian coffee industry. This paper describes a thorough genomic characterization of coffee-infecting X. fastidiosa strains, initially performed through a microarray-based approach, which demonstrated that CLS strains could be subdivided in two phylogenetically distinct subgroups. Whole-genomic sequencing of two of these bacteria (one from each subgroup) allowed identification of ORFs and horizontally transferred elements (HTEs) that were specific to CLS-related X. fastidiosa strains. Such analyses confirmed the size and importance of HTEs as major mediators of chromosomal evolution amongst these bacteria, and allowed identification of differences in gene content, after comparisons were made with previously sequenced X. fastidiosa strains, isolated from alternative hosts. Although direct experimentation still needs to be performed to elucidate the biological consequences associated with such differences, it was interesting to verify that CLS-related bacteria display variations in genes that produce toxins, as well as surface-related factors (such as fimbrial adhesins and LPS) that have been shown to be involved with recognition of specific host factors in different pathogenic bacteria. © 2015 The Authors.

  15. The diversity of citrus endophytic bacteria and their interactions with Xylella fastidiosa and host plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, João Lúcio; Araújo, Welington Luiz; Lacava, Paulo Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) and has been associated with important losses in commercial orchards of all sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.)] cultivars. The development of this disease depends on the environmental conditions, including the endophytic microbial community associated with the host plant. Previous studies have shown that X. fastidiosa interacts with the endophytic community in xylem vessels as well as in the insect vector, resulting in a lower bacterial population and reduced CVC symptoms. The citrus endophytic bacterium Methylobacterium mesophilicum can trigger X. fastidiosa response in vitro, which results in reduced growth and induction of genes associated with energy production, stress, transport, and motility, indicating that X. fastidiosa has an adaptive response to M. mesophilicum. Although this response may result in reduced CVC symptoms, the colonization rate of the endophytic bacteria should be considered in studies that intend to use this endophyte to suppress CVC disease. Symbiotic control is a new strategy that uses symbiotic endophytes as biological control agents to antagonize or displace pathogens. Candidate endophytes for symbiotic control of CVC must occupy the xylem of host plants and attach to the precibarium of sharpshooter insects to access the pathogen. In the present review, we focus on interactions between endophytic bacteria from sweet orange plants and X. fastidiosa, especially those that may be candidates for control of CVC. PMID:27727362

  16. The diversity of citrus endophytic bacteria and their interactions with Xylella fastidiosa and host plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Lúcio Azevedo

    Full Text Available Abstract The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC and has been associated with important losses in commercial orchards of all sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.] cultivars. The development of this disease depends on the environmental conditions, including the endophytic microbial community associated with the host plant. Previous studies have shown that X. fastidiosa interacts with the endophytic community in xylem vessels as well as in the insect vector, resulting in a lower bacterial population and reduced CVC symptoms. The citrus endophytic bacterium Methylobacterium mesophilicum can trigger X. fastidiosa response in vitro, which results in reduced growth and induction of genes associated with energy production, stress, transport, and motility, indicating that X. fastidiosa has an adaptive response to M. mesophilicum. Although this response may result in reduced CVC symptoms, the colonization rate of the endophytic bacteria should be considered in studies that intend to use this endophyte to suppress CVC disease. Symbiotic control is a new strategy that uses symbiotic endophytes as biological control agents to antagonize or displace pathogens. Candidate endophytes for symbiotic control of CVC must occupy the xylem of host plants and attach to the precibarium of sharpshooter insects to access the pathogen. In the present review, we focus on interactions between endophytic bacteria from sweet orange plants and X. fastidiosa, especially those that may be candidates for control of CVC.

  17. Identification of an operon, Pil-Chp, that controls twitching motility and virulence in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cursino, Luciana; Galvani, Cheryl D; Athinuwat, Dusit; Zaini, Paulo A; Li, Yaxin; De La Fuente, Leonardo; Hoch, Harvey C; Burr, Thomas J; Mowery, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an important phytopathogenic bacterium that causes many serious plant diseases, including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Disease manifestation by X. fastidiosa is associated with the expression of several factors, including the type IV pili that are required for twitching motility. We provide evidence that an operon, named Pil-Chp, with genes homologous to those found in chemotaxis systems, regulates twitching motility. Transposon insertion into the pilL gene of the operon resulted in loss of twitching motility (pilL is homologous to cheA genes encoding kinases). The X. fastidiosa mutant maintained the type IV pili, indicating that the disrupted pilL or downstream operon genes are involved in pili function, and not biogenesis. The mutated X. fastidiosa produced less biofilm than wild-type cells, indicating that the operon contributes to biofilm formation. Finally, in planta the mutant produced delayed and less severe disease, indicating that the Pil-Chp operon contributes to the virulence of X. fastidiosa, presumably through its role in twitching motility.

  18. Radicinin from Cochliobolus sp. inhibits Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce's Disease of grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Thomas J; Rolshausen, Philippe E; Roper, M Caroline; Reader, Jordan M; Steinhaus, Matthew J; Rapicavoli, Jeannette; Vosburg, David A; Maloney, Katherine N

    2015-08-01

    The fastidious phytopathogenic bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, poses a substantial threat to many economically important crops, causing devastating diseases including Pierce's Disease of grapevine. Grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) planted in an area under Pierce's Disease pressure often display differences in disease severity and symptom expression, with apparently healthy vines growing alongside the dying ones, despite the fact that all the vines are genetic clones of one another. Under the hypothesis that endophytic microbes might be responsible for this non-genetic resistance to X. fastidiosa, endophytic fungi were isolated from vineyard cvs. 'Chardonnay' and 'Cabernet Sauvignon' grown under high Pierce's Disease pressure. A Cochliobolus sp. isolated from a Cabernet Sauvignon grapevine inhibited the growth of X. fastidiosa in vitro. Bioassay-guided isolation of an organic extract of Cochliobolus sp. yielded the natural product radicinin as the major active compound. Radicinin also inhibited proteases isolated from the culture supernatant of X. fastidiosa. In order to assess structure-activity relationships, three semi-synthetic derivatives of radicinin were prepared and tested for activity against X. fastidiosa in vitro. Assay results of these derivatives are consistent with enzyme inactivation by conjugate addition to carbon-10 of radicinin, as proposed previously. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiplexed lateral flow microarray assay for detection of citrus pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary,; Bruce, R [Santa Fe, NM; Stubben, Christopher J [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    The invention provides highly sensitive and specific assays for the major citrus pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas axonopodis, including a field deployable multiplexed assay capable of rapidly assaying for both pathogens simultaneously. The assays are directed at particular gene targets derived from pathogenic strains that specifically cause the major citrus diseases of citrus variegated chlorosis (Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c) and citrus canker (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri). The citrus pathogen assays of the invention offer femtomole sensitivity, excellent linear dynamic range, and rapid and specific detection.

  20. Visualization of Twitching Motility and Characterization of the Role of the PilG in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiangyang; Lin, Hong

    2016-04-08

    Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram-negative non-flagellated bacterium that causes a number of economically important diseases of plants. The twitching motility provides X. fastidiosa a means for long-distance intra-plant movement and colonization, contributing toward pathogenicity in X. fastidiosa. The twitching motility of X. fastidiosa is operated by type IV pili. Type IV pili of Xylella fastidiosa are regulated by pilG, a chemotaxis regulator in Pil-Chp operon encoding proteins that are involved with signal transduction pathways. To elucidate the roles of pilG in the twitching motility of X. fastidiosa, a pilG-deficient mutant XfΔpilG and its complementary strain XfΔpilG-C containing native pilG were developed. A microfluidic chambers integrated with a time-lapse image recording system was used to observe twitching motility in XfΔpilG, XfΔpilG-C and its wild type strain. Using this recording system, it permits long-term spatial and temporal observations of aggregation, migration of individual cells and populations of bacteria via twitching motility. X. fastidiosa wild type and complementary XfΔpilG-C strain showed typical twitching motility characteristics directly observed in the microfluidic flow chambers, whereas mutant XfΔpliG exhibited the twitching deficient phenotype. This study demonstrates that pilG contributes to the twitching motility of X. fastidiosa. The microfluidic flow chamber is used as a means for observing twitching motility.

  1. Differentiation of Xylella fastidiosa strains via multilocus sequence analysis of environmentally mediated genes (MLSA-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Havird, Justin C; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2012-03-01

    Isolates of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa are genetically very similar, but studies on their biological traits have indicated differences in virulence and infection symptomatology. Taxonomic analyses have identified several subspecies, and phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes have shown broad host-based genetic differences; however, results are still inconclusive for genetic differentiation of isolates within subspecies. This study employs multilocus sequence analysis of environmentally mediated genes (MLSA-E; genes influenced by environmental factors) to investigate X. fastidiosa relationships and differentiate isolates with low genetic variability. Potential environmentally mediated genes, including host colonization and survival genes related to infection establishment, were identified a priori. The ratio of the rate of nonsynonymous substitutions to the rate of synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) was calculated to select genes that may be under increased positive selection compared to previously studied housekeeping genes. Nine genes were sequenced from 54 X. fastidiosa isolates infecting different host plants across the United States. Results of maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian phylogenetic (BP) analyses are in agreement with known X. fastidiosa subspecies clades but show novel within-subspecies differentiation, including geographic differentiation, and provide additional information regarding host-based isolate variation and specificity. dN/dS ratios of environmentally mediated genes, though gene dN/dS ratios and correlate with increased sequence variability. MLSA-E can more precisely resolve relationships between closely related bacterial strains with low genetic variability, such as X. fastidiosa isolates. Discovering the genetic relationships between X. fastidiosa isolates will provide new insights into the epidemiology of populations of X. fastidiosa, allowing improved disease management in economically important crops.

  2. Avaliação da suscetibilidade à Xylella fastidiosa em diferentes espécies de cafeeiro Susceptibity valuation to Xylella fastidiosa in different coffee species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Benetti Queiroz-Voltan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A bactéria Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. foi detectada pela primeira vez em cafeeiro no Brasil, em 1995, entretanto acredita-se que a cultura foi infectada por essa bactéria há muitos anos, embora os sintomas fossem atribuídos a um estresse nutricional. Até o momento têm sido realizados estudos principalmente com espécies de C. arabica e C. canephora, porém, em outras espécies do gênero, somente foi detectada sua presença. Neste trabalho, objetivou-se avaliar a proporção de elementos de vaso do xilema obstruídos, total e parcialmente, pela X. fastidiosa, naturalmente infectadas, em diferentes espécies de cafeeiro do Banco de Germoplasma do IAC, visando identificar material resistente a essa bactéria para ser utilizado no programa de melhoramento genético. Os acessos estudados foram: C. canephora (progenitora da 'Guarini', C. liberica var. liberica, os quatro acessos de C. liberica var. dewevrei (Ugandae, Dibowskii, Abeokutae, Excelsa e o híbrido interespecífico Piatã (C. arabica X C. liberica var. dewevrei. Todos eles mostraram-se menos suscetíveis à X. fastidiosa. A porcentagem de obstrução dos elementos de vasos na folha não foi maior que 0,6% na maioria dos acessos, com exceção de Excelsa e do híbrido Piatã com até 2% de obstrução, sendo bem menos suscetíveis a essa bactéria do que as cultivares de C. arabica. Trata-se, portanto, de materiais genéticos importantes para serem utilizados no programa de melhoramento do cafeeiro visando à resistência ao agente dessa doença.Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. bacteria was firstly detected in coffee plants in Brazil in 1995. However it is believed to be attacking this crop this time. Disease symptoms have been attributed mostly to nutritional unbalances. Up to date studies have comprised only the species C. arabica and C. canephora. However X. fastidiosa was also detected in other Coffea species, but without disease symptoms. Aiming to identify in the IAC

  3. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Michael; Yokota, Kenji; Antonova, Elena; Garcia, Angelica; Beaulieu, Ellen; Hayes, Terry; Iavarone, Anthony T; Lindow, Steven E

    2016-07-19

    Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF). We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate host harboring X. fastidiosa RpfF (XfRpfF) is capable of producing a variety of both saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids. However, only 2-cis unsaturated acids were found to be biologically active in X. fastidiosa X. fastidiosa produces, and is particularly responsive to, a novel DSF species, 2-cis-hexadecanoic acid that we term XfDSF2. It is also responsive to other, even longer 2-enoic acids to which other taxa such as Xanthomonas campestris are unresponsive. The 2-enoic acids that are produced by X. fastidiosa are strongly affected by the cellular growth environment, with XfDSF2 not detected in culture media in which 2-tetradecenoic acid (XfDSF1) had previously been found. X. fastidiosa is responsive to much lower concentrations of XfDSF2 than XfDSF1. Apparently competitive interactions can occur between various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that block the function of those agonistic 2-enoic fatty acids. By altering the particular 2-enoic acids produced and the relative balance of free enoic and saturated fatty acids, X. fastidiosa might modulate the extent of DSF-mediated quorum sensing. X. fastidiosa, having a complicated lifestyle in which it moves and multiplies within plants but also must be vectored by insects, utilizes DSF-based quorum sensing to partition the expression of traits needed for these two processes within different cells in this population based on local cellular density. The finding that it can produce a variety of DSF species in a strongly

  4. Efeito da Xylella fastidiosa em cafeeiros em diferentes regiões edafoclimáticas Effect of Xylella fastidiosa in coffee plants at different edaphoclimatic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Benetti Queiroz-Voltan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A bactéria Xylella fastidiosa vem causando problemas para a cafeicultura, uma vez que sua presença, associada a diversos fatores de estresse, provoca um decréscimo na produção devido à diminuição no número e tamanho dos frutos e à morte de alguns ramos. Este trabalho objetiva avaliar o efeito da X. fastidiosa sobre cultivares de Coffea arabica (enxertados ou não através da quantificação da proporção de vasos do xilema obstruídos pela bactéria, nas diferentes partes da planta e entre ramos com e sem sintoma da doença, em experimentos desenvolvidos em diferentes regiões edafoclimáticas. Avaliou-se também a distribuição das classes de infecção nas diferentes partes da planta nos materiais genéticos estudados. Os experimentos foram instalados em 1986 em Mococa e Garça (SP e as amostras para o estudo anatômico, retiradas em abril de 1998 e 2000 (período de estresse hídrico, respectivamente, das plantas de cafeeiros dessas áreas. Na região de Mococa, observou-se que a nervura principal e o pecíolo foram os tecidos com proporção maior de vasos do xilema obstruídos pela X. fastidiosa; na região de Garça, foram o pecíolo e o caule. Não houve diferenças significativas na obstrução de elementos de vaso do xilema do cafeeiro ocasionado pela bactéria entre as duas regiões estudadas. Não houve tolerância à bactéria nos materiais genéticos, havendo no entanto variação dentro de cada um deles. Na região de Garça, nas plantas de café, observou-se alta proporção de vasos obstruídos nas raízes (3%, entretanto, não houve dano maior na parte aérea.The Xylella fastidiosa bacterium causes problems to coffee cultivation because of a relationship with various stress factors, leading to reduction on coffee production by decreasing fruit number and size, as well as senescence of branches. This research aimed to evaluate the effect of Xylella fastidiosa to Coffea arabica cultivars (grafted or not through the

  5. Xylella fastidiosa comparative genomic database is an information resource to explore the annotation, genomic features, and biology of different strains

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    Alessandro M. Varani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Xylella fastidiosa comparative genomic database is a scientific resource with the aim to provide a user-friendly interface for accessing high-quality manually curated genomic annotation and comparative sequence analysis, as well as for identifying and mapping prophage-like elements, a marked feature of Xylella genomes. Here we describe a database and tools for exploring the biology of this important plant pathogen. The hallmarks of this database are the high quality genomic annotation, the functional and comparative genomic analysis and the identification and mapping of prophage-like elements. It is available from web site http://www.xylella.lncc.br.

  6. Twitching motility and biofilm formation are associated with tonB1 in Xylella fastidiosa

    OpenAIRE

    Cursino, Luciana; Li, Yaxin; Zaini, Paulo A.; De La Fuente, Leonardo; Hoch, Harvey C.; Burr, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    A mutation in the Xylella fastidiosa tonB1 gene resulted in loss of twitching motility and in significantly less biofilm formation as compared with a wild type. The altered motility and biofilm phenotypes were restored by complementation with a functional copy of the gene. The mutation affected virulence as measured by Pierce's disease symptoms on grapevines. The role of TonB1 in twitching and biofilm formation appears to be independent of the characteristic iron-uptake function of this prote...

  7. Hidden Markov models applied to a subsequence of the Xylella fastidiosa genome

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    Silva Cibele Q. da

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dependencies in DNA sequences are frequently modeled using Markov models. However, Markov chains cannot account for heterogeneity that may be present in different regions of the same DNA sequence. Hidden Markov models are more realistic than Markov models since they allow for the identification of heterogeneous regions of a DNA sequence. In this study we present an application of hidden Markov models to a subsequence of the Xylella fastidiosa DNA data. We found that a three-state model provides a good description for the data considered.

  8. Xylella fastidiosa outer membrane vesicles modulate plant colonization by blocking attachment to surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Michael; Zaini, Paulo A; Baccari, Clelia; Tran, Sophia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2014-09-16

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria have been studied intensively in recent years, primarily in their role in delivering virulence factors and antigens during pathogenesis. However, the near ubiquity of their production suggests that they may play other roles, such as responding to envelope stress or trafficking various cargoes to prevent dilution or degradation by other bacterial species. Here we show that OMVs produced by Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-colonizing plant pathogenic bacterium, block its interaction with various surfaces such as the walls of xylem vessels in host plants. The release of OMVs was suppressed by the diffusible signal factor-dependent quorum-sensing system, and a X. fastidiosa ΔrpfF mutant in which quorum signaling was disrupted was both much more virulent to plants and less adhesive to glass and plant surfaces than the WT strain. The higher virulence of the ΔrpfF mutant was associated with fivefold higher numbers of OMVs recovered from xylem sap of infected plants. The frequency of attachment of X. fastidiosa to xylem vessels was 20-fold lower in the presence of OMVs than in their absence. OMV production thus is a strategy used by X. fastidiosa cells to adjust attachment to surfaces in its transition from adhesive cells capable of insect transmission to an "exploratory" lifestyle for systemic spread within the plant host which would be hindered by attachment. OMV production may contribute to the movement of other bacteria in porous environments by similarly reducing their contact with environmental constituents.

  9. Comparative analysis of differentially expressed sequence tags of sweet orange and mandarin infected with Xylella fastidiosa

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    Alessandra A. de Souza

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Citrus ESTs Sequencing Project (CitEST conducted at Centro APTA Citros Sylvio Moreira/IAC has identified and catalogued ESTs representing a set of citrus genes expressed under relevant stress responses, including diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC, caused by Xylella fastidiosa. All sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb. varieties are susceptible to X. fastidiosa. On the other hand, mandarins (C. reticulata Blanco are considered tolerant or resistant to the disease, although the bacterium can be sporadically detected within the trees, but no disease symptoms or economic losses are observed. To study their genetic responses to the presence of X. fastidiosa, we have compared EST libraries of leaf tissue of sweet orange Pêra IAC (highly susceptible cultivar to X. fastidiosa and mandarin ‘Ponkan’ (tolerant artificially infected with the bacterium. Using an in silico differential display, 172 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed in such conditions. Sweet orange presented an increase in expression of photosynthesis related genes that could reveal a strategy to counterbalance a possible lower photosynthetic activity resulting from early effects of the bacterial colonization in affected plants. On the other hand, mandarin showed an active multi-component defense response against the bacterium similar to the non-host resistance pattern.

  10. Production of DNA microarray and expression analysis of genes from Xylella fastidiosa in different culture media

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    Regiane de Fátima Travensolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA Microarray was developed to monitor the expression of many genes from Xylella fastidiosa, allowing the side by-side comparison of two situations in a single experiment. The experiments were performed using X. fastidiosa cells grown in two culture media: BCYE and XDM2. The primers were synthesized, spotted onto glass slides and the array was hybridized against fluorescently labeled cDNAs. The emitted signals were quantified, normalized and the data were statistically analyzed to verify the differentially expressed genes. According to the data, 104 genes were differentially expressed in XDM2 and 30 genes in BCYE media. The present study showed that DNA microarray technique efficiently differentiate the expressed genes under different conditions.DNA Microarray foi desenvolvida para monitorar a expressão de muitos genes de Xylella fastidiosa, permitindo a comparação de duas situações distintas em um único experimento. Os experimentos foram feitos utilizando células de X. fastidiosa cultivada em dois meios de cultura: BCYE e XDM2. Pares de oligonucleotídeos iniciadores foram sintetizados, depositados em lâminas de vidro e o arranjo foi hibridizado contra cDNAs marcados fluorescentemente. Os sinais emitidos foram quantificados, normalizados e os dados foram estatisticamente analisados para verificar os genes diferencialmente expressos. De acordo com nossos dados, 104 genes foram diferencialmente expressos para o meio de cultura XDM2 e 30 genes para o BCYE. No presente estudo, nós demonstramos que a técnica de DNA microarrays eficientemente diferencia genes expressos sob diferentes condições de cultivo.

  11. Origins of the Xylella fastidiosa prophage-like regions and their impact in genome differentiation.

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    Alessandro de Mello Varani

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram negative plant pathogen causing many economically important diseases, and analyses of completely sequenced X. fastidiosa genome strains allowed the identification of many prophage-like elements and possibly phage remnants, accounting for up to 15% of the genome composition. To better evaluate the recent evolution of the X. fastidiosa chromosome backbone among distinct pathovars, the number and location of prophage-like regions on two finished genomes (9a5c and Temecula1, and in two candidate molecules (Ann1 and Dixon were assessed. Based on comparative best bidirectional hit analyses, the majority (51% of the predicted genes in the X. fastidiosa prophage-like regions are related to structural phage genes belonging to the Siphoviridae family. Electron micrograph reveals the existence of putative viral particles with similar morphology to lambda phages in the bacterial cell in planta. Moreover, analysis of microarray data indicates that 9a5c strain cultivated under stress conditions presents enhanced expression of phage anti-repressor genes, suggesting switches from lysogenic to lytic cycle of phages under stress-induced situations. Furthermore, virulence-associated proteins and toxins are found within these prophage-like elements, thus suggesting an important role in host adaptation. Finally, clustering analyses of phage integrase genes based on multiple alignment patterns reveal they group in five lineages, all possessing a tyrosine recombinase catalytic domain, and phylogenetically close to other integrases found in phages that are genetic mosaics and able to perform generalized and specialized transduction. Integration sites and tRNA association is also evidenced. In summary, we present comparative and experimental evidence supporting the association and contribution of phage activity on the differentiation of Xylella genomes.

  12. Detection and typing of Xylella fastidiosa from glassy-winged sharpshooter for Pierce’s disease epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiology of Pierce’s disease of grape, caused by the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), is largely dependent on populations of insect vectors such as the invasive glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) (Homalodisca vitripennis). In the grape-growing regions of the southern San Joaquin Valley...

  13. Plasmid vectors for Xylella fastidiosa utilizing a toxin-antitoxin system for plasmid stability in the absence of antibiotic selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in a variety of important crop and landscape plants. Functional genetic studies have led to a broader understanding of virulence mechanisms used by this pathogen in the grapevine host. Plasmid shuttle vectors are important tools in studies of bacte...

  14. Xylella fastidiosa in rabbiteye blueberry in Louisiana is genetically similar to a strain found in Southern highbush blueberry in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the past ten years, Xylella fastidiosa has been confirmed as a pathogen of Southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum interspecific hybrids) in Georgia and Florida. Recent work in Louisiana has shown that it is also associated with reduced yield and altered fruit quality in ‘Tifblue’ ...

  15. The distribution and biology of potential vectors of Xylella fastidiosa on coffee and citrus in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant diseases caused by Xylella fastidiosa (Wells et al.) (Xf) surround the Caribbean Basin. Two major commodities of Puerto Rico, coffee and citrus, are highly susceptible to Xf. We surveyed potential vectors of Xf in coffee and citrus farms in western Puerto Rico over an 18 month period. Cicadel...

  16. Plasmid transfer by conjugation as a possible route of horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important component of evolution and adaptation of bacterial species. Xylella fastidiosa has the ability to incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome by homologous recombination at relatively high rates. This genetic recombination is believed to play a role in adaptati...

  17. De Novo whole genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex strain BB01 from blueberry in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study reports a de novo assembled draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex strain BB01 causing blueberry bacterial leaf scorch in Georgia, USA. The BB01 genome is 2,517,579 bp with a G+C content of 51.8% and 2,943 open reading frames (ORFs) and 48 RNA genes....

  18. Association of Xylella fastidiosa with Yield Loss and Altered Fruit Quality in a Naturally Infected Rabbiteye Blueberry Orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in a number of plants in the southeastern United States, including southern highbush blueberry, but little was known concerning its potential impact in rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum). In a naturally infected orchard in Louisiana, mean yields of X. fastidi...

  19. Population structure of Xylella fastidiosa associated with almond leaf scorch disease in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) causes disease in many commercial crops including almond leaf scorch (ALS) disease in susceptible almond (Prunus dulcis). In this study, genetic diversity and population structure of Xf associated with ALS disease were evaluated. Strains isolated from two almond production si...

  20. Characterization of novel virulent broad-host-range phages of Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Stephen J; Das, Mayukh; Bhowmick, Tushar Suvra; Young, Ry; Gonzalez, Carlos F

    2014-01-01

    The xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of several plant diseases, most notably Pierce's disease of grape and citrus variegated chlorosis. We report the isolation and characterization of the first virulent phages for X. fastidiosa, siphophages Sano and Salvo and podophages Prado and Paz, with a host range that includes Xanthomonas spp. Phages propagated on homologous hosts had observed adsorption rate constants of ~4 × 10(-12) ml cell(-1) min(-1) for X. fastidiosa strain Temecula 1 and ~5 × 10(-10) to 7 × 10(-10) ml cell(-1) min(-1) for Xanthomonas strain EC-12. Sano and Salvo exhibit >80% nucleotide identity to each other in aligned regions and are syntenic to phage BcepNazgul. We propose that phage BcepNazgul is the founding member of a novel phage type, to which Sano and Salvo belong. The lysis genes of the Nazgul-like phage type include a gene that encodes an outer membrane lipoprotein endolysin and also spanin gene families that provide insight into the evolution of the lysis pathway for phages of Gram-negative hosts. Prado and Paz, although exhibiting no significant DNA homology to each other, are new members of the phiKMV-like phage type, based on the position of the single-subunit RNA polymerase gene. The four phages are type IV pilus dependent for infection of both X. fastidiosa and Xanthomonas. The phages may be useful as agents for an effective and environmentally responsible strategy for the control of diseases caused by X. fastidiosa.

  1. Three New Pierce's Disease Pathogenicity Effectors Identified Using Xylella fastidiosa Biocontrol Strain EB92-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujian; Chakrabarty, Pranjib K; Fleites, Laura A; Rayside, Patricia A; Hopkins, Donald L; Gabriel, Dean W

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa (X. fastidiosa) infects a wide range of plant hosts and causes economically serious diseases, including Pierce's Disease (PD) of grapevines. X. fastidiosa biocontrol strain EB92-1 was isolated from elderberry and is infectious and persistent in grapevines but causes only very slight symptoms under ideal conditions. The draft genome of EB92-1 revealed that it appeared to be missing genes encoding 10 potential PD pathogenicity effectors found in Temecula1. Subsequent PCR and sequencing analyses confirmed that EB92-1 was missing the following predicted effectors found in Temecula1: two type II secreted enzymes, including a lipase (LipA; PD1703) and a serine protease (PD0956); two identical genes encoding proteins similar to Zonula occludens toxins (Zot; PD0915 and PD0928), and at least one relatively short, hemagglutinin-like protein (PD0986). Leaves of tobacco and citrus inoculated with cell-free, crude protein extracts of E. coli BL21(DE3) overexpressing PD1703 exhibited a hypersensitive response (HR) in less than 24 hours. When cloned into shuttle vector pBBR1MCS-5, PD1703 conferred strong secreted lipase activity to Xanthomonas citri, E. coli and X. fastidiosa EB92-1 in plate assays. EB92-1/PD1703 transformants also showed significantly increased disease symptoms on grapevines, characteristic of PD. Genes predicted to encode PD0928 (Zot) and a PD0986 (hemagglutinin) were also cloned into pBBR1MCS-5 and moved into EB92-1; both transformants also showed significantly increased symptoms on V. vinifera vines, characteristic of PD. Together, these results reveal that PD effectors include at least a lipase, two Zot-like toxins and a possibly redundant hemagglutinin, none of which are necessary for parasitic survival of X. fastidiosa populations in grapevines or elderberry.

  2. Detecting genetic introgression: high levels of intersubspecific recombination found in Xylella fastidiosa in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunney, Leonard; Yuan, Xiaoli; Bromley, Robin E; Stouthamer, Richard

    2012-07-01

    Documenting the role of novel mutation versus homologous recombination in bacterial evolution, and especially in the invasion of new hosts, is central to understanding the long-term dynamics of pathogenic bacteria. We used multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to study this issue in Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca from Brazil, a bacterium causing citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) and coffee leaf scorch (CLS). All 55 citrus isolates typed (plus one coffee isolate) defined three similar sequence types (STs) dominated by ST11 (85%), while the remaining 22 coffee isolates defined two STs, mainly ST16 (74%). This low level of variation masked unusually large allelic differences (>1% divergence with no intermediates) at five loci (leuA, petC, malF, cysG, and holC). We developed an introgression test to detect whether these large differences were due to introgression via homologous recombination from another X. fastidiosa subspecies. Using additional sequencing around these loci, we established that the seven randomly chosen MLST targets contained seven regions of introgression totaling 2,172 bp of 4,161 bp (52%), only 409 bp (10%) of which were detected by other recombination tests. This high level of introgression suggests the hypothesis that X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca became pathogenic on citrus and coffee (crops cultivated in Brazil for several hundred years) only recently after it gained genetic variation via intersubspecific recombination, facilitating a switch from native hosts. A candidate donor is the subspecies infecting plum in the region since 1935 (possibly X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex). This hypothesis predicts that nonrecombinant native X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca (not yet isolated) does not cause disease in citrus or coffee.

  3. Three New Pierce's Disease Pathogenicity Effectors Identified Using Xylella fastidiosa Biocontrol Strain EB92-1.

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    Shujian Zhang

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa (X. fastidiosa infects a wide range of plant hosts and causes economically serious diseases, including Pierce's Disease (PD of grapevines. X. fastidiosa biocontrol strain EB92-1 was isolated from elderberry and is infectious and persistent in grapevines but causes only very slight symptoms under ideal conditions. The draft genome of EB92-1 revealed that it appeared to be missing genes encoding 10 potential PD pathogenicity effectors found in Temecula1. Subsequent PCR and sequencing analyses confirmed that EB92-1 was missing the following predicted effectors found in Temecula1: two type II secreted enzymes, including a lipase (LipA; PD1703 and a serine protease (PD0956; two identical genes encoding proteins similar to Zonula occludens toxins (Zot; PD0915 and PD0928, and at least one relatively short, hemagglutinin-like protein (PD0986. Leaves of tobacco and citrus inoculated with cell-free, crude protein extracts of E. coli BL21(DE3 overexpressing PD1703 exhibited a hypersensitive response (HR in less than 24 hours. When cloned into shuttle vector pBBR1MCS-5, PD1703 conferred strong secreted lipase activity to Xanthomonas citri, E. coli and X. fastidiosa EB92-1 in plate assays. EB92-1/PD1703 transformants also showed significantly increased disease symptoms on grapevines, characteristic of PD. Genes predicted to encode PD0928 (Zot and a PD0986 (hemagglutinin were also cloned into pBBR1MCS-5 and moved into EB92-1; both transformants also showed significantly increased symptoms on V. vinifera vines, characteristic of PD. Together, these results reveal that PD effectors include at least a lipase, two Zot-like toxins and a possibly redundant hemagglutinin, none of which are necessary for parasitic survival of X. fastidiosa populations in grapevines or elderberry.

  4. Direct tissue blot immunoassay for detection of Xylella fastidiosa in olive trees

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    Khaled DJELOUAH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct tissue blot immunoassay (DTBIA technique has been compared with ELISA and PCR for detection of Xylella fastidiosa in olive trees from Apulia (southern Italy. Fresh cross-sections of young twigs and leaf petioles were printed onto nitrocellulose membranes and analyzed in the laboratory. Analyses of a first group of 61 samples gave similar efficiency for the three diagnostic techniques for detection the bacterium (24 positive and 36 negative samples, except for a single sample which was positive only with DTBIA and PCR. Similar results were obtained by separately analyzing suckers and twigs collected from different sectors of tree canopies of a second group of 20 olive trees (ten symptomatic and ten symptomless. In this second test the three diagnostic techniques confirmed the irregular distribution of the bacterium in the tree canopies and erratic detectability of the pathogen in the young suckers. It is therefore necessary to analyse composite samples per tree which should be prepared with twigs collected from different sides of the canopy. The efficiency comparable to ELISA and PCR, combined with the advantages of easier handling, speed and cost, make DTBIA a valid alternative to ELISA in large-scale surveys for occurrence of X. fastidiosa. Moreover, the printing of membranes directly in the field prevents infections spreading to Xylella-free areas, through movement of plant material with pathogen vectors for laboratory testing.

  5. A new paradigm for vector inoculation of Xylella fastidiosa: Direct evidence of egestion and salivation supports that sharpshooters can be “flying syringes”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite nearly 70 years of research, the inoculation mechanism of Xylella fastidiosa by its sharpshooter vectors remains unproven. X. fastidiosa is unique among insect-transmitted plant pathogens because it is propagative but non-circulative, adhering to and multiplying on the cuticular lining of th...

  6. A conjugative 38 kB plasmid is present in multiple subspecies of Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Elizabeth E; Stenger, Drake C

    2012-01-01

    A ≈ 38kB plasmid (pXF-RIV5) was present in the Riv5 strain of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolated from ornamental plum in southern California. The complete nucleotide sequence of pXF-RIV5 is almost identical to that of pXFAS01 from X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa strain M23; the two plasmids vary at only 6 nucleotide positions. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analyses indicate pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 share some similarity to chromosomal and plasmid (pXF51) sequences of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c and more distant similarity to plasmids from a wide variety of bacteria. Both pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 encode homologues of a complete Type IV secretion system involved in conjugation and DNA transfer among bacteria. Mating pair formation proteins (Trb) from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP31758 are the mostly closely related non-X. fastidiosa proteins to most of the Trb proteins encoded by pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01. Unlike many bacterial conjugative plasmids, pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 do not carry homologues of known accessory modules that confer selective advantage on host bacteria. However, both plasmids encode seven hypothetical proteins of unknown function and possess a small transposon-associated region encoding a putative transposase and associated factor. Vegetative replication of pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 appears to be under control of RepA protein and both plasmids have an origin of DNA replication (oriV) similar to that of pRP4 and pR751 from Escherichia coli. In contrast, conjugative plasmids commonly encode TrfA and have an oriV similar to those found in IncP-1 incompatibility group plasmids. The presence of nearly identical plasmids in single strains from two distinct subspecies of X. fastidiosa is indicative of recent horizontal transfer, probably subsequent to the introduction of subspecies fastidiosa to the United States in the late 19(th) century.

  7. A conjugative 38 kB plasmid is present in multiple subspecies of Xylella fastidiosa.

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    Elizabeth E Rogers

    Full Text Available A ≈ 38kB plasmid (pXF-RIV5 was present in the Riv5 strain of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolated from ornamental plum in southern California. The complete nucleotide sequence of pXF-RIV5 is almost identical to that of pXFAS01 from X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa strain M23; the two plasmids vary at only 6 nucleotide positions. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analyses indicate pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 share some similarity to chromosomal and plasmid (pXF51 sequences of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c and more distant similarity to plasmids from a wide variety of bacteria. Both pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 encode homologues of a complete Type IV secretion system involved in conjugation and DNA transfer among bacteria. Mating pair formation proteins (Trb from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP31758 are the mostly closely related non-X. fastidiosa proteins to most of the Trb proteins encoded by pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01. Unlike many bacterial conjugative plasmids, pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 do not carry homologues of known accessory modules that confer selective advantage on host bacteria. However, both plasmids encode seven hypothetical proteins of unknown function and possess a small transposon-associated region encoding a putative transposase and associated factor. Vegetative replication of pXF-RIV5 and pXFAS01 appears to be under control of RepA protein and both plasmids have an origin of DNA replication (oriV similar to that of pRP4 and pR751 from Escherichia coli. In contrast, conjugative plasmids commonly encode TrfA and have an oriV similar to those found in IncP-1 incompatibility group plasmids. The presence of nearly identical plasmids in single strains from two distinct subspecies of X. fastidiosa is indicative of recent horizontal transfer, probably subsequent to the introduction of subspecies fastidiosa to the United States in the late 19(th century.

  8. VapD in Xylella fastidiosa Is a Thermostable Protein with Ribonuclease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Juliano S; Santiago, André da S; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Rosselli-Murai, Luciana K; Favaro, Marianna T P; Santos, Clelton A; Horta, Maria Augusta C; Crucello, Aline; Beloti, Lilian L; Romero, Fabian; Tasic, Ljubica; de Souza, Alessandra A; de Souza, Anete P

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa strain 9a5c is a gram-negative phytopathogen that is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), a disease that is responsible for economic losses in Brazilian agriculture. The most well-known mechanism of pathogenicity for this bacterial pathogen is xylem vessel occlusion, which results from bacterial movement and the formation of biofilms. The molecular mechanisms underlying the virulence caused by biofilm formation are unknown. Here, we provide evidence showing that virulence-associated protein D in X. fastidiosa (Xf-VapD) is a thermostable protein with ribonuclease activity. Moreover, protein expression analyses in two X. fastidiosa strains, including virulent (Xf9a5c) and nonpathogenic (XfJ1a12) strains, showed that Xf-VapD was expressed during all phases of development in both strains and that increased expression was observed in Xf9a5c during biofilm growth. This study is an important step toward characterizing and improving our understanding of the biological significance of Xf-VapD and its potential functions in the CVC pathosystem.

  9. A chitinase is required for Xylella fastidiosa colonization of its insect and plant hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labroussaa, Fabien; Ionescu, Michael; Zeilinger, Adam R; Lindow, Steven E; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2017-04-01

    Xylella fastidiosa colonizes the xylem network of host plant species as well as the foregut of its required insect vectors to ensure efficient propagation. Disease management strategies remain inefficient due to a limited comprehension of the mechanisms governing both insect and plant colonization. It was previously shown that X. fastidiosa has a functional chitinase (ChiA), and that chitin likely serves as a carbon source for this bacterium. We expand on that research, showing that a chiA mutant strain is unable to grow on chitin as the sole carbon source. Quantitative PCR assays allowed us to detect bacterial cells in the foregut of vectors after pathogen acquisition; populations of the wild-type and complemented mutant strain were both significantly larger than the chiA mutant strain 10 days, but not 3 days, post acquisition. These results indicate that adhesion of the chiA mutant strain to vectors may not be impaired, but that cell multiplication is limited. The mutant was also affected in its transmission by vectors to plants. In addition, the chiA mutant strain was unable to colonize host plants, suggesting that the enzyme has other substrates associated with plant colonization. Lastly, ChiA requires other X. fastidiosa protein(s) for its in vitro chitinolytic activity. The observation that the chiA mutant strain is not able to colonize plants warrants future attention to be paid to the substrates for this enzyme.

  10. The Bacterial Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa Affects the Leaf Ionome of Plant Hosts during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente, Leonardo; Parker, Jennifer K.; Oliver, Jonathan E.; Granger, Shea; Brannen, Phillip M.; van Santen, Edzard; Cobine, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogenic bacterium that lives inside the host xylem vessels, where it forms biofilm believed to be responsible for disrupting the passage of water and nutrients. Here, Nicotiana tabacum was infected with X. fastidiosa, and the spatial and temporal changes in the whole-leaf ionome (i.e. the mineral and trace element composition) were measured as the host plant transitioned from healthy to diseased physiological status. The elemental composition of leaves was used as an indicator of the physiological changes in the host at a specific time and relative position during plant development. Bacterial infection was found to cause significant increases in concentrations of calcium prior to the appearance of symptoms and decreases in concentrations of phosphorous after symptoms appeared. Field-collected leaves from multiple varieties of grape, blueberry, and pecan plants grown in different locations over a four-year period in the Southeastern US showed the same alterations in Ca and P. This descriptive ionomics approach characterizes the existence of a mineral element-based response to X. fastidiosa using a model system suitable for further manipulation to uncover additional details of the role of mineral elements during plant-pathogen interactions. This is the first report on the dynamics of changes in the ionome of the host plant throughout the process of infection by a pathogen. PMID:23667547

  11. Population structure of the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa among street trees in Washington D.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jordan Lee; Balci, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial leaf scorch, associated with the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, is a widely established and problematic disease of landscape ornamentals in Washington D.C. A multi-locus sequence typing analysis was performed using 10 housekeeping loci for X. fastidiosa strains in order to better understand the epidemiology of leaf scorch disease in this municipal environment. Samples were collected from 7 different tree species located throughout the District of Columbia, consisting of 101 samples of symptomatic and asymptomatic foliage from 84 different trees. Five strains of the bacteria were identified. Consistent with prior data, these strains were host specific, with only one strain associated with members of the red oak family, one strain associated with American elm, one strain associated with American sycamore, and two strains associated with mulberry. Strains found for asymptomatic foliage were the same as strains from the symptomatic foliage on individual trees. Cross transmission of the strains was not observed at sites with multiple species of infected trees within an approx. 25 m radius of one another. X. fastidiosa strain specificity observed for each genus of tree suggests a highly specialized host-pathogen relationship.

  12. The bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa affects the leaf ionome of plant hosts during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo De La Fuente

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogenic bacterium that lives inside the host xylem vessels, where it forms biofilm believed to be responsible for disrupting the passage of water and nutrients. Here, Nicotiana tabacum was infected with X. fastidiosa, and the spatial and temporal changes in the whole-leaf ionome (i.e. the mineral and trace element composition were measured as the host plant transitioned from healthy to diseased physiological status. The elemental composition of leaves was used as an indicator of the physiological changes in the host at a specific time and relative position during plant development. Bacterial infection was found to cause significant increases in concentrations of calcium prior to the appearance of symptoms and decreases in concentrations of phosphorous after symptoms appeared. Field-collected leaves from multiple varieties of grape, blueberry, and pecan plants grown in different locations over a four-year period in the Southeastern US showed the same alterations in Ca and P. This descriptive ionomics approach characterizes the existence of a mineral element-based response to X. fastidiosa using a model system suitable for further manipulation to uncover additional details of the role of mineral elements during plant-pathogen interactions. This is the first report on the dynamics of changes in the ionome of the host plant throughout the process of infection by a pathogen.

  13. VapD in Xylella fastidiosa Is a Thermostable Protein with Ribonuclease Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano S Mendes

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa strain 9a5c is a gram-negative phytopathogen that is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC, a disease that is responsible for economic losses in Brazilian agriculture. The most well-known mechanism of pathogenicity for this bacterial pathogen is xylem vessel occlusion, which results from bacterial movement and the formation of biofilms. The molecular mechanisms underlying the virulence caused by biofilm formation are unknown. Here, we provide evidence showing that virulence-associated protein D in X. fastidiosa (Xf-VapD is a thermostable protein with ribonuclease activity. Moreover, protein expression analyses in two X. fastidiosa strains, including virulent (Xf9a5c and nonpathogenic (XfJ1a12 strains, showed that Xf-VapD was expressed during all phases of development in both strains and that increased expression was observed in Xf9a5c during biofilm growth. This study is an important step toward characterizing and improving our understanding of the biological significance of Xf-VapD and its potential functions in the CVC pathosystem.

  14. Population structure of the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa among street trees in Washington D.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Lee Harris

    Full Text Available Bacterial leaf scorch, associated with the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, is a widely established and problematic disease of landscape ornamentals in Washington D.C. A multi-locus sequence typing analysis was performed using 10 housekeeping loci for X. fastidiosa strains in order to better understand the epidemiology of leaf scorch disease in this municipal environment. Samples were collected from 7 different tree species located throughout the District of Columbia, consisting of 101 samples of symptomatic and asymptomatic foliage from 84 different trees. Five strains of the bacteria were identified. Consistent with prior data, these strains were host specific, with only one strain associated with members of the red oak family, one strain associated with American elm, one strain associated with American sycamore, and two strains associated with mulberry. Strains found for asymptomatic foliage were the same as strains from the symptomatic foliage on individual trees. Cross transmission of the strains was not observed at sites with multiple species of infected trees within an approx. 25 m radius of one another. X. fastidiosa strain specificity observed for each genus of tree suggests a highly specialized host-pathogen relationship.

  15. Reação de variedades e clones de laranjas a Xylella fastidiosa Reaction of oranges varieties and clones to Xylella fastidiosa

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    Paulo Sergio de Souza

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A clorose variegada dos citros (CVC é uma doença grave, causada por Xylella fastidiosa. As medidas usuais de controle mostram-se pouco eficientes ou práticas e com alto custo. Dessa forma, o uso de variedades resistentes e/ou tolerantes desponta como a alternativa mais eficiente, razão pela qual se julgou oportuna a realização deste trabalho. O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o comportamento de variedades e clones de laranjas introduzidas em relação a X. fastidiosa. Foram estudados 59 variedades e clones de laranjas doces e 2 de laranjas azedas introduzidos da França, Itália e Portugal. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos casualizados (DBC, com 62 tratamentos e 4 repetições, incluindo a variedade 'Pêra', como padrão. Cada parcela continha duas plantas, sendo uma inoculada e a outra sem inoculação. Para a inoculação do patógeno, foi empregado o método de encostia, utilizando-se de mudas infectadas. Para a avaliação da incidência da doença, utilizou-se de dados qualitativos, positivos ou negativos, enquanto para severidade empregou-se escala de notas, que foi estabelecida baseando-se nos sintomas de CVC, confirmados através dos testes de PCR. As variedades de laranjas azedas Beja e Sr. Pinto e as laranjas doces Navelina ISA 315, Navelina SRA 332 e Newhall Navel SRA 343 não apresentaram sintomas em folhas até 27 meses após a inoculação.Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC is a serious disease, caused by Xylella fastidiosa, being the most important to the Brazilian citriculture. The usual measures of control show less efficient or practice and they are very expensive. The use of resistant varieties is showed as the most efficient, consisting the aimed of this research. The objective of the present work was study the behavior of varieties and clones introduced in relation to X. fastidiosa. Were studied 59 varieties and clones of sweet oranges and 2 sour oranges introduced from France, Italy and Portugal

  16. Efeito da poda do tipo decote no controle da xylella fastidiosa em cultivares de cafeeiro "Decote" type pruning effect upon xylella fastidiosa control in coffee cultivars

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    Rachel Benetti Queiroz-Voltan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A bactéria Xylella fastidiosa causa prejuízos à cafeicultura e o emprego de produtos químicos, até o presente, não tem possibilitado o controle econômico dessa bactéria. O manejo adequado do cafezal, desde o plantio, com o uso de mudas isentas da bactéria e o controle das cigarrinhas vetoras, são medidas que atenuam a incidência da doença. A utilização de podas, que tem sido recomendada como medida de controle em citros e videiras, não tem ainda eficiência comprovada para o cafeeiro. Neste trabalho, objetivou-se estudar a eficácia do emprego da poda do tipo decote em cafeeiros arábica como controle de X. fastidiosa. Para tanto, após o emprego desse tipo de poda em cafeeiros infectados pela bactéria, quantificou-se a proporção de elementos de vaso do xilema obstruídos pela bactéria, e avaliou-se a severidade dos sintomas externos de infecção provocados pela X. fastidiosa. Oito meses após a aplicação da poda, no mês de junho de 2003 (período seco, observou-se que as plantas estavam com 4% dos elementos de vaso do pecíolo, 2% na nervura principal e 1% no caule obstruído pela X. fastidiosa. No período chuvoso, 14 meses após a poda, a proporção de obstrução dos elementos de vaso diminuiu para 2% no pecíolo, 1% no caule e na nervura principal. A prática da poda diminuiu ligeiramente a proporção de elementos de vaso obstruídos pela bactéria apenas no período seco, uma vez que foi observado antes da poda um máximo de 6% de obstrução no pecíolo. Os novos ramos que brotavam no cafeeiro, na estação chuvosa, pareciam compensar a obstrução dos ramos mais velhos, diminuindo a proporção de obstrução dos elementos de vaso na planta. Em 2003, não houve diferenças na severidade do sintoma externo entre os tratamentos nos dois períodos, seca e chuvoso. Entretanto, no período seco de 2004, as cultivares Catuaí Vermelho IAC 81 e Mundo Novo IAC 515-20, enxertadas sobre o porta-enxerto 'Apoatã IAC 2258

  17. Homologous Recombination and Xylella fastidiosa Host-Pathogen Associations in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D; Francisco, Carolina S; Lopes, João R S; Muller, Christiane; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2017-03-01

    Homologous recombination affects the evolution of bacteria such as Xylella fastidiosa, a naturally competent plant pathogen that requires insect vectors for dispersal. This bacterial species is taxonomically divided into subspecies, with phylogenetic clusters within subspecies that are host specific. One subspecies, pauca, is primarily limited to South America, with the exception of recently reported strains in Europe and Costa Rica. Despite the economic importance of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in South America, little is known about its genetic diversity. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) has previously identified six sequence types (ST) among plant samples collected in Brazil (both subsp. pauca and multiplex). Here, we report on a survey of X. fastidiosa genetic diversity (MLST based) performed in six regions in Brazil and two in Argentina, by sampling five different plant species. In addition to the six previously reported ST, seven new subsp. pauca and two new subsp. multiplex ST were identified. The presence of subsp. multiplex in South America is considered to be the consequence of a single introduction from its native range in North America more than 80 years ago. Different phylogenetic approaches clustered the South American ST into four groups, with strains infecting citrus (subsp. pauca); coffee and olive (subsp. pauca); coffee, hibiscus, and plum (subsp. pauca); and plum (subsp. multiplex). In areas where these different genetic clusters occurred sympatrically, we found evidence of homologous recombination in the form of bidirectional allelic exchange between subspp. pauca and multiplex. In fact, the only strain of subsp. pauca isolated from a plum host had an allele that originated from subsp. multiplex. These signatures of bidirectional homologous recombination between endemic and introduced ST indicate that gene flow occurs in short evolutionary time frames in X. fastidiosa, despite the ecological isolation (i.e., host plant species) of genotypes.

  18. A cell-cell signaling sensor is required for virulence and insect transmission of Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Subhadeep; Wistrom, Christina; Lindow, Steven E

    2008-02-19

    Cell-cell signaling in Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-colonizing plant pathogenic bacterium, mediated by a fatty acid Diffusible Signaling Factor (DSF), is required to colonize insect vectors and to suppress virulence to grape. Here, we show that a hybrid two-component regulatory protein RpfC is involved in negative regulation of DSF synthesis by RpfF in X. fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa rpfC mutants hyperexpress rpfF and overproduce DSF and are deficient in virulence and movement in the xylem vessels of grape. The expression of the genes encoding the adhesins FimA, HxfA, and HxfB is much higher in rpfC mutants, which also exhibit a hyperattachment phenotype in culture that is associated with their inability to migrate in xylem vessels and cause disease. rpfF mutants deficient in DSF production have the opposite phenotypes for all of these traits. RpfC is also involved in the regulation of other signaling components including rpfG, rpfB, a GGDEF domain protein that may be involved in intracellular signaling by modulating the levels of cyclic-di-GMP, and the virulence factors tolC and pglA required for disease. rpfC mutants are able to colonize the mouthparts of insect vectors and wild-type strains but are not transmitted as efficiently to new host plants, apparently because of their high levels of adhesiveness. Because of the conflicting contributions of adhesiveness and other traits to movement within plants and vectoring to new host plants, X. fastidiosa apparently coordinates these traits in a population-size-dependent fashion involving accumulation of DSF.

  19. Global gene expression under nitrogen starvation in Xylella fastidiosa: contribution of the σ54 regulon

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    da Silva Neto José F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative fastidious bacterium, grows in the xylem of several plants causing diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis. As the xylem sap contains low concentrations of amino acids and other compounds, X. fastidiosa needs to cope with nitrogen limitation in its natural habitat. Results In this work, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of the X. fastidiosa nitrogen starvation response. A time course experiment (2, 8 and 12 hours of cultures grown in defined medium under nitrogen starvation revealed many differentially expressed genes, such as those related to transport, nitrogen assimilation, amino acid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, and many genes encoding hypothetical proteins. In addition, a decrease in the expression levels of many genes involved in carbon metabolism and energy generation pathways was also observed. Comparison of gene expression profiles between the wild type strain and the rpoN null mutant allowed the identification of genes directly or indirectly induced by nitrogen starvation in a σ54-dependent manner. A more complete picture of the σ54 regulon was achieved by combining the transcriptome data with an in silico search for potential σ54-dependent promoters, using a position weight matrix approach. One of these σ54-predicted binding sites, located upstream of the glnA gene (encoding glutamine synthetase, was validated by primer extension assays, confirming that this gene has a σ54-dependent promoter. Conclusions Together, these results show that nitrogen starvation causes intense changes in the X. fastidiosa transcriptome and some of these differentially expressed genes belong to the σ54 regulon.

  20. Intersubspecific recombination in Xylella fastidiosa Strains native to the United States: infection of novel hosts associated with an unsuccessful invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunney, Leonard; Hopkins, Donald L; Morano, Lisa D; Russell, Stephanie E; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa infects xylem and causes disease in many plant species in the Americas. Different subspecies of this bacterium and different genotypes within subspecies infect different plant hosts, but the genetics of host adaptation are unknown. Here we examined the hypothesis that the introduction of novel genetic variation via intersubspecific homologous recombination (IHR) facilitates host shifts. We investigated IHR in 33 X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates previously identified as recombinant based on 8 loci (7 multilocus sequence typing [MLST] loci plus 1 locus). We found significant evidence of introgression from X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa in 4 of the loci and, using published data, evidence of IHR in 6 of 9 additional loci. Our data showed that IHR regions in 2 of the 4 loci were inconsistent (12 mismatches) with X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa alleles found in the United States but consistent with alleles from Central America. The other two loci were consistent with alleles from both regions. We propose that the recombinant forms all originated via genomewide recombination of one X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex ancestor with one X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa donor from Central America that was introduced into the United States but subsequently disappeared. Using all of the available data, 5 plant hosts of the recombinant types were identified, 3 of which also supported non-IHR X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex, but 2 were unique to recombinant types from blueberry (7 isolates from Georgia, 3 from Florida); and blackberry (1 each from Florida and North Carolina), strongly supporting the hypothesis that IHR facilitated a host shift to blueberry and possibly blackberry.

  1. Crystal structure of a small heat-shock protein from Xylella fastidiosa reveals a distinct high-order structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Emanuella Maria Barreto; Scorsato, Valéria; Dos Santos, Marcelo Leite; Júnior, Atilio Tomazini; Tada, Susely Ferraz Siqueira; Dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Polikarpov, Igor; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Citrus variegated chlorosis is a disease that attacks economically important citrus plantations and is caused by the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. In this work, the structure of a small heat-shock protein from X. fastidiosa (XfsHSP17.9) is reported. The high-order structures of small heat-shock proteins from other organisms are arranged in the forms of double-disc, hollow-sphere or spherical assemblies. Unexpectedly, the structure reported here reveals a high-order architecture forming a nearly square cavity.

  2. Search of Xylella fastidiosa in plants with symptoms of chlorosis and leaf scorch present in ornamental areas in the university district and nearness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Acevedo, Maria Jose

    2010-01-01

    The presence of Xylella fastidiosa is detected in plants considered as hosts of urban ornament with characteristic symptoms, present in gardens in the area of the university district and around in the area. Urban ornamental plants are identified with suggestive symptomatology of infection by X. fastidiosa in gardens of urban areas. Plants are classified according to the presence or absence of symptoms. In the study were gathered 97 samples, belonging to 29 vegetable species with symptoms of chlorosis on leaves, leaf scorch, delay in the development and loss of foliage. The identified plants are screened by techniques of ELISA, and immunofluorescence for the detection of X. fastidiosa. Xylella fastidiosa is isolated from urban ornamental plants. The isolates of Xylella obtained, are characterized phenotypic and molecularly. The performance of two standardized immunological techniques are compared for the serological detection of Xylella fastidiosa. The presence of X. fastidiosa is detected, using the DAS-ELISA technique on 48 of the 97 processed samples, corresponding to 46,1% of the samples. Parallely, the samples processed using the IFA technique, have detected the presence of X. fastidiosa in the same proportions [es

  3. Nanofilms of hyaluronan/chitosan assembled layer-by-layer: An antibacterial surface for Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Montelongo, Jacobo; Nascimento, Vicente F; Murillo, Duber; Taketa, Thiago B; Sahoo, Prasana; de Souza, Alessandra A; Beppu, Marisa M; Cotta, Monica A

    2016-01-20

    In this work, nanofilms of hyaluronan/chitosan (HA/CHI) assembled layer by layer were synthesized; their application as a potential antimicrobial material was demonstrated for the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative bacterium, here used as a model. For the synthesis, the influence of pH and ionic strength of these natural polymer stem-solutions on final characteristics of the HA/CHI nanofilms was studied in detail. The antibacterial effect was evaluated using widefield fluorescence microscopy. These results were correlated with the chemical properties of the nanofilms, studied by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, as well as with their morphology and surface properties characterized using SEM and AFM. The present findings can be extended to design and optimize HA/CHI nanofilms with enhanced antimicrobial behavior for other type of phytopathogenic gram-negative bacteria species, such as Xanthomonas citri, Xanthomas campestri and Ralstonia solanacearum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide O-antigen delays plant innate immune recognition of Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Muszyński, Artur; Figueroa-Balderas, Rosa; Morales-Cruz, Abraham; Azadi, Parastoo; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Castro, Claudia; Cantu, Dario; Roper, M Caroline

    2018-01-26

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are among the known pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). LPSs are potent elicitors of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI), and bacteria have evolved intricate mechanisms to dampen PTI. Here we demonstrate that Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), a hemibiotrophic plant pathogenic bacterium, possesses a long chain O-antigen that enables it to delay initial plant recognition, thereby allowing it to effectively skirt initial elicitation of innate immunity and establish itself in the host. Lack of the O-antigen modifies plant perception of Xf and enables elicitation of hallmarks of PTI, such as ROS production specifically in the plant xylem tissue compartment, a tissue not traditionally considered a spatial location of PTI. To explore translational applications of our findings, we demonstrate that pre-treatment of plants with Xf LPS primes grapevine defenses to confer tolerance to Xf challenge.

  5. Evaluation of Xylella fastidiosa genetic diversity by fAFPL markers Diversidade genética de Xylella fastidiosa avaliada por marcadores fAFPL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Takeshi Kishi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The first phytopathogenic bacterium with its DNA entirely sequenced is being detected and isolated from different host plants in several geographic regions. Although it causes diseases in cultures of economic importance, such as citrus, coffee, and grapevine little is known about the genetic relationships among different strains. Actually, all strains are grouped as a single species, Xylella fastidiosa, despite colonizing different hosts, developing symptoms, and different physiological and microbiological observed conditions. The existence of genetic diversity among X. fastidiosa strains was detected by different methodological techniques, since cultural to molecular methods. However, little is know about the phylogenetic relationships developed by Brazilian strains obtained from coffee and citrus plants. In order to evaluate it, fAFLP markers were used to verify genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships developed by Brazilian and strange strains. fAFLP is an efficient technique, with high reproducibility that is currently used for bacterial typing and classification. The obtained results showed that Brazilian strains present genetic diversity and that the strains from this study were grouped distinctly according host and geographical origin like citrus-coffee, temecula-grapevine-mulberry and plum-elm.A primeira bactéria fitopatogênica a ter seu genoma totalmente seqüenciado foi detectada e isolada em diferentes hospedeiros em diferentes regiões geográficas. Embora seja causadora de doenças em culturas economicamente importantes, como citros, cafeeiro e videira, pouco se conhece acerca das relações genéticas estabelecidas entre isolados da bactéria. Atualmente, todos os isolados são agrupados como uma única espécie, Xylella fastidiosa, apesar de colonizarem diferentes hospedeiros que desenvolvem sintomas diferenciados e possuir diferentes condições fisiológicas e microbiológicas. A existência de diversidade gen

  6. ASPECTOS ESTRUTURAIS DE CAFEEIRO INFECTADO COM XYLELLA FASTIDIOSA

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    RACHEL BENETTI QUEIROZ-VOLTAN

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudaram-se as alterações anatômicas em folhas e caules de ramos de cafeeiros infectados com X. fastidiosa visando compreender as causas dos seus distúrbios fisiológicos. Analisaram-se amostras dos cultivares comerciais de Coffea arabica L. - Catuaí Vermelho IAC H 2077-25-81 e Mundo Novo 515-20 enxertados sobre a progênie IAC 2258 de C. canephora - e de Catuaí Vermelho IAC H 2077-25-81 sem enxertia (pé franco. As amostras foram coletadas no campo, no Núcleo Experimental de Campinas, IAC, em cafezais onde foi detectada a presença da bactéria. Analisou-se também a estrutura da folha e do caule de ramos com e sem sintomas visuais da bactéria, sendo estimada a porcentagem de obstrução dos vasos do xilema do caule. Os ramos infectados apresentaram um encurtamento dos entrenós e, com o agravamento da doença, senescência foliar precoce na sua base, resultando em pequeno número de folhas no ápice. O número e a posição dos ramos por indivíduo com tais sintomas variaram entre as plantas, sendo mais freqüentes na região basal. Esses ramos também mostraram pecíolos e área foliar reduzidos e frutos menores e agrupados, em vista de um encurtamento dos pedicelos e dos entrenós, além de uma deposição de "goma" nos vasos do xilema do caule, pecíolo e folha, assim como divisões celulares anormais no xilema, floema e córtex daquelas partes. As células do mesofilo das folhas afetadas apresentaram número reduzido de cloroplastos, associado a maior concentração de cristais de oxalato de cálcio. Sugere-se que a presença da bactéria esteja induzindo a senescência foliar que se relaciona a um ou mais fatores de estresse.Leaf and stem anatomical changes were studied in coffee plants infected with X. fastidiosa looking for the causes of the observed physiological disturbances. Samples of commercial cultivars of Coffea arabica L. were analysed - Catuaí Vermelho IAC H 2077-25-81 and Mundo Novo 515-20 grafted on the progenie IAC

  7. Expression of Xylella fastidiosa RpfF in citrus disrupts signaling in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and thereby its virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, R; Picchi, S C; Takita, M A; Tomaz, J P; Pereira, W E L; Machado, M A; Ionescu, M; Lindow, S; De Souza, A A

    2014-11-01

    Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, that cause citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) and citrus canker diseases, respectively, utilize diffusible signal factor (DSF) for quorum sensing. DSF, produced by RpfF, are similar fatty acids in both organisms, although a different set of genes is regulated by DSF in each species. Because of this similarity, Xylella fastidiosa DSF might be recognized and affect the biology of Xanthomonas citri. Therefore, transgenic Citrus sinensis and Carrizo citrange plants overexpressing the Xylella fastidiosa rpfF were inoculated with Xanthomonas citri and changes in symptoms of citrus canker were observed. X. citri biofilms formed only at wound sites on transgenic leaves and were thicker; however, bacteria were unable to break through the tissue and form pustules elsewhere. Although abundant growth of X. citri occurred at wound sites on inoculated transgenic leaves, little growth was observed on unwounded tissue. Genes in the DFS-responsive core in X. citri were downregulated in bacteria isolated from transgenic leaves. DSF-dependent expression of engA was suppressed in cells exposed to xylem sap from transgenic plants. Thus, altered symptom development appears to be due to reduced expression of virulence genes because of the presence of antagonists of DSF signaling in X. citri in rpfF-expressing plants.

  8. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K; Nobrega, Marcelo M; Cesar, Carlos L; Temperini, Marcia L A; Carvalho, Hernandes F; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Monica A

    2015-04-20

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation.

  9. The exopolysaccharide of Xylella fastidiosa is essential for biofilm formation, plant virulence, and vector transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, N; Martinez, R Hernandez; Dumenyo, C Korsi; Cooksey, D A; Almeida, R P P

    2013-09-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) synthesized by plant-pathogenic bacteria are generally essential for virulence. The role of EPS produced by the vector-transmitted bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was investigated by knocking out two genes implicated in the EPS biosynthesis, gumD and gumH. Mutant strains were affected in growth characteristics in vitro, including adhesion to surfaces and biofilm formation. In addition, different assays were used to demonstrate that the mutant strains produced significantly less EPS compared with the wild type. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that both mutant strains did not produce oligosaccharides. Biologically, the mutants were deficient in movement within plants, resulting in an avirulent phenotype. Additionally, mutant strains were affected in transmission by insects: they were very poorly transmitted by and retained within vectors. The gene expression profile indicated upregulation of genes implicated in cell-to-cell signaling and adhesins while downregulation in genes was required for within-plant movement in EPS-deficient strains. These results suggest an essential role for EPS in X. fastidiosa interactions with both plants and insects.

  10. Production of Xylella fastidiosa diffusible signal factor in transgenic grape causes pathogen confusion and reduction in severity of Pierce's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindow, Steven; Newman, Karyn; Chatterjee, Subhadeep; Baccari, Clelia; Lavarone, Anthony T; Ionescu, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The rpfF gene from Xylella fastidiosa, encoding the synthase for diffusible signal factor (DSF), was expressed in 'Freedom' grape to reduce the pathogen's growth and mobility within the plant. Symptoms in such plants were restricted to near the point of inoculation and incidence of disease was two- to fivefold lower than in the parental line. Both the longitudinal and lateral movement of X. fastidiosa in the xylem was also much lower. DSF was detected in both leaves and xylem sap of RpfF-expressing plants using biological sensors, and both 2-Z-tetradecenoic acid, previously identified as a component of X. fastidiosa DSF, and cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid were detected in xylem sap using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. A higher proportion of X. fastidiosa cells adhered to xylem vessels of the RpfF-expressing line than parental 'Freedom' plants, reflecting a higher adhesiveness of the pathogen in the presence of DSF. Disease incidence in RpfF-expressing plants in field trials in which plants were either mechanically inoculated with X. fastidiosa or subjected to natural inoculation by sharpshooter vectors was two- to fourfold lower in than that of the parental line. The number of symptomatic leaves on infected shoots was reduced proportionally more than the incidence of infection, reflecting a decreased ability of X. fastidiosa to move within DSF-producing plants.

  11. Xylella fastidiosa differentially accumulates mineral elements in biofilm and planktonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobine, Paul A; Cruz, Luisa F; Navarrete, Fernando; Duncan, Daniel; Tygart, Melissa; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a bacterial plant pathogen that infects numerous plant hosts. Disease develops when the bacterium colonizes the xylem vessels and forms a biofilm. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was used to examine the mineral element content of this pathogen in biofilm and planktonic states. Significant accumulations of copper (30-fold), manganese (6-fold), zinc (5-fold), calcium (2-fold) and potassium (2-fold) in the biofilm compared to planktonic cells were observed. Other mineral elements such as sodium, magnesium and iron did not significantly differ between biofilm and planktonic cells. The distribution of mineral elements in the planktonic cells loosely mirrors the media composition; however the unique mineral element distribution in biofilm suggests specific mechanisms of accumulation from the media. A cell-to-surface attachment assay shows that addition of 50 to 100 µM Cu to standard X. fastidiosa media increases biofilm, while higher concentrations (>200 µM) slow cell growth and prevent biofilm formation. Moreover cell-to-surface attachment was blocked by specific chelation of copper. Growth of X. fastidiosa in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions showed that addition of 50 µM Cu to the media accelerated attachment and aggregation, while 400 µM prevented this process. Supplementation of standard media with Mn showed increased biofilm formation and cell-to-cell attachment. In contrast, while the biofilm accumulated Zn, supplementation to the media with this element caused inhibited growth of planktonic cells and impaired biofilm formation. Collectively these data suggest roles for these minerals in attachment and biofilm formation and therefore the virulence of this pathogen.

  12. O antigen modulates insect vector acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M; Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Walker, Sharon; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Xylella fastidiosa differentially accumulates mineral elements in biofilm and planktonic cells.

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    Paul A Cobine

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a bacterial plant pathogen that infects numerous plant hosts. Disease develops when the bacterium colonizes the xylem vessels and forms a biofilm. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was used to examine the mineral element content of this pathogen in biofilm and planktonic states. Significant accumulations of copper (30-fold, manganese (6-fold, zinc (5-fold, calcium (2-fold and potassium (2-fold in the biofilm compared to planktonic cells were observed. Other mineral elements such as sodium, magnesium and iron did not significantly differ between biofilm and planktonic cells. The distribution of mineral elements in the planktonic cells loosely mirrors the media composition; however the unique mineral element distribution in biofilm suggests specific mechanisms of accumulation from the media. A cell-to-surface attachment assay shows that addition of 50 to 100 µM Cu to standard X. fastidiosa media increases biofilm, while higher concentrations (>200 µM slow cell growth and prevent biofilm formation. Moreover cell-to-surface attachment was blocked by specific chelation of copper. Growth of X. fastidiosa in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions showed that addition of 50 µM Cu to the media accelerated attachment and aggregation, while 400 µM prevented this process. Supplementation of standard media with Mn showed increased biofilm formation and cell-to-cell attachment. In contrast, while the biofilm accumulated Zn, supplementation to the media with this element caused inhibited growth of planktonic cells and impaired biofilm formation. Collectively these data suggest roles for these minerals in attachment and biofilm formation and therefore the virulence of this pathogen.

  14. Ionome changes in Xylella fastidiosa-infected Nicotiana tabacum correlate with virulence and discriminate between subspecies of bacterial isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J E; Sefick, S A; Parker, J K; Arnold, T; Cobine, P A; De La Fuente, L

    2014-10-01

    Characterization of ionomes has been used to uncover the basis of nutrient utilization and environmental adaptation of plants. Here, ionomic profiles were used to understand the phenotypic response of a plant to infection by genetically diverse isolates of Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterial plant pathogen. In this study, X. fastidiosa isolates were used to infect a common model host (Nicotiana tabacum 'SR1'), and leaf and sap concentrations of eleven elements together with plant colonization and symptoms were assessed. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that changes in the ionome were significantly correlated with symptom severity and bacterial populations in host petioles. Moreover, plant ionome modification by infection could be used to differentiate the X. fastidiosa subspecies with which the plant was infected. This report establishes host ionome modification as a phenotypic response to infection.

  15. Population Structure of Xylella fastidiosa Associated with Almond Leaf Scorch Disease in the San Joaquin Valley of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Islam, Md Sajedul; Cabrera-La Rosa, Juan C; Civerolo, Edwin L; Groves, Russell L

    2015-06-01

    Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in many commercial crops, including almond leaf scorch (ALS) disease in susceptible almond (Prunus dulcis). In this study, genetic diversity and population structure of X. fastidiosa associated with ALS disease were evaluated. Isolates obtained from two almond orchards in Fresno and Kern County in the San Joaquin Valley of California were analyzed for two successive years. Multilocus simple-sequence repeat (SSR) analysis revealed two major genetic clusters that were associated with two host cultivars, 'Sonora' and 'Nonpareil', respectively, regardless of the year of study or location of the orchard. These relationships suggest that host cultivar selection and adaptation are major driving forces shaping ALS X. fastidiosa population structure in the San Joaquin Valley. This finding will provide insight into understanding pathogen adaptation and host selection in the context of ALS disease dynamics.

  16. Eficiência da poda em cafeeiros no controle da Xylella fastidiosa Prune efficiency in the control of Xylella fastidiosa in coffee trees

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    Rachel Benetti Queiroz-Voltan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A bactéria Xylella fastidiosa coloniza os vasos do xilema dos seus hospedeiros, bloqueando o movimento da água e nutrientes, afetando a produção. Até o momento, o manejo adequado do cafezal, desde o plantio, com o uso de mudas isentas da bactéria e o controle das cigarrinhas vetoras, são medidas que atenuam a incidência da doença. A poda é uma prática importante para a otimização da produção do cafezal, e o tipo de poda depende da cultivar e do ambiente, usando-se podas tradicionais ou drásticas. Neste trabalho, objetivou-se avaliar a eficiência do emprego de diferentes tipos de poda no controle de X. fastidiosa nas cultivares comerciais de café arábica `Acaiá IAC 474-19' e `Catuaí Vermelho IAC 81'. Oito plantas de cada cultivar foram submetidas aos tipos de podas: decote, esqueletamento e recepa, em outubro de 2003, e oito delas foram mantidas sem poda, como testemunha. Para o estudo anatômico, anteriormente à poda, foram retirados cinco ramos das plantas utilizadas como testemunha e, em outubro de 2004 (período chuvoso e junho de 2005 (período seco, retiraram-se outros cinco ramos de cada planta dos quatro tratamentos. Na cultivar Acaiá IAC 474-19, notou-se baixa proporção de obstrução dos elementos de vaso de xilema, não sendo observadas diferenças entre os tratamentos. Na `Catuaí Vermelho IAC 81', embora as diferenças entre os tratamentos também não tenham sido significativas, constatou-se uma tendência em diminuir a proporção de obstrução de elementos de vasos do xilema pela bactéria nas podas mais drásticas do tipo esqueletamento e recepa, nos dois períodos (chuvoso e seco. Sugere-se que a prática da poda dos tipos esqueletamento e recepa sejam mais vantajosas para o controle da Xylella em situações de alta severidade.Xylella fastidiosa bacteria colonize the host plant xylem vessels and block the water and nutrient flow with consequent yield reduction. Up to now, adequate coffee plantation

  17. The induction of differentially expressed proteins of Xylella fastidiosa with citrus extract Indução de proteínas de Xylella fastidiosa expressas diferencialmente com extrato de citros

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    Cláudia de M. Bellato

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro system was developed to induce and identify Xylella fastidiosa proteins that were differentially expressed in the presence of callus-derived extracts from its host, the citrus cultivar Pêra. To optimize the induction, we first developed a single culture medium for the growth of both, host and bacteria. This medium, CPXPm7, which mimics the citrus xylem sap, showed that X. fastidiosa at 72 h post-incubation had 10(8 colony forming units mL-1, while Pêra cells had the highest fresh weight content (0.79 g. After testing various methods of co-cultivation of the bacteria and host callus grown in this single medium, the best induction procedure was to grow X. fastidiosa in a solid medium amended with an extract of Pêra callus grown in CPXPm7. Analysis, by two-dimensional electrophoresis, of the X. fastidiosa proteins (120 µg of total proteins grown in the presence of Pêra callus extract revealed 414 differentially expressed protein spots when compared to the protein profile obtained in the absence of the extract. The system developed in this study improves the induction and analysis of differentially expressed proteins of X. fastidiosa, which may be involved in pathogenicity.Estudos in vitro foram desenvolvidos para obter proteínas de Xylella fastidiosa expressas diferencialmente na presença de calos do hospedeiro, citros cultivar Pêra. Para otimizar a indução, desenvolveu-se um meio de cultura comum, o qual foi baseado na seiva do xilema de citros, para cultivar a bacteria e os calos de Pêra. Dados mostraram, após 72 h de cultivo neste meio, 10(8 unidades formadoras de colônias de X. fastidiosa por mL, e 0,79 g de peso seco de células de Pêra. Após testar diferentes métodos de co-cultivo da bactéria com calos de Pêra neste meio, observou-se que a melhor taxa de indução ocorreu quando X. fastidiosa foi cultivada em meio sólido enriquecido com um extrato derivado dos calos de Pêra. Análise em gel bidimensional (2DE

  18. An Evaluation of the Genetic Diversity of Xylella fastidiosa Isolated from Diseased Citrus and Coffee in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X; Miranda, V S; Machado, M A; Lemos, E G; Hartung, J S

    2001-06-01

    ABSTRACT Strains of Xylella fastidiosa, isolated from sweet orange trees (Citrus sinensis) and coffee trees (Coffea arabica) with symptoms of citrus variegated chlorosis and Requeima do Café, respectively, were indistinguishable based on repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR assays. These strains were also indistinguishable with a previously described PCR assay that distinguished the citrus strains from all other strains of Xylella fastidiosa. Because we were not able to document any genomic diversity in our collection of Xylella fastidiosa strains isolated from diseased citrus, the observed gradient of increasing disease severity from southern to northern regions of São Paulo State is unlikely due to the presence of significantly different strains of the pathogen in the different regions. When comparisons were made to reference strains of Xylella fastidiosa isolated from other hosts using these methods, four groups were consistently identified consistent with the hosts and regions from which the strains originated: citrus and coffee, grapevine and almond, mulberry, and elm, plum, and oak. Independent results from random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR assays were also consistent with these results; however, two of the primers tested in RAPD-PCR were able to distinguish the coffee and citrus strains. Sequence comparisons of a PCR product amplified from all strains of Xylella fastidiosa confirmed the presence of a CfoI polymorphism that can be used to distinguish the citrus strains from all others. The ability to distinguish Xylella fastidiosa strains from citrus and coffee with a PCR-based assay will be useful in epidemiological and etiological studies of this pathogen.

  19. Calcium-Enhanced Twitching Motility in Xylella fastidiosa Is Linked to a Single PilY1 Homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luisa F; Parker, Jennifer K; Cobine, Paul A; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-12-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is restricted to the xylem vessel environment, where mineral nutrients are transported through the plant host; therefore, changes in the concentrations of these elements likely impact the growth and virulence of this bacterium. Twitching motility, dependent on type IV pili (TFP), is required for movement against the transpiration stream that results in basipetal colonization. We previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca) increases the motility of X. fastidiosa, although the mechanism was unknown. PilY1 is a TFP structural protein recently shown to bind Ca and to regulate twitching and adhesion in bacterial pathogens of humans. Sequence analysis identified three pilY1 homologs in X. fastidiosa (PD0023, PD0502, and PD1611), one of which (PD1611) contains a Ca-binding motif. Separate deletions of PD0023 and PD1611 resulted in mutants that still showed twitching motility and were not impaired in attachment or biofilm formation. However, the response of increased twitching at higher Ca concentrations was lost in the pilY1-1611 mutant. Ca does not modulate the expression of any of the X. fastidiosa PilY1 homologs, although it increases the expression of the retraction ATPase pilT during active movement. The evidence presented here suggests functional differences between the PilY1 homologs, which may provide X. fastidiosa with an adaptive advantage in environments with high Ca concentrations, such as xylem sap. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Initial biochemical and functional characterization of a 5'-nucleotidase from Xylella fastidiosa related to the human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Clelton A; Saraiva, Antonio M; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Beloti, Lilian L; Crucello, Aline; Favaro, Marianna T P; Horta, Maria A C; Santiago, André S; Mendes, Juliano S; Souza, Alessandra A; Souza, Anete P

    2013-01-01

    The 5'-nucleotidases constitute a ubiquitous family of enzymes that catalyze either the hydrolysis or the transfer of esterified phosphate at the 5' position of nucleoside monophosphates. These enzymes are responsible for the regulation of nucleotide and nucleoside levels in the cell and can interfere with the phosphorylation-dependent activation of nucleoside analogs used in therapies targeting solid tumors and viral infections. In the present study, we report the initial biochemical and functional characterization of a 5'-nucleotidase from Xylella fastidiosa that is related to the human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase I. X. fastidiosa is a plant pathogenic bacterium that is responsible for numerous economically important crop diseases. Biochemical assays confirmed the phosphatase activity of the recombinant purified enzyme and revealed metal ion dependence for full enzyme activity. In addition, we investigated the involvement of Xf5'-Nt in the formation of X. fastidiosa biofilms, which are structures that occlude the xylem vessels of susceptible plants and are strictly associated with bacterial pathogenesis. Using polyclonal antibodies against Xf5'-Nt, we observed an overexpression of Xf5'-Nt during the initial phases of X. fastidiosa biofilm formation that was not observed during X. fastidiosa planktonic growth. Our results demonstrate that the de/phosphorylation network catalyzed by 5'-nucleotidases may play an important role in bacterial biofilm formation, thereby contributing novel insights into bacterial nucleotide metabolism and pathogenicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Temperature-Independent Cold-Shock Protein Homolog Acts as a Virulence Factor in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevine, is a fastidious organism that requires very specific conditions for replication and plant colonization. Cold temperatures reduce growth and survival of X. fastidiosa both in vitro and in planta. However, little is known regarding physiological responses of X. fastidiosa to temperature changes. Cold-shock proteins (CSP), a family of nucleic acid-binding proteins, act as chaperones facilitating translation at low temperatures. Bacterial genomes often encode multiple CSP, some of which are strongly induced following exposure to cold. Additionally, CSP contribute to the general stress response through mRNA stabilization and posttranscriptional regulation. A putative CSP homolog (Csp1) with RNA-binding activity was identified in X. fastidiosa Stag's Leap. The csp1 gene lacked the long 5' untranslated region characteristic of cold-inducible genes and was expressed in a temperature-independent manner. As compared with the wild type, a deletion mutant of csp1 (∆csp1) had decreased survival rates following cold exposure and salt stress in vitro. The deletion mutant also was significantly less virulent in grapevine, as compared with the wild type, in the absence of cold stress. These results suggest an important function of X. fastidiosa Csp1 in response to cellular stress and during plant colonization.

  2. A preliminary survey on the presence of Xylella fastidiosa in olive, citrus and grapevine groves in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed AARABE

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is gram negative, xylem-inhabiting, devastating pathogen which causes various diseases on more than 300 plant hosts. Given the recent confirmed findings of X. fastidiosa in the European Union, this bacterium is becoming a serious threat to the Moroccan agricultural sector. A survey was conducted during May-September 2015 on the presence of X. fastidiosa in several commercial groves, covering olive, citrus and grapevine growing areas. In a few trees, severe symptoms which could be associated to the bacterium were observed. A total of 900 samples of different crops from different regions were randomly collected: 220 olive trees (cv. Picholine Marocaine from two regions, 410 citrus trees belonging to 7 different cultivars collected in 4 regions and 270 grapevine plants belonging to 6 different cultivars from 3 regions; all these samples were tested for the presence of X. fastidiosa by using an ELISA commercial kit. The obtained results did not show any positive sample. These preliminary results are taken as an encouraging indication, considering that X. fastidiosa was not found in Morocco, at least in the surveyed crops. However, frequent extensive surveys in different regions are needed to prevent its entrance into the country.

  3. A triply cloned strain of xylella fastidiosa multiplies and induces symptoms of citrus variegated chlorosis in sweet orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li; Zreik; Fernandes; Miranda; Teixeira; Ayres; Garnier; Bov

    1999-08-01

    Xylella fastidiosa isolate 8.1.b obtained from a sweet orange tree affected by citrus variegated chlorosis in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and shown in 1993 to be the causal agent of the disease, was cloned by repeated culture in liquid and on solid PW medium, yielding triply cloned strain 9a5c. The eighth and the 16th passages of strain 9a5c were mechanically inoculated into sweet orange plants. Presence of X. fastidiosa in sweet orange leaves of shoots having grown after inoculation (first-flush shoots) was detected by DAS-ELISA and PCR. Thirty-eight days after inoculation, 70% of the 20 inoculated plants tested positive, and all plants gave strong positive reactions 90 days after inoculation. Symptoms first appeared after 3 months and were conspicuous after 5 months. X. fastidiosa was reisolated from sweet orange leaves, 44 days after inoculation. These results indicate that X. fastidiosa strain 9a5c, derived from pathogenic isolate 8.1.b by triply cloning, is also pathogenic. Strain 9a5c is now used for the X. fastidiosa genome sequencing project undertaken on a large scale in Brazil.http://link. springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00284/bibs/39n2p106.html

  4. Functional characterization of replication and stability factors of an incompatibility group P-1 plasmid from Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Woo; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Stenger, Drake C

    2010-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa strain riv11 harbors a 25-kbp plasmid (pXF-RIV11) belonging to the IncP-1 incompatibility group. Replication and stability factors of pXF-RIV11 were identified and used to construct plasmids able to replicate in X. fastidiosa and Escherichia coli. Replication in X. fastidiosa required a 1.4-kbp region from pXF-RIV11 containing a replication initiation gene (trfA) and the adjacent origin of DNA replication (oriV). Constructs containing trfA and oriV from pVEIS01, a related IncP-1 plasmid of the earthworm symbiont Verminephrobacter eiseniae, also were competent for replication in X. fastidiosa. Constructs derived from pXF-RIV11 but not pVEIS01 replicated in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Xanthomonas campestris, and Pseudomonas syringae. Although plasmids bearing replication elements from pXF-RIV11 or pVEIS01 could be maintained in X. fastidiosa under antibiotic selection, removal of selection resulted in plasmid extinction after 3 weekly passages. Addition of a toxin-antitoxin addiction system (pemI/pemK) from pXF-RIV11 improved plasmid stability such that >80 to 90% of X. fastidiosa cells retained plasmid after 5 weekly passages in the absence of antibiotic selection. Expression of PemK in E. coli was toxic for cell growth, but toxicity was nullified by coexpression of PemI antitoxin. Deletion of N-terminal sequences of PemK containing the conserved motif RGD abolished toxicity. In vitro assays revealed a direct interaction of PemI with PemK, suggesting that antitoxin activity of PemI is mediated by toxin sequestration. IncP-1 plasmid replication and stability factors were added to an E. coli cloning vector to constitute a stable 6.0-kbp shuttle vector (pXF20-PEMIK) suitable for use in X. fastidiosa.

  5. Seasonal Fluctuations of Sap-Feeding Insect Species Infected by Xylella fastidiosa in Apulian Olive Groves of Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Moussa, Issam Eddine; Mazzoni, Valerio; Valentini, Franco; Yaseen, Thaer; Lorusso, Donato; Speranza, Stefano; Digiaro, Michele; Varvaro, Leonardo; Krugner, Rodrigo; D'Onghia, Anna Maria

    2016-08-01

    A study on seasonal abundance of Auchenorrhyncha species and their infectivity by Xylella fastidiosa in the Apulia region of Italy was conducted to identify ideal periods for monitoring and adoption of potential control measures against insect vectors. Adult populations of Auchenorrhyncha species were monitored monthly over a 2-yr period from five olive groves. A total of 15 species were captured, identified, and tested for presence of X. fastidiosa by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For three species, Philaenus spumarius L., Neophilaenus campestris (Fallèn), and Euscelis lineolatus Brullé, positive reactions to X. fastidiosa were obtained, on average, in 16.3, 15.9 and 18.4% of adult insects, respectively. Philaneous spumarius was the dominant species (39.8% of total Auchenorrhyncha captured) with the highest adult abundance in summer months. Adult P. spumarius and N. campestris were first detected between March and May in both years, and all insects tested during these periods (year 1: n = 42, year 2: n = 132) gave negative reactions to X. fastidiosa by PCR. Similarly, first adults of E. lineolatus that appeared from October to November (year 1: n = 20, year 2: n = 15) tested negative for presence of X. fastidiosa Given the lack of transstadial and transovarial transmission of X. fastidiosa and considering that P. spumarius is univoltine, control measures against nymphal stages of P. spumarius should be investigated as means of population suppression to reduce spread of X. fastidiosa in olive groves. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Natural Competence of Xylella fastidiosa Occurs at a High Frequency Inside Microfluidic Chambers Mimicking the Bacterium's Natural Habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Prem P; Lopez, Samantha M; Almeida, Rodrigo P P; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium that is the causal agent of emerging diseases in a number of economically important crops. Genetic diversity studies have demonstrated homologous recombination occurring among X. fastidiosa strains, which has been proposed to contribute to host plant shifts. Moreover, experimental evidence confirmed that X. fastidiosa is naturally competent for recombination in vitro Here, as an approximation of natural habitats (plant xylem vessels and insect mouthparts), recombination was studied in microfluidic chambers (MCs) filled with media amended with grapevine xylem sap. First, different media were screened for recombination in solid agar plates using a pair of X. fastidiosa strains that were previously reported to recombine in coculture. The highest frequency of recombination was obtained with PD3 medium, compared to those with the other two media (X. fastidiosa medium [XFM] and periwinkle wilt [PW] medium) used in previous studies. Dissection of the media components led to the identification of bovine serum albumin as an inhibitor of recombination that was correlated to its previously known effect on inhibition of twitching motility. When recombination was performed in liquid culture, the frequencies were significantly higher under flow conditions (MCs) than under batch conditions (test tubes). The recombination frequencies in MCs and agar plates were not significantly different from each other. Grapevine xylem sap from both susceptible and tolerant varieties allowed high recombination frequency in MCs when mixed with PD3. These results suggest that X. fastidiosa has the ability to be naturally competent in the natural growth environment of liquid flow, and this phenomenon could have implications in X. fastidiosa environmental adaptation. Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen that lives inside xylem vessels (where water and nutrients are transported inside the plant) and the mouthparts of insect vectors. This bacterium

  7. Calcium Increases Xylella fastidiosa Surface Attachment, Biofilm Formation, and Twitching Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luisa F.; Cobine, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms inside xylem vessels, a process thought to be influenced by the chemical composition of xylem sap. In this work, the effect of calcium on the production of X. fastidiosa biofilm and movement was analyzed under in vitro conditions. After a dose-response study with 96-well plates using eight metals, the strongest increase of biofilm formation was observed when medium was supplemented with at least 1.0 mM CaCl2. The removal of Ca by extracellular (EGTA, 1.5 mM) and intracellular [1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA/AM), 75 μM] chelators reduced biofilm formation without compromising planktonic growth. The concentration of Ca influenced the force of adhesion to the substrate, biofilm thickness, cell-to-cell aggregation, and twitching motility, as shown by assays with microfluidic chambers and other assays. The effect of Ca on attachment was lost when cells were treated with tetracycline, suggesting that Ca has a metabolic or regulatory role in cell adhesion. A double mutant (fimA pilO) lacking type I and type IV pili did not improve biofilm formation or attachment when Ca was added to the medium, while single mutants of type I (fimA) or type IV (pilB) pili formed more biofilm under conditions of higher Ca concentrations. The concentration of Ca in the medium did not significantly influence the levels of exopolysaccharide produced. Our findings indicate that the role of Ca in biofilm formation may be related to the initial surface and cell-to-cell attachment and colonization stages of biofilm establishment, which rely on critical functions by fimbrial structures. PMID:22194297

  8. Intrinsic bent DNA sites in the chromosomal replication origin of Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gimenes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The features of the nucleotide sequences in both replication and promoter regions have been investigated in many organisms. Intrinsically bent DNA sites associated with transcription have been described in several prokaryotic organisms. The aim of the present study was to investigate intrinsic bent DNA sites in the segment that holds the chromosomal replication origin, oriC, of Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c. Electrophoretic behavior analyses, as well as in silico analyses of both the 2-D projection and helical parameters, were performed. The chromosomal segment analyzed contains the initial sequence of the rpmH gene, an intergenic region, the dnaA gene, the oriC sequence, and the 5' partial sequence of the dnaN gene. The analysis revealed fragments with reduced electrophoretic mobility, which indicates the presence of curved DNA segments. The analysis of the helical parameter ENDS ratio revealed three bent DNA sites (b1, b2, and b3 located in the rpmH-dnaA intergenic region, the dnaA gene, and the oriC 5' end, respectively. The chromosomal segment of X. fastidiosa analyzed here is rich in phased AT tracts and in CAnT motifs. The 2-D projection indicated a segment whose structure was determined by the cumulative effect of all bent DNA sites. Further, the in silico analysis of the three different bacterial oriC sequences indicated similar negative roll and twist >34.00° values. The DnaA box sequences, and other motifs in them, may be associated with the intrinsic DNA curvature.

  9. Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) Synthase RpfF of Xylella fastidiosa Is a Multifunction Protein Also Required for Response to DSF

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; Da Silva, Aline Maria; Garcia, Angelica; Yokota, Kenji; Lindow, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, like related Xanthomonas species, employs an Rpf cell-cell communication system consisting of a diffusible signal factor (DSF) synthase, RpfF, and a DSF sensor, RpfC, to coordinate expression of virulence genes. While phenotypes of a ΔrpfF strain in Xanthomonas campestris could be complemented by its own DSF, the DSF produced by X. fastidiosa (XfDSF) did not restore expression of the XfDSF-dependent genes hxfA and hxfB to a ΔrpfF strain of X. fastidiosa, suggesting that Rp...

  10. Molecular characteristics of a strain (Salento-1 of Xylella fastidiosa isolated in Apulia (Italy from an olive plant with the quick decline syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca BLEVE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA-based approaches were used to characterize a strain (Salento-1 of Xylella fastidiosa obtained from an olive plant suffering from the syndrome of quick decline in Apulia (South Italy. Salento-1 was indistinguishable from strain CoDiRO previously isolated from olive in Apulia and assigned to  X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca. Based on our results and comparative analysis with reported data, the subspecies pauca, multiplex, and fastidiosa may invade olive throughout the world (California, Italy, Argentina and Brazil. The strain Salento-1 has been deposited in the National Collection of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria (NCPPB, England, and in the Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms (BCCM, Belgium.

  11. Characterization of regulatory pathways in Xylella fastidiosa: genes and phenotypes controlled by algU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiang Yang; Dumenyo, C Korsi; Hernandez-Martinez, Rufina; Azad, Hamid; Cooksey, Donald A

    2007-11-01

    Many virulence genes in plant bacterial pathogens are coordinately regulated by "global" regulatory genes. Conducting DNA microarray analysis of bacterial mutants of such genes, compared with the wild type, can help to refine the list of genes that may contribute to virulence in bacterial pathogens. The regulatory gene algU, with roles in stress response and regulation of the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharide alginate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and many other bacteria, has been extensively studied. The role of algU in Xylella fastidiosa, the cause of Pierce's disease of grapevines, was analyzed by mutation and whole-genome microarray analysis to define its involvement in aggregation, biofilm formation, and virulence. In this study, an algU::nptII mutant had reduced cell-cell aggregation, attachment, and biofilm formation and lower virulence in grapevines. Microarray analysis showed that 42 genes had significantly lower expression in the algU::nptII mutant than in the wild type. Among these are several genes that could contribute to cell aggregation and biofilm formation, as well as other physiological processes such as virulence, competition, and survival.

  12. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck infected with Xylella fastidiosa

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    Alessandra A. de Souza

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the genetic responses resulting from physiological changes that occur in plants displaying citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC symptoms, we adopted a strategy of comparing two EST libraries from sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck]. One of them was prepared with plants showing typical CVC symptoms caused by Xylella fastidiosa and the other with non-inoculated plants. We obtained 15,944 ESTs by sequencing the two cDNA libraries. Using an in silico hybridization strategy, 37 genes were found to have significant variation at the transcriptional level. Within this subset, 21 were up-regulated and 16 were down-regulated in plants with CVC. The main functional categories of the down-regulated transcripts in plants with CVC were associated with metabolism, protein modification, energy and transport facilitation. The majority of the up-regulated transcripts were associated with metabolism and defense response. Some transcripts associated with adaptation to stress conditions were up-regulated in plants with CVC and could explain why plants remain alive even under severe water and nutritional stress. Others of the up-regulated transcripts are related to defense response suggesting that sweet orange plants activate their defense machinery. The genes associated with stress response might be expressed as part of a secondary response related to physiological alterations caused by the infection.

  13. Fatty acid synthesis in Xylella fastidiosa: correlations between genome studies, 13C NMR data, and molecular models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osiro, Denise; Muniz, Joao Renato C.; Coleta Filho, Helvecio Della; Alves de Sousa, Alessandra; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Garratt, Richard C.; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa was the first plant pathogen to have its complete genome sequence elucidated. Routine database analyses suggested that two enzymes essential for fatty acid synthesis were missing, one of these is the holo-acyl-carrier-protein synthase. However, here we demonstrate, using 13 C NMR spectroscopy, that X. fastidiosa is indeed able to synthesize fatty acids from acetate via an apparently conventional metabolic pathway. We further identify a gene product HetI, an alternative phosphopantetheinyl transferase, which we propose to fill the missing link. Homology modeling of HetI shows conservation of the Coenzyme A binding site suggesting it to be an active enzyme and reveals several interesting structural features when compared with the surfactin synthase-activating enzyme, on which the model was built. These include a simplified topology due to N- and C-terminal deletions and the observation of a novel serine ladder

  14. Short communication. A survey of potential insect vectors of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa in three regions of Spain

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    Joao R. S. Lopes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of a rapid-spreading olive disease associated with Xylella fastidiosa in southern Italy represents a high risk to susceptible crops in other countries of the Mediterranean basin, if insect vectors occur in the region. The goal of this study was to identify xylem-feeding Auchenorrhyncha that could potentially act as vectors of X. fastidiosa in three regions of Spain (Andalucía, Murcia and Madrid. Samplings with sweep net and stem tap were carried out in October/2004 on grapevines and adjacent crops (olives, nectarine, citrus, Prunus spp., ornamental trees and herbaceous weeds. Yellow sticky cards were placed in ten vineyards located across 100 km in Andalucía and in three vineyards distant 10-15 km apart in Murcia. Specimens of frequently-trapped species were tested by nested- or multiplex-PCR for the presence of X. fastidiosa. The Typhlocybinae leafhopper, Austroasca (Jacobiasca lybica (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae was the most abundant species in vineyards and citrus orchards. Planthoppers (Hemiptera: Fulgoroidea and psyllids (Hemiptera: Psylloidea were prevalent on olives. Cicadellinae leafhoppers (known as sharpshooters, which are major vectors of X. fastidiosa in the Americas, were not found in the samples. The only potential vectors were spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopoidea collected on Populus sp., herbaceous and on conifer trees (Pinus halepense; the spittlebug Neophileanus sp. was common on conifer trees adjacent to a vineyard in Jumilla. None of the insect samples tested positive for X. fastidiosa by PCR assays. However, spittlebugs already associated with susceptible crops in Spain may allow fast spread of X. fastidiosa in case this pathogen is introduced.

  15. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Xylella fastidiosa DsbA Family Members: New insightsinto the Enzyme-Substrate Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, F.; Meza, A; Gulmarges, B

    2009-01-01

    Disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA catalyzes disulfide bond formation in proteins secreted to the periplasm and has been related to the folding process of virulence factors in many organisms. It is among the most oxidizing of the thioredoxin-like proteins, and DsbA redox power is understood in terms of the electrostatic interactions involving the active site motif CPHC. The plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa has two chromosomal genes encoding two oxidoreductases belonging to the DsbA family, and in one of them, the canonical motif CPHC is replaced by CPAC. Biochemical assays showed that both X. fastidiosa homologues have similar redox properties and the determination of the crystal structure of XfDsbA revealed substitutions in the active site of X. fastidiosa enzymes, which are proposed to compensate for the lack of the conserved histidine in XfDsbA2. In addition, electron density maps showed a ligand bound to the XfDsbA active site, allowing the characterization of the enzyme interaction with an 8-mer peptide. Finally, surface analysis of XfDsbA and XfDsbA2 suggests that X. fastidiosa enzymes may have different substrate specificities.

  16. Tolerance to oxidative stress is required for maximal xylem colonization by the xylem-limited bacterial phytopathogen, Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Lee, Yunho; Igo, Michele M; Roper, M Caroline

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial plant pathogens often encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) during host invasion. In foliar bacterial pathogens, multiple regulatory proteins are involved in the sensing of oxidative stress and the activation of the expression of antioxidant genes. However, it is unclear whether xylem-limited bacteria, such as Xylella fastidiosa, experience oxidative stress during the colonization of plants. Examination of the X. fastidiosa genome uncovered only one homologue of oxidative stress regulatory proteins, OxyR. Here, a knockout mutation in the X. fastidiosa oxyR gene was constructed; the resulting strain was significantly more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) relative to the wild-type. In addition, during early stages of grapevine infection, the survival rate was 1000-fold lower for the oxyR mutant than for the wild-type. This supports the hypothesis that grapevine xylem represents an oxidative environment and that X. fastidiosa must overcome this challenge to achieve maximal xylem colonization. Finally, the oxyR mutant exhibited reduced surface attachment and cell-cell aggregation and was defective in biofilm maturation, suggesting that ROS could be a potential environmental cue stimulating biofilm development during the early stages of host colonization. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  17. Response of Xylella fastidiosa to zinc: decreased culturability, increased exopolysaccharide production, and formation of resilient biofilms under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Fernando; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-02-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa produces biofilm that accumulates in the host xylem vessels, affecting disease development in various crops and bacterial acquisition by insect vectors. Biofilms are sensitive to the chemical composition of the environment, and mineral elements being transported in the xylem are of special interest for this pathosystem. Here, X. fastidiosa liquid cultures were supplemented with zinc and compared with nonamended cultures to determine the effects of Zn on growth, biofilm, and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production under batch and flow culture conditions. The results show that Zn reduces growth and biofilm production under both conditions. However, in microfluidic chambers under liquid flow and with constant bacterial supplementation (closer to conditions inside the host), a dramatic increase in biofilm aggregates was seen in the Zn-amended medium. Biofilms formed under these conditions were strongly attached to surfaces and were not removed by medium flow. This phenomenon was correlated with increased EPS production in stationary-phase cells grown under high Zn concentrations. Zn did not cause greater adhesion to surfaces by individual cells. Additionally, viability analyses suggest that X. fastidiosa may be able to enter the viable but nonculturable state in vitro, and Zn can hasten the onset of this state. Together, these findings suggest that Zn can act as a stress factor with pleiotropic effects on X. fastidiosa and indicate that, although Zn could be used as a bactericide treatment, it could trigger the undesired effect of stronger biofilm formation upon reinoculation events.

  18. Grape Cultivar and Sap Culture Conditions Affect the Development of Xylella fastidiosa Phenotypes Associated with Pierce's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lingyun; Zaini, Paulo A; Hoch, Harvey C; Burr, Thomas J; Mowery, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium in plant hosts and causes Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevines, which differ in susceptibility according to the Vitis species (spp.). In this work we compared X. fastidiosa biofilm formation and population dynamics when cultured in xylem saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant Vitis spp. under different conditions. Behaviors in a closed-culture system were compared to those in different sap-renewal cultures that would more closely mimic the physicochemical environment encountered in planta. Significant differences in biofilm formation and growth in saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant spp. were only observed using sap renewal culture. Compared to saps from susceptible V. vinifera, those from PD-resistant V. aestivalis supported lower titers of X. fastidiosa and less biofilm and V. champinii suppressed both growth and biofilm formation, behaviors which are correlated with disease susceptibility. Furthermore, in microfluidic chambers X. fastidiosa formed thick mature biofilm with three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as pillars and mounds, in saps from all susceptible spp. In contrast, only small aggregates of various shapes were formed in saps from four out of five of the resistant spp.; sap from the resistant spp. V. mustangensis was an exception in that it also supported thick lawns of biofilm but not the above described 3-D structures typically seen in a mature biofilm from the susceptible saps. Our findings provide not only critical technical information for future bioassays, but also suggest further understanding of PD susceptibility.

  19. Effects of the antimicrobial peptide gomesin on the global gene expression profile, virulence and biofilm formation of Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogaça, Andréa C; Zaini, Paulo A; Wulff, Nelson A; da Silva, Patrícia I P; Fázio, Marcos A; Miranda, Antônio; Daffre, Sirlei; da Silva, Aline M

    2010-05-01

    In the xylem vessels of susceptible hosts, such as citrus trees, Xylella fastidiosa forms biofilm-like colonies that can block water transport, which appears to correlate to disease symptoms. Besides aiding host colonization, bacterial biofilms play an important role in resistance against antimicrobial agents, for instance antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here, we show that gomesin, a potent AMP from a tarantula spider, modulates X. fastidiosa gene expression profile upon 60 min of treatment with a sublethal concentration. DNA microarray hybridizations revealed that among the upregulated coding sequences, some are related to biofilm production. In addition, we show that the biofilm formed by gomesin-treated bacteria is thicker than that formed by nontreated cells or cells exposed to streptomycin. We have also observed that the treatment of X. fastidiosa with a sublethal concentration of gomesin before inoculation in tobacco plants correlates with a reduction in foliar symptoms, an effect possibly due to the trapping of bacterial cells to fewer xylem vessels, given the enhancement in biofilm production. These results warrant further investigation of how X. fastidiosa would respond to the AMPs produced by citrus endophytes and by the insect vector, leading to a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these molecules on bacterial virulence.

  20. Plasmid Vectors for Xylella fastidiosa Utilizing a Toxin-Antitoxin System for Stability in the Absence of Antibiotic Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-08-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in a variety of important crop and landscape plants. Functional genetic studies have led to a broader understanding of virulence mechanisms used by this pathogen in the grapevine host. Plasmid shuttle vectors are important tools in studies of bacterial genetics but there are only a limited number of plasmid vectors available that replicate in X. fastidiosa, and even fewer that are retained without antibiotic selection. Two plasmids are described here that show stable replication in X. fastidiosa and are effective for gene complementation both in vitro and in planta. Plasmid maintenance is facilitated by incorporation of the PemI/PemK plasmid addiction system, consisting of PemK, an endoribonuclease toxin, and its cognate antitoxin, PemI. Vector pXf20pemIK utilizes a native X. fastidiosa replication origin as well as a high-copy-number pUC origin for propagation in Escherichia coli cloning strains. Broad-host-range vector pBBR5pemIK is a medium- to low-copy-number plasmid based on the pBBR1 backbone. Both plasmids are maintained for extended periods of time in the absence of antibiotic selection, as well as up to 14 weeks in grapevine, without affecting bacterial fitness. These plasmids present an alternative to traditional complementation and expression vectors which rely on antibiotic selection for plasmid retention.

  1. Grape Cultivar and Sap Culture Conditions Affect the Development of Xylella fastidiosa Phenotypes Associated with Pierce's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Harvey C.; Burr, Thomas J.; Mowery, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium in plant hosts and causes Pierce’s disease (PD) of grapevines, which differ in susceptibility according to the Vitis species (spp.). In this work we compared X. fastidiosa biofilm formation and population dynamics when cultured in xylem saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant Vitis spp. under different conditions. Behaviors in a closed-culture system were compared to those in different sap-renewal cultures that would more closely mimic the physicochemical environment encountered in planta. Significant differences in biofilm formation and growth in saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant spp. were only observed using sap renewal culture. Compared to saps from susceptible V. vinifera, those from PD-resistant V. aestivalis supported lower titers of X. fastidiosa and less biofilm and V. champinii suppressed both growth and biofilm formation, behaviors which are correlated with disease susceptibility. Furthermore, in microfluidic chambers X. fastidiosa formed thick mature biofilm with three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as pillars and mounds, in saps from all susceptible spp. In contrast, only small aggregates of various shapes were formed in saps from four out of five of the resistant spp.; sap from the resistant spp. V. mustangensis was an exception in that it also supported thick lawns of biofilm but not the above described 3-D structures typically seen in a mature biofilm from the susceptible saps. Our findings provide not only critical technical information for future bioassays, but also suggest further understanding of PD susceptibility. PMID:27508296

  2. Grape Cultivar and Sap Culture Conditions Affect the Development of Xylella fastidiosa Phenotypes Associated with Pierce's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyun Hao

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium in plant hosts and causes Pierce's disease (PD of grapevines, which differ in susceptibility according to the Vitis species (spp.. In this work we compared X. fastidiosa biofilm formation and population dynamics when cultured in xylem saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant Vitis spp. under different conditions. Behaviors in a closed-culture system were compared to those in different sap-renewal cultures that would more closely mimic the physicochemical environment encountered in planta. Significant differences in biofilm formation and growth in saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant spp. were only observed using sap renewal culture. Compared to saps from susceptible V. vinifera, those from PD-resistant V. aestivalis supported lower titers of X. fastidiosa and less biofilm and V. champinii suppressed both growth and biofilm formation, behaviors which are correlated with disease susceptibility. Furthermore, in microfluidic chambers X. fastidiosa formed thick mature biofilm with three-dimensional (3-D structures, such as pillars and mounds, in saps from all susceptible spp. In contrast, only small aggregates of various shapes were formed in saps from four out of five of the resistant spp.; sap from the resistant spp. V. mustangensis was an exception in that it also supported thick lawns of biofilm but not the above described 3-D structures typically seen in a mature biofilm from the susceptible saps. Our findings provide not only critical technical information for future bioassays, but also suggest further understanding of PD susceptibility.

  3. Genetic characterization of Xylella fastidiosa isolated from citrus and coffee plants Caracterização genética de Xylella fastidiosa isolada de plantas de citros e café

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Savonitti Miranda

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The Citrus Variegated Chlorosis and the Coffee Leaf Scorch are some of the many destructive diseases caused by Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative bacterium limited to the xylem of affected plants. As its genetic characterization is still not well established, different isolates of X. fastidiosa from citrus and coffee were evaluated through RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA technique to characterize and classify these isolates based on similarity coefficients. Sixteen isolates of X. fastidiosa were used on this trial, obtained from citrus, coffee and almond. The genetic polymorphism evaluation was performed using six arbitrary 10-base primer pairs. It was possible to establish a dendogram in which the isolates were classified into five groups (A, B, C, D and E. A prevalence of citrus isolates in groups A and D was observed. In groups B and C, there was a prevalence of coffee isolates meanwhile the group D consisted of the almond isolate, solely.A Clorose Variegada dos Citros e a Requeima das Folhas do Cafeeiro são algumas das várias doenças destrutivas causadas pela Xylella fastidiosa, que é uma bactéria gram-negativa e limitada ao xilema de plantas afetadas. Como a sua caracterização genética ainda não está determinada, diferentes isolados da X. fastidiosa de citros e café foram avaliados pela técnica RAPD (Polimorfismo do DNA Amplificado ao Acaso para caracterizar e classificar estes isolados com base em coeficientes de similaridade. Foram utilizados 16 isolados de X. fastidiosa provenientes de citros, café e amêndoa. A avaliação do polimorfismo genético foi realizada utilizando seis iniciadores randômicos de 10 pares de base. Foi possível estabelecer um dendograma no qual os isolados foram classificados em cinco grupos (A, B, C, D e E. Nos grupos A e D existe uma forte predominância de isolados de citros. Nos grupos B e C há predominância de isolados de café enquanto no grupo E ficou apenas o isolado de amêndoa.

  4. Cloning and expression of cellulase XF-818 of Xylella fastidiosa in Escherichia Coli Clonagem e expressão da celulase Xf-818 de Xylella Fastidiosa em Escherichia Coli

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    Nelson Arno Wulff

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa's genome was the first of a plant pathogen to be completely sequenced. Through comparative sequence analysis many genes were identified and, among them, several potentially involved in plant-pathogen interaction. However, the biological role of each gene should be assigned experimentally. On this regard, heterologous protein expression is a powerful tool to produce proteins from such genes, allowing their characterization. X. fastidiosa lives inside xylem vessels and eventually would degrade pit membranes from xylem cells to move radialy into the host. The identification of several putative plant cell wall degrading enzymes on X. fastidiosa genome prompted the assession of the function of such proteins. The open reading frame (ORF Xf-818 was cloned into expression vector pET20b and E. coli cells harboring such plasmid exhibited cellulase activity. Using IPTG at 0.4 mmol L-1 with a 12 h incubation at 32°C are the best conditions to produce higher amounts of heterologous protein. The enzyme degrades cellulose confirming the endoglucanase activity of Xf-818.Xylella fastidiosa foi a primeira bactéria fitopatogênica que teve seu genoma completamente seqüenciado. A identificação de diversos genes, através de similaridade de seqüências, indicou os possíveis mecanismos de patogenicidade da bactéria. Entretanto, a determinação da função de um gene requer a confirmação experimental e, neste aspecto, a expressão heteróloga é uma poderosa ferramenta. X. fastidiosa coloniza somente o xilema das plantas hospedeiras e a identificação putativa de diversos genes semelhantes a enzimas que degradam a parede celular vegetal, estimularam o presente estudo de catacterização destas enzimas. A clonagem da ORF Xf-818 de X. fastidiosa no vetor de expressão pET20b possibilitou a produção da proteína heterologamente em E. coli. O emprego de IPTG a 0,4 mmol L-1 com 12 h a 32°C, possibilitou as melhores condições para E. coli

  5. Detection and characterization of pXFSL21, a novel single-copy plasmid from Xylella fastidiosa Strain Stag’s Leap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa Strain Stag’s Leap, originally isolated from Napa Valley, California, is highly virulent in causing Pierce’s Disease (PD) of grapevine. Plasmids are extrachromosomal genetic elements associated with bacterial environmental adaptation such as virulence development. In this study, t...

  6. Preliminary findings suggest that vector feeding behaviors controlling inoculation of Xylella fastidiosa are performed less on Vitis arizonica than on V. vinifera ‘Chardonnay’

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    The most successful example of classical grapevine breeding for resistance to Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) is the PdR1 gene, which mediates resistance to Xf multiplication and spread in the host, once Xf has been inoculated. No effort has been made to determine whether resistance of PdR1 or its parent wi...

  7. Plant water stress effects on stylet probing behaviors of Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) associated with acquisition and inoculation of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, is a xylem fluid-ingesting leafhopper that transmits Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of several plant diseases in the Americas. While the role of plant water stress on the population density and dispersal of H. vitripennis has been studie...

  8. Wintercuring of Prunus dulcis cv ‘Butte,’ P. webbii and their interspecific hybrid in response to Xylella fastidiosa infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clonal replicates of Prunus dulcis cv ‘Butte,’ P. webbii and their interspecific hybrid P 63-61 were inoculated with Xylella fastidiosa strain M23 and evaluated for Almond Leaf Scorch Disease and subsequent wintercuring of infections during three growing seasons. Initial inoculations established gr...

  9. Host selection and adaptation are major driving forces shaping ALS Xylella fastidiosa population structure in the San Joaquin Valley of California

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    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) causes disease in many commercial crops including almond leaf scorch (ALS) disease in susceptible almond (Prunus dulcis). In this study, genetic diversity and population structure of Xf associated with ALS disease were evaluated. Strains from two almond production sites in th...

  10. A zinc, copper and citric acid biocomplex shows promise for control of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca in olive trees in Apulia region (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca is associated with the “olive quick decline syndrome” in the Apulia region of southern Italy. To investigate control of this phytopathogen, a compound containing zinc and copper complexed with citric-acid hydracids (Dentamet®) was evaluated for in vitro ...

  11. Comparações sazonais do efeito da Xylella fastidiosa em cultivares de cafeeiro Seasonal comparactions of Xylella fastidiosa effect in coffee cultivars

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    Rachel Benetti Queiroz-Voltan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Há muitos anos, o cafeeiro vem apresentando problemas de atrofia e seca dos ramos, atribuídos a um esgotamento nutricional devido às altas taxas de produção. Entretanto, hoje sabe-se que esse problema é causado pela presença da bactéria Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. cujos sintomas estão relacionados a fatores de estresse. Embora essa bactéria tenha sido muito estudada nos Estados Unidos, devido aos danos causados à videira, pouco se conhece sobre a relação patógeno-hospedeiro-vetor nas diferentes culturas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi o de avaliar a obstrução de elementos de vaso do xilema nas diferentes partes da planta, em ramos com e sem sintomas externos de infecção, de cultivares de cafeeiro (porta-enxertados ou pé-franco, em duas épocas do ano, a fim de verificar o efeito da bactéria na estrutura da planta e na sua nutrição. Foi utilizado um experimento instalado em 1986, em Garça (SP, sendo as amostras retiradas em 2000. Para o estudo anatômico foram obtidas amostras em dois períodos: abril/maio (estação seca e novembro/dezembro (estação chuvosa e para as análises foliar e edáfica foram retiradas amostras em abril. A proporção de obstrução de elementos de vaso do xilema devido ao efeito ocasionado pela bactéria foi maior na estação seca, no período de estresse hídrico, do que na estação chuvosa. O órgão que apresentou uma proporção maior de obstrução de elementos de vaso foi o caule, seguido do pecíolo, limbo e raiz. Não houve diferença significativa na proporção de elementos de vaso obstruídos entre os tratamentos nos dois períodos do ano; também, não houve diferença significativa na composição nutricional foliar nas condições do estudo, porém as amostras retiradas dos ramos com sintoma de infecção, de alguns tratamentos, apresentaram menores concentrações de alguns elementos químicos em relação àquelas amostras retiradas de ramos sem sintoma da presença da bact

  12. Spatial-temporal distribution of sharpshooters (Hemyptera: Cicadellidae insect vectors of Xylella fastidiosa in citrus orchards = Distribuição espaço-temporal de cigarrinhas (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae vetores da Xylella fastidiosa em pomares cítricos

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    Rúbia de Oliveira Molina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Variegated chlorosis (CVC is a citrus disease, reported initially in the northwest of São Paulo state and in the Triângulo Mineiro region of Minas Gerais state in 1987. The CVC is caused by the xylematic bacteria Xylella fastidiosa. The bacteria is spread through contaminated bubbles or by insect vectors belonging to the Hemyptera order and Cicadellidae family. The aimed of this study was to identify the species of Xylella fastidiosa insect vector and to determine its spatial and temporal distribution in commercial orchards of sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck]. The experiment was conducted in a commercial area of sweet orange, Pêra variety, grafted on Rangpur lime, located in northwest Paraná. For sampling, yellow sticky traps were used, distributed in the peripheral and central area of the orchard with four replicates per street sampled (5, 30, 55 and 80th plant, each plant was considered a sample unit. Were evaluated ten plots per street, totaling 40 traps for sampling. Every thirty days during the evaluation period, the traps were renewed in the orchard. The main species caught were Acrogonia citrine and Dilobopterus costalimai. The highest incidences occurred from winter to spring, and summer to autumn of the next year. According to the geostatistical analysis, the spatial distribution of these species concentrated in the peripheral zone of the portion where a higher incidence of these species was captured. The results show that it is necessary to adopt pest management practices for the Cicadellidae vector of X. fastidiosa differentiated in space and time. = A clorose variegada dos citros (CVC é uma doença de plantas cítricas, constatada, em 1987, inicialmente nos municípios do noroeste paulista e da região do triângulo mineiro. Ela é causada por uma bactéria de xilema, denominada Xylella fastidiosa. Sua disseminação ocorre através de borbulhas contaminadas ou por meio de insetos vetores da ordem Hemiptera e fam

  13. Seasonal Abundance and Natural Inoculativity of Insect Vectors of Xylella fastidiosa in Oklahoma Tree Nurseries and Vineyards.

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    Overall, Lisa M; Rebek, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is the causative agent of diseases of perennial plants including peach, plum, elm, oak, pecan, and grape. This bacterial pathogen is transmitted by xylem-feeding insects. In recent years, Pierce's disease of grape has been detected in 10 counties in central and northeastern Oklahoma, prompting further investigation of the disease epidemiology in this state. We surveyed vineyards and tree nurseries in Oklahoma for potential insect vectors to determine species composition, infectivity, and natural inoculativity of commonly captured insect vectors. Yellow sticky cards were used to sample insect fauna at each location. Insects were removed from sticky cards and screened for X. fastidiosa using immunocapture-PCR to determine their infectivity. A second objective was to test the natural inoculativity of insect vectors that are found in vineyards. Graphocephala versuta (Say), Graphocephala coccinea (Forster), Paraulacizes irrorata (F.), Oncometopia orbona (F.), Cuerna costalis (F.), and Entylia carinata Germar were collected from vineyards and taken back to the lab to determine their natural inoculativity. Immunocapture-PCR was used to test plant and insect samples for presence of X. fastidiosa. The three most frequently captured species from vineyards and tree nurseries were G. versuta, Clastoptera xanthocephala Germar, and O. orbona. Of those insects screened for X. fastidiosa, 2.4% tested positive for the bacterium. Field-collected G. versuta were inoculative to both ragweed and alfalfa. Following a 7-d inoculation access period, a higher percentage of alfalfa became infected than ragweed. Results from this study provide insight into the epidemiology of X. fastidiosa in Oklahoma. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Factors affecting the initial adhesion and retention of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa in the foregut of an insect vector.

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    Killiny, Nabil; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2014-01-01

    Vector transmission of bacterial plant pathogens involves three steps: pathogen acquisition from an infected host, retention within the vector, and inoculation of cells into susceptible tissue of an uninfected plant. In this study, a combination of plant and artificial diet systems were used to determine the importance of several genes on the initial adhesion and retention of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa to an efficient insect vector. Mutant strains included fimbrial (fimA and pilB) and afimbrial (hxfA and hxfB) adhesins and three loci involved in regulatory systems (rpfF, rpfC, and cgsA). Transmission assays with variable retention time indicated that HxfA and HxfB were primarily important for early adhesion to vectors, while FimA was necessary for both adhesion and retention. The long pilus protein PilB was not deficient in initial adhesion but may be important for retention. Genes upregulated under the control of rpfF are important for both initial adhesion and retention, as transmission rates of this mutant strain were initially low and decreased over time, while disruption of rpfC and cgsA yielded trends similar to that shown by the wild-type control. Because induction of an X. fastidiosa transmissible state requires pectin, a series of experiments were used to test the roles of a polygalacturonase (pglA) and the pectin and galacturonic acid carbohydrates on the transmission of X. fastidiosa. Results show that galacturonic acid, or PglA activity breaking pectin into its major subunit (galacturonic acid), is required for X. fastidiosa vector transmission using an artificial diet system. This study shows that early adhesion and retention of X. fastidiosa are mediated by different factors. It also illustrates that the interpretation of results of vector transmission experiments, in the context of vector-pathogen interaction studies, is highly dependent on experimental design.

  15. Development of single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies against Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca by phage display.

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    Yuan, Qing; Jordan, Ramon; Brlansky, Ronald H; Istomina, Olga; Hartung, John

    2015-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a member of the gamma proteobacteria. It is fastidious, insect-vectored and xylem-limited and causes a variety of diseases, some severe, on a wide range of economically important perennial crops, including grape and citrus. Antibody based detection assays are commercially available for X. fastidiosa, and are effective at the species, but not at the subspecies level. We have made a library of scFv antibody fragments directed against X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c (citrus) by using phage display technology. Antibody gene repertoires were PCR-amplified using 23 primers for the heavy chain variable region (V(H)) and 21 primers for the light chain variable region (V(L)). The V(H) and V(L) were joined by overlap extension PCR, and then the genes of the scFv library were ligated into the phage vector pKM19. The library contained 1.2×10(7) independent clones with full-length scFv inserts. In each of 3cycles of affinity-selection with 9a5c, about 1.0×10(12) phage were used for panning with 4.1×10(6), 7.1×10(6), 2.1×10(7) phage recovered after the first, second and third cycles, respectively. Sixty-six percent of clones from the final library bound X. fastidiosa 9a5c in an ELISA. Some of these scFv antibodies recognized strain 9a5c and did not recognize X. fastidiosa strains that cause Pierce's disease of grapevine. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Role of cyclic di-GMP in Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation, plant virulence, and insect transmission.

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    Chatterjee, Subhadeep; Killiny, Nabil; Almeida, Rodrigo P P; Lindow, Steven E

    2010-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa must coordinately regulate a variety of traits contributing to biofilm formation, host plant and vector colonization, and transmission between plants. Traits such as production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), adhesins, extracellular enzymes, and pili are expressed in a cell-density-dependent fashion mediated by a cell-to-cell signaling system involving a fatty acid diffusible signaling factor (DSF). The expression of gene PD0279 (which has a GGDEF domain) is downregulated in the presence of DSF and may be involved in intracellular signaling by modulating the levels of cyclic di-GMP. PD0279, designated cyclic di-GMP synthase A (cgsA), is required for biofilm formation, plant virulence, and vector transmission. cgsA mutants exhibited a hyperadhesive phenotype in vitro and overexpressed gumJ, hxfA, hxfB, xadA, and fimA, which promote attachment of cells to surfaces and, hence, biofilm formation. The mutants were greatly reduced in virulence to grape albeit still transmissible by insect vectors, although at a reduced level compared with transmission rates of the wild-type strain, despite the fact that similar numbers of cells of the cgsA mutant were acquired by the insects from infected plants. High levels of EPS were measured in cgsA mutants compared with wild-type strains, and scanning electron microscopy analysis also revealed a thicker amorphous layer surrounding the mutants. Overexpression of cgsA in a cgsA-complemented mutant conferred the opposite phenotypes in vitro. These results suggest that decreases of cyclic di-GMP result from the accumulation of DSF as cell density increases, leading to a phenotypic transition from a planktonic state capable of colonizing host plants to an adhesive state that is insect transmissible.

  17. Characterization of the Xylella fastidiosa PD1311 gene mutant and its suppression of Pierce's disease on grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lingyun; Johnson, Kameka; Cursino, Luciana; Mowery, Patricia; Burr, Thomas J

    2017-06-01

    Xylella fastidiosa causes Pierce's disease (PD) on grapevines, leading to significant economic losses in grape and wine production. To further our understanding of X. fastidiosa virulence on grapevines, we examined the PD1311 gene, which encodes a putative acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetase, and is highly conserved across Xylella species. It was determined that PD1311 is required for virulence, as the deletion mutant, ΔPD1311, was unable to cause disease on grapevines. The ΔPD1311 strain was impaired in behaviours known to be associated with PD development, including motility, aggregation and biofilm formation. ΔPD1311 also expressed enhanced sensitivity to H 2 O 2 and polymyxin B, and showed reduced survival in grapevine sap, when compared with wild-type X. fastidiosa Temecula 1 (TM1). Following inoculation, ΔPD1311 could not be detected in grape shoots, which may be related to its altered growth and sensitivity phenotypes. Inoculation with ΔPD1311 2 weeks prior to TM1 prevented the development of PD in a significant fraction of vines and eliminated detectable levels of TM1. In contrast, vines inoculated simultaneously with TM1 and ΔPD1311 developed disease at the same level as TM1 alone. In these vines, TM1 populations were distributed similarly to populations in TM1-only inoculated plants. These findings suggest that, through an indirect mechanism, pretreatment of vines with ΔPD1311 suppresses pathogen population and disease. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  18. Specific Detection and Identification of American Mulberry-Infecting and Italian Olive-Associated Strains of Xylella fastidiosa by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

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    Wei Guan

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa causes bacterial leaf scorch in many landscape trees including elm, oak, sycamore and mulberry, but methods for specific identification of a particular tree host species-limited strain or differentiation of tree-specific strains are lacking. It is also unknown whether a particular landscape tree-infecting X. fastidiosa strain is capable of infecting multiple landscape tree species in an urban environment. We developed two PCR primers specific for mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa based on the nucleotide sequence of a unique open reading frame identified only in mulberry-infecting strains among all the North and South American strains of X. fastidiosa sequenced to date. PCR using the primers allowed for detection and identification of mulberry-infecting X. fastidiosa strains in cultures and in samples collected from naturally infected mulberry trees. In addition, no mixed infections with or non-specific detections of the mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa were found in naturally X. fastidiosa-infected oak, elm and sycamore trees growing in the same region where naturally infected mulberry trees were grown. This genotype-specific PCR assay will be valuable for disease diagnosis, studies of strain-specific infections in insects and plant hosts, and management of diseases caused by X. fastidiosa. Unexpectedly but interestingly, the unique open reading frame conserved in the mulberry-infecting strains in the U. S. was also identified in the recently sequenced olive-associated strain CoDiRO isolated in Italy. When the primer set was tested against naturally infected olive plant samples collected in Italy, it allowed for detection of olive-associated strains of X. fastidiosa in Italy. This PCR assay, therefore, will also be useful for detection and identification of the Italian group of X. fastidiosa strains to aid understanding of the occurrence, evolution and biology of this new group of X. fastidiosa strains.

  19. Specific Detection and Identification of American Mulberry-Infecting and Italian Olive-Associated Strains of Xylella fastidiosa by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei; Shao, Jonathan; Elbeaino, Toufic; Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Tingchang; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa causes bacterial leaf scorch in many landscape trees including elm, oak, sycamore and mulberry, but methods for specific identification of a particular tree host species-limited strain or differentiation of tree-specific strains are lacking. It is also unknown whether a particular landscape tree-infecting X. fastidiosa strain is capable of infecting multiple landscape tree species in an urban environment. We developed two PCR primers specific for mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa based on the nucleotide sequence of a unique open reading frame identified only in mulberry-infecting strains among all the North and South American strains of X. fastidiosa sequenced to date. PCR using the primers allowed for detection and identification of mulberry-infecting X. fastidiosa strains in cultures and in samples collected from naturally infected mulberry trees. In addition, no mixed infections with or non-specific detections of the mulberry-infecting strains of X. fastidiosa were found in naturally X. fastidiosa-infected oak, elm and sycamore trees growing in the same region where naturally infected mulberry trees were grown. This genotype-specific PCR assay will be valuable for disease diagnosis, studies of strain-specific infections in insects and plant hosts, and management of diseases caused by X. fastidiosa. Unexpectedly but interestingly, the unique open reading frame conserved in the mulberry-infecting strains in the U. S. was also identified in the recently sequenced olive-associated strain CoDiRO isolated in Italy. When the primer set was tested against naturally infected olive plant samples collected in Italy, it allowed for detection of olive-associated strains of X. fastidiosa in Italy. This PCR assay, therefore, will also be useful for detection and identification of the Italian group of X. fastidiosa strains to aid understanding of the occurrence, evolution and biology of this new group of X. fastidiosa strains.

  20. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jeremy G; Lincoln, James E; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  1. Surface physicochemical properties at the micro and nano length scales: role on bacterial adhesion and Xylella fastidiosa biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite, Gabriela S; Janissen, Richard; Clerici, João H; Rodrigues, Carolina M; Tomaz, Juarez P; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Mônica A

    2013-01-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa grows as a biofilm causing vascular occlusion and consequently nutrient and water stress in different plant hosts by adhesion on xylem vessel surfaces composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and proteins. Understanding the factors which influence bacterial adhesion and biofilm development is a key issue in identifying mechanisms for preventing biofilm formation in infected plants. In this study, we show that X. fastidiosa biofilm development and architecture correlate well with physicochemical surface properties after interaction with the culture medium. Different biotic and abiotic substrates such as silicon (Si) and derivatized cellulose films were studied. Both biofilms and substrates were characterized at the micro- and nanoscale, which corresponds to the actual bacterial cell and membrane/ protein length scales, respectively. Our experimental results clearly indicate that the presence of surfaces with different chemical composition affect X. fastidiosa behavior from the point of view of gene expression and adhesion functionality. Bacterial adhesion is facilitated on more hydrophilic surfaces with higher surface potentials; XadA1 adhesin reveals different strengths of interaction on these surfaces. Nonetheless, despite different architectural biofilm geometries and rates of development, the colonization process occurs on all investigated surfaces. Our results univocally support the hypothesis that different adhesion mechanisms are active along the biofilm life cycle representing an adaptation mechanism for variations on the specific xylem vessel composition, which the bacterium encounters within the infected plant.

  2. Calcium transcriptionally regulates the biofilm machinery of Xylella fastidiosa to promote continued biofilm development in batch cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Chen, Hongyu; McCarty, Sara E; Liu, Lawrence Y; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    The functions of calcium (Ca) in bacteria are less characterized than in eukaryotes, where its role has been studied extensively. The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa has several virulence features that are enhanced by increased Ca concentrations, including biofilm formation. However, the specific mechanisms driving modulation of this feature are unclear. Characterization of biofilm formation over time showed that 4 mM Ca supplementation produced denser biofilms that were still developing at 96 h, while biofilm in non-supplemented media had reached the dispersal stage by 72 h. To identify changes in global gene expression in X. fastidiosa grown in supplemental Ca, RNA-Seq of batch culture biofilm cells was conducted at three 24-h time intervals. Results indicate that a variety of genes are differentially expressed in response to Ca, including genes related to attachment, motility, exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, peptidoglycan synthesis, regulatory functions, iron homeostasis, and phages. Collectively, results demonstrate that Ca supplementation induces a transcriptional response that promotes continued biofilm development, while biofilm cells in nonsupplemented media are driven towards dispersion of cells from the biofilm structure. These results have important implications for disease progression in planta, where xylem sap is the source of Ca and other nutrients for X. fastidiosa. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Zinc Detoxification Is Required for Full Virulence and Modification of the Host Leaf Ionome by Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Fernando; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for all forms of life because it is a structural or catalytic cofactor of many proteins, but it can have toxic effects at high concentrations; thus, microorganisms must tightly regulate its levels. Here, we evaluated the role of Zn homeostasis proteins in the virulence of the xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, causal agent of Pierce's disease of grapevine, among other diseases. Two mutants of X. fastidiosa 'Temecula' affected in genes which regulate Zn homeostasis (zur) and Zn detoxification (czcD) were constructed. Both knockouts showed increased sensitivity to Zn at physiologically relevant concentrations and increased intracellular accumulation of this metal compared with the wild type. Increased Zn sensitivity was correlated with decreased growth in grapevine xylem sap, reduced twitching motility, and downregulation of exopolysaccharide biosynthetic genes. Tobacco plants inoculated with either knockout mutant showed reduced foliar symptoms and a much reduced (czcD) or absent (zur) modification of the leaf ionome (i.e., the mineral nutrient and trace element composition), as well as reduced bacterial populations. The results show that detoxification of Zn is crucial for the virulence of X. fastidiosa and verifies our previous findings that modification of the host leaf ionome correlates with bacterial virulence.

  4. Genomics and X-ray microanalysis indicate that Ca2+ and thiols mediate the aggregation and adhesion of Xylella fastidiosa

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    Leite B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of the genome sequence of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis, is accelerating important investigations concerning its pathogenicity. Plant vessel occlusion is critical for symptom development. The objective of the present study was to search for information that would help to explain the adhesion of X. fastidiosa cells to the xylem. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that adhesion may occur without the fastidium gum, an exopolysaccharide produced by X. fastidiosa, and X-ray microanalysis demonstrated the presence of elemental sulfur both in cells grown in vitro and in cells found inside plant vessels, indicating that the sulfur signal is generated by the pathogen surface. Calcium and magnesium peaks were detected in association with sulfur in occluded vessels. We propose an explanation for the adhesion and aggregation process. Thiol groups, maintained by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, could be active on the surface of the bacteria and appear to promote cell-cell aggregation by forming disulfide bonds with thiol groups on the surface of adjacent cells. The enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase has been shown to be an auxiliary component in the adhesiveness of some human pathogens. The negative charge conferred by the ionized thiol group could of itself constitute a mechanism of adhesion by allowing the formation of divalent cation bridges between the negatively charged bacteria and predominantly negatively charged xylem walls.

  5. Citrus Functional Genomics and Molecular Modeling in Relation to Citrus sinensis (Sweet Orange) Infection with Xylella fastidiosa (Citrus Variegated Chlorosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Upendra N; Tiwari, Sameeksha; Prasanna, Pragya; Awasthi, Manika; Singh, Swati; Pandey, Veda P

    2016-08-01

    Citrus are among the economically most important fruit tree crops in the world. Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), caused by Xylella fastidiosa infection, is a serious disease limiting citrus production at a global scale. With availability of citrus genomic resources, it is now possible to compare citrus expressed sequence tag (EST) data sets and identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within and among different citrus cultivars that can be exploited for citrus resistance to infections, citrus breeding, among others. We report here, for the first time, SNPs in the EST data sets of X. fastidiosa-infected Citrus sinensis (sweet orange) and their functional annotation that revealed the involvement of eight C. sinensis candidate genes in CVC pathogenesis. Among these genes were xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase, and peroxidase were found to be involved in plant cell wall metabolism. These have been further investigated by molecular modeling for their role in CVC infection and defense. Molecular docking analyses of the wild and the mutant (SNP containing) types of the selected three enzymes with their respective substrates revealed a significant decrease in the binding affinity of substrates for the mutant enzymes, thus suggesting a decrease in the catalytic efficiency of these enzymes during infection, thereby facilitating a favorable condition for infection by the pathogen. These findings offer novel agrigenomics insights in developing future molecular targets and strategies for citrus fruit cultivation in ways that are resistant to X. fastidiosa infection, and by extension, with greater harvesting efficiency and economic value.

  6. Insights into enzyme-substrate interaction and characterization of catalytic al intermediates of a Xylella Fastidiosa antioxidant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcos Antonio de; Cussiol, Jose Renato Rosa; Soares Netto, Luis Eduardo; Guimaraes, Beatriz Gomes; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar

    2005-01-01

    Plants and animals have developed various strategies to defend themselves from pathogens. One of them is the generation of oxidants such as organic Hydroperoxides (OHP). OHP can be generated through free radicals as well as enzymatic oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. To counteract this oxidative stress, bacteria have evolved several antioxidant mechanisms. Organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr) was initially identified as a factor involved in the resistance of bacteria, most of them pathogenic, to OHP, but not H 2 O 2 . We have cloned Ohr gene from Xylella fastidiosa and expressed in in Escherichia coli. The biochemical role of Ohr remained unknown for a long time until this work and the work of Nikolov's group (Cornell University, New York) independently showed that these proteins are thiol dependent peroxidases, whose activity is generated by a reactive cysteine. (author)

  7. Insights into enzyme-substrate interaction and characterization of catalytic al intermediates of a Xylella Fastidiosa antioxidant protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Marcos Antonio de; Cussiol, Jose Renato Rosa; Soares Netto, Luis Eduardo [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Dept. de Genetica e Biologia Evolutiva; Guimaraes, Beatriz Gomes; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biologia Molecular Estrutural

    2005-07-01

    Plants and animals have developed various strategies to defend themselves from pathogens. One of them is the generation of oxidants such as organic Hydroperoxides (OHP). OHP can be generated through free radicals as well as enzymatic oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. To counteract this oxidative stress, bacteria have evolved several antioxidant mechanisms. Organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr) was initially identified as a factor involved in the resistance of bacteria, most of them pathogenic, to OHP, but not H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. We have cloned Ohr gene from Xylella fastidiosa and expressed in in Escherichia coli. The biochemical role of Ohr remained unknown for a long time until this work and the work of Nikolov's group (Cornell University, New York) independently showed that these proteins are thiol dependent peroxidases, whose activity is generated by a reactive cysteine. (author)

  8. Diffusible signal factor (DSF) synthase RpfF of Xylella fastidiosa is a multifunction protein also required for response to DSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; Da Silva, Aline Maria; Garcia, Angelica; Yokota, Kenji; Lindow, Steven E

    2013-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, like related Xanthomonas species, employs an Rpf cell-cell communication system consisting of a diffusible signal factor (DSF) synthase, RpfF, and a DSF sensor, RpfC, to coordinate expression of virulence genes. While phenotypes of a ΔrpfF strain in Xanthomonas campestris could be complemented by its own DSF, the DSF produced by X. fastidiosa (XfDSF) did not restore expression of the XfDSF-dependent genes hxfA and hxfB to a ΔrpfF strain of X. fastidiosa, suggesting that RpfF is involved in XfDSF sensing or XfDSF-dependent signaling. To test this conjecture, rpfC and rpfF of X. campestris were replaced by those of X. fastidiosa, and the contribution of each gene to the induction of a X. campestris DSF-dependent gene was assessed. As in X. fastidiosa, XfDSF-dependent signaling required both X. fastidiosa proteins RpfF and RpfC. RpfF repressed RpfC signaling activity, which in turn was derepressed by XfDSF. A mutated X. fastidiosa RpfF protein with two substitutions of glutamate to alanine in its active site was incapable of XfDSF production yet enabled a response to XfDSF, indicating that XfDSF production and the response to XfDSF are two separate functions in which RpfF is involved. This mutant was also hypervirulent to grape, demonstrating the antivirulence effects of XfDSF itself in X. fastidiosa. The Rpf system of X. fastidiosa is thus a novel example of a quorum-sensing signal synthase that is also involved in the response to the signal molecule that it synthesizes.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a glutathione S-transferase from Xylella fastidiosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Wanius; Travensolo, Regiane F.; Rodrigues, Nathalia C.; Muniz, João R. C.; Caruso, Célia S.; Lemos, Eliana G. M.; Araujo, Ana Paula U.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase from X. fastidiosa (xfGST) has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.23 Å. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) form a group of multifunctional isoenzymes that catalyze the glutathione-dependent conjugation and reduction reactions involved in the cellular detoxification of xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds. GST from Xylella fastidiosa (xfGST) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by conventional affinity chromatography. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of xfGST is described. The purified protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method, producing crystals that belonged to the triclinic space group P1. The unit-cell parameters were a = 47.73, b = 87.73, c = 90.74 Å, α = 63.45, β = 80.66, γ = 94.55°. xfGST crystals diffracted to 2.23 Å resolution on a rotating-anode X-ray source

  10. Cigarrinhas dos Citros, Vetoras da Bactéria Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al.: Pragas Potenciais para a Citricultura Sergipana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruberval Azevedo

    2015-04-01

    Abstract. The citrus industry in Brazil plays a role of great economic, social, generating jobs, income and development. Brazil is the largest producer of citrus, the State of Sergipe stands out in 5th place in national production. Among the many pest problems faced by Brazilian citrus is Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC, known as the yellowing caused by the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. The CVC was officially identified in Brazil in 1987, in orchards of “Triângulo Mineiro” and North and northwest of the state of São Paulo. In the Northeast Region of Brazil, was found in 1996 in the municipality of Boquim Sergipe, and Bahia in 1997, the municipalities of Rio Real and Itapicuru. The aim was to review the literature on the species of leafhoppers vectors of CVC, and verify that occur in the state of Sergipe. The first symptoms are seen in the leaves, then go for the fruits and end up affecting the entire plant, and to be perceived can take between five months and two years. The main vectors of X. fastidiosa in citrus are the sharpshooters of the family Cicadellidae. In Brazil 12 sharpshooters species have already been confirmed. For the state of Sergipe, is scarce information about the Cicadellidae vectors, the data are limited to the northern coast of Bahia, except for vague quote about four genus (Oncometropia, Acrogonia, Dilobopterus and Homolodisca and three species (Homolodisca ignorata Melichar, Acrogonia sp. and Homolodisca spottii Takiya, Cavichioli & McKamey.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a glutathione S-transferase from Xylella fastidiosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Wanius, E-mail: wanius@if.sc.usp.br [Laboratório de Biofísica Molecular ‘Sérgio Mascarenhas’, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Carlos (Brazil); Travensolo, Regiane F. [Grupo de Bioanalítica, Microfabricação e Separações, Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Carlos (Brazil); Rodrigues, Nathalia C.; Muniz, João R. C. [Laboratório de Biofísica Molecular ‘Sérgio Mascarenhas’, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Carlos (Brazil); Caruso, Célia S. [Grupo de Bioanalítica, Microfabricação e Separações, Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Carlos (Brazil); Lemos, Eliana G. M. [Laboratório de Bioquímica de Microrganismos e de Plantas, Departamento de Tecnologia, UNESP, Jaboticabal (Brazil); Araujo, Ana Paula U. [Laboratório de Biofísica Molecular ‘Sérgio Mascarenhas’, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Carlos (Brazil); Carrilho, Emanuel, E-mail: wanius@if.sc.usp.br [Grupo de Bioanalítica, Microfabricação e Separações, Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Carlos (Brazil); Laboratório de Biofísica Molecular ‘Sérgio Mascarenhas’, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Carlos (Brazil)

    2008-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase from X. fastidiosa (xfGST) has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.23 Å. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) form a group of multifunctional isoenzymes that catalyze the glutathione-dependent conjugation and reduction reactions involved in the cellular detoxification of xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds. GST from Xylella fastidiosa (xfGST) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by conventional affinity chromatography. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of xfGST is described. The purified protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method, producing crystals that belonged to the triclinic space group P1. The unit-cell parameters were a = 47.73, b = 87.73, c = 90.74 Å, α = 63.45, β = 80.66, γ = 94.55°. xfGST crystals diffracted to 2.23 Å resolution on a rotating-anode X-ray source.

  12. Diversidade genética de Xylella fastidiosa em regiões produtoras de citros na Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Oliveira Casais

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar, por meio de marcadores SSR, a diversidade genética de Xylella fastidiosa no Estado da Bahia. Foram estudadas duas das principais regiões produtoras de citros no Estado, o Litoral Norte e o Recôncavo Sul. Para fins comparativos, utilizaram-se dez amostras provenientes do Estado de São Paulo. Foram empregados os seguintes iniciadores: ASSR20, OSSR9, OSSR17, CSSR4, CSSR12 e CSSR20, dos quais os quatro últimos permitiram identificar 22 loci polimórficos. As populações de X. fastidiosa presentes em citros no Estado da Bahia apresentam elevada diversidade genética, com base nos marcadores SSR, com pools gênicos distintos e agrupamento geográfico. No Litoral Norte, as populações do isolado apresentam maior diversidade genética do que as da região do Recôncavo Sul da Bahia.

  13. Spatial Genetic Structure of Coffee-Associated Xylella fastidiosa Populations Indicates that Cross Infection Does Not Occur with Sympatric Citrus Orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Carolina S; Ceresini, Paulo C; Almeida, Rodrigo P P; Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D

    2017-04-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, an economically important plant-pathogenic bacterium, infects both coffee and citrus trees in Brazil. Although X. fastidiosa in citrus is well studied, knowledge about the population structure of this bacterium infecting coffee remains unknown. Here, we studied the population structure of X. fastidiosa infecting coffee trees in São Paulo State, Brazil, in four regions where citrus is also widely cultivated. Genotyping of over 500 isolates from coffee plants using 14 genomic microsatellite markers indicated that populations were largely geographically isolated, as previously found with populations of X. fastidiosa infecting citrus. These results were supported by a clustering analysis, which indicated three major genetic groups among the four sampled regions. Overall, approximately 38% of isolates showed significant membership coefficients not related to their original geographical populations (i.e., migrants), characterizing a significant degree of genotype flow among populations. To determine whether admixture occurred between isolates infecting citrus and coffee plants, one site with citrus and coffee orchards adjacent to each other was selected; over 100 isolates were typed from each host plant. No signal of natural admixture between citrus- and coffee-infecting isolates was found; artificial cross-infection assays with representative isolates also yielded no successful cross infection. A comparison determined that X. fastidiosa populations from coffee have higher genetic diversity and allelic richness compared with citrus. The results showed that coffee and citrus X. fastidiosa populations are effectively isolated from each other and, although coffee populations are spatially structured, migration has an important role in shaping diversity.

  14. Characterization of the LysR-type transcriptional regulator YcjZ-like from Xylella fastidiosa overexpressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, André S; Santos, Clelton A; Mendes, Juliano S; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Beloti, Lilian L; Souza, Alessandra A; Souza, Anete P

    2015-09-01

    The Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c strain is a xylem-limited phytopathogen that is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC). This bacterium is able to form a biofilm and occlude the xylem vessels of susceptible plants, which leads to significant agricultural and economic losses. Biofilms are associated with bacterial pathogenicity because they are very resistant to antibiotics and other metal-based chemicals that are used in agriculture. The X. fastidiosa YcjZ-like (XfYcjZ-like) protein belongs to the LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family and is involved in various cellular functions that range from quorum sensing to bacterial survival. In the present study, we report the cloning, expression and purification of XfYcjZ-like, which was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The secondary folding of the recombinant and purified protein was assessed by circular dichroism, which revealed that XfYcjZ-like contains a typical α/β fold. An initial hydrodynamic characterization showed that XfYcjZ-like is a globular tetramer in solution. In addition, using a polyclonal antibody against XfYcjZ-like, we assessed the expression profile of this protein during the different developmental phases of X. fastidiosa in in vitro cultivated biofilm cells and demonstrated that XfYcjZ-like is upregulated in planktonic cells in response to a copper shock treatment. Finally, the ability of XfYcjZ-like to interact with its own predicted promoter was confirmed in vitro, which is a typical feature of LysR. Taken together, our findings indicated that the XfYcjZ-like protein is involved in both the organization of the architecture and the maturation of the bacterial biofilm and that it is responsive to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolation of Xylella fastidiosa from Citrus sinensis (L) Osb. And Vitis vinifera and study of genetic diversity in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar Alvarez, Estela Yamileth

    2007-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes diseases in different crops. Symptoms similar to those caused by citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) were observed in sweet orange trees which served as shade and fences in coffee plantations in Costa Rica, in 2002. A total of 35 citrus trees and 24 vines from eight different districts and 3 respectively were evaluated by 'double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay' (DASELISA), resulting in 21 citrus and 19 positive vid. From four citrus trees and six of vines, were obtained six isolates and seven isolates respectively in solid medium, whose morphological and biochemical characteristics coincided with those reported in the literature as characteristic of X. fastidiosa. The identity of the isolates is confirmed by the chain polymerase reaction (PCR) using primers 272-1/272-2int and RST31/RST33. Three isolates from Grecia (Alajuela Province) amplified a band of 500pb using specific primers 272-2int/CVC-1 for strains of X. fastidiosa that cause CVC. The genetic variability of isolates from each other in comparison with isolates of coffee in Costa Rica, U.S. grapes and citrus in Brazil have been studied using techniques of random amplification polymorphism DNA (RAPD) and length polymorphisms of restriction fragments (RFLPs) of the products obtained with primers int/272-2int JB-1/JB-2 and 272-1. The results showed a clear separation between citrus isolates of Costa Rica; and, an association of three of them with the strains of citrus in Brasil. Also, an association between strains of coffee of Costa Rica with grape vines in the U.S. An association of molecular analysis confirmed the data variance. (author) [es

  16. Salivary enzymes are injected into xylem by the glassy-winged sharpshooter, a vector of Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, Elaine A; Andrews, Kim B; Shugart, Holly J; Carl Greve, L; Labavitch, John M; Alhaddad, Hasan

    2012-07-01

    A few phytophagous hemipteran species such as the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, (Germar), subsist entirely on xylem fluid. Although poorly understood, aspects of the insect's salivary physiology may facilitate both xylem-feeding and transmission of plant pathogens. Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium that causes Pierce's disease of grape and other scorch diseases in many important crops. X. fastidiosa colonizes the anterior foregut (precibarium and cibarium) of H. vitripennis and other xylem-feeding vectors. Bacteria form a dense biofilm anchored in part by an exopolysaccharide (EPS) matrix that is reported to have a β-1,4-glucan backbone. Recently published evidence supports the following, salivation-egestion hypothesis for the inoculation of X. fastidiosa during vector feeding. The insect secretes saliva into the plant and then rapidly takes up a mixture of saliva and plant constituents. During turbulent fluid movements in the precibarium, the bacteria may become mechanically and enzymatically dislodged; the mixture is then egested back out through the stylets into plant cells, possibly including xylem vessels. The present study found that proteins extracted from dissected H. vitripennis salivary glands contain several enzyme activities capable of hydrolyzing glycosidic linkages in polysaccharides such as those found in EPS and plant cell walls, based on current information about the structures of those polysaccharides. One of these enzymes, a β-1,4-endoglucanase (EGase) was enriched in the salivary gland protein extract by subjecting the extract to a few, simple purification steps. The EGase-enriched extract was then used to generate a polyclonal antiserum that was used for immunohistochemical imaging of enzymes in sharpshooter salivary sheaths in grape. Results showed that enzyme-containing gelling saliva is injected into xylem vessels during sharpshooter feeding, in one case being carried by the transpiration stream away

  17. On-site detection of Xylella fastidiosa in host plants and in “spy insects” using the real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaer YASEEN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A recent severe outbreak of Xylella fastidiosa associated with ‘olive quick decline syndrome’ (OQDS was reported in Apulia (Southern Italy. In this study an on-site real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification (real-time LAMP was developed for detecting X. fastidiosa in host plants and insects. A marked simplification of the DNA extraction procedure was obtained by heating the samples in a portable Smart-Dart device and using an optimized enhancer reaction buffer. The connection to a tablet or Smartphone allowed to visualize the results of the reaction in real time. Compared to PCR and ELISA, with which it showed comparable results in terms of sensitivity and reliability in the X. fastidiosa detection, this simplified real-time LAMP procedure proved to be “user friendly”, displaying the advantages to be an on-site detection method of easy handling, rapid execution and low cost.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of stationary phase survival protein E (SurE) from Xylella fastidiosa in two crystal forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Marcelo Augusto dos; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Souza, Anete Pereira de; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization and preliminary analysis of two crystal forms of survival protein E from X. fastidiosa are reported. The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a phytopathogenic organism that causes citrus variegated chlorosis, a disease which attacks economically important crops, mainly oranges. In this communication, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of XfSurE, a survival protein E from X. fastidiosa, are reported. Data were collected for two crystal forms, I and II, to 1.93 and 2.9 Å resolution, respectively. Crystal form I belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 172.36, b = 84.18, c = 87.24 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 96.59°, whereas crystal form II belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.05, b = 81.26, c = 72.84 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 94.76°

  19. Large-scale intersubspecific recombination in the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is associated with the host shift to mulberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunney, Leonard; Schuenzel, Erin L; Scally, Mark; Bromley, Robin E; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Homologous recombination plays an important role in the structuring of genetic variation of many bacteria; however, its importance in adaptive evolution is not well established. We investigated the association of intersubspecific homologous recombination (IHR) with the shift to a novel host (mulberry) by the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. Mulberry leaf scorch was identified about 25 years ago in native red mulberry in the eastern United States and has spread to introduced white mulberry in California. Comparing a sequence of 8 genes (4,706 bp) from 21 mulberry-type isolates to published data (352 isolates representing all subspecies), we confirmed previous indications that the mulberry isolates define a group distinct from the 4 subspecies, and we propose naming the taxon X. fastidiosa subsp. morus. The ancestry of its gene sequences was mixed, with 4 derived from X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (introduced from Central America), 3 from X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex (considered native to the United States), and 1 chimeric, demonstrating that this group originated by large-scale IHR. The very low within-type genetic variation (0.08% site polymorphism), plus the apparent inability of native X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex to infect mulberry, suggests that this host shift was achieved after strong selection acted on genetic variants created by IHR. Sequence data indicate that a single ancestral IHR event gave rise not only to X. fastidiosa subsp. morus but also to the X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex recombinant group which infects several hosts but is the only type naturally infecting blueberry, thus implicating this IHR in the invasion of at least two novel native hosts, mulberry and blueberry.

  20. Attempts to develop sustainable biocontrol strategies of Xylella fastidiosa infections in olive

    OpenAIRE

    D'Attoma G., Morelli M., Cicco S., Saponari M. and Saldarelli P.

    2017-01-01

    X. fastidiosa is a plant pathogenic bacterium, which is causing the ‘Olive Quick Decline Syndrome’ (OQDS), on olive trees in the southern part of Apulia region. The knowledge of mechanisms regulating olive- X. fastidiosa interactions is fundamental to develop biocontrol strategies. In Pierce’s Disease (PD) the pathogen virulence relies on a fine balance between motile cells, which move and proliferate in xylem vessels, and sticky cells forming a biofilm and responsible for vessels...

  1. Survey of potential sharpshooter and spittlebug vectors of Xylella fastidiosa to grapevines at the São Francisco River Valley, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudiney Ringenberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Survey of potential sharpshooter and spittlebug vectors of Xylella fastidiosa to grapevines at the São Francisco River Valley, Brazil. Pierce's disease of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa, is a serious problem in some regions of North America, not yet reported in Brazil. In this study, a survey of potential sharpshooter (Hemiptera, Cicadellidae, Cicadellinae and spittlebug (Hemiptera, Cercopidae vectors of X. fastidiosa was conducted in vineyards at the São Francisco River Valley, a major grape growing region in Brazil. Four vineyards of Vitis vinifera L. were sampled fortnightly from June/2005 to June/2007, using yellow sticky cards, each placed at two different heights (45 cm aboveground and 45 cm above the crop canopy in 10 sampling localities. A total of 4,095 specimens of sharpshooters were collected, nearly all from 3 Proconiini species, Homalodisca spottii Takiya, Cavichioli & McKamey, 2006 (96.8% of the specimens, Tapajosa fulvopunctata (Signoret, 1854 (3.1%, and Tretogonia cribrata Melichar, 1926 (1 specimen. Hortensia similis (Walker, 1851 (2 specimens was the only Cicadellini species. Only 1 cercopid specimen, belonging to Aeneolamia colon (Germar, 1821, was trapped. Even though they are not considered potential Xylella vectors, 2 Gyponini leafhoppers were collected: Curtara samera DeLong & Freytag, 1972 (11 specimens and Curtara inflata DeLong & Freytag, 1976 (1 specimen. Homalodisca spottii was observed feeding and mating on green branches of grapevines, in addition to egg masses. Because of its prevalence on the crop canopy, occurrence throughout the year (with peaks from February to August, and ability to colonize grapevines, H. spottii could be an important vector if a X. fastidiosa strain pathogenic to grapevines becomes introduced at the São Francisco River Valley.

  2. Differential gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c during co-cultivation with the endophytic bacterium Methylobacterium mesophilicum SR1.6/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Santos, Daiene Souza; Nunes, Luiz Roberto; Costa de Oliveira, Regina Lúcia Batista da; de Oliveira, Marcus Vinicius; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2015-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), colonizes plant xylem, reducing sap flow, and inducing internerval chlorosis, leaf size reduction, necrosis, and harder and smaller fruits. This bacterium may be transmitted from plant to plant by sharpshooter insects, including Bucephalogonia xanthopis. The citrus endophytic bacterium Methylobacterium mesophilicum SR1.6/6 colonizes citrus xylem and previous studies showed that this strain is also transferred from plant to plant by B. xanthopis (Insecta), suggesting that this endophytic bacterium may interact with X. fastidiosa in planta and inside the insect vector during co-transmission by the same insect vector. To better understand the X. fastidiosa behavior in the presence of M. mesophilicum, we evaluated the X. fastidiosa transcriptional profile during in vitro interaction with M. mesophilicum SR1.6/6. The results showed that during co-cultivation, X. fastidiosa down-regulated genes related to growth and up-regulated genes related to energy production, stress, transport, and motility, suggesting the existence of a specific adaptive response to the presence of M. mesophilicum in the culture medium. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Functional and structural studies of the disulfide isomerase DsbC from the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa reveals a redox-dependent oligomeric modulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Clelton A; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Trivella, Daniela B B; Beloti, Lilian L; Schneider, Dilaine R S; Saraiva, Antonio M; Crucello, Aline; Azzoni, Adriano R; Souza, Alessandra A; Aparicio, Ricardo; Souza, Anete P

    2012-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that grows as a biofilm inside the xylem vessels of susceptible plants and causes several economically relevant crop diseases. In the present study, we report the functional and low-resolution structural characterization of the X. fastidiosa disulfide isomerase DsbC (XfDsbC). DsbC is part of the disulfide bond reduction/isomerization pathway in the bacterial periplasm and plays an important role in oxidative protein folding. In the present study, we demonstrate the presence of XfDsbC during different stages of X. fastidiosa biofilm development. XfDsbC was not detected during X. fastidiosa planktonic growth; however, after administering a sublethal copper shock, we observed an overexpression of XfDsbC that also occurred during planktonic growth. These results suggest that X. fastidiosa can use XfDsbC in vivo under oxidative stress conditions similar to those induced by copper. In addition, using dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering, we observed that the oligomeric state of XfDsbC in vitro may be dependent on the redox environment. Under reducing conditions, XfDsbC is present as a dimer, whereas a putative tetrameric form was observed under nonreducing conditions. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the overexpression of XfDsbC during biofilm formation and provide the first structural model of a bacterial disulfide isomerase in solution. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  4. Functional and Evolutionary Characterization of a UDP-Xylose Synthase Gene from the Plant Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, Involved in the Synthesis of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide.

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    Alencar, Valquíria Campos; Jabes, Daniela Leite; Menegidio, Fabiano Bezerra; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; de Souza, Lucas Rodrigo; Puzer, Luciano; Meneghetti, Maria Cecília Zorél; Lima, Marcelo Andrade; Tersariol, Ivarne Luis Dos Santos; de Oliveira, Regina Costa; Nunes, Luiz R

    2017-02-07

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-infecting bacillus, responsible for many important crop diseases, such as Pierce's disease of vineyards, citrus variegated chlorosis, and coffee leaf scorch (CLS), among others. Recent genomic comparisons involving two CLS-related strains, belonging to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca, revealed that one of them carries a frameshift mutation that inactivates a gene encoding an oxidoreductase of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily, which may play important roles in determining structural variations in bacterial glycans and glycoconjugates. However, the exact nature of this SDR has been a matter of controversy, as different annotations of X. fastidiosa genomes have implicated it in distinct reactions. To confirm the nature of this mutated SDR, a comparative analysis was initially performed, suggesting that it belongs to a subgroup of SDR decarboxylases, representing a UDP-xylose synthase (Uxs). Functional assays, using a recombinant derivative of this enzyme, confirmed its nature as XfUxs, and carbohydrate composition analyses, performed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules obtained from different strains, indicate that inactivation of the X. fastidiosa uxs gene affects the LPS structure among CLS-related X. fastidiosa strains. Finally, a comparative sequence analysis suggests that this mutation is likely to result in a morphological and evolutionary hallmark that differentiates two subgroups of CLS-related strains, which may influence interactions between these bacteria and their plant and/or insect hosts.

  5. Characterization of the Xylella fastidiosa PD1671 gene encoding degenerate c-di-GMP GGDEF/EAL domains, and its role in the development of Pierce's disease.

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    Cursino, Luciana; Athinuwat, Dusit; Patel, Kelly R; Galvani, Cheryl D; Zaini, Paulo A; Li, Yaxin; De La Fuente, Leonardo; Hoch, Harvey C; Burr, Thomas J; Mowery, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an important phytopathogenic bacterium that causes many serious plant diseases including Pierce's disease of grapevines. X. fastidiosa is thought to induce disease by colonizing and clogging xylem vessels through the formation of cell aggregates and bacterial biofilms. Here we examine the role in X. fastidiosa virulence of an uncharacterized gene, PD1671, annotated as a two-component response regulator with potential GGDEF and EAL domains. GGDEF domains are found in c-di-GMP diguanylate cyclases while EAL domains are found in phosphodiesterases, and these domains are for c-di-GMP production and turnover, respectively. Functional analysis of the PD1671 gene revealed that it affected multiple X. fastidiosa virulence-related phenotypes. A Tn5 PD1671 mutant had a hypervirulent phenotype in grapevines presumably due to enhanced expression of gum genes leading to increased exopolysaccharide levels that resulted in elevated biofilm formation. Interestingly, the PD1671 mutant also had decreased motility in vitro but did not show a reduced distribution in grapevines following inoculation. Given these responses, the putative PD1671 protein may be a negative regulator of X. fastidiosa virulence.

  6. Characterization of the Xylella fastidiosa PD1671 gene encoding degenerate c-di-GMP GGDEF/EAL domains, and its role in the development of Pierce's disease.

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    Luciana Cursino

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is an important phytopathogenic bacterium that causes many serious plant diseases including Pierce's disease of grapevines. X. fastidiosa is thought to induce disease by colonizing and clogging xylem vessels through the formation of cell aggregates and bacterial biofilms. Here we examine the role in X. fastidiosa virulence of an uncharacterized gene, PD1671, annotated as a two-component response regulator with potential GGDEF and EAL domains. GGDEF domains are found in c-di-GMP diguanylate cyclases while EAL domains are found in phosphodiesterases, and these domains are for c-di-GMP production and turnover, respectively. Functional analysis of the PD1671 gene revealed that it affected multiple X. fastidiosa virulence-related phenotypes. A Tn5 PD1671 mutant had a hypervirulent phenotype in grapevines presumably due to enhanced expression of gum genes leading to increased exopolysaccharide levels that resulted in elevated biofilm formation. Interestingly, the PD1671 mutant also had decreased motility in vitro but did not show a reduced distribution in grapevines following inoculation. Given these responses, the putative PD1671 protein may be a negative regulator of X. fastidiosa virulence.

  7. The Major Outer Membrane Protein MopB Is Required for Twitching Movement and Affects Biofilm Formation and Virulence in Two Xylella fastidiosa strains.

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    Chen, Hongyu; Kandel, Prem P; Cruz, Luisa F; Cobine, Paul A; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2017-11-01

    MopB is a major outer membrane protein (OMP) in Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterial plant pathogen that causes losses on many economically important crops. Based on in silico analysis, the uncharacterized MopB protein of X. fastidiosa contains a β-barrel structure with an OmpA-like domain and a predicted calcium-binding motif. Here, MopB function was studied by mutational analysis taking advantage of the natural competence of X. fastidiosa. Mutants of mopB were constructed in two different X. fastidiosa strains, the type strain Temecula and the more virulent WM1-1. Deletion of the mopB gene impaired cell-to-cell aggregation, surface attachment, and biofilm formation in both strains. Interestingly, mopB deletion completely abolished twitching motility. Electron microscopy of the bacterial cell surface revealed that mopB deletion eliminated type IV and type I pili formation, potentially caused by destabilization of the outer membrane. Both mopB mutants showed reduced virulence using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) as a host under greenhouse conditions. These results suggest that MopB has pleiotropic functions in biofilm formation and twitching motility and is important for virulence of X. fastidiosa.

  8. Carbohydrate metabolism of Xylella fastidiosa: Detection of glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathway enzymes and cloning and expression of the enolase gene

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    Facincani Agda Paula

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the functionality of the glycolytic pathways in the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. To this effect, the enzymes phosphoglucose isomerase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase of the glycolytic pathway, and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway were studied, followed by cloning and expression studies of the enolase gene and determination of its activity. These studies showed that X. fastidiosa does not use the glycolytic pathway to metabolize carbohydrates, which explains the increased duplication time of this phytopatogen. Recombinant enolase was expressed as inclusion bodies and solubilized with urea (most efficient extractor, Triton X-100, and TCA. Enolase extracted from X. fastidiosa and from chicken muscle and liver is irreversibly inactivated by urea. The purification of enolase was partial and resulted in a low yield. No enzymatic activity was detected for either recombinant and native enolases, aldolase, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting that X. fastidiosa uses the Entner-Doudoroff pathway to produce pyruvate. Evidence is presented supporting the idea that the regulation of genes and the presence of isoforms with regulation patterns might make it difficult to understand the metabolism of carbohydrates in X. fastidiosa.

  9. Recent evolutionary radiation and host plant specialization in the Xylella fastidiosa subspecies native to the United States.

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    Nunney, Leonard; Vickerman, Danel B; Bromley, Robin E; Russell, Stephanie A; Hartman, John R; Morano, Lisa D; Stouthamer, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The bacterial pathogen, Xylella fastidiosa, infects many plant species in the Americas, making it a good model for investigating the genetics of host adaptation. We used multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to identify isolates of the native U.S. subsp. multiplex that were largely unaffected by intersubspecific homologous recombination (IHR) and to investigate how their evolutionary history influences plant host specialization. We identified 110 "non-IHR" isolates, 2 minimally recombinant "intermediate" ones (including the subspecific type), and 31 with extensive IHR. The non-IHR and intermediate isolates defined 23 sequence types (STs) which we used to identify 22 plant hosts (73% trees) characteristic of the subspecies. Except for almond, subsp. multiplex showed no host overlap with the introduced subspecies (subspecies fastidiosa and sandyi). MLST sequences revealed that subsp. multiplex underwent recent radiation (<25% of subspecies age) which included only limited intrasubspecific recombination (ρ/θ = 0.02); only one isolated lineage (ST50 from ash) was older. A total of 20 of the STs grouped into three loose phylogenetic clusters distinguished by nonoverlapping hosts (excepting purple leaf plum): "almond," "peach," and "oak" types. These host differences were not geographical, since all three types also occurred in California. ST designation was a good indicator of host specialization. ST09, widespread in the southeastern United States, only infected oak species, and all peach isolates were ST10 (from California, Florida, and Georgia). Only ST23 had a broad host range. Hosts of related genotypes were sometimes related, but often host groupings crossed plant family or even order, suggesting that phylogenetically plastic features of hosts affect bacterial pathogenicity.

  10. Chemical characterization of Citrus sinensis grafted on C. limonia and the effect of some isolated compounds on the growth of Xylella fastidiosa.

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    Ribeiro, Alan Bezerra; Abdelnur, Patrícia Verardi; Garcia, Cleverson Fernando; Belini, Adriana; Severino, Vanessa G Pasqualotto; da Silva, M Fátima das G F; Fernandes, João B; Vieira, Paulo C; de Carvalho, Sérgio A; de Souza, Alessandra A; Machado, Marcos A

    2008-09-10

    Citrus sinensis grafted on C. limonia produces a considerable number of compounds that are not common in both plants developed from germination of seeds. The chemical profile of scion and rootstock differ notably for absence in the form of flavonoids and coumarins containing C5 prenyl groups attached to the carbon atoms of aromatic and heterocyclic systems or to oxygen. Only linear pyranocoumarins xanthyletin and xanthoxyletin were found in scion. This observation indicates that the prenylated compounds once biosynthesized in the roots could have been translocated to other organs. Xylella fastidiosa colonizes the xylem of plants causing diseases on several economically important crops such as citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC). A number of flavonoids, coumarins, alkaloids, dihydrocinnamic acid derivative, anacardic acid, triterpenes, and limonoids were tested for in vitro activity on the growth of Xylella fastidiosa. Azadirachtin A was the most active. Hesperidin, which occurs in great amounts in cells of the mesophyll of the affected leaves with CVC, showed a moderate activity suggesting that it can act as a good barrier for small-size colonies from X. fastidiosa.

  11. Detection of siderophores in endophytic bacteria Methylobacterium spp. associated with Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca Detecção de sideróforos nas bactérias endofíticas Methylobacterium spp. associadas com Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Teixeira Lacava; Maria Estela Silva-Stenico; Welington Luiz Araújo; Ana Valéria Colnaghi Simionato; Emanuel Carrilho; Siu Mui Tsai; João Lúcio Azevedo

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the production of siderophores by endophytic bacteria Methylobacterium spp., which occupy the same ecological niche as Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca (Xfp) in citrus plants. The siderophore production of Methylobacterium strains was tested according to chromeazurol agar assay test (CAS), Csáky test (hydroxamate-type) and Arnow test (catechol-type). In addition, the ability of Xfp to use siderophores, in vitro, produced by endophytic bacteria as source ...

  12. Analysis of the genome-wide variations among multiple strains of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa

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    Walker M Andrew

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative, xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is responsible for causing economically important diseases in grapevine, citrus and many other plant species. Despite its economic impact, relatively little is known about the genomic variations among strains isolated from different hosts and their influence on the population genetics of this pathogen. With the availability of genome sequence information for four strains, it is now possible to perform genome-wide analyses to identify and categorize such DNA variations and to understand their influence on strain functional divergence. Results There are 1,579 genes and 194 non-coding homologous sequences present in the genomes of all four strains, representing a 76. 2% conservation of the sequenced genome. About 60% of the X. fastidiosa unique sequences exist as tandem gene clusters of 6 or more genes. Multiple alignments identified 12,754 SNPs and 14,449 INDELs in the 1528 common genes and 20,779 SNPs and 10,075 INDELs in the 194 non-coding sequences. The average SNP frequency was 1.08 × 10-2 per base pair of DNA and the average INDEL frequency was 2.06 × 10-2 per base pair of DNA. On an average, 60.33% of the SNPs were synonymous type while 39.67% were non-synonymous type. The mutation frequency, primarily in the form of external INDELs was the main type of sequence variation. The relative similarity between the strains was discussed according to the INDEL and SNP differences. The number of genes unique to each strain were 60 (9a5c, 54 (Dixon, 83 (Ann1 and 9 (Temecula-1. A sub-set of the strain specific genes showed significant differences in terms of their codon usage and GC composition from the native genes suggesting their xenologous origin. Tandem repeat analysis of the genomic sequences of the four strains identified associations of repeat sequences with hypothetical and phage related functions. Conclusion INDELs and strain specific genes

  13. The DinJ/RelE Toxin-Antitoxin System Suppresses Bacterial Proliferation and Virulence of Xylella fastidiosa in Grapevine.

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    Burbank, Lindsey P; Stenger, Drake C

    2017-04-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce's disease of grapes, is a slow-growing, xylem-limited, bacterial pathogen. Disease progression is characterized by systemic spread of the bacterium through xylem vessel networks, causing leaf-scorching symptoms, senescence, and vine decline. It appears to be advantageous to this pathogen to avoid excessive blockage of xylem vessels, because living bacterial cells are generally found in plant tissue with low bacterial cell density and minimal scorching symptoms. The DinJ/RelE toxin-antitoxin system is characterized here for a role in controlling bacterial proliferation and population size during plant colonization. The DinJ/RelE locus is transcribed from two separate promoters, allowing for coexpression of antitoxin DinJ with endoribonuclease toxin RelE, in addition to independent expression of RelE. The ratio of antitoxin/toxin expressed is dependent on bacterial growth conditions, with lower amounts of antitoxin present under conditions designed to mimic grapevine xylem sap. A knockout mutant of DinJ/RelE exhibits a hypervirulent phenotype, with higher bacterial populations and increased symptom development and plant decline. It is likely that DinJ/RelE acts to prevent excessive population growth, contributing to the ability of the pathogen to spread systemically without completely blocking the xylem vessels and increasing probability of acquisition by the insect vector.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis Provides Evidence on the Genetic Relatedness of the Emergent Xylella fastidiosa Genotype in Italy to Isolates from Central America.

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    Giampetruzzi, Annalisa; Saponari, Maria; Loconsole, Giuliana; Boscia, Donato; Savino, Vito Nicola; Almeida, Rodrigo P P; Zicca, Stefania; Landa, Blanca B; Chacón-Diaz, Carlos; Saldarelli, Pasquale

    2017-07-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-pathogenic bacterium recently introduced in Europe that is causing decline in olive trees in the South of Italy. Genetic studies have consistently shown that the bacterial genotype recovered from infected olive trees belongs to the sequence type ST53 within subspecies pauca. This genotype, ST53, has also been reported to occur in Costa Rica. The ancestry of ST53 was recently clarified, showing it contains alleles that are monophyletic with those of subsp. pauca in South America. To more robustly determine the phylogenetic placement of ST53 within X. fastidiosa, we performed a comparative analysis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the study of the pan-genome of the 27 currently public available whole genome sequences of X. fastidiosa. The resulting maximum-parsimony and maximum likelihood trees constructed using the SNPs and the pan-genome analysis are consistent with previously described X. fastidiosa taxonomy, distinguishing the subsp. fastidiosa, multiplex, pauca, sandyi, and morus. Within the subsp. pauca, the Italian and three Costa Rican isolates, all belonging to ST53, formed a compact phylotype in a clade divergent from the South American pauca isolates, also distinct from the recently described coffee isolate CFBP8072 imported into Europe from Ecuador. These findings were also supported by the gene characterization of a conjugative plasmid shared by all the four ST53 isolates. Furthermore, isolates of the ST53 clade possess an exclusive locus encoding a putative ATP-binding protein belonging to the family of histidine kinase-like ATPase gene, which is not present in isolates from the subspecies multiplex, sandyi, and pauca, but was detected in ST21 isolates of the subspecies fastidiosa from Costa Rica. The clustering and distinctiveness of the ST53 isolates supports the hypothesis of their common origin, and the limited genetic diversity among these isolates suggests this is an emerging clade within subsp

  15. Plant water stress effects on stylet probing behaviors of Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) associated with acquisition and inoculation of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

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    Krugner, Rodrigo; Backus, Elaine A

    2014-02-01

    ABSTRACT The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is a xylem fluid-ingesting leafhopper that transmits Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al., a plant-infecting bacterium that causes several plant diseases in the Americas. Although the role of plant water stress on the population density and dispersal ofH. vitripennis has been studied, nothing is known about the effects of plant water stress on the transmission of X. fastidiosa by H. vitripennis. A laboratory study was conducted to determine the influence of plant water stress on the sharpshooter stylet probing behaviors associated with the acquisition and inoculation of X. fastidiosa. Electrical penetration graph was used to monitor H. vitripennis feeding behaviors for 20-h periods on citrus [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] and almond [Prunus dulcis (Miller) D.A. Webb] plants subjected to levels of water stress. Adult H. vitripennis successfully located xylem vessels, then performed behaviors related to the evaluation of the xylem cell and fluid, and finally ingested xylem fluid from citrus and almond plants under the tested fluid tensions ranging from -5.5 to -33.0 bars and -6.0 to -24.5 bars, respectively. In general, long and frequent feeding events associated with the acquisition and inoculation of X. fastidiosa were observed only in fully irrigated plants (i.e., >-10 bars), which suggests that even low levels of plant water stress may reduce the spread of X. fastidiosa. Results provided insights to disease epidemiology and support the hypothesis that application of regulated deficit irrigation has the potential to reduce the incidence of diseases caused by X.fastidiosa by reducing the number of vectors and by decreasing pathogen transmission efficiency.

  16. Specific Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH) Test to Highlight Colonization of Xylem Vessels by Xylella fastidiosa in Naturally Infected Olive Trees (Olea europaea L.)

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    Cardinale, Massimiliano; Luvisi, Andrea; Meyer, Joana B.; Sabella, Erika; De Bellis, Luigi; Cruz, Albert C.; Ampatzidis, Yiannis; Cherubini, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    The colonization behavior of the Xylella fastidiosa strain CoDiRO, the causal agent of olive quick decline syndrome (OQDS), within the xylem of Olea europaea L. is still quite controversial. As previous literature suggests, even if xylem vessel occlusions in naturally infected olive plants were observed, cell aggregation in the formation of occlusions had a minimal role. This observation left some open questions about the whole behavior of the CoDiRO strain and its actual role in OQDS pathogenesis. In order to evaluate the extent of bacterial infection in olive trees and the role of bacterial aggregates in vessel occlusions, we tested a specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe (KO 210) for X. fastidiosa and quantified the level of infection and vessel occlusion in both petioles and branches of naturally infected and non-infected olive trees. All symptomatic petioles showed colonization by X. fastidiosa, especially in the larger innermost vessels. In several cases, the vessels appeared completely occluded by a biofilm containing bacterial cells and extracellular matrix and the frequent colonization of adjacent vessels suggested a horizontal movement of the bacteria. Infected symptomatic trees had 21.6 ± 10.7% of petiole vessels colonized by the pathogen, indicating an irregular distribution in olive tree xylem. Thus, our observations point out the primary role of the pathogen in olive vessel occlusions. Furthermore, our findings indicate that the KO 210 FISH probe is suitable for the specific detection of X. fastidiosa. PMID:29681910

  17. RNA-Seq analysis of Citrus reticulata in the early stages of Xylella fastidiosa infection reveals auxin-related genes as a defense response.

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    Rodrigues, Carolina M; de Souza, Alessandra A; Takita, Marco A; Kishi, Luciano T; Machado, Marcos A

    2013-10-03

    Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), caused by Xylella fastidiosa, is one the most important citrus diseases, and affects all varieties of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb). On the other hand, among the Citrus genus there are different sources of resistance against X. fastidiosa. For these species identifying these defense genes could be an important step towards obtaining sweet orange resistant varieties through breeding or genetic engineering. To assess these genes we made use of mandarin (C. reticulata Blanco) that is known to be resistant to CVC and shares agronomical characteristics with sweet orange. Thus, we investigated the gene expression in Ponkan mandarin at one day after infection with X. fastidiosa, using RNA-seq. A set of genes considered key elements in the resistance was used to confirm its regulation in mandarin compared with the susceptible sweet orange. Gene expression analysis of mock inoculated and infected tissues of Ponkan mandarin identified 667 transcripts repressed and 724 significantly induced in the later. Among the induced transcripts, we identified genes encoding proteins similar to Pattern Recognition Receptors. Furthermore, many genes involved in secondary metabolism, biosynthesis and cell wall modification were upregulated as well as in synthesis of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and auxin. This work demonstrated that the defense response to the perception of bacteria involves cell wall modification and activation of hormone pathways, which probably lead to the induction of other defense-related genes. We also hypothesized the induction of auxin-related genes indicates that resistant plants initially recognize X. fastidiosa as a necrotrophic pathogen.

  18. Development and systematic validation of qPCR assays for rapid and reliable differentiation of Xylella fastidiosa strains causing citrus variegated chlorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbin; Teixeira, Diva C; Hartung, John S; Huang, Qi; Duan, Yongping; Zhou, Lijuan; Chen, Jianchi; Lin, Hong; Lopes, Silvio; Ayres, A Juliano; Levy, Laurene

    2013-01-01

    The xylem-limited, Gram-negative, fastidious plant bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), a destructive disease affecting approximately half of the citrus plantations in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. The disease was recently found in Central America and is threatening the multi-billion U.S. citrus industry. Many strains of X. fastidiosa are pathogens or endophytes in various plants growing in the U.S., and some strains cross infect several host plants. In this study, a TaqMan-based assay targeting the 16S rDNA signature region was developed for the identification of X. fastidiosa at the species level. Another TaqMan-based assay was developed for the specific identification of the CVC strains. Both new assays have been systematically validated in comparison with the primer/probe sets from four previously published assays on one platform and under similar PCR conditions, and shown to be superior. The species specific assay detected all X. fastidiosa strains and did not amplify any other citrus pathogen or endophyte tested. The CVC-specific assay detected all CVC strains but did not amplify any non-CVC X. fastidiosa nor any other citrus pathogen or endophyte evaluated. Both sets were multiplexed with a reliable internal control assay targeting host plant DNA, and their diagnostic specificity and sensitivity remained unchanged. This internal control provides quality assurance for DNA extraction, performance of PCR reagents, platforms and operators. The limit of detection for both assays was equivalent to 2 to 10 cells of X. fastidiosa per reaction for field citrus samples. Petioles and midribs of symptomatic leaves of sweet orange harbored the highest populations of X. fastidiosa, providing the best materials for detection of the pathogen. These new species specific assay will be invaluable for molecular identification of X. fastidiosa at the species level, and the CVC specific assay will be very powerful for the

  19. Monitoramento populacional das cigarrinhas vetoras de Xylella fastidiosa, através de armadilhas adesivas amarelas em pomares comerciais de citros Population monitoring of leafhopper vectors of Xylella fastidiosa, through yellow sticky traps in commercial citrus orchards

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    Rúbia de Oliveira Molina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A Clorose variegada dos citros (CVC é uma doença causada pela bactéria de xilema Xylella fastidiosa Wells. A disseminação ocorre por meio de insetos vetores pertencente à ordem Hemiptera, família Cicadellidae (subfamília Cicadellinae, os quais transmitem a bactéria depois de se alimentarem em plantas contaminadas. Neste trabalho, objetivou-se identificar e monitorar as espécies de cigarrinhas vetoras em um pomar comercial no município de Paranavaí, Paraná. O experimento foi realizado em um talhão comercial de laranja doce (Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck, variedade Pera, com 1.000 plantas de dez anos de idade. A amostragem foi realizada por meio de armadilhas adesivas amarelas, distribuídas na área periférica e central do pomar, com duas repetições por rua amostrada. As etiquetas foram distribuídas entre a 5ª e 30ª plantas em 10 ruas, totalizando 20 armadilhas que foram renovadas no pomar, a cada trinta dias, durante o período de avaliação que foi entre junho de 2005 e setembro de 2006. As principais espécies de Cicadellinae capturadas foram Acrogonia citrina Marucci & Cavichioli, Dilobopterus costalimai Young e Macugonalia cavifrons Stal. Essas espécies apresentaram ocorrência constante e frequência de 3,97%, 4,2%, 13,0% respectivamente, em relação ao total de cigarrinhas coletadas.Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC is the disease caused by the bacteria Xylella fastidiosa Wells. Dissemination occurs through insect vectors belonging to the order Hemiptera, family Cicadellidae (subfamily Cicadellinae, which transmit the bacteria after feeding on infected plants. The objective of this study was to identify the species of insect vectors in an orchard in the municipality of Paranavaí, in the State of Paraná. The experiment was conducted in a commercial stand of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck, Pêra variety with 1,000 10-year-old plants. Monitoring was performed using yellow sticky traps, distributed in the central

  20. Multilocus sequence typing of Xylella fastidiosa isolated from olive affected by “olive quick decline syndrome” in Italy

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    Toufic ELBEAINO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf in olive trees in southern Italy, the scanty molecular information on this bacterium and its association with the olive quick decline syndrome (OQDS prompted the necessity to isolate and acquire more genetic data on the type of strain present in that region. For the first time, the bacterium was isolated from infected olive on culture media. Genetic information were obtained through genomic comparison with other subspecies or strains. The sequences of thirteen genes from its genome, comprising seven housekeeping genes (leuA, petC, lacF, cysG, holC, nuoL and gltT usually used in multilocus sequence typing (MLST systems, and six genes involved in different biochemical functions (RNA Pol sigma-70 factor, hypothetical protein HL, 16S rRNA, rfbD, nuoN, and pilU, were analyzed. The sequences of the biochemical function genes were explored  individually to study the genetic structure of this bacterium, while the MLST genes were linked together into one concatameric sequence (4161 bp long to increase the resolution of the phylogenetic analysis when compared with Xf strains previously reported. Sequence analyses of single genes showed that the Xf olive strain is distinct from the four previously defined taxons (Xf subsp. fastidiosa, Xf subsp. multiplex, Xf subsp. sandyi and Xf subsp. pauca with a dissimilarity rate that reached 4%. In particular, Xf from olive shared the greatest identity with the strain “9a5c” (subsp. pauca, but was nevertheless distinct from it. Similarly, the MLST based on concatameric sequences confirmed the genetic variance of Xf from olive by generating a novel sequence type profile (ST53. Phylogenetic tree analyses showed that Xf from olive clustered in one clade close to subspecies pauca (strains “9a5c” and “CVC0018”, but was nevertheless distinct from them. These results indicate molecular divergence of this olive bacterium with all other strains yet reported.

  1. Identification of a non-host plant of Xylella fastidiosa to rear healthy sharpshooter vectors Identificação de uma planta não-hospedeira de Xylella fastidiosa para criação de insetos vetores sadios

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    Rosangela Cristina Marucci

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Rearing leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae vectors free of Xylella fastidiosa is a requirement for studies of various aspects of vector-pathogen interactions. The selection of a plant that allows vector development but not bacterial multiplication is desirable to produce healthy vectors. In this study, two leafhopper hosts, Vernonia condensata ('boldo' and Aloysia virgata ('lixeira' were needle inoculated with citrus and coffee strains of X. fastidiosa to evaluate if these plants support pathogen colonization. The inoculated plants did not present symptoms and the pathogen was not detected by culture and PCR tests, neither soon after inoculation (7-14 days nor later, at 1, 4, 6 and 12 months after inoculation. To obtain healthy adults of the leafhopper vectors Acrogonia citrina, Bucephalogonia xanthophis, Dilobopterus costalimai, Homalodisca ignorata and Oncometopia facialis, early-instar nymphs were reared on V. condensata. X. fastidiosa was not detected in any of 175 adults obtained. V. condensata and A. virgata are nonpropagative hosts of X. fastidiosa and enable the production of healthy leafhoppers for vector studies.A obtenção de cigarrinhas (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae livres de Xylella fastidiosa é importante para estudos de interação entre essa bactéria e seus vetores, sendo desejável a seleção de uma planta que permita a criação desses insetos, mas não a multiplicação da bactéria. Neste estudo, duas plantas hospedeiras de cigarrinhas, Vernonia condensata (boldo e Aloysia virgata (lixeira, foram inoculadas por agulha com as estirpes de citros e de cafeeiro de X. fastidiosa, para avaliar a possibilidade deste patógeno colonizá-las. Não foram observados sintomas, nem se detectou a bactéria por isolamento em meio de cultura e/ou PCR em períodos curtos (7 e 14 dias ou longos (1, 4, 6 e 12 meses após a inoculação. Para obtenção de adultos sadios das cigarrinhas vetoras, Acrogonia citrina, Bucephalogonia xanthophis

  2. Directed evolution induces tributyrin hydrolysis in a virulence factor of Xylella fastidiosa using a duplicated gene as a template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouran, Hossein; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rao, Basuthkar J; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya

    2014-01-01

    Duplication of genes is one of the preferred ways for natural selection to add advantageous functionality to the genome without having to reinvent the wheel with respect to catalytic efficiency and protein stability. The duplicated secretory virulence factors of Xylella fastidiosa (LesA, LesB and LesC), implicated in Pierce's disease of grape and citrus variegated chlorosis of citrus species, epitomizes the positive selection pressures exerted on advantageous genes in such pathogens. A deeper insight into the evolution of these lipases/esterases is essential to develop resistance mechanisms in transgenic plants. Directed evolution, an attempt to accelerate the evolutionary steps in the laboratory, is inherently simple when targeted for loss of function. A bigger challenge is to specify mutations that endow a new function, such as a lost functionality in a duplicated gene. Previously, we have proposed a method for enumerating candidates for mutations intended to transfer the functionality of one protein into another related protein based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the active site residues (DECAAF). In the current work, we present in vivo validation of DECAAF by inducing tributyrin hydrolysis in LesB based on the active site similarity to LesA. The structures of these proteins have been modeled using RaptorX based on the closely related LipA protein from Xanthomonas oryzae. These mutations replicate the spatial and electrostatic conformation of LesA in the modeled structure of the mutant LesB as well, providing in silico validation before proceeding to the laborious in vivo work. Such focused mutations allows one to dissect the relevance of the duplicated genes in finer detail as compared to gene knockouts, since they do not interfere with other moonlighting functions, protein expression levels or protein-protein interaction.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of the grape cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene CYP736B expression in response to Xylella fastidiosa infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker M Andrew

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP mediate synthesis and metabolism of many physiologically important primary and secondary compounds that are related to plant defense against a range of pathogenic microbes and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to Xylella fastidiosa (Xf infection, we investigated expression and regulatory mechanisms of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene in both disease resistant and susceptible grapevines. Results Cloning of genomic DNA and cDNA revealed that the CYP736B gene was composed of two exons and one intron with GT as a donor site and AG as an acceptor site. CYP736B transcript was up-regulated in PD-resistant plants and down-regulated in PD-susceptible plants 6 weeks after Xf inoculation. However, CYP736B expression was very low in stem tissues at all evaluated time points. 5'RACE and 3'RACE sequence analyses revealed that there were three candidate transcription start sites (TSS in the upstream region and three candidate polyadenylation (PolyA sites in the downstream region of CYP736B. Usage frequencies of each transcription initiation site and each polyadenylation site varied depending on plant genotype, developmental stage, tissue, and treatment. These results demonstrate that expression of CYP736B is regulated developmentally and in response to Xf infection at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Multiple transcription start and polyadenylation sites contribute to regulation of CYP736B expression. Conclusions This report provides evidence that the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene is involved in defense response at a specific stage of Xf infection in grapevines; multiple transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites exist for CYP736B in grapevine; and coordinative and selective use of transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites play an important role in regulation of CYP736B expression

  4. Grapevine rootstock effects on scion sap phenolic levels, resistance to Xylella fastidiosa infection, and progression of Pierce’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Michael Wallis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf causes Pierce’s disease (PD, an important disease of grapevine, Vitis vinifera L.. Grapevine rootstocks were developed to provide increased resistance to root disease, but rootstock effects on cane and vine diseases remain unclear. Grapevines that consisted of Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay grafted to 13 different rootstocks were inoculated with Xf and evaluated for PD severity and Xf titer after six months. A subset of six rootstock/scion combinations had xylem sap phenolic levels assessed in non-infected and Xf-infected grapevines. Vigor also was analyzed by measuring root lengths and masses. Cabernet Sauvignon grafted to 101-14MG, 1103P, 420A, or Schwarzmann had reduced PD severity compared to Cabernet Sauvignon grafted to 110R, 5BB, or SO4. Chardonnay grafted to Salt Creek or Freedom had reduced PD severity compared to Chardonnay grafted to RS3 or Schwarzmann. Chardonnay grafted to RS3 had greater Xf titer than Chardonnay grafted to 101-14MG, Freedom, or Salt Creek. No other differences in Xf titer among rootstocks were observed. Of the six scion/rootstock combinations which had xylem sap phenolics analyzed, Chardonnay/ RS3 had the highest levels of most phenolics whereas Cabernet Sauvignon/101-14MG had the lowest phenolic levels. However, Chardonnay/101-14MG, which had mild PD symptoms, had greater sap levels of caftaric acid than other scion/rootstock combinations. Sap levels of caftaric acid, methyl salicylate, a procyanidin trimer, and quinic acid were greater in Xf-infected versus non-infected grapevines. Chardonnay on 101-14MG or Salt Creek had greater root mass than Chardonnay on RS3. Cabernet Sauvignon on 101-14MG had greater root mass than Cabernet Sauvignon on 110R. These results identified rootstocks with the capacity for reducing PD symptom progression. Rootstocks also were shown to affect Xf titer, xylem sap phenolic levels, and plant vigor.

  5. DNA microarray-based genome comparison of a pathogenic and a nonpathogenic strain of Xylella fastidiosa delineates genes important for bacterial virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Tie; Zaini, Paulo A; Moreira, Leandro M; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N; Matsukuma, Adriana Y; Durham, Alan M; Teixeira, Diva C; El-Dorry, Hamza; Monteiro, Patrícia B; da Silva, Ana Claudia R; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; da Silva, Aline M; Gomes, Suely L

    2004-08-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes serious diseases in a wide range of economically important crops. Despite extensive comparative analyses of genome sequences of Xylella pathogenic strains from different plant hosts, nonpathogenic strains have not been studied. In this report, we show that X. fastidiosa strain J1a12, associated with citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), is nonpathogenic when injected into citrus and tobacco plants. Furthermore, a DNA microarray-based comparison of J1a12 with 9a5c, a CVC strain that is highly pathogenic and had its genome completely sequenced, revealed that 14 coding sequences of strain 9a5c are absent or highly divergent in strain J1a12. Among them, we found an arginase and a fimbrial adhesin precursor of type III pilus, which were confirmed to be absent in the nonpathogenic strain by PCR and DNA sequencing. The absence of arginase can be correlated to the inability of J1a12 to multiply in host plants. This enzyme has been recently shown to act as a bacterial survival mechanism by down-regulating host nitric oxide production. The lack of the adhesin precursor gene is in accordance with the less aggregated phenotype observed for J1a12 cells growing in vitro. Thus, the absence of both genes can be associated with the failure of the J1a12 strain to establish and spread in citrus and tobacco plants. These results provide the first detailed comparison between a nonpathogenic strain and a pathogenic strain of X. fastidiosa, constituting an important step towards understanding the molecular basis of the disease.

  6. The MqsRA Toxin-Antitoxin System from Xylella fastidiosa Plays a Key Role in Bacterial Fitness, Pathogenicity, and Persister Cell Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merfa, Marcus V.; Niza, Bárbara; Takita, Marco A.; De Souza, Alessandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Through the formation of persister cells, bacteria exhibit tolerance to multidrug and other environmental stresses without undergoing genetic changes. The toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are involved in the formation of persister cells because they are able to induce cell dormancy. Among the TA systems, the MqsRA system has been observed to be highly induced in persister cells of Xylella fastidiosa (causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis—CVC) activated by copper stress, and has been described in Escherichia coli as related to the formation of persister cells and biofilms. Thus, we evaluated the role of this TA system in X. fastidiosa by overexpressing the MqsR toxin, and verified that the toxin positively regulated biofilm formation and negatively cell movement, resulting in reduced pathogenicity in citrus plants. The overexpression of MqsR also increased the formation of persister cells under copper stress. Analysis of the gene and protein expression showed that this system likely has an autoregulation mechanism to express the toxin and antitoxin in the most beneficial ratio for the cell to oppose stress. Our results suggest that this TA system plays a key role in the adaptation and survival of X. fastidiosa and reveal new insights into the physiology of phytopathogen-host interactions. PMID:27375608

  7. Global expression profile of biofilm resistance to antimicrobial compounds in the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa reveals evidence of persister cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Lígia S; Takita, Marco A; Olivato, Jacqueline C; Kishi, Luciano T; de Souza, Alessandra A

    2012-09-01

    Investigations of biofilm resistance response rarely focus on plant-pathogenic bacteria. Since Xylella fastidiosa is a multihost plant-pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilm in the xylem, the behavior of its biofilm in response to antimicrobial compounds needs to be better investigated. We analyzed here the transcriptional profile of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in response to inhibitory and subinhibitory concentrations of copper and tetracycline. Copper-based products are routinely used to control citrus diseases in the field, while antibiotics are more widely used for bacterial control in mammals. The use of antimicrobial compounds triggers specific responses to each compound, such as biofilm formation and phage activity for copper. Common changes in expression responses comprise the repression of genes associated with metabolic functions and movement and the induction of toxin-antitoxin systems, which have been associated with the formation of persister cells. Our results also show that these cells were found in the population at a ca. 0.05% density under inhibitory conditions for both antimicrobial compounds and that pretreatment with subinhibitory concentration of copper increases this number. No previous report has detected the presence of these cells in X. fastidiosa population, suggesting that this could lead to a multidrug tolerance response in the biofilm under a stressed environment. This is a mechanism that has recently become the focus of studies on resistance of human-pathogenic bacteria to antibiotics and, based on our data, it seems to be more broadly applicable.

  8. Characterization of the TolB-Pal trans-envelope complex from Xylella fastidiosa reveals a dynamic and coordinated protein expression profile during the biofilm development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Clelton A; Janissen, Richard; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Beloti, Lilian L; Azzoni, Adriano R; Cotta, Monica A; Souza, Anete P

    2015-10-01

    The intriguing roles of the bacterial Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex range from maintenance of cell envelope integrity to potential participation in the process of cell division. In this study, we report the characterization of the XfTolB and XfPal proteins of the Tol-Pal complex of Xylella fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa is a major plant pathogen that forms biofilms inside xylem vessels, triggering the development of diseases in important cultivable plants around the word. Based on functional complementation experiments in Escherichia coli tolB and pal mutant strains, we confirmed the role of xftolB and xfpal in outer membrane integrity. In addition, we observed a dynamic and coordinated protein expression profile during the X. fastidiosa biofilm development process. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), the low-resolution structure of the isolated XfTolB-XfPal complex in solution was solved for the first time. Finally, the localization of the XfTolB and XfPal polar ends was visualized via immunofluorescence labeling in vivo during bacterial cell growth. Our results highlight the major role of the components of the cell envelope, particularly the TolB-Pal complex, during the different phases of bacterial biofilm development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of a response regulator involved in surface attachment, cell-cell aggregation, exopolysaccharide production and virulence in the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegel, Tanja M; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Cheng, Davis W; Lin, Hong; Stenger, Drake C; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C; Roper, M Caroline

    2013-04-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce's disease of grapevine, possesses several two-component signal transduction systems that allow the bacterium to sense and respond to changes in its environment. Signals are perceived by sensor kinases that autophosphorylate and transfer the phosphate to response regulators (RRs), which direct an output response, usually by acting as transcriptional regulators. In the X. fastidiosa genome, 19 RRs were found. A site-directed knockout mutant in one unusual RR, designated XhpT, composed of a receiver domain and a histidine phosphotransferase output domain, was constructed. The resulting mutant strain was analysed for changes in phenotypic traits related to biofilm formation and gene expression using microarray analysis. We found that the xhpT mutant was altered in surface attachment, cell-cell aggregation, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production and virulence in grapevine. In addition, this mutant had an altered transcriptional profile when compared with wild-type X. fastidiosa in genes for several biofilm-related traits, such as EPS production and haemagglutinin adhesins. © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  10. Ectopic Expression of Xylella fastidiosa rpfF Conferring Production of Diffusible Signal Factor in Transgenic Tobacco and Citrus Alters Pathogen Behavior and Reduces Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, R; Souza-Neto, R R; Takita, M A; Lindow, S E; De Souza, A A

    2017-11-01

    The pathogenicity of Xylella fastidiosa is associated with its ability to colonize the xylem of host plants. Expression of genes contributing to xylem colonization are suppressed, while those necessary for insect vector acquisition are increased with increasing concentrations of diffusible signal factor (DSF), whose production is dependent on RpfF. We previously demonstrated that transgenic citrus plants ectopically expressing rpfF from a citrus strain of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca exhibited less susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, another pathogen whose virulence is modulated by DSF accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of rpfF in both transgenic tobacco and sweet orange also confers a reduction in disease severity incited by X. fastidiosa and reduces its colonization of those plants. Decreased disease severity in the transgenic plants was generally associated with increased expression of genes conferring adhesiveness to the pathogen and decreased expression of genes necessary for active motility, accounting for the reduced population sizes achieved in the plants, apparently by limiting pathogen dispersal through the plant. Plant-derived DSF signal molecules in a host plant can, therefore, be exploited to interfere with more than one pathogen whose virulence is controlled by DSF signaling.

  11. The chemotaxis regulator pilG of Xylella fastidiosa is required for virulence in Vitis vinifera grapevines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type IV pili of X. fastidiosa are regulated by pilG, a response regulator protein putatively involved in chemotaxis-like operon sensing stimuli through signal transduction pathways. To elucidate roles of pilG in pathogenicity of X. fastidiosa, the pilG-deletion mutant and complementary strain contai...

  12. A rhamnose-rich O-antigen mediates adhesion, virulence, and host colonization for the xylem-limited phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jennifer C; Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Roper, M Caroline

    2013-06-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterium that causes a lethal disease of grapevine called Pierce's disease. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composes approximately 75% of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria and, because it is largely displayed on the cell surface, it mediates interactions between the bacterial cell and its surrounding environment. LPS is composed of a conserved lipid A-core oligosaccharide component and a variable O-antigen portion. By targeting a key O-antigen biosynthetic gene, we demonstrate the contribution of the rhamnose-rich O-antigen to surface attachment, cell-cell aggregation, and biofilm maturation: critical steps for successful infection of the host xylem tissue. Moreover, we have demonstrated that a fully formed O-antigen moiety is an important virulence factor for Pierce's disease development in grape and that depletion of the O-antigen compromises its ability to colonize the host. It has long been speculated that cell-surface polysaccharides play a role in X. fastidiosa virulence and this study confirms that LPS is a major virulence factor for this important agricultural pathogen.

  13. N-Acetylcysteine in Agriculture, a Novel Use for an Old Molecule: Focus on Controlling the Plant–Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Lígia S.; Giorgiano, Thais E.; Takita, Marco A.; Forim, Moacir R.; Silva, Luis F. C.; Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D.; Machado, Marcos A.; de Souza, Alessandra A.

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen bacterium that causes diseases in many different crops. In citrus, it causes Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC). The mechanism of pathogenicity of this bacterium is associated with its capacity to colonize and form a biofilm in the xylem vessels of host plants, and there is not yet any method to directly reduce populations of this pathogen in the field. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), a cysteine analogue used mainly to treat human diseases, on X. fastidiosa in different experimental conditions. Concentrations of NAC over 1 mg/mL reduced bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces, biofilm formation and the amount of exopolysaccharides (EPS). The minimal inhibitory concentration of NAC was 6 mg/mL. NAC was supplied to X. fastidiosa-infected plants in hydroponics, fertigation, and adsorbed to organic fertilizer (NAC-Fertilizer). HPLC analysis indicated that plants absorbed NAC at concentrations of 0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL but not at 6 mg/mL. Sweet orange plants with CVC symptoms treated with NAC (0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL) in hydroponics showed clear symptom remission and reduction in bacterial population, as analyzed by quantitative PCR and bacterial isolation. Experiments using fertigation and NAC-Fertilizer were done to simulate a condition closer to that normally is used in the field. For both, significant symptom remission and a reduced bacterial growth rate were observed. Using NAC-Fertilizer the lag for resurgence of symptoms on leaves after interruption of the treatment increased to around eight months. This is the first report of the anti-bacterial effect of NAC against a phytopathogenic bacterium. The results obtained in this work together with the characteristics of this molecule indicate that the use of NAC in agriculture might be a new and sustainable strategy for controlling plant pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24009716

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of BigR, a transcription repressor from Xylella fastidiosa involved in biofilm formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Rosicler Lázaro; Rinaldi, Fábio Cupri; Guimarães, Beatriz Gomes; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. BigR (biofilm growth-associated repressor) is a novel repressor protein that regulates the transcription of an operon implicated in biofilm growth in both Xylella fastidiosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This protein binds to a palindromic TA-rich element located in the promoter of the BigR operon and strongly represses transcription of the operon. BigR contains a helix–turn–helix (HTH) domain that is found in some members of the ArsR/SmtB family of metal sensors, which control metal resistance in bacteria. Although functional studies have suggested that BigR does not act as a metal sensor, the presence of two cysteines and a methionine in its primary structure raised the possibility of BigR being a metal-ligand protein. In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from native and SeMet crystals to resolutions of 1.95 and 2.2 Å, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group P321 and contain one molecule per asymmetric unit

  15. N-acetylcysteine in agriculture, a novel use for an old molecule: focus on controlling the plant-pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Lígia S; Giorgiano, Thais E; Takita, Marco A; Forim, Moacir R; Silva, Luis F C; Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D; Machado, Marcos A; de Souza, Alessandra A

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen bacterium that causes diseases in many different crops. In citrus, it causes Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC). The mechanism of pathogenicity of this bacterium is associated with its capacity to colonize and form a biofilm in the xylem vessels of host plants, and there is not yet any method to directly reduce populations of this pathogen in the field. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), a cysteine analogue used mainly to treat human diseases, on X. fastidiosa in different experimental conditions. Concentrations of NAC over 1 mg/mL reduced bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces, biofilm formation and the amount of exopolysaccharides (EPS). The minimal inhibitory concentration of NAC was 6 mg/mL. NAC was supplied to X. fastidiosa-infected plants in hydroponics, fertigation, and adsorbed to organic fertilizer (NAC-Fertilizer). HPLC analysis indicated that plants absorbed NAC at concentrations of 0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL but not at 6 mg/mL. Sweet orange plants with CVC symptoms treated with NAC (0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL) in hydroponics showed clear symptom remission and reduction in bacterial population, as analyzed by quantitative PCR and bacterial isolation. Experiments using fertigation and NAC-Fertilizer were done to simulate a condition closer to that normally is used in the field. For both, significant symptom remission and a reduced bacterial growth rate were observed. Using NAC-Fertilizer the lag for resurgence of symptoms on leaves after interruption of the treatment increased to around eight months. This is the first report of the anti-bacterial effect of NAC against a phytopathogenic bacterium. The results obtained in this work together with the characteristics of this molecule indicate that the use of NAC in agriculture might be a new and sustainable strategy for controlling plant pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Sequence/structural analysis of xylem proteome emphasizes pathogenesis-related proteins, chitinases and β-1, 3-glucanases as key players in grapevine defense against Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of various plant diseases including Pierce’s disease in the US, and Citrus Variegated Chlorosis in Brazil, remains a continual source of concern and economic losses, especially since almost all commercial varieties are sensitive to this Gammaproteobacteria. Differential expression of proteins in infected tissue is an established methodology to identify key elements involved in plant defense pathways. Methods. In the current work, we developed a methodology named CHURNER that emphasizes relevant protein functions from proteomic data, based on identification of proteins with similar structures that do not necessarily have sequence homology. Such clustering emphasizes protein functions which have multiple copies that are up/down-regulated, and highlights similar proteins which are differentially regulated. As a working example we present proteomic data enumerating differentially expressed proteins in xylem sap from grapevines that were infected with X. fastidiosa. Results. Analysis of this data by CHURNER highlighted pathogenesis related PR-1 proteins, reinforcing this as the foremost protein function in xylem sap involved in the grapevine defense response to X. fastidiosa. β-1, 3-glucanase, which has both anti-microbial and anti-fungal activities, is also up-regulated. Simultaneously, chitinases are found to be both up and down-regulated by CHURNER, and thus the net gain of this protein function loses its significance in the defense response. Discussion. We demonstrate how structural data can be incorporated in the pipeline of proteomic data analysis prior to making inferences on the importance of individual proteins to plant defense mechanisms. We expect CHURNER to be applicable to any proteomic data set.

  17. N-acetylcysteine in agriculture, a novel use for an old molecule: focus on controlling the plant-pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia S Muranaka

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen bacterium that causes diseases in many different crops. In citrus, it causes Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC. The mechanism of pathogenicity of this bacterium is associated with its capacity to colonize and form a biofilm in the xylem vessels of host plants, and there is not yet any method to directly reduce populations of this pathogen in the field. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC, a cysteine analogue used mainly to treat human diseases, on X. fastidiosa in different experimental conditions. Concentrations of NAC over 1 mg/mL reduced bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces, biofilm formation and the amount of exopolysaccharides (EPS. The minimal inhibitory concentration of NAC was 6 mg/mL. NAC was supplied to X. fastidiosa-infected plants in hydroponics, fertigation, and adsorbed to organic fertilizer (NAC-Fertilizer. HPLC analysis indicated that plants absorbed NAC at concentrations of 0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL but not at 6 mg/mL. Sweet orange plants with CVC symptoms treated with NAC (0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL in hydroponics showed clear symptom remission and reduction in bacterial population, as analyzed by quantitative PCR and bacterial isolation. Experiments using fertigation and NAC-Fertilizer were done to simulate a condition closer to that normally is used in the field. For both, significant symptom remission and a reduced bacterial growth rate were observed. Using NAC-Fertilizer the lag for resurgence of symptoms on leaves after interruption of the treatment increased to around eight months. This is the first report of the anti-bacterial effect of NAC against a phytopathogenic bacterium. The results obtained in this work together with the characteristics of this molecule indicate that the use of NAC in agriculture might be a new and sustainable strategy for controlling plant pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of BigR, a transcription repressor from Xylella fastidiosa involved in biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Rosicler Lázaro; Rinaldi, Fábio Cupri; Guimarães, Beatriz Gomes, E-mail: beatriz@lnls.br; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo, E-mail: beatriz@lnls.br [Center for Molecular and Structural Biology, Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas, SP, CP 6192, CEP 13083-970 (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. BigR (biofilm growth-associated repressor) is a novel repressor protein that regulates the transcription of an operon implicated in biofilm growth in both Xylella fastidiosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This protein binds to a palindromic TA-rich element located in the promoter of the BigR operon and strongly represses transcription of the operon. BigR contains a helix–turn–helix (HTH) domain that is found in some members of the ArsR/SmtB family of metal sensors, which control metal resistance in bacteria. Although functional studies have suggested that BigR does not act as a metal sensor, the presence of two cysteines and a methionine in its primary structure raised the possibility of BigR being a metal-ligand protein. In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from native and SeMet crystals to resolutions of 1.95 and 2.2 Å, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group P321 and contain one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  19. Xylella fastidiosa CoDiRO strain associated with the olive quick decline syndrome in southern Italy belongs to a clonal complex of the subspecies pauca that evolved in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelletti, Simone; Scortichini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-limited bacterium transmitted by xylem-fluid-feeding Hemiptera insects, causes economic losses of both woody and herbaceous plant species. A Xyl. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain, namely CoDiRO, was recently found to be associated with the 'olive quick decline syndrome' in southern Italy (i.e. Apulia region). Recently, some Xyl. fastidiosa strains intercepted in France from Coffea spp. plant cuttings imported from Central and South America were characterized. The introduction of infected plant material from Central America in Apulia was also postulated even though an ad hoc study to confirm this hypothesis is lacking. In the present study, we assessed the complete and draft genome of 27 Xyl. fastidiosa strains. Through a genome-wide approach, we confirmed the occurrence of three subspecies within Xyl. fastidiosa, namely fastidiosa, multiplex and pauca, and demonstrated the occurrence of a genetic clonal complex of four Xyl. fastidiosa strains belonging to subspecies pauca which evolved in Central America. The CoDiRO strain displayed 13 SNPs when compared with a strain isolated in Costa Rica from Coffea sp. and 32 SNPs when compared with two strains obtained from Nerium oleander in Costa Rica. These results support the close relationships of the two strains. The four strains in the clonal complex contain prophage-like genes in their genomes. This study strongly supports the possibility of the introduction of Xyl. fastidiosa in southern Italy via coffee plants grown in Central America. The data also stress how the current global circulation of agricultural commodities potentially threatens the agrosystems worldwide.

  20. Characterization of the Xylella fastidiosa PD1671 Gene Encoding Degenerate c-di-GMP GGDEF/EAL Domains, and Its Role in the Development of Pierce’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cursino, Luciana; Athinuwat, Dusit; Patel, Kelly R.; Galvani, Cheryl D.; Zaini, Paulo A.; Li, Yaxin; De La Fuente, Leonardo; Hoch, Harvey C.; Burr, Thomas J.; Mowery, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an important phytopathogenic bacterium that causes many serious plant diseases including Pierce’s disease of grapevines. X. fastidiosa is thought to induce disease by colonizing and clogging xylem vessels through the formation of cell aggregates and bacterial biofilms. Here we examine the role in X. fastidiosa virulence of an uncharacterized gene, PD1671, annotated as a two-component response regulator with potential GGDEF and EAL domains. GGDEF domains are found in c-di-GMP diguanylate cyclases while EAL domains are found in phosphodiesterases, and these domains are for c-di-GMP production and turnover, respectively. Functional analysis of the PD1671 gene revealed that it affected multiple X. fastidiosa virulence-related phenotypes. A Tn5 PD1671 mutant had a hypervirulent phenotype in grapevines presumably due to enhanced expression of gum genes leading to increased exopolysaccharide levels that resulted in elevated biofilm formation. Interestingly, the PD1671 mutant also had decreased motility in vitro but did not show a reduced distribution in grapevines following inoculation. Given these responses, the putative PD1671 protein may be a negative regulator of X. fastidiosa virulence. PMID:25811864

  1. Detection of siderophores in endophytic bacteria Methylobacterium spp. associated with Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca Detecção de sideróforos nas bactérias endofíticas Methylobacterium spp. associadas com Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca

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    Paulo Teixeira Lacava

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the production of siderophores by endophytic bacteria Methylobacterium spp., which occupy the same ecological niche as Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca (Xfp in citrus plants. The siderophore production of Methylobacterium strains was tested according to chromeazurol agar assay test (CAS, Csáky test (hydroxamate-type and Arnow test (catechol-type. In addition, the ability of Xfp to use siderophores, in vitro, produced by endophytic bacteria as source of iron, was evaluated. All 37 strains of Methylobacterium spp. tested were CAS-positive for siderophore production. Methylobacterium spp. produced hydroxamate-type, but not catechol-type siderophores. In vitro growth of Xfp was stimulated by the presence of supernatant siderophores of endophytic Methylobacterium mesophilicum.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a produção de sideróforos pelas bactérias endofíticas Methylobacterium spp., que ocupam o mesmo nicho ecológico que Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca (Xfp, em plantas cítricas. A produção de sideróforos, pelas linhagens de Methylobacterium, foi testada por meio do ensaio de cromoazarol-ágar (chromeazurol agar assay-CAS, teste de Csáky (tipo hidroxamato e do teste de Arnow (tipo catecol. Além disso, a habilidade de Xfp em utilizar sideróforos produzidos por bactérias endofíticas, como fonte de ferro, in vitro, foi avaliada. Todas as 37 linhagens de Methylobacterium spp. testadas foram positivas para a produção de sideróforos, pelo teste CAS-ágar. Methylobacterium spp. foram capazes de produzir sideróforos do tipo hidroxamato, mas não do tipo catecol. O crescimento in vitro de Xfp foi estimulado pela presença de sideróforos no sobrenadante de Methylobacterium mesophilicum endofítica.

  2. Combined use of a new SNP-based assay and multilocus SSR markers to assess genetic diversity of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca infecting citrus and coffee plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Lopes, Joao R S; Jiménez-Díaz, Rafael M; Landa, Blanca B

    2015-03-01

    Two haplotypes of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca (Xfp) that correlated with their host of origin were identified in a collection of 90 isolates infecting citrus and coffee plants in Brazil, based on a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gyrB sequence. A new single-nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE) protocol was designed for rapid identification of Xfp according to the host source. The protocol proved to be robust for the prediction of the Xfp host source in blind tests using DNA from cultures of the bacterium, infected plants, and insect vectors allowed to feed on Xfp-infected citrus plants. AMOVA and STRUCTURE analyses of microsatellite data separated most Xfp populations on the basis of their host source, indicating that they were genetically distinct. The combined use of the SNaPshot protocol and three previously developed multilocus SSR markers showed that two haplotypes and distinct isolates of Xfp infect citrus and coffee in Brazil and that multiple, genetically different isolates can be present in a single orchard or infect a single tree. This combined approach will be very useful in studies of the epidemiology of Xfp-induced diseases, host specificity of bacterial genotypes, the occurrence of Xfp host jumping, vector feeding habits, etc., in economically important cultivated plants or weed host reservoirs of Xfp in Brazil and elsewhere. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  3. The Type II Secreted Lipase/Esterase LesA is a Key Virulence Factor Required for Xylella fastidiosa Pathogenesis in Grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Rafael; Gouran, Hossein; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Gillespie, Hyrum W; Almeida-Souza, Hebréia O; Tu, Aye; Rao, Basuthkar J; Feldstein, Paul A; Bruening, George; Goulart, Luiz R; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2016-01-12

    Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevines is caused by Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), a xylem-limited gamma-proteobacterium that is responsible for several economically important crop diseases. The occlusion of xylem elements and interference with water transport by Xf and its associated biofilm have been posited as the main cause of PD symptom development; however, Xf virulence mechanisms have not been described. Analysis of the Xf secretome revealed a putative lipase/esterase (LesA) that was abundantly secreted in bacterial culture supernatant and was characterized as a protein ortholog of the cell wall-degrading enzyme LipA of Xanthomonas strains. LesA was secreted by Xf and associated with a biofilm filamentous network. Additional proteomic analysis revealed its abundant presence in outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Accumulation of LesA in leaf regions associated positively with PD symptoms and inversely with bacterial titer. The lipase/esterase also elicited a hypersensitive response in grapevine. Xf lesA mutants were significantly deficient for virulence when mechanically inoculated into grapevines. We propose that Xf pathogenesis is caused by LesA secretion mediated by OMV cargos and that its release and accumulation in leaf margins leads to early stages of observed PD symptoms.

  4. Avaliação da resistência à Xylella fastidiosa em germoplasma de tangerina e híbridos introduzidos da Itália e Córsega

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    GONZÁLEZ JAIMES ELENA PAOLA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A Clorose Variegada dos Citros (CVC, causada pela bactéria Xylella fastidiosa, é atualmente uma das doenças que mais afeta a citricultura brasileira, sendo as variedades de laranja-doce as mais afetadas. Ensaio instalado na Estação Experimental de Bebedouro (EECB, em condições de estufa, teve como objetivo avaliar o comportamento em relação à CVC de germoplasma de citros introduzidos pela EECB, Fundecitrus e Cenargen. Os materiais foram multiplicados sobre diversos porta-enxertos e, quando atingiram o tamanho adequado, inoculados por garfagem lateral de ramo doente. Cada variedade constou de quatro plantas, três das quais foram inoculadas, e a outra sem inocular deixada como padrão. As avaliações consistiram na observação de sintomas, teste de ELISA e PCR. Os primeiros sintomas nos materiais contaminados começaram a surgir 7 meses após a inoculação. Encontraram-se 18 variedades positivas no teste de PCR, o que indica sua suscetibilidade à bactéria Xylella fastidiosa. Entretanto, as variedades que foram detectadas pelo teste ELISA e não pelo PCR não foram contadas como suscetíveis e, sim, como falsos positivos.

  5. Ingestão de seiva do xilema de laranjeiras 'Pêra' e 'Valência' (Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck sadias e infectadas por Xylella fastidiosa, pelas cigarrinhas vetoras Oncometopia facialis e Dilobopterus costalimai (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae Xylem sap ingestion form healthy "Pera" and "Valencia" sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck and infected ones by Xylella fastidiosa, Oncometopia facialis and Dilobopterus costalimai (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae

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    Luiz Henrique Montesino

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se o efeito da infecção pela bactéria Xylella fastidiosa, agente causal da Clorose Variegada dos Citros (CVC, sobre a taxa de ingestão de seiva do xilema de plantas cítricas por duas espécies de cigarrinhas vetoras (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae. Foram utilizados pés-francos de laranjeira-doce (Citrus sinensis das variedades 'Pêra' e 'Valência', infectadas por X. fastidiosa da linhagem 9a5c, por meio de inoculação mecânica. Os insetos utilizados nos experimentos foram coletados em campo, sendo um representante da Tribo Cicadellini (Dilobopterus costalimai e um da Proconiini (Oncometopia facialis. A taxa de ingestão de seiva do xilema por O. facialis foi quantificada nos ramos das plantas e a de D. costalimai nas folhas e ramos, por meio da avaliação do volume do líquido (honeydew excretado por unidade de tempo. O consumo pela cigarrinha O. facialis nas plantas doentes foi menor do que nas plantas sadias. Na variedade 'Pêra' doente, o consumo foi baixo, não permitindo a quantificação da seiva eliminada. Na 'Pêra' sadia e na 'Valência' doente e sadia, O. facialis apresentou valores expressivos de excreção, com maior alimentação no período diurno. Nas plantas sadias das duas variedades, o consumo pela cigarrinha D. costalimai foi maior do que nas plantas com CVC. Comparando-se as variedades, o consumo foi superior na variedade 'Valência', e, em relação às partes da planta, folha e ramo, a taxa de ingestão foi maior no ramo das duas variedades, apresentando consumo maior no período diurno.It was studied the effect of Xylella fastidiosa infection, causal agent of Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC, on the xylem sap ingestion rate of citrus plants by two sharpshooters species (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae. Seedlings of sweet orange Pera and Valencia (Citrus sinensis were used and infected by X. fastidiosa, strain 9a5c, obtained by mechanical inoculation. The insects used in the experiments were collected in the field, one

  6. Host colonization differences between citrus and coffee isolates of Xylella fastidiosa in reciprocal inoculation Diferenças em colonização do hospedeiro por isolados de Xylella fastidiosa de citros e cafeeiro em inoculações recíprocas

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    Simone de Souza Prado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC and coffee stem atrophy (CSA are important diseases in Brazil associated with closely-related strains of Xylella fastidiosa, but little is know about host aoverlappingnd importance of citrus and coffee as inoculum sources of these strains. In this study, reciprocal-inoculation experiments were performed to determine if CVC and CSA isolates are biologically similar within citrus and coffee plants. These two hosts were mechanically inoculated with a CVC and a CSA isolate of X. fastidiosa at four concentrations ranging between10³ and 10(9 colony forming units CFU mL-1. At two, four and eight months after inoculation, the infection efficiency and bacterial populations of the isolates in each host were determined by culturing. The CVC isolate infected both citrus and coffee plants, but developed lower populations in coffee. The CSA isolate did not colonize citrus. Inoculation of coffee plants with the CVC isolate resulted in low rates of infection and required an inoculum concentration ten-fold higher than that necessary to obtain a similar (25% rate of infection in citrus. The relatively low infection rates and bacterial numbers of the CVC isolate in coffee plants compared with those observed in citrus suggest that coffee is not a suitable host to serve as a source of inoculum of the CVC strain for primary spread to citrus or within coffee plantations.Clorose variegada dos citros (CVC e atrofia dos ramos do cafeeiro (ARC são doenças importantes no Brasil, associadas a estirpes de Xylella fastidiosa que são geneticamente próximas. Entretanto, pouco se sabe a respeito de plantas hospedeiras em comum e da importância de citros e cafeeiro como fontes de inóculo dessas estirpes. Neste estudo, realizaram-se experimentos de inoculação recíproca para determinar se isolados de X. fastidiosa de CVC e de ARC são biologicamente semelhantes em plantas de citros e café. Estes dois hospedeiros foram mecanicamente

  7. Locais e período de alimentação da cigarrinha vetora de Xylella fastidiosa, Bucephalogonia xanthophis (Berg (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae, em mudas cítricas Feeding sites and food intake of Bucephalogonia xanthophis (Berg (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae, a sharpshooter vector of Xylella fastidiosa, on citrus plants

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    Marcelo Pedreira de Miranda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A cigarrinha Bucephalogonia xanthophis (Berg (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae é um importante vetor da bactéria Xylella fastidiosa, agente causal da clorose variegada dos citros. Este trabalho teve como objetivo identificar o local preferido de alimentação e o período de maior atividade alimentar desta cigarrinha em citros, no sentido de elucidar o comportamento alimentar relacionado à transmissão da bactéria. O local de alimentação foi estudado em ensaio de escolha, no qual 30 insetos adultos foram liberados em gaiolas de observação (n = 10 contendo uma muda de laranja-doce [Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck]. Após 1; 15; 21; 25; 39; 45 e 49 h da liberação, contaram-se os insetos na parte superior (ramos com brotações e inferior (haste principal, até H"40 cm de altura da muda. Nos ramos da parte superior, avaliou-se a preferência entre a haste, o pecíolo e o limbo foliar. Em um segundo ensaio, 20 machos e 20 fêmeas de B. xanthophis foram confinados individualmente sobre a haste de 'seedlings' de laranja-doce para determinar os períodos de alimentação, quantificando-se a excreção de 'honeydew' (medida indireta da ingestão em períodos sucessivos de dia e noite, durante 48 h. A maioria dos indivíduos de B. xanthophis preferiu a haste dos ramos novos (62%, na parte superior da muda cítrica (91%. Nos 'seedlings', observou-se maior volume de excreção e proporção de indivíduos excretando durante a fotofase, independentemente do sexo. Portanto, em estudos de transmissão de X. fastidiosa, deve-se considerar a preferência de B. xanthophis pela haste de brotações cítricas e sua maior atividade alimentar durante a fotofase.The sharpshooter Bucephalogonia xanthophis (Berg (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae is an important vector of Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterium that causes citrus variegated chlorosis. This study aimed to identify the preferred feeding sites and periods of this vector on citrus, in order to improve our understanding of the

  8. Transcriptome profiling of two olive cultivars in response to infection by the CoDiRO strain of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampetruzzi, Annalisa; Morelli, Massimiliano; Saponari, Maria; Loconsole, Giuliana; Chiumenti, Michela; Boscia, Donato; Savino, Vito N; Martelli, Giovanni P; Saldarelli, Pasquale

    2016-06-27

    The recent Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca (Xfp) outbreak in olive (Olea europaea) groves in southern Italy is causing a destructive disease denoted Olive Quick Decline Syndrome (OQDS). Field observations disclosed that Xfp-infected plants of cv. Leccino show much milder symptoms, than the more widely grown and highly susceptible cv. Ogliarola salentina. To determine whether these field observations underlie a tolerant condition of cv. Leccino, which could be exploited for lessening the economic impact of the disease on the local olive industry, transcriptional changes occurring in plants of the two cultivars affected by Xfp were investigated. A global quantitative transcriptome profiling comparing susceptible (Ogliarola salentina) and tolerant (Leccino) olive cultivars, infected or not by Xfp, was done on messenger RNA (mRNAs) extracted from xylem tissues. The study revealed that 659 and 447 genes were differentially regulated in cvs Leccino and Ogliarola upon Xfp infection, respectively, whereas 512 genes were altered when the transcriptome of both infected cultivars was compared. Analysis of these differentially expressed genes (DEGs) shows that the presence of Xfp is perceived by the plants of both cultivars, in which it triggers a differential response strongly involving the cell wall. Up-regulation of genes encoding receptor-like kinases (RLK) and receptor-like proteins (RLP) is the predominant response of cv. Leccino, which is missing in cv. Ogliarola salentina. Moreover, both cultivars react with a strong re-modelling of cell wall proteins. These data suggest that Xfp elicits a different transcriptome response in the two cultivars, which determines a lower pathogen concentration in cv. Leccino and indicates that this cultivar may harbor genetic constituents and/or regulatory elements which counteract Xfp infection. Collectively these findings suggest that cv. Leccino is endowed with an intrinsic tolerance to Xfp, which makes it eligible for further studies

  9. Populational fluctuation of vectors of Xylella fastidiosa, wells in sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck] varieties of northwest Paraná State, Brazil

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    Rúbia de Oliveira Molina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the population flutuation of the sharpshooters species subfamily Cicadellinae belonging to the tribes Cicadellini and Proconiini, in sweet orange [Citrus sinensis( L. Osbeck] commercial orchards of the northwest region of Paraná State , Brazil. Samplings were carried out the employing every time 24 yellow sticky cards. Identification of the species showed that the most representative were Dilobopterus costalimai of the Cicadellini tribe and Acrogonia citrina of the Proconiini tribe.A Clorose variegada dos citros (CVC é uma importante doença que ocorre nos citros, cujo agente causal é a bactéria Xylella fastidiosa, Wells. A bactéria depende, obrigatoriamente, de insetos vetores para sua disseminação, que são as cigarrinhas sugadoras do xilema (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae, Cicadellinae. No presente estudo objetivou-se avaliar a flutuação populacional de espécies de cigarrinhas nas diferentes variedades de laranja doce [Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck], Natal, Pêra, Valência e Folha Murcha, em um pomar comercial localizado na região Noroeste do Paraná, no período de janeiro de 2000 a dezembro de 2002. Amostragens quinzenais foram realizadas com o uso de armadilhas adesivas amarelas, num total de 24 armadilhas em cada avaliação. Após a identificação das espécies observou-se, que as mais representativas foram Dilobopterus costalimai da tribo Cicadellini e Acrogonia citrina da tribo Proconiini, sendo que a variedade de laranja Pêra apresentou o maior número de espécies vetoras durante os anos avaliados.

  10. Phenotype overlap in Xylella fastidiosa is controlled by the cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase Eal in response to antibiotic exposure and diffusible signal factor-mediated cell-cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Alessandra A; Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2013-06-01

    Eal is an EAL domain protein in Xylella fastidiosa homologous to one involved in resistance to tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EAL and HD-GYP domain proteins are implicated in the hydrolysis of the secondary messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (cyclic di-GMP). Cell density-dependent communication mediated by a Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) also modulates cyclic di-GMP levels in X. fastidiosa, thereby controlling the expression of virulence genes and genes involved in insect transmission. The possible linkage of Eal to both extrinsic factors such as antibiotics and intrinsic factors such as quorum sensing, and whether both affect virulence, was thus addressed. Expression of eal was induced by subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin, and an eal deletion mutant was more susceptible to this antibiotic than the wild-type strain and exhibited phenotypes similar to those of an rpfF deletion mutant blocked in DSF production, such as hypermotility, reduced biofilm formation, and hypervirulence to grape. Consistent with that, the rpfF mutant was more susceptible than the wild-type strain to tobramycin. Therefore, we propose that cell-cell communication and antibiotic stress can apparently lead to similar modulations of cyclic di-GMP in X. fastidiosa, resulting in similar phenotypes. However, the effect of cell density is dominant compared to that of antibiotic stress, since eal is suppressed by RpfF, which may prevent inappropriate behavioral changes in response to antibiotic stress when DSF accumulates.

  11. Identification of Xylella fastidiosa antivirulence genes: hemagglutinin adhesins contribute a biofilm maturation to X. fastidios and colonization and attenuate virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhabert, Magalie R; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2005-08-01

    Xylella fastidosa, a gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterium, is the causal agent of several economically important plant diseases, including Pierce's disease (PD) and citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC). Until recently, the inability to transform or produce transposon mutants of X. fastidosa had been a major impediment to identifying X. fastidosa genes that mediate pathogen and plant interactions. A random transposon (Tn5) library of X. fastidosa was constructed and screened for mutants showing more severe symptoms and earlier grapevine death (hypervirulence) than did vines infected with the wild type. Seven hypervirulent mutants identified in this screen moved faster and reached higher populations than the wild type in grapevines. These results suggest that X. fastidosa attenuates its virulence in planta and that movement is important in X. fastidosa virulence. The mutated genes were sequenced and none had been described previously as antivirulence genes, although six of them showed similarity with genes of known functions in other organisms. One transposon insertion inactivated a hemagglutinin adhesin gene (PD2118), which we named HxfA. Another mutant in a second putative X. fastidosa hemagglutinin gene, PD1792 (HxfB), was constructed, and further characterization of these hxf mutants suggests that X. fastidosa hemagglutinins mediate contact between X. fastidosa cells, which results in colony formation and biofilm maturation within the xylem vessels.

  12. Quantification and localization of hesperidin and rutin in Citrus sinensis grafted on C. limonia after Xylella fastidiosa infection by HPLC-UV and MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Márcio Santos; da Silva, Danielle Fernandes; Forim, Moacir Rossi; da Silva, Maria Fátima das Graças Fernandes; Fernandes, João Batista; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Silva, Denise Brentan; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; de Carvalho, Sérgio Alves; de Souza, Alessandra Alves; Machado, Marcos Antônio

    2015-07-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) method was developed for quantifying hesperidin and rutin levels in leaves and stems of Citrus limonia, with a good linearity over a range of 1.0-80.0 and 1.0-50.0 μg mL(-1) respectively, with r(2)>0.999 for all curves. The limits of detection (LOD) for both flavonoids were 0.6 and 0.5 μg mL(-1), respectively, with quantification (LOQ) being 2.0 and 1.0 μg mL(-1), respectively. The quantification method was applied to Citrus sinensis grafted onto C. limonia with and without CVC (citrus variegated chlorosis) symptoms after Xylella fastidiosa infection. The total content of rutin was low and practically constant in all analyses in comparison with hesperidin, which showed a significant increase in its amount in symptomatic leaves. Scanning electron microscopy studies on leaves with CVC symptoms showed vessel occlusion by biofilm, and a crystallized material was noted. Considering the difficulty in isolating these crystals for analysis, tissue sections were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) to confirm the presence of hesperidin at the site of infection. The images constructed from MS/MS data with a specific diagnostic fragment ion (m/z 483) also showed higher ion intensities for it in infected plants than in healthy ones, mainly in the vessel regions. These data suggest that hesperidin plays a role in the plant-pathogen interaction, probably as a phytoanticipin. This method was also applied to C. sinensis and C. limonia seedlings, and comparison with the graft results showed that the rootstock had an increased hesperidin content ∼3.6 fold greater in the graft stem than in the stem of C. sinensis seedlings. Increase in hesperidin content by rootstock can be related to induced internal defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Análise espaço-temporal da clorose variegada dos citros no Noroeste do Paraná, com uso de PCR para detecção de Xylella fastidiosa = Spatio-temporal analysis of the citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC in the Northwest of Paraná, using PCR for detection of Xylella fastidiosa

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    William Mário de Carvalho Nunes

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A citricultura é afetada por inúmeras doenças, como a clorose variegada do citros (CVC, causada pela bactéria Xylella fastidiosa. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a distribuição espacial da doença dentro de pomares comerciais do Noroeste do Paraná com o uso de métodos moleculares. Foram selecionados pomares sintomáticos para CVC com as variedades ‘Pêra’, ‘Valência’ e ‘Folha Murcha’ (Citrus sinensis Osbeck. Foram marcadas para cada variedade, 4 plantas-referência positivas para CVC (por sintomas e análise molecular e 8 plantas ao redor de cada uma das plantas-referência foram amostradas, num total de 36 plantas por variedade. Realizou-se o teste da Reação da Polimerase em Cadeia (PCR para detecção da bactéria e na mesma época foram conduzidas avaliações visuais de sintomas de CVC. Os resultados da análise temporal, utilizando-se os modelos Monomolecular, Logístico e Gompertz, apontaram o modelo Logístico como o que melhor se ajustou para descrever o comportamento da doença no tempo, para todas as variedades estudadas. Observou-se que o comportamento espacial da doença diferiu quando a mesma área foiavaliada pelos métodos visual e molecular, resultando em uma diferença no padrão espacial das áreas avaliadas. Portanto, ambos os métodos empregados, sintomas e PCR, foram capazes de constatar asmudanças no padrão espacial apresentado, sendo que a análise molecular (PCR foi mais sensível para detectar as mudanças ocorridas.Countless diseases affect the citriculture, as the citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC which is caused by the bacteria Xylella fastidiosa.The aim of this work was to determine the space distribution of the disease inside commercial orchards in the Northwest of Paraná, using molecular methods. Symptomatic orchards were selected for CVC with the varieties 'Pêra', 'Valência' and 'Folha Murcha' (Citrus sinensis Osbeck. For each variety, 4 positive reference-plant for CVC

  14. Enhanced reliability and accuracy for field deployable bioforensic detection and discrimination of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca, causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis using razor ex technology and TaqMan quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Ping; Arif, Mohammad; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Melcher, Ulrich; Ochoa Corona, Francisco Manuel

    2013-01-01

    A reliable, accurate and rapid multigene-based assay combining real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and a Razor Ex BioDetection System (Razor Ex) was validated for detection of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca (Xfp, a xylem-limited bacterium that causes citrus variegated chlorosis [CVC]). CVC, which is exotic to the United States, has spread through South and Central America and could significantly impact U.S. citrus if it arrives. A method for early, accurate and sensitive detection of Xfp in plant tissues is needed by plant health officials for inspection of products from quarantined locations, and by extension specialists for detection, identification and management of disease outbreaks and reservoir hosts. Two sets of specific PCR primers and probes, targeting Xfp genes for fimbrillin and the periplasmic iron-binding protein were designed. A third pair of primers targeting the conserved cobalamin synthesis protein gene was designed to detect all possible X. fastidiosa (Xf) strains. All three primer sets detected as little as 1 fg of plasmid DNA carrying X. fastidiosa target sequences and genomic DNA of Xfp at as little as 1 - 10 fg. The use of Razor Ex facilitates a rapid (about 30 min) in-field assay capability for detection of all Xf strains, and for specific detection of Xfp. Combined use of three primer sets targeting different genes increased the assay accuracy and broadened the range of detection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a field-deployable rapid and reliable bioforensic detection and discrimination method for a bacterial phytopathogen based on multigene targets.

  15. A TaqMan-based real time PCR assay for specific detection and quantification of Xylella fastidiosa strains causing bacterial leaf scorch in oleander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei; Shao, Jonathan; Singh, Raghuwinder; Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Tingchang; Huang, Qi

    2013-02-15

    A TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay was developed for specific detection of strains of X. fastidiosa causing oleander leaf scorch. The assay uses primers WG-OLS-F1 and WG-OLS-R1 and the fluorescent probe WG-OLS-P1, designed based on unique sequences found only in the genome of oleander strain Ann1. The assay is specific, allowing detection of only oleander-infecting strains, not other strains of X. fastidiosa nor other plant-associated bacteria tested. The assay is also sensitive, with a detection limit of 10.4fg DNA of X. fastidiosa per reaction in vitro and in planta. The assay can also be applied to detect low numbers of X. fastidiosa in insect samples, or further developed into a multiplex real-time PCR assay to simultaneously detect and distinguish diverse strains of X. fastidiosa that may occupy the same hosts or insect vectors. Specific and sensitive detection and quantification of oleander strains of X. fastidiosa should be useful for disease diagnosis, epidemiological studies, management of oleander leaf scorch disease, and resistance screening for oleander shrubs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Conformational variability of the stationary phase survival protein E from Xylella fastidiosa revealed by X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering studies, and normal mode analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Agnes Thiane Pereira; Fonseca, Emanuella Maria Barreto; Reis, Marcelo Augusto Dos; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Santos, Clelton Aparecido Dos; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; Polikarpov, Igor; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Aparicio, Ricardo; Iulek, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium that infects a wide variety of plants. Stationary phase survival protein E is classified as a nucleotidase, which is expressed when bacterial cells are in the stationary growth phase and subjected to environmental stresses. Here, we report four refined X-ray structures of this protein from X. fastidiosa in four different crystal forms in the presence and/or absence of the substrate 3'-AMP. In all chains, the conserved loop verified in family members assumes a closed conformation in either condition. Therefore, the enzymatic mechanism for the target protein might be different of its homologs. Two crystal forms exhibit two monomers whereas the other two show four monomers in the asymmetric unit. While the biological unit has been characterized as a tetramer, differences of their sizes and symmetry are remarkable. Four conformers identified by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) in a ligand-free solution are related to the low frequency normal modes of the crystallographic structures associated with rigid body-like protomer arrangements responsible for the longitudinal and symmetric adjustments between tetramers. When the substrate is present in solution, only two conformers are selected. The most prominent conformer for each case is associated to a normal mode able to elongate the protein by moving apart two dimers. To our knowledge, this work was the first investigation based on the normal modes that analyzed the quaternary structure variability for an enzyme of the SurE family followed by crystallography and SAXS validation. The combined results raise new directions to study allosteric features of XfSurE protein. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Structures of the N-acetyltransferase domain of Xylella fastidiosa N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase with and without a His tag bound to N-acetyl-L-glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2015-01-01

    Structures of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain of the bifunctional N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Xylella fastidiosa bound to N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG) with and without an N-terminal His tag have been solved and refined at 1.7 and 1.4 Å resolution, respectively. The NAT domain with an N-terminal His tag crystallized in space group P4(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a=b=51.72, c=242.31 Å. Two subunits form a molecular dimer in the asymmetric unit, which contains ∼41% solvent. The NAT domain without an N-terminal His tag crystallized in space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a=63.48, b=122.34, c=75.88 Å, β=107.6°. Eight subunits, which form four molecular dimers, were identified in the asymmetric unit, which contains ∼38% solvent. The structures with and without the N-terminal His tag provide an opportunity to evaluate how the His tag affects structure and function. Furthermore, multiple subunits in different packing environments allow an assessment of the plasticity of the NAG binding site, which might be relevant to substrate binding and product release. The dimeric structure of the X. fastidiosa N-acetytransferase (xfNAT) domain is very similar to that of human N-acetyltransferase (hNAT), reinforcing the notion that mammalian NAGS is evolutionally derived from bifunctional bacterial NAGS/K.

  18. Association of the sharpshooter X wave with xylem inoculation of Xylella fastidiosa leading to systemic, symptomatic Pierce’s diesease infection in grape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite several decades of study, the mechanism of inoculation of X. fastidiosa (Xf) to grapevines by its sharpshooter vectors still is not fully understood. Recent research showed that Xf is inoculated into or onto artificial diets by a combination of egestion and salivation. However, the salivatio...

  19. Kennisleemtes over Xylella vragen meer onderzoek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.

    2016-01-01

    tijdens workshops over Xylella fastidiosa, in augustus in Milaan en onlangs in Brussel, bleek dat er nog veel vragen onbeantwoord zijn over de bacterie, verspreiding en waardplanten. In Noord- en Zuid-Amerika is al veel expertise aanwezig. Dat wordt gebruikt voor verder onderzoek binnen de EU. Doel

  20. Directed evolution induces tributyrin hydrolysis in a virulence factor of Xylella fastidiosa using a duplicated gene as a template [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/48i

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Gouran

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of genes is one of the preferred ways for natural selection to add advantageous functionality to the genome without having to reinvent the wheel with respect to catalytic efficiency and protein stability. The duplicated secretory virulence factors of Xylella fastidiosa (LesA, LesB and LesC, implicated in Pierce's disease of grape and citrus variegated chlorosis of citrus species, epitomizes the positive selection pressures exerted on advantageous genes in such pathogens. A deeper insight into the evolution of these lipases/esterases is essential to develop resistance mechanisms in transgenic plants. Directed evolution, an attempt to accelerate the evolutionary steps in the laboratory, is inherently simple when targeted for loss of function. A bigger challenge is to specify mutations that endow a new function, such as a lost functionality in a duplicated gene. Previously, we have proposed a method for enumerating candidates for mutations intended to transfer the functionality of one protein into another related protein based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the active site residues (DECAAF. In the current work, we present in vivo validation of DECAAF by inducing tributyrin hydrolysis in LesB based on the active site similarity to LesA. The structures of these proteins have been modeled using RaptorX based on the closely related LipA protein from Xanthomonas oryzae. These mutations replicate the spatial and electrostatic conformation of LesA in the modeled structure of the mutant LesB as well, providing in silico validation before proceeding to the laborious in vivo work. Such focused mutations allows one to dissect the relevance of the duplicated genes in finer detail as compared to gene knockouts, since they do not interfere with other moonlighting functions, protein expression levels or protein-protein interaction.

  1. Xylella taiwanensis sp. nov. cause of pear leaf scorch disease in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa is a group of xylem-limited and nutritionally fastidious plant pathogenic bacteria. While mostly found in the Americas, new X. fastidiosa strains have been reported from other continents such as Asia, including a pear leaf scorch (PLS) strain from Taiwan. Current taxonomy of X. fa...

  2. A Simple Defined Medium for the Production of True Diketopiperazines in Xylella fastidiosa and Their Identification by Ultra-Fast Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Michelli Massaroli da; Andrade, Moacir Dos Santos; Bauermeister, Anelize; Merfa, Marcus Vinícius; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Fernandes, João Batista; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Silva, Maria Fátima das Graças Fernandes da; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Machado, Marcos Antônio; Souza, Alessandra Alves de

    2017-06-13

    Diketopiperazines can be generated by non-enzymatic cyclization of linear dipeptides at extreme temperature or pH, and the complex medium used to culture bacteria and fungi including phytone peptone and trypticase peptone, can also produce cyclic peptides by heat sterilization. As a result, it is not always clear if many diketopiperazines reported in the literature are artifacts formed by the different complex media used in microorganism growth. An ideal method for analysis of these compounds should identify whether they are either synthesized de novo from the products of primary metabolism and deliver true diketopiperazines. A simple defined medium ( X. fastidiosa medium or XFM) containing a single carbon source and no preformed amino acids has emerged as a method with a particularly high potential for the grown of X. fastidiosa and to produce genuine natural products. In this work, we identified a range of diketopiperazines from X. fastidiosa 9a5c growth in XFM, using Ultra-Fast Liquid Chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Diketopiperazines are reported for the first time from X. fastidiosa , which is responsible for citrus variegated chlorosis. We also report here fatty acids from X. fastidiosa , which were not biologically active as diffusible signals, and the role of diketopiperazines in signal transduction still remains unknown.

  3. A Simple Defined Medium for the Production of True Diketopiperazines in Xylella fastidiosa and Their Identification by Ultra-Fast Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelli Massaroli da Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Diketopiperazines can be generated by non-enzymatic cyclization of linear dipeptides at extreme temperature or pH, and the complex medium used to culture bacteria and fungi including phytone peptone and trypticase peptone, can also produce cyclic peptides by heat sterilization. As a result, it is not always clear if many diketopiperazines reported in the literature are artifacts formed by the different complex media used in microorganism growth. An ideal method for analysis of these compounds should identify whether they are either synthesized de novo from the products of primary metabolism and deliver true diketopiperazines. A simple defined medium (X. fastidiosa medium or XFM containing a single carbon source and no preformed amino acids has emerged as a method with a particularly high potential for the grown of X. fastidiosa and to produce genuine natural products. In this work, we identified a range of diketopiperazines from X. fastidiosa 9a5c growth in XFM, using Ultra-Fast Liquid Chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Diketopiperazines are reported for the first time from X. fastidiosa, which is responsible for citrus variegated chlorosis. We also report here fatty acids from X. fastidiosa, which were not biologically active as diffusible signals, and the role of diketopiperazines in signal transduction still remains unknown.

  4. Chromosome-Based Genetic Complementation System for Xylella fastidiosa▿

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Ayumi; Young, Glenn M.; Igo, Michele M.

    2009-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited, gram-negative bacterium that causes Pierce's disease of grapevine. Here, we describe the construction of four vectors that facilitate the insertion of genes into a neutral site (NS1) in the X. fastidiosa chromosome. These vectors carry a colE1-like (pMB1) replicon and DNA sequences from NS1 flanking a multiple-cloning site and a resistance marker for one of the following antibiotics: chloramphenicol, erythromycin, gentamicin, or kanamycin. In X. fastidio...

  5. Acquisition of Xyllela fastidiosa causes changes to the inoculation behavior (EPG X wave) of an efficient sharpshooter vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) is a foregut-borne bacterium that is inoculated into xylem cells of a healthy plant during feeding by sharpshooter vectors. Inoculation occurs during salivation and egestion behaviors that are likely represented by the sharpshooter X wave. The objective of this study was to t...

  6. Universal detection of phytoplasmas and Xylella spp. by TaqMan singleplex and multiplex real-time PCR with dual priming oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Ito

    Full Text Available Phytoplasmas and Xylella spp. are bacteria that cause many economically important plant diseases worldwide. TaqMan probe-based quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR assays have been utilized to universally detect phytoplasmas or Xylella fastidiosa. To develop a superior universal qPCR method, we used a dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO with two annealing sites as a reverse primer to target the well-conserved bacterial 16S rDNA. The new qPCR assays universally detected various species of phytoplasmas and subspecies of X. fastidiosa as well as Xylella taiwanensis, and generally showed superior threshold cycle values when amplifying specific or non-specific products compared to current universal qPCR assays. The proposed qPCR assays were integrated to develop a multiplex qPCR assay that simultaneously detected phytoplasmas, Xylella spp., and an internal plant DNA positive control within 1 hour. This assay could detect a minimum of ten bacterial cells and was compatible with crude extractions used in the rapid screening of various plants. The amplicons were of sufficient lengths to be directly sequenced for preliminary identification, and the primers could be used in universal conventional PCR assays. Additionally, reverse DPO primers can be utilized to improve other probe-based qPCR assays.

  7. Influence of Xylella fastidiosa cold shock proteins on pathogenesis in grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cold shock proteins (CSPs), a family of nucleic acid binding proteins are an essential part of microbial adaptation to temperature changes. Bacterial CSPs are often expressed in a temperature-dependent manner, and act as chaperones, facilitating translation at low temperature by stabilizing mRNA. In...

  8. Egg maturation by the glassy-winged sharpshooter (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae); a vector of Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rates of spread of insect-transmitted plant pathogens are a function of vector abundance. Despite this, factors affecting population growth rates of insects that transmit plant pathogens have received limited attention. The glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis) feeds on xylem-sap and ...

  9. Filamentation and spatiotemporal distribution of extracellular polymeric substances: role on X.fastidiosa single cell adhesion and biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Monteiro, Moniellen P.; César, Carlos L.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms can be defined as a community of microorganisms attached to a surface, living embedded in a self- produced matrix of hydrated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which comprises most of the biofilm mass. We have recently used an extensive pool of microscopy techniques (confocal fluorescence, electron and scanning probe microscopies) at the micro and nanoscales in order to create a detailed temporal observation of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation, using both wild type strain and Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-modified cells of this citrus phytopathogen. We have identified three different EPS compositions, as well as their spatial and temporal distribution from single cell to mature biofilm formation stages. In the initial adhesion stage, soluble-EPS (S-EPS) accumulates at cell polar regions and forms a surface layer which facilitates irreversible cell attachment and cell cluster formation. These small clusters are subsequently connected by filamentous cells; further S-EPS surface coverage facilitates cell attachment and form filaments, leading to a floating framework of mature biofilms. The important role of EPS in X.fastidiosa biology was further investigated by imunolabelling experiments to detect the distribution of XadA1 adhesin, which is expressed in early stages of biofilm formation and released in outer membrane vesicles. This protein is located mainly in S-EPS covered areas, as well as on the filaments, indicating a molecular pathway to the enhanced cell attachment previously observed. These results suggest that S-EPS may thus represent an important target for disease control, slow plant colonization by the bacteria, keeping the plant more productive in the field.

  10. An EPG waveform library for sharpshooters and preliminary effects of applied voltage on behaviors controlling Xylella fastidiosa inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electropenetrography (EPG) waveforms represent electrical conductivity of fluids flowing through an insect’s mouthparts. Over the 50 years since its invention, EPG has undergone three major electronic transformations. The newest, third generation of electropenetrograph, the AC-DC EPG monitor, offers...

  11. Estudo fitoquímico de Citrus: resistência a Xylella fastidiosa e interação com Oncometopia facialis.

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Verardi Abdelnur

    2006-01-01

    Neste trabalho estão descritas dezesseis substâncias isoladas de C. limonia: xantiletina, seselina, xantoxiletina, trans-kelactona, trans-decursidinol, junosmarina escopoletina, isoescopoletina, demetilsuberosina, xantoarnol, clausarina, limonianina, 5,4-diidróxi-6-(3-metil-2-butenil)-2,2-dimetilpirano(5,6-7,8) flavanona, β-sitosterol, estigmasterol e campesterol; sendo uma destacada, a 5,4- diidróxi-6-(3-metil-2-butenil)-2,2-dimetilpirano(5,6-7,8) flavanona, por ser inédita na lit...

  12. First report of pecan bacterial leaf scorch caused by Xylella fastidiosa in pecan (Carya illinoinensis) in Arizona, New Mexico, California, and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecan bacterial leaf scorch (PBLS) is a chronic disease that can cause major yield losses in pecan orchards. In the 2015-16 growing seasons, symptoms consistent with PBLS were observed in commercial pecan cultivars in AZ, NM, CA and TX. Symptoms included tan to light brown necrotic lesions, which ...

  13. Effects of kaolin particle film and imidacloprid on glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)populations and the prevention of spread of Xylella fastidiosa in grape

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca coagulata (Say), was introduced into California and soon became a major pest of important agronomic, horticultural, landscape, ornamental crops and native trees in California. This pest feeds readily on grape and, in doing so, transmits X. fastidio...

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_004556 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rase ... [Xylella fastidiosa Temecula1] ... Length = 230 ... Query: 10 ... RLHQGDALRLLCGIDSASVDAVITDPP...YCSGAMRMADRFKPTKRKYINNGTKHVAPDFDC 69 ... RLHQGDALRLLCGIDSASVDAVITDPPYCSG...AMRMADRFKPTKRKYINNGTKHVAPDFDC Sbjct: 1 ... RLHQGDALRLLCGIDSASVDAVITDPPYCSGAMRMADRFKPTKRKYINNGTKHVAPDFDC 60 ... Qu

  15. Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) analyses for characterization and detection of grapevine pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapevines can become infected by a variety of devastating pathogens, including the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa and canker fungi. Multiple strains of Xylella fastidiosa exist, each causing different diseases on various hosts. Although sequence-based genotyping can assist in distinguishing these str...

  16. Scapoidus titanus performs a dual-meaning, sharpshooter-style EPG X wave in xylem and phloem: Could S. titanus be a potential vector of Xylella fastidiosa in European vineyards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In phytophagous hemipterans, salivary sheath-feeding species are described as xylem or phloem sap-ingesting specialists. Because these two food sources have different characteristics, two different feeding tactics are associated with this supposed specialization. Study of feeding behavior is crucial...

  17. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Since DNA encrypts the genetic code it cannot be a random ... strains of bacteria such as the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, marine Cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus marinus or ..... This holds even for the highly virulent strain Y. pestis which.

  18. Rootstock effects on almond leaf scorch disease incidence and severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    A five-year field study was conducted to evaluate effects of duration and exclusion of Xylella fastidiosa infections on young almond tree performance and their links to tree vigor. ‘Nemaguard’, ‘Okinawa’, ‘Nonpareil’, and Y119 were used as rootstocks for almond scion ‘Sonora’. Among X.fastidiosa-inf...

  19. Plant water stress effects on the net dispersal rate of the insect vector Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) and movement of its egg parasitoid, Gonatocerus ashmeadi Girault (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homalodisca vitripennis, one of the main vectors of Xylella fastidiosa, is associated with citrus plantings in California, USA. Infested citrus orchards act as a source of vectors to adjacent vineyards where X. fastidiosa causes Pierce’s disease (PD). An analysis of the pattern and rate of movement ...

  20. EPG waveforms of blue green sharpshooter: impedance and voltage level effects on stylet probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue-green sharpshooter (BGSS), Graphocephala atropunctata, is a native California vector of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) a foregut-borne bacterium that is the causal agent of Pierce’s disease in grapevines. A 3rd-generation, AC-DC electropenetrograph (EPG) was used to record probing behaviors of adult B...

  1. Bacterial Leaf Scorch of Amenity Trees a Wide-Spread Problem of Economic Significance to the Urban Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Lashomb; Alan Iskra; Ann Brooks Gould; George Hamilton

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial leaf scorch (BLS) of amenity trees is caused by the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-limited pathogen that causes water stress resulting in leaf scorch, decline, and eventual death of affected trees. Recent surveys indicate that BLS is widespread throughout the eastern half of the United States. In New Jersey, BLS primarily affects red and pin oaks...

  2. Bacterial leaf scorch distribution and isothermal lines (PROJECT NC-EM-08-02)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard C. Adams; Mursel Catall; James Walla; Ann B. Gould

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial leaf scorch (BLS) of shade trees is the common name for a disease caused by Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-inhabiting bacterium that has fastidious nutritional requirements and is difficult to culture or verify by culturing. Forest trees including oak, sycamore, elm, planetree, sweetgum, mulberry and maple are species susceptible to ...

  3. Modeling deployment of Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deployment of Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines is a key solution to mitigating economic losses caused by Xylella fastidiosa. While Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines under development display mild symptoms and have lower bacterial populations than susceptible varieties, all appear to remain ...

  4. Design of a candidate vibrational signal for mating disruption against the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca Vitripennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca vitripennis, is an important pest of grapevines due to its ability to transmit Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce’s disease. GWSS mating communication is based on vibrational signals; therefore, vibrational mating disruption could be an ...

  5. Playback interference of glassy-winged sharp shooter communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal communication is vital to reproduction, particularly for securing a mate. Insects commonly communicate by exchanging vibrational signals that are transmitted through host plants. The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca vitripennis, is an important vector of Xylella fastidiosa, a pl...

  6. Effects of nymphal diet and adult feeding on allocation of resources to glassy-winged sharpshooter egg production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter is an invasive insect capable of transmitting the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa. Pre-oviposition periods of laboratory reared glassy-winged sharpshooters are variable. Here, two questions were addressed: does nymphal diet affect pre-oviposition period and how d...

  7. EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS AND VECTOR ABILITY OF GLASSY-WINGED SHARPSHOOTERS FROM ALLOPATRIC POPULATIONS IN CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), is native to the southeastern United States and northeastern Mexico. It was detected in southern California in the late 1980s and in the San Joaquin Valley in 1999, where it transmits the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa to grapev...

  8. Glassy-winged sharpshooters (GWSS) are not GWSS: Differential Reproductive Maturity between Allopatric Californian Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) is native to southeastern U.S. and northeastern Mexico. It was detected in southern California in the late 1980s and in the San Joaquin Valley in 1999, where it transmits the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. to grapevines and other crops. The reproductive ...

  9. Differential reproductive maturity between allopatric populations of Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) is native to southeastern U.S. and northeastern Mexico. It was detected in southern California in the late 1980s and in the San Joaquin Valley in 1999, where it transmits the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. to grapevines and other crops. The reproductive ...

  10. Mating disruption of Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) by playback of vibrational signals in vineyard trellis

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is an important vector of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce’s disease of grapevine. Area-wide applications of neonicotinoid insecticides have suppressed GWSS populati...

  11. Playback of natural vibrational signals in vineyard trellis for mating disruption of glassy-winged sharpshooter

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is a vector of Xylella fastidiosa, an important bacterial pathogen of several crops in the Americas and Europe. Mating communication of this and many other cicadellid pests involves the exchange of substrate-...

  12. Potential Military Chemical/Biological Agents and Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    mycoides Xylella fastidiosa Other Animal Diseases/Pathogens of Concern Fungi Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia Deutrrerophoma tracheiphila Contagious...of the disease, which include lameness, low milk production, weight loss, mastitis , debilitation, and abortion. FMD occurs in many major livestock...man. o. Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP).15 J-5 (1) CBPP is caused by Mycoplasma mycoides and primarily affects cattle. The principal

  13. Ecology, Diversity and Comparative Genomics of Oceanic Cyanobacterial Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    A. P., Terenzi, M. F., Truffi, D., Tsai, S. M., Tsuhako, M. H., Vallada, H., Van Sluys, M. A., Verjovski-Almeida, S., Vettore, A. L., Zago , M. A...L., Zago , M. A., Zatz, M., Meidanis, J., and Setubal, J. C. (2000). The genome sequence of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa. The Xylelia

  14. EPG waveform library for Graphocephala atropunctata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae): Effect of input resistor and voltage levels on waveform appearance and probing behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphocephala atropunctata is a vector of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), the causal agent of Pierce’s disease of grapevines. A 3rd-generation, AC-DC electropenetrograph (EPG) was used to record stylet probing and ingestion behaviors of adult G. atropunctata on healthy grapevines. This study presents a com...

  15. Propagation of Homalodisca Coagulata Virus-01 via Homalodisca Vitripennis cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis) is a highly vagile and polyphagous insect found throughout the southwestern United States. These insects are the predominant vectors of Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-limited bacterium that is the causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevin...

  16. Characterization of the marine propionate-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfofaba fastidiosa sp. nov. and reclassification of Desulfomusa hansenii as Desulfofaba hansenii comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildgaard, Lone; Ramsing, Niels Birger; Finster, Kai

    2004-03-01

    A rod-shaped, slightly curved sulfate reducer, designated strain P2(T), was isolated from the sulfate-methane transition zone of a marine sediment. Cells were motile by means of a single polar flagellum. The strain reduced sulfate, thiosulfate and sulfite to sulfide and used propionate, lactate and 1-propanol as electron donors. Strain P2(T) also grew by fermentation of lactate. Propionate was oxidized incompletely to acetate and CO(2). The DNA G+C content was 48.8 mol%. Sequence analysis of the small-subunit rDNA and the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene revealed that strain P2(T) was related to the genera Desulfonema, Desulfococcus, Desulfosarcina, 'Desulfobotulus', Desulfofaba, Desulfomusa and Desulfofrigus. These genera include incomplete as well as complete oxidizers of substrates. Strain P2(T) shared important morphological and physiological traits with Desulfofaba gelida and Desulfomusa hansenii, including the ability to oxidize propionate incompletely to acetate. The 16S rRNA gene similarities of P2(T) to Desulfofaba gelida and Desulfomusa hansenii were respectively 92.9 and 91.5 %. Combining phenotypic and genotypic traits, we propose strain P2(T) to be a member of the genus Desulfofaba. The name Desulfofaba fastidiosa sp. nov. (type strain P2(T)=DSM 15249(T)=ATCC BAA-815(T)) is proposed, reflecting the limited number of substrates consumed by the strain. In addition, the reclassification of Desulfomusa hansenii as a member of the genus Desulfofaba, Desulfofaba hansenii comb. nov., is proposed. A common line of descent and a number of shared phenotypic traits support this reclassification.

  17. Population genomic analysis of a bacterial plant pathogen: novel insight into the origin of Pierce's disease of grapevine in the U.S.

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    Leonard Nunney

    Full Text Available Invasive diseases present an increasing problem worldwide; however, genomic techniques are now available to investigate the timing and geographical origin of such introductions. We employed genomic techniques to demonstrate that the bacterial pathogen causing Pierce's disease of grapevine (PD is not native to the US as previously assumed, but descended from a single genotype introduced from Central America. PD has posed a serious threat to the US wine industry ever since its first outbreak in Anaheim, California in the 1880s and continues to inhibit grape cultivation in a large area of the country. It is caused by infection of xylem vessels by the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, a genetically distinct subspecies at least 15,000 years old. We present five independent kinds of evidence that strongly support our invasion hypothesis: 1 a genome-wide lack of genetic variability in X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa found in the US, consistent with a recent common ancestor; 2 evidence for historical allopatry of the North American subspecies X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex and X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa; 3 evidence that X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa evolved in a more tropical climate than X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex; 4 much greater genetic variability in the proposed source population in Central America, variation within which the US genotypes are phylogenetically nested; and 5 the circumstantial evidence of importation of known hosts (coffee plants from Central America directly into southern California just prior to the first known outbreak of the disease. The lack of genetic variation in X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa in the US suggests that preventing additional introductions is important since new genetic variation may undermine PD control measures, or may lead to infection of other crop plants through the creation of novel genotypes via inter-subspecific recombination. In general, geographically mixing of previously

  18. Control of Pierce's Disease by Phage.

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    Mayukh Das

    Full Text Available Pierce's Disease (PD of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (Xf, is a limiting factor in the cultivation of grapevines in the US. There are presently no effective control methods to prevent or treat PD. The therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of a phage cocktail composed of four virulent (lytic phages was evaluated for control of PD. Xf levels in grapevines were significantly reduced in therapeutically or prophylactically treated grapevines. PD symptoms ceased to progress one week post-therapeutic treatment and symptoms were not observed in prophylactically treated grapevines. Cocktail phage levels increased in grapevines in the presence of the host. No in planta phage-resistant Xf isolates were obtained. Moreover, Xf mutants selected for phage resistance in vitro did not cause PD symptoms. Our results indicate that phages have great potential for biocontrol of PD and other economically important diseases caused by Xylella.

  19. Anterior foregut microbiota of the glassy-winged sharpshooter explored using deep 16S rRNA gene sequencing from individual insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E Rogers

    Full Text Available The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS is an invasive insect species that transmits Xylella fastidiosa, the bacterium causing Pierce's disease of grapevine and other leaf scorch diseases. X. fastidiosa has been shown to colonize the anterior foregut (cibarium and precibarium of sharpshooters, where it may interact with other naturally-occurring bacterial species. To evaluate such interactions, a comprehensive list of bacterial species associated with the sharpshooter cibarium and precibarium is needed. Here, a survey of microbiota associated with the GWSS anterior foregut was conducted. Ninety-six individual GWSS, 24 from each of 4 locations (Bakersfield, CA; Ojai, CA; Quincy, FL; and a laboratory colony, were characterized for bacteria in dissected sharpshooter cibaria and precibaria by amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene using Illumina MiSeq technology. An average of approximately 150,000 sequence reads were obtained per insect. The most common genus detected was Wolbachia; sequencing of the Wolbachia ftsZ gene placed this strain in supergroup B, one of two Wolbachia supergroups most commonly associated with arthropods. X. fastidiosa was detected in all 96 individuals examined. By multilocus sequence typing, both X. fastidiosa subspecies fastidiosa and subspecies sandyi were present in GWSS from California and the colony; only subspecies fastidiosa was detected in GWSS from Florida. In addition to Wolbachia and X. fastidiosa, 23 other bacterial genera were detected at or above an average incidence of 0.1%; these included plant-associated microbes (Methylobacterium, Sphingomonas, Agrobacterium, and Ralstonia and soil- or water-associated microbes (Anoxybacillus, Novosphingobium, Caulobacter, and Luteimonas. Sequences belonging to species of the family Enterobacteriaceae also were detected but it was not possible to assign these to individual genera. Many of these species likely interact with X. fastidiosa in the

  20. Caracterização da comunidade bacteriana endofítica de citros por isolamento, PCR específico e DGGE Characterization of the endophytic bacterial community from citrus by isolation, specific PCR and DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Teixeira Lacava

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar a comunidade bacteriana endofítica de plantas assintomáticas (escapes e afetadas pela clorose variegada dos citros (CVC por meio de isolamento em meio de cultura, técnica de gradiente desnaturante em gel de eletroforese (DGGE e detecção de Methylobacterium mesophilicum e Xyllela fastidiosa por meio de PCR específico, para estudar esta comunidade e sua relação com a ocorrência da CVC. A análise da comunidade bacteriana via DGGE permitiu a detecção de X. fastidiosa, bem como Klebsiella sp. e Acinetobacter sp. como endófitos de citros. Foram observados também Curtobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., Enterobacter sp. e Bacillus spp. Utilizando primers específicos, Methylobacterium mesophilicum e X. fastidiosa também foram observadas, reforçando hipóteses de que estas bactérias podem estar interagindo no interior da planta hospedeira.The aim of this work was to characterize endophytic bacterial community of assintomatic (escape and Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC-affected citrus plants using isolation in culture medium, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE technique and Methylobacterium mesophilicum as well as Xylella fastidiosa specific PCR, allowing to assess this community and its interactions with CVC. The study of bacterial community by DGGE analysis allowed the detection of X. fastidiosa, as well as Klebsiella sp. e Acinetobacter sp., which were not detected previously. Curtobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., Enterobacter sp. and Bacillus spp. were also observed as endophyte in citrus plants. Using specific primers Methylobacterium mesophilicum and X. fastidiosa were observed, reinforcing that these bacteria could interact inside the host plant.

  1. Compositions and Methods for the Treatment of Pierce's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Goutam (Santa Fe, NM)

    2008-10-07

    Chimeric anti-microbial proteins, compositions, and methods for the therapeutic and prophylactic treatment of plant diseases caused by the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa are provided. The anti-microbial proteins of the invention generally comprise a surface recognition domain polypeptide, capable of binding to a bacterial membrane component, fused to a bacterial lysis domain polypeptide, capable of affecting lysis or rupture of the bacterial membrane, typically via a fused polypeptide linker. In particular, methods and compositions for the treatment or prevention of Pierce's disease of grapevines are provided. Methods for the generation of transgenic Vitus vinefera plants expressing xylem-secreted anti-microbial chimeras are also provided.

  2. Avaliação de tangerinas, tangores e tangelos em relação à clorose variegada dos citros Evaluation of mandarines, tangors and tangelos in relation to the citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Rodrigues da Silva

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A Clorose Variegada dos Citros (CVC, causada pela bactéria Xylella fastidiosa, é uma séria ameaça à citricultura brasileira, constituindo-se, atualmente, numa das principais doenças dos citros no Brasil. O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar cultivares de citros introduzidas quanto à suscetibilidade ou resistência à CVC, em condições de campo. O trabalho foi conduzido em Bebedouro-SP. Os materiais genéticos estudados foram cultivares de tangerinas e híbridos (tangores e tangelos introduzidas de bancos de germoplasma da Itália, Portugal, Espanha e Córsega. O trabalho foi constituído por 56 parcelas, com três plantas das quais uma foi inoculada, empregando-se o método de encostia, utilizando-se de mudas previamente infectadas como fontes da bactéria. Foram avaliados os sintomas da doença mediante observação visual através de notas e teste de PCR, específico para Xylella fastidiosa. Os materiais genéticos que se apresentaram positivos ao PCR, mas não apresentaram sintomas, e os que foram negativos ao PCR, possuem um potencial de utilização em programas de melhoramento genético visando à resistência e/ou à tolerância à doença.The Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC, caused by the bacteria Xylella fastidiosa, is a serious threat to the Brazilian citriculture, being, actually, one of the mains diseases to the citrus in Brazil. The objective of this work was evaluate citrus cultivars, introduced according to the susceptibility or resistance to CVC, in field conditions. The research was carried in Bebedouro city - São Paulo state - Brazil. The genotypes studied were cultivars of mandarines and hybrids (tangors and tangelos, introduced from the germplasm collections of Italy, Portugal, Spain and Corsica. The work was composed by 56 portions, with 3 plants, being one of them inoculated, using the approach graft method, with infected plants. Were evaluated the symptoms of the disease by visual observation and PCR test

  3. X-FIDO: An Effective Application for Detecting Olive Quick Decline Syndrome with Deep Learning and Data Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Albert C.; Luvisi, Andrea; De Bellis, Luigi; Ampatzidis, Yiannis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a vision-based program to detect symptoms of Olive Quick Decline Syndrome (OQDS) on leaves of Olea europaea L. infected by Xylella fastidiosa, named X-FIDO (Xylella FastIdiosa Detector for O. europaea L.). Previous work predicted disease from leaf images with deep learning but required a vast amount of data which was obtained via crowd sourcing such as the PlantVillage project. This approach has limited applicability when samples need to be tested with traditional methods (i.e., PCR) to avoid incorrect training input or for quarantine pests which manipulation is restricted. In this paper, we demonstrate that transfer learning can be leveraged when it is not possible to collect thousands of new leaf images. Transfer learning is the re-application of an already trained deep learner to a new problem. We present a novel algorithm for fusing data at different levels of abstraction to improve performance of the system. The algorithm discovers low-level features from raw data to automatically detect veins and colors that lead to symptomatic leaves. The experiment included images of 100 healthy leaves, 99 X. fastidiosa-positive leaves and 100 X. fastidiosa-negative leaves with symptoms related to other stress factors (i.e., abiotic factors such as water stress or others diseases). The program detects OQDS with a true positive rate of 98.60 ± 1.47% in testing, showing great potential for image analysis for this disease. Results were obtained with a convolutional neural network trained with the stochastic gradient descent method, and ten trials with a 75/25 split of training and testing data. This work shows potential for massive screening of plants with reduced diagnosis time and cost. PMID:29067037

  4. X-FIDO: An Effective Application for Detecting Olive Quick Decline Syndrome with Deep Learning and Data Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert C. Cruz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a vision-based program to detect symptoms of Olive Quick Decline Syndrome (OQDS on leaves of Olea europaea L. infected by Xylella fastidiosa, named X-FIDO (Xylella FastIdiosa Detector for O. europaea L.. Previous work predicted disease from leaf images with deep learning but required a vast amount of data which was obtained via crowd sourcing such as the PlantVillage project. This approach has limited applicability when samples need to be tested with traditional methods (i.e., PCR to avoid incorrect training input or for quarantine pests which manipulation is restricted. In this paper, we demonstrate that transfer learning can be leveraged when it is not possible to collect thousands of new leaf images. Transfer learning is the re-application of an already trained deep learner to a new problem. We present a novel algorithm for fusing data at different levels of abstraction to improve performance of the system. The algorithm discovers low-level features from raw data to automatically detect veins and colors that lead to symptomatic leaves. The experiment included images of 100 healthy leaves, 99 X. fastidiosa-positive leaves and 100 X. fastidiosa-negative leaves with symptoms related to other stress factors (i.e., abiotic factors such as water stress or others diseases. The program detects OQDS with a true positive rate of 98.60 ± 1.47% in testing, showing great potential for image analysis for this disease. Results were obtained with a convolutional neural network trained with the stochastic gradient descent method, and ten trials with a 75/25 split of training and testing data. This work shows potential for massive screening of plants with reduced diagnosis time and cost.

  5. X-FIDO: An Effective Application for Detecting Olive Quick Decline Syndrome with Deep Learning and Data Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Albert C; Luvisi, Andrea; De Bellis, Luigi; Ampatzidis, Yiannis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a vision-based program to detect symptoms of Olive Quick Decline Syndrome (OQDS) on leaves of Olea europaea L. infected by Xylella fastidiosa , named X-FIDO ( Xylella FastIdiosa Detector for O. europaea L.). Previous work predicted disease from leaf images with deep learning but required a vast amount of data which was obtained via crowd sourcing such as the PlantVillage project. This approach has limited applicability when samples need to be tested with traditional methods (i.e., PCR) to avoid incorrect training input or for quarantine pests which manipulation is restricted. In this paper, we demonstrate that transfer learning can be leveraged when it is not possible to collect thousands of new leaf images. Transfer learning is the re-application of an already trained deep learner to a new problem. We present a novel algorithm for fusing data at different levels of abstraction to improve performance of the system. The algorithm discovers low-level features from raw data to automatically detect veins and colors that lead to symptomatic leaves. The experiment included images of 100 healthy leaves, 99 X. fastidiosa -positive leaves and 100 X. fastidiosa -negative leaves with symptoms related to other stress factors (i.e., abiotic factors such as water stress or others diseases). The program detects OQDS with a true positive rate of 98.60 ± 1.47% in testing, showing great potential for image analysis for this disease. Results were obtained with a convolutional neural network trained with the stochastic gradient descent method, and ten trials with a 75/25 split of training and testing data. This work shows potential for massive screening of plants with reduced diagnosis time and cost.

  6. Nutritional deficiency in citrus with symptoms of citrus variegated chlorosis disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ME. Silva-Stenico

    Full Text Available It is well known that citrus plants that have been infected by Xylella fastidiosa display nutritional deficiencies, probably caused by production of extracellular polymers by the bacteria that block normal nutrient flow through the xylem. The aim of this work was to study the mineral composition of specific foliar areas in different stages of infection in citrus. Thus, the concentrations of macro and micronutrients in leaves of citrus infected by X. fastidiosa were measured. Samples from four infected citrus orchards in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were respectively collected from Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, Neves Paulista, Gavião Peixoto and Paraíso counties. The presence of X. fastidiosa in leaves was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using specific PCR primers. To understand the variation in leaf-nutrient content in citrus plants, we used foliar nutrient values from control (non-symptomatic plants as a reference. Chemometric analysis showed that the deficiency of P and K in symptomatic trees for all orchards and high concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn were observed in chlorotic areas, although other studies revealed deficiency of zinc in leaves. This is the first report showing that a correlation between chlorotic citrus leaf and higher concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn are observed when infected and healthy plants were compared.

  7. MANAGING NEWLY ESTABLISHED PESTS: Cooperative efforts contained spread of Pierce's disease and found genetic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Bruening

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of Pierce's disease of grapevine in the Temecula Valley in the late 1990s was one in a decades-long series of sporadic appearances of this infection in California. However, the new outbreak was qualitatively different because of the rapidity with which it spread in the vineyard and its appearance almost simultaneously at distant locations. The causative agent of Pierce's disease is the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, and the distinct characteristics of the Temecula Valley outbreak were traced to the establishment of a new insect vector in California, the glassy-winged sharpshooter. Intensive and collaborative efforts among government agencies, industry and research institutions over 15 years have successfully contained the disease, and given scientists time to discover promising long-term potential solutions through genetic resistance.

  8. Proteomics approach to identify unique xylem sap proteins in Pierce's disease-tolerant Vitis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Sheikh M; Mazhar, Hifza; Vasanthaiah, Hemanth K N

    2010-03-01

    Pierce's disease (PD) is a destructive bacterial disease of grapes caused by Xylella fastidiosa which is xylem-confined. The tolerance level to this disease varies among Vitis species. Our research was aimed at identifying unique xylem sap proteins present in PD-tolerant Vitis species. The results showed wide variation in the xylem sap protein composition, where a set of polypeptides with pI between 4.5 and 4.7 and M(r) of 31 kDa were present in abundant amount in muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia, PD-tolerant), in reduced levels in Florida hybrid bunch (Vitis spp., PD-tolerant) and absent in bunch grapes (Vitis vinifera, PD-susceptible). Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis of these proteins revealed their similarity to beta-1, 3-glucanase, peroxidase, and a subunit of oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 1, which are known to play role in defense and oxygen generation. In addition, the amount of free amino acids and soluble sugars was found to be significantly lower in xylem sap of muscadine genotypes compared to V. vinifera genotypes, indicating that the higher nutritional value of bunch grape sap may be more suitable for Xylella growth. These data suggest that the presence of these unique proteins in xylem sap is vital for PD tolerance in muscadine and Florida hybrid bunch grapes.

  9. Citrus plastid-related gene profiling based on expressed sequence tag analyses

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    Tercilio Calsa Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastid-related sequences, derived from putative nuclear or plastome genes, were searched in a large collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs and genomic sequences from the Citrus Biotechnology initiative in Brazil. The identified putative Citrus chloroplast gene sequences were compared to those from Arabidopsis, Eucalyptus and Pinus. Differential expression profiling for plastid-directed nuclear-encoded proteins and photosynthesis-related gene expression variation between Citrus sinensis and Citrus reticulata, when inoculated or not with Xylella fastidiosa, were also analyzed. Presumed Citrus plastome regions were more similar to Eucalyptus. Some putative genes appeared to be preferentially expressed in vegetative tissues (leaves and bark or in reproductive organs (flowers and fruits. Genes preferentially expressed in fruit and flower may be associated with hypothetical physiological functions. Expression pattern clustering analysis suggested that photosynthesis- and carbon fixation-related genes appeared to be up- or down-regulated in a resistant or susceptible Citrus species after Xylella inoculation in comparison to non-infected controls, generating novel information which may be helpful to develop novel genetic manipulation strategies to control Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC.

  10. Temporal and spatial scaling of the genetic structure of a vector-borne plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D; Francisco, Carolina S; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2014-02-01

    The ecology of plant pathogens of perennial crops is affected by the long-lived nature of their immobile hosts. In addition, changes to the genetic structure of pathogen populations may affect disease epidemiology and management practices; examples include local adaptation of more fit genotypes or introduction of novel genotypes from geographically distant areas via human movement of infected plant material or insect vectors. We studied the genetic structure of Xylella fastidiosa populations causing disease in sweet orange plants in Brazil at multiple scales using fast-evolving molecular markers (simple-sequence DNA repeats). Results show that populations of X. fastidiosa were regionally isolated, and that isolation was maintained for populations analyzed a decade apart from each other. However, despite such geographic isolation, local populations present in year 2000 were largely replaced by novel genotypes in 2009 but not as a result of migration. At a smaller spatial scale (individual trees), results suggest that isolates within plants originated from a shared common ancestor. In summary, new insights on the ecology of this economically important plant pathogen were obtained by sampling populations at different spatial scales and two different time points.

  11. Genome sequence of the rice-pathogenic bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae RS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guan-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Liu, He; Lou, Miao-Miao; Tian, Wen-Xiao; Li, Bin; Zhou, Xue-Ping; Zhu, Bo; Jin, Gu-Lei

    2011-09-01

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae is a phytobacterium which is the causative agent of several plant diseases with economic significance. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of strain RS-1, which was isolated from rice shoots in a rice field in China. This strain can cause bacterial stripe of rice. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Genome Sequence of the Rice-Pathogenic Bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae RS-1 ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Guan-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Liu, He; Lou, Miao-Miao; Tian, Wen-Xiao; Li, Bin; Zhou, Xue-Ping; Zhu, Bo; Jin, Gu-Lei

    2011-01-01

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae is a phytobacterium which is the causative agent of several plant diseases with economic significance. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of strain RS-1, which was isolated from rice shoots in a rice field in China. This strain can cause bacterial stripe of rice.

  13. Genome Sequence of the Rice-Pathogenic Bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae RS-1 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guan-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Liu, He; Lou, Miao-Miao; Tian, Wen-Xiao; Li, Bin; Zhou, Xue-Ping; Zhu, Bo; Jin, Gu-Lei

    2011-01-01

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae is a phytobacterium which is the causative agent of several plant diseases with economic significance. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of strain RS-1, which was isolated from rice shoots in a rice field in China. This strain can cause bacterial stripe of rice. PMID:21742879

  14. Bioassay assessment of metarhizium anisopliae (metchnikoff sorokin (deuteromycota: hyphomycetes against Oncometopia facialis (signoret (hemiptera: cicadellidae Avaliação do bioensaio de Metarhizium anisopliae (metchnikoff sorokin (deuteromycota: hyphomycetes contra Oncometopia facialis (signoret (hemiptera: cicadellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolney Dalla Pria Júnior

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC is an economically important, destructive disease in Brazil and is caused by Xylella fastidiosa and transmitted by sharpshooter insects. In this study, the efficacy of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae in controlling the sharpshooter Oncometopia facialis was studied by bioassay conditions. In the bioassay, insects were sprayed with a suspension containing 5 X 10(7 conidia mL-1. Adults captured in the field were treated in groups of 10 in a total of 11 replications per treatment. Significant differences between the natural mortality and the mortality of insects treated with the fungus were observed 6 days after inoculations (PA Clorose Variegada dos Citros (CVC é uma doença economicamente importante e destrutiva no Brasil e é causada pela bactéria Xylella fastidiosa e transmitida por insetos vetores tal como Oncometopia facialis. Nesse estudo, a eficácia do fungo Metarhizium anisopliae em controlar o inseto vetor O. facialis foi estudada em condições de bioensaio. Nesse bioensaio, insetos foram pulverizados com uma suspensão de 5 X 10(7 conídio mL-1. Insetos-adultos capturados no campo foram tratados em grupos de 10, em um total de 11 replicatas por tratamento. Diferenças significativas entre a mortalidade natural e a mortalidade dos insetos tratados com o fungo foram observadas em 6 dias após a inoculação (P<0.05. Estas diferenças significativas aumentaram antes do décimo dia após o tratamento. O fungo causou uma mortalidade de 87,1%, com uma LT50 variando entre 5 e 6 dias. A LC50 foi de 1,2 X 10(6 conídio mL-1, variando de 7,7 X 10(5 a 2 X 10(6 conídio mL-1. Estes resultados mostraram que o vetor O. facialis foi susceptível a ação entomopatogênica de M. anisopliae em condições controladas durante o bioensaio.

  15. Rooting of healthy and CVC-affected 'Valência' sweet orange stem cuttings, through the use of plant regulators

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    Gustavo Habermann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC is a disease caused by Xylella fastidiosa. Using different concentrations of plant regulators, such as auxins (indole-3-butyric acid and gibberellic acid biosynthesis-inhibitor (paclobutrazol, physiological rooting capacity of healthy and CVC-affected stem cuttings were evaluated in order to investigate the importance of plant hormone imbalance and xylem occlusion in plants with CVC. The percentages of dead, alive and rooted cuttings, cuttings with callus and mean number of roots per cuttings did not show statistical differences in response to the distinct concentrations of synthetic plant regulators. There were differences only between healthy and CVC-affected cuttings. This showed the importance of xylem occlusion and diffusive disturbances in diseased plants, in relation to root initiation capacity and hormonal translocation in the plant tissue.Clorose variegada dos citros (CVC é uma doença causada por Xylella fastidiosa, podendo determinar oclusão do xilema e desbalanço hormonal, o que por fim está relacionado ao processo de iniciação radicial em estacas. Usando diferentes concentrações de fitorreguladores, como auxinas (ácido 3-indol butírico e inibidores da biossíntese de ácido giberélico (paclobutrazol, que são promotores do enraizamento de estacas, verificou-se a capacidade fisiológica de enraizamento de estacas sadias e com CVC, a fim de investigar a importância do desbalanço hormonal e oclusão do xilema em plantas doentes. As porcentagens de estacas mortas, vivas, enraizadas e com calo e o número médio de raízes por estaca não mostraram diferenças estatísticas em resposta às diferentes concentrações dos reguladores vegetais sintéticos. Houve diferenças apenas entre estacas sadias e doentes. Isto aponta a importância da oclusão do xilema e distúrbios difusivos em plantas doentes, em relação à capacidade de iniciação radicial e à translocação hormonal no tecido

  16. A force sensor using nanowire arrays to understand biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Prasana K.; Cavalli, Alessandro; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Murillo, Duber M.; Souza, Alessandra A.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the cellular signaling and function at the nano-bio interface can pave the way towards developing next-generation smart diagnostic tools. From this perspective, limited reports detail so far the cellular and subcellular forces exerted by bacterial cells during the interaction with abiotic materials. Nanowire arrays with high aspect ratio have been used to detect such small forces. In this regard, live force measurements were performed ex-vivo during the interaction of Xylella fastidiosa bacterial cells with InP nanowire arrays. The influence of nanowire array topography and surface chemistry on the response and motion of bacterial cells was studied in detail. The nanowire arrays were also functionalized with different cell adhesive promoters, such as amines and XadA1, an afimbrial protein of X.fastidiosa. By employing the well-defined InP nanowire arrays platform, and single cell confocal imaging system, we were able to trace the bacterial growth pattern, and show that their initial attachment locations are strongly influenced by the surface chemistry and nanoscale surface topography. In addition, we measure the cellular forces down to few nanonewton range using these nanowire arrays. In case of nanowire functionalized with XadA1, the force exerted by vertically and horizontally attached single bacteria on the nanowire is in average 14% and 26% higher than for the pristine array, respectively. These results provide an excellent basis for live-cell force measurements as well as unravel the range of forces involved during the early stages of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

  17. EPG waveform library for Graphocephala atropunctata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae): Effect of adhesive, input resistor, and voltage levels on waveform appearance and stylet probing behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Felix A; Backus, Elaine A

    2018-05-31

    Blue-green sharpshooter, Graphocephala atropunctata, is a native California vector of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), a foregut-borne bacterium that is the causal agent of Pierce's disease in grapevines. A 3rd-generation, AC-DC electropenetrograph (EPG monitor) was used to record stylet probing and ingestion behaviors of adult G. atropunctata on healthy grapevines. This study presents for the first time a complete, updated waveform library for this species, as well as effects of different electropenetrograph settings and adhesives on waveform appearances. Both AC and DC applied signals were used with input resistor (Ri) levels (amplifier sensitivities) of 10 6 , 10 7 , 10 8 and 10 9  Ohms, as well as two type of adhesives, conducting silver paint and handmade silver glue. Waveform description, characterization of electrical origins (R versus emf components), and proposed biological meanings of waveforms are reported, as well as qualitative differences in waveform appearances observed with different electropenetrograph settings and adhesives. In addition, a quantitative study with AC signal, using two applied voltage levels (50 and 200 mV) and two Ri levels (10 7 and 10 9  Ohms) was performed. Intermediate Ri levels 10 7 and 10 8  Ohms provided EPG waveforms with the greatest amount of information, because both levels captured similar proportions of R and emf components, as supported by appearance, clarity, and definition of waveforms. Similarly, use of a gold wire loop plus handmade silver glue provided more definition of waveforms than a gold wire loop plus commercial conducting silver paint. Qualitative/observational evidence suggested that AC applied signal caused fewer aberrant behaviors/waveforms than DC applied signal. In the quantitative study, behavioral components of the sharpshooter X wave were the most affected by changes in Ri and voltage level. Because the X wave probably represents X. fastidiosa inoculation behavior, future studies of X. fastidiosa

  18. On the drought in the Balearic Islands during the hydrological year 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Climent; Romero, Romualdo; Homar, Víctor; Alonso, Sergio; Jansà, Agustí; Amengual, Arnau

    2017-12-01

    During the hydrological year 2015-2016 (September to August) a severe drought affected the Balearic Islands, with substantial consequences (alleviated partially by desalination plants) on water availability for consumption from reservoirs and aquifers and also on the vegetation cover. In particular, a plague of Xylella fastidiosa reached an alarming level for almond and olive trees. The expansion of this infestation could be attributed to, or at least favored by, the extreme drought. In this paper we analyze this anomalous episode in terms of the corresponding water balance in comparison with the balance obtained from long-term climatological data. It is shown that the drought was the result of a lack of winter precipitation, the lowest in 43 years, which led to a shortage of water storage in the soil. In several meteorological stations analyzed, evaporation was greater than precipitation during all the months of the year. In terms of attribution, it is found that during the 2015-2016 winter the atmospheric circulation over the North Atlantic was largely westerly and intense, with high values of the NAO index that were reflected in high pressures over the Iberian Peninsula and the western Mediterranean.

  19. Espécies de cigarrinhas (Hemiptera, Cicadellidae, Cicadellinae em pomares de citros da região de Bebedouro, SP, com descrição de uma espécie nova de Acrogonia Stål

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    Rosangela Cristina Marucci

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Sharpshooter leafhoppers (Hemiptera, Cicadellidae, Cicadellinae in citrus groves of the area of Bebedouro, SP, with description of a new species of Acrogonia Stål. Sixteen species of Cicadellidae, subfamily Cicadellinae, were collected and identified: 11 of the tribe Cicadellini and five of the tribe Proconiini. The ten most common species, together with a new species, are characterized based on external morphology and male genitalia: Acrogonia citrina Marucci & Cavichioli sp. nov.; Bucephalogonia xanthophis (Berg, 1879; Dilobopterus costalimai Young, 1977; Ferrariana trivittata (Signoret, 1854; Hortensia similis (Walker, 1851; Macugonalia cavifrons (Stål, 1862; M. leucomelas (Walker, 1851; Oncometopia facialis (Signoret, 1854; Plesiommata corniculata Young, 1977 and P. mollicella (Fowler, 1900. The leafhopper samples were collected in citrus groves and in adjacent habitats (woods, swamp, cultivable plain, spontaneous vegetation of the grove, coffee crop and sugarcane at the counties of Bebedouro and Monte Azul Paulista and in the district of Turvínia. The collecting methods were: insect net, yellow sticky cards, portable suction trap and Malaise trap. Identification keys were elaborated for the 16 species. There is a great diversity of Cicadellinae species in the citric groves. In the three areas sampled, it was collected a larger number of species of the tribe Cicadellini than of the tribe Proconiini. In the Bebedouro area, the vector species of Xylella fastidiosa, A. citrina sp. nov., B. xanthophis, D. costalimai and O. facialis, were collected in the citrus groves and in all adjacent habitats.

  20. Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, John; Genin, Stephane; Magori, Shimpei; Citovsky, Vitaly; Sriariyanum, Malinee; Ronald, Pamela; Dow, Max; Verdier, Valérie; Beer, Steven V; Machado, Marcos A; Toth, Ian; Salmond, George; Foster, Gary D

    2012-08-01

    Many plant bacteriologists, if not all, feel that their particular microbe should appear in any list of the most important bacterial plant pathogens. However, to our knowledge, no such list exists. The aim of this review was to survey all bacterial pathologists with an association with the journal Molecular Plant Pathology and ask them to nominate the bacterial pathogens they would place in a 'Top 10' based on scientific/economic importance. The survey generated 458 votes from the international community, and allowed the construction of a Top 10 bacterial plant pathogen list. The list includes, in rank order: (1) Pseudomonas syringae pathovars; (2) Ralstonia solanacearum; (3) Agrobacterium tumefaciens; (4) Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae; (5) Xanthomonas campestris pathovars; (6) Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovars; (7) Erwinia amylovora; (8) Xylella fastidiosa; (9) Dickeya (dadantii and solani); (10) Pectobacterium carotovorum (and Pectobacterium atrosepticum). Bacteria garnering honourable mentions for just missing out on the Top 10 include Clavibacter michiganensis (michiganensis and sepedonicus), Pseudomonas savastanoi and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This review article presents a short section on each bacterium in the Top 10 list and its importance, with the intention of initiating discussion and debate amongst the plant bacteriology community, as well as laying down a benchmark. It will be interesting to see, in future years, how perceptions change and which bacterial pathogens enter and leave the Top 10. © 2012 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2012 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Infection processes of xylem-colonizing pathogenic bacteria: possible explanations for the scarcity of qualitative disease resistance genes against them in crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chungyun; Han, Sang Wook; Song, Yu-Rim; Kim, Bo-Young; Lee, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Je-Min; Yeam, Inhwa; Heu, Sunggi; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2015-07-01

    Disease resistance against xylem-colonizing pathogenic bacteria in crops. Plant pathogenic bacteria cause destructive diseases in many commercially important crops. Among these bacteria, eight pathogens, Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. campestris pv. campestris, Erwinia amylovora, Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, and Xylella fastidiosa, infect their host plants through different infection sites and paths and eventually colonize the xylem tissues of their host plants, resulting in wilting symptoms by blocking water flow or necrosis of xylem tissues. Noticeably, only a relatively small number of resistant cultivars in major crops against these vascular bacterial pathogens except X. oryzae pv. oryzae have been found or generated so far, although these pathogens threaten productivity of major crops. In this review, we summarize the lifestyles of major xylem-colonizing bacterial pathogens and then discuss the progress of current research on disease resistance controlled by qualitative disease resistance genes or quantitative trait loci against them. Finally, we propose infection processes of xylem-colonizing bacterial pathogens as one of possible reasons for why so few qualitative disease resistance genes against these pathogens have been developed or identified so far in crops.

  2. Alternation of host plants as a survival mechanism of leafhoppers Dilobopterus costalimai and Oncometopia facialis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae, vectors of the Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC

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    Milanez José Maria

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilobopterus costalimai (Young and Oncometopia facialis (Signoret are two of the most important species of citrus leafhoppers, vectors of bacterium Xylella fastidiosa which causes the Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC disease. To develop a rearing technique for these species under laboratory conditions, the egg laying preference and nymph development were studied in different breeding systems: Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia and "falso boldo" (Vernonia condensata as host plants. Trials were set up in a randomized block design with three treatments (n=8. Females of D. costalimai had particular preference for ovipositing on Rangpur lime leaves while O. facialis females placed a higher number of eggs on "falso boldo", but it did not differ statistically from the Rangpur lime. The nymphal viability of D. costalimai was null in Rangpur lime and 58% in "falso boldo". For O. facialis the nymphal viability was 25 and 78% in Rangpur lime and "falso boldo", respectively. "Falso boldo" is more suitable as a host plant to rear the two species of citrus leafhoppers. The alternation of host plants seems to be an important survival mechanism of the CVC-vector species, as shown in natural conditions.

  3. Genomes-based phylogeny of the genus Xanthomonas

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    Rodriguez-R Luis M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Xanthomonas comprises several plant pathogenic bacteria affecting a wide range of hosts. Despite the economic, industrial and biological importance of Xanthomonas, the classification and phylogenetic relationships within the genus are still under active debate. Some of the relationships between pathovars and species have not been thoroughly clarified, with old pathovars becoming new species. A change in the genus name has been recently suggested for Xanthomonas albilineans, an early branching species currently located in this genus, but a thorough phylogenomic reconstruction would aid in solving these and other discrepancies in this genus. Results Here we report the results of the genome-wide analysis of DNA sequences from 989 orthologous groups from 17 Xanthomonas spp. genomes available to date, representing all major lineages within the genus. The phylogenetic and computational analyses used in this study have been automated in a Perl package designated Unus, which provides a framework for phylogenomic analyses which can be applied to other datasets at the genomic level. Unus can also be easily incorporated into other phylogenomic pipelines. Conclusions Our phylogeny agrees with previous phylogenetic topologies on the genus, but revealed that the genomes of Xanthomonas citri and Xanthomonas fuscans belong to the same species, and that of Xanthomonas albilineans is basal to the joint clade of Xanthomonas and Xylella fastidiosa. Genome reduction was identified in the species Xanthomonas vasicola in addition to the previously identified reduction in Xanthomonas albilineans. Lateral gene transfer was also observed in two gene clusters.

  4. On the drought in the Balearic Islands during the hydrological year 2015–2016

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    C. Ramis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During the hydrological year 2015–2016 (September to August a severe drought affected the Balearic Islands, with substantial consequences (alleviated partially by desalination plants on water availability for consumption from reservoirs and aquifers and also on the vegetation cover. In particular, a plague of Xylella fastidiosa reached an alarming level for almond and olive trees. The expansion of this infestation could be attributed to, or at least favored by, the extreme drought. In this paper we analyze this anomalous episode in terms of the corresponding water balance in comparison with the balance obtained from long-term climatological data. It is shown that the drought was the result of a lack of winter precipitation, the lowest in 43 years, which led to a shortage of water storage in the soil. In several meteorological stations analyzed, evaporation was greater than precipitation during all the months of the year. In terms of attribution, it is found that during the 2015–2016 winter the atmospheric circulation over the North Atlantic was largely westerly and intense, with high values of the NAO index that were reflected in high pressures over the Iberian Peninsula and the western Mediterranean.

  5. Espécies de cigarrinhas em cultivo de café no Município de Santa Teresa, Espírito Santo, Brasil (Hemiptera, Cicadellidae, Cicadellinae

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    Rachel A. Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As cigarrinhas da subfamília Cicadellinae são importantes vetores de patógenos de plantas cultivadas, dentre eles, a bactéria Xylella fastidiosa, que, no Brasil, ataca cultivos de citros, café e também de ameixa. Pouca informação é conhecida sobre a ocorrência, distribuição e biologia de cicadelíneos em plantações de café. Este trabalho apresenta uma lista de 141 espécimes, coletados em meses alternados, no período entre junho de 2009 e abril de 2010, em plantação de café no Município de Santa Teresa no Estado do Espírito Santo, Brasil. Esses espécimes estão distribuídos em 16 gêneros e 21 espécies pertencentes às duas tribos de Cicadellinae: Cicadellini e Proconiini. Dentre os Cicadellini listados, o gênero Graphocephala é, pela primeira vez, registrado para o Brasil.

  6. Identification of Novel and Conserved microRNAs in Homalodisca vitripennis, the Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter by Expression Profiling.

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    Raja Sekhar Nandety

    Full Text Available The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae, is a xylem-feeding leafhopper and an important vector of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa; the causal agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. MicroRNAs are a class of small RNAs that play an important role in the functional development of various organisms including insects. In H. vitripennis, we identified microRNAs using high-throughput deep sequencing of adults followed by computational and manual annotation. A total of 14 novel microRNAs that are not found in the miRBase were identified from adult H. vitripennis. Conserved microRNAs were also found in our datasets. By comparison to our previously determined transcriptome sequence of H. vitripennis, we identified the potential targets of the microRNAs in the transcriptome. This microRNA profile information not only provides a more nuanced understanding of the biological and physiological mechanisms that govern gene expression in H. vitripennis, but may also lead to the identification of novel mechanisms for biorationally designed management strategies through the use of microRNAs.

  7. Plant Pathology and Information Technology: Opportunity for Management of Disease Outbreak and Applications in Regulation Frameworks

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    Andrea Luvisi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In many European rural areas, agriculture is not only an economic activity, but it is strictly linked to environmental and social characteristics of the area. Thus, sometimes, a pathogen can become a social threat, as in the case of Xylella fastidiosa and olive trees (Olea europaea L. in Salento. Fast and systemic response to threats represents the key to success in stopping pest invasions, and proves a great help in managing lots of data in a short time or coordinating large-scale monitoring coming from applying Information Technology tools. Regarding the field of applications, the advantages provided by new technologies are countless. However, is it the same in agriculture? Electronic identification tools can be applied for plant health management and certification. Treatments, agrochemical management or impact assessment may also be supported by dematerialization of data. Information Technology solution for urban forestry management or traceability of commodities belonging to “Food from Somewhere” regimes were analyzed and compared to protection from pests of a unique tree heritage such as olive trees in Salento.

  8. Doing Gener in Brazilian Biology: Obstacles and Prejudices on Knowledge Production within the FAFESP Genome Proyect

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    Conceição da Costa, Maria

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyse the participation of women scientist in knowledge production within the Genome Project sponsored by FAPESP (The State of São Paulo Research Foundation. Between 1997 and 2003, FAPESP invested approximately 33 million euros to develop the FAPESP Genome Project (PGF, generating major changes in Molecular Biology in Brazil: institutions devoted to fostering science and technology have been investing large sum of money; bioinformatics became one of the fields with great demand for professionals, and the results of the Xylella Genome Project, first organism sequenced in Brazil, were published in several international scientific journals including Nature, and Brazil became the first country to develop genome projects outside USA, Europe and Japan. As a consequence of this process, women scientists were loosing space as “spokespersons of this new science”, playing secondary roles at the project.Este artículo tiene como objetivo analizar la participación de las mujeres en la producción de conocimiento del proyecto genoma financiado por la FAPESP (Fundación de Apoyo a la Investigación del Estado de São Paulo. Entre 1997 y 2003, FAPESP invirtió aproximadamente 33 millones de euros en el desarrollo del Proyecto Genoma Fapesp (PGF, provocando importantes cambios en la Biología Molecular brasileña: las instituciones de fomento a la investigación comenzaron a promoverla con grandes financiaciones; la bioinformática se tornó uno de los campos con mayor demanda de profesionales y, por fin, los resultados del Proyecto Genoma de la Xylella Fastidiosa, primer organismo vivo secuenciado en Brasil, se publicaron en revistas científicas internacionales, como Nature. Con ello se convierte en el primer país fuera de la tríada EUA-Europa-Japón en desarrollar proyectos genoma. Como consecuencia del proceso, las mujeres están perdiendo espacio como “portavoces de esta nueva ciencia”, ocupando papeles secundarios en el

  9. Deficiência hídrica agrava os sintomas fisiológicos da clorose variegada dos citros em laranjeira 'Natal' Water deficiency intensifies physiological symptoms of citrus variegated clorosis in 'Natal' sweet orange plants

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    Eduardo Caruso Machado

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A clorose variegada dos citros (CVC é uma doença que tem promovido sérios prejuízos aos laranjais das regiões Norte e Nordeste do Estado de São Paulo, onde a deficiência hídrica e as altas temperaturas são mais frequentes. Assim, este trabalho objetivou a avaliação do efeito da deficiência hídrica no desenvolvimento de sintomas fisiológicos em laranjeira 'Natal' com CVC. Foram realizadas medidas do potencial da água na folha, transpiração, condutância estomática e assimilação de CO2, em laranjeiras em condições naturais e submetidas à irrigação. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos ao acaso com cinco repetições. A condutância estomática, a transpiração diária e o potencial da água na folha foram menores nas plantas com CVC. A assimilação diária de CO2 foi menor nas laranjeiras com CVC mesmo quando irrigadas. De fato, a irrigação diminuiu o efeito da CVC, porém não impediu o estabelecimento da doença em laranjeiras inoculadas com Xylella fastidiosa. Em relação aos demais tratamentos, as plantas infectadas e mantidas sob condições naturais (sem irrigação apresentaram maior comprometimento das trocas gasosas, mesmo quando as avaliações fisiológicas foram feitas em período úmido (verão.Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC is a disease that has caused serious economical losses in citrus grove located in the North and Northeastern regions of São Paulo State, where water deficiency and high temperature occur frequently. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of water deficiency on the development of physiological symptoms in 'Natal' sweet orange plants with CVC. Measurements of leaf water potential, transpiration, stomatal conductance e CO2 assimilation were taken in plants under natural conditions and submitted to irrigation. The experimental design was in randomized blocks, with five replications. Stomatal conductance, daily transpiration and leaf water potential were

  10. Fluxo de seiva e fotossíntese em laranjeira 'Natal' com clorose variegada dos citros Sap flow and photosynthesis of 'Natal' sweet orange plants with citrus variegated chlorosis

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    Eduardo Caruso Machado

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos da clorose variegada dos citros (CVC, no fluxo de seiva, trocas gasosas e atividade fotoquímica em laranjeira 'Natal', com e sem CVC, em condição de campo. O curso diário do fluxo de seiva, potencial da água na folha, assimilação de CO2, transpiração, condutância estomática e eficiência quântica máxima e efetiva do fotossistema II foram avaliados. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos ao acaso com cinco repetições. O fluxo de seiva foi 1,9 vez superior nas plantas sadias em relação às doentes. Em plantas doentes ocorreu queda de 43, 28 e 33% na assimilação de CO2, condutância estomática e transpiração, respectivamente. As plantas com CVC apresentaram fotoinibição dinâmica. Uma vez que a eficiência quântica efetiva apresentou um padrão de resposta semelhante, durante o dia, em ambos os tratamentos, o efeito protetor da fotorrespiração no aparato fotoquímico em plantas com CVC é discutido. As quedas de assimilação de CO2, transpiração e de fluxo de seiva, nas plantas com CVC, foram decorrentes do menor valor da condutância estomática, possivelmente causado pela colonização dos vasos do xilema pela Xylella fastidiosa.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC on sap flow, gas exchanges and photochemical activity in 'Natal' sweet orange plants with and without CVC under field condition. Diurnal courses of sap flow, leaf water potential, CO2 assimilation rate and transpiration, stomatal conductance, potential and effective quantum efficiency of photosystem II were evaluated. The experiment was arranged in a random block design with five repetitions. Healthy plants showed sap flow values around 1.9 times higher than injured ones. Injured plants exhibited reductions of 43, 28 and 33% in CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration, respectively. CVC-affected plants showed dynamic

  11. Nonlinear models for describing the Citrus Variegated Chlorosis in groves of two counties at northwestern Paraná state, Brazil = Modelo não-linear para a curva de progresso de incidência da Clorose Variegada dos Citros (CVC em dois municípios da região noroeste do Estado do Paraná

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    Clara Matiko Ueda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, the production of sweet oranges has been threatened by the Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC incited by the gram-negative bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Wells. Commercial citrus groves in two counties at the Northwestern Paraná state were evaluated to estimate the disease progression by using parameterizations of nonlinear models. Groves of Citrus sinensis Osbeck, variety “Pêra”, “Valência”, “Natal” and “Folha Murcha” had all the plants evaluated for the presence of disease symptoms. Thereafter, different parameterizations of the Logistic and Gompertz models were fitted to these data. The goodness of fit was evaluated by the intrinsic (IN and parameter-effects (PE curvatures of Bates and Watts, the bias of Box and the Hougaard measures of skewness. In Loanda, the best model was the Fermi-Dirac, and in Nova Esperança the data were best fitted to the parameterization L5, which is also a parameterization from the Logistic model.A citricultura é afetada por diversas doenças, dentre as quais a Clorose Variegada dos Citros (CVC causada pela bactéria Xylella fastidiosa (Wells. Para a região noroeste do Estado do Paraná, onde foi avaliada a CVC, propõe-se encontrar modelos não-lineares de curvas de progresso de incidência da CVC que representem o percentual de plantas acometidas pela doença. Para avaliar o comprometimento dos pomares com relação à doença, foram escolhidos pomares comerciais em dois municípios, onde foi determinada a proporção de plantas doentes. Foram selecionados talhões de laranja doce (Citrus sinensis Osbeck nas variedades “Pêra”, “Valência”, “Natal” e “Folha Murcha” e a avaliação de todas as plantas do talhão foi realizada visualmente em relação à presença ou à ausência de sintomas de CVC. Para estimar o modelo que melhor se ajustou aos dados de progresso da proporção da doença em cada talhão, foram considerados modelos não-lineares decrescimento sigmoidal

  12. A Microbial Community in Sediments Beneath the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet, Ice Stream C (Kamb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, M.; Han, S.; Foo, W.; Bui, D.; Lanoil, B.

    2004-12-01

    In 2000, an ice-drilling project focusing on the "sticky spot" of Ice Stream C recovered cores of sub-glacial sediments from beneath the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet. We have characterized several chemical and microbiological parameters of the sole intact sediment core. Pore waters extracted from these sediments were brackish and some were supersaturated with respect to calcite. Ion chromatography demonstrated the presence of several organic acids at low, but detectable, levels in the pore water. DAPI direct cell counts were approximately 107 cells g-1. Aerobic viable plate counts were much lower than direct cell counts; however, they were two orders of magnitude higher on plates incubated at low temperature (4 ° C; 3.63 x 105 CFU ml-1) than at higher temperatures (ca. 22° C; 1.5 x 103 CFU ml-1); no colonies were detected on plates incubated anaerobically at either temperature. 16S rDNA clone library analysis indicates extremely limited bacterial diversity in these samples: six phylogenetic clades were detected. The three dominant bacterial phylogenetic clades in the clone libraries (252 clones total) were most closely related to Thiobacillus thioparus (180 clones), Polaromonas vacuolata (34 clones), and Gallionella ferruginea (35 clones) and their relatives; one clone each represented the other three phylogenetic clades (most closely related to Ralstonia pickettii, Lysobacter antibioticus, and Xylella fastidiosa, respectively). These sequences match closely with sequences previously obtained from other subglacial environments in Alaska, Ellesmere Island, Canada and New Zealand. Implications of this microbial community to subglacial chemistry and microbial biogeography will be discussed.

  13. Effects of citrus and avocado irrigation and nitrogen-form soil amendment on host selection by adult Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadel, H; Seligmann, R; Johnson, M W; Hagler, J R; Stenger, D C; Groves, R L

    2008-06-01

    Host plant water status is thought to influence dispersal of the xylophagous leafhopper Homalodisca vitripennis Germar, especially where plants are grown under high evaporative demand. Preference by adult H. vitripennis for plants grown under different water deficit and nitrogen form fertilization regimens was studied under laboratory conditions. Leafhopper abundance and ovipositional preference were studied on potted 'Washington navel' orange and 'Haas' avocado in cage choice tests, and feeding rate was estimated using excreta produced by insects confined on plants. A similar study compared responses to citrus treated with 1:1 and 26:1 ratios of fertigated nitrate-N to ammonium-N. The insects were more abundant, oviposited, and fed significantly more on surplus-irrigated plants than on plants under moderate continuous deficit irrigation except avocado feeding, which was nearly significant. Plants exposed to drought became less preferred after 3 and 7 d in avocado and citrus, respectively. Citrus xylem fluid tension at this point was estimated at 0.93 MPa. A corresponding pattern of decline in feeding rate was observed on citrus, but on avocado, feeding rate was low overall and not statistically different between treatments. No statistical differences in abundance, oviposition, or feeding were detected on citrus fertigated with 26:1 or 1:1 ratios of nitrate-N to ammonium-N. Feeding occurred diurnally on both plant species. Discussion is provided on the potential deployment of regulated deficit irrigation to manage H. vitripennis movement as part of a multitactic effort to minimize the risk of disease outbreaks from Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. in southern California agriculture.

  14. Reference genes for accurate transcript normalization in citrus genotypes under different experimental conditions.

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    Valéria Mafra

    Full Text Available Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR has emerged as an accurate and widely used technique for expression profiling of selected genes. However, obtaining reliable measurements depends on the selection of appropriate reference genes for gene expression normalization. The aim of this work was to assess the expression stability of 15 candidate genes to determine which set of reference genes is best suited for transcript normalization in citrus in different tissues and organs and leaves challenged with five pathogens (Alternaria alternata, Phytophthora parasitica, Xylella fastidiosa and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. We tested traditional genes used for transcript normalization in citrus and orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana genes described as superior reference genes based on transcriptome data. geNorm and NormFinder algorithms were used to find the best reference genes to normalize all samples and conditions tested. Additionally, each biotic stress was individually analyzed by geNorm. In general, FBOX (encoding a member of the F-box family and GAPC2 (GAPDH was the most stable candidate gene set assessed under the different conditions and subsets tested, while CYP (cyclophilin, TUB (tubulin and CtP (cathepsin were the least stably expressed genes found. Validation of the best suitable reference genes for normalizing the expression level of the WRKY70 transcription factor in leaves infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus showed that arbitrary use of reference genes without previous testing could lead to misinterpretation of data. Our results revealed FBOX, SAND (a SAND family protein, GAPC2 and UPL7 (ubiquitin protein ligase 7 to be superior reference genes, and we recommend their use in studies of gene expression in citrus species and relatives. This work constitutes the first systematic analysis for the selection of superior reference genes for transcript normalization in different citrus organs and under biotic stress.

  15. Feeding and development of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, on Australian native plant species and implications for Australian biosecurity.

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    Anna A Rathé

    Full Text Available In any insect invasion the presence or absence of suitable food and oviposition hosts in the invaded range is a key factor determining establishment success. The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, is an important insect vector of the xylem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, Xylella fastidiosa, which causes disease in numerous host plants including food and feedstock crops, ornamentals and weeds. Both the pathogen and the vector are native to the Americas and are considered to be highly invasive. Neither has been detected in Australia. Twelve Australian native plant species present in the USA were observed over two years for suitability as H. vitripennis feeding, oviposition and nymph development hosts. Hosts providing evidence of adult or nymph presence were Leptospermum laevigatum, Acacia cowleana, Eremophila divaricata, Eucalyptus wandoo, Hakea laurina, Melaleuca laterita and Swainsona galegifolia. An oviposition-suitability field study was conducted with citrus, a favoured oviposition host, as a positive control. Citrus and L. laevigatum, A. cowleana, B. ericifolia×B. spinulosa, C. pulchella, E. divaricata, E. wandoo, H. laurina, and S. galegifolia were found to be oviposition hosts. Egg parasitism by the mymarid parasitoid Gonatocerus ashmeadi was observed on all Australian plants. A number of Australian plants that may facilitate H. vitripennis invasion have been identified and categorised as 'high risk' due to their ability to support all three life stages (egg, nymph and adult of the insect in the field (L. laevigatum, A. cowleana, E. divaricata, H. laurina, and S. galegifolia. The implications of these host status and natural enemy research findings are discussed and placed in an Australian invasion context.

  16. Acquisition and evolution of plant pathogenesis-associated gene clusters and candidate determinants of tissue-specificity in xanthomonas.

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    Hong Lu

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas is a large genus of plant-associated and plant-pathogenic bacteria. Collectively, members cause diseases on over 392 plant species. Individually, they exhibit marked host- and tissue-specificity. The determinants of this specificity are unknown.To assess potential contributions to host- and tissue-specificity, pathogenesis-associated gene clusters were compared across genomes of eight Xanthomonas strains representing vascular or non-vascular pathogens of rice, brassicas, pepper and tomato, and citrus. The gum cluster for extracellular polysaccharide is conserved except for gumN and sequences downstream. The xcs and xps clusters for type II secretion are conserved, except in the rice pathogens, in which xcs is missing. In the otherwise conserved hrp cluster, sequences flanking the core genes for type III secretion vary with respect to insertion sequence element and putative effector gene content. Variation at the rpf (regulation of pathogenicity factors cluster is more pronounced, though genes with established functional relevance are conserved. A cluster for synthesis of lipopolysaccharide varies highly, suggesting multiple horizontal gene transfers and reassortments, but this variation does not correlate with host- or tissue-specificity. Phylogenetic trees based on amino acid alignments of gum, xps, xcs, hrp, and rpf cluster products generally reflect strain phylogeny. However, amino acid residues at four positions correlate with tissue specificity, revealing hpaA and xpsD as candidate determinants. Examination of genome sequences of xanthomonads Xylella fastidiosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia revealed that the hrp, gum, and xcs clusters are recent acquisitions in the Xanthomonas lineage.Our results provide insight into the ancestral Xanthomonas genome and indicate that differentiation with respect to host- and tissue-specificity involved not major modifications or wholesale exchange of clusters, but subtle changes in a small

  17. Sequencing and de novo assembly of the transcriptome of the glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis.

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    Raja Sekhar Nandety

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The glassy-winged sharpshooter Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae, is a xylem-feeding leafhopper and important vector of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa; the causal agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. The functional complexity of the transcriptome of H. vitripennis has not been elucidated thus far. It is a necessary blueprint for an understanding of the development of H. vitripennis and for designing efficient biorational control strategies including those based on RNA interference. RESULTS: Here we elucidate and explore the transcriptome of adult H. vitripennis using high-throughput paired end deep sequencing and de novo assembly. A total of 32,803,656 paired-end reads were obtained with an average transcript length of 624 nucleotides. We assembled 32.9 Mb of the transcriptome of H. vitripennis that spanned across 47,265 loci and 52,708 transcripts. Comparison of our non-redundant database showed that 45% of the deduced proteins of H. vitripennis exhibit identity (e-value ≤1(-5 with known proteins. We assigned Gene Ontology (GO terms, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG annotations, and potential Pfam domains to each transcript isoform. In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of key regulatory genes of H. vitripennis, we characterized predicted proteins involved in the metabolism of juvenile hormone, and biogenesis of small RNAs (Dicer and Piwi sequences from the transcriptomic sequences. Analysis of transposable element sequences of H. vitripennis indicated that the genome is less expanded in comparison to many other insects with approximately 1% of the transcriptome carrying transposable elements. CONCLUSIONS: Our data significantly enhance the molecular resources available for future study and control of this economically important hemipteran. This transcriptional information not only provides a more nuanced understanding of the underlying biological and physiological mechanisms that

  18. The PDB database is a rich source of alpha-helical anti-microbial peptides to combat disease causing pathogens [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

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    Sandeep Chakraborty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic potential of α-helical anti-microbial peptides (AH-AMP to combat pathogens is fast gaining prominence. Based on recently published open access software for characterizing α-helical peptides (PAGAL, we elucidate a search methodology (SCALPEL that leverages the massive structural data pre-existing in the PDB database to obtain AH-AMPs belonging to the host proteome. We provide in vitro validation of SCALPEL on plant pathogens (Xylella fastidiosa, Xanthomonas arboricola and Liberibacter crescens by identifying AH-AMPs that mirror the function and properties of cecropin B, a well-studied AH-AMP. The identified peptides include a linear AH-AMP present within the existing structure of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC20, and an AH-AMP mimicing the properties of the two α-helices of cecropin B from chitinase (CHITI25. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these peptides are comparable to that of cecropin B, while anionic peptides used as control failed to show any inhibitory effect on these pathogens. Substitute therapies in place of conventional chemotherapies using membrane permeabilizing peptides like these might also prove effective to target cancer cells. The use of native structures from the same organism could possibly ensure that administration of such peptides will be better tolerated and not elicit an adverse immune response. We suggest a similar approach to target Ebola epitopes, enumerated using PAGAL recently, by selecting suitable peptides from the human proteome, especially in wake of recent reports of cationic amphiphiles inhibiting virus entry and infection.

  19. Metabolic complementarity and genomics of the dual bacterial symbiosis of sharpshooters.

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    Dongying Wu

    2006-06-01

    targets for controlling plant pathogens such as Xylella fastidiosa, a major agroeconomic problem, for which H. coagulata and other sharpshooters serve as vectors of transmission.

  20. Antennal olfactory responses of adult meadow spittlebug, Philaenus spumarius, to volatile organic compounds (VOCs.

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    Giacinto Salvatore Germinara

    Full Text Available The meadow spittlebug, Philaenus spumarius L. (Hemiptera, Aphrophoridae is a commonly found vector of Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. (1987 strain subspecies pauca associated with the "Olive Quick Decline Syndrome" in Italy. To contribute to the knowledge of the adult P. spumarius chemoreceptivity, electroantennographic (EAG responses of both sexes to 50 volatile organic compounds (VOCs including aliphatic aldehydes, alcohols, esters, and ketones, terpenoids, and aromatics were recorded. Measurable EAG responses were elicited by all compounds tested. In both sexes, octanal, 2-octanol, 2-decanone, (E-2-hexenyl acetate, and vanillin elicited the strongest antennal amplitude within the chemical groups of aliphatic saturated aldehydes, aliphatic alcohols, aliphatic acetates and aromatics, respectively. Male and female EAG responses to sulcatol, (±linalool, and sulcatone were higher than those to other terpenoinds. In both sexes, the weakest antennal stimulants were phenethyl alcohol and 2-pentanone. Sexual differences in the EAG amplitude were found only for four of test compounds suggesting a general similarity between males and females in antennal sensitivity. The olfactory system of both sexes proved to be sensitive to changes in stimulus concentration, carbon chain length, and compound structure. Compounds with short carbon chain length (C5-C6 elicited lower EAG amplitudes than compounds with higher carbon chain length (C9-C10 in all classes of aliphatic hydrocarbons with different functional groups. The elucidation of the sensitivity profile of P. spumarius to a variety of VOCs provides a basis for future identification of behaviorally-active compounds useful for developing semiochemical-based control strategies of this pest.

  1. Bacterial variations on the methionine salvage pathway

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    Haas Dieter

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thiomethyl group of S-adenosylmethionine is often recycled as methionine from methylthioadenosine. The corresponding pathway has been unravelled in Bacillus subtilis. However methylthioadenosine is subjected to alternative degradative pathways depending on the organism. Results This work uses genome in silico analysis to propose methionine salvage pathways for Klebsiella pneumoniae, Leptospira interrogans, Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis and Xylella fastidiosa. Experiments performed with mutants of B. subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa substantiate the hypotheses proposed. The enzymes that catalyze the reactions are recruited from a variety of origins. The first, ubiquitous, enzyme of the pathway, MtnA (methylthioribose-1-phosphate isomerase, belongs to a family of proteins related to eukaryotic intiation factor 2B alpha. mtnB codes for a methylthioribulose-1-phosphate dehydratase. Two reactions follow, that of an enolase and that of a phosphatase. While in B. subtilis this is performed by two distinct polypeptides, in the other organisms analyzed here an enolase-phosphatase yields 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In the presence of dioxygen an aci-reductone dioxygenase yields the immediate precursor of methionine, ketomethylthiobutyrate. Under some conditions this enzyme produces carbon monoxide in B. subtilis, suggesting a route for a new gaseous mediator in bacteria. Ketomethylthiobutyrate is finally transaminated by an aminotransferase that exists usually as a broad specificity enzyme (often able to transaminate aromatic aminoacid keto-acid precursors or histidinol-phosphate. Conclusion A functional methionine salvage pathway was experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, in P. aeruginosa. Apparently, methionine salvage pathways are frequent in Bacteria (and in Eukarya, with recruitment of different polypeptides to perform the needed reactions (an ancestor of a translation initiation factor and Ru

  2. Multiplicação in vitro da ameixeira 'Santa Rosa': efeito da citocinina BAP

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    Rogalski Marcelo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A ameixeira 'Santa Rosa' apresenta alta produtividade, ótimo sabor e aparência dos frutos para a comercialização. No entanto, por ser altamente suscetível à escaldadura das folhas (Xylella fastidiosa Wells, esta variedade apresenta problemas de cultivo no sul do Brasil. As técnicas de cultura in vitro permitem propagar e rapidamente espécies de interesse, além de permitir a limpeza de patógenos e a produção de matrizes com qualidade genética e sanitária comprovada. Porém, o uso prático da propagação in vitro requer a otimização das condições de cultura para cada espécie e/ou variedade. Dentre os fatores que mais influenciam a micropropagação, estão as citocininas, com destaque para o BAP. O objetivo principal deste trabalho foi avaliar o potencial de multiplicação in vitro da ameixeira 'Santa Rosa' sob diferentes concentrações de BAP. Após três subculturas em meio MA1, segmentos nodais com 0,5-1,0 cm foram submetidos a diferentes concentrações de BAP (0,5; 1,0; 2,0 e 3,0 mg.L-1. Os resultados mostraram que não ocorreram diferenças significativas no número de brotos para as diferentes concentrações de BAP testadas. No entanto, o maior número de brotos por explante (3,6 obteve-se na concentração de 2,0 mg.L-1 e a maior altura média dos brotos foi obtido na concentração de 0,5 mg.L-1 de BAP. Concentrações maiores que a 0,5 mg.L-1 de BAP inibiram o crescimento dos brotos. A micropropagação da ameixeira 'Santa Rosa' a partir de ápices caulinares e gemas laterais em meio de cultura MA1 mostrou-se eficaz.

  3. Computational Biology Tools for Identifying Specific Ligand Binding Residues for Novel Agrochemical and Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshich, Izabella Agostinho Pena; Nishimura, Leticia; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Salim, Jose Augusto; Villalta-Romero, Fabian; Borro, Luiz; Yano, Inacio Henrique; Mazoni, Ivan; Tasic, Ljubica; Jardine, Jose Gilberto; Neshich, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The term "agrochemicals" is used in its generic form to represent a spectrum of pesticides, such as insecticides, fungicides or bactericides. They contain active components designed for optimized pest management and control, therefore allowing for economically sound and labor efficient agricultural production. A "drug" on the other side is a term that is used for compounds designed for controlling human diseases. Although drugs are subjected to much more severe testing and regulation procedures before reaching the market, they might contain exactly the same active ingredient as certain agrochemicals, what is the case described in present work, showing how a small chemical compound might be used to control pathogenicity of Gram negative bacteria Xylella fastidiosa which devastates citrus plantations, as well as for control of, for example, meningitis in humans. It is also clear that so far the production of new agrochemicals is not benefiting as much from the in silico new chemical compound identification/discovery as pharmaceutical production. Rational drug design crucially depends on detailed knowledge of structural information about the receptor (target protein) and the ligand (drug/agrochemical). The interaction between the two molecules is the subject of analysis that aims to understand relationship between structure and function, mainly deciphering some fundamental elements of the nanoenvironment where the interaction occurs. In this work we will emphasize the role of understanding nanoenvironmental factors that guide recognition and interaction of target protein and its function modifier, an agrochemical or a drug. The repertoire of nanoenvironment descriptors is used for two selected and specific cases we have approached in order to offer a technological solution for some very important problems that needs special attention in agriculture: elimination of pathogenicity of a bacterium which is attacking citrus plants and formulation of a new fungicide. Finally

  4. Etiology of three recent diseases of citrus in São Paulo State: sudden death, variegated chlorosis and huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bové, Joseph Marie; Ayres, Antonio Juliano

    2007-01-01

    , citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), was observed in 1987 in the Triangulo Mineiro of Minas Gerais State and the northern and north-eastern parts of SSP. By 2000, the disease affected already 34% of the 200 million sweet orange trees in SSP. By 2005, the percentage had increased to 43%, and CVC was present in all citrus growing regions of Brazil. Electron microscopy showed that xylem-limited bacteria were present in all symptomatic sweet orange leaves and fruit tissues tested, but not in similar materials from healthy, symptomless trees. Bacteria were consistently cultured from twigs of CVC-affected sweet orange trees but not from twigs of healthy trees. Serological analyses showed the CVC bacterium to be a strain of Xylella fastidiosa. The disease could be reproduced and Koch's postulates fulfilled, by mechanically inoculating a pure culture of X. fastidiosa isolate 8.1.b into sweet orange seedlings. The genome of a CVC strain of X. fastidiosa was sequenced in SSP in the frame of a project supported by FAPESP and Fundecitrus. X. fastidiosa is the first plant pathogenic bacterium, the genome of which has been sequenced. Until recently, America was free of huanglongbing (HLB), but in March 2004 and August 2005, symptoms of the disease were recognized, respectively in the State of São Paulo (SSP) and in Florida, USA. HLB was known in China since 1870 and in South Africa since 1928. Because of its destructiveness and its rapid spread by efficient psyllid insect-vectors, HLB is probably the most serious citrus disease. HLB is caused by a phloem sieve tube-restricted Gram negative bacterium, not yet available in culture. In the 1990s, the bacterium was characterized by molecular techniques as a member of the alpha proteobacteria designated Candidatus Liberibacter africanus for the disease in Africa, and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus for HLB in Asia. In SSP, Ca. L. asiaticus is also present, but most of the trees are infected with a new species, Candidatus Liberibacter

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_004556 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... fastidiosa Temecula1] ... Length = 89 ... Query: 111 TPPSITITPTAVEMLKGTLANAPGSTLALSIDSRFQPTFELAPIN...TQAIAAEYNGLRVQF 170 ... TPPSITITPTAVEMLKGTLANAPGSTLALSIDSRFQPTFELAPINTQAIA...AEYNGLRVQF Sbjct: 1 ... TPPSITITPTAVEMLKGTLANAPGSTLALSIDSRFQPTFELAPINTQAIAAEYNGLRVQF 60 ...

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_004556 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lla ... fastidiosa Temecula1] ... Length = 101 ... Query: 10 ... TSHRPYLLRALVEWINDNGMTPHILVDAGIQGVQV...PESAVKDGRVVLNIAGRAVMHLHIG 69 ... TSHRPYLLRALVEWINDNGMTPHILVDAGIQGVQVPESAVK...DGRVVLNIAGRAVMHLHIG Sbjct: 1 ... TSHRPYLLRALVEWINDNGMTPHILVDAGIQGVQVPESAVKDGRVVLNIAGRAVMHLHIG 60 ...

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_002488 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fastidiosa (strain ... 9a5c) ... Length = 101 ... Query: 10 ... TSHRPYLLRALVEWIND...NGMTPHILVDAGIQGVQVPESAVKDGRVVLNIAGRAVMHLHIG 69 ... TSHRPYLLRALVEWINDNGMTPHILVDAGIQGVQVPESAVK...DGRVVLNIAGRAVMHLHIG Sbjct: 1 ... TSHRPYLLRALVEWINDNGMTPHILVDAGIQGVQVPESAVKDGRVVLNIAGRAVMHLHIG 60 ...

  8. Alfalfa and pastures: sources of pests or generalist natural enemies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce’s disease of grapevine and almond leaf scorch disease are both caused by the bacterial pathogen Xyllela fastidiosa. In the Central Valley of California, the green sharpshooter is the most common vector of X. fastidiosa. As alfalfa fields and pastures are considered source habitats for green s...

  9. Novel methods of monitoring the feeding behavior of Homalodisca coagulata (Say) (Hemiptera; Cicadellidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Petr; Bextine, B. R.; Doležalová, R.; Miller, T. A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 5 (2004), s. 1055-1062 ISSN 0013-8746 Grant - others:USDA-APHIS Cooperative Agreement(US) 8500-0510-GR Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Susceptible rice varieties * xylella -fastidosa * pierces--disease Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.083, year: 2004

  10. Correction: Studholme et al., Draft Genome Sequences of Xanthomonas sacchari and Two Banana-Associated Xanthomonads Reveal Insights into the Xanthomonas Group 1 clade. Genes 2011, 2, 1050–1065.

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    Murray Grant

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Following publication of our article [1], we found errors in analyses performed by the corresponding author (DJS related to the phylogenetic relationship between Xylella species and the other xanthomonads. These errors do not make any difference to the main findings and conclusions reported in our paper. For example, the phylogenetic positions of NCPPB1131, NCPPB1132 and NCPPB4393 within the Group 1 Xanthomonas species are unaffected. However, we wish to apologize to the authors of a previous work [2] for creating any negative impression on the quality of their phylogenetic analyses and to take this opportunity to rectify the errors. [...

  11. Membracidos de Colombia - I. Revisión parcial de las especies del género Alchisme Kirkaldy (Homoptera: Membracidae: Hoplophorioninae Membracidos de Colombia - I. Revisión parcial de las especies del género Alchisme Kirkaldy (Homoptera: Membracidae: Hoplophorioninae

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    Restrepo Mejía Ruben

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available Se revisó el género Alchisme Kirkaldy. De las diecinueve especies anotadas por Metcalf (1965 no se obtuvieron especímenes de A. apicalis (Walker, A. costaricensis Goding, A. elevata Goding, A. laticornis Funkhouser, A. pinguicornisFunkhouser, A. recurva (Stäl, A. spinosa Funkhouser y A. truncaticornis (Germar. Se incluyen las descripciones originales de estas especies y tentativamente se localizan en la clave presentada. Se redescriben: A. bos (Fairmaire, A. fastidiosa (Fairmaire, A. grossa (Fairmaire, A. inermis (Fairmaire, A. nigrocarinata (Fairmaire, A. rubrocostata (Spinola, A. turrita (Germar, A. ustulata (Fairmaire, A. virescens (Fairmaire y A. nigrocarinata var. tridentata (Fairmaire, para la cual se usa su combinación original A. tridentata (Fairmaire. Se sinonimizóa A. projecta Funkhouser en favor de A. bos (Fairmaire.Se ilustran las principales características del pronoto y de los genitales de los machos; se observaron y se obtuvieron fotografías de los edeagos en un microscopio electrónico "rastreador" (Scanning Electro Microscope, las cualesse incluyen como parte de las ilustraciones. Se analizó la distribución geográfica del género y se ilustró por medio de mapas.The genus Alchisme Kirkaldy was revised. From nineteen species listed by Metcalf (1965 not specimens were obtained of eight of them. Original descriptions of these species are included and tentatively are localized in the key.  A redescription is given for the species A. bos (Fairmaire, A. fastidiosa (Fairmaire, A. grossa (Fairmaire, A. inermis (Fairmaire, A. nigrocarinata (Fairmaire, A. rubrocostata (Spinola, A. turrita (Germar, A. ustulata (Fairmaire, A. virescens (Fairmaire y A. nigrocarinata var. tridentata (Fairmaire, for which was used the original combination A. tridentata (Fairmaire. A. projecta Funkhouser was synonymized in A. bos (Fairmaire. The main pronotum characters and male genitalia are illustred; Scanning Electro Microscope pictures of the

  12. Neurofisiología y funciones mentales

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    Carlos Moreno B.

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available El editor de la revista Nature, al comentar una revisión sobre el estado de las neurociencias, el 15 de octubre de 1981, afirmo: "En cierto sentido, las neurociencias están en el filo de la navaja de la nueva biología. Enriquecidas por la información novedosa y fortalecidas con un desfile vertiginoso de nuevas técnicas, están comprometidas con una de las más molestas y antiguas preguntas: ¿Cómo lleva a cabo sus funciones la representación física de la mente, llamada cerebro? Pero en otro sentido, las neurociencias incluyen algunas de las investigaciones más fastidiosas. EI continuo progreso de la técnica, tan veloz como podamos imaginarlo, es con frecuencia una fuente de frustración y desilusión para los investigadores. La que está de moda este año con las neuronas, puede ser el descarte del próximo... En general, las neurociencias están en el negocio de fabricar ladrillos sin barro.

  13. Identification and in silico analysis of the Citrus HSP70 molecular chaperone gene family

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    Luciano G. Fietto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The completion of the genome sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana model system provided a powerful molecular tool for comparative analysis of gene families present in the genome of economically relevant plant species. In this investigation, we used the sequences of the Arabidopsis Hsp70 gene family to identify and annotate the Citrus Hsp70 genes represented in the CitEST database. Based on sequence comparison analysis, we identified 18 clusters that were further divided into 5 subgroups encoding four mitochondrial mtHsp70s, three plastid csHsp70s, one ER luminal Hsp70 BiP, two HSP110/SSE-related proteins and eight cytosolic Hsp/Hsc70s. We also analyzed the expression profile by digital Northern of each Hsp70 transcript in different organs and in response to stress conditions. The EST database revealed a distinct population distribution of Hsp70 ESTs among isoforms and across the organs surveyed. The Hsp70-5 isoform was highly expressed in seeds, whereas BiP, mitochondrial and plastid HSp70 mRNAs displayed a similar expression profile in the organs analyzed, and were predominantly represented in flowers. Distinct Hsp70 mRNAs were also differentially expressed during Xylella infection and Citrus tristeza viral infection as well as during water deficit. This in silico study sets the groundwork for future investigations to fully characterize functionally the Citrus Hsp70 family and underscores the relevance of Hsp70s in response to abiotic and biotic stresses in Citrus.

  14. Current millennium biotechniques for biomedical research on parasites and host-parasite interactions

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    Teixeira Antonio RL

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of biotechnology in the last three decades has generated the feeling that the newest scientific achievements will deliver high standard quality of life through abundance of food and means for successfully combating diseases. Where the new biotechnologies give access to genetic information, there is a common belief that physiological and pathological processes result from subtle modifications of gene expression. Trustfully, modern genetics has produced genetic maps, physical maps and complete nucleotide sequences from 141 viruses, 51 organelles, two eubacteria, one archeon and one eukaryote (Saccharomices cerevisiae. In addition, during the Centennial Commemoration of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute the nearly complete human genome map was proudly announced, whereas the latest Brazilian key stone contribution to science was the publication of the Shillela fastidiosa genomic sequence highlythed on a Nature cover issue. There exists a belief among the populace that further scientific accomplishments will rapidly lead to new drugs and methodological approaches to cure genetic diseases and other incurable ailments. Yet, much evidence has been accumulated, showing that a large information gap exists between the knowledge of genome sequence and our knowledge of genome function. Now that many genome maps are available, people wish to know what are we going to do with them. Certainly, all these scientific accomplishments will shed light on many more secrets of life. Nevertheless, parsimony in the weekly announcements of promising scientific achievements is necessary. We also need many more creative experimental biologists to discover new, as yet un-envisaged biotechnological approaches, and the basic resource needed for carrying out mile stone research necessary for leading us to that "promised land"often proclaimed by the mass media.

  15. Etiopatogenia e imunoprofilaxia da pneumonia enzoótica suína Etiopathogenesis and immunoprofilaxis of Swine Enzootic Pneumonia

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    Fabricio Rochedo Conceição

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A Pneumonia Enzoótica Suína (PES, causada pela bactéria fastidiosa Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, é a doença respiratória mais importante dos suínos, responsável por enormes prejuízos à suinocultura brasileira e mundial. A elevada prevalência e o fato de pré-dispor os suínos à patógenos oportunistas tornam esta doença o alvo central de um programa de saúde de rebanho para doenças respiratórias. O conhecimento das características do agente etiológico bem como dos seus fatores de patogenicidade pode ajudar na elaboração de novas estratégias de controle da PES. O objetivo desta revisão foi discutir alguns aspectos da etiopatogenia da PES que têm implicação na imunoprofilaxia da doença e os principais resultados obtidos com vacinas de última geração avaliadas experimentalmente.Swine Enzootic Pneumonia (SEP, caused by fastidious bacterium Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, is the most important respiratory disease of swines, responsible for high losses to Brazilian and worldwide swine breeding. The high prevalence and the fact to predis-pose the swines to secondary pathogens make this disease the central target of a herd health program to respiratory diseases. The knowledge of the characteristics and pathogenicity factors of etiologic agent could help in the development of new strategies to control SEP. The aim of this review was to discuss some aspects of the etiopathogenesis of the SEP that have implications in the immunoprofilaxis of disease and the main results obtained with new generation vaccines evaluated experimentally.

  16. Genomic insights into strategies used by Xanthomonas albilineans with its reduced artillery to spread within sugarcane xylem vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieretti Isabelle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xanthomonas albilineans causes leaf scald, a lethal disease of sugarcane. X. albilineans exhibits distinctive pathogenic mechanisms, ecology and taxonomy compared to other species of Xanthomonas. For example, this species produces a potent DNA gyrase inhibitor called albicidin that is largely responsible for inducing disease symptoms; its habitat is limited to xylem; and the species exhibits large variability. A first manuscript on the complete genome sequence of the highly pathogenic X. albilineans strain GPE PC73 focused exclusively on distinctive genomic features shared with Xylella fastidiosa—another xylem-limited Xanthomonadaceae. The present manuscript on the same genome sequence aims to describe all other pathogenicity-related genomic features of X. albilineans, and to compare, using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH, genomic features of two strains differing in pathogenicity. Results Comparative genomic analyses showed that most of the known pathogenicity factors from other Xanthomonas species are conserved in X. albilineans, with the notable absence of two major determinants of the “artillery” of other plant pathogenic species of Xanthomonas: the xanthan gum biosynthesis gene cluster, and the type III secretion system Hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity. Genomic features specific to X. albilineans that may contribute to specific adaptation of this pathogen to sugarcane xylem vessels were also revealed. SSH experiments led to the identification of 20 genes common to three highly pathogenic strains but missing in a less pathogenic strain. These 20 genes, which include four ABC transporter genes, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein gene and an oxidoreductase gene, could play a key role in pathogenicity. With the exception of hypothetical proteins revealed by our comparative genomic analyses and SSH experiments, no genes potentially involved in any offensive or counter-defensive mechanism