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Sample records for physiopathology clinical manifestations

  1. [Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: physiopathology, clinical manifestations and genetics].

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    Preiss, Yudith; Santos, José L; Smalley, Susan V; Maiz, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, caused by genetic deficiency of the 27-hydroxylase enzyme (encoded by CYP27A1). It plays a key role in cholesterol metabolism, especially in bile acid synthesis and in the 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D3 in the liver. Its deficiency causes reduced bile acid synthesis and tissue accumulation of cholestanol. Clinical manifestations are related to the presence of cholestanol deposits and include tendon xanthomas, premature cataracts, chronic diarrhea, progressive neurologic impairment and less frequently coronary heart disease, early onset osteoporosis and abnormalities in the optic disk and retina. An early diagnosis and treatment with quenodeoxycholic acid may prevent further complications, mainly neurological manifestations. This review summarizes cholesterol metabolism related to bile acid synthesis, physiopathology, biochemistry and treatment of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

  2. Clinical physiopathology of hypernatremia

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    F. Sgambato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The maintenance of sodium levels at normal ranges has to be considered one of the most important and crucial physiological balance in order to preserve life. The increase of natremia determines the leakage of H2O from the inside of cells and the consequent brain cells withering, that causes encephalopathy at different stages and in some cases it can even lead to death. AIM OF THE STUDY The fundamentals of general physiopathology are analysed together with systems of compensation and brain adaptation in the three different aetiopathogenetic forms: primary increase of sodium (hypervolemic and haedematose form; missed introduction of pure water (mainly euvolemic form, with no aedema; loss of hypotonic fluids (hypovolemic form with dehydration. The three different clinical entities with their relative clinical approaches have been described.

  3. Physiopathology of human embryonic implantation: clinical incidences.

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    Pauline Demailly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation consists of a series of events promoting the invasion of the endometrium and then the uterine arterial system by the extra-embryonic trophoblast. In order for this semi-heterologous implantation to succeed, the endometrium has to first undergo a number of structural and biochemical changes (decidualization. The decidua's various constituents subsequently play a role in the embryonic implantation. The third step is the transformation of the uterine vascular system and the growth of the placenta, which will provide the foetoplacental unit with nutrients. Several physiopathological aspects will be discussed: 1 the implantation window, regulated by maternal and embryonic hormonal secretions and thus influenced by any defects in the latter: dysharmonic luteal phase, 21-hydroxylase block, abnormal integrin expression, 2 the successive trophoblast invasions of uterine vessels which, when defective, lead to early embryo loss or late-onset vascular pathologies, as preeclampsia, 3 the pregnancy's immunological equilibrium, with a spontaneously tolerated semi-allogeneic implant, 4 the impact of pro-coagulant factors (thrombophilia on the pregnancy's progression, 5 the environment of the uterus, ranging from hydrosalpinx to uterine contractions. In summary, the least anatomical or physiological perturbation can interfere with human embryonic implantation - a very particular phenomenon and a true biological paradox.

  4. Cardiac cachexia and muscle wasting: definition, physiopathology, and clinical consequences

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    Okoshi MP

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marina P Okoshi,1 Fernando G Romeiro,1 Paula F Martinez,1,2 Silvio A Oliveira Jr,1,2 Bertha F Polegato,1 Katashi Okoshi11Internal Medicine Department, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University, UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2School of Physiotherapy, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, BrazilAbstract: Cachexia and muscle wasting are frequently observed in heart failure patients. Cachexia is a predictor of reduced survival, independent of important parameters such as age, heart failure functional class, and functional capacity. Muscle and fat wasting can also predict adverse outcome during cardiac failure. Only more recently were these conditions defined in International Consensus. Considering that heart failure is an inflammatory disease, cardiac cachexia has been diagnosed by finding a body weight loss >5%, in the absence of other diseases and independent of other criteria. Muscle wasting has been defined as lean appendicular mass corrected for height squared of 2 standard deviations or more below the mean for healthy individuals between 20 years and 30 years old from the same ethnic group. The etiology of heart failure-associated cachexia and muscle wasting is multifactorial, and the underlying physiopathological mechanisms are not completely understood. The most important factors are reduced food intake, gastrointestinal alterations, immunological activation, neurohormonal abnormalities, and an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic processes. Cachexia and muscle wasting have clinical consequences in several organs and systems including the gastrointestinal and erythropoietic systems, and the heart, previously affected by the primary disease. We hope that a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in their physiopathology will allow the development of pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies to effectively prevent and treat heart failure-induced cachexia and muscle wasting before significant body

  5. [Clinical physiology and physiopathology of the atrioventricular node].

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    Runge, M; Luckmann, E; Narula, O S

    1977-10-22

    The functional behaviour of the healthy and sick human AV-node under various clinical-experimental conditions is described with special reference to (1) AV-nodal conduction, (2) AV-nodel refractoriness, (3) influence of autonomic tone and (4) role of the AV-node in the initiation of rhythm disturbances.

  6. Abrupt clinical onset of Chiari type I/syringomyelia complex: clinical and physiopathological implications.

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    Massimi, Luca; Della Pepa, Giuseppe M; Caldarelli, Massimo; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2012-07-01

    Chiari I malformation (CI) continues to raise great interest among physicians due to the larger and larger number of newly diagnosed cases. The clinical and radiological picture and the management options of such a chronic disease are well acknowledged as well as those of the associated syringomyelia. Little is known, on the other hand, about abrupt clinical onset following decompensation of CI/syringomyelia complex. This review on the sudden onset of these two conditions shows that this is a very rare phenomenon; only 41 cases are being reported in the last three decades. In all these cases, acute onset was referable to CI/syringomyelia and the clinical course quickly precipitated. Motor deficits (36.5 %), respiratory failure (29 %), cranial nerve palsy (17 %), and cardiac arrest (14.5 %) were the most common findings, thus confirming that abrupt onset may have severe and life-threatening consequences. Indeed, sudden or early mortality accounted for 19.5 % of cases. In spite of that, most of the surviving subjects had an excellent outcome following either surgical or medical/rehabilitation treatment. Physiopathology of abrupt onset is attributed to the acute compression of the brainstem/upper cervical spinal cord by ectopic tonsils and syringobulbia/syringomyelia, frequently precipitated by a minor injury, followed by impairment of medullary baroreceptors and midbrain reticular substance (cardiac arrest, syncope), medullary chemoreceptors and phrenic nerve nuclei (respiratory failure), lower cranial nerve nuclei (cardiac arrest, cranial nerve palsy), and pyramidal tracts (motor deficits). About 87 % of patients of this review were asymptomatic prior to their acute onset. The problem of the management of asymptomatic subjects is still open.

  7. Unusual clinical manifestations of leptospirosis

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    Bal A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has protean clinical manifestations. The classical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Unusual clinical manifestations may result from involvement of pulmonary, cardiovascular, neural, gastrointestinal, ocular and other systems. Immunological phenomena secondary to antigenic mimicry may also be an important component of many clinical features and may be responsible for reactive arthritis. Leptospirosis in early pregnancy may lead to fetal loss. There are a few reports of leptospirosis in HIV- infected individuals but no generalisation can be made due to paucity of data. It is important to bear in mind that leptospiral illness may be a significant component in cases of dual infections or in simultaneous infections with more than two pathogens.

  8. Diverse clinical manifestations of pheochromocytomas.

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    Badui, E; Mancilla, R; Szymanski, J J; Garcia-Rubi, D; Estañol, B

    1982-03-01

    Many difficulties are encountered by clinicians in attempting to diagnose pheochromocytomas. We describe several patients with unusual clinical features. These include sudden death, cerebral hemorrhage, refractory congestive heart failure, acute abdominal pain, and hypercalcemia. In 2 patients, the rare association of this tumor and pregnancy was observed. Two subjects had sudden death, 1 during a pneumoencephalogram and another during an epidural block. The clinicians should be aware of these manifestations of pheochromocytomas.

  9. Clinical manifestation of myeloperoxidase deficiency.

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    Lanza, F

    1998-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an iron-containing heme protein localized in the azurophilic granules of neutrophil granulocytes and in the lysosomes of monocytes, is involved in the killing of several micro-organisms and foreign cells, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, red cells, and malignant and nonmalignant nucleated cells. Despite the primary role of the oxygen-dependent MPO system in the destruction of certain phagocytosed microbes, subjects with total or partial MPO deficiency generally do not have an increased frequency of infections, probably because other MPO-independent mechanism(s) for microbicidal activity compensate for the lack of MPO. Infectious diseases, especially with species of Candida, have been observed predominantly in MPO-deficient patients who also have diabetes mellitus, but the frequency of such cases is very low, less than 5% of reported MPO-deficient subjects. Evidence from a number of investigators indicates that individuals with total MPO deficiency show a high incidence of malignant tumors. Since MPO-deficient PMNs exhibit in vitro a depressed lytic action against malignant human cells, it can be speculated that the neutrophil MPO system plays a central role in the tumor surveillance of the host. However, any definitive conclusion on the association between MPO deficiency and the occurrence of cancers needs to be confirmed in further clinical studies. Clinical manifestations of this disorder depend on the nature of the defect; an acquired abnormality associated with other hematological or nonhematological diseases has been occasionally described, but the primary deficiency is the form more commonly reported. Another area of interest pertinent to MPO expression is related to the use of anti-MPO monoclonal antibodies for the lineage assignment of acute leukemic cells, the definition of FAB MO acute myeloid leukemia, the identification of biphenotypic acute leukemias, and their distinction from acute leukemia with minimal phenotypic deviation

  10. Physiopathological hypothesis of cellulite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, José Maria Pereira; de Godoy, Maria de Fátima Guerreiro

    2009-08-31

    A series of questions are asked concerning this condition including as regards to its name, the consensus about the histopathological findings, physiological hypothesis and treatment of the disease. We established a hypothesis for cellulite and confirmed that the clinical response is compatible with this hypothesis. Hence this novel approach brings a modern physiological concept with physiopathologic basis and clinical proof of the hypothesis. We emphasize that the choice of patient, correct diagnosis of cellulite and the technique employed are fundamental to success.

  11. Physiopathological Hypothesis of Cellulite

    OpenAIRE

    de Godoy, José Maria Pereira; Godoy,Maria de Fátima Guerreiro

    2009-01-01

    A series of questions are asked concerning this condition including as regards to its name, the consensus about the histopathological findings, physiological hypothesis and treatment of the disease. We established a hypothesis for cellulite and confirmed that the clinical response is compatible with this hypothesis. Hence this novel approach brings a modern physiological concept with physiopathologic basis and clinical proof of the hypothesis. We emphasize that the choice of patient, correct ...

  12. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Stansbury, Robert C.; Strollo, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests tha...

  13. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Robert C; Strollo, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  14. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome. Clinical manifestations. Treatment].

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    Exeni, Ramón A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical manifestation are described in children with epidemic HUS. The intestinal involvement in the prodromic period, is outlined and the most common disturbances such acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, leucocitosis hypertension, neurological, pancreatic and cardiac manifestations are described. We discuss the acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, metabolic acidosis, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia. The etiopathogenic treatment and the control of renal sequelae are also discussed.

  15. Clinical manifestations of organizing pneumonia

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    Martín Hunter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Organizing pneumonia is a clinical entity asociated with nonspecific symptoms and radiological findings and abnormalities in pulmonary function tests. It is defined by the characteristic histopathological pattern: filling of alveoli and respiratory bronchioles by plugs of granulation tissue. It can be idiopathic (COP or secondary to other causes (SOP. It is an unusual finding and the clinical and radiographic findings are nonspecific. For specific diagnosis an invasive procedure has to be done, but often empirical treatment is started when there's a clinical suspicion. We describe the clinical characteristics of 13 patients with histological diagnosis of organizing pneumonia. Data was obtained from their medical records. The median age was 76 years and the median time to diagnosis from the onset of symptoms was 31 days. In 10 cases the diagnosis was made by transbronchial biopsy. 8 patients required hospitalization, 4 of them received high doses of steroids and 3 required ventilatory support. One patient died from a cause attributable to this entity and 5 relapsed. Dyspnea, cough and fever were the most frequent symptoms. Most patients had more than one tomographic pattern being the most common ground glass opacities and alveolar consolidation. Nine patients were diagnosed with COP and 4 with SOP. The most frequent underlying cause of SOP was drug toxicity. The clinical characteristics of the reported cases are consistent with previously published series. As an interesting feature, there was a group of patients that needed high doses of steroids and ventilatory support.

  16. CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF ORGANIC ACIDEMIA

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    Salehpour, Shadab

    2012-01-01

    A clinical presentation of a metabolic disorder, often first seen in infants who present with poor feeding, vomiting, tachypnea, acidosis, hyperammonemia, ketosis, ketonuria, irritability, and convulsions or hypotonia and lethargy, findings that are otherwise suggestive of neonatal sepsis Diseases with OA Isovaleric and propionic acidemias, maple syrup urine disease, medium chain acyl dehydrogenase deficiency, glutaric, methylmalonic, formiminoglutamic acidurias.DescriptionThe term “organic a...

  17. Clinical manifestations of bovine leukosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, D.K.

    1979-01-01

    The diagnosis of animals infected with BLV can be accurately identified with the available serologic tests. Diagnosis of animals in the incipient stage of leukosis is extremely difficult and can only be diagnosed by a positive tissue biopsy. Animals with frank tumor involvement can be suspected and diagnosed on a tentative clinical basis on the signs reported. Positive diagnosis must be made on the basis of a biopsy of the tumor or in some cases on a hemotological examination.

  18. [Cellulitis: clinical manifestations and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, C-L; Menzinger, S; Genné, D

    2013-10-09

    Cellulitis is an acute bacterial non-necrotizing dermal-hypodermal infection predominantly affecting the lower limbs. It is characterised by a circumscribed erythema with a raised border and fever. The predisposing factors are skin wounds, edema from any cause and systemic factors (diabetes, immunosuppression). The diagnosis is clinical and the most common complication is recurrence. Other complications include local abscess, fasciitis and bacteremia. The germ is rarely identified. The majority of infections (85%) is due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus. The treatment of cellulitis consists of an association of an antibiotic with rest of the concerned area.

  19. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

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    Gloria Lugo; Lara Pena; Fernando Cordido

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Ac...

  20. Chloracne. Clinical manifestations and etiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zugerman, C. (Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Chloracne is a rare but important acneiform eruption often associated with the ingestion of chlorinated phenolic agents such as dioxins with subsequent toxicity from these chemicals. Clinically, chloracne can be distinguished from acne vulgaris by the distribution and appearance of the lesions and by taking a detailed history. In some instances, it may be associated with particularly xerotic skin, pigmentation, follicular hyperkeratosis, conjunctivitis, and actinic elastosis. Histologically, the primary lesion is a follicular plug containing keratinous material. Chloracne is difficult if not impossible to treat adequately and once present, may persist for years. Consequently, good hygiene, safe manufacturing processes so that no inhalation or skin contact is possible, and the elimination of atmospheric contamination are all necessary in the prevention of this potentially debilitating disease.34 references.

  1. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

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    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  2. Clinical Manifestations of the Opiate Withdrawal Syndrome

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    Faniya Shigakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, substance abuse is one of the most serious problems facing our society. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical manifestations of the opiate withdrawal syndrome (OWS. The study included 112 patients (57 women and 55 men aged from 18 to 64 years with opium addiction according to the DSM-IV. To study the clinical manifestation of OWS, the special 25-score scale with four sections to assess severity of sleep disorders, pain syndrome, autonomic disorders, and affective symptoms was used. Given the diversity of the OWS symptoms, attention was focused on three clinical variants, affective, algic and mixed. The OWS affective variant was registered more frequently in women, while the mixed type of OWS was more typical of men.

  3. Hepatitis A: clinical manifestations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Lee, Hyo-Suk

    2010-01-01

    Due to improved living conditions and subsequent changes in hepatitis A epidemiology, the disease burden of hepatitis A is increasing in many regions. Recently, Korea has faced a large, community-wide outbreak of hepatitis A, which has prompted a vaccination program. The clinical spectrum of hepatitis A virus infection ranges from asymptomatic infection to fulminant hepatitis. Clinical manifestations depend on the age of the host: less than 30% of infected young children are symptomatic, while about 80% of infected adults manifest severe hepatitis with remarkably elevated serum aminotransferases. Fulminant hepatitis is rare, with a reported incidence from 0.015 to 0.5%. Atypical manifestations include relapsing hepatitis and prolonged cholestasis, and complicated cases with acute kidney injury have been reported. Extrahepatic manifestations, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, pure red cell aplasia, pleural or pericardial effusion, acute reactive arthritis, acute pancreatitis, acalculous cholecystitis, mononeuritis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome, have been rarely reported. Management of hepatitis A includes general supportive care, and critical decisions regarding liver transplantation await further studies on prognostic predictors. Fundamental management of hepatitis A is active vaccination. However, a vaccination program should be adapted to the regional situation, according to differing epidemiology and disease burden.

  4. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lugo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal.

  5. Varied Clinical Manifestations of Amebic Colitis.

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    Cooper, Chad J; Fleming, Rhonda; Boman, Darius A; Zuckerman, Marc J

    2015-11-01

    Invasive amebiasis is common worldwide, but infrequently observed in the United States. It is associated with considerable morbidity in patients residing in or traveling to endemic areas. We review the clinical and endoscopic manifestations of amebic colitis to alert physicians to the varied clinical manifestations of this potentially life-threatening disease. Copyright ©Most patients present with watery or bloody diarrhea. Less common presentations of amebic colitis include abdominal pain, overt gastrointestinal bleeding, exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease, or the incidental association with colon cancer. Amebic liver abscesses are the most frequent complication. Rectosigmoid involvement may be found on colonoscopy; however, most case series have reported that the cecum is the most commonly involved site, followed by the ascending colon. Endoscopic evaluation should be used to assist in the diagnosis, with attention to the observation of colonic inflammation, ulceration, and amebic trophozoites on histopathological examination.

  6. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Gloria; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal.

  7. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Gloria; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal. PMID:22518126

  8. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

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    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  9. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Julio

    2011-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic disease of the human brain. Modern imaging studies, CT and MRI, have defined the diagnosis and characterization of the disease. Through these studies the therapeutic approach for each case may be individualized with the aid of antihelmintics, steroids, symptomatic medicines, or surgery. The use of one or various therapeutic measures largely depends on the peculiar combination of number, location, and biological stage of lesions as well as the degree of inflammatory response to the parasites. Although there is not a typical clinical picture of NCC, epilepsy is the most frequent manifestation of parenchymal NCC, whereas hydrocephalus is the most frequent manifestation of meningeal NCC. Eradication of cysticercosis is an attainable goal by public education and sanitary improvement in endemic areas.

  10. Multi-physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T CFTR mutation revealed by clinical and cellular investigations.

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    Farhat, Raed; El-Seedy, Ayman; El-Moussaoui, Kamal; Pasquet, Marie-Claude; Adolphe, Catherine; Bieth, Eric; Languepin, Jeanne; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Kitzis, Alain; Ladevèze, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    This study combines a clinical approach and multiple level cellular analyses to determine the physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T (p.Lys464Asn) CFTR exon 10 mutation, detected in a CF patient with a frameshift deletion in trans and a TG(11)T(5) in cis. Minigene experiment, with different TG(m)T(n) alleles, and nasal cell mRNA extracts were used to study the impact of c.1392G>T on splicing in both in cellulo and in vivo studies. The processing and localization of p.Lys464Asn protein were evaluated, in cellulo, by western blotting analyses and confocal microscopy. Clinical and channel exploration tests were performed on the patient to determine the exact CF phenotype profile and the CFTR chloride transport activity. c.1392G>T affects exon 10 splicing by inducing its complete deletion and encoding a frameshift transcript. The polymorphism TG(11)T(5) aggravates the effects of this mutation on aberrant splicing. Analysis of mRNA obtained from parental airway epithelial cells confirmed these in cellulo results. At the protein level the p.Lys464Asn protein showed neither maturated form nor membrane localization. Furthermore, the in vivo channel tests confirmed the absence of CFTR activity. Thus, the c.1392G>T mutation alone or in association with the TG repeats and the poly T tract revealed obvious impacts on splicing and CFTR protein processing and functionality. The c.[T(5); 1392G>T] complex allele contributes to the CF phenotype by affecting splicing and inducing a severe misprocessing defect. These results demonstrate that the classical CFTR mutations classification is not sufficient: in vivo and in cellulo studies of a possible complex allele in a patient are required to provide correct CFTR mutation classification, adequate medical counseling, and adapted therapeutic strategies.

  11. Neurosarcoidosis: Clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

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    Nozaki, Kenkichi; Judson, Marc A

    2012-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic granulomatous disease affecting multiple organs. Neurosarcoidosis, involving the central and/or peripheral nervous systems, is a relatively rare form of sarcoidosis. Its clinical manifestations include cranial neuropathies, meningitis, neuroendocrinological dysfunction, hydrocephalus, seizures, neuropsychiatric symptoms, myelopathy and neuropathies. The diagnosis is problematic, especially when occurring as an isolated form without other organ involvement. Distinguishing neurosarcoidosis from other granulomatous diseases and multiple sclerosis is especially important. Although biopsy of neural tissue is the gold standard for the diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis, this is often not practical and the diagnosis must be inferred though other tests, often coupled with biopsy of extraneural organs. Corticosteroids and other immuno-suppressants are frequently used for the treatment of neurosarcoidosis. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical features, diagnosis, diagnostic tests, diagnostic criteria, and therapy of neurosarcoidosis.

  12. Hereditary angioedema: imaging manifestations and clinical management.

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    Gakhal, Mandip S; Marcotte, Gregory V

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a genetic disorder typically related to insufficient or dysfunctional C1-esterase inhibitor. Patients present with episodic swelling of various body parts, such as the face, neck, bowel, genitals, and extremities. Acute or severe symptoms can lead to patients presenting to the emergency room, particularly when the neck and abdominopelvic regions are affected, which is often accompanied by radiologic imaging evaluation. Patients with hereditary angioedema can pose a diagnostic challenge for emergency department physicians and radiologists at initial presentation, and the correct diagnosis may be missed or delayed, due to lack of clinical awareness of the disease or lack of its consideration in the radiologic differential diagnosis. Timely diagnosis of hereditary angioedema and rapid initiation of appropriate therapy can avoid potentially life-threatening complications. This article focuses on the spectrum of common and characteristic acute imaging manifestations of hereditary angioedema and provides an update on important recent developments in its clinical management and treatment.

  13. Epidemiology and clinical manifestations of mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrikkos, George; Skiada, Anna; Lortholary, Olivier; Roilides, Emmanuel; Walsh, Thomas J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2012-02-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging angioinvasive infection caused by the ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the Mucorales order of the class of Zygomycetes. Mucormycosis has emerged as the third most common invasive mycosis in order of importance after candidiasis and aspergillosis in patients with hematological and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Mucormycosis also remains a threat in patients with diabetes mellitus in the Western world. Furthermore, this disease is increasingly recognized in recently developed countries, such as India, mainly in patients with uncontrolled diabetes or trauma. Epidemiological data on this type of mycosis are scant. Therefore, our ability to determine the burden of disease is limited. Based on anatomic localization, mucormycosis can be classified as one of 6 forms: (1) rhinocerebral, (2) pulmonary, (3) cutaneous, (4) gastrointestinal, (5) disseminated, and (6) uncommon presentations. The underlying conditions can influence clinical presentation and outcome. This review describes the emerging epidemiology and the clinical manifestations of mucormycosis.

  14. [Physiopathology of cerebral malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, P

    1995-01-01

    Physiopathology of severe malaria is extremely complex and misappreciated. Sequestration of parasited red cells and role of cytokines are now accepted but we still have to discover why only a few people develop a severe malaria. A better knowledge of that physiopathology would allow the conception of new therapeutic strategies to reduce malaria mortality.

  15. Dante and cardiology: Physiopathology and clinical features of cardiovascular diseases in the Middle Ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, M A; Cambioli, L; Castagna, F; Cianci, N; Varrenti, M; Giannattasio, C; Cesana, G

    2015-02-15

    Ancient non-medical texts can unexpectedly provide useful information on the development of knowledge about the heart and its diseases throughout history. The 750th anniversary of the birth of the Italian poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) provides a timely opportunity to analyze medical references in his works, in particular, focusing on literary descriptions that may be attributed to cardiovascular disorders. Dante's high level of medical knowledge, probably derived from his academic studies, is testified by his affiliation to the Florentine Guild of physicians and pharmacists. In all his works, the poet shows a deep interest for the heart. However, his anatomical and physiological knowledge of the circulatory system appears to be poor, probably due to it being based on theories and concepts brought forth by Aristotle and Galen, which were taught in medieval universities. Despite this, accurate descriptions of some symptoms (emotional syncope, orthopnea, dyspnea on exertion) and signs (ascites, paleness), which may be attributed to cardiovascular disorders, can be easily found in Dante's works, particularly in his masterpiece, the Divine Comedy. The literary and historical analysis of cardiovascular signs and symptoms allows us to assume that clinical features due to alterations of heart function were probably known by medieval physicians, but their etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms were not completely understood in that period. Historians of cardiology and clinicians should consider analysis of non-medical texts (including poetry) as an opportunity to better investigate the evolution of their discipline throughout the ages.

  16. Physiopathological, Epidemiological, Clinical and Therapeutic Aspects of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Urso

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH is dilutional hyponatremia, a variant of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH, characterized by a plasma concentration of sodium lower than 135 mEq/L. The prevalence of EAH is common in endurance (<6 hours and ultra-endurance events (>6 hours in duration, in which both athletes and medical providers need to be aware of risk factors, symptom presentation, and management. The development of EAH is a combination of excessive water intake, inadequate suppression of the secretion of the antidiuretic hormone (ADH (due to non osmotic stimuli, long race duration, and very high or very low ambient temperatures. Additional risk factors include female gender, slower race times, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Signs and symptoms of EAH include nausea, vomiting, confusion, headache and seizures; it may result in severe clinical conditions associated with pulmonary and cerebral edema, respiratory failure and death. A rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment with a hypertonic saline solution is essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome.

  17. Uncommon and Neglected Venezuelan Viral Diseases: Etiologic Agents, Physiopathological, Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Gabaldon-Figueira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract (english Viral infectious diseases are common in Venezuela, influenza, dengue, yellow fever, HIV infection, viral Hepatitis, chikungunya fever and many others represent public health problems in the country and therefore, have been well documented. However, other rarer and even unique or lethal viral illnesses present in Venezuela are usually poorly understood or even unknown. This review described Venezuelan Hemorrhagic Fever, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis, Hantavirus Infections and Mayaro fever, named as neglected diseases, emphasizing the etiologic agents and their most relevant pathogenic mechanisms, clinical and epidemiological characteristics. Although there is not an official report about the re-emergence of these diseases, falling living standards and unsanitary conditions, together with limited accessibility to hygiene products and medical supplies, put us on alert about the re-emergence of these neglected diseases. Resumen (español Las enfermedades infecciosas virales son comunes en Venezuela, influenza, dengue, fiebre amarilla, infección por VIH, hepatitis viral, fiebre chikungunya y muchas otras representan problemas de salud pública en el país y por lo tanto, han sido bien documentadas. Sin embargo, otras enfermedades virales más raras e incluso únicas y letales presentes en Venezuela son generalmente poco estudiadas y hasta desconocidas. Esta revisión describe alguna de estas enfermedades olvidadas tales como la fiebre hemorrágica venezolana, la encefalitis equina venezolana, las infecciones por hantavirus y la fiebre de Mayaro, haciendo hincapié en los agentes etiológicos y en sus mecanismos patogénicos más relevantes, características clínicas y epidemiológicas. Aunque no hay informes oficiales sobre el resurgimiento de estas enfermedades, la caída de los niveles de vida y las condiciones insalubres, junto con el acceso limitado a los productos de higiene y suministros médicos, debe alertar sobre el

  18. The J curve in hypertension. Physiopathologic speculation or a relevant issue in clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Pinna

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The J curve phenomenon in the treatment of hypertension refers to the view that reducing blood pressure below a certain critical point (diastolic pressure in particular is no longer beneficial and may actually increase the risk of cardiovascular events. The existence of this phenomenon has been debated for many years. Many autors deny that it exists, at least within the range of pressure values commonly observed in clinical practice. Aim of the study: The aim of this article is to verify whether in 2010 it is still possible to talk about a J curve or whether the inverse relationship between diastolic pressure and cardiovascular events depends on pre-existent diseases. Materials and methods: The authors carried out a search of the PubMed database for articles published in 2004 or later with the following Keywords J-curve, antihypertensive treatment, and blood pressure goals. Results: Most of the studies reviewed confirmed the existence of a J curve, but the role played by serious comorbidities is still unclear. In most cases, patients with major diseases have lower blood pressures. Moreover, cardiac patients already have impairments involving the coronary circulation. It is quite obvious that these patients are more exposed to pressure drops, especially those occurring during diastole, when the vast majority of blood flow to the coronary circulation is delivered. Conclusions: A J curve certainly exists: there is obviously a threshold value under which an excessively low blood pressure can no longer guarantee adequate perfusion of vital organs. The problem lies in the identification of this threshold value. Furthermore, considering the undeniable impact on this phenomenon of concurrent diseases, timely intervention is essential to avoid transforming low-risk patients (those less likely to experience J curve-related complications into high-risk patients (more likely to experience these complications.

  19. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Diseases: Concept And Clinical Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary “periodic fever syndromes”, familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency. PMID:23711932

  20. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: concept and clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this review is to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary "periodic fever syndromes", familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) and 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency.

  1. Hypertonicity: Clinical entities, manifestations and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Argyropoulos, Christos; Ing, Todd S; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid J; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2017-01-01

    Hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and is associated with mortality and severe short-term and long-term neurological sequelae. The main clinical syndromes of hypertonicity are hypernatremia and hyperglycemia. Hypernatremia results from relative excess of body sodium over body water. Loss of water in excess of intake, gain of sodium salts in excess of losses or a combination of the two are the main mechanisms of hypernatremia. Hypernatremia can be hypervolemic, euvolemic or hypovolemic. The management of hypernatremia addresses both a quantitative replacement of water and, if present, sodium deficit, and correction of the underlying pathophysiologic process that led to hypernatremia. Hypertonicity in hyperglycemia has two components, solute gain secondary to glucose accumulation in the extracellular compartment and water loss through hyperglycemic osmotic diuresis in excess of the losses of sodium and potassium. Differentiating between these two components of hypertonicity has major therapeutic implications because the first component will be reversed simply by normalization of serum glucose concentration while the second component will require hypotonic fluid replacement. An estimate of the magnitude of the relative water deficit secondary to osmotic diuresis is obtained by the corrected sodium concentration, which represents a calculated value of the serum sodium concentration that would result from reduction of the serum glucose concentration to a normal level. PMID:28101446

  2. Tardive Dystonia: Clinical Spectrum and Novel Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jeffrey Davis

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dystonia was identified in 25 patients: involvement of the face and neck was most common; truncal and limb dystonia were also observed. There were 3 cases of laryngospasm and 2 of spasmodic dysphonia. The latter has not been previously reported as a manifestation of tardive dystonia. In all cases, movements typical of classic tardive dyskinesia could be demonstrated. This group illustrates the variety of dystonic disorders that may occur in conjunction with tardive dyskinesia.

  3. [Hyperhomocysteinaemia: physiopathology and medical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre Delgadillo, A; Téllez Zenteno, J F; Morales Buenrrostro, L E

    2000-01-01

    Homocysteine is an intermediate aminoacid result of the conversion of methionine to cysteine. Homocystinuria or the hyperhomocysteinaemia are the most frequently related disorders of this aminoacid, being the former an autosomic recessive alteration, whereas the latter is conditioned by multiple factors, being the most important the genetic and nutritional factors. In the last years this alteration has regained special interest because of its increasing role in the thrombotic pathologies and the identification that hyperhomocysteinaemia represents an independent risk factor for the accelerated atherogenesis of multiple diseases. In this review physiopathological aspects and clinical implications of hyperhomocysteinaemia are mentioned as well as its diagnoses and treatment.

  4. Clinical manifestations and cerebral angiographic findings of moyamoya disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical features and angiographic findings of moyamoya disease (MMD) as well as their relationship. Methods A total of 22 MMD patients received routine digital substraction angiography (DSA). The clinical manifestations and angiographic findings were analyzed. Results Clinical manifestations varied and each patient often had multiple symptoms,including cerebral infarction in 9 patients with an average age of 23.6 (13-39 years) and cerebral hemorrhage in 7 patients with an average age...

  5. [Clinical and roentgenological manifestations of the silent sinus syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, S Z; Piskunov, I S; Zav'ialov, F N; Solodilova, N M

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the results of the examination and treatment of four patients presenting with the silent sinus syndrome provided materials for the generalized characteristic of clinical and roentgenological manifestations of this condition.

  6. Lipid storage myopathies with unusual clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppin Megha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the clinical presentation, course and pathologic findings found in three adult patients with lipid storage myopathy. Excessive lipid storage was found in Type 1 fibers of muscle. Clinical improvement on oral levo-carnitine therapy suggests the possibility of carnitine deficiency as the most likely etiology in two of the patients and one had mitochondrial myopathy confirmed on genetic analysis.

  7. Clinical Manifestations and Outcome of Syphilitic Uveitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollemeijer, Jan G.; Wieringa, Wietse G.; Missotten, Tom O. A. R.; Meenken, Ina; ten Dam-van Loon, Ninette H.; Rothova, Aniki; Los, Leonoor I.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE. To analyze visual outcome, effectiveness of various modes of antibiotic treatment, and prognostic factors in patients with serologically proven syphilitic uveitis. METHODS. The clinical records of 85 patients (139 eyes) diagnosed with syphilitic uveitis between 1984 and 2013 at tertiary cen

  8. Uterine fibroids: clinical manifestations and contemporary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Leo; Mutlu, Levent; Sinclair, Donna; Taylor, Hugh

    2014-09-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomata) are extremely common lesions that are associated with detrimental effects including infertility and abnormal uterine bleeding. Fibroids cause molecular changes at the level of endometrium. Abnormal regulation of growth factors and cytokines in fibroid cells may contribute to negative endometrial effects. Understanding of fibroid biology has greatly increased over the last decade. Although the current armamentarium of Food and Drug Administration-approved medical therapies is limited, there are medications approved for use in heavy menstrual bleeding that can be used for the medical management of fibroids. Emergence of the role of growth factors in pathophysiology of fibroids has led researchers to develop novel therapeutics. Despite advances in medical therapies, surgical management remains a mainstay of fibroid treatment. Destruction of fibroids by interventional radiological procedures provides other effective treatments. Further experimental studies and clinical trials are required to determine which therapies will provide the greatest benefits to patients with fibroids.

  9. Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease: clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD disease is an arthropathy caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP crystal deposits in articular tissues, most commonly fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. According to EULAR, four different clinical presentations can be observed: 1 asymptomatic CPPD; 2 osteoarthritis (OA with CPPD; 3 acute CPP crystal arthritis; 4 chronic CPP inflammatory crystal arthritis. Acute CPP crystal arthritis is characterized by sudden onset of pain, swelling and tenderness with overlying erythema, usually in a large joint, most often the knee, wrist, shoulder, and hip. Occasionally, ligaments, tendons, bursae, bone and the spine can be involved. CPPD of the atlanto-occipital joint (crowned dens syndrome can cause periodic acute cervico-occipital pain with fever, neck stiffness and laboratory inflammatory syndrome. Chronic inflammatory arthritis is characterized by joint swelling, morning stiffness, pain, and high ESR and CRP. The relationship between OA and CPPD is still unclear. The main problem is whether such crystals are directly involved in the pathogenesis of OA or if they are the result of joint degeneration. Diagnosis is based on evaluation of history and clinical features, conventional radiology, and synovial fluid examination. Non-polarized light microscopy should be used initially to screen for CPPD crystals based upon their characteristic morphology, and compensated polarized light microscopy, showing the crystals to be weakly positive birefringent, is recommended for definitive identification, although this last pattern only occurs in about 20% of samples. The main goals of CPPD therapy are control of the acute or chronic inflammatory reaction and prevention of further episodes.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus infections: epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Steven Y C; Davis, Joshua S; Eichenberger, Emily; Holland, Thomas L; Fowler, Vance G

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a wide range of clinical infections. It is a leading cause of bacteremia and infective endocarditis as well as osteoarticular, skin and soft tissue, pleuropulmonary, and device-related infections. This review comprehensively covers the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management of each of these clinical entities. The past 2 decades have witnessed two clear shifts in the epidemiology of S. aureus infections: first, a growing number of health care-associated infections, particularly seen in infective endocarditis and prosthetic device infections, and second, an epidemic of community-associated skin and soft tissue infections driven by strains with certain virulence factors and resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. In reviewing the literature to support management strategies for these clinical manifestations, we also highlight the paucity of high-quality evidence for many key clinical questions. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Infections: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Clinical Manifestations, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joshua S.; Eichenberger, Emily; Holland, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a wide range of clinical infections. It is a leading cause of bacteremia and infective endocarditis as well as osteoarticular, skin and soft tissue, pleuropulmonary, and device-related infections. This review comprehensively covers the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management of each of these clinical entities. The past 2 decades have witnessed two clear shifts in the epidemiology of S. aureus infections: first, a growing number of health care-associated infections, particularly seen in infective endocarditis and prosthetic device infections, and second, an epidemic of community-associated skin and soft tissue infections driven by strains with certain virulence factors and resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. In reviewing the literature to support management strategies for these clinical manifestations, we also highlight the paucity of high-quality evidence for many key clinical questions. PMID:26016486

  12. Clinical manifestations and managements in jellyfish envenomation A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Taheri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The phylum Cnidarians have over nine thousand species that approximately, one hundred species are dangerous for humans. Annually, a large number of deaths were reported due to jellyfish stings. The manifestations depend on their species and kind of venoms, and include the local and systemic manifestations. A number of methods and compounds were used and under investigation for management of injuries with jellyfishes. Due to the lack of an integrated systematic review, the current study was done. Materials and Methods: The PubMed data bank was searched for the term “Jellyfish”. A total of 1677 papers were found. These papers were divided into three categories: medical, biomedical and biotechnological fields. The medical category was further divided into three subcategories comprising systemic manifestations, cutaneous manifestations and treatments for the stings of jellyfishes. The biomedical category was further subdivided into genomics, proteomics, and biology of venoms, mechanisms of actions and products of biomedical significance. In this part of systematic review, the medical aspects of injuries with jellyfishes were evaluated. Results: The clinical manifestations in jellyfish envenomation depend on their species and the nature of venoms. The most common clinical manifestations of jellyfish stings are cutaneous presentations like urticasia, erythema, swelling, vesicles and severe dermonectoric manifestations. Systemic manifestations were seen in the stings of box jellyfishes, Portuguese man-of-war and in Irukandji syndrome. The most common recommendations for jellyfish envenomation managements include decreasing the local effects of venom, prevention of the venomous nematocysts release, and Controlling of systemic reactions. Application of commercial vinegar (4 - 6% acetic acid, hot water immersion (HWI (42 ° C for 20 minutes, ice packs, sea water rinsing for inactivating nematocysts, administration of topical and parenteral

  13. Scrub typhus:pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Senaka Rajapakse; Chaturaka Rodrigo; Deepika Fernando

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scrub typhus is a zoonosis caused by the pathogenOrientia tsutsugamushi (O. tsutsugamushi). The disease has significant prevalence in eastern and Southeast Asia. Usually presenting as an acute febrile illness, the diagnosis is often missed because of similarities with other tropical febrile infections. Many unusual manifestations are present, and these are described in this review, together with an outline of current knowledge of pathophysiology. Awareness of these unusual clinical manifestations will help the clinician to arrive at an early diagnosis, resulting in early administration of appropriate antibiotics. Prognostic indicators for severe disease have not yet been clearly established.

  14. Clinical Manifestations and Outcomes of West Nile Virus Infection

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    James J. Sejvar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the emergence of West Nile virus (WNV in North America in 1999, understanding of the clinical features, spectrum of illness and eventual functional outcomes of human illness has increased tremendously. Most human infections with WNV remain clinically silent. Among those persons developing symptomatic illness, most develop a self-limited febrile illness. More severe illness with WNV (West Nile neuroinvasive disease, WNND is manifested as meningitis, encephalitis or an acute anterior (polio myelitis. These manifestations are generally more prevalent in older persons or those with immunosuppression. In the future, a more thorough understanding of the long-term physical, cognitive and functional outcomes of persons recovering from WNV illness will be important in understanding the overall illness burden.

  15. Migraine: etiology, risk, triggering, aggravating factors and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Lindemann Carezzato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the etiology and clinical manifestations of migraine. An integrative literature review was performed guided by the question: What is the evidence available in the literature about the etiology, signs and symptoms of migraine? The article search was conducted in the electronic databases PubMed and LILACS, considering publications in the period from 2006 to 2010. The selected articles were categorized and evaluated according to the level of evidence. One found 1,677 articles and 26 were selected for full reading. Most studies (84.6% consisted of a non-experimental design and were classified as evidence level IV. Although the clinical manifestations found in this study confirm the data available in the literature, it is noticed that migraine does not have well-established causes

  16. First clinical manifestation of Brugada syndrome during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnau, Dirk; Figulla, Hans R; Surber, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    The role of hormonal changes during pregnancy in Brugada syndrome is unknown. Only rare case reports of Brugada syndrome during pregnancy have been published. In this article, we describe a patient with first clinical manifestation of Brugada syndrome during pregnancy. The definitive diagnosis could only be achieved by drug challenge with ajmaline after childbirth because the spontaneous typical Brugada-like pattern was absent. Elevated hormone levels during pregnancy may increase the risk for arrhythmias in particular cases.

  17. ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME: DIAGNOSIS AND CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS (A LECTURE)

    OpenAIRE

    Tat’yana M Reshetnyak

    2014-01-01

    The lecture provides information about the etiology and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and genetic susceptibility to its development. The most recent international diagnostic criteria for APS and its variants have been reported. This syndrome can affect multiple organ systems depending on localization of thrombosis; therefore, nowadays the problem of APS is multidisciplinary. Clinical manifestations of APS are rather general (thrombosis of different localization); thus, the d...

  18. Clinical Profile of Atypical Manifestations of Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothapregada, Sriram; Kamalakannan, Banupriya; Thulasingam, Mahalakshmy

    2016-06-01

    To study the clinical profile and outcome of the atypical manifestations of dengue fever in children. All children (0-12 y of age) diagnosed and confirmed as dengue fever at a tertiary care hospital at Puducherry, between the 1st of August 2012 and January 31st 2015 were reviewed retrospectively from hospital case records as per the revised World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines 2011 for dengue fever. The diagnosis was confirmed by NS1 antigen-based ELISA test or dengue serology for IgM and IgG antibodies and the data was analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. Out of 254 children admitted with dengue fever, non-severe dengue and severe dengue were seen in 62.6 % and 37.4 % respectively. Atypical manifestations were seen in 106 cases (41.7 %). Mean age of presentation was 6.9(3.3) y. M: F ratio was 1.2:1. The common manifestations of severe dengue infection were shock (37.4 %), bleeding (20.1 %) and multi-organ dysfunction (2.4 %). The most common atypical manifestations of dengue fever were lymphadenopathy (41.7 %), splenomegaly (21.2 %), biphasic fever (18.1 %), hepatitis (11.4 %), febrile diarrhea (6.3 %), refractory shock (2.4 %) and impaired consciousness (1.9 %). The other atypical manifestations present were portal hypertension, acalculous cholecystitis, appendicitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), myocarditis, pericardial effusion, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), myositis, acute kidney injury (AKI), hemophagocytic syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC). Platelet count did not always correlate well with the severity of bleeding. There were six deaths (2.4 %) and out of them four presented with impaired consciousness (66.6 %). The common causes for poor outcome were multiorgan failure, encephalopathy and refractory shock. The atypical manifestations of dengue fever are no more a rare entity. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion and vigilance for atypical manifestations of

  19. [Juvenil idiopathic arthritis. Part 1: diagnosis, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espada, Graciela

    2009-10-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is not a single disease and constitutes an heterogeneous group of illnesses or inflammatory disorders. This new nomenclature encompasses different disease categories, each of which has different presentation, clinical signs, symptoms, and outcome. The cause of the disease is still unknown but both environmental and genetic factors seem to be related to its pathogenesis. Is the most common chronic rheumatic disease in children and an important cause of short-term and long-term disability. In this article, clinical manifestation, new classification and approach to diagnosis are reviewed.

  20. Clinical manifestation, imageological and pathological characteristics of Wernicke encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shunchang Han; Chuanqiang Pu; Qiuping Gui; Xusheng Huang; Senyang Lang; Weiping Wu; Peifu Wang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical manifestations of Wernicke encephalopathy(WE) are atypical and short of effective auxiliary examination means. The effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of WE have been reported suecessively. But its imageological detection needs to be further investigated.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the eharacteristics of clinical manifestations, skull MRI examination and pathological results in patients with WE.DESTGN: Retrospective analysis.SETTTNG: The General Hospital of Chinese PLA.PARTTCTPANTS: Ten patients of WE admitted to the Department of Neurology, General Hospital of Chinese PLA were recruited. Among them, five patients were diagnosed pathologically after death. Their pathological changes accorded with the pathological characteristics of WE. The other 5 patients were diagnosed clinically before death. Their pathological changes accorded with clinical and imageological manifestations and had definite reaction to the treatment of thiamine. Ten patients, 7 males and 3 females, were aged (47±13) years ranging from 33 to 73 years. Their disease courses averaged 6 weeks ranging from 3 to 10 weeks. They all were non-alcoholics. Four patients developed WE after acute pancreatitis, two patients after the recurrence of gastric cancer, two patients after cholecystectomy, one patient after hepatitis medicamentosa, one patient after Alzheimer disease. Informed consents were obtained from all the patients and their relatives.METHODS: After admission, clinical manifestations of patients were observed and recorded. Five patients underwent skull MRI examination and their detected results were recorded. Five dead patients underwent autopsy and brain pathological examinations. Neuropathological examination involved cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem.MATN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical manifestations, MRI examination results, pathological analysis results and prognosis of all the patients.RESULTS: Ten patients with WE were involved in the final

  1. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy: an overview of the physiopathology, clinical evidence, and management of the oral damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinna R

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Pinna,1 Guglielmo Campus,2 Enzo Cumbo,3 Ida Mura,1 Egle Milia2 1Department of Biomedical Science, 2Department of Surgery, Microsurgery and Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, 3Department of Dental Science, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy Background: The irradiation of head and neck cancer (HNC often causes damage to the salivary glands. The resulting salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia seriously reduce the patient’s quality of life. Purpose: To analyze the literature of actual management strategies for radiation-induced hypofunction and xerostomia in HNC patients. Methods: MEDLINE/PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases were electronically evaluated for articles published from January 1, 1970, to June 30, 2013. Two reviewers independently screened and included papers according to the predefined selection criteria. Results: Sixty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. The systematic review of the literature suggests that the most suitable methods for managing the clinical and pathophysiological consequences of HNC radiotherapy might be the pharmacological approach, for example, through the use of cholinergic agonists when residual secretory capacity is still present, and the use of salivary substitutes. In addition, a modified diet and the patient’s motivation to enhance oral hygiene can lead to a significant improvement. Conclusion: Radiation-induced xerostomia could be considered a multifactorial disease. It could depend on the type of cancer treatment and the cumulative radiation dose to the gland tissue. A preventive approach and the correct treatment of the particular radiotherapeutic patient can help to improve the condition of xerostomia. Keywords: radiation-induced xerostomia, salivary gland hypofunction, management strategies

  2. Clinical and radiological manifestations of paraneoplastic syndrome of bronchogenic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldner Branislav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to present some clinical and radiological manifestations of PNS in relation to bronchogenic carcinoma (BC and to evaluate the usefulness of imaging findings in the diagnosis of asymptomatic BC. In the study group of 204 patients (146 male and 58 female with proven bronchogenic carcinoma, PNS was present in 18 (8.62% patients. The patients with PNS were divided into two groups. The first one consisted of 13 (72.2% patients with symptoms related to primary tumours while the second one consisted of 5 (27.7% patients with symptoms, at initial appearance, indicative of disorders of other organs and systems. The predominant disorder was Lambert-Eaton Syndrome, associated with small-cell carcinoma. Endocrine manifestations included: inappropriate antidiuretic hormone production syndrome (small-cell carcinoma, a gonadotropin effect with gynaecomastia and testicular atrophy (planocellular carcinoma, small-cell carcinoma, a case of Cushing Syndrome (small-cell carcinoma, and hyper-calcaemia, due to the production of the parathyroid hormone-related peptide, which was associated with planocellular carcinoma. A rare case of bilateral exophthalmos was found as PNS at adenocarcinoma. Digital clubbing and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HO were associated with planocellular and adenocarcinoma, while clubbing was much more common than HO, especially among women. The differences between the two groups were related to the time of PNS appearance. In the first group, PNS occurred late on in the illness, while in the second group, PNS preceded the diagnosis of BC. Alternatively, the disappearance of a clinical or a radiological manifestation of PNS after surgery or chemotherapy may be an indicator of an improvement in health or PNS may be the first sign of illness recurrence. Radiological manifestations of PNS in asymptomatic patients may serve as a useful screen for identifying primary BC. In symptomatic patients, it may be an

  3. Thrombosis in vasculitic disorders-clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ofrat Beyar; Brenner, Benjamin; Horowitz, Netanel A

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation and coagulation are known to affect each other in many ways. Vasculitis represents a group of disorders where blood vessels (small, medium, large or variable) are infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Accumulating evidence in the literature suggests both clinical and physiological association between vasculitis and thrombosis. Vasculitis-associated thrombosis involves arteries and veins, and a tight connection has been reported between the activity of vasculitis and the appearance of thrombosis. Pathophysiology of these relations is complex and not completely understood. While thrombophilic factors are associated with vasculitis, it remains unclear whether a true association with clinical thrombosis is present. Furthermore, several factors leading to hemostasis, endothelial injury and induction of microparticles were described as possibly accounting for thrombosis. Management of thrombosis in vasculitis patients is challenging and should be further assessed in randomized controlled studies. The current review describes clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis associated with different vasculitides.

  4. Clinical manifestations of primary syphilis in homosexual men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Bjekić

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of a new millennium, syphilis incidence has been increasing worldwide, occurring primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM. The clinical features of primary syphilis among MSM is described, a case-note review of the primary syphilis (PS patients who attended the Institute of Skin and Venereal Diseases. The diagnosis was assessed based upon the clinical features and positive syphilis serology tests. Among 25 patients with early syphilis referred during 2010, PS was diagnosed in a total of 13 cases. In all patients, unprotected oral sex was the only possible route of transmission, and two out of 13 patients had HIV co-infection. Overall, 77% of men presented with atypical penile manifestation. The VDRL test was positive with low titers. The numerous atypical clinical presentations of PS emphasize the importance of continuing education of non-experienced physicians, especially in countries with lower reported incidence of syphilis.

  5. Clinical manifestations of primary syphilis in homosexual men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Bjekić

    Full Text Available At the beginning of a new millennium, syphilis incidence has been increasing worldwide, occurring primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM. The clinical features of primary syphilis among MSM is described, a case-note review of the primary syphilis (PS patients who attended the Institute of Skin and Venereal Diseases. The diagnosis was assessed based upon the clinical features and positive syphilis serology tests. Among 25 patients with early syphilis referred during 2010, PS was diagnosed in a total of 13 cases. In all patients, unprotected oral sex was the only possible route of transmission, and two out of 13 patients had HIV co-infection. Overall, 77% of men presented with atypical penile manifestation. The VDRL test was positive with low titers. The numerous atypical clinical presentations of PS emphasize the importance of continuing education of non-experienced physicians, especially in countries with lower reported incidence of syphilis.

  6. Atypical Clinical Manifestations of Graves' Disease: An Analysis in Depth

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    Mohamed Osama Hegazi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, there has been an increase in the number of reports about newly recognized (atypical or unusual manifestations of Graves' disease (GD, that are related to various body systems. One of these manifestations is sometimes the main presenting feature of GD. Some of the atypical manifestations are specifically related to GD, while others are also similarly seen in patients with other forms of hyperthyroidism. Lack of knowledge of the association between these findings and GD may lead to delay in diagnosis, misdiagnosis, or unnecessary investigations. The atypical clinical presentations of GD include anemia, vomiting, jaundice, and right heart failure. There is one type of anemia that is not explained by any of the known etiological factors and responds well to hyperthyroidism treatment. This type of anemia resembles anemia of chronic disease and may be termed GD anemia. Other forms of anemia that are associated with GD include pernicious anemia, iron deficiency anemia of celiac disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Vomiting has been reported as a presenting feature of Graves' disease. Some cases had the typical findings of hyperthyroidism initially masked, and the vomiting did not improve until hyperthyroidism has been detected and treated. Hyperthyroidism may present with jaundice, and on the other hand, deep jaundice may develop with the onset of overt hyperthyroidism in previously compensated chronic liver disease patients. Pulmonary hypertension is reported to be associated with GD and to respond to its treatment. GD-related pulmonary hypertension may be so severe to produce isolated right-sided heart failure that is occasionally found as the presenting manifestation of GD.

  7. Functional speech disorders: clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J R

    2016-01-01

    Acquired psychogenic or functional speech disorders are a subtype of functional neurologic disorders. They can mimic organic speech disorders and, although any aspect of speech production can be affected, they manifest most often as dysphonia, stuttering, or prosodic abnormalities. This chapter reviews the prevalence of functional speech disorders, the spectrum of their primary clinical characteristics, and the clues that help distinguish them from organic neurologic diseases affecting the sensorimotor networks involved in speech production. Diagnosis of a speech disorder as functional can be supported by sometimes rapidly achieved positive outcomes of symptomatic speech therapy. The general principles of such therapy are reviewed. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME: DIAGNOSIS AND CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS (A LECTURE

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    Tat’yana M Reshetnyak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture provides information about the etiology and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS and genetic susceptibility to its development. The most recent international diagnostic criteria for APS and its variants have been reported. This syndrome can affect multiple organ systems depending on localization of thrombosis; therefore, nowadays the problem of APS is multidisciplinary. Clinical manifestations of APS are rather general (thrombosis of different localization; thus, the diagnosis can be verified only in the case of presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. The differential diagnosis of APS is discussed.

  9. Analysis of clinical manifestations of symptomatic acquired jejunoileal diverticular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chia-Yuan Liu; Wen-Hsiung Chang; Shee-Chan Lin; Cheng-Hsin Chu; Tsang-En Wang; Shou-Chuan Shih

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze systematically our experience over 22 years with symptomatic acquired diverticular disease of the jejunum and ileum, exploring the clinical manifestations and diagnosis of this rare but life-threatening disease.METHODS: The medical records of patients with surgically confirmed symptomatic jejunoileal diverticular disease were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included demographic data, laboratory results, clinical course (acute or chronic), preoperative diagnosis, and operative findings. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) surgical confirmation of jejunoileal diverticular disease and (2)exclusion of congenital diverticula (e.g. Meckel's diverticulum).RESULTS: From January 1982 to July 2004, 28 patients with a total of 29 operations met the study criteria. The male:female ratio was 14:14, and the mean age was 62.6±3.5 years. The most common manifestation was abdominal pain. In nearly half of the patients, the symptoms were chronic. Two patients died after surgery. Only four cases were correctly diagnosed prior to surgery, three by small bowel series.CONCLUSION: Symptomatic acquired small bowel diverticular disease is difficult to diagnose. It should be considered in older patients with unexplained chronic abdominal symptoms. A small bowel series may be helpful in diagnosing this potentially life-threatening disease.

  10. Clinical Manifestations and Distribution of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Pakistan

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    Abaseen Khan Afghan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is a rising epidemic in Pakistan. It is a major public health problem in the country especially alongside regions bordering the neighboring Afghanistan and cities that have had the maximum influx of refugees. The purpose of our paper is to highlight the diverse clinical manifestations of the disease seen along with the geographic areas affected, where the hosts are particularly susceptible. This would also be helpful in presenting the broad spectrum of the disease for training of health care workers and help in surveillance of CL in the region. The increased clinical diversity and the spectrum of phenotypic manifestations noted underscore the fact that the diagnosis of CL should be not only considered when dealing with common skin lesions, but also highly suspected by dermatologists and even primary care physicians even when encountering uncommon pathologies. Hence, we would strongly advocate that since most of these patients present to local health care centers and hospitals, primary care practitioners and even lady health workers (LHWs should be trained in identification of at least the common presentations of CL.

  11. [The sacroiliac joint dysfunction: clinical manifestations, diagnostics and manual therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2005-01-01

    Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is one of the proved causes of sacroiliac joint syndrome. We are talking about the restricted mobility of sacrum opposite to ilium the type of "reversible blockage of movement". Main characteristics of dysfunction are as follows: restricted "joint play", referred pain, normal radiological finding, normal lab results and disappearance of clinical symptoms after deblocking of articular bodies. Pain from a blocked joint can be referred to lower back, buttocks, hip, groin, thigh, calf and lower part of abdomen. Dispersion of painful regions is a consequence of a complex and variable innervation of articular capsule. Blocked position of articular bodies and protracted tension of articular capsule causes a stimulus of nociceptors by which a capsule is protected. Nociceptive activity is manifested with referred pains in innervational region of stimulated sensitive nerves. In the article, besides the clinical manifestations, there is described a diagnostics and manual therapy of dysfunction. Springing tests by means of which a passive mobility ("joint play") is being tested, are most valuable in dysfunction diagnostics. Manual therapy (mobilization/manipulation) is indicated and efficacious with the patients suffering from dysfunction.

  12. Effect of maternal transmissions on clinical manifestations of myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, I.; Koike, R.; Onodera, O. [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The mutation of myotonic dystrophy (DM) has been identified as unstable expansions of trinucleotide CTG repeat, located on chromosome 19q13-3. Although previous investigations have emphasized the strong association of the sizes of the CTG repeat with ages of onset as well as the clinical manifestations, effects of the paternal or maternal transmissions other than CTG repeats on the clinical manifestations in DM have not been evaluated in detail. To investigate how parental transmission affect the DM phenotype, we analyzed 15 cases of paternal transmission and 25 cases of maternal transmission. We have classified DM patients into 4 clinical grades. As in accordance with previous reports, there is a good correlation on sizes of the CTG repeat with their clinical features. The sizes of the CTG repeat in congenital DM patients (4.13{plus_minus}0.221 kbp) (Mean {plus_minus}SEM), who inherited mutant genes from their mothers, were not significantly larger than those of non-congenital DM patients (3.65 {plus_minus}0.36 kbp). As it has been well established that congenital DM patients are born to affected mothers, we investigated to see if there are any parental bias on the clinical manifestations in non-congenital DM. We classified each case into 4 classes depending on the size ranges of the CTG repeat (0 to 1.5 kbp, 1.5 to 3.0 kbp, 3.0 to 4.5 kbp, 4.5 kbp<). In each group of the size ranges of the CTG repeat, the distribution of cases among grades I to III were compared between paternally and maternally transmitted cases. There were statistically significant differences in the distributions of cases among grades I to III for the size ranges of 3 to 4.5 kbp expansions (p<0.01) and over 4.5 kbp expansions (p<0.05) on {chi}{sup 2} test, respectively. The results revealed that maternally transmitted cases tend to show severe phenotypes compared to paternally transmitted ones even if they have similar sizes of CTG repeat.

  13. Epidemiology and clinical manifestations of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebbelstrup Jensen, Betina; Olsen, Katharina E P; Struve, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) represents a heterogeneous group of E. coli strains. The pathogenicity and clinical relevance of these bacteria are still controversial. In this review, we describe the clinical significance of EAEC regarding patterns of infection in humans, transmission......, reservoirs, and symptoms. Manifestations associated with EAEC infection include watery diarrhea, mucoid diarrhea, low-grade fever, nausea, tenesmus, and borborygmi. In early studies, EAEC was considered to be an opportunistic pathogen associated with diarrhea in HIV patients and in malnourished children...... in developing countries. In recent studies, associations with traveler's diarrhea, the occurrence of diarrhea cases in industrialized countries, and outbreaks of diarrhea in Europe and Asia have been reported. In the spring of 2011, a large outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) and hemorrhagic colitis...

  14. Moebius syndrome: clinical manifestations in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luciana Monti; Diniz, Michele Baffi; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2009-01-01

    Moebius syndrome is a congenital, nonprogressive disorder clinically characterized by loss of facial expression, impaired stomatognathic system functions, incapacity to close the eyelids, and several oral impairments. The purpose of this paper was to present the clinical manifestations and the dental treatment in a 5-year, 2-month-old male Moebius syndrome patient. The child presented with facial asymmetry, difficulty performing facial mimic movements and pronouncing some letters, and compromised suction, mastication, breathing, and deglutition. An intraoral examination revealed hypofunction of the perioral muscles, cheeks and tongue, ankyloglossia, anterior open bite, and absence of carious lesions and dental anomalies. The dental treatment consisted of frenectomy and further placement of a removable orthodontic appliance with a palatal crib for correction of the anterior open bite. After 12 months of follow-up, anterior open bite decreased and speech, deglutition, and mastication improved.

  15. Incidence, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Clifton O'neill; Brohl, Andrew Scott; Običan, Sarah Gloria

    2015-09-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) is a complex systemic disease with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. In the obstetric population, recurrent early pregnancy loss, fetal loss, and thrombosis are hallmarks of the disease. Patients with APLS have developed one or more pathogenic auto-antibodies directed against plasma and cell surface proteins. These antibodies are characterized by their affinity for anionic phospholipids. Interactions between APLS antibodies and their protein targets influence a wide variety of biological systems and signaling pathways, including monocytes, platelets, the complement system, and endothelial cells. While much research is currently directed at understanding the mechanisms involved in this autoimmune disease, the key clinical presentation is the hypercoagulable state resulting in thrombosis occurring in essentially any arterial or venous location, as well as numerous obstetrical complications. Treatment of APLS is generally directed at preventing thrombosis and poor pregnancy outcomes by ameliorating the hypercoagulable state.

  16. Clinical Manifestations of Campylobacter concisus Infection in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Linde; Engberg, Jørgen; Ejlertsen, Tove

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: There is only sparse information about the clinical impact of Campylobacter concisus infections in children. METHODS:: A study was performed during a two-year period to determine the clinical manifestations in C. concisus positive children with gastroenteritis. A case patient...... with Campylobacter jejuni/coli infection. RESULTS:: Two thousand three hundred and seventy-two diarrheic stool samples from 1,867 children were cultured for pathogenic enteric bacteria during the study period, and 85 and 109 children with C. concisus and C. jejuni/coli, respectively, were identified. Comparison...... for more than two weeks and two-thirds of all children with C. concisus reported loose stools after six month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS:: Campylobacter concisus infection in children seems to have a milder course of acute gastroenteritis compared with C. jejuni/coli infection, but is associated with more...

  17. Clinical Features and Extraintestinal Manifestations of Crohn Disease in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ah; Chun, Peter; Hwang, Eun Ha; Mun, Sang Wook; Lee, Yeoun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features and extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) of Crohn disease (CD) in Korean pediatric patients. Methods The medical records of 73 children diagnosed with CD were retrospectively reviewed. Data regarding baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, including CD phenotype at diagnosis based on the Montreal classification, and clinical features and course of EIMs were investigated. Results Fifty-two (71.2%) of the patients were males. The mean age of the patients was 12.5 years. The mean follow-up period was 3.4 years. The disease location was ileal in 3 (4.1%) of the patients, colonic in 13 (17.8%), ileocolonic in 56 (76.7%). The clinical behavior was inflammatory in 62 (84.9%) of the patients, stricturing in 8 (11.0%), and penetrating in 3 (4.1%). Perianal abscesses or fistulas were found in 37 (50.7%) of the patients. EIMs observed during the study period were anal skin tag in 25 patients (34.2%), hypertransaminasemia in 20 (27.4%), peripheral arthritis in 2 (2.7%), erythema nodosum in 2 (2.7%), vulvitis in 1 (1.4%), uveitis in 1 (1.4%), and pulmonary thromboembolism in 1 (1.4%). Conclusion Perianal diseases and manifestations were present in more than half of Korean pediatric CD patients at diagnosis. Inspection of the anus should be mandatory in Korean children with suspicious CD, as perianal fistulas, abscesses, and anal skin tags may be the first clue to the diagnosis of CD. PMID:28090468

  18. T Helper Cell Subsets in Clinical Manifestations of Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Diani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which is associated with systemic inflammation and comorbidities, such as psoriatic arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The autoimmune nature of psoriasis has been established only recently, conferring a central role to epidermal CD8 T cells recognizing self-epitopes in the initial phase of the disease. Different subsets of helper cells have also been reported as key players in the psoriasis pathogenesis. Here, we reviewed the knowledge on the role of each subset in the psoriatic cascade and in the different clinical manifestations of the disease. We will discuss the role of Th1 and Th17 cells in the initiation and in the amplification phase of cutaneous inflammation. Moreover, we will discuss the recently proposed role of tissue resident Th22 cells in disease memory in sites of recurrent psoriasis and the possible involvement of Th9 cells. Finally, we will discuss the hypothesis of a link between T helper cell subsets recirculating from the skin and the systemic manifestations of psoriasis.

  19. Cerebral venous thrombosis: Update on clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management

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    Leys Didier

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may mimic many other neurological disorders and lead to misdiagnoses. Headache is the most common symptom and may be associated with other symptoms or remain isolated. The other frequent manifestations are focal neurological deficits and diffuse encephalopathies with seizures. The key to the diagnosis is the imaging of the occluded vessel or of the intravascular thrombus, by a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Causes and risk factors include medical, surgical and obstetrical causes of deep vein thrombosis, genetic and acquired prothrombotic disorders, cancer and hematological disorders, inflammatory systemic disorders, pregnancy and puerperium, infections and local causes such as tumors, arteriovenous malformations, trauma, central nervous system infections and local infections. The breakdown of causes differs in different parts of the world. A meta-analysis of the most recent prospectively collected series showed an overall 15% case-fatality or dependency rate. Heparin therapy is the standard therapy at the acute stage, followed by 3-6 months of oral anticoagulation. Patients with isolated intracranial hypertension may require a lumbar puncture to remove cerebrospinal fluid before starting heparin when they develop a papilloedema that may threaten the visual acuity or decompressive hemicraniectomy. Patients who develop seizures should receive antiepileptic drugs. Cerebral venous thrombosis - even pregnancy-related - should not contraindicate future pregnancies. The efficacy and safety of local thrombolysis and decompressive hemicraniectomy should be tested

  20. T Helper Cell Subsets in Clinical Manifestations of Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, Marco; Altomare, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which is associated with systemic inflammation and comorbidities, such as psoriatic arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The autoimmune nature of psoriasis has been established only recently, conferring a central role to epidermal CD8 T cells recognizing self-epitopes in the initial phase of the disease. Different subsets of helper cells have also been reported as key players in the psoriasis pathogenesis. Here, we reviewed the knowledge on the role of each subset in the psoriatic cascade and in the different clinical manifestations of the disease. We will discuss the role of Th1 and Th17 cells in the initiation and in the amplification phase of cutaneous inflammation. Moreover, we will discuss the recently proposed role of tissue resident Th22 cells in disease memory in sites of recurrent psoriasis and the possible involvement of Th9 cells. Finally, we will discuss the hypothesis of a link between T helper cell subsets recirculating from the skin and the systemic manifestations of psoriasis. PMID:27595115

  1. Ocular manifestations in Hansen’s disease- a clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Samuel, Sundararajan D

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy or Hansen’s disease is a chronic mildly contagious granulomatous disease of tropical and subtropical regions caused by the rod shaped bacillus, Mycobacterium leprae. It affects the skin, peripheral nerves in the hands and feet, mucous membrane of nose, throat and eyes. When left untreated, it is capable of producing various deformities and disfigurements. Aim: To study the ocular involvement in patients with Leprosy under the parameters of age group, sex type and duration of leprosy. To study the different ocular manifestations and identify the potentially sight threatening lesions and provide early management. Methods: This was a prospective study which included 50 cases diagnosed with Hansen’s disease. Detailed history and thorough clinical examination was done. Potentially sight threatening lesions were managed conservatively or surgically. Results: Out of 50 cases of Leprosy, 58% had ocular involvement and majority were in the age group 21-40years. Ocular involvement was predominantly seen in Lepromatous type with 35% having ocular lesions. The most common ocular manifestation observed was superciliary madarosis (48%. Potentially sight threatening lesions accounted for 72.4% of which lagophthalmos was common. No cases of blindness seen. Conclusion: Visual impairment is preventable in Leprosy if detected early. The risk of ocular complications increases with the duration of the disease, despite being treated with systemic anti-leprosy drugs.

  2. CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF VASCULITIS AT THE ONSET OF MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Vasil'ev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes two patients (a 50-year woman and a 72-year man in whom the clinical manifestations of ulceronecrotic vasculitis had long preceded before the diagnosis of multiple myeloma was made. In the former, monoclonal cryoglobulinemia type I induced ulcerative lesions with the development of dry toe gangrene and paraproteinemic renal lesion. In the latter, ulceronecrotic vasculitis with the development of dry toe gangrene was a manifestation of monoclonal paraproteinemia without signs of cryoglobulinemia. Both patients were found to have monoclonal blood secretion (РIgGλ и РIgGκ and urine Bence Jones protein (BJλ+BJκ, BJκ in the absence of immunological markers of vasculitis developing in patients with rheumatic diseases. Immunochemical study of serum/urine and, when monoclonal secretion of PIg+BJ is detected, further examination for plasma cell dyscrasia should be performed in all cases of vascular disorders (cold allergy, Raynaud's syndrome, purpura, ulcers of cruses, and gangrene of distal phalanxes of the hands/feet in patients with atypical vasculitis. The timely immunochemical study of blood and urine will make it possible to diagnose plasma cell dyscrasia (different types of myelomic disease, Waldenstrцm macroglobulinemia, primary amyloidosis at the early stage of the disease and to rule out unjustifiably diagnosed vasculitis in patients with atypical vascular lesions.

  3. Obesity and heart failure: epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Martin A; Lavie, Carl J; Agrawal, Harsh; Aggarwal, Kul B; Kumar, Senthil A

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for heart failure (HF) in both men and women. The mortality risk of overweight and class I and II obese adults with HF is lower than that of normal weight or underweight adults with HF of comparable severity, a phenomenon referred to as the obesity paradox. Severe obesity produces hemodynamic alterations that predispose to changes in cardiac morphology and ventricular function, which may lead to the development of HF. The presence of systemic hypertension, sleep apnea, and hypoventilation, comorbidities that occur commonly with severe obesity, may contribute to HF in such patients. The resultant syndrome is known as obesity cardiomyopathy. Substantial weight loss in severely obese persons is capable of reversing most obesity-related abnormalities of cardiac performance and morphology and improving the clinical manifestations of obesity cardiomyopathy.

  4. [PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION: PRINCIPLE CHARACTERISTICS, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, VACCINE PROPHYLAXIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopukhov, P D; Briko, N I; Khaldin, A A; Tsapkova, N N; Lupashko, O V

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are a large and diverse group of viruses. It includes approximately 200 fully described types that have been detected in humans. Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are etiologic agents during various, benign and malignant lesions of mucous membrane and skin epithelium. Very importantly, persistent HPV infection of certain types is a leading cause of carcinoma of uterine cervix, penis, vulva; vagina, anal canal and fauces (including tongue base and tonsils). HPV infection prophylaxis is the best means to control HPV-conditioned diseases, and vaccination, as had been demonstrated, --the most effective method of its prophylaxis. In this paper principle characteristics and clinical manifestations of papillomavirus infection, as well as effectiveness of vaccination against HPV are examined.

  5. Clinical Manifestations of Hyper IgE Syndromes

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    Alexandra F. Freeman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 4 years, three genetic etiologies of hyper IgE syndromes have been identified: STAT3, DOCK8, and Tyk2. All of these hyper IgE syndromes are characterized by eczema, sinopulmonary infections, and greatly elevated serum IgE. However, each has distinct clinical manifestations. Mutations in STAT3 cause autosomal dominant HIES (Job’s syndrome, which is unique in its diversity of connective tissue, skeletal, and vascular abnormalities. DOCK8 deficiency is characterized by severe cutaneous viral infections such as warts, and a predisposition to malignancies at a young age. Only one individual has been identified with a hyper IgE phenotype associated with Tyk2 deficiency, which is characterized by nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. The identification of these genetic etiologies is leading to advances in understanding the pathogenesis of these syndromes with the goal of improving treatment.

  6. Pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Youn-Soo; Kim, Joong-Gon

    2010-11-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is the most common rheumatic childhood disease; its onset is before 16 years of age and it persists for at least 6 weeks. JRA encompasses a heterogeneous group of diseases that is classified according to 3 major presentations: oligoarthritis, polyarthritis, and systemic onset diseases. These presentations may originate from the same or different causes that involve interaction with specific immunogenetic predispositions, and result in heterogeneous clinical manifestations. An arthritic joint exhibits cardinal signs of joint inflammation, such as swelling, pain, heat, and loss of function; any joint can be arthritic, but large joints are more frequently affected. Extra-articular manifestations include high fever, skin rash, serositis, and uveitis. The first 2 types of JRA are regarded as T helper 1 (Th1) cell-mediated inflammatory disorders, mainly based on the abundance of activated Th1 cells in the inflamed synovium and the pathogenetic role of proinflammatory cytokines that are mainly produced by Th1 cell-stimulated monocytes. In contrast, the pathogenesis of systemic onset disease differs from that of other types of JRA in several respects, including the lack of association with human leukocyte antigen type and the absence of autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells. Although the precise mechanism that leads to JRA remains unclear, proinflammatory cytokines are thought to be responsible for at least part of the clinical symptoms in all JRA types. The effectiveness of biologic therapy in blocking the action of these cytokines in JRA patients provides strong evidence that they play a fundamental role in JRA inflammation.

  7. Clinical manifestations and outcomes in severe ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xuesong; YAO Wei; LIU Wenbin; LI Jun; LU Yumin

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical manifestations and outcomes of severe ulcerative colitis (UC),we retrospectively reviewed 41 patients with severe UC from 144 consecutively hospitalized UC cases from 1988 to 2004.Data recorded included onset,symptoms,signs,laboratory results,endoscopic,radiologic and pathologic findings,the clinical treatment process and follow-up.Of these severe cases,92.7%(38/41)had pancolitis.Clinically,36.9%(15/41)were categorized as first onset type,36.9%(15/41)were chronic persistent and 26.8%(11/41)were chronic recurrent.Steroids played a main role in the remission of severe UC(61.0%).Thirty-one cases(75.6%) were relieved by drug therapy.Seven cases(17.1%) progressed to the need for operation.An early age of onset,pancolitis,low hemoglobin and serum albumin levels,and the need for intravenous steroids tended to be associated with the need for surgery.In conclusion,most of the severe UC patients respond well to drug therapy,but for individuals who are unresponsive to drug therapy,or for those depending on steroids,after a reasonable duration of treatment,the necessity for surgery should be considered.

  8. Clinical Manifestations in 82 Neurobrucellosis Patients from Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreshaj, Shemsedin; Shala, Nexhmedin; Dreshaj, Gresa; Ramadani, Naser; Ponosheci, Albina

    2016-12-01

    Central nervous system involvement is a serious complication of brucellosis with various incidence and various clinical presentations. Hospitalized patients in University Clinical Centre, Clinic for Infectious diseases in Prishtina, with laboratory-confirmed brucellosis, were analyzed, a brucellosis-endemic region. Among the 648 confirmed cases with brucellosis during the period 1991- 2013, 82 patients (12.65%) were diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. The clinical manifestations in patients with neurobrucellosis were evaluated and compared with brucellosis patients. The major presentations among the brucellosis patients were headache, fever, sweating, nausea, weight loss and arthralgia, while from CNS predominant complains were: headache, vomiting, tremor, low back pain, hearing loss and visual disturbance. The mean age of 82 neurobrucellosis patients was 31.46 years with age distribution 12-71 years, from them 5 (6.1%), younger than 16 years, with a non-significant predominance of women (53.65%). The most common neurological findings were radiculopathies of legs (41.46%) neck rigidity (46.34%), agitation (25,6%), behavioral disorders (18.3%), disorientation (19.5%) and stroke (1.22%). Cranial nerves were involved in 20 of 82 patients (24.4%). Neurological consequences were evidenced in 5 (6.1%) patients. Three patients leave hospital with consequences of peripheral facial paresis, two with sensorineural hearing loss and one with left hemiparesis. Headache, nausea and vomiting and weight loss are significantly (pKosovo, may serve as an indication for neurobrucellosis. In endemic areas for brucellosis patients complaining in radiculopathies, persistent headache, facial palsy, hearing loss or presenting stroke without risk factors, should be considered for screening for neurobrucellosis.

  9. Neuropathic pain due to malignancy: Mechanisms, clinical manifestations and therapy

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    Pjević Miroslava

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neuropathic pain in cancer patients requires a focused clinical evaluation based on knowledge of common neuropathic pain syndromes. Definition Neuropathic pain is a non-nociceptive pain or "differentiation" pain, which suggests abnormal production of impulses by neural tissue that is separated from afferent input. Impulses arise from the peripheral nervous system or central nervous system. Causes of neuropathic pain due to malignancy Neuropathic pain is caused directly by cancer-related pathology (compression/infiltration of nerve tissue, combination of compression/infiltration or by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (surgical procedures, chemotherapy, radiotherapy. Mechanisms Pathophysiological mechanisms are very complex and still not clear enough. Neuropathic pain is generated by electrical hyperactivity of neurons along the pain pathways. Peripheral mechanisms (primary sensitization of nerve endings, ectopically generated action potentials within damaged nerves, abnormal electrogenesis within sensory ganglia and central mechanisms (loss of input from peripheral nociceptors into dorsal horn, aberrant sprouting within dorsal horn, central sensitization, loss of inhibitory interneurons, mechanisms at higher centers are involved. Diagnosis The quality of pain presents as spontaneous pain (continuous and paroxysmal, abnormal pain (allodynia, hyperalgesia, hyperpathia, paroxysmal pain. Clinical manifestations Clinically, neuropathic pain is described as the pain in the peripheral nerve (cranial nerves, other mononeuropathies, radiculopathy, plexopathy, paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathy and relatively infrequent, central pain syndrome. Therapy Treatment of neuropathic pain remains a challenge for clinicians, because there is no accepted algorithm for analgesic treatment of neuropathic pain. Pharmacotherapy is considered to be the first line therapy. Opioids combined with non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs are warrented. If

  10. Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbelstrup Jensen, Betina; Olsen, Katharina E. P.; Struve, Carsten; Petersen, Andreas Munk

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) represents a heterogeneous group of E. coli strains. The pathogenicity and clinical relevance of these bacteria are still controversial. In this review, we describe the clinical significance of EAEC regarding patterns of infection in humans, transmission, reservoirs, and symptoms. Manifestations associated with EAEC infection include watery diarrhea, mucoid diarrhea, low-grade fever, nausea, tenesmus, and borborygmi. In early studies, EAEC was considered to be an opportunistic pathogen associated with diarrhea in HIV patients and in malnourished children in developing countries. In recent studies, associations with traveler's diarrhea, the occurrence of diarrhea cases in industrialized countries, and outbreaks of diarrhea in Europe and Asia have been reported. In the spring of 2011, a large outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) and hemorrhagic colitis occurred in Germany due to an EAEC O104:H4 strain, causing 54 deaths and 855 cases of HUS. This strain produces the potent Shiga toxin along with the aggregative fimbriae. An outbreak of urinary tract infection associated with EAEC in Copenhagen, Denmark, occurred in 1991; this involved extensive production of biofilm, an important characteristic of the pathogenicity of EAEC. However, the heterogeneity of EAEC continues to complicate diagnostics and also our understanding of pathogenicity. PMID:24982324

  11. MHC associations with clinical and autoantibody manifestations in European SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D L; Fernando, M M A; Taylor, K E; Chung, S A; Nititham, J; Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Barcellos, L F; Behrens, T W; Cotsapas, C; Gaffney, P M; Graham, R R; Pons-Estel, B A; Gregersen, P K; Harley, J B; Hauser, S L; Hom, G; Langefeld, C D; Noble, J A; Rioux, J D; Seldin, M F; Vyse, T J; Criswell, L A

    2014-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease affecting multiple organ systems and characterized by autoantibody formation to nuclear components. Although genetic variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is associated with SLE, its role in the development of clinical manifestations and autoantibody production is not well defined. We conducted a meta-analysis of four independent European SLE case collections for associations between SLE sub-phenotypes and MHC single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and variant HLA amino acids. Of the 11 American College of Rheumatology criteria and 7 autoantibody sub-phenotypes examined, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibody subsets exhibited the highest number and most statistically significant associations. HLA-DRB1*03:01 was significantly associated with both sub-phenotypes. We found evidence of associations independent of MHC class II variants in the anti-Ro subset alone. Conditional analyses showed that anti-Ro and anti-La subsets are independently associated with HLA-DRB1*0301, and that the HLA-DRB1*03:01 association with SLE is largely but not completely driven by the association of this allele with these sub-phenotypes. Our results provide strong evidence for a multilevel risk model for HLA-DRB1*03:01 in SLE, where the association with anti-Ro and anti-La antibody-positive SLE is much stronger than SLE without these autoantibodies.

  12. Clinical manifestations and significance of post-traumatic thoracolumbar syringomyelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱勇; 朱泽章; 吕锦瑜; 王斌; 李卫国; 朱丽华

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the pathogenic mechanism and the clinical significance of post-traumatic thoracolumbar syringomyelia through reviewing the clinical manifestations. Methods: The data of 15 patients (14 males and 1 female, aged from 28 to 56 years, with an average of 36 years) with post-traumatic syringomyelia treated in our hospital from December 1997 to February 2002 were studied retrospectively. Two patients suffered from T11 fractures, 7 from T12 fractures and 6 from L1 fractures. There were 12 patients with burst fractures and 3 with fracture dislocations. Anterior decompression, bone graft, bone fusion and internal fixation were made on 6 patients, posterior decompression, bone graft, bone fusion and internal fixation on 1 patient, and non-surgical treatment on 8 patients. Results: Syringomyelia of the patients was diagnosed accurately with magnetic resonance imaging at 0.5-4 years after the original thoracolumbar fracture. The cavern was round in 6 cases, elliptic in 6 cases, and irregular in 3 cases. The patients also suffered from pain (80%), myodynamia attenuation in lower extremities (66.7%), aggravated spasm (46.7%), sensation loss or hypesthesia (46.7%), decreased coordinate function of lower extremities (20%) and autonomic nerve symptom (6.7%).Conclusions: Post-traumatic thoracolumbar syringomyelia should be suspected if the patient has new neurological symptoms, such as myodynamia attenuation in lower extremities, after the neural function becomes stable for certain time.

  13. A CLINICAL STUDY OF MUCOCUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJEC TIVES: It is a well - known fact that the skin is referred to as the mirror of the internal diseases. This study has undertaken with the objectives of knowing the spectrum of mucocutaneous manifestations in diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A total of 100 patients with dermatological manifestation were included in the study. Relevant investigation for the diagnosis of diabetes and dermatological disorders were done. RESULTS : Majority of the cases belonged to the age group 41 - 60 years. Various dermatoses observed in the patients were fungal, bacterial and viral infections, lichen planus, vitiligo, diabetic bullae and diabetic dermopathy, granuloma annulare, among the various cutaneous manifestations. Thirty four patients had associated systemic illness, hypertension being most commonly observed. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSION: A diabetic patient can present with both specific and non - specific dermatological manifestations. Thus a patient presenting with mucocutaneous manifestations in the absence of primary cutaneous disorders should be investigated for the underlying diabetic status . KEYWORDS : Diabetes; mucocutaneous Manifestations.

  14. Sesame seed allergy: Clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations

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    Fazlollahi MR.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant-origin foods are among the most important sources of food allergic reactions. An increase in the incidence of sesame seed allergy among children and adults has been reported in recent years. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the prevalence, importance and clinical manifestations of sesame allergy among Iranian patients.Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 250 patients with suspected IgE-mediated food allergies completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick tests with sesame extract as well as cross-reacting foods (walnut, soya and peanut. Total IgE and sesame-specific IgE levels were measured. Patients with positive skin test reactions and/or IgE specific for sesame without clinical symptoms were considered sensitive to sesame. The patients who also had clinical symptoms with sesame consumption were diagnosed as allergic to sesame.Results: Of the 250 patients enrolled in this study, 129 were male and 121 female, with a mean age of 11.7 years. The most common food allergens were cow's milk, egg, curry, tomato and sesame. Sesame sensitivity was found in 35 patients (14.1%. Only five patients (2% had sesame allergy. Sesame-sensitive patients had a significantly higher frequency of positive prick test to cross-reacting foods when compared to non-sensitized patients (p=0.00. The type of symptom was independent of gender and age of the patients, but urticaria and dermatitis-eczema were significantly more frequent in sensitized patients (p=0.008.Conclusions: This is the first study addressing the prevalence of sesame seed allergy in Iranian population. We found sesame to be a common and important cause of food allergy. The panel of foods recommended for use in diagnostic allergy tests should be adjusted.

  15. Giant cell arteritis. Part I. Terminology, classification, clinical manifestations, diagnosis

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    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a vasculitis affecting mainly large and medium-sized arteries, which the classification of systemic vasculitides refers to as those mainly involving the large vessels. GCA is typified by the involvement of extracranial aortic branches and intracranial vessels, the aorta and its large vessels are being affected most frequently. The paper considers the terminology, classification, prevalence, major pathogenic mechanisms, and morphology of GCA. A broad spectrum of its clinical subtypes is due to target vessel stenosis caused by intimal hyperplasia. In 40% of cases, GCA is shown to be accompanied by polymyalgia rheumatica that may either precede or manifest simultaneously with GCA, or follow this disease. The menacing complications of GCA may be visual loss or ischemic strokes at various sites depending on the location of the occluded vessel. Along with the gold standard verification of the diagnosis of GCA, namely temporal artery biopsy, the author indicates other (noninvasive methods for detection of vascular lesions: color Doppler ultrasonography of the temporal arteries, fluorescein angiography of the retina, mag-netic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography to rule out aortic aneurysm. Dynamic 18F positron emission tomography is demonstrated to play a role in the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness.

  16. Clinical manifestations and oral findings in Fraser syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Michele Baffi; Lima, Luciana Monti; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; de Paula, Andréia Bolzan; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    This article is the first known case report of Fraser syndrome in the dental literature. Its purpose was to present the clinical manifestations, oral findings, and dental treatment of a 14-year, 10-month-old female patient. Fraser syndrome is a rare recessive autosomal genetic disorder characterized by multisystemic malformation, usually comprising cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and renal defects. The child presented with: (1) hydrocephaly; (2) face asymmetry; (3) low-inserted ears; (4) flat nose bridge; (5) cryptophthalmos; (6) bilateral absence of eyeballs; (7) hypertelorism; (8) syndactyly on the left fingers and toes; (9) skeletal defects; and (10) lower limb asymmetry. The intraoral examination revealed: (1) complete primary denture; (2) malocclusion; (3) tooth crowding; (4) ogival palate; (5) normal labial frena; (6) absence of lingual frenum (not compromising the tongue movements); (7) parched lips; (8) supragingival calculus adhered to all tooth surfaces; and (9) moderate gingivitis. The dental treatment consisted of periodic monitoring of the patient's oral health status and supragingival scaling associated with topical applications of 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate gel at 2-week intervals to reduce gingivitis.

  17. Subjective cognitive decline: The first clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease?

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    Adalberto Studart Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Mild cognitive impairment is considered as the first clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease (AD, when the individual exhibits below performance on standardized neuropsychological tests. However, some subjects before having a lower performance on cognitive assessments already have a subjective memory complaint. Objective: A review about subjective cognitive decline, the association with AD biomarkers and risk of conversion to dementia. Methods: We performed a comprehensive non-systematic review on PubMed. The keywords used in the search were terms related to subjective cognitive decline. Results: Subjective cognitive decline is characterized by self-experience of deterioration in cognitive performance not detected objectively through formal neuropsychological testing. However, various terms and definitions have been used in the literature and the lack of a widely accepted concept hampers comparison of studies. Epidemiological data have shown that individuals with subjective cognitive decline are at increased risk of progression to AD dementia. In addition, there is evidence that this group has a higher prevalence of positive biomarkers for amyloidosis and neurodegeneration. However, Alzheimer's disease is not the only cause of subjective cognitive decline and various other conditions can be associated with subjective memory complaints, such as psychiatric disorders or normal aging. The features suggestive of a neurodegenerative disorder are: onset of decline within the last five years, age at onset above 60 years, associated concerns about decline and confirmation by an informant. Conclusion: These findings support the idea that subjective cognitive complaints may be an early clinical marker that precedes mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites and Clinical Manifestations in Children

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    M Ebadi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis and treatment of parasitic infections are very important because of pathologic changes and clinical symptoms produced in the host, and for taking measures against them. These diseases have more adverse effects and more importance in children. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of intestinal parasites and their clinical manifestations in children 0-14 years old referred to Yazd Central Laboratory. Methods: The present cross- sectional descriptive study was performed during the April 2005 to September 2006, with data obtained from the stool samples of 1500 children, using both wet mount smear (physiologic saline and Lugol΄s solutions and formalin-ethyl acetate concentration method for detection of the intestinal parasites and also with the tape test for eggs of Enterobius vermicularis and Taenia. Results: From 1500 examined stool samples, 128(8.5% cases were positive for one of the intestinal parasites, including 67(52.3% females and 61(47.7% males. Ninety five percent of positive cases were infected with protozoa and 5% with helminths. The most frequent protozoans were Blastocystis hominis 41.3%, Giardia lamblia 33.6%, and Entamoeba coli 14.7%. Enterobius vermicularis (4.3% and Hymenolepis nana (0.7% were the helminth species. The most abundant infection rate was shown in the 5-9 years old group, with a significant difference compared with other age groups (P< 0.05. About 87% of children infested with Blastocystis hominis showed more than 5 Blastocystis per 400x microscope fields, and 100% of children infested with Giardia lamblia and Chilomastix mesnili had clinical symptoms. Conclusion: In this study, lower contamination rates in comparison with the similar studies conducted in other regions of the country was seen, which may be as a result of the hot and dry climate and improved personal hygiene and public health services. There is a need for further studies about the prevalence and clinical symptoms of

  19. Clinical manifestations of cow milk protein intolerance in infants

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    Mladenović Marija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The disorder of cow milk protein intolerance is characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by hypersensitivity of type I, II, or IV, and occurs in 2-3% of children, mostly infants. Objective. The aim of this study was to present our experiences and observations of clinical signs and symptoms of cow milk protein intolerance in infants aged below 12 months. Method. The investigation was carried out on a sample of 55 infants, aged between 1.5-9 months (x=4.2l±1.25, who had cow milk protein intolerance. Diagnosis of illness was based on characteristic anamnestic, clinical, and laboratory parameters, as well as on an adequate patient's response to antigen elimination. Results. The clinical presentation of cow milk protein intolerance was dominated by cutaneous problems, found in 40/55 (72.73% infants, followed by digestive disorders, found in 31 (56.36%, while respiratory tract disorders were observed least frequently (14.55%. None of the patients developed anaphylactic shock. Changes involving only one system were found in 35 (63.64% patients; of these 20 (36.36% were cutaneous and 15 (27.27% digestive. Twenty (36.36% infants displayed multisystemic changes; of these 12 were cutaneus with digestive, 4 were cutaneus with respiratory, while 4 infants had cutaneous, digestive, and respiratory disorders. Of the 55 infants with cow milk protein intolerance, 26 (47.27% had urticaria, 22 (40.00% perioral erythema, 21 (38.18% diarrhoea (15 haemorrhagic, 6 non-haemorrhagic, 13 (23.64% vomiting, 12 (21.82% Quincke's oedema, 12 (21.82% eczema, 5 (9.09% obstructive bronchitis, while 3 (5.45% infants had laryngitis. In 5 (9.09% patients we found a significant body weight deficit and in 3 (5.45%, sideropenic anaemia, while longitudinal growth retardation was not registered in any of the patients. Conclusion. Our study showed that the disorder of cow milk protein intolerance predominantly involved cutaneous disorders as well

  20. A CLINICAL STUDY OF MUCOCUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF HIV

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    Murugesh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Mucocutaneous manifestations are extremely common and varied in HIV infected patients. The present study was done to know the overall prevalence of mucocutaneous manifestations in HIV infected patients and to know the frequency of individual manifestations. METHODS: A total of 150 HIV seropositive patients from voluntary counseling and testing center were included in the study. Detailed history, thorough physical examination and relevant investigations were done to confirm the mucocutaneous manifestations when present. RESULTS: Ninety two percent (92% of 150 positives had mucocutaneous manifestations at presentation. Majority (75.34% of the patients belonged to the age group 25 – 49 years and male to female ratio was 1.08:1. Oral candidiasis was the most common (33.33% manifestation. Other common infectious conditions seen were HSV (16.67% dermatophytosis (12.67%, genital candidiasis (9.33%, herpes genitalis (10%. Common non-infectious disorders included generalized xerosis and ichthyosis (14.66%, generalized hyperpigmentation (11.33% and seborrheic dermatitis (6.67%. Hair and nail changes included diffuse alopecia (18%, trichomegaly (6.67% and melanonychia (32%.Pruritic papular dermatitis was seen in 16%. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSION: This study thus emphasizes the need for dermatological evaluation of all patients with HIV infection for early management and improved quality of life.

  1. Craniofacial muscle pain: review of mechanisms and clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic surveys of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have demonstrated that a considerable proportion of the population--up to 5% or 6%--will experience persistent pain severe enough to seek treatment. Unfortunately, the current diagnostic classification of craniofacial muscle pain is based on descriptions of signs and symptoms rather than on knowledge of pain mechanisms. Furthermore, the pathophysiology and etiology of craniofacial muscle pain are not known in sufficient detail to allow causal treatment. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain cause-effect relationships; however, it is still uncertain what may be the cause of muscle pain and what is the effect of muscle pain. This article reviews the literature in which craniofacial muscle pain has been induced by experimental techniques in animals and human volunteers and in which the effects on somatosensory and motor function have been assessed under standardized conditions. This information is compared to the clinical correlates, which can be derived from the numerous cross-sectional studies in patients with craniofacial muscle pain. The experimental literature clearly indicates that muscle pain has significant effects on both somatosensory and craniofacial motor function. Typical somatosensory manifestations of experimental muscle pain are referred pain and increased sensitivity of homotopic areas. The craniofacial motor function is inhibited mainly during experimental muscle pain, but phase-dependent excitation is also found during mastication to reduce the amplitude and velocity of jaw movements. The underlying neurobiologic mechanisms probably involve varying combinations of sensitization of peripheral afferents, hyperexcitability of central neurons, and imbalance in descending pain modulatory systems. Reflex circuits in the brain stem seem important for the adjustment of sensorimotor function in the presence of craniofacial pain. Changes in somatosensory and motor function may therefore be

  2. Early clinical manifestations associated with death from visceral leishmaniasis.

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    Valdelaine Etelvina Miranda de Araújo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Brazil, lethality from visceral leishmaniasis (VL is high and few studies have addressed prognostic factors. This historical cohort study was designed to investigate the prognostic factors for death from VL in Belo Horizonte (Brazil. METHODOLOGY: The analysis was based on data of the Reportable Disease Information System-SINAN (Brazilian Ministry of Health relating to the clinical manifestations of the disease. During the study period (2002-2009, the SINAN changed platform from a Windows to a Net-version that differed with respect to some of the parameters collected. Multivariate logistic regression models were performed to identify variables associated with death from VL, and these were included in prognostic score. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Model 1 (period 2002-2009; 111 deaths from VL and 777 cured patients included the variables present in both SINAN versions, whereas Model 2 (period 2007-2009; 49 deaths from VL and 327 cured patients included variables common to both SINAN versions plus the additional variables included in the Net version. In Model 1, the variables significantly associated with a greater risk of death from VL were weakness (OR 2.9; 95%CI 1.3-6.4, Leishmania-HIV co-infection (OR 2.4; 95%CI 1.2-4.8 and age ≥60 years (OR 2.5; 95%CI 1.5-4.3. In Model 2, the variables were bleeding (OR 3.5; 95%CI 1.2-10.3, other associated infections (OR 3.2; 95%CI 1.3-7.8, jaundice (OR 10.1; 95%CI 3.7-27.2 and age ≥60 years (OR 3.1; 95%CI 1.4-7.1. The prognosis score was developed using the variables associated with death from VL of the latest version of the SINAN (Model 2. The predictive performance of which was evaluated by sensitivity (71.4%, specificity (73.7%, positive and negative predictive values (28.9% and 94.5% and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (75.6%. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge regarding the factors associated with death from VL may improve clinical management of patients and contribute to lower

  3. Significado clínico y fisiopatológico del eosinófilo Clinical and physiopathological significance of the eosinophil

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    José Domingo Torres Hernández

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available

    El eosinófilo es una célula con funciones protectoras y beneficiosas especificas pero que en algunas circunstancias Interviene como mediador en diferentes procesos fisiopatológicos. Un recuento aumentado en la sangre periférica (mayor de 500 células/mm cúbico siempre debe investigarse porque puede ser el Indicador precoz de una enfermedad o la guía para llegar a un diagnóstico.

    The eosinophil is a cell with specific protective and beneficial functions but In some circumstances It acts as a mediator in different physiopathologic processes. Increased periphery blood counts (more than 500 cells/cubic mm should always be investigated since they may be the earliest indication of a disease or represent an important diagnostic guide.

  4. A CLINICAL STUDY OF OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS

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    Ravinder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND HIV/AIDS is a multi system disorder with ocular involvement is about 70-80% of HIV patient occupational exposure to HIV is a significant health hazard for the treating clinicians including Eye Surgeons. AIM To study and evaluation of ocular manifestation in HIV patients attending out patient. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is observational study of 104 HIV+ve cases for a period of 1 year those patients who attended ophthalmic out patient department. RESULTS 73 were males (70.19% and 31 were females (29.80%. Majority of the patients belongs to age group of 15-50 years. Out of 104 patients 83(79.80% were married and 21(20.20% were unmarried. HIV was predominantly seen in labourers 41(32.42%. The predominant mode of transmission of sexual (Hetero Sexual transmission. HIV infection was predominantly seen in uneducated patients 64(61.53%. Total No. of ocular findings in 51 cases out of 75 with anterior Uveitis, Conjunctival microvasculopathy, Herpes Simplex Keratitis and Conjunctivitis are the most common anterior segment manifestation. CMV retinitis, HIV Microvasculopathy are the most common posterior segment manifestation. CONCLUSIONS Ophthalmologists should be familiar with common and uncommon ocular manifestations of AIDS+ve cases and their diagnosis and treatment, as early and proper treatment can Salvage their vision and improve the quality of life.

  5. West Syndrome in South Iran: Electro-Clinical Manifestations

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    ALI Akabar ASADI-POOYA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Asadi-Pooya AA, Sharifzade M. West Syndrome in South Iran: Electro-Clinical Manifestations. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Summer; 7(3: 40-44.ObjectiveWe aimed to determine the clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG characteristics of the patients with West syndrome (WS in south Iran.Materials & MethodsIn this retrospective study, all patients with a clinical diagnosis of WS were recruited in the outpatient epilepsy clinic at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences between September 2008 and May 2012. Age, gender, age at seizure onset, seizure type(s, epilepsy risk factors, EEG and imaging studies of all patients were registered routinely.ResultsDuring the study period, 2500 patients with epilepsy were registered at our epilepsy clinic. Thirty-two patients (1.3% were diagnosed to have WS. Age of onset (mean ± standard deviation was 4.99 ± 3.06 months. Sixteen patients were male and 16 were female. Nine (28.1% were reported to have two or more seizure types and 23 (71.8% had one seizure type (epileptic spasms. At referral, no developmental delay was detected in two patients and in the rest, a mild to severe delay was noted.Electroencephalography showed typical hypsarrhythmia in 59.4% of our patients and modified hypsarrhythmia or atypical presentations were seen in 40.6%. Two patients had pyridoxine (B6-dependent seizures, confirmed by oral B6 trial.ConclusionVariants of the classical triad of WS including other seizure types, atypical EEG findings, and normal psychomotor function at the beginning could be observed in some patients. Rarely, treatable genetic disorders (e.g., pyridoxine-dependent seizures should be considered in those in whom no other diagnosis is evident. References1. Blume WT, Lüders HO, Mizrahi E, Tassinari C, van Emde Boas W, Engel J Jr. Glossary of descriptive terminology for ictal semiology: report of the ILAE task force on classification and terminology. Epilepsia. 2001 Sep;42(9:1212-8.2. Carmant L

  6. Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Empirical Treatments for Catatonia

    OpenAIRE

    Bhati, Mahendra T.; Datto, Catherine J; O'Reardon, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Review the medical literature on the history and clinical features of catatonia so as to provide a contemporary clinical guide for successfully diagnosing and treating the various clinical forms of catatonia.

  7. Chondrocyte physiopathology and drug efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serni, U; Mannoni, A

    1991-01-01

    After a brief exposition on the physiopathology of cartilage, and characteristic features of chondrocytes and proteoglycans (PGs) in osteoarthritis (OA), it is underlined how different molecules of GAGs and aggregated PGs added to the culture media can prevent damage and reduction of GAGs and fibril production in chondrocytes cultured with NSAIDs and corticosteroids. In animal models of OA, the local or general administration of GAGPS reduces the proteinase activity, the level of uronic acid in synovial fluid and the number of inflammatory cells in synovia. In the Pond-Nuki dog, GAGPS improves the cartilage surface. These favourable events can also occur in human OA, where it is, moreover, difficult to monitor the patients. For this purpose, patients must be selected in the first two stages of primary OA, and followed using NMR, the only device able to scan cartilage and subchondral bone, to determine their consistency and thickness, and to provide information on water content.

  8. Facial diplegia: etiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic evaluation

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    Sefer Varol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Facial diplegia (FD is a rare neurological manifestation with diverse causes. This article aims to systematically evaluate the etiology, diagnostic evaluation and treatment of FD. Method The study was performed retrospectively and included 17 patients with a diagnosis of FD. Results Patients were diagnosed with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS (11, Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis (1, neurosarcoidosis (1, non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (1, tuberculous meningitis (1 herpes simplex reactivation (1 and idiopathic (1. In addition, two patients had developed FD during pregnancy. Conclusion Facial diplegia is an ominous symptom with widely varying causes that requires careful investigation.

  9. [The clinical and serological manifestations of Lyme disease in Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan'eva, L P; Skripnikova, I A; Barskova, V G; Steere, A C

    1995-01-01

    Out of 86 Lyme's disease patients with a history of migrating erythema nervous system, cardiovascular and articular involvement was observed in 27, 6 and 43% of cases. Acrodermatitis was diagnosed in 2% of patients. Affection of locomotor system manifested with acute arthritis episodes or pains in major joints. 11 patients of 12 examined at arthritis onset showed elevated titer of anti-Borrelia IgG antibodies. Serologically, of 80 patients with arthritis or arthralgia without prior migrating erythema 6 demonstrated antibodies to 5 and more Borrelia polypeptides.

  10. Trismus as a Clinical Manifestation of Tetanus: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadiochos, Ioannis; Papadiochou, Sofia; Petsinis, Vassilis; Goutzanis, Lampros; Atsali, Charikleia; Papadogeorgaki, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Although the incidence of tetanus disease has radically declined in developed countries, both dental practitioners and oral and maxillofacial surgeons should be knowledgeable about its diagnosis since initial manifestations of the disease, such as trismus and dysphagia, are observed in the orofacial region. This study reports on a case of generalized tetanus diagnosed in a middle-aged man. Before the tetanus diagnosis, the patient had sought medical advice from seven different health care professionals, including a dentist and an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. The patient reported trismus and dysphagia as his main complaints. The suspicion of tetanus emerged from the patient's manifestations in conjunction with his history of trauma and his agricultural occupation. The patient underwent successful treatment including administration of muscle relaxants, antibiotics, and booster vaccination doses of tetanus toxoid as well as a tracheostomy and aided mechanical ventilation. This case report highlights the significance of taking a meticulous medical history, thoroughly performing a physical examination, and systematically assessing orofacial signs and symptoms.

  11. Physiopathology of intratendinous calcific deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva Francesco

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In calcific tendinopathy (CT, calcium deposits in the substance of the tendon, with chronic activity-related pain, tenderness, localized edema and various degrees of decreased range of motion. CT is particularly common in the rotator cuff, and supraspinatus, Achilles and patellar tendons. The presence of calcific deposits may worsen the clinical manifestations of tendinopathy with an increase in rupture rate, slower recovery times and a higher frequency of post-operative complications. The aetiopathogenesis of CT is still controversial, but seems to be the result of an active cell-mediated process and a localized attempt of the tendon to compensate the original decreased stiffness. Tendon healing includes many sequential processes, and disturbances at different stages of healing may lead to different combinations of histopathological changes, diverting the normal healing processes to an abnormal pathway. In this review, we discuss the theories of pathogenesis behind CT. Better understanding of the pathogenesis is essential for development of effective treatment modalities and for improvement of clinical outcomes.

  12. ENTEROVIRUS INFECTION: VARIETY OF ETIOLOGICAL FACTORS AND CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Kanaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Enteroviruses are widely distributed human infectious pathogens. In spite of infection a disease does not manifest in majority number of cases. However, in some infected persons the different kind of symptoms can be observed; from common cold signs up to  aseptic (serous meningitis and myocarditis. Severe enteroviral cases with lethal outcomes are rarely reported. Ability of enteroviruses to cause large outbreaks and even epidemic distribution is very significant for health care systems. Taking in account a high genetic diversity of enteroviruses it is possible appearance of new highly pathogenic strains in the future. In some countries including the Russian Federation the permanent surveillance for enteroviral infections is provided besides of WHO polio elimination program. The laboratory diagnostics of enterovirus infections is complicated by numerous of pathogen serotypes. Thus, classical virological methods should be supported by molecular-biological tools to sequence pathogen genome and to define phylogenetic relations between different enterovirus strains.

  13. Ocular manifestations of erythema nodosum in children (clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Markova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal disorders are the second leading cause of blindness and low vision in children. Early diagnosis and accurate interpretation of optic fundus abnormalities and novel diagnostic tools improve outcomes and prevent irreversible complications. Recently, the occurrence of atypical optic fundus pathology in children has increased. This requires correct differential diagnosis using modern non-invasive methods. Erythema nodosum (EN is a rare condition that affects preschool children. This condition is characterized by acute or chronic deep dermal hypodermal skin vasculitis. Infectious diseases are considered as one of EN causes. EN is also associated with fungal diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, hormone imbalance, sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, tuberculosis, medications. However, EN may occur as an isolated condition as well. Literature data on ocular manifestations of erythema nodosum are limited (episcleritis, pigment epitheliopathy. Acute bilateral neurochorioretinitis with serous MZ neuroepithelium detachment in a 5-year girl is of interest for clinicians, pediatricians, and ophthalmologists.  

  14. Ocular manifestations of erythema nodosum in children (clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Markova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinal disorders are the second leading cause of blindness and low vision in children. Early diagnosis and accurate interpretation of optic fundus abnormalities and novel diagnostic tools improve outcomes and prevent irreversible complications. Recently, the occurrence of atypical optic fundus pathology in children has increased. This requires correct differential diagnosis using modern non-invasive methods. Erythema nodosum (EN is a rare condition that affects preschool children. This condition is characterized by acute or chronic deep dermal hypodermal skin vasculitis. Infectious diseases are considered as one of EN causes. EN is also associated with fungal diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, hormone imbalance, sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, tuberculosis, medications. However, EN may occur as an isolated condition as well. Literature data on ocular manifestations of erythema nodosum are limited (episcleritis, pigment epitheliopathy. Acute bilateral neurochorioretinitis with serous MZ neuroepithelium detachment in a 5-year girl is of interest for clinicians, pediatricians, and ophthalmologists.  

  15. Otological manifestations of turner syndrome: Clinical and radiological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đerić Dragoslava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality where all or a part of one of the X chromosomes is absent or it has other abnormalities. Besides characteristic abnormalities of short stature and infertility, women with Turner syndrome have increased risks for tumors of the central nervous system, especially meningioma and an otologic disease. Meningioma involving the middle ear is extremely rare, and this condition has never been published in association with Turner syndrome. Case Report. We present an otologic manifestation associated with other abnormalities in a patient with Turner syndrome and discuss diagnosis and possible treatment options. Conclusion. Multidisciplinary team approach is essential in these patients in order to evaluate their vulnerability and define therapeutic priorities.

  16. The role of human leukocyte antigen in susceptibility and clinical manifestations of sarcoidosis.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) with susceptibility and clinical manifestations of sarcoidosis, fifty-five patients with sarcoidosis were studied by using allele group specific polymerase chain reaction technique (PCR). Our data

  17. KIT D816V mutation burden does not correlate to clinical manifestations of indolent systemic mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Vestergaard, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of indolent systemic mastocytosis (ISM) comprise mediator-related symptoms, anaphylaxis, and osteoporosis. A new sensitive method for KIT D816V mutation detection allows quantification of the level of mutation-positive cells.......Clinical manifestations of indolent systemic mastocytosis (ISM) comprise mediator-related symptoms, anaphylaxis, and osteoporosis. A new sensitive method for KIT D816V mutation detection allows quantification of the level of mutation-positive cells....

  18. Stress and coping in patients with clinical manifestation of Human papillomavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Hrvoje Cvitanovic; Mirna Šitum; Jelena Meštrović-Štefekov; Liborija Lugović-Mihić

    2017-01-01

    Stressful life events in response to a psychosocial trigger have been reported to negatively affect the course of infections. This study was based on patients with clinical manifestations of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and a control group of patients with psoriasis who were admitted over a period of one year to the Dermatology Department of Karlovac General Hospital. A total of 122 patients participated in the study, either with a confirmed diagnosis of clinical manifestations of HP...

  19. Clinical and Laboratory Manifestations of Meningococcemia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mamishi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Lack of vaccination and modern health care facilities in many countries including Iran let meningococcemia to remain as a serious challenging disorder especially among children and in spite of improved diagnosis and earlier treatment its prognosis is still dismal. This study describes 68 cases (54.4% male of proved meningococcemia hospitalized since 1992 up to the end of 2002 in Children Medical Center Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Infants of 6 to 12 month old were a major concern in number (14.7% and severity of disease. 5.9% of the cases have had at least two hospitalization history for meningococcal septicemia and 19.1% of the patients had Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, nephrotic syndrome or chronic liver disease in their past medical history. Meningeal irritation signs were seen in 55.9% and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF smear was positive in 71.4% and culture was positive in 48.5% of patients. Meningococcal septicemia ended in shock (38.2%, Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC (7.4%, thrombocytopenia (10.3%, arthritis (4.4%,ocular complications (2.9%, pericarditis (2.9% and seizure (8.8% in 51 of the cases, and death occurred in 7 patients. This study shows that the manifestation of the disease is similar to those described elsewhere except for lower pneumonia and no seasonal variations.

  20. Patterns of clinical mastitis manifestations in Danish organic dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette; Enevoldsen, Carsten

    1997-01-01

    Danish organic dairy production is characterized by a low input of antibiotics for udder treatment and a high input of other mastitis control procedures. A study was conducted in 14 organic dairy herds with the objectives of obtaining a comprehensive description of clinical mastitis cases...... and identifying characteristic patterns in these results. Clinical signs, inflammatory reactions and microbiological identifications were obtained from 367 cases of clinical mastitis occurring over 18 months. Cow characteristics and preincident values such as milk yield and somatic cell count were obtained...... for each cow. Signs of previous udder inflammation were present in two-thirds of the clinical mastitis cases. Severe local inflammatory reactions were found in 21% of the cases and some indication of generalized signs such as fever and reduced appetite were found in 35% of the cases. Logistic regression...

  1. Human cysticercosis: parasitology, pathology, clinical manifestations and available treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbe, G

    1994-10-01

    Human cysticercosis is a global health problem and neurocysticercosis a serious clinical syndrome. The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis can now be made with a high degree of accuracy by scrutiny of clinical signs and symptoms in combination with X-ray, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, serological tests and laboratory examinations. Differential clinical diagnosis with tumor, and vascular and inflammatory conditions, may however, prove difficult in nonendemic areas. The management of cysticercosis has been radically changed by the advent of effective chemotherapy. Both the heterocyclic pyrazinoisoquinoline compound, praziquantel and the benzimidazole carbamate, albendazole, have now been extensively tested and successfully used for treatments of neurocysticercosis, usually in combination with corticosteroids. The definition of appropriate criteria and guidelines for the use of chemotherapy, may however, require further research. Surgical interventions continue to play an important role in certain clinical presentations. Recent advances in immunological research hold realistic promise for the development of a vaccine against Taenia solium.

  2. Physiopathology and treatment of critical bleeding: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia González-Guerrero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to develop the different factors involved in the physiopathology of trauma-induced coagulopathy, through a review of publications on the matter; as well as to assess the evidence available on the treatment of critical bleeding and the recommendations by clinical practice guidelines. Methods: a search has been conducted on the bibliography published about the physiopathology and treatment of critical bleeding in the PUBMED, BestPractice, UpToDate databases and the Cochrane Plus Library. The main key words used for this search were “early trauma induced coagulopathy”, “mechanisms of early trauma-induced coagulopathy”, “blood transfusion guidelines”, “massive transfusion guidelines” and ”fibrinogen replacement therapy”. The most clinically relevant articles were selected for this review. Conclusions: the physiopathology of the trauma-induced coagulopathy is a more complex matter and involves more factors than was initially assumed. The early treatment of the coagulopathy is critical for the initial management of the critical bleeding. However, the use of blood derivatives should be rational and based on homogeneous and high-quality scientific evidence. The main cornerstones for the treatment of critical bleeding are: fluid therapy, fibrinogen concentrate, prothrombin complex concentrate, plasma, erythrocyte or platelet concentrates, tranexamic acid, and calcium. Their administration should be assessed depending on the clinical condition of each patient.

  3. Hyperthyroidism in four guinea pigs: clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzel, F; Hierlmeier, B; Christian, M; Reifinger, M

    2013-12-01

    Hyperthyroidism was diagnosed in four guinea pigs by demonstration of an increased serum total thyroxine concentration. The main clinical signs were comparable with those observed in feline hyperthyroidism and included weight loss despite maintenance of appetite and a palpable mass in the ventral cervical region. Three animals were treated successfully with methimazole for between 13 and 28 months. Clinical signs and regular measurement of circulating total thyroxine concentrations appear to be convenient parameters for monitoring response to medical therapy.

  4. The prevalence of clinically diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis and its clinical manifestations: a nationwide register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarchou, Sofia; Lindström, Ulf; Askling, Johan; Eriksson, Jonas K; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena; Neovius, Martin; Turesson, Carl; Kristensen, Lars Erik; Jacobsson, Lennart T H

    2015-05-09

    Prevalence estimates of ankylosing spondylitis vary considerably, and there are few nationwide estimates. The present study aimed to describe the national prevalence of clinically diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis in Sweden, stratified according to age, sex, geographical, and socio-economic factors, and according to subgroups with ankylosing spondylitis-related clinical manifestations and pharmacological treatment. All individuals diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis according to the World Health Organization International Classification of Disease codes, between 1967 and 2009, were identified from the National Patient Register. Data regarding disease manifestations, patient demographics, level of education, pharmacological treatment, and geographical region were retrieved from the National Patient Register and other national registers. A total of 11,030 cases with an ankylosing spondylitis diagnosis (alive, living in Sweden, and 16 to 64 years old in December 2009) were identified in the National Patient Register, giving a point prevalence of 0.18% in 2009. The prevalence was higher in northern Sweden, and lower in those with a higher level of education. Men had a higher prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis (0.23% versus 0.14%, P ankylosing spondylitis of 0.18%. It revealed phenotypical and treatment differences between the sexes, as well as geographical and socio-economic differences in disease prevalence.

  5. The prevalence of clinically diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis and its clinical manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exarchou, Sofia; Lindström, Ulf; Askling, Johan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prevalence estimates of ankylosing spondylitis vary considerably, and there are few nationwide estimates. The present study aimed to describe the national prevalence of clinically diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis in Sweden, stratified according to age, sex, geographical, and socio......-economic factors, and according to subgroups with ankylosing spondylitis-related clinical manifestations and pharmacological treatment. METHODS: All individuals diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis according to the World Health Organization International Classification of Disease codes, between 1967 and 2009...... with an ankylosing spondylitis diagnosis (alive, living in Sweden, and 16 to 64 years old in December 2009) were identified in the National Patient Register, giving a point prevalence of 0.18% in 2009. The prevalence was higher in northern Sweden, and lower in those with a higher level of education. Men had a higher...

  6. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis; two different genes responsible for similar clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hunmin; Hwang, Hee; Cheong, Hae Il; Park, Hye Won

    2011-11-01

    Primary hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder manifesting as recurrent periodic flaccid paralysis and concomitant hypokalemia. HOKPP is divided into type 1 and type 2 based on the causative gene. Although 2 different ion channels have been identified as the molecular genetic cause of HOKPP, the clinical manifestations between the 2 groups are similar. We report the cases of 2 patients with HOKPP who both presented with typical clinical manifestations, but with mutations in 2 different genes (CACNA1Sp.Arg528His and SCN4A p.Arg672His). Despite the similar clinical manifestations, there were differences in the response to acetazolamide treatment between certain genotypes of SCN4A mutations and CACNA1S mutations. We identified p.Arg672His in the SCN4A gene of patient 2 immediately after the first attack through a molecular genetic testing strategy. Molecular genetic diagnosis is important for genetic counseling and selecting preventive treatment.

  7. MELAS syndrome: Clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Adesina, Adekunle M; Jones, Jeremy; Scaglia, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is one of the most frequent maternally inherited mitochondrial disorders. MELAS syndrome is a multi-organ disease with broad manifestations including stroke-like episodes, dementia, epilepsy, lactic acidemia, myopathy, recurrent headaches, hearing impairment, diabetes, and short stature. The most common mutation associated with MELAS syndrome is the m.3243A>G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)). The m.3243A>G mutation results in impaired mitochondrial translation and protein synthesis including the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex subunits leading to impaired mitochondrial energy production. The inability of dysfunctional mitochondria to generate sufficient energy to meet the needs of various organs results in the multi-organ dysfunction observed in MELAS syndrome. Energy deficiency can also stimulate mitochondrial proliferation in the smooth muscle and endothelial cells of small blood vessels leading to angiopathy and impaired blood perfusion in the microvasculature of several organs. These events will contribute to the complications observed in MELAS syndrome particularly the stroke-like episodes. In addition, nitric oxide deficiency occurs in MELAS syndrome and can contribute to its complications. There is no specific consensus approach for treating MELAS syndrome. Management is largely symptomatic and should involve a multidisciplinary team. Unblinded studies showed that l-arginine therapy improves stroke-like episode symptoms and decreases the frequency and severity of these episodes. Additionally, carnitine and coenzyme Q10 are commonly used in MELAS syndrome without proven efficacy.

  8. Chromoblastomycosis: an overview of clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz-Telles, Flavio; Esterre, Phillippe; Perez-Blanco, Maigualida; Vitale, Roxana G; Salgado, Claudio Guedes; Bonifaz, Alexandro

    2009-02-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is one of the most frequent infections caused by melanized fungi. It is a subcutaneous fungal infection, usually an occupational related disease, mainly affecting individuals in tropical and temperate regions. Although several species are etiologic agents, Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Cladophialophora carrionii are prevalent in the endemic areas. Chromoblastomycosis lesions are polymorphic and must be differentiated from those associated with many clinical conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed by the observation of muriform cells in tissue and the isolation and the identification of the causal agent in culture. Chromoblastomycosis still is a therapeutic challenge for clinicians due to the recalcitrant nature of the disease, especially in the severe clinical forms. There are three treatment modalities, i.e., physical treatment, chemotherapy and combination therapy but their success is related to the causative agent, the clinical form and severity of the chromoblastomycosis lesions. There is no treatment of choice for this neglected mycosis, but rather several treatment options. Most of the patients can be treated with itraconazole, terbinafine or a combination of both. It is also important to evaluate the patient's individual tolerance of the drugs and whether the antifungal will be provided for free or purchased, since antifungal therapy must be maintained in long-term regimens. In general, treatment should be guided according to clinical, mycological and histopathological criteria.

  9. Detection and clinical manifestation of placental malaria in southern Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P. Mockenhaupt; G. Bedu-Addo; C. von Gaertner; R. Boye; K. Fricke; I. Hannibal; F. Karakaya; M. Schaller; U. Ulmen; P.A. Acquah; E. Dietz; T.A. Eggelte; U. Bienzle

    2006-01-01

    Background: Plasmodium falciparum can be detected by microscopy, histidine-rich-protein-2 (HRP2) capture test or PCR but the respective clinical relevance of the thereby diagnosed infections in pregnant women is not well established. Methods: In a cross-sectional, year-round study among 839 deliveri

  10. Clinical manifest x-linked recessive adrenoleukodystrophy in a female

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jack, Gyda Hlin Skuladottir; Malm-Willadsen, Karolina; Frederiksen, Anja;

    2013-01-01

    examination revealed decreased sensitivity in the feet, particularly to touch. Deep tendon reflexes in the lower limbs were brisk, and Babinski's sign was present bilaterally. Multiple sclerosis (MS) was excluded, and all clinical and biochemical tests were normal. After two years of progressing symptoms...

  11. Manifestations and clinical impact of pediatric inherited thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Irene L M; van Ommen, C Heleen; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2015-02-12

    The etiology of pediatric venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) is multifactorial, and in most children, 1 or more clinical risk factors are present. In addition, inherited thrombophilic disorders contribute to the development of pediatric VTE. In this review, the role of inherited thrombophilic disorders in the development of pediatric VTE, as well as the benefits and limitations of thrombophilia testing, will be discussed.

  12. [Current views on etiology, pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of acromegaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław; Marek, Bogdan

    2012-02-01

    Acromegaly is a relatively rare disease caused by excess secretion of growth hormone, usually from a pituitary somatotrope adenoma. Most of the tumors causing acromegaly are sporadic but in some cases the disease results from the presence of an inherited endocrine syndrome including type 1 multiple endocrine neoplasia, McCune-Albright syndrome and Carney complex. Because of the slow evolution of signs and symptoms, acromegaly can be a diagnostic challenge. The disease is characterised by significantly increased morbidity and mortality, both of which are secondary to the involvement of multiple organ systems. This prompts the need for the rapid and accurate recognition and management of this disorder. Acromegaly is diagnosed on the basis of clinical picture, hormonal assays and radiologic imaging of the pituitary gland. This article reviews the etiology, histopathological picture, clinical features and current diagnostic strategies in acromegaly and prognosis in this disorder.

  13. Clinical manifestations of hysteria: an epistemological perspective or how historical dynamics illuminate current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros De Bustos, Elisabeth; Galli, Sylvio; Haffen, Emmanuel; Moulin, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Hysteria has generated the most heated debates among physicians, from antiquity to the present day. It has been long confused with neuroses and neurological pathologies such as Parkinson's disease and epilepsy, principally associated with women and sexual disorders. The clinical manifestations must first be seen in their historical context, as interpretation varies according to the time period. Recently, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders by the American Psychiatric Association marked a break in the consensus that previously seemed to apply to the concept of hysteria and approach to the clinical manifestations. The clinical manifestations of hysteria are numerous and multifaceted, comprising 3 main classifications: paroxysms, attacks, and acute manifestations; long-lasting functional syndromes, and visceral events. Each main classification can be subdivided into several subgroups. The first main group of paroxysms, attacks, and acute manifestations includes major hysterical attacks, such as prodrome, trance and epileptic states, minor hysterical attacks such as syncope and tetany, twilight states, paroxysmal amnesia, and cataleptic attacks. The second group includes focal hysterical symptoms, paralyses, contractures and spasms, anesthesia, and sensory disorders. Visceral manifestations can be subdivided into spasms, pain, and general and trophic disorders. The diversity of the symptoms of hysteria and its changing clinical presentation calls into question the same hysterical attacks and the same symptoms, which have had only a few differences for over 2,000 years. A new definition of hysteria should be proposed, in that it is a phenomenon that is not pathological, but physiological and expressional.

  14. Prevalence and clinical manifestation of lymphomas in North Eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mava Yakubu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lymphomas are one of the commonest childhood malignancies. Due to varied clinical features many patients are misdiagnosed and treated for other diseases. It is imperative to keep health workers informed about the current trend of lymphomas in northeastern Nigeria to facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the extent of lymphomas at presentation and to define the pattern of presentation in relation to gender and site. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of cases of lymphomas over a 15 year period was conducted. Structured questionnaires were used to document demographic characteristics and clinical features. The non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL cases were categorized using standard classification schemes. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software version 16, Illinois, Chicago, USA. Spearman's correlation and Student's t-test were applied where appropriate. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Fifty cases of lymphoma, 10 (20% belong to HL and 40 (80% belong to NHL. Lymphoma is common in male, though the male to female preponderance was not significant in both the cases (P = 0.107 and 0.320, respectively. Maxilla was the commonest site of primary malignancy (36% and late presentation of patients were observed. New trend was noticed, the NHL patients present commonly with severe symptoms than HL (P = 0.038. HL was dominated by lymphocytic predominant type, while NHL was dominated by the small non cleaved cells (Burkitt's lymphoma (70%. CONCLUSION: Childhood lymphoma in northeastern Nigeria has a slight shift in varied clinical presentation in favor of NHL. Patients in this study had late presentation.

  15. Marked and persistent eosinophilia in the absence of clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Yun K; Khoury, Paneez; Ware, JeanAnne M; Holland-Thomas, Nicole C; Stoddard, Jennifer L; Gurprasad, Shakuntala; Waldner, Amy J; Klion, Amy D

    2014-04-01

    Although most patients with hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES) present with clinical signs and symptoms attributable to eosinophilic tissue infiltration, some untreated patients remain asymptomatic or have signs and symptoms, such as allergic rhinitis, for which the relationship to peripheral eosinophilia is unclear (hypereosinophilia of unknown significance [HEUS]). To identify and characterize subjects with HEUS of 5 years duration or more as compared to untreated patients with symptomatic HES and healthy normal volunteers. All subjects with eosinophilia underwent yearly evaluation, including a standardized clinical evaluation, whole blood flow cytometry to assess lymphocyte subsets and eosinophil activation, and serum collection. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured overnight with and without phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin. Cytokines and chemokines were measured in serum and cell supernatants, and mRNA expression was assessed by using quantitative real-time PCR. Eight of the 210 subjects referred for the evaluation of eosinophilia (absolute eosinophil count [AEC] > 1500/μL) met the criteria for HEUS of 5 years duration or more (range, 7-29 years). Peak eosinophil count and surface expression of eosinophil activation markers were similar in subjects with HEUS and in untreated subjects with platelet-derived growth factor alpha-negative HES (n = 28). Aberrant or clonal T-cell populations were identified in 50% of the subjects with HEUS as compared to 29% of the subjects with HES (P = .12). Increased levels of IL-5, GM-CSF, IL-9, and IL-17A were also comparable in subjects with HEUS and HES. Serum levels of IgE and IL-13 were significantly increased only in subjects with HES. A small number of patients with persistent peripheral eosinophilia (AEC > 1500/μL) appear to have clinically benign disease. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  16. Clinical manifestations of Kingella kingae infections: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, V A; Wagner, K F

    1989-01-01

    A patient with antecedent coccidioidal pulmonary cavitary disease who developed an empyema due to Kingella kingae prompted our analysis of the literature regarding this unusual bacterial pathogen. Formerly classified among other genera and considered a nonpathogen, K. kingae has been increasingly recognized as a cause of human infection. While the most commonly diagnosed infections due to this organism are endocarditis and septic arthritis, there have also been isolated reports of bacteremia, diskitis, abscesses, meningitis, and oropharyngeal infections. The treatment of choice is penicillin, to which K. kingae strains are uniformly susceptible. Recognition of the potential pathogenicity of this microorganism in appropriate clinical settings will probably result in more prompt and specific therapy.

  17. [Clinical manifestation and surgical treatment of superior lumbar disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klishin, D N; Dreval', O N; Gorozhanin, A V

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of analysis of presentation and surgical treatment of 103 patients with lumbar disc herniation the authors performed comparative assessment of symptoms and therapeutic techniques in patients with higher and lower lumbar disc disease. Short-term and long-term results were evaluated using visual analogue scale and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Statistically significant differences in dynamics of pain and ODI were not present. In spite of differences in clinical presentation, the results of surgical treatment in both groups were similar. They depended on severity of preoperative neurological deficit regardless of level of lesion. Specific features of surgical procedure in superior lumbar disk herniation are described.

  18. Zika virus infection: epidemiology, clinical manifestations and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Guilherme Amaral; Santos, Flavia Barreto Dos; Sequeira, Patricia Carvalho

    2016-10-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus previously believed to cause only a mild and self-limiting illness. Recently, it has emerged as a new public health threat that caused a large outbreak in French Polynesia in 2013-2014 and since 2015 an explosive outbreak in Brazil, with an increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) and neurological complications, mainly Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Since then, it has spread through the Americas. On 1 February 2016, the WHO declared the ZIKV epidemic in Brazil a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. We reviewed the epidemiology of ZIKV infection, clinical presentations and diagnosis. We highlighted the clinical features and nonvector borne transmission of the virus. Association between ZIKV infection and severe foetal outcomes, including microcephaly and other birth defects; increased rate of GBS and other neurological complications due to the ongoing ZIKV outbreak; increased evidence to date of ZIKV being the only arbovirus linked to sexual transmission; the challenge of ZIKV diagnosis; and the need for a specific point-of care test in epidemic scenarios. The findings illustrate the emergence of a viral disease with the identification of new associated disorders, new modes of transmission, including maternal-foetal and sexual transmission.

  19. Clinical manifestations of human papillomavirus infection in nongenital sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, J L; Rasmussen, J E

    1991-04-01

    Our knowledge of warts dates thousands of years. Most warts represent no more than a transient infection in the hands and feet of children and adults. With the relatively recent medical advances permitting the prolonged survival of immunocompromised hosts, however, HPV-induced lesions have become an important problem. In these patients, lesions represent a recurring, intractable infection that predisposes the patient to the development of skin cancer. Such problems have been appreciated for some time in patients with EV. Newer laboratory techniques have led to an increasing number of clinical entities linked with an HPV cause in the nonimmunosuppressed host. Although evidence incriminating HPV as a causative factor for genital cancers of the cervix and the skin continues to mount, such evidence for nongenital Bowen's disease, certain squamous cell carcinomas of the skin, keratoacanthomas, and other tumors of the skin also has begun to grow. It is to be hoped that continued advances in molecular biologic techniques will further delineate the relationship between HPV and these conditions, lead to an HPV classification scheme that is more utilitarian from a clinical point of view, and ultimately lead to improved treatment.

  20. Clinical Manifest X-Linked Recessive Adrenoleukodystrophy in a Female

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    Gyda Hlin Skuladottir Jack

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD is a rare X-linked inherited leukodystrophy with a reduced capacity for degradation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs. The intracellular accumulation of VLCFA leads to demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS and cell destruction in the adrenal glands. ALD primarily affects males; however, females may develop milder symptoms that may be difficult to recognize. The present report describes a 35-year-old female who experienced a feeling of heaviness in the upper and lower limbs, pain in both knees, and difficulty climbing stairs, running, and jumping. Clinical examination revealed decreased sensitivity in the feet, particularly to touch. Deep tendon reflexes in the lower limbs were brisk, and Babinski's sign was present bilaterally. Multiple sclerosis (MS was excluded, and all clinical and biochemical tests were normal. After two years of progressing symptoms, the patient was reevaluated and plasma levels of VLCFA were found to be elevated. Seven years prior to this finding, the patient had been found to be heterozygous for the missense mutation c.1679C> T, p.Pro560Leu on the ABCD1 gene (ATP-Binding Cassette subfamily D1. In conclusion, the patient's symptoms could be attributed to ALD. The present case underlines the importance of reevaluating family history in women presenting with vague neurological symptoms.

  1. Non-stiff anti-amphiphysin syndrome: clinical manifestations and outcome after immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jangsup; Lee, Soon-Tae; Shin, Jung-Won; Byun, Jung-Ick; Lim, Jung-Ah; Shin, Yong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Park, Kyung-Il; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2014-09-15

    Amphiphysin antibody causes paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome and can also result in a variety of neurological manifestations. Here, we investigated the clinical spectrum of 20 patients with non-stiff anti-amphiphysin syndrome and their responses to immunotherapy. The most common neurological manifestation was limbic encephalitis (n=10), followed by dysautonomia (n=9), and cerebellar dysfunction (n=6). Cancer was detected in only seven patients. Intravenous immunoglobulin or steroid treatment was effective in most patients, but three improved only after rituximab treatment. Our study suggests that anti-amphiphysin syndrome can manifest as non-stiff encephalomyelitis and is only partially associated with cancer. Active immunotherapy, including rituximab, would be beneficial.

  2. Gasperini syndrome as clinical manifestation of pontine demyelination

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    Krasnianski M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Gasperini syndrome is a very rare brainstem disease characterized by the typical combination of ipsilateral lesions of the cranial nerves V-VII and dissociated contralateral hemihypesthesia, whereas both contralateral and ipsilateral hypacusis was described. Since the first description in 1912, only a few cases of this crossed brainstem syndrome were published so far. Pontine infarction and bleedings were the reported causes of the syndrome. Here we report a 44-year-old man with the classical Gasperini syndrome due to pontine demyelination in multiple sclerosis. The clinical findings were correlated with changes on MRI. The present case shows that classical crossed brainstem syndromes are topological terms not invariably associated with brainstem ischemia in particular vascular areas and may contribute to the differential diagnosis of peripheral facial nerve palsy.

  3. Clinical Manifestations of Fibrosing Mediastinitis in Chinese Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Hu; Jian-Xing Qiu; Ji-Ping Liao; Hong Zhang; Zhe Jin; Guang-Fa Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Fibrosing mediastinitis (FM) is a rare disease.FM is thought to be related to prior granulomatous mediastinal infection,such as histoplasmosis or tuberculosis.The majority of cases have been reported in endemic regions for histoplasmosis.The characteristics of cases of FM in China,where the prevalence of tuberculosis is high,have not been reported.We analyzed the clinical,imaging,and bronchoscopic features of Chinese patients with FM to promote awareness of this disease.Methods:Between January 2005 and June 2015,twenty patients were diagnosed with FM in our hospital.Medical records and follow-up data were collected.Imaging and biopsy findings were reviewed by radiologists and pathologists.Results:A total of 20 patients were analyzed (8 males and 12 females).The age ranged from 43 to 88 years with a mean age of 69.5 years.Previous or latent tuberculosis was found in 12 cases.Clinical symptoms included dyspnea (18/20),cough (17/20),expectoration (7/20),and recurrent pneumonia (3/20).Chest computed tomography scans showed a diffuse,homogeneous,soft tissue process throughout the mediastinum and hila with compression of bronchial and pulmonary vessels.Calcification was common (15/20).Pulmonary hypertension was present in 9 of 20 cases.Diffuse black pigmentation in the bronchial mucosa was frequently seen on bronchoscopy (12/13).The patients' response to antituberculosis treatment was inconsistent.Conclusions:FM in Chinese patients is most likely associated with tuberculosis.Some characteristics of FM are different from cases caused by histoplasmosis.

  4. [Endometriosis: physiopathology and investigation trends (first part)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Yánez, Rodrigo; Mota González, Manuel

    2007-08-01

    Until today endometriosis continues to be a diagnostic challenge since the only way to confirm a diagnosis, based on clinical criteria, is through direct visualization of the endometriosis lesions. This has a direct impact in the development of proper statistics on the incidence and prevalence of endometriosis. Current research has been focused on the basis of the Retrograde Menstruation theory, establishing the involvement of various biochemical, immunologic and molecular factors within the physiopathology of endometriosis. The development of endometriosis has been divided into 5 basic processes: adhesion, invasion, recruiting, angiogenesis and proliferation, here, we have revised the first two due to the importance they potentially contain with regards to diagnosis and therapy. Research on adhesion has led to studies on the peritoneal epithelium structure, the role of integrins, intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM), cadherins and hyaluronic acid; invasiveness has led to the study of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), various protocols on metaloproteinases and their inhibitors as well as their interactions and response to sexual steroids, tumor growth factor beta (TGF-beta), interleukins and metalloproteinase polymorphisms. These advances have been crucial, though various observations leads us to believe that the etiology is multifactorial, there are factors whose antagonists, inhibitors or suppressors may actually have a role as molecular markers or therapeutic agents of endometriosis.

  5. Clinical manifestations of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae infections.

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    Yen-Ting Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections caused by non-O1 Vibrio cholera are uncommon. The aim of our study was to investigate the clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with non-O1 V. cholera infections. METHODS: The clinical charts of all patients with non-O1 V. cholera infections and who were treated in two hospitals in Taiwan were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: From July 2009 to June 2014, a total of 83 patients with non-O1 V. cholera infections were identified based on the databank of the bacteriology laboratories of two hospitals. The overall mean age was 53.3 years, and men comprised 53 (63.9% of the patients. Liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus were the two most common underlying diseases, followed by malignancy. The most common type of infection was acute gastroenteritis (n = 45, 54.2%, followed by biliary tract infection (n = 12, 14.5% and primary bacteremia (n = 11, 13.3%. Other types of infection, such as peritonitis (n = 5, 6.0%, skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI (n = 5, 6.0%, urinary tract infection (n = 3, 3.6% and pneumonia (2, 2.4%, were rare. July and June were the most common months of occurrence of V. cholera infections. The overall in-hospital mortality of 83 patients with V. cholera infections was 7.2%, but it was significantly higher for patients with primary bacteremia, hemorrhage bullae, acute kidney injury, acute respiratory failure, or admission to an ICU. Furthermore, multivariate analysis showed that in-hospital mortality was significantly associated with acute respiratory failure (odds ratio, 60.47; 95% CI, 4.79-763.90, P = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: Non-O1 V. cholera infections can cause protean disease, especially in patients with risk factors and during warm-weather months. The overall mortality of 83 patients with non-O1 V. cholera infections was only 7.2%; however, this value varied among different types of infection.

  6. THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF CALCIUM PYROPHOSPHATE CRYSTAL DEPOSITION DISEASE

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    F. M. Kudaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to provide the clinical characteristics of joint injury in patients with calcium pyrophosphate crystal (CPC deposition disease.Subjects and methods. The trial enrolled 68 patients (43 women, 25 men with a verified diagnosis of CPC deposition disease. Their mean age was 60.2±11.8 years and disease duration was 7.5±6.4 years. Examination revealed the presence of arthritis and arthralgias. Polarizing microscopy with an Olympus CX31-P compensator was used to detectcrystals in synovial fluid. X-ray study of the knee joints was performed in the anteroposterior and lateral projections and that of the hand joints was in the frontal projection, Ultrasonography (USG of the knee and wrist joints was done using a GE Voluson-I transducer.Results. A concurrence of arthritis and arthralgias was noted in 37 (54% patients; 24 (36% patients had arthralgias only; 7 (10% had arthritis only. Arthritis affecting the knee, wrist, ankle, and first metacarpophalangeal joints was observed in 53, 15, 12, and 6% of cases, respectively. There was acute arthritis in 18% of the patients and chronic arthritis in 39%; the rate of CPC osteoarthrosis was 43%. Joint USG diagnosed knee and wrist joint chondrocalcinosis in 94 and 56% of the patients, respectively. USG could reveal asymptomatic wrist joint chondrocalcinosis significantly more often (in 56 and 17% of the patients, respectively; p = 0.008. Besides, USG could visualize synovitis in the knee joints in 88% of the patients with isolated arthralgias in them and synovitis in the wrinkle joints in 52% of the patients without clinical signs of inflammation in them.Conclusion. Osteoarthrosis is the most common form of CPC deposition disease. Knee joints in this disease are most frequently involved. Joint USG is of more informative value in detecting chondrocalcinosis than X-ray study; USG can also identify synovitis in the intact joints.

  7. The characteristics and clinical manifestation of subjects with non-specific pattern of pulmonary function tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周德训

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of pulmonary function and the clinical significance of non-specific pattern(NSP).Methods A total of 1 933 pulmonary function tests of adult patients were analyzed,and those with NSP were selected.The pulmonary function test results,clinical diagnosis and radiological manifestations were

  8. Ocular Manifestations of Noonan Syndrome: A Prospective Clinical and Genetic Study of 25 Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trier, D.C. van; Vos, A.M. de; Draaijer, R.W.; Burgt, I. van der; Draaisma, J.M.T.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the full spectrum of ocular manifestations in patients with Noonan syndrome (NS). DESIGN: Prospective cross-sectional clinical and genetic study in a tertiary referral center. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five patients with NS (mean age, 14 years; range, 8 months-25 years) clinically

  9. A Diagnostic Approach to Autoimmune Disorders: Clinical Manifestations: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Shashi; Adams, Matthew; Kamat, Deepak

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune disorders are not commonly encountered in a general pediatric practice, but they may mimic many other disorders. Although they occur infrequently, it is always important to pause and consider an autoimmune disorder in the differential diagnosis. A detailed history and careful physical examination play an important role in guiding laboratory evaluation for these disorders. Many autoimmune disorders present with symptoms that involve multiple organ systems. The common symptoms that may make one consider a rheumatic disorder in the differential diagnosis are fever, fatigue, joint pain, rash, ulcers, and muscle weakness. The most common reason for referral to a pediatric rheumatologist is joint pain. A good joint examination may be performed by the use of the pediatric Gait, Arms, Legs, Spine screen, which is a validated screening tool. A small portion of children with fever of unknown origin may have an autoimmune disorder, with a majority of them having an infectious disease. Some patients with undiagnosed rheumatic disorders may present to the emergency. department. The characteristics of historic and clinical examination features of various autoimmune disorders are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(6):e223-e229.].

  10. Recognizing the clinical manifestations of acromegaly: case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuliano, Sherry L; Laws, Edward R

    2014-03-01

    To present case studies of a 36-year-old woman and a 73-year-old man who presented with the syndrome of acromegaly, and to provide primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) with the understanding of the clinical and laboratory features needed for early recognition and treatment of this fascinating disease. A comprehensive review of published literature on acromegaly is presented. The findings discussed include the history, physical examination, and diagnostic studies of two patients presenting in different ways. They both saw multiple healthcare providers, and had symptoms and signs eventually leading to the diagnosis of acromegaly. Acromegaly is the result of excessive amounts of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1), almost always caused by a benign adenoma of the pituitary gland. This leads to coarse facial features, soft tissue swelling (including the tongue), enlargement of the hands and feet, respiratory problems, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, carpal tunnel syndrome, and osteoarthritis. Early recognition and appropriate referral can reverse some of the signs and symptoms over time, and lead to decreased mortality and a markedly improved quality of life. These cases exemplify the challenges faced by NPs and other healthcare providers in diagnosing patients with acromegaly. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. Red cell pyruvate kinase deficiency: from genetics to clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, A; Bianchi, P

    2000-03-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency is the most frequent enzyme abnormality of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway causing hereditary non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia. The degree of haemolysis varies widely, ranging from very mild or fully compensated forms, to life-threatening neonatal anaemia and jaundice necessitating exchange transfusions. Splenectomy should be reserved for young patients who require regular blood transfusions. The gene encoding for pyruvate kinase (PK-LR) has been localized to the long arm of chromosome I; the cDNA of R-type is 2060 bp long and codes for 574 amino acids. More than 130 different mutations, mostly missense, have so far been described in association with PK deficiency, 1529A and 1456T being considered to be the most common mutations in Caucasians. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme may help in predicting the severity of the molecular defect. Further data on clinical features of homozygous patients are needed, at least for some mutations, to allow a more precise genotype/phenotype correlation.

  12. CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF PREGNANCY

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    Sharath Kumar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pregnancy is a period of profound immunologic, endocr ine, metabolic and vascular changes which are tolerated by the body for a relatively short time. Almost all pregnant women (90% may develop both physiologic and pathologic changes in the skin, nails, and hair which should be recognized and appropriately m anaged 1 . Moreover, pregnancy modifies the course of a number of pre - existing dermatological conditions. AIMS: To find out the frequency and pattern of skin changes in pregnant women i.e. physiological skin changes, dermatoses modified by pregnancy and spec ific dermatoses of pregnancy . DESIGN: Prospective descriptive study . METHODS AND MATERIAL: A total of 300 pregnant women attending antenatal OPD and those admitted in wards having symptoms related to skin and mucosa, at tertiary care centre between June 20 11 and November 2012 were studied. Patients not willing to give informed consent were only excluded. . Detailed history, clinical examination and relevant investigations were done. RESULTS: In our study age distribution of pregnancy, was in range of 16 - 30 years. Most of the cases belonged to 2 nd and 3 rd trimester (93%. Pigmentary changes were the most common non specific pregnancy dermatosis, seen in almost all cases. Of these linea nigra (87% being the commonest. Overall 54 cases showed specific dermatos es of pregnancy. Of these the most common was prurigo of pregnancy (12% followed by pruritus of pregnancy (4%, PUPPP (2%. Among the other dermatological conditions, scabies (16% was the commonest. Fungal infections were seen in 14%, viral infections in 8% and bacterial infections in 5%. CONCLUSION: Majority of the dermatoses associated with pregnancy were observed in third trimester and among multigravidas. Pigmentary changes was the commonest physiological change observed. Prurigo of pregnancy was the commonest specific dermatosis of pregnancy. There were no cases of dermatoses modified during pregnancy

  13. Clinical manifestations of the anti-IgLON5 disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaig, Carles; Graus, Francesc; Compta, Yarko; Högl, Birgit; Bataller, Luis; Brüggemann, Norbert; Giordana, Caroline; Heidbreder, Anna; Kotschet, Katya; Lewerenz, Jan; Macher, Stefan; Martí, Maria J; Montojo, Teresa; Pérez-Pérez, Jesus; Puertas, Inmaculada; Seitz, Caspar; Simabukuro, Mateus; Téllez, Nieves; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Iranzo, Alex; Ercilla, Guadalupe; Sabater, Lidia; Santamaría, Joan; Dalmau, Josep

    2017-05-02

    To report the presentation, main syndromes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association, and immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass in the anti-IgLON5 disease: a disorder with parasomnias, sleep apnea, and IgLON5 antibodies. This was a retrospective clinical analysis of 22 patients. The IgG subclass was determined using reported techniques. Patients' median age was 64 years (range 46-83). Symptoms that led to initial consultation included sleep problems (8 patients; 36%), gait abnormalities (8; 36%), bulbar dysfunction (3; 14%), chorea (2; 9%), and cognitive decline (1; 5%). By the time of diagnosis of the disorder, 4 syndromes were identified: (1) a sleep disorder with parasomnia and sleep breathing difficulty in 8 (36%) patients; (2) a bulbar syndrome including dysphagia, sialorrhea, stridor, or acute respiratory insufficiency in 6 (27%); (3) a syndrome resembling progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP-like) in 5 (23%); and (4) cognitive decline with or without chorea in 3 (14%). All patients eventually developed parasomnia, sleep apnea, insomnia, or excessive daytime sleepiness. HLA-DRB1*10:01 and HLA-DQB1*05:01 were positive in 13/15 (87%) patients; the DRB1*10:01 allele was 36 times more prevalent than in the general population. Among 16 patients with paired serum and CSF samples, 14 had IgLON5 antibodies in both, and 2 only in serum (both had a PSP-like syndrome). Twenty of 21 patients had IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies; the latter predominated in 16. Patients with IgLON5 antibodies develop a characteristic sleep disorder preceded or accompanied by bulbar symptoms, gait abnormalities, oculomotor problems, and, less frequently, cognitive decline. IgG4 subclass antibodies predominate over IgG1; we confirm a strong association with the HLA-DRB1*10:01 allele. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. STUDY OF CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND COMPLICATIONS OF HAEMOTOXIC SNAKE ENVENOMATION

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    Narasimham

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Snake bites are of major public health importance in many communities as causes of haemorrhage, other morbidity and mortality. 1 Of the 3000 species of snakes, about 500 belong to the 3 families of venomous snakes, Atr actaspididae, Elapidae and Viperidae. Estimated 15000 – 20000 people die each year from snake bite in India. 2 In tropical countries snake bite is occupational disease of farmers, plantation workers and hunters. In India after snake bite clinical manifestati ons are pain, oedema, bleeding at bite site. 3 The inpatient complaints are hypovolemic shock, bleeding diathesis, renal failure, sepsis. 4,5 The only specific treatment is Anti Snake Venom (A. S. V. In India most cases of renal injuries are caused by Rus sell’s viper and Saw scaled viper. 6,7 METHODS: Patients with history of snake bite with or without bite marks, bleeding diathesis or with prolonged clotting time or both. And observed for oliguria and high coloured urine to see renal injury. Period to b rought to hospital ( B elow 4 hours is ideal time early or late, tourniquet application and level of consciousness, and did the simple bed side test is 20 minute blood clot test and prothrombin time, platelet count. RESULTS: Out of 50 cases 35 cases are males and 15 cases are females, so common in males. Common symptoms are nausea, vomits, pain, swelling and paresthesia. Common signs are bleeding from bleeding site, gum bleeding, epistaxis, haemetemesis, malena. CONCLUSION: It is found more common in males. Common symptoms nausea, vomit, pain, swelling. Common sign are bleeding at bite site, gum bleeding, epistax i s, haemetemesis, malena, decreased urine output, giddiness and vertigo.

  15. HYPOPARATHYROIDISM: ETIOLOGY, CLINICAL MANIFESTATION, CURRENT DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT

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    N. G. Mokrysheva

    2016-01-01

    treatment with recombinant PTH is not widely used. Replacement therapy with recombinant human PTH is a  promising area, especially in severe clinical cases, refractory to conventional treatment.

  16. Clinical manifestations and prognostic factors of Morganella morganii bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T-Y; Chan, M-C; Yang, Y-S; Lee, Y; Yeh, K-M; Lin, J-C; Chang, F-Y

    2015-02-01

    Although Morganella morganii causes a variety of clinical infections, there are limited studies on M. morganii bacteremia after the year 2000. A total of 109 patients with M. morganii bacteremia at a medical center in Taiwan from 2003 to 2012 were studied. Among them, 30.3 % had polymicrobial bacteremia and 75.2 % had community-acquired infection. The most common underlying diseases were hypertension (62.4 %) and diabetes mellitus (38.5 %). The urinary tract (41.3 %) was the major portal of entry, followed by the hepatobiliary tract (27.5 %), skin and soft tissue (21.1 %), and primary bacteremia (10.1 %). Susceptibility testing of M. morganii isolates showed ubiquitous resistance to first-generation cephalosporins and ampicillin-clavulanate; resistance rates to gentamicin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin were 30.3 %, 1.8 %, and 10.1 %, respectively. Overall, the 14-day mortality was 14.7 %. Univariate analysis revealed that elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) values [p = 0.0137, odds ratio (OR) 5.26], intensive care unit (ICU) admission (p = 0.011, OR 4.4), and higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores (p < 0.001, OR 1.62) were significantly associated with mortality. The APACHE II score remained the only significant risk factor for mortality in multivariate analysis (p = 0.0012, OR 1.55). In conclusion, M. morganii bacteremia patients were mostly elderly, with one or more comorbidities. Most of the patients had community-acquired infection via the urinary and hepatobiliary tracts. Furthermore, prognosis can be predicted according to disease severity measured by the APACHE II score.

  17. Correlation of Serotype-Specific Dengue Virus Infection with Clinical Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Eric S.; Marks, Morgan A.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Fiestas, Victor; Suarez, Luis; Vargas, Jorge; Aguayo, Nicolas; Madrid, Cesar; Vimos, Carlos; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Disease caused by the dengue virus (DENV) is a significant cause of morbidity throughout the world. Although prior research has focused on the association of specific DENV serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4) with the development of severe outcomes such as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, relatively little work has correlated other clinical manifestations with a particular DENV serotype. The goal of this study was to estimate and compare the prevalence of non-hemorrhagic clinical manifestations of DENV infection by serotype. Methodology and Principal Findings Between the years 2005–2010, individuals with febrile disease from Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Paraguay were enrolled in an outpatient passive surveillance study. Detailed information regarding clinical signs and symptoms, as well as demographic information, was collected. DENV infection was confirmed in patient sera with polyclonal antibodies in a culture-based immunofluorescence assay, and the infecting serotype was determined by serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies. Differences in the prevalence of individual and organ-system manifestations were compared across DENV serotypes. One thousand seven hundred and sixteen individuals were identified as being infected with DENV-1 (39.8%), DENV-2 (4.3%), DENV-3 (41.5%), or DENV-4 (14.4%). When all four DENV serotypes were compared with each other, individuals infected with DENV-3 had a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal manifestations, and individuals infected with DENV-4 had a higher prevalence of respiratory and cutaneous manifestations. Conclusions/Significance Specific clinical manifestations, as well as groups of clinical manifestations, are often overrepresented by an individual DENV serotype. PMID:22563516

  18. Detection and clinical manifestation of placental malaria in southern Ghana

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    Acquah Patrick A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum can be detected by microscopy, histidine-rich-protein-2 (HRP2 capture test or PCR but the respective clinical relevance of the thereby diagnosed infections in pregnant women is not well established. Methods In a cross-sectional, year-round study among 839 delivering women in Agogo, Ghana, P. falciparum was screened for in both, peripheral and placental blood samples, and associations with maternal anaemia, low birth weight (LBW and preterm delivery (PD were analysed. Results In peripheral blood, P. falciparum was observed in 19%, 34%, and 53% by microscopy, HRP2 test, and PCR, respectively. For placental samples, these figures were 35%, 41%, and 59%. Irrespective of diagnostic tool, P. falciparum infection increased the risk of anaemia. Positive peripheral blood results of microscopy and PCR were not associated with LBW or PD. In contrast, the HRP2 test performed well in identifying women at increased risk of poor pregnancy outcome, particularly in case of a negative peripheral blood film. Adjusting for age, parity, and antenatal visits, placental HRP2 was the only marker of infection associated with LBW (adjusted odds ratio (aOR, 1.5 (95%CI, 1.0–2.2 and, at borderline statistical significance, PD (aOR, 1.4 (1.0–2.1 in addition to anaemia (aOR, 2.3 (1.7–3.2. Likewise, HRP2 in peripheral blood of seemingly aparasitaemic women was associated with PD (aOR, 1.7 (1.0–2.7 and anaemia (aOR, 2.1 (1.4–3.2. Conclusion Peripheral blood film microscopy not only underestimates placental malaria. In this highly endemic setting, it also fails to identify malaria as a cause of foetal impairment. Sub-microscopic infections detected by a HRP2 test in seemingly aparasitaemic women increase the risks of anaemia and PD. These findings indicate that the burden of malaria in pregnancy may be even larger than thought and accentuate the need for effective anti-malarial interventions in pregnancy.

  19. Clinical manifestations of Eosinophilic meningitis due to infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Chindaprasirt, Jarin; Senthong, Vichai; Limpawattana, Panita; Auvichayapat, Narong; Tassniyom, Sompon; Chotmongkol, Verajit; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M

    2013-12-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis, caused by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, is prevalent in northeastern Thailand, most commonly in adults. Data regarding clinical manifestations of this condition in children is limited and may be different those in adults. A chart review was done on 19 eosinophilic meningitis patients aged less than 15 years in Srinagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Thailand. Clinical manifestations and outcomes were reported using descriptive statistics. All patients had presented with severe headache. Most patients were males, had fever, nausea or vomiting, stiffness of the neck, and a history of snail ingestion. Six patients had papilledema or cranial nerve palsies. It was shown that the clinical manifestations of eosinophilic meningitis due to A. cantonensis in children are different from those in adult patients. Fever, nausea, vomiting, hepatomegaly, neck stiffness, and cranial nerve palsies were all more common in children than in adults.

  20. Clinical manifestations of geriatric depression in a memory clinic: toward a proposed subtyping of geriatric depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Carol; Machnicki, Gerardo; Serrano, Cecilia M; Rojas, Galeno; Vazquez, Gustavo; Allegri, Ricardo F

    2011-11-01

    As the older population increases so does the number of older psychiatric patients. Elderly psychiatric patients manifest certain specific and unique characteristics. Different subtypes of depressive syndromes exist in late-life depression, and many of these are associated with cognitive impairment. A total of 109 depressive patients and 30 normal subjects matched by age and educational level were evaluated using a neuropsychiatric interview and an extensive neuropsychological battery. Depressive patients were classified into four different groups by SCAN 2.1 (schedules for clinical assessment in Neuropsychiatry): major depression disorder (n: 34), dysthymia disorder (n: 29), subsyndromal depression (n: 28), and depression due to mild dementia of Alzheimer's type (n: 18). We found significant associations (pdepressive status and demographic or clinical factors that include marital status (OR: 3.4, CI: 1.2-9.6), level of daily activity (OR: 5.3, CI: 2-14), heart disease (OR: 12.5, CI: 1.6-96.3), and high blood cholesterol levels (p:.032). Neuropsychological differences were observed among the four depressive groups and also between depressive patients and controls. Significant differences were observed in daily life activities and caregivers' burden between depressive patients and normal subjects. Geriatric depression is associated with heart disease, high cholesterol blood levels, marital status, and daily inactivity. Different subtypes of geriatric depression have particular clinical features, such as cognitive profiles, daily life activities, and caregivers' burden, that can help to differentiate among them. The cohort referred to a memory clinic with memory complaints is a biased sample, and the results cannot be generalized to other non-memory symptomatic cohorts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Recent knowledge on the linkage of strain specific genotypes with clinical manifestations of human citomegalovirus disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatelli, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Human citomegalovirus (CMV) is a beta-herpesvirus able to establish lifelong persistent infections which usually remain asymptomatic. However, severe diseases may develop in immunocompromised subjects (e.g., AIDS patients and transplant recipients) and if acquired in utero. Circulating CMV clinical strains display genetic polymorphisms in multiple genes, which may be implicated in CMV-induced immunopathogenesis, as well as strain-specific tissue-tropism, viral spread in the host cells and virulence, finally determining the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of CMV disease. Current literature report a number of studies regarding the main CMV polymorphic genes (UL55-gB, UL144, UL73-gN, UL74-gO), their diagnostic and therapeutic impact, their potential clinical relevance as prognostic markers. This paper aims to critically analyse the results of these studies and evaluate the linkage of strain-specific genotypes with clinical manifestations of CMV disease and their perspective implications.

  2. Unusual manifestations of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: A clinical observation

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    Akhila Kumar Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT is the most common hereditary neuromuscular disorder. Careful assessment of clinical presentations, mode of inheritance, electrophysiological studies, and genetic analysis form the basis for the diagnosis of CMT. CMT4 is a group of progressive motor and sensory axonal demyelinating neuropathies. It is distinguished from other forms of CMT by autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance, variable clinical manifestations, electrophysiological study, nerve biopsy, and specific genetic studies. Here, we report an interesting case of hereditary neuropathy with recessive inheritance pattern who presented with combined clinical phenotypes of 4B1, 4C, and 4D subtypes. The histopathological study revealed onion bulb appearance suggestive of demyelination and remyelination phenomenon. The overlapping clinical manifestation may create a diagnostic challenge which would be confirmed by specific molecular analysis.

  3. Fisiopatologia e manejo clínico da ventilação seletiva Physiopathology and clinical management of one-lung ventilation

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    Halina Cidrini Ferreira

    2004-12-01

    elimination of carbon dioxide is the greatest challenge in the management of the one-lung ventilation. It is recommend that the tidal volume administrated to the ventilated lung be similar to that used during conventional mechanical ventilation and that high fractions of inspired oxygen be used. However, several alternative methods have been proposed in order to minimize hypoxemia during one-lung ventilation, including the correct positioning of the double-lumen tube, the use of positive end-expiratory pressure or continuous positive airway pressure, nitric oxide administration, and alveolar recruitment. The management of one-lung ventilation continues to be a challenge in clinical practice.

  4. Clinical manifestations of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in children in the first few months of life

    OpenAIRE

    Aziza Khodjaeva

    2012-01-01

    The research objective was to study frequency of antenatal infection and record probable clinical manifestations in 100 children with HCMV born from mother with HCMV in blood and mononuclear cells. The study identified poly-systemic internal organ damage in neonates due to prenatal HCMV. Research procedures involved study of 100 pairs of patients, Mother-Child tandem, using regular clinical assessment methods per algorithm and HCMV diagnostic methods: ELISA, affinity and avidity of HCMV antib...

  5. [A single metastasis in the carpal bones as the first clinical manifestation of a hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales Pinzón, R; Alonso Sánchez, J M; de la Mano González, S; El Karzazi Tarazona, K

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary tumor of the liver. Spreading outside the liver usually takes place in advanced stages of the disease, and bone is the third most common site of metastases. We present a case of hepatocellular carcinoma in which the first clinical manifestation was a single metastasis to the carpal bones. The interest of this case lies in the way this hepatocellular carcinoma manifested as well as in the unusual site of the metastasis. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Cutaneous Manifestations of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: Clinical Histological and Immunopathological Features

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    Veronica Bonciolini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dermatological manifestations associated with intestinal diseases are becoming more frequent, especially now when new clinical entities, such as Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS, are identified. The existence of this new entity is still debated. However, many patients with diagnosed NCGS that present intestinal manifestations have skin lesions that need appropriate characterization. Methods: We involved 17 patients affected by NCGS with non-specific cutaneous manifestations who got much better after a gluten free diet. For a histopathological and immunopathological evaluation, two skin samples from each patient and their clinical data were collected. Results: The median age of the 17 enrolled patients affected by NCGS was 36 years and 76% of them were females. On the extensor surfaces of upper and lower limbs in particular, they all presented very itchy dermatological manifestations morphologically similar to eczema, psoriasis or dermatitis herpetiformis. This similarity was also confirmed histologically, but the immunopathological analysis showed the prevalence of deposits of C3 along the dermo-epidermal junction with a microgranular/granular pattern (82%. Conclusions: The exact characterization of new clinical entities such as Cutaneous Gluten Sensitivity and NCGS is an important objective both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, since these are patients who actually benefit from a GFD (Gluten Free Diet and who do not adopt it only for fashion.

  7. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis; two different genes responsible for similar clinical manifestations

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    Hunmin Kim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP is an autosomal dominant disorder manifesting as recurrent periodic flaccid paralysis and concomitant hypokalemia. HOKPP is divided into type 1 and type 2 based on the causative gene. Although 2 different ion channels have been identified as the molecular genetic cause of HOKPP, the clinical manifestations between the 2 groups are similar. We report the cases of 2 patients with HOKPP who both presented with typical clinical manifestations, but with mutations in 2 different genes (CACNA1S p.Arg528His and SCN4A p.Arg672His. Despite the similar clinical manifestations, there were differences in the response to acetazolamide treatment between certain genotypes of SCN4A mutations and CACNA1S mutations. We identified p.Arg672His in the SCN4A gene of patient 2 immediately after the first attack through a molecular genetic testing strategy. Molecular genetic diagnosis is important for genetic counseling and selecting preventive treatment.

  8. Reproducibility of manifest refraction between surgeons and optometrists in a clinical refractive surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Yap, Timothy E; Carp, Glenn I; Archer, Timothy J; Gobbe, Marine

    2014-03-01

    To measure and compare the interobserver reproducibility of manifest refraction according to a standardized protocol for normal preoperative patients in a refractive surgery practice. Private clinic, London, United Kingdom. Retrospective case series. This retrospective study comprised patients attending 2 preoperative refractions before laser vision correction. The first manifest refraction was performed by 1 of 7 optometrists and the second manifest refraction by 1 of 2 surgeons, all trained using a standard manifest refraction protocol. Spherocylindrical data were converted into power vectors for analysis. The dioptric power differences between observers were calculated and analyzed. One thousand nine hundred twenty-two consecutive eyes were stratified into a myopia group and a hyperopia group and then further stratified by each surgeon-optometrist combination. The mean surgeon-optometrist dioptric power difference was 0.21 diopter (D) (range 0.15 to 0.32 D). The mean difference in spherical equivalent refraction was 0.03 D, with 95% of all refractions within ±0.44 D for all optometrist-surgeon combinations. The severity of myopic or hyperopic ametropia did not affect the interobserver reproducibility of the manifest refraction. There was close agreement in refraction between surgeons and optometrists using a standard manifest refraction protocol of less than 0.25 D. This degree of interobserver repeatability is similar to that in intraobserver repeatability studies published to date and may represent the value of training and the use of a standard manifest refraction protocol between refraction observers in a refractive surgery practice involving co-management between surgeons and optometrists. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Werner syndrome: a changing pattern of clinical manifestations in Japan (1917~2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, M; Ishikawa, Y; Sugimoto, M; Furuichi, Y

    2013-02-01

    As ~75% of the Werner syndrome (WS) patients recognized between 1904 and 2008 all over the world are of Japanese origin, the most case reports and clinical studies on WS has been published in Japanese journals. Thus, the detailed English-written clinical review on the recent WS case reports has been warranted. Although WS has been characterized by a variety of clinical manifestations mimicking premature aging, the recent longevity and delayed age-associated manifestations observed both from Japanese WS and general population may suggest a common environmental effect on some gene(s) other than WRN and may give us a newer pathophysiological look at WS and also natural aging through the molecular dysfunction of WRN.

  10. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: contemporary conceptions of etiology, pathogenesis and peculiarities of clinical manifestations (review

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    Chesnokova N.P.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The research work presents an analysis of literature review and results of investigations on the problems of etiology, pathogenesis, classification and peculiarities of clinical manifestations of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Special attention is paid to both contemporary conceptions of carcinogenesis, reflecting the role of proto-oncogenes activation, an-tioncogenes and apoptosis genes suppression in mechanisms of neoplasia development and «specific mechanisms» of oncogenic transformation induction of B-lymphocytes and the subsequent development of the stages of promotion, progression and marked clinical manifestations of formation. Possibility of further improvement of use of immune phe-notype character and oncomarkers in diagnostics of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia clinical variants and in evaluation of effectiveness of its therapy has been indicated in the article

  11. Clinical and Para clinical Manifestations of Tuberous Sclerosis: A Cross Sectional Study on 81 Pediatric Patients

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    Seyyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Tonekaboni SH, Tousi P, Ebrahimi A, Ahmadabadi F, keyhanidoust Z, Zamani Gh, Rezvani M, Amirsalari S, Tavassoli A, Rounagh A, Rezayi A. Clinical and Para clinical Manifestations of Tuberous Sclerosis: A Cross Sectional Study on 81 Pediatric Patients. Iran J Child Neurol 2012; 6(3: 25-31.ObjectiveMigraine is a disabling illness that causes absence from school andaffects the quality of life. It has been stated that headache may representan epileptic event. EEG abnormality is a prominent finding in childrenwith migraine. The aim of this study was to evaluate EEG abnormalitiesin children with migraine.Materials & MethodsTwo-hundred twenty-eight children were enrolled into the study.Evaluation and following of cases was performed by one physician,paraclinical tests were used to increase the accuracy. The study wasconducted under the supervision of pediatric neurology masters and theselected cases were from different parts of the country.ResultsComparing EEG abnormalities in different types of migraine revealedthat there is an association between them. There was also a significantdifference between EEG abnormalities in different types of aura. Migrainetype was associated with the patient’s age. Sleep disorders were morecommon in patients with a positive family history of seizure.ConclusionOur study dosclosed migraine as a common problem in children withabnormalities present in approximately 20% of the patients. Migraineand abnormal EEG findings are significantly associated.RefrencesBundey S, Evans K. Tuberous sclerosis: a genetic study. J Neurol Neurosurg. Psychiatry 1969 Dec;32(6:591-603.Staley BA, Vail EA, Thiele EA. Tuberous sclerosis complex: diagnostic challenges, presenting symptoms,and commonly missed signs. Pediatrics 2011 Jan;127(1:e117-25.Thiele EA, Korf BR. Phakomatoses and allied conditions.In: Swaiman KF, Ashwal S, Ferriero DM. Swaimans pediatric neurology. 5th ed. China: Elsevier Saunders;2012. p. 504

  12. Latrodectism: variations in clinical manifestations provoked by Latrodectus species of spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maretić, Z

    1983-01-01

    The clinical picture caused by the bite of Latrodectus spp. is described, including the patient's general condition with agonizing pains, cramps, spasms, motor unrest, boardlike abdomen, "facies latrodectismica", sweating, oliguria, hypertension, anxiety, mental excitation and an extended convalescence. The notorious biters are mainly L. mactans, L. variolus, L. hesperus, L. tredecimguttatus, L. hasselti, L. indistinctus and L. menavodi, all of which appear to provoke somewhat similar clinical pictures. For some species, however, there is limited data and for the toxicity of some spiders, such as L. rhodesiensis, no data are available, However, it would appear that the clinical manifestations of the venom are similar in all species.

  13. Update on Medical Management of Clinical Manifestations of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Jessica M

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulation of normal kidney functions in chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to several pathophysiologic abnormalities that have the potential to significantly clinically affect the CKD patient. This article discusses the clinical impact of hypertension, hypokalemia, anemia, dysrexia, nausea/vomiting, and constipation in the CKD patient and therapies for these conditions. These clinical manifestations of disease may not occur in every patient and may also develop later during the progression of disease. Therefore, monitoring for, identifying, and addressing these factors is considered an important part of the medical management of CKD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical manifestations of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection in children in the first few months of life

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    Aziza Khodjaeva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The research objective was to study frequency of antenatal infection and record probable clinical manifestations in 100 children with HCMV born from mother with HCMV in blood and mononuclear cells. The study identified poly-systemic internal organ damage in neonates due to prenatal HCMV. Research procedures involved study of 100 pairs of patients, Mother-Child tandem, using regular clinical assessment methods per algorithm and HCMV diagnostic methods: ELISA, affinity and avidity of HCMV antibodies, and HCMV genome identification via PCR method in blood plasma and mononuclear cells. Initial clinical disease manifested in 71% of children during late neonatal period. Children who died of HCMV (5% were infected antenatal, and 39% were born prematurely. Embryonic stigma found in five cases. HCMV’s affinity to different tissues during the process of embryogenesis leads of poly-systemic damage and results in various clinical manifestations in the postnatal period. HCMV’s ability to invade mononuclear blood cells jeopardizes the antivirus defense system. The research is vital to deter the transmission of the virus and provide HCMV specific treatment to couples planning to have children.

  15. The impact of type 2 diabetes and Microalbuminuria on future cardiovascular events in patients with clinically manifest vascular disease from the Second Manifestations of ARTerial Disease (SMART) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Visseren, F.L.J.; Algra, A.; Graaf, van der Y.

    2008-01-01

    Aims Type 2 diabetes mellitus and microalbuminuria are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Whether these two complications are important and independent risk factors for future CVD events in a high-risk population with clinically manifest vascular disease is unknown. The objecti

  16. Clinical Manifestations of Cytomegalovirus-Associated Posterior Uveitis and Panuveitis in Patients Without Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathanapitoon, Kessara; Tesavibul, Nattaporn; Choopong, Pitipol; Boonsopon, Sutasinee; Kongyai, Natedao; Ausayakhun, Somsanguan; Kunavisarut, Paradee; Rothova, Aniki

    2013-01-01

    Importance: Little attention has been paid to clinical features of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in individuals without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Objective: To describe the clinical manifestations and comorbidities of patients without HIV infection who have CMV-associated posterior uvei

  17. [Multiple erythema migrans and facial nerve paralysis: clinical manifestations of early disseminated Lyme borreliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S A; Baran, A M; Boettcher, C; Kieseier, B C; Reifenberger, J

    2014-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a common vector-borne disease in Europe. The infection follows different stages with a broad variability of clinical symptoms and manifestations in different organs. A 49-year-old man presented with flu-like symptoms, facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythematous macular on his trunk and extremities. We diagnosed Lyme disease (stage II) with facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythema migrans. Intravenous ceftriaxone led to complete healing of hissymptoms within 2 weeks.

  18. Case Reports of Cat Scratch Disease with Typical and Atypical Clinical Manifestations: A Literature Review

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    Gulshan Umbreen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cat scratch disease (CSD is the most well-known zoonotic disease spread by domestic animals like cats. Cats are the source of Bartonella henselae. Most patients more than ninety percent 3-12 days after a scratch from a cat, undoubtedly a little cat with insects present with one or more erythematous injuries at the site of inoculation, the sore is typically a crusted papule or, once in a while, a pustule. More than half of cases in one study show that the systemic indications went with the lymphadenopathy. These may incorporate fever, discomfort, migraine and anorexia and frequently happen in immunocompromised patients. Atypically clinical manifestations happen are altered mental status, perplexity, prolonged fever, respiratory protestations (atypical pneumonitis, Joint pain, synovitis, Back agony is uncommon. The hypothesis of the study to find out that cat scratch disease cause typical and atypical clinical manifestation. Study was conducted July 2015 to September 2015. The methodology sections of a review article are listed all of the databases and citation indexes that were searched such as Web of Science and PubMed and any individual journals that were searched. Various case reports were mentioned in the study. Case reports of cat scratch diseases with typical and atypical clinical manifestation included in the study. The objective of review of these reporting cases is to make physicians aware about cat scratch diseases and also need to create awareness about cat scratch disease in pet owner. Although it is self-limiting needs to report to health authorities. There are few cases reported in which mostly cases reported in twain, japan, Brazil, Texas, United States, Dhaka, Spain with typical and atypical clinical manifestation

  19. Penile ulcer as a specific clinical manifestation of Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cláudia Cardoso de Macedo; Bressa, José Antônio Nascimento; Mendes, Fernanda; Roncada, Eduardo Vinicius Mendes; Monteiro, Rodrigo; Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia is considered a lymphoma by the World Health Organization. Cutaneous lesions, particularly of a specific type, are rare occurring in 5% of patients. What draws attention in this case is the unusual cutaneous clinical manifestation and its location on the genitals, which has not been described in researched literature, therefore imposing differential diagnosis with other etiologies of genital ulcers. PMID:27192528

  20. Molecular analysis and association with clinical and laboratory manifestations in children with sickle cell anemia

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    Roberta Faria Camilo-Araújo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze the frequency of βS-globin haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia, and their influence on clinical manifestations and the hematological profile of children with sickle cell anemia. Method: The frequency of βS-globin haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia and any association with clinical and laboratorial manifestations were determined in 117 sickle cell anemia children aged 3–71 months. The confirmation of hemoglobin SS and determination of the haplotypes were achieved by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and alpha-thalassemia genotyping was by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (single-tube multiplex-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The genotype distribution of haplotypes was 43 (36.7% Central African Republic/Benin, 41 (35.0% Central African Republic/Central African Republic, 20 (17.0% Rare/atypical, and 13 (11.1% Benin/Benin. The frequency of the α3.7 deletion was 1.71% as homozygous (−α3.7/−α3.7 and 11.9% as heterozygous (−α3.7/αα. The only significant association in respect to haplotypes was related to the mean corpuscular volume. The presence of alpha-thalassemia was significantly associated to decreases in mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and reticulocyte count and to an increase in the red blood cell count. There were no significant associations of βS-globin haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia with clinical manifestations. Conclusions: In the study population, the frequency of alpha-thalassemia was similar to published data in Brazil with the Central African Republic haplotype being the most common, followed by the Benin haplotype. βS-globin haplotypes and interaction between alpha-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia did not influence fetal hemoglobin concentrations or the number of clinical manifestations.

  1. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevêdo Silva, J; Monteiro Fernandes, K; Trés Pancotto, J A; Sotero Fragoso, T; Donadi, E A; Crovella, S; Sandrin-Garcia, P

    2013-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with heterogeneous clinical manifestations and target tissue damage. Currently, several genes have been associated with SLE susceptibility, including vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is a mediator of immune responses through the action of vitamin D. Polymorphisms in the VDR gene can impair the vitamin D (D3) function role, and since SLE patients show deficient D3 blood levels, it leads to a possible connection to the disease's onset. In our study we searched for an association between VDR polymorphisms and risk of developing SLE, as well as the disease's clinical manifestations. We enrolled 158 SLE patients and 190 Southeast Brazilian healthy controls, genotyped for five Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), covering most of the VDR gene region. We found an association between VDR SNPs and SLE for the following clinical manifestations: rs11168268 and cutaneous alterations (p=0.036), rs3890733 (p=0.003) rs3890733 and arthritis (p=0.001), rs2248098 and immunological alterations (p=0.040), rs4760648 and antibody anti-dsDNA (p=0.036). No association was reported between VDR polymorphisms and SLE susceptibility.

  2. Clinical manifestation, imaging, and genotype analysis of two pedigrees with spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peipei, Liu; Yang, Liu; Weihong, Gu; Xiaonan, Song

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical manifestation, imaging characteristics, genotype, and the relationship between the three aforementioned parameters in two pedigrees suffering from spinocerebellar ataxia. To evaluate the clinical manifestation of the two pedigrees and to compare the characteristics, we performed the MRI analysis of some patients from both pedigrees, while 2 ml of the peripheral blood sample was collected for gene analysis. The gene analysis data showed that pedigree 1 was certified spinocerebellar ataxia type-2 (SCA2); the CAG repeats in the proband, proband's mother, and proband's brother were 44, 36, and 38, respectively. The MRI revealed brainstem cerebellar atrophy and "cross sign" and "ordinate sign" of pons. Pedigree 2 was certified SCA1; the CAG repeats of the proband, proband's aunt, and proband's asymptomatic cousin were 60, 51, and 52, respectively. The MRI revealed cerebellar atrophy in these individuals. We, therefore, concluded that it was difficult to diagnose the SCA subset solely through the clinical manifestation. The imaging characteristics analysis and final diagnosis depended basically on gene analysis data.

  3. Clinical manifestations and outcome of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection at tertiary care teaching hospital

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    Virendra Chandrashekhar Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: AIDS has become chronic illness which is well treated with antiretroviral therapy and management of opportunistic infections (OIs. Aims and Objectives: The study clinical profile and outcome of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV seropositive patients. Materials and Methods: This was retrospective observational study carried out over a period of 1 year (January 2011–December 2011. All HIV patients admitted in medicine ward, and ICU were enrolled. Statistical analysis was performed using SSPE statistical software trial version 11. The P< 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Of total 111 patients with a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS, 75 (67.56% were male and 36 (32.43% were female patients. A total 52 (46.84% patients presented with respiratory manifestations, of them 23 (44.23% had pulmonary tuberculosis (TB, 6 (11.53% had tubercular effusion, and 3 (5.76% had Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Respiratory manifestations including pulmonary TB were the most common presentation (P< 0.001. Total 27 (24.32% patients were presented with the neurological manifestation of them 8 (29.62% had a cerebro-vascular accident, 5 (18.51% had cryptococcal meningitis, 4 (14.81% had tubercular meningitis, and 1 (3.70% had progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Total 12 (38.70% had acute gastroenteritis 6 (19.35% had oral candidiasis, 8 (25% had general tonic clonic seizure and 7 (21.87% had pyrexia of unknown origin, 6 (18.75% had septicemia, 6 (18.75% had acute renal failure, and 6 (94.11% had anemia. A total 11 (9.90% patients succumbed. Conclusions: Overall respiratory manifestations were the common presentation in a present cohort of HIV seropositive patients and TB was the most common OI and the cerebrovascular accident was the most common neurological manifestation.

  4. Clinical characteristics and imaging manifestations of AIDS complicated with disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Pu-xuan; ZHU Wen-ke; ZHAN Neng-yong; LIU Yan; CHEN Xin-chun; YE Ru-xin; CAI Li-sheng; ZHU Bo-ping

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics and imaging manifestations of AIDS complicated with disseminated Penicillium marneffei (PM) infection. Methods A total of 12 patients with AIDS complicated with disseminated PM infection were collected and the symptoms, signs, laboratory examination results and image manifestations of these patients were analyzed retrospectively. Results (1) The diagnosis of PM infection in all the 12 cases were confirmed by peripheral blood culture.All the 12 cases (100%) had irregular fever (38-41 ℃) and enlarged lymph nodes, 8 cases (66%) had skin rashes; 8 cases (66%) had hepatomegaly; 9 cases (75%) had splenomegaly while 8 cases (66%) had anemia. (2) Imaging manifestation: Five cases manifested bilateral pulmonary disseminated miliary nodular shadows or lattice signs; 1 case showed enlarged hilar lymph node and 2 zases showed patchy shadow with pleuritis. One case presented sub-pleural curve line shadow at the posterior part of the right lower lung,and adhesion between the intestinal wall and intestinal mesentery in mass form in the abdomen by CT examination. Conclusion Patients suffering from AIDS (CD4T lymphocytes <50/μ L) with impaired immunity might be susceptible to complication of disseminated PM infection, which presents mainly damage of multiple organs and symptoms such as fever; enlargement of liver,spleen and lymph nodes, as well as specific skin maculopapular rashes. Imaging manifestations in the lungs were revealed as miliary nodular shadows and lattice-like shadows. Intensified abdominal CT might reveal presence of several enlarged postperitoneal lymph nodes and intestinal adhesion in shape of "cakes".

  5. Animal models that best reproduce the clinical manifestations of human intoxication with organophosphorus compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Edna F R; Aracava, Yasco; DeTolla, Louis J; Beecham, E Jeffrey; Basinger, G William; Wakayama, Edgar J; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2014-08-01

    The translational capacity of data generated in preclinical toxicological studies is contingent upon several factors, including the appropriateness of the animal model. The primary objectives of this article are: 1) to analyze the natural history of acute and delayed signs and symptoms that develop following an acute exposure of humans to organophosphorus (OP) compounds, with an emphasis on nerve agents; 2) to identify animal models of the clinical manifestations of human exposure to OPs; and 3) to review the mechanisms that contribute to the immediate and delayed OP neurotoxicity. As discussed in this study, clinical manifestations of an acute exposure of humans to OP compounds can be faithfully reproduced in rodents and nonhuman primates. These manifestations include an acute cholinergic crisis in addition to signs of neurotoxicity that develop long after the OP exposure, particularly chronic neurologic deficits consisting of anxiety-related behavior and cognitive deficits, structural brain damage, and increased slow electroencephalographic frequencies. Because guinea pigs and nonhuman primates, like humans, have low levels of circulating carboxylesterases-the enzymes that metabolize and inactivate OP compounds-they stand out as appropriate animal models for studies of OP intoxication. These are critical points for the development of safe and effective therapeutic interventions against OP poisoning because approval of such therapies by the Food and Drug Administration is likely to rely on the Animal Efficacy Rule, which allows exclusive use of animal data as evidence of the effectiveness of a drug against pathologic conditions that cannot be ethically or feasibly tested in humans.

  6. Clinical manifestations that predict abnormal brain computed tomography (CT in children with minor head injury

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    Nesrin Alharthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Computed tomography (CT used in pediatric pediatrics brain injury (TBI to ascertain neurological manifestations. Nevertheless, this practice is associated with adverse effects. Reports in the literature suggest incidents of morbidity and mortality in children due to exposure to radiation. Hence, it is found imperative to search for a reliable alternative. Objectives: The aim of this study is to find a reliable clinical alternative to detect an intracranial injury without resorting to the CT. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study was undertaken in patients (1-14 years with blunt head injury and having a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 13-15 who had CT performed on them. Using statistical analysis, the correlation between clinical examination and positive CT manifestation is analyzed for different age-groups and various mechanisms of injury. Results: No statistically significant association between parameteres such as Loss of Consciousness, ′fall′ as mechanism of injury, motor vehicle accidents (MVA, more than two discrete episodes of vomiting and the CT finding of intracranial injury could be noted. Analyzed data have led to believe that GCS of 13 at presentation is the only important clinical predictor of intracranial injury. Conclusion: Retrospective data, small sample size and limited number of factors for assessing clinical manifestation might present constraints on the predictive rule that was derived from this review. Such limitations notwithstanding, the decision to determine which patients should undergo neuroimaging is encouraged to be based on clinical judgments. Further analysis with higher sample sizes may be required to authenticate and validate findings.

  7. COXITIS IN ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS: COMPARISON OF CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS WITH ULTRASOUND STUDY DATA

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    M. V. Podryadnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the clinical manifestations of coxitis with the data of HJ ultrasound study (USS on inpatient samples.Subjects and methods. This cross-sectional study enrolled 220 AS patients meeting the modified 1984 New York criteria who had been consecutively admitted to the clinic of the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology in 2012–2013. A specially designed schedule was filled out for each patient. Disease activity was measured by the BASDAI and ASDAS and functional status was assessed by the BASFI. Coxitis was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs, such as HJ pain and/or movement limitations on patient admission to the clinic. All the patients underwent HJ USS.Results. The clinical signs of coxitis were found in 162 (73.6% patients. In 107 (66% of them, pain intensity recorded by the digital rating scale if only in one joint was 4 scores or higher. The patients with and without the clinical signs of coxitis were matched for age and disease duration. However, in coxitis, high disease activity was detected significantly more frequently and BASFI scores were also significantly higher. USS indicated that 119 (54% patients had joint effusion. HJ effusion was found in 104 (63% of the 162 patients with clinically manifest coxitis; and among the119 patients with USS verified coxitis, 87% were seen to have clinical signs of joint injury and 104 (47% patients had both clinical and ultrasound signs of HJ injury simultaneously. USS revealed no signs of synovitis in 58 patients with the clinical signs of HJ lesion.Conclusion. Among the patients with AS, the rate of coxitis runs to 51%. The patients with coxitis have higher disease activity and more pronounced functional impairments than those without HJ injury. Coxitis causes considerably diminished working ability. In a number of cases, USS allows, when the clinical manifestations are similar, a differential diagnosis between synovitis and enthesitis located in this

  8. Metabolic alkalosis: pathogenesis and physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Tarantino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alkalosis is an acid-base disorder frequently encountered in hospitalised patients, particularly those in critical conditions and is not infrequently complicated by mixed acid-base disorders. This disorder can have serious clinical consequences, especially on the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. The disorder’s gravity is partly due to the precarious nature of the defence and compensation processes the body is able to provide to combat the alteration in the blood’s pH. Metabolic alkalosis is just one, secondary component of a complex water and electrolyte balance disorder, on which the maintenance of the acid-base disorder depends. Metabolic alkalosis can be a complication of various somewhat diverse conditions and is often common in hospital settings. A multitude of pathophysiological factors contribute to maintaining the acid-base disorder: these factors influence and feed one another. As the resolution of the acid-base disorder depends on the correction of these factors, it is essential to know their exact mechanisms in order to undertake the most appropriate therapeutic action.

  9. STUDY OF CLINICAL, HAEMATOLOGICAL AND HEPATIC MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH FALCIPARUM MALARIA

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    Balaraj

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Malarial infection is a major health problem in many parts of India. Several factors have been attributed to increased morbidity and mortality in malaria with altered hematological and hepatic parameters playing an important role. Our aim is to study the clinical, hematological and hepatic manifestations in patients with falciparum malaria. METHODS: This observational study was conducted from November 2012 to October 2013 at Kempegowda Institute of Medical Science and Research Hospital Bangalore. 75 patients of falciparum malaria confirmed by PS, MPQBC positive for Plasmodium falciparum or both falciparum and vivax were included in the study. All patients underwent detailed clinical history, thorough physical examination and investigated with hematological and hepatic parameters. This was followed by monitoring the outcome of the patients with respect to morbidity and mortality. Data was analyzed with descriptive statistical tools. RESULT: Of the 75 patients fever was present in all cases. Pallor (62% was the most common sign followed by splenomegaly (58% and icterus (48%. Anemia (60% was the most common complication, followed by jaundice (44%, cerebral malaria (40%, ARF (25%, ARDS (12%. 12 patients had severe anemia (Hb% <6 gm %. Severe thrombocytopenia (<50, 000 mm3 was seen in 5% of the patients. PT and APTT were increased in 23% and 12% of the cases respectively. 2 patients in the study expired. CONCLUSION: Clinical manifestations of plasmodium falciparum infection ranged from only fever to severe complications including cerebral malaria, acute renal failure, acute hemolytic crisis and hepatic dysfunction. Acute onset fever and splenomegaly were most common clinical manifestations found. Severe Anemia and jaundice are poor prognostic factor and has adverse outcome. Thrombocytopenia increased PT; aPTT does not have any correlation to mortality

  10. Clinical and immunological manifestations in 151 SLE patients living in Dubai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSaleh, J; Jassim, V; ElSayed, M; Saleh, N; Harb, D

    2008-01-01

    To gain better understanding of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Dubai we studied the clinical and immunological manifestations in a cohort of 151 patients attended Rheumatology Clinic in Dubai Hospital between January 2002 and January 2007. We found that the female to male ratio was 20.5:1, with a mean age of 35.5 years (0.9). The mean age at disease onset was 28.9 years (0.8) and mean disease duration 6.7 years (0.4). Five-year survival rate in our cohort was 94%. The commonest clinical manifestations in this cohort were arthritis (88%), haematological abnormalities (61.6%), and malar rash (60.3%). Leucopenia, fever, hair loss and proteinuria were observed in approximately half of the patients. Anaemia was found in 44.3% but only 9.9% had haemolytic anaemia. Photosensitive rash was seen in 43% of patients. Approximately one-third of the patients had serositis and mouth ulcers, 30.5 and 27.2% respectively. Vasculitis was observed in 19.2% of patients. Neuropsychiatric manifestations (15.9%), discoid lupus lesions (12.6%), and brain infarcts (13.2%) were infrequent. Subacute cutaneous lupus (6%) was also uncommon. Anti-nuclear antibodies were detected in 98%, anti-double stranded DNA antibodies in 88.7%, anti-Sm antibodies in 19.7%, anti-RNP in 40.4%, anti-Ro antibodies in 52.3% and anti-La antibodies in 19.8%. Anti-cardiolipin IgM and IgG were detected in 25.3 and 22.4%, respectively. This study suggests that Arabs with SLE residing in Dubai have comparable clinical features to their counterparts in other Arab countries and Western countries. The high prevalence of positive anti-Ro antibodies among our Arab patients probably reflects a character, that is, commonly seen in SLE patients of Middle East origin.

  11. Psychogenic dysphonia: diversity of clinical and vocal manifestations in a case series.

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    Martins, Regina Helena Garcia; Tavares, Elaine Lara Mendes; Ranalli, Paula Ferreira; Branco, Anete; Pessin, Adriana Bueno Benito

    2014-01-01

    Psychogenic dysphonia is a functional disorder with variable clinical manifestations. To assess the clinical and vocal characteristics of patients with psychogenic dysphonia in a case series. The study included 28 adult patients with psychogenic dysphonia, evaluated at a University hospital in the last ten years. Assessed variables included gender, age, occupation, vocal symptoms, vocal characteristics, and videolaryngostroboscopic findings. 28 patients (26 women and 2 men) were assessed. Their occupations included: housekeeper (n=17), teacher (n=4), salesclerk (n=4), nurse (n=1), retired (n=1), and psychologist (n=1). Sudden symptom onset was reported by 16 patients and progressive symptom onset was reported by 12; intermittent evolution was reported by 15; symptom duration longer than three months was reported by 21 patients. Videolaryngostroboscopy showed only functional disorders; no patient had structural lesions or changes in vocal fold mobility. Conversion aphonia, skeletal muscle tension, and intermittent voicing were the most frequent vocal emission manifestation forms. In this case series of patients with psychogenic dysphonia, the most frequent form of clinical presentation was conversion aphonia, followed by musculoskeletal tension and intermittent voicing. The clinical and vocal aspects of 28 patients with psychogenic dysphonia, as well as the particularities of each case, are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. [The reactions of hypersensitivity: the mechanisms of development, clinical manifestations, principles of diagnostic (a lecture)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukavkina, S Yu; Kharseyeva, G G

    2014-05-01

    The article considers the principles of modern classification of hypersensitivity, pathogenic mechanisms of formation of its various types resulting in development of typical clinical symptoms and syndromes. The knowledge and comprehension of these issues is important for physicians of different specializations since it permits to properly make out and formulate diagnosis and timely send patient for examination and treatment to such specialist as allergist-immunologist. The particular attention was paid to description of pathogenesis of diseases and syndromes underlaid by IgE-mediated type of hypersensitivity since their share is highest and clinical manifestations frequently require emergency medical care. The diagnostic of allergic diseases is to be implemented sequentially (step-by-step) and include common clinical and special (specific) methods. In case of choosing of extent of specialized allergological examination the diagnostic significance of techniques and their safety is to be taken into account concerning condition of patient. The diagnosis is objectively formulated only by complex of examination results. It is worth to remember about possibility of development of syndromes similar to IgE-mediated allergy by their clinical manifestations but belonging to non-allergic type of hypersensitivity. It is important to know main causes, mechanisms and ways of formation of such reactions previously named as anaphylactoid ones.

  13. Psychogenic dysphonia: diversity of clinical and vocal manifestations in a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Helena Garcia Martins

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychogenic dysphonia is a functional disorder with variable clinical manifestations. Objective: To assess the clinical and vocal characteristics of patients with psychogenic dysphonia in a case series. Methods: The study included 28 adult patients with psychogenic dysphonia, evaluated at a University hospital in the last ten years. Assessed variables included gender, age, occupation, vocal symptoms, vocal characteristics, and videolaryngostroboscopic findings. Results: 28 patients (26 women and 2 men were assessed. Their occupations included: housekeeper (n = 17, teacher (n = 4, salesclerk (n = 4, nurse (n = 1, retired (n = 1, and psychologist (n = 1. Sudden symptom onset was reported by 16 patients and progressive symptom onset was reported by 12; intermittent evolution was reported by 15; symptom duration longer than three months was reported by 21 patients. Videolaryngostroboscopy showed only functional disorders; no patient had structural lesions or changes in vocal fold mobility. Conversion aphonia, skeletal muscle tension, and intermittent voicing were the most frequent vocal emission manifestation forms. Conclusions: In this case series of patients with psychogenic dysphonia, the most frequent form of clinical presentation was conversion aphonia, followed by musculoskeletal tension and intermittent voicing. The clinical and vocal aspects of 28 patients with psychogenic dysphonia, as well as the particularities of each case, are discussed.

  14. Clinical spectrum of cutaneous manifestations in renal and renopancreatic recipients in two centers in Uruguay.

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    Dufrechou, L; Nin, M; Curi, L; Larre Borges, P; Martínez Asuaga, M; Noboa, O; Orihuela, S; González-Martínez, F; Larre Borges, A

    2014-11-01

    Uruguay, with a total population of 3,345,000 inhabitants, is the Latin American country with the second highest number of renal replacement therapies. Long-term immunosuppressant therapy is essential for graft survival but results in reduced immunosurveillance, leading to an increased risk of complications. A variety of dermatological manifestations and a large increase in nonmelanoma skin cancers have been reported in this population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency and clinical spectrum of cutaneous manifestations in renal and renopancreatic recipients in 2 reference centers in Uruguay. Two hundred and six renal or renopancreatic recipients between 21 and 77 years old were evaluated between September 2009 and September 2011. A total of 206 dermatoses were observed; 60% of the patients had at least 1 cutaneous manifestation. The most frequent dermatoses were cutaneous side effects due to immunosuppressive treatment (40.6%), followed by infections (26.1%), miscellaneous causes (18.9%), and malignant and premalignant lesions (14.4%). Transplant recipients represent a high-risk dermatological population. Physicians in transplant units should be aware of the importance of dermatological screening in order to promote early detection of skin cancer.

  15. Extrahepatic manifestations of Hepatitis C Virus infection: a general overview and guidelines for a clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zignego, A L; Ferri, C; Pileri, S A; Caini, P; Bianchi, F B

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus is associated with a wide series of extrahepatic manifestations. Based on available data the link between the virus and some of these extrahepatic diseases is only suggested and needs further confirmation. Hepatitis C Virus-related lymphoproliferative disorders, whose prototype is mixed cryoglobulinaemia, represent the most closely related extrahepatic manifestations of Hepatitis C Virus. Other Hepatitis C Virus-associated disorders include nephropathies, thyreopathies, sicca syndrome, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, porphyria cutanea tarda, lichen planus, diabetes, chronic polyarthritis, cardiopathy and atherosclerosis. A pathogenetic link between Hepatitis C Virus and some extrahepatic manifestations was confirmed by their responsiveness to antiviral therapy, which is now deemed the first therapeutic option to consider. By contrast, there are diseases where treatment with interferon was ineffective or dangerous. The aim of the present paper is to outline the most recent evidence concerning extrahepatic disorders that are possibly associated with Hepatitis C Virus infection. Special emphasis will be given to discussion of the most appropriate clinical approaches to be adopted in order to diagnose, treat (possibly prevent) and follow-up extrahepathic diseases in patients with Hepatitis C Virus infection.

  16. Stress and Coping in Patients with Clinical Manifestations of Human Papillomavirus.

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    Cvitanović, Hrvoje; Šitum, Mirna; Meštrović-Štefekov, Jelena; Lugović-Mihić, Liborija

    2017-04-01

    Stressful life events in response to a psychosocial trigger have been reported to negatively affect the course of infections. This study was based on patients with clinical manifestations of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and a control group of patients with psoriasis who were admitted over a period of one year to the Dermatology Department of Karlovac General Hospital. A total of 122 patients participated in the study, either with a confirmed diagnosis of clinical manifestations of HPV infection (n=66) or in a psoriasis control group (n=56). The aim of this study was to determine which coping strategies are used in patients with clinical manifestations of HPV infection. We used the Recent Life Changes Questionnaire and Brief COPE test for stress evaluation. There were no statically significant differences between adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies comparing patients with HPV and a control group. The difference in specific coping strategies between HPV and control groups showed that self-blame and planning strategies were statistically significantly more common in the HPV group. Patients with HPV with genital warts used maladaptive coping statistically significantly more than patients with non-genital localization of HPV. Patients with HPV who had a higher score of life stress events used maladaptive coping statistically significantly more than patients with a lower life stress events score. The results point to the need for patients with HPV with genital localization and high numbers of stress events to learn how to cope with stress, enabling them to take action and change their ways of coping. There is also a need to integrate psychological intervention into standard care protocols of dermatologic diseases.

  17. Orofacial manifestations in HIV positive children attending Mildmay Clinic in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbanja, Juliet; Gitta, Sheba; Peterson, Stefan; Rwenyonyi, Charles Mugisha

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the orofacial manifestations and their influence on oral function in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive children attending Mildmay Clinic in Uganda. This was a cross-sectional study based on clinical examination, medical records and a structured questionnaire of 368 children aged between 1.5 and 17 years. The clinical examination for dental caries was based on decayed, extracted and filled teeth (deft) and decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) indices as defined by World Health Organisation. The soft tissue orofacial lesions were assessed using the classification and diagnostic criteria as described by the Collaborative Workgroup on the Oral Manifestations of Pediatric HIV Infections. Approximately 67.4% of the children were on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The majority (77.4%) of the children had at least one orofacial lesion associated with HIV, pseudomembranous candidiasis being the most prevalent. Overall, 61.7% of the children with orofacial lesions reported at least one form of discomfort in the mouth. Discomfort was particularly associated with swallowing. The prevalence of orofacial lesions was significantly higher in children with poor oral hygiene and lower in those on HAART than in their respective counterparts. The CD4+ cell count, age and gender of the children did not significantly influence the distribution of orofacial lesions. The mean deft and DMFT scores were 11.8 and 2.7, respectively. The d- and D-components contributed 54.7 and 42.1%, respectively. Consumption of sugary snacks was directly associated with dental caries. Despite these children attending an HIV care centre of excellence, they have a high prevalence of orofacial manifestations associated with HIV. The majority of the children experienced discomfort in the oral cavity, particularly during swallowing.

  18. Subcuteneous swelling as the first clinical manifestation of small cell carcinoma of lung

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    Sunil Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous swelling as first clinical presentation of small cell lung carcinoma is uncommon and rarely reported in literature. This case highlights a rare presentation in which subcutaneous swelling was the first clinical manifestation of a small cell carcinoma of lung which also had metastasis to rib bone, muscle and pleural involvement as pleural effusion. We describe the case of a 64-year-old male patient who presented with dyspnea, pleuritic pain, loss of weight and nodule on his anterior chest, back and left arm suspicious of lipoma. Biopsies revealed small cell carcinoma of lung. This case demonstrates the meticulous work up of subcutaneous swelling in the clinical scenario of breathlessness, chest pain and loss of weight.

  19. [Down syndrome associated with clinical manifestations of Kabuki syndrome: report of a case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E O; Freitas, E M; Costa, S M; Duarte, A R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe an atypical case of Down syndrome presenting with additional clinical manifestations that might be components of Kabuki (Niikawa-Kuroki) syndrome.CLINICAL REPORT: We report the clinical history of a 19-month-old girl with a 47,XX, +21 karyotype, who presented brachycephaly, flat face, long palpebral fissures, eversion of the lateral portion of the lower eyelids, arched eyebrows with sparse lateral regions, long eyelashes, epicanthus, cortical cataract, small ears, protruding tongue, muscular hypotonia, developmental delay, hyperflexibility of joints, brachydactyly, and dermatoglyphic abnormalities.CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of Down syndrome was confirmed cytogenetically. However, the presence of additional anomalies - mainly in the ocular region - suggested that the child might also have the Kabuki syndrome.

  20. Frequency and clinical manifestations of post-poliomyelitis syndrome in a brazilian tertiary care center

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    Abrahão Augusto Juviniano Quadros

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency and clinical manifestations of patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS in a Brazilian division of neuromuscular disorders. METHODS: A total of 167 patients with prior history of paralytic poliomyelitis was investigated for PPS, based on international diagnostic criteria. Other variables analyzed were: gender, race, age at poliomyelitis infection, age at PPS onset, and PPS symptoms. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-nine patients presented PPS, corresponding to 77.2% of the studied population. 62.8% were women and 37.2% were men. Mean age of patients with PPS at onset of PPS symptoms was 39.9±9.69 years. Their main clinical manifestations were: new weakness in the previously affected limbs (69% and in the apparently not affected limbs (31%; joint pain (79.8%; fatigue (77.5%; muscle pain (76%; and cold intolerance (69.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Most patients of our sample presented PPS. In Brazil, PPS frequency and clinical features are quite similar to those of other countries.

  1. Patent ductus arteriosus: peculiarities of early neonatal, postnatal diagnostics, clinical manifestations, treatment and prognosis

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    K.A. Kalashnikova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the published data on the prevalence, the main clinical manifestations, and modern methods of early neonatal and postnatal diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of patent ductus arteriosus — the congenital malformation of cardiovascular system. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases version10 defines it Q25.0 Patent ductus arteriosus. Patent ductus Botalli. Botallo’s duct patency. The pre-valence of the patent ductus arteriosus is from 0.006 to 0.02 % in mature newborns, in premature newborns — from 15 to 80 %. Clinical manifestation of the malformation depends on its size, pulmonary pressure, and proportion of pulmonary and syste-mic circulation. One of the basic clinical signs of patent ductus arteriosus  is permanent eddy murmur  in II–III space along left sternal border. In newborns and infants and if severe pulmonary hypertension diastolic murmur can be absent while systolic and forced second sound on pulmonary artery, collapsing magnus pulse, increased pulse pressure are determined. Open ductus arteriosus is not determined auscultatory in low-weight premature children. The electrocardiograph reveals downloaded left ventricular. Echo-cardiograph images ductus arteriosis, increased left ventriclular, volume overload of left ventricular. Chest roentgenograms may reveal prominent pulmonary arterial markings, increased heart breadth due to hypertrophic left ventricular. Drug obliteration with indometacin is effective in newborns aged 2 weeks. The surgical indication is verified heart disease aged 6–12 months old. The appropriate age for surgical intervention is 2–5 years old.

  2. A comparative study of clinical manifestations caused by tuberculosis in immunocompromised and non-immunocompromised patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵长周; 瞿介明; 何礼贤

    2003-01-01

    Objective To characterize the differences between clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients (ICPs) and non-immunocompromised patients (non-ICPs) with tuberculosis.Methods Underlying diseases, clinical presentations, misdiagnosis, treatment and prognosis, etc, were analyzed retrospectively in 115 tuberculosis patients, including 39 ICPs and 76 non-ICPs.Results Compared with non-ICPs, the individuals who were ICP had more expectoration (64.1% vs 35.5%), pulmonary moist rale (41.0% vs 9.2%), miliary pulmonary tuberculosis (30.8% vs 2.6%), pleural effusion (48.7% vs 25.0%) and lymphadenopathy (18.0% vs 4.0 %). ICPs had less lung cavity (15.4% vs 22.4%) and pleural thickening (15.4% vs 23.7%) compared to non-ICPs. Pulmonary tuberculosis in ICPs was prone to be misdiagnosed as pneumonia (23.1% vs 6.6%). Pulmonary tuberculosis was found in the apicoposterior segment (SI+SII) in more cases in non-ICPs (21.7%, 10/46) than ICPs (10.3%, 3/29). The diagnostic value of tuberculin skin test and adenosine deaminase in pleural effusions was limited in ICPs. ICPs had significantly poorer prognoses than non-ICPs.Conclusion The clinical manifestations of ICPs with tuberculosis are atypical, misdiagnosis often occurs, resulting in a worse prognosis.

  3. A case of Bloom syndrome with uncommon clinical manifestations confirmed on genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian-Bing, Wu; Cheng-Rang, Li; Yi-Ping, Ma; Nan, Sheng; Hui, Li; Lin, Lin

    2016-02-01

    Bloom syndrome, a rare autosomal-recessive disorder, characteristically presents with photosensitivity, telangiectatic facial erythema, and growth deficiency. We present a case of Bloom syndrome with uncommon clinical manifestations including alopecia areata, eyebrow hair loss, flat nose, reticular pigmentation, and short sharpened distal phalanges with fingernails that were wider than they were long. We detected the Bloom syndrome gene, BLM, which is one of the members of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, and found changes in 2 heterozygous nucleotide sites in the patient as well as her father and mother.

  4. Septo-optic dysplasia complex: Clinical and radiological manifestations in Omani children

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    Rana Al-Senawi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: SOD is a clinically heterogeneous disorder with a wide spectrum of ophthalmic, endocrine, and neurologic manifestations. All features might not be present in a single patient. A high consanguinity rate and lack of history of alcohol and drug use were observed in our cohort. Most affected children present first to the pediatrician with failure to thrive. Radiological confirmation of ONH necessitates high-resolution imaging and interpretation by an experienced neuro-radiologist. In our cohort, all patients with ONH had associated optic chiasmal hypoplasia. Early detection and treatment reduces disease-related morbidity, and can be life saving.

  5. The epigenomics of polycystic ovarian syndrome: from pathogenesis to clinical manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuxia; Zhu, Dongyi; Duan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a complex condition of ovarian dysfunction and metabolic abnormalities with widely varying clinical manifestations resulting from interference of the genome and the environment through integrative biological mechanisms with the emerging field of epigenetics...... and comorbidity. Recent data based on profiling of the DNA methylome of PCOS in different tissues provided consistent molecular evidence in support of epidemiological findings on disease comorbidity suggesting a possible autoimmune basis in the pathogenesis of the disease. We show that the field of epigenetics...

  6. Clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations of vitamin D deficiency in newborns presented with hypocalcemia

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    Ashraf Soliman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Clinical and radiological manifestations of newborns with severe VDD have not been studied well. Materials and Methods: We studied the clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations of 10 full-term (FT newborns (6: M, 4: F infant presented to with symptomatic hypocalcemia (seizure secondary to vitamin D deficiency (VDD during the first 10 days of life are described. All were exclusively breastfed since birth. All their mothers have low 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD level 60 ng/mL and 60% had decreased magnesium (Mg concentrations (<0.7 mmol/L. Their alkaline phosphatase (ALP concentrations were significantly higher than normal newborns. All other laboratory results (liver function tests, urea and electrolytes, C reactive protein, lumbar puncture, blood culture, and lactate were normal. In all patients, seizures ceased within 2 days of starting treatment with alphacalcidol and calcium. Radiological manifestations included metaphyseal band of relative lucency (osteopenia, just under the line of provisional calcification, within distal radius (7/10, femur (4/10, and tibia (3/10, mild cupping and haziness of distal radius (2/10. Discussion: Newborns with VDD had significantly lower serum calcium, ALP and PTH and higher phosphate concentrations, compared to older infants with VDD rickets. In newborns with VDD, serum calcium levels were correlated significantly with 25OHD (r = 0.597, P < 0.001, Mg concentrations (r = 0.436, P < 0.001 and negatively with ALP concentrations (r = −0.451, P < 0.001. Serum PTH concentrations were correlated significantly with serum Mg (r = 0.78, P < 0.0001 but not with serum calcium (r = −0.103, P = 0.3 or 25OHD (r = −0.03, P = 0.7 concentrations. Conclusion: The clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations of VDD in newborns indicate that they are less adapted to VDD compared to older infants. VD supplementation for mothers and newborns should be considered to avoid short

  7. Brugada syndrome in the paediatric population: a comprehensive approach to clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Corcia, M Cecilia; de Asmundis, Carlo; Chierchia, Gian-Battista; Brugada, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Brugada syndrome is an inherited arrhythmogenic disorder, characterised by coved-type ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads, and is associated with increased risk of sudden death. It is genetically and clinically heterogeneous, presenting typically in the fourth or fifth decade of life. The prevalence of Brugada syndrome in the paediatric population is low compared with the adult population. Interestingly, over the last several years, there has been growing evidence in the literature of onset of the disease during childhood. Most of the paediatric cases reported in the literature consist of asymptomatic Brugada syndrome; however, some patients manifest the disease at different regions of the cardiac conduction system at a young age. Early expression of the disease can be affected by multiple factors, including genetic substrate, hormonal changes, and still unknown environmental exposures. The initial manifestation of Brugada syndrome in children can include sinus node dysfunction and atrial arrhythmias. Brugada syndrome can also manifest as ventricular arrhythmias leading to sudden death at an early age. In symptomatic children, performance of the ajmaline test by an experienced team can be safely used as a diagnostic tool to unmask latent Brugada syndrome. Defining indications for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator in children with the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome remains challenging. Given the rarity of the syndrome in children, most paediatric cardiologists will only rarely see a young patient with Brugada syndrome and there is still no universal consensus regarding the optimal management approach. Care should be individualised according to the specific clinical presentation, taking into account the family history, genetic data, and the family's specific preferences.

  8. Intramuscular manifestation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and myeloma: Prevalence, clinical signs, and computed tomography features

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    Surov, Alexey; Spielmann, Rolf-Peter; Behrmann, Curd (Dept. of Radiology, Martin Luther Univ., Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)), e-mail: alex.surow@medizin.uni-halle.de; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen (Dept. of Hematology/Oncology, Martin Luther Univ., Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)); Arnold, Dirk (Dept. of Pathology, Martin Luther Univ., Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)); Schmidt, Joerg (Dept. of Medical Statistics and Controlling, Martin Luther Univ., Halle-Wittenberg (Germany))

    2010-01-15

    Background: Intramuscular manifestations of malignant immuno proliferative diseases (IMMID) are very rare. Purpose: To determine the prevalence and the clinical features of IMMID in a large series of patients, and to analyze their radiological appearances. Material and Methods: Between 1997 and 2007, 20 patients with IMMID (non-Hodgkin lymphoma [NHL], n=14, and myeloma, n=6) were identified. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT). In five cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was additionally performed. Results: Clinically, 16 patients presented with local pain and soft-tissue swelling. In four patients, IMMID was found incidentally. The most common site was the erector spinae muscle, followed by the iliopsoas and pelvic muscles. In 13 cases of IMMID, diffuse mass-forming muscle infiltration was found. Focal intramuscular masses were identified in seven cases. Conclusion: NHL mostly manifests as diffuse muscle enlargement, whereas myelomas form focal intramuscular masses. Nevertheless, CT and MR appearances are nonspecific and can be misinterpreted as muscle sarcoma or inflammatory disease. Although rare, muscle involvement should be considered in the differential diagnosis of muscle disorders in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and myeloma

  9. The role of diabetes on the clinical manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; PrayGod, George;

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes is associated with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), possibly due to impaired immunity, and diabetes may exacerbate the clinical manifestations of TB. Our aim was to assess the role of diabetes in the clinical manifestations of TB. Methods: We studied 1250 patients with pulmonary TB...... in an urban population in a cross-sectional study in Tanzania. All participants were tested for diabetes and HIV co-infection, and TB culture intensity was assessed. Levels of white blood cells, haemoglobin, acute phase reactants, CD4 count and HIV viral load were measured, and a qualitative morbidity...... questionnaire was used to identify the prevalence of disease-related symptoms. Results: Tuberculosis patients with diabetes had a higher neutrophil count (B 0.5 x 10 9 cells/ l, 95% CI 0.2; 0.9, P = 0.001) than non-diabetic TB patients. Serum C-reactive protein (B 18.8 mg / l, CI 95% 8.2; 29.4, P = 0...

  10. The hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome - clinical manifestation diversity in primary immune deficiency

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    Szczawinska-Poplonyk Aleksandra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hyper-IgE syndromes are rare, complex primary immunodeficiencies characterized by clinical manifestation diversity, by particular susceptibility to staphylococcal and mycotic infections as well as by a heterogeneous genetic origin. Two distinct entities - the classical hyper-IgE syndrome which is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and the autosomal recessive hyper-IgE syndrome have been recognized. The autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome is associated with a cluster of facial, dental, skeletal, and connective tissue abnormalities which are not observable in the recessive type. In the majority of affected patients with autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome a mutation in the signal transducer and the activator of the transcription 3 gene has been identified, leading to an impaired Th17 cells differentiation and to a downregulation of an antimicrobial response. A mutation in the dedicator of the cytokinesis 8 gene has been identified as the cause of many cases with autosomal recessive hyper-IgE syndrome and, in one patient, a mutation in tyrosine kinase 2 gene has been demonstrated. In this paper, the authors provide a review of the clinical manifestations in the hyper-IgE syndromes with particular emphasis on the diversity of their phenotypic expression and present current diagnostic guidelines for these diseases.

  11. [Clinical manifestations of "Hunger Disease" among children in the ghettos during the Holocaust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercshlag-Elkayam, Orit; Even, Lea; Shasha, Shaul M

    2003-05-01

    The harsh life in the ghettos were characterized by overcrowding, shortage of supplies (e.g. money, sanitation, medications), poor personal hygiene, inclement weather and exhaustion. Under these conditions, morbidity was mainly due to infectious diseases, both endemic and epidemic outbreaks with a high mortality rate. The dominant feature was hunger. Daily caloric allowance was 300-800, and in extreme cases (i.e. Warsaw ghetto) it was only 200 calories. The food was lacking important nutrients (e.g. vitamins, trace elements) leading to protean clinical expression, starvation and death. The clinical manifestations of starvation were referred to as "the Hunger Disease", which became the subject of research by the medical doctors in the ghettos, mainly in the Warsaw ghetto in which a thorough documentation and research were performed. The first victims of hunger were children. First they failed to thrive physically and later mentally. Like their elders, they lost weight, but later growth stopped and their developmental milestones were lost with the loss of curiosity and motivation to play. The mortality rate among babies and infants was 100%, as was described by the ghetto doctors: "when the elder children got sick, the small ones were already dead...". In the last weeks of the ghettos there were no children seen in the streets. In this article the environmental conditions and daily life of children in the ghettos are reviewed, and the manifestations of "Hunger Disease" among them is scrutinized.

  12. Food allergy in Catalonia: Clinical manifestations and its association with airborne allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, J; Gázquez, V; Rubira, N; Valdesoiro, L; Guilarte, M; Garcia-Moral, A; Depreux, N; Soto-Retes, L; De Molina, M; Luengo, O; Lleonart, R; Basagaña, M

    Food allergy affects around 6% of the European population and its prevalence worldwide has been increasing in the last decades, but studies focused on investigating food allergy epidemiology in Europe are lacking. The Cibus project was created to register the main culprit foods and their clinical manifestations in food allergic patients in Catalonia. A specific online database was designed. Allergists from eight different Catalan hospitals registered the new diagnoses of food allergy. 618 food allergic patients were included. Egg and milk were the main elicitors in the early ages, while fruits and nuts were the most frequent in patients >14 years old. Fish was more frequent in children, while seafood and Anisakis allergy were more frequent in the >14-year-old group. Overall, peach was the most prevalent food eliciting an allergic reaction (10%). Food allergy diagnosis was reached using compatible clinical history and positive skin prick test to the involved food in 98% of cases. Globally, urticaria was the most frequently reported manifestation in our population (48.2%), followed by oral allergy syndrome (25.6%) and anaphylaxis (24.8%). The Cibus project gives a full overview of the profile of food allergic patients in Catalonia and reinforces the predominance of plant food allergies in the Mediterranean area. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS in clients attending TASO clinics in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirwomwe, J F; Rwenyonyi, C M; Muwazi, L M; Besigye, B; Mboli, F

    2007-09-01

    The objective of the study is to establish the prevalence of oral manifestations and their influence on oral functions. A total of 514 subjects aged 18 to 58 years (mean 42 years) were randomly recruited from five The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) clinics in Uganda. They were clinically examined for oral lesions under field conditions by four trained dentists based on World Health Organization criteria. Women constituted 74.5% of the study population. Oral manifestations were recorded in 72% of the subjects, out of which 70% had candidiasis of pseudomembranous, erythematous, and angular cheilitis variants. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, atypical ulcers, necrotizing periodontitis, and hairy leucoplakia were least frequently observed in the subjects. Of those who had oral lesions (n = 370), 68.4% had some form of discomfort in the mouth. Tooth brushing, chewing, and swallowing were frequently associated with discomfort. Reported forms of discomfort were dry mouth, increased salivation, and burning sensation especially on taking salty and spicy foods or acidic drinks. Only 8.5% (n = 44) of the subjects were taking medications specifically for oral lesions, which included antifungal, antiviral, and antibacterial agents. None of the subjects were on antiretroviral therapy. Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in TASO clients is a major public health problem requiring education in recognition and appropriate management.

  14. Portal vein thrombosis: Insight into physiopathology, diagnosis, and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponziani, Francesca R; Zocco, Maria A; Campanale, Chiara; Rinninella, Emanuele; Tortora, Annalisa; Maurizio, Luca Di; Bombardieri, Giuseppe; Cristofaro, Raimondo De; Gaetano, Anna M De; Landolfi, Raffaele; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a relatively common complication in patients with liver cirrhosis, but might also occur in absence of an overt liver disease. Several causes, either local or systemic, might play an important role in PVT pathogenesis. Frequently, more than one risk factor could be identified; however, occasionally no single factor is discernable. Clinical examination, laboratory investigations, and imaging are helpful to provide a quick diagnosis, as prompt treatment might greatly affect a patient’s outcome. In this review, we analyze the physiopathological mechanisms of PVT development, together with the hemodynamic and functional alterations related to this condition. Moreover, we describe the principal factors most frequently involved in PVT development and the recent knowledge concerning diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Finally, we analyze the implications of PVT in the setting of liver transplantation and its possible influence on patients’ future prognoses. PMID:20066733

  15. Research note. Clinical reports and analysis of patients with clinical manifestations of migraine-like headache and unruptured aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M

    2015-02-13

    A retrospective analysis of three cases of clinical manifestations of migraine-like headache, including clinical features, imaging findings, and follow-up results was done to explore the potential correlation between migraine and unruptured aneurysm. Clinical data and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) results were retrospectively analyzed. All three patients met the diagnostic criteria for migraine without aura stated in the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, established by the International Headache Society in 2004. The DSA results suggested that the aneurysms occurred in the anterior communicating artery (two cases) and in the internal carotid artery (one case); the migraine attacks disappeared after aneurysm embolization, with a follow-up time of 6, 10, and 16 months in the three cases, respectively. The pathogenesis of migraine is not fully understood; however, the potential correlation between migraine attack and unruptured saccular aneurysm needs attention, and the specific pathogenesis should be further investigated.

  16. Skin Manifestations of Insulin Resistance: From a Biochemical Stance to a Clinical Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saldivar, Gloria; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; González-González, José Gerardo; Gómez-Flores, Minerva

    2017-03-01

    Worldwide, more than 1.9 billion adults are overweight, and around 600 million people suffer from obesity. Similarly, ~382 million individuals live with diabetes, and 40-50% of the global population is labeled at "high risk" (i.e., prediabetes). The impact of these two chronic conditions relies not only on the burden of illnesses per se (i.e., associated increased morbidity and mortality), but also on their increased cost, burden of treatment, and decreased health-related quality of life. For this review a comprehensive search in several databases including PubMed (MEDLINE), Ovid EMBASE, Web of Science, and Scopus was conducted. In both diabetes and obesity, genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors overlap and are inclusive rather than exclusive. De facto, 70-80% of the patients with obesity and virtually every patient with type 2 diabetes have insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a well-known pathophysiologic factor in the development of type 2 diabetes, characteristically appearing years before its diagnosis. The gold standard for insulin resistance diagnosis (the euglycemic insulin clamp) is a complex, invasive, costly, and hence unfeasible test to implement in clinical practice. Likewise, laboratory measures and derived indexes [e.g., homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR-)] are indirect, imprecise, and not highly accurate and reproducible tests. However, skin manifestations of insulin resistance (e.g., acrochordons, acanthosis nigricans, androgenetic alopecia, acne, hirsutism) offer a reliable, straightforward, and real-time way to detect insulin resistance. The objective of this review is to aid clinicians in recognizing skin manifestations of insulin resistance. Diagnosing these skin manifestations accurately may cascade positively in the patient's health by triggering an adequate metabolic evaluation, a timely treatment or referral with the ultimate objective of decreasing diabetes and obesity burden, and improving the

  17. Acute sialadenitis in children and adolescents: CT findings and clinical manifestations according to glandular involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A. Leum; Kim, Young Tong; Han, Jong Kyu; Jou, Sung Shick; Jung, Du Shin [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    This study was designed to compare the CT findings and clinical manifestations in children and adolescents with acute sialadenitis according to the involved salivary glands. The study included fifty children and adolescents (34 boys, 16 girls) with acute sialadenitis that was diagnosed during the past five years. All of the subjects were divided into three groups: group I (parotid gland involvement, n = 16), group II (submandibular gland involvement, n = 20) and group III (involvement of both glands, n 14). We analyzed the presence of an abscess, sialolith, bilaterality, cellulitis and lymphadenopathy on CT scans. The analyzed clinical data were age, sex, lymphadenopathy, pain, swelling, presence of a mass, tonsillitis, treatment period and surgical treatment if it was performed. The presence of an abscess, sialolith, cellulitis, swelling, age, presence of a palpable mass and treatment period were statistically significant factors for the patients in the three groups. An abscess was combined only in group I patients. There was a high rate of sialolith in group II patients and cellulitis in group III patients as seen on CT scans. Swelling in group II patients and group III patients and the presence of a palpable mass in group I patients were identified as clinical manifestations. Age was younger in group I patients (mean age, 5.3 years) than in group II patients (mean age, 12.9 years) and group III patients (mean age, 15.2 years). The treatment period was longer for group I patients. For acute sialadenitis in children and adolescents, age, presence of an abscess, sialolith, cellulitis, swelling, presence of a palpable mass and treatment period were different according to the involved salivary glands.

  18. [Clinical manifestations in patients exposed to an environmental toxic accident (Abidjan, Ivory Coast 2006)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, B; Horo, K; Godé, C; Ahui, B; Kouassi, M N; Achi, V; Anon, J-C; Koffi, N; N'Gom, A; Aka-Danguy, E; Koffi, M O; Itchy, M; Koné, K; Manewa, S

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, 528 tons of petroleum toxic waste have been released in Abidjan (Ivory Coast) during a major environmental accident. This study was aimed to describe the clinical manifestations provoked by these toxic waste. We have analysed the records of patients admitted to the university hospital of Cocody (Abidjan) following exposure to toxic waste. All the information were recorded on specific files or on notification files created by the physicians of the National Institute of Public Health, the authority charged with the supervision of this exercise. The files were completed by the physician in the course of the examination of the patient. Over a period of 3-month-period, 10,598 patients were examined. The clinical manifestations affected all age groups. They were dominated by respiratory symptoms: pulmonary (74.5%) and upper respiratory (31.0%). Pulmonary symptoms included cough (48.8%), chest pain (37.9%), dyspnoea (9.5%) and a few cases of hemoptysis. Digestive symptoms mainly comprised abdominal pain (36.2%), diarrhea (23.0%), abdominal distension (19.9%) and vomiting (9.9%). The other symptoms were neurological, ophthalmic, cardiovascular and gynaecological. More than 96% of patients presented with at least two symptoms. The respiratory symptoms were significantly more frequent in patients over the age of 17 while diarrhea and vomiting were more often found in patients less than 17 years old. Chest pain was significantly more common in men while abdominal pain and vomiting predominated in women (P=0.001). The clinical consequences of toxic waste exposure were varied and sometimes serious. A medium- and long-term evaluation of the subjects is required. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The changing faces of IgG4-related disease: Clinical manifestations and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Arshia Duza; Selmi, Carlo; Datta-Mitra, Ananya; Sonu, Rebecca; Chen, Mingyi; Gershwin, M Eric; Raychaudhuri, Siba P

    2015-10-01

    Since the earliest reports in 2001, immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease has been defined as an autoimmune systemic disease characterized by the lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of affected tissues leading to fibrosis and obliterative phlebitis along with elevated serum IgG4 levels. Prior to this unifying hypothesis, a plethora of clinical manifestations were considered as separate entities despite the similar laboratory profile. The pathology can be observed in virtually all organs and may thus be a challenging diagnosis, especially when the adequate clinical suspicion is not present or when obtaining a tissue biopsy is not feasible. Nonetheless, the most frequently involved organs are the pancreas and exocrine glands but these may be spared. Immunosuppressants lead to a prompt clinical response in virtually all cases and prevent histological sequelae and, as a consequence, an early differential diagnosis from other conditions, particularly infections and cancer, as well as an early treatment should be pursued. We describe herein two cases in which atypical disease manifestations were observed, i.e., one with recurrent neck lymph node enlargement and proptosis, and one with jaundice. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease is largely incomplete but data support a significant role for Th2 cytokines with the contribution of innate immunity factors such as Toll-like receptors, macrophages and basophils. Further, macrophages activated by IL4 overexpress B cell activating factors and contribute to chronic inflammation and the development of fibrosis. We cannot rule out the possibility that the largely variable disease phenotypes reflect different pathogenetic mechanisms and the tissue microenvironment may then contribute to the organ involvement.

  20. Membrane lipidomics in schizophrenia patients: a correlational study with clinical and cognitive manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, C; Sweers, K; Frajerman, A; Bergaoui, H; Ferreri, F; Delva, C; Lapidus, N; Lamaziere, A; Roiser, J P; De Hert, M; Nuss, P

    2016-10-04

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental condition in which several lipid abnormalities-either structural or metabolic-have been described. We tested the hypothesis that an abnormality in membrane lipid composition may contribute to aberrant dopamine signaling, and thereby symptoms and cognitive impairment, in schizophrenia (SCZ) patients. Antipsychotic-medicated and clinically stable SCZ outpatients (n=74) were compared with matched healthy subjects (HC, n=40). A lipidomic analysis was performed in red blood cell (RBC) membranes examining the major phospholipid (PL) classes and their associated fatty acids (FAs). Clinical manifestations were examined using the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS). Cognitive function was assessed using the Continuous Performance Test, Salience Attribution Test and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Sphingomyelin (SM) percentage was the lipid abnormality most robustly associated with a schizophrenia diagnosis. Two groups of patients were defined. The first group (SCZ c/SM-) is characterized by a low SM membrane content. In this group, all other PL classes, plasmalogen and key polyunsaturated FAs known to be involved in brain function, were significantly modified, identifying a very specific membrane lipid cluster. The second patient group (SCZ c/SM+) was similar to HCs in terms of RBC membrane SM composition. Compared with SCZ c/SM+, SCZ c/SM- patients were characterized by significantly more severe PANSS total, positive, disorganized/cognitive and excited psychopathology. Cognitive performance was also significantly poorer in this subgroup. These data show that a specific RBC membrane lipid cluster is associated with clinical and cognitive manifestations of dopamine dysfunction in schizophrenia patients. We speculate that this membrane lipid abnormality influences presynaptic dopamine signaling.

  1. Season of birth, clinical manifestations and Dexamethasone Suppression Test in unipolar major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaprinis George S

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports in the literature suggest that the season of birth might constitute a risk factor for the development of a major psychiatric disorder, possibly because of the effect environmental factors have during the second trimester of gestation. The aim of the current paper was to study the possible relationship of the season of birth and current clinical symptoms in unipolar major depression. Methods The study sample included 45 DSM-IV major depressive patients and 90 matched controls. The SCAN v. 2.0, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS were used to assess symptomatology, and the 1 mg Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST was used to subcategorize patients. Results Depressed patients as a whole did not show differences in birth season from controls. However, those patients born during the spring manifested higher HDRS while those born during the summer manifested the lowest HAS scores. DST non-suppressors were almost exclusively (90% likely to be born during autumn and winter. No effect from the season of birth was found concerning the current severity of suicidal ideation or attempts. Discussion The current study is the first in this area of research using modern and rigid diagnostic methodology and a biological marker (DST to categorize patients. Its disadvantages are the lack of data concerning DST in controls and a relatively small size of patient sample. The results confirm the effect of seasonality of birth on patients suffering from specific types of depression.

  2. [Affective respiratory and reflex paroxysms--evaluation of anamnestic data, clinical manifestations and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lnĕnicková, D; Makovská, Z; Lnĕnicka, J

    1993-08-01

    The authors elaborated data, using the retrospective method, of a group of 146 patients with affective respiratory and reflex paroxysms. They focused attention on clinical manifestations of the disease, anamnestic data suggesting possible damage or immaturity of stem structures, the influence of heredity and the family environment. They found that in 63.7% the disease was manifested before the age of 1 year, most frequently at the age of 9-12 months. The cyanotic type of paroxysms was found in 67.5% of the patients, the pallid type in 21% and 3.5% of the patients suffered from both types of paroxysms. In 27.4% perinatal risks were recorded. The influence of a family-history was statistically significant in relation to the patient's age during the first attack: in patients with a positive family-history the mean age being by 1.8 months lower. 82.9% of the patients had a normal neurological finding, the EEG was evaluated as normal in 89.6% of 125 thus examined children. Psychological examinations made in 12 children revealed in all instances anomalies of personality with a predominance of lack of compliance and adaptability to the environment. Deterioration of the health status as a result of affective respiratory and reflex paroxysms was not recorded in any of the patients.

  3. Clinical Manifestations Associated with Overweight/Obesity in Puerto Ricans with Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M.; Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Mayor, Ángel M.; Ríos, Grissel; Vilá, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the clinical manifestations associated with overweight/obesity in Hispanics from Puerto Rico with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed in 144 patients with FMS (per American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria). Sociodemographic features, FMS-related symptoms, tender points (per ACR criteria), comorbidities, and FMS treatment were examined. BMI was calculated and patients were grouped into two categories: BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m2 (nonoverweight/obese) and BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (overweight/obese). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate differences between the study groups. Results. The mean (standard deviation (SD)) age of patients was 50.2 (9.9) years; 95.1% were females and 75.7% were overweight/obese. In the bivariate analysis, overweight/obese patients were more likely to have self-reported memory impairment, anxiety, shortness of breath, and urinary frequency than nonoverweight/obese patients. In addition, the tender point count was higher in the overweight/obese group. In the logistic regression analyses, self-reported memory impairment and urinary frequency differences remained significant after adjusting for confounding variables. Conclusion. In this population of Puerto Ricans with FMS, overweight/obese patients experienced more FMS-related manifestations than nonoverweight/obese individuals. However, prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations and to elucidate if weight reduction interventions could favorably impact the severity of FMS. PMID:26885384

  4. The epigenomics of polycystic ovarian syndrome: from pathogenesis to clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuxia; Zhu, Dongyi; Duan, Hongmei; Tan, Qihua

    2016-12-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a complex condition of ovarian dysfunction and metabolic abnormalities with widely varying clinical manifestations resulting from interference of the genome and the environment through integrative biological mechanisms with the emerging field of epigenetics offering an appealing tool for studying the nature and nurture of the disease. We review the current literature of epigenetic studies on PCOS from disease development to the association analysis of the DNA methylome and to exploratory studies on the molecular mechanisms of disease heterogeneity and comorbidity. Recent data based on profiling of the DNA methylome of PCOS in different tissues provided consistent molecular evidence in support of epidemiological findings on disease comorbidity suggesting a possible autoimmune basis in the pathogenesis of the disease. We show that the field of epigenetics and epigenomics could serve to link molecular regulatory mechanisms with disease development and disease manifestation which could contribute to PCOS prevention and treatment and eventually promote reproductive health in fertile age women. We summarize the up-to-date findings and discuss the implications of various studies and point to new avenues of research on PCOS in the rapidly developing field of epigenetics and epigenomics.

  5. What's new in the physiopathology of acne?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, D H; Kwon, H H

    2015-07-01

    There are four central factors that contribute to acne physiopathology: the inflammatory response, colonization with Propionibacterium acnes, increased sebum production and hypercornification of the pilosebaceous duct. In addition, research in the areas of diet and nutrition, genetics and oxidative stress is also yielding some interesting insights into the development of acne. In this paper we review some of the most recent research and novel concepts revealed in this work, which has been published by researchers from diverse academic disciplines including dermatology, immunology, microbiology and endocrinology. We discuss the implications of their findings (particularly in terms of opportunities to develop new therapies), highlight interrelationships between these novel factors that could contribute to the pathology of acne, and indicate where gaps in our understanding still exist. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Analysis of risk factors and clinical manifestations associated with Clostridium difficile disease in Serbian hospitalized patients

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    Stojanović Predrag

    Full Text Available Abstract Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious diarrhoea in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors important for the development of hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile-associated disease and clinical manifestations of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. The clinical trial group included 37 hospitalized patients who were selected according to the inclusion criteria. A control group of 74 hospitalized patients was individually matched with cases based on hospital, age (within 4 years, sex and month of admission.Clostridium difficile-associated disease most commonly manifested as diarrhoea (56.76% and colitis (32%, while in 8.11% of patients, it was diagnosed as pseudomembranous colitis, and in one patient, it was diagnosed as fulminant colitis. Statistically significant associations (p < 0.05 were found with the presence of chronic renal failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular accident (stroke and haemodialysis. In this study, it was confirmed that all the groups of antibiotics, except for tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, were statistically significant risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated disease (p < 0.05. However, it was difficult to determine the individual role of antibiotics in the development of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Univariate logistic regression also found that applying antibiotic therapy, the duration of antibiotic therapy, administration of two or more antibiotics to treat infections, administering laxatives and the total number of days spent in the hospital significantly affected the onset of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (p < 0.05, and associations were confirmed using the multivariate model for the application of antibiotic therapy (p = 0.001, duration of antibiotic treatment (p = 0.01, use of laxatives (p = 0.01 and total number of days spent in the hospital (p = 0.001. In this study

  7. Clinical manifestations of atopy in children up to two years of age

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    Ilić Nevenka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Atopic diseases such as atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and asthma have had increased prevalence during the past decade and nowadays occur in every third child in developed countries. The aim of the study was to determine frequency and type of atopic diseases at the age of two, as well as the importance the total IgE antibodies concentrations have in diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. Methods. The study involved 175 children up to two years of age. Allergy-like symptoms were found after surveying their parents and pediatric medical records. Using the fluorescence immunossay (FIA method, total IgE antibodies concentrations and specific IgE antibodies (Phadiatop infant were determined on an Immunocap 100 Dyagnostic System. Results. One or more allergy-like symptoms accounted for 57.7% of findings in children under the age of two, whilst in 19.4% the existence of IgE-related allergic diseases was found. Atopic diseases usually have clinical manifestations of atopic dermatitis (11.4%, IgE-bound wheezing/asthma (10.8% and food allergies (7.4%, and to much lesser extent those of allergic rhinitis (3.4% and urticaria (1.7%. The significantly higher total IgE antibodies concentrations were found in children with allergy-like symptoms (p < 0.0005 (cut-off 15.15 kU/L, sensitivity 76.5% specificity 71.6%. Conclusion. Almost 20% of two-year-old children have any of clinically manifested allergic diseases, with atopic dermatitis and IgE wheeze/asthma being predominant. The higher total IgE antibodies concentration is a good marker for sensitization in children with allergy-like symptoms.

  8. Clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS patients: differences between public and private hospitals in Jakarta

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    Herdiman T. Pohan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study is to determine the demographic data, risk factors, clinical presentations, opportunistic/co-infections and its difference between public and private hospitals. A retrospective -descriptive study was conducted in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital (public hospital and Medistra Hospital (private hospital, Jakarta. The inclusion criteria were new HIV/AIDS cases admitted in year 2002-2003 and positive HIV serology (Elisa method. Secondary data were collected form medical record. Sixty-six subjects were enrolled in this study (public hospital 30 subjects and private hospital 36 subjects, consist of 59 male (89.4% and 7 female (10.6%. Thirty-seven percent subjects were defined as HIV and 62% AIDS. Risk factors obtained include drug user (59.1%, homosexual (13.6%, heterosexual (21.1%, transfusion (1.5% and maternal-child (perinatal (1.5%. The clinical symptoms mainly present as acute fever (56.2%, weight loss (39.4%, cough (38.8%, shortness of breath (27.2%, chronic diarrhea (22.8%, prolong fever (19.7%, loss of conciousness (15.3%, anorexia (15.3%. Significant differences between public and private hospitals were seen in fever and cough symptoms. Clinical presentation of HIV/AIDS patients during admission were : pneumonia (56%, oral trush (22.6%, anemia (56.5%, leucopenia (32.3%, lymphopenia (55.9%, elevated AST/ALT (66.1%, hypoalbuminemia (46.9%, limphadenopathy (10.6%, brain space occuping lesion (7.6%, encephalopathy (6.0%, pulmonary tb and pleural effusion (10.6%. The opportunistic and co-infections present were candidiasis (25.8%, chronic hepatitis C (24.2%, chronic hepatitis B and C (4.5%, pulmonary tb, lymphadenitis and miliary tb. Candidiasis and pulmonary tb were frequently found in public hospital. In conclusion from this study that clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS were young man or woman, with one or more possible risk factor, had fever, respiratory complain, loss of body weight, chronic diarrhea

  9. Gonorrhoea: auxotypes, serovars, and clinical manifestations among female sex workers from Kinshasa, Zaïre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukenge-Tshibaka, L; Alary, M; Van Dyck, E; Laga, M; Nzila, N

    1997-01-01

    The main question in this paper was to look at the distribution of auxotypes and serovars of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and check whether they correlate with clinical symptoms/signs among female sex workers (FSW) from Kinshasa, Zaïre. The subject were 1233 FSW enrolled in a cross sectional study on STDs and HIV infection in 1988; 771 of them were followed prospectively for a median duration of 23 months. At each visit, clinical symptoms and signs of cervicitis were recorded and the subjects were screened for gonococcal and chlamydial infection. The pre-dominant auxotypes were prototrophic (35.2%), proline requiring (29.6%), and proline requiring phenylalanine inhibition (19%). Serovars 1A-6 (42.5%) and 1B-1 (16.7%) were the commonest. Infection with auxotype prototrophic and phenylalanine inhibition (Proto/Phenali) was significantly associated with both mucopurulent cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease; (OR = 8.9; p = 0.002 and OR =19 x9; p = 0.002; respectively). Despite the few associations found in this study, there was not clear pattern linking clinical manifestations to auxotype/serovar profiles. PMID:9582486

  10. Langerhans Cells Histiocytosis: Features of Clinical and Laboratory Manifestations and Course of the Disease

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    O.I. Dorosh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research. To specify the features of clinical symptoms, course of the disease and the efficacy of treatment for Langerhans cells histiocytosis (LCH in children. Methods of the Study. Clinacal, haemotological, biochemical, histological, immunohistochemical, radiological ones. Results of the Study. An analysis of 25 cases of LCH in children was presented. Monosystem LCH most often affects the skeletal system. Multisystem LCH is characterized by diversity of clinical manifestations, more severe course and high risk of death. One third of patients with multisystem LCH are infants. In children with monosystem LCH we observed complete clinical response to first-line therapy. At the same time, complete response to polychemotherapy is observed only in 30 % of children with multisystem LCH. Prognosis of the disease depends on the initial affection of risk organs (bone marrow, liver, lungs, spleen, their dysfunction and the child’s age at the time of diagnosis. Process reactivation in children with multisystem LCH occurs in the first 12 months from the onset of the disease.

  11. Clinical manifestations of cytomegalovirus-associated posterior uveitis and panuveitis in patients without human immunodeficiency virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Pathanapitoon (Kessara); N. Tesavibul (Nattaporn); P. Choopong (Pitipol); S. Boonsopon (Sutasinee); N. Kongyai (Natedao); S. Ausayakhun (Somsanguan); P. Kunavisarut (Paradee); A. Rothova (Aniki)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractImportance: Little attention has been paid to clinical features of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in individuals without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Objective: To describe the clinical manifestations and comorbidities of patients without HIV infection who have CMV-associated po

  12. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

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    Ana Peixinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine dysregulation syndrome.

  13. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Peixinho, Ana; De Azevedo, Ana Luísa; Simões, Rita Moiron

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine d...

  14. Spleen volume and clinical disease manifestations of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in African children.

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    Kotlyar, Simon; Nteziyaremye, Julius; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Akech, Samuel O; Moore, Christopher L; Maitland, Kathryn

    2014-05-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is common in African children. Severe disease manifestations include severe malarial anemia (SMA) and cerebral malaria (CM). In vitro studies suggest that splenic sequestration is associated with SMA and protective against CM. We sought to characterize the relationship between ultrasonographically derived spleen volume (SV), clinical manifestations and outcome. We conducted a prospective observational study of severe malaria and SV in children aged 3 months to 12 years in Eastern Uganda. An SV normogram was generated from 186 healthy controls and adjusted for total body surface area (TBSA). Children with severe P. falciparum malaria were classified according to disease phenotype, and SV z-scores were compared for cases and controls to assess the degree of spleen enlargement. One hundred and four children with severe malaria, median age 19.2 months, were enrolled; 54 were classified as having SMA and 15 with CM. Mortality was 27% in the CM group vs 1.9% in the SMA group. TBSA-adjusted SV z-scores were lower in children with CM compared to SMA (1.98 [95% CI 1.38-2.57] vs 2.73 [95% CI 2.41-3.04]; p=0.028). Mean SV z-scores were lower in children who died (1.20 [95% CI 0.14-2.25]) compared to survivors (2.58 [95% CI 2.35-2.81]); p=0.004. SV is lower in CM compared to SMA. Severe malaria with no increase in SV z-score may be associated with mortality.

  15. The clinical manifestations and survival of systemic lupus erythematosus patients in Turkey: report from two centers.

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    Pamuk, O N; Akbay, F G; Dönmez, S; Yilmaz, N; Calayir, G B; Yavuz, S

    2013-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease with a variety of clinical features. Survival has become longer as a result of better treatment modalities and better supportive care. There is no information on survival of SLE patients in Turkey. We evaluated clinical features and survival in SLE patients in two rheumatology departments. All SLE patients being followed up by the Department of Rheumatology, Trakya University Medical Faculty, and the Department of Rheumatology, Marmara University Medical Faculty, over the 1996-2012 period were included. Patients were diagnosed with SLE if they fulfilled at least four American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. The clinical and laboratory features, mortality data were obtained from medical charts. We had 428 SLE patients, and women (399 patients, 93.2%) far outnumbered men (29 patients, 6.8%). The mean age at the time of SLE diagnosis was 40.3 ± 12.4 years. The most frequent clinical manifestations were arthritis (76.9%) and photosensitivity (70.1%). Renal disease was present in 32.9% of patients and neurological involvement in 12.9% of patients. After a median follow-up of 60 months, 19 patients died. The most frequent causes of death were ischemic heart disease, chronic renal failure and sepsis. The rate of five-year survival was 96%; 10-year survival, 92%; and 15-year survival, 88.8%. Multivariate Cox analysis showed that serositis at the time of diagnosis, SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score 6, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia were independent prognostic factors. Data from two centers in Northwestern Turkey show that the mortality rate for SLE is similar to the rate in Western countries.

  16. Gender related differences in demographic and clinical manifestations in patients suffering from various subtypes of schizophrenia

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    Gorana Sulejmanpašić Arslanagić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Schizophrenia is devastating neuropsychiatric disorder that has no clearly identified etiology. The subtypes of schizophrenia are distinguished by the prevalent symptomatology. The aim of this study was to determine gender related differences in demographic and clinical manifestations in patients suffering from various subtypes of schizophrenia.Methods: A longitudinal, prospective,original,clinical investigation first in our local area, with application of Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV Axis I Disorders (SCID I was used in this work. The study included 121 patients during five years period. Patients were recruited as consecutive admissions to the Psychiatric clinic, from all parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina, mostly Sarajevo region.Results: The study was conducted on a group of schizophrenic patients which consisted of 52.1% male and 47.9% female patients. Average duration of the episode was about a month. Majority of patients (male were in the group of disorganized (hebephrenic schizophrenia. The duration of current psychotic episode was similar in all three groups regarding subtypes of schizophrenia. Psychotic episodes appear equally in both gender (higher in disorganized group with a statistically significant difference between all groups (p<0.001.Conclusions: Male group patients showed tendency to be younger than women. Most of the schizophrenic individuals start to suffer from this disease between age of 20 and 39 years. Male group patients suffered mostly of disorganized (hebephrenic type of schizophrenia. Duration of psychotic episode was proportionally the same in both groups while in male group the highest number of episodes was found in group of disorganized schizophrenia.

  17. Clinical manifestation and laboratory findings in positive blood culture in neonatal septicemia

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    Gholamreza Khademi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/objective: Neonatal septicemia is one of the major causes of mortality in newborns. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical manifestations and laboratory findings in positive blood culture in neonatal septicemia. Methods: In this retrospective study, we allocated 100 records positive blood culture of neonates suffering from septicemia. A questionnaire was completed for each patient consisting the age at admission, gender, weight at birth, admission time, type of delivery, pre- or post-term delivery and the clinical symptoms. Types of organism causing sepsis, and their resistance to antibiotics were evaluated and method for empirical treatment was recommended. Results: Respiratory distress, cyanosis and lethargy were more common in the patients. The antibiogram showed Ampicillin resistance in 86% and Gentamycin resistance in 66% of studied records. Also, 36% cases of positive blood culture with gram-negative and 64% with gram-positive bacteria were observed. The most common bacteria in blood cultures were negative-coagulase Staphylococcus (%35, Staphylococcus Aureus (%24, Klebsiella (%18, respectively. Other bacteria were Enterobacter, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus (%5, Acinetobacter (%3, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Negative-Gram Bacilli (%2 and Ceratia (%1. The most common effective antibiotics against bacterial growth in Antibiograms were Vancomycin, Cephalosporin, Amikacin, Co-trimoxazole and Gentamycin. Conclusion: Since the most common bacteria in neonatal septicemia cases were negative-coagulase Staphylococcus, Staphylococcus Aureus, Klebsiella, the pediatricians must select the regiments that cover gram-negative bacteria for empirical antibiotic treatments.

  18. CD57 Expression in Incidental, Clinically Manifest, and Metastatic Carcinoma of the Prostate

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    Holger Wangerin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. CD57 is normally found on NK-cells, but little is known about its expression in prostatic tissue. Methods. We investigated CD57 expression by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays containing 3262 prostate cancers (PCa, lymph node metastases, and benign prostatic tissue. The results were compared with clinical and pathological parameters. Results. Overall, 87% of PCa showed a moderate or strong expression of CD57. There was no significant difference to corresponding benign prostatic tissue. CD57 was increasingly lost from incidental over clinically manifest cancers to metastases. It correlated significantly with Gleason grade and pT-category, but not with PSA tissue expression. Loss of CD57 expression was an independent risk factor for PSA recurrence after prostatectomy in a multivariate Cox regression analysis. In standard sections, CD57 expression was heterogeneous, especially in large, high-grade PCa. Conclusions. There is a peculiar expression of CD57 in PCa and benign prostatic tissue. CD57 loss is associated with tumor dedifferentiation and tumor size. However, the use of this marker for prognostic purposes is hampered by its heterogeneous expression.

  19. From Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestation, and Diagnosis to Treatment: An Overview on Autoimmune Pancreatitis

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    Ou Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a special type of chronic pancreatitis which is autoimmune mediated. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC 2011 proposed two types of AIP: type I is associated with histological pattern of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP, characterized by serum IgG4 elevation, whereas type 2 is named idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP, with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL and immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4 negative. The pathogenic mechanism is unclear now; based on genetic factors, disease specific or related antigens, innate and adaptive immunity may be involved. The most common clinical manifestations of AIP are obstructive jaundice and upper abdominal pain. The diagnosis can be made by a combination of parenchymal and ductal imaging, serum IgG4 concentrations, pancreatic histology, extrapancreatic disease, and glucocorticoid responsiveness according to ICDC 2011. Because of the clinical and imaging similarities with pancreatic cancer, general work-up should be done carefully to exclude pancreatic malignant tumor before empirical trial of glucocorticoid treatment. Glucocorticoid is the most common drug for AIP to induce remission, while there still exists controversy on steroid maintenance and treatment for relapse. Further studies should be done to identify more specific serum biomarkers for AIP, the pathogenic mechanisms, and the treatment for relapse.

  20. The Clinical Manifestation and Genetic Evaluation in Patients with 45,X/46,XY Mosaicism.

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    Wu, Qinghua; Wang, Cong; Shi, Huirong; Kong, Xiangdong; Ren, Shumin; Jiang, Miao

    2017-02-18

    45,X/46,XY mosaicism is a rare chromosomal abnormality and probably underdiagnosed. Although clinical and genetic analyses have been performed in some disorders of sexual development, there have been few studies focusing on the phenotype and genetic details of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, especially in the Chinese population. The aim of this study was to describe the experience of our service in relation to 16 cases with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. The age at the first evaluation of the patients ranged from 43 days to 30 years. Eight patients were reared as female and 8 as male. The main reasons for examination were primary amenorrhea, sterility, or ambiguous genitalia. Short stature was more common in female than in male patients. Two patients accepted gonadectomy due to tumor risk and none presented gonadal malignancy. The SRY gene was amplified positively in all of the patients. AZF gene microdeletions were present in 6 of 8 male patients, and all adult male patients had no sperm. No correlation has been found between clinical manifestations and the proportion of mosaic cells in peripheral blood. Our observations may permit a better management of people with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism.

  1. Cutaneous manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome: a review of the clinical features, diagnosis and management.

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    Pinto-Almeida, Teresa; Caetano, Mónica; Sanches, Madalena; Selores, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is a relatively recent systemic autoimmune disorder defined by thrombotic events and/or obstetric complications in the presence of persistent elevated antiphospholipid antibodies. It\\'s characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and virtually any organ system or tissue may be affected by the consequences of vascular occlusion. Diagnosis is sometimes difficult and although classification criteria have been published and revised there remain ongoing issues regarding nomenclature, expanding clinical features, laboratory tests and management and much still has to be done. Cutaneous manifestations are common and frequently the first sign of the disease. Although extremely diverse it\\'s important to know which dermatological findings should prompt consideration of antiphospholipid syndrome and the appropriate management for those patients. Much has been debated about when to consider antiphospholipid syndrome and consensus still does not exist, however in spite of being a diagnostic challenge clinicians should know when to look for antiphospholipid antibodies since an early diagnosis is important to prevent further and serious complications. In this article we focus on the cutaneous features that should raise suspicion on the presence of antiphospholipid syndrome and on the complex management of such patients. Many other dermatological signs related to this syndrome have been described in the literature but only occasionally and without consistency or statistic impact and therefore will not be considered here.

  2. [Acute encephalitis. Neuropsychiatric manifestations as expression of influenza virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Flagge, Noris; Bayard, Vicente; Quirós, Evelia; Alonso, Tomás

    2009-01-01

    The aim is to review the encephalitis in infants and adolescents as well as its etiology, clinical manifestation, epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnostic methods and treatment, and the neuropsyquiatric signs appearing an influenza epidemy. Encephalitis is an inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS) which involves the brain. The clinical manifestations usually are: headache, fever and confusional stage. It could also be manifested as seizures, personality changes, or psiqyiatric symptoms. The clinical manifestations are related to the virus and the cell type affected in the brain. A meningitis or encephalopathy need to be ruled out. It could be present as an epidemic or isolated form, beeing this the most frequent form. It could be produced by a great variety of infections agents including virus, bacterias, fungal and parasitic. Viral causes are herpesvirus, arbovirus, rabies and enterovirus. Bacterias such as Borrelia burgdorferi, Rickettsia and Mycoplasma neumoniae. Some fungal causes are: Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum. More than 100 agents are related to encephalitis. The diagnosis of encephalitis is a challenge for the clinician and its infectious etiology is clear in only 40 to 70% of all cases. The diagnosis of encephalitis can be established with absolute certainty only by the microscopic examination of brain tissue. Epidemiology is related to age of the patients, geographic area, season, weather or the host immune system. Early intervention can reduce the mortality rate and sequels. We describe four patients with encephalitis and neuropsychiatric symptoms during an influenza epidemic.

  3. Multiple Embolism in a Female Patient with Infective Endocarditis: Low Back Pain and Hematuria as the Initial Clinical Manifestations

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    Vieira Marcelo Luiz Campos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old female patient with mitral valve prolapse and a previous history of lumbosacral spondyloarthrosis and lumbar disk hernia had an episode of infective endocarditis due to Streptococcus viridans, which evolved with peripheral embolism to the left kidney, spleen, and left iliac artery, and intraventricular cerebral hemorrhage. Her clinical manifestations were low back pain and hematuria, which were initially attributed to an osteoarticular condition. Infective endocarditis is a severe polymorphic disease with multiple clinical manifestations and it should always be included in the differential diagnosis by clinicians.

  4. Factor V leiden mutation in Behcet’s disease and the relationship with clinical manifestations

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    Mowla K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Behcet's disease (BD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease with unknown origin characterized by recurrent oral aphtous ulcers, genital, ocular and skin lesions. A single point mutation 1691G to A in the factor V gene increases the risk of venous thrombosis. This study designed to determine factor V Leiden mutation in Behcet's disease, and to find out it's relationship with the clinical manifestations in Khuzestan province, Iran. "n"nMethods: One hundred patients with Behcet's Disease (44 males and 56 females based on international diagnostic criteria and 70 healthy subjects were included in the study. Patients and controls were tested for the presence of factor V Leiden mutation using polymerase chain reaction method."n"nResults: The prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation was significantly higher in BD (10 out of 100, 10% compared with healthy control subjects (1 out of 70, 1.4%, (p=0.025. Vascular lesions in this study were deep vein thrombosis (DVT (7%, subcutaneous thrombophlebitis (5%, stroke (1% and retinal vasculitis (39%. It was found that there was no association between venous thrombosis and the factor V Leiden mutation in Khuzestanian patients. Also, no association between

  5. Acute gouty arthritis and rapidly progressive renal failure as manifestation of multiple myeloma: clinical case description

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    O.V. Gudym

    2017-09-01

    study of the bone marrow completely confirmed the diagnosis of multiple myeloma. The presented clinical case is interesting because multiple myeloma clinically debuted with acute gouty arthritis, eclipsing the clinical manifestations of kidney damage and other symptoms.

  6. Evaluation of clinical manifestations and laboratory findings of primary hyperparathyroidism in Imam Hospital (1988-1998

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    Alam Salimi M

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical manifestations of primary hyper-para-thyroidism (pHPT had been dramatically changed during last 25 years. Evaluation of changes in clinical findings was the aim of this study. Materials and methods: In a retrospective, descriptive case series, patients' records of all 47 pHPT (44 females, 3 males from 1988 till 1998 were studied. Patients’ clinical presentations, signs and symptoms, laboratory and radiologic findings were reviewed and the results were compared with 34 patients' studied during 1978-1987. Serum Ca>10.5 mg/dl with increased or high normal PTH were the diagnostic criteria of pHPT. Results: Patients’ age range was 11-70 and mean ±SD was 38±16 years, with a female to male ratio of 14:1. 57 percent of the patients had bone pain and muscle weakness, 12 percent were asymptomatic, 10 percent had pathologic fractures, 8 percent had renal stones, 8 percent had symptoms of hypercalcemia, and 2 percent had giant cell lesion. The mean±SD of serum calcium was 11.48±1.16 mg/dl, phosphorus was 2.4±0.6 mg/dl and 24-h urinary Ca was 294±197 mg. Serum PTH was increased from 1.5 to 500 folds. The frequency of single adenoma in right inferior, left inferior, and left superior gland were 43 percent, 30 percent, and 13 percent respectively. Conclusion: In the study 12 percent of patients were asymptomatic whereas there was no asymptomatic case in the previous study. Prevalence of severe bone disease and the interval between onset of symptoms and diagnosis was also reduced. According to this study detection of pHPT in asymptomatic phase remarkably increased.

  7. Nipple eczema, an indicative manifestation of atopic dermatitis? A clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical study.

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    Song, Hyo Sang; Jung, Soo-Eun; Kim, You Chan; Lee, Eun-So

    2015-04-01

    Nipple eczema exhibits as a minor manifestation of atopic dermatitis (AD) or occurs as a single skin symptom on the nipple. To characterize the relationship between nipple eczema and AD, a clinical evaluation and an immunohistochemical study were performed. All cases of nipple eczema were confirmed histopathologically. We divided the patients with nipple eczema into 2 groups, namely, those with AD and those without AD, and compared several clinical features. Upon histological examination, the degree of inflammation was subjectively graded as mild, moderate, or severe by 2 separate investigators. Immunohistochemical stainings were performed by using antiinterleukin (IL)-4, anti-IL-13, anti-CD4, and anti-CD8 antibodies, and the results were scored semiquantitatively. In 43 cases evaluated, 12 were nipple eczema with AD. The clinical analysis and histological examination showed no significant differences between the groups. There were consistent findings of IL-4 expressions throughout the epidermis and IL-13 expression mainly in the perivascular area of the dermis. Although CD4 and CD8 were expressed in the cells in the dermis, CD8 expression was detected in the serocrusts of the epidermis. Expression levels of IL-4, IL-13, CD4, and CD8 exhibited no significant differences between the nipple eczema group with AD and the nipple eczema group without AD. Although nipple eczema may accompany AD, we found no definite differences in the degree or pattern of inflammation and cytokine expression level regardless of whether AD was present or not. Serocrust formation seemed to be mainly a collection of CD8-positive cells.

  8. Pulmonary embolism in intensive care unit: Predictive factors, clinical manifestations and outcome

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    Bahloul Mabrouk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine predictive factors, clinical and demographics characteristics of patients with pulmonary embolism (PE in ICU, and to identify factors associated with poor outcome in the hospital and in the ICU. Methods : During a four-year prospective study, a medical committee of six ICU physicians prospectively examined all available data for each patient in order to classify patients according to the level of clinical suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism. During the study periods, all patients admitted to our ICU were classified into four groups. The first group includes all patients with confirmed PE; the second group includes some patients without clinical manifestations of PE; the third group includes patients with suspected and not confirmed PE and the fourth group includes all patients with only deep vein thromboses (DVTs without suspicion of PE. The diagnosis of PE was confirmed either by a high-probability ventilation/perfusion (V/Q scan or by a spiral computed tomography (CT scan showing one or more filling defects in the pulmonary artery or in its branches. The diagnosis was also confirmed by echocardiography when a thrombus in the pulmonary artery was observed. Results : During the study periods, 4408 patients were admitted in our ICU. The diagnosis of PE was confirmed in 87 patients (1.9%. The mean delay of development of PE was 7.8 ± 9.5 days. On the day of PE diagnosis, clinical examination showed that 50 patients (57.5% were hypotensive, 63 (72.4% have SIRS, 15 (17.2% have clinical manifestations of DVT and 71 (81.6% have respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation. In our study, intravenous unfractionated heparin was used in 81 cases (93.1% and low molecular weight heparins were used in 4 cases (4.6%. The mean ICU stay was 20.2 ± 25.3 days and the mean hospital stay was 25.5 ± 25 days. The mortality rate in ICU was 47.1% and the in-hospital mortality rate was 52.9%. Multivariate analysis showed that

  9. Correlation between extraintestinal manifestations and clinical parameters with the histologic activity index in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

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    Štulić Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC are chronic, idiopathic, inflammatory diseases of the digestive tract. The aim of this study was to determine a possible correlation between the clinical parameters of the disease activity degree and the presence of extraintestinal manifestations with disease activity histopathological degree, in patients presented with CD and UC. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 134 patients (67 with CD and UC, respectively treated at the Clinic of Gastroenterology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade. After clinical, laboratory, endoscopic, histopathologic and radiologic diagnostics, the patients were divided into two groups according to their histopathological activity. The group I comprised 79 patients whose values of five-grade histopathological activity were less than 5 (45 with CD and 34 with UC, while the group II consisted of 55 patients with the values higher than 5 (22 with CD and 33 with UC. The CD activity index (CDAI and Truelove and Witts' scale of UC were used for clinical evaluation of the disease activity. Results. CD extraintestinal manifestations were present in 28.9% and 63.6% of the patients in the groups I and II, respectively (p 0.05. Conclusion. In the patients presented with CD, the extraintestinal manifestations with higher CDAI suggested a higher degree of histopathological activity. On the contrary, in the UC patients, Truelove and Witts' scale and extraintestinal manifestations were not valid predictors of the disease histopathological activity.

  10. [Physiopathological mechanisms in tinnitus generation and persistence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, C

    2005-10-01

    Progress in neuroscience research has given birth to new theories for tinnitus generation. From a point of view where cochlear dysfunctions would be considered as the origin and maintenance mechanisms, it has been introduced the important role of compensation systems from the central auditory pathways. They could act as the most relevant factor for chronic persistent tinnitus after a peripheral aggression. Unmasking of silent synapses or sprouting of new ones activate cortical reorganization for frecuencial areas nearby the non-stimulated ones through brain plasticity. Connections to associative cortex and limbic-amigdala area using the non-classical auditory system explain the presence of hyperacusis, anxiety or depression, factors that increase the severity of tinnitus. Implementation of these physiopathological theories reinforces the tinnitus neurophysiological model. The development of an aversive response through the survival reflex and the participation of negative emotional response are the responsible for signal persistence and vegetative reactions from the autonomous nervous system. Implications of this knowledge for tinnitus treatment involve the central auditory system approach through the combination of medical counselling for reduction of the aversive reaction and sound therapy to diminish its perception.

  11. [Megacolon and sigmoid volvulus: incidence and physiopathology].

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    Saravia Burgos, Jaime; Acosta Canedo, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of Megacolon is multiple. One of these causes and the most frequent is Chagas disease. Its complication: sigmoid volvulus was de main diagnosis in the admitted patients at the Bolivian and Japanese Gastroenterological Institute of Cochabamba Bolivia. It usually affects people of a low economic income. In this Gastroenterological Hospital a transversal and prospective study has been done, in order to know the real incidence and the physiopathology of this disease. In a six year period, from 2000 to 2006, 8.954 patients were admitted to the Hospital: of these, 814 (9.09%), where diagnosticated as lower intestinal obstruction. In 608 (74.7%) the final diagnosis was sigmoid torsion. Radiological diagnosis was made in 84% of the patients and endoscopic decompression was successful in 88.7%. As reported in the medical literature, the main cause of megacolon in this part of the world is Chagas disease. In our investigation 22% (98 patients), were serology positive to Chagas disease, and another 21.44% (95 patients) were serology negative. They were coca leaf chewers. One of coca leaf compounds is cocaine which blocks the adrenaline and noradrenaline degradation by mean of monoamine oxidase inactivation. These two hormones stay a long term of time in the target organ: the large bowel. By this mean chronic and persistent vessel constriction develops intestinal wall atrophy and lower resistance to the intraintestinal pressure.

  12. Re-Emergence of Zika Virus: A Review on Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaib, Waqas; Stanazai, Hashim; Abazid, Ahmad G; Mattar, Ahmed A

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus (ZKV) is an arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family, which includes West Nile, dengue fever, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis virus. It is transmitted by the Aedes genus of mosquitoes. Before 2015, ZKV outbreaks occurred in areas of Africa, the Pacific Islands, and Southeast Asia. The current large outbreak, which began in Brazil, has also emerged throughout a large part of South/Central America, a number of islands in the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Mexico. A sudden rise in the numbers of infants reported born with microcephaly in Brazil, and the detection of the single-stranded positive RNA virus in the amniotic fluid of affected newborns, has captured medical, mainstream media, and global political attention, causing considerable concern in a post-Ebola global community considerably more focused on the threat of internationally transmissible diseases. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of ZKV for clinicians, with the emphasis on pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment/preventive measures.

  13. Clinical Manifestations Vary with Different Age Spectrums in Infants with Kawasaki Disease

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    Hao-Chuan Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Kawasaki disease (KD is an acute systemic vasculitis with unknown etiology. The diagnosis of KD depends on clinical manifestations. The prevalence of coronary artery abnormality (CAA is 11.0% and results in cardiac sequelae, such as myocardial infarction or coronary aneurysm, which are the most serious complications in KD. Methods. We divided KD's children into different age groups: ≤6 months old, 7 months to 1 year old, and >1 year old, respectively. Different parameters were compared in each group. Results. Infants ≤6 months old are less likely to fulfill KD's major diagnostic criteria within 10 days, are prone to develop incomplete KD with the lowest cholesterol level, and have the greatest chance to have CAA and the laboratory features associated with CAA, such as the longest time needed to confirm CA diagnosis, lower hemoglobin level, lower albumin level, and higher platelet count. Infants <1 year old develop higher percentage of leukocytosis and sterile pyuria. But this group has fewer patients with neck lymphadenopathy.

  14. A case of symptomatic cervical perineural (Tarlov) cyst: clinical manifestation and management.

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    Kim, Keewon; Chun, Se Woong; Chung, Sun G

    2012-01-01

    Perineural (Tarlov) cysts are most often found in the sacral region and are rare in the cervical spine. Although they are usually asymptomatic, a small number of those at the lumbosacral level have been known to produce localized or radicular pain. Few reports are available on symptomatic perineural cysts in the cervical spine and it has not been discussed how they should be managed. We present here a case of cervical perineural cysts with persistent radicular pain where the pain was adequately managed with repetitive transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI). The patient had experienced intractable pain in the posterior neck and left upper extremity for more than 7 years. The nature of the pain was cramping and a tingling sensation, which was aggravated in the supine position. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a perineural cyst in the neural foramen of left C7 root. The patient underwent three repetitive TFESIs targeted at the root. Each injection provided incremental relief, which lasted more than 6 months. Follow-up image revealed shrinkage of the cyst. This case illustrates in detail the clinical manifestation of a rare symptomatic perineural cyst in the cervical region and to our knowledge is the first to report the beneficial effect of repetitive TFESI.

  15. Portal hypertension: an uncommon clinical manifestation of Takayasu arteritis in a 9-year-old child

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    Herrera, Cristina N; Tomala-Haz, Javier E

    2016-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is the third most common childhood vasculitis and its clinical manifestations depend on the arteries involved. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with multiple aneurysms in carotid and iliac arteries, subclavian and coronary arteries, and abdominal aorta. At the age of 7 years, he presented with recurrent fever and hepatosplenomegaly. An angio-computed tomography scan showed aneurysms in the left subclavian artery, abdominal aorta, and both proximal iliac arteries. He was diagnosed with TA and was treated with corticosteroids, aspirin, and enalapril. One year later, he was admitted to Dr Roberto Gilbert Children’s Hospital because of intracranial hemorrhage. Angiography revealed enlargement of aneurysms enlargement and new aneurysms. He also developed portal hypertension. Treatment with intravenous corticosteroids, azathioprine, and monthly intravenous cyclophosphamide was begun. After 6 months of no improvement, infliximab was begun. The aim of this article was to report the concurrence of coronary involvement and portal vein hypertension in pediatric TA because there were scarce reports on this matter. PMID:27895519

  16. Clinical manifestations and dental management of dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukabbos, Halima; Al-Sineedi, Faisal

    2013-10-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) associated with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that affects the connective tissues and results in dentine dysplasia. This case report discusses the systemic and dental manifestations of OI and DI in a 4-year-old child, with moderate presentation of both disorders, who was treated at King Fahd Military Medical Complex in Dhahran. Dental treatment included the use of strip and stainless-steel crowns under local anesthesia, as well as behavior modification techniques. Rigorous home care instructions, including reinforcement of the oral hygiene practice and avoidance of any episode that may lead to bone fracture, were discussed with the parents. The case was reevaluated at 3-month follow-up visits, wherein the medical and dental histories were updated, the child's growth was monitored, periodic clinical and radiographic examinations were performed, and the oral hygiene was evaluated via the debris index score and caries risk assessment. Further treatment of the permanent dentition may be needed in the future.

  17. Influence of weight loss on the clinical manifestations of osteoarthritis of the knee-joints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Vladimirovna Solov'eva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity consistently associated with the development of a number of chronic diseases, leading to a decrease in quality of life, disability and death. The article examines the connection between obesity and disease of the musculoskeletal system, describes the mechanisms by means of which obesity leads to the development of osteoarthritis. It is evident that reduction of body mass can slow the progression of osteoporosis. The own experience of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of obesity with the use of orlistat in 50 obese patients with osteoarthritis of the knee II–III stage is presented. Treatment has resulted in a decrease in body weight, waist circumference, accompanied by a decrease in symptoms osteoarthritis among all the patients. Our results showed that the addition of orlistat to standard osteoarthritis scheme leads to significant reduction in weight and reduction of clinical manifestations of osteoarthritis. According to the above, the drugs that have impact on weight loss, should be included in the treatment regimen of patients with osteoarthritis and obesity.

  18. Food-borne trematodiases in Southeast Asia epidemiology, pathology, clinical manifestation and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripa, Banchob; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Intapan, Pewpan M; Maleewong, Wanchai; Brindley, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    The food-borne trematodiases are an important group of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Over 40 million people are infected with food-borne trematodes and 750 million (>10% of the world's population) are at risk of these NTDs. Here, we review the life cycles, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, pathology and pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention and control of the major food-borne trematodiases in Southeast Asia. We focus particularly on opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini and clonorchiasis caused by Clonorchis sinensis, which people contract by ingestion of metacercariae in flesh of raw or undercooked freshwater fishes, on fascioliasis caused by Fasciola species, where infection arises from ingestion of metacercariae on water plants such as watercress, and on Paragonimus species, the lung flukes, which use freshwater crabs and other crustaceans as intermediate hosts. We also include information on the intestinal flukes Fasciolopsis buski, the echinostomes and the so-called 'minute intestinal flukes' of the family Heterophyidae. Ecological information, placing emphasis on reservoir hosts, intermediate snail hosts and secondary hosts where applicable, is also reviewed and research needs are highlighted.

  19. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions:a review on epidemiology,etiology,clinical manifestation and pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomy Martin; LI Hui

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To review the current progress in epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestation, and pathophysiology of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions(SCADRs). Data sources Data were acquired by using Blackwell-Synergy, PubMed, original articles published in the main Chinese journals and related medical textbooks materials. Study-selection and date extraction Throughout the literature review 49 articles were selected. Results SCADRs cases are rare, however, the implication is life threatening with significant mortatity rates. Epidemiology studies have shown various incidences from different regions, gender, age, race and concurrent illness. There are typical signs and symptoms for each type of SCADRs, but this is not always so. Drugs associated with inducing SCADRs are anticonvulsants, antibiotics, NSAIDs and antirheumatic drugs. In some countries, especially in Asia, traditional drugs are offen the cause of SCADRs. Genetic polymorphisms and viral infections are predisposition factors of SCADRs. Patients with certain genetic alleles and underlying diseases are vulnerable to SCADRs. The exact pathogenesis of SCADRs is not well defined. Nonetheless, recent study showed that reactive metabolites and immunological processes have a significant role in SCADRs. Conclusions The different SCADRs reactions are attributed by different intrinsic factors, such as genetic polymorphisms, gender, age and race as well as extrinsic factors, such as underlying diseases. Different regions and culprit drugs also play a role in the various types of SCADRs.

  20. Drug-resistant parietal lobe epilepsy: clinical manifestations and surgery outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Marjan; Sperling, Michael R; Rabiei, Amin H; Asadi-Pooya, Ali A

    2017-03-01

    We reviewed a large surgical cohort to investigate the clinical manifestations, EEG and neuroimaging findings, and postoperative seizure outcome in patients with drug-resistant parietal lobe epilepsy (PLE). All drug-resistant PLE patients, who were investigated for epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center between 1986 and 2015, were identified. Demographic data, seizure data, EEG recordings, brain MRI, pathological findings, and postsurgical seizure outcome were reviewed. In total, 18 patients (11 males and seven females) were identified. Sixteen patients (88%) had tonic-clonic seizures, 12 (66%) had focal seizures with impaired awareness, and 13 (72%) described auras. Among 15 patients who had brain MRI, 14 patients (93%) had parietal lobe lesions. Only three of 15 patients (20%) who had interictal scalp EEG recordings showed parietal interictal spikes. Of 12 patients with available ictal surface EEG recordings, only three patients (25%) had parietal ictal EEG onset. After a mean follow-up duration of 8.6 years, 14 patients (77.7%) showed a favourable postoperative seizure outcome. In patients with PLE, semiology and EEG may be misleading and brain MRI is the most valuable tool to localize the epileptogenic zone. Postsurgical seizure outcome was favourable in our patients with drug-resistant parietal lobe epilepsy.

  1. Mucormycosis and entomophthoramycosis: a review of the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, R M; Patel, R

    2004-03-01

    The class Zygomycetes is divided into two orders, Mucorales and Entomophthorales. These two orders produce dramatically different infections. Genera from the order Mucorales (Rhizopus, Mucor, Rhizomucor, Absidia, Apophysomyces, Cunninghamella and Saksenaea) cause an angioinvasive infection called mucormycosis. Mucormycosis presents with rhino-orbito-cerebral, pulmonary, disseminated, cutaneous, or gastrointestinal involvement. Immunocompromising states such as haematological malignancy, bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, neutropenia, solid organ transplantation, diabetes mellitus with or without ketoacidosis, corticosteroids, and deferoxamine therapy for iron overload predispose patients to infection. Mucormycosis in immunocompetent hosts is rare, and is often related to trauma. Mortality rates can approach 100% depending on the patient's underlying disease and form of mucormycosis. Early diagnosis, along with treatment of the underlying medical condition, surgery, and an amphotericin B product are needed for a successful outcome. Genera from the order Entomophthorales produce a chronic subcutaneous infection called entomophthoramycosis in immunocompetent patients. This infection occurs in tropical and subtropical climates. The genus Basidiobolus typically produces a chronic subcutaneous infection of the thigh, buttock, and/or trunk. Rarely, it has been reported to involve the gastrointestinal tract. The genus Conidiobolus causes a chronic infection of the nasal submucosa and subcutaneous tissue of the nose and face. This paper will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of mucormycosis and entomophthoramycosis.

  2. Clinical manifestations and prognostic factors in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shee-Chan Lin; Ming-Jer Huang; Chen-Yuan Zeng; Tzang-In Wang; Zen-Liang Liu; Ray-Kuan Shiay

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence of CD117-positive immunohistochemical staining in previously diagnosed gastrointestinal (GI) tract stromal tumors (GTST) and to analyze the tumors' clinical manifestations and prognostic factors.METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with a previous diagnosis of GI stromal tumor, leiomyoma, or leiomyosarcoma. Tissue samples were assessed with CD117, CD34, SMA and S100 immunohistochemical staining. Clinical and pathological characteristics were analyzed for prognostic factors.RESULTS: CD117 was positive in 81 (89 %) of 91 tissue samples. There were 59 cases (72.8 %) positive for CD34,13 (16 %) positive for SMA, and 12 (14.8 %) positive for S100. There was no gender difference in patients with CD117-positive GIST. Their mean age was 65 years. There were 44 (54 %) tumors located in the stomach and 29 (36 %)in the small intestine. The most frequent presenting symptoms were abdominal pain and GI bleeding. The mean tumor size was 7.5±5.7 cm. There were 35 cases (43.2 %)with tumors >5 cm. The tumor size correlated significantly with tumor mitotic count and resectability. Tumor size, mitotic count, and resectability correlated significantly with tumor recurrence and survival. There was recurrent disease in 39 % of our patients, and their mean survival after recurrence was 16.6 months. Most recurrences were at the primary site or metastatic to the liver. Twenty-six percent of our patients died of their disease.CONCLUSION: Traditional histologic criteria are not specific enough to diagnose GIST. This diagnosis must be confirmed with CD117 immunohistochemical staining. Prognosis is dependent on tumor size, mitotic count, and resectability.

  3. The Relation between Diverse Phenotypes of PCOS with Clinical Manifestations, Anthropometric Indices and Metabolic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrami, Seyedeh Hajar; Abbasi Ranjbar, Zahra; Milani, Forozan; Kezem-Nejad, Ehsan; Hassanzadeh Rad, Afagh; Dalil Heirat, Seyedeh Fatemeh

    2016-02-01

    Critical issue regarding to variation of findings based on different phenotypes led investigators to define whether they are distinct features or overlapping ones. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association between diverse phenotypes of PCOS (Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome) with clinical manifestations, anthropometric indices, and metabolic characteristics. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in 15-39 years old women with PCOS referred to infertility clinics in the north part of Iran, Rasht during 2010-2011. Data were gathered through an interview by a form consisted of demographic characteristics, laboratory findings, ovarian volume and anthropometric indices. A total of 214 patients consisted of 161 PCOS (cases) and 53 normal women (controls) participated in this study. The most prevalent phenotype in PCOS population was IM/PCO/HA (54%), followed by IM/HA (28%) and IM/PCO (13%). PCO/HA was present only in 6 PCOS patients (5%). PCOS patients were significantly younger than controls (P=0.07). Results showed that increased ovarian volume were higher in PCOS group in comparison with controls and IM/PCO/HA, and IM/PCO had respectively the largest ovarian volumes. Also, a significant relation was observed based on Cholesterol, 17OHP, LH, TG, 2hpp, and LH/FSH between patients with PCOS and control groups. There were significant differences in demographic, anthropometric, hormonal and ultrasound findings between PCOS and controls. Therefore, it seems that classification of the characteristics of each phenotype could offer an appropriate guide for screening risks of PCOS and may facilitate performing most favorable treatment for these complications.

  4. Clinical and neuroradiological manifestations of reversible splenial lesion syndrome: a report of 13 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li WANG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To summarize the clinical and MRI imaging features, treatment and prognosis of reversible splenial lesion syndrome (RESLES. Methods  The clinical manifestation and MRI imaging appearances of 13 RESLES patients were retrospectively evaluated and the pertinent literatures of RESLES were reviewed. Results  Of the 13 cases (11 males and 2 female, aged from 13 to 58 years, 1 was complicated with spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome, 1 with epidemic hemorrhagic fever, 1 with antiepileptic drug withdraw, 1 with pituitary crisis combining Sjogren syndrome, 1 with still disease, and 8 cases were complicated with viral encephalitis (meningoencephalitis. The first MRI imaging was performed from 2 to 39 days after onset. All the lesions were measured about 1-2cm, located in the central area and involved no other part of corpus callosum. They were characterized by high signal intensity on FLAIR and T2 sequences, with mild signal reduction on T1 sequence, and hyperintensity on DWI with low apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values. The lesions formed as ovoid and boomerang. Following intravenous injection of contrast medium in 3 cases, no enhancement was found in the splenial lesions. All the patients completely recovered or obviously improved after appropriate treatments. The splenial lesions disappeared or obviously weakened on the follow-up MRI imaging, ranging from 6 to 30 days after first MRI imaging. Conclusions  RESLES is characterized by the MRI finding as a reversible lesion with transiently reduced diffusion in the splenium of corpus callosum. Symptoms of RESLES are various, the outcome is favorable in most cases, and the etiology and pathogenesis of RESLES are still unclear. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.10.09

  5. Amyopathic Dermatomyositis: A Concise Review of Clinical Manifestations and Associated Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udkoff, Jeremy; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-10-01

    Amyopathic dermatomyositis is a rare, idiopathic, connective tissue disease that presents with dermatologic lesions of classic dermatomyositis but lacks the myopathy of this disease. Cutaneous manifestations may include Gottron's sign, heliotrope rash, and characteristic patterns of poikiloderma. There is a substantial risk for developing interstitial lung disease or malignancy in patients with amyopathic dermatomyositis. A literature review of amyopathic dermatomyositis was performed using the PubMed medical database. The key features of amyopathic dermatomyositis, including autoantibodies, clinical presentation and dermatologic manifestations, epidemiology, history, associated malignancies, management, and pathogenesis, are summarized in this review. Cancer (solid tumor) (73/79, 89 %) and hematologic malignancies (9/79, 11 %) were reported in 79 patients, with three patients having more than one malignancy. In addition, there were six patients with amyopathic dermatomyositis who had tumor of unknown primary, and eight patients with cancer-associated amyopathic dermatomyositis for whom no additional details were provided. From the group of 73 tumors for whom primary origin and sex were available, malignancy of the genitourinary organs (24/73, 33 %), aerorespiratory organs (15/73, 21 %), and breast (14/73, 19 %) were the most commonly observed solid organ tumors. Tumors of the genitourinary organs (15/48, 31 %) and breast (14/48, 29 %) were the most frequent neoplasms in women, accounting for 29 of 48 (60 %) cancers, with the most common sites being breast (14/48, 29 %), ovary (8/48, 17 %), and cervix or uterus (5/48, 10 %). In men, tumors of the aerorespiratory (9/25, 36 %) and genitourinary (9/25, 36 %) tracts were the most common neoplasms, accounting for 72 % (18/25) of cancers; the most common sites of primary malignancy were nasopharyngeal (6/25, 24 %), bladder (4/25, 16 %), and either colorectal, lung or prostate cancer (three cancers each

  6. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of unusual manifestations of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Adrian; Pérez-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa; Nodar, Andrés; Martínez-Lamas, Lucía; Vasallo, Francisco Jose; Álvarez-Fernández, Maximiliano; Crespo, Manuel

    2017-06-22

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) typically presents as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia. However, Streptococcus pneumoniae can produce infection at any level of the body (endocarditis, arthritis, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, etc.), which is also known as unusual IPD (uIPD). There are very limited data available about the clinical and microbiological profile of these uncommon manifestations of pneumococcal disease. Our aim was to analyse clinical forms, microbiological profile, epidemiology and prognosis of a cohort of patients with unusual invasive pneumococcal disease (uIPD). We present a retrospective study of 389 patients (all adult and paediatric patients diagnosed during the period) diagnosed with IPD at our hospital (Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo) between 1992 and 2014. We performed an analysis of clinical, microbiological and demographical characteristics of patients comparing the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) period with the post-vaccination phase. IPD and uIPD were defined as follows; IPD: infection confirmed by the isolation of S. pneumoniae from a normally sterile site, which classically presented as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia; uIPD: any case of IPD excluding pneumonia, meningitis, otitis media, rhinosinusitis or primary bacteraemia. A total of 22 patients (6%) met the criteria of uIPD. A Charlson index >2 was more prevalent in uIPD patients than IPD patients (45% vs 24%; p=0.08). The most common clinical presentation of uIPD was osteoarticular infection (8 patients, 36%), followed by gastrointestinal disease (4 patients, 18%). Infection with serotypes included in PCV-13 was significantly higher in IPD patients (65%) than in patients with uIPD, 35% (p=0.018). Conversely, infection with multidrug-resistant strains was higher among patient with uIPD (27% vs 9%; p=0.014). The all-cause mortality rate was 15%, 13% in the IPD group and 32% among patients with uIPD (p=0

  7. The plethora, clinical manifestations and treatment options of autoimmunity in patients with primary immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barış, Hatice Ezgi; Kıykım, Ayça; Nain, Ercan; Özen, Ahmet Oğuzhan; Karakoç-Aydıner, Elif; Barış, Safa

    2016-01-01

    Aim Although the association between primary immunodeficiency and autoimmunity is already well-known, it has once again become a topic of debate with the discovery of newly-defined immunodeficiencies. Thus, investigation of the mechanisms of development of autoimmunity in primary immunodefficiency and new target-specific therapeutic options has come to the fore. In this study, we aimed to examine the clinical findings of autoimmunity, autoimmunity varieties, and treatment responses in patients who were genetically diagnosed as having primary immunodeficiency. Material and Methods The files of patients with primary immunodeficiency who had clinical findings of autoimmunity, who were diagnosed genetically, and followed up in our clinic were investigated. The demographic and clinical features of the patients and their medical treatments were evaluated. Results Findings of autoimmunity were found in 30 patients whose genetic mutations were identified. The mean age at the time of the first symptoms was 8.96±14.64 months, and the mean age of receiving a genetic diagnosis was 82.55±84.71 months. The most common diseases showing findings of autoimmunity included immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy X-linked syndrome (16.7%); autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (10%); lipopolysaccharide-responsive beige-like anchor protein deficiency (10%); and DiGeorge syndrome (10%). Twelve (40%) patients showed findings of autoimmunity at the time of first presentation. The most common findings of autoimmunity included inflammatory bowel disease, inflammatory bowel disease-like findings (n=14, 46.7%), immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n=11, 36.7%), and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (n=9, 30.0%). A response to immunosupressive agents was observed in 15 (50%) patients. Ten patients underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Six patients were lost to follow-up due to a variety of complications. Conclusion Autoimmunity is frequently observed in patients with

  8. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade: clinical manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, David Cavalcanti; de Oliveira, José Salvador Rodrigues; Parísio, Katya; Ramalho, Fernanda Maria Morselli

    2014-03-01

    The authors report a case with pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade as a rare clinical manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease in a young man with acute myelogenous leukemia submitted to an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a related donor.

  9. A CLINICAL STUDY OF RHEUMATOLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Vineetha Kolar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with various rheumatological manifestations that are debilitating and affect the quality of life. The present study is about prevalence of rheumatological manifestations in type 2 diabetics. METHODS The current study is a cross sectional study with 100 patients of type 2 diabetics and 50 patients of age and sex matched non diabetics were examined for rheumatological manifestations during the period July 2008 to July 2010. The Rheumatological manifestations are documented and prevalence rates were calculated in percent of total cases in each group using Fisher’s exact test and Chi-square test. RESULTS Rheumatological manifestations were seen in 31% patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to 16% in non-diabetics. Periarthritis of shoulder was seen in 18% diabetics compared to 4% in non-diabetics and was statistically significant. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis was observed in 3% of diabetics. Osteoarthritis of knee was noted in 8% of diabetics compared to 10% of non-diabetics. Carpal tunnel syndrome was seen in 3% of diabetics and 2% non-diabetics. The manifestations were more predominant in females 43.6% as compared to males 23%. CONCLUSION Rheumatological manifestations are more prevalent in type 2 diabetics than non-diabetics especially periarthritis of shoulder

  10. Clinical manifestations and hematological and serological findings in children with dengue infection

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    Mulya Rahma Karyanti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF is endemic to Indonesia and remains a public health problem, with its highest incidence in children. There have been few reports on the clinical, hematological and serological data in children \\\\lith dengue. Objective To assess the clinical and laboratory profiles of children \\\\lith dengue infection in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods Clinical, hematological and serological infonnation from children diagnosed v.ith dengue infection in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital were collected from 2007 to 2009. Results Of611 children admitted with dengue, 143 (23.4% had dengue fever (DF, 252 (41.2% had DHF grades I and II; and 216 (35.4% had DHF grades III and IV. Of the 81 cases where dengue serotypes were identified, 12.3% were DENV1, 35.8% were DENV-2, 48.2% were DENV-3 and 3.7% were DENV-4. Mean age of subjects was 8.9 years (SD 4.4, and 48.4% of cases were boys. The mean length of fever before hospital admission was 4.2 days (SD 1.1 and mean length of stay in the hospital was 4 days (SD 2.7. Common symptoms observed were petechiae, hepatomegaly and epistaxis. Complications found mostly in those with dengue shock syndrome (DSS were hematemesis (30 cases, 4.9% of all patients, encephalopathy (19 cases, 3.1 % and melena (17 cases, 2.8%. Conclusion Signs and symptoms of fever, bleeding manifestations and thrombocytopenia were present in children 'With DF and DHF, while signs of increased vascular permeability were found only in those 'With DHF. Encephalopathy and gastrointestinal bleeding were found mostly in DSS cases. At admission, leukopenia was found in more DF patients than in DHF patients. Absence of leukopenia may be a sign of more severe dengue infection.

  11. Clinical manifestations and dental management of dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with osteogenesis imperfecta: Case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abukabbos, Halima; Al-Sineedi, Faisal

    2013-01-01

    .... This case report discusses the systemic and dental manifestations of OI and DI in a 4-year-old child, with moderate presentation of both disorders, who was treated at King Fahd Military Medical Complex in Dhahran...

  12. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND ULTRASONIC SIGNS OF INFLAMMATION IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    O. G. Alekseeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial membrane and a wide range of extra-articular (systemic manifestations. The main goal of RA therapy is to achieve low disease activity or clinical remission. Power Doppler (PD ultrasonography (USG can significantly distinguish between active synovitis (hypervascularization of the synovial membrane and inactive synovial proliferation.Objective: to investigate the association between the ultrasonic signs of active inflammation and the clinical and laboratory parameters of disease activity in patients with RA.Subjects and methods. The investigation included RA patients followed up at the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology within the first Russian strategic study of pharmacotherapy for RA – REMARCA (Russian invEstigation of MethotrexAte and biologicals for eaRly aCtive Arthritis. A total of 105 RA patients (mean age 51 years, among whom 80% were rheumatoid factor (RF-positive and 75% were anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (ACCP-positive, were examined. In all the patients, methotrexate (metoject, MEDAC, Germany as the first diseasemodifying anti-rheumatic drug was subcutaneously injected in an initial dose of 10 mg/week with its rapid escalation up to 20–25 mg/week. Then the therapy was added by biologicals as the need arose. The clinical and laboratory parameters were analyzed immediately before and then 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks following treatment. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated using the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR criteria and activity indices (DAS28, CDAI, and SDAI. USG of eight articular areas (the wrist, second and third metacarpophalangeal, second and third proximal interphalangeal, second and fifth metatarsophalangeal articulations in the hand and foot of the clinically dominant side was carried out in all the patients prior to treatment and at 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks

  13. Clinical manifestations and arsenic methylation after a rare subacute arsenic poisoning accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yi; Zheng, Quanmei; Li, Bing; Li, Xin; Jin, Yaping; Lv, Xiuqiang; Qu, Guang; Sun, Guifan

    2008-06-01

    One hundred and four workers ingested excessive levels of arsenic in an accident caused by leakage of pipeline in a copper-smelting factory. Clinical examinations were performed by physicians in a local hospital. Excreted urinary arsenic species were determined by cold trap hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. In the initial toxic phase, gastrointestinal symptoms were predominant (83 people, 79.8%). Most patients showed leucopenia (72 people, 69.2%), and increased serum alanine aminotransferase (84 people, 80.8%) and aspartate aminotransferase (58 people, 55.8%). Thirty-five patients (33.6%) had elevated red blood cells in urine. After 17 days of admission, many subjects (45 people, 43.3%) developed peripheral neuropathy and 25 of these 45 patients (24.0%) showed a decrease in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity. In the comparison of urinary arsenic metabolites among subacute arsenic-poisoned, chronic high arsenic-exposed and control subjects, we found that subacute arsenic-poisoned patients had significantly elevated proportions of urinary inorganic arsenic (iAs) and methylarsonic acid (MMA) but reduced proportion of urinary dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) compared with chronic high arsenic-exposed and control subjects. Chronic exposed subjects excreted higher proportions of iAs and MMA but lower proportions of DMA in urine compared with control subjects. These results suggest that gastrointestinal symptoms, leucopenia, and hepatic and urinary injury are predominant in the initial phase of subacute arsenic poisoning. Peripheral neuropathy is the most frequent manifestation after the initial phase. The biomethylation of arsenic decreases in a dose rate-dependent manner.

  14. Plasma globotriaosylsphingosine: diagnostic value and relation to clinical manifestations of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombach, S M; Dekker, N; Bouwman, M G; Linthorst, G E; Zwinderman, A H; Wijburg, F A; Kuiper, S; Vd Bergh Weerman, M A; Groener, J E M; Poorthuis, B J; Hollak, C E M; Aerts, J M F G

    2010-09-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of alpha-Galactosidase A, causing accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and elevated plasma globotriaosylsphingosine (lysoGb3). The diagnostic value and clinical relevance of plasma lysoGb3 concentration was investigated. All male and adult female patients with classical Fabry disease could be discerned by an elevated plasma lysoGb3. In young pre-symptomatic Fabry heterozygotes, lysoGb3 levels can be normal. Individuals carrying the R112H and P60L mutations, without classical Fabry symptoms, showed no elevated plasma lysoGb3. Multiple regression analysis showed that there is no correlation of plasma lysoGb3 concentration with total disease severity score in Fabry males. However, plasma lysoGb3 concentration did correlate with white matter lesions (odds ratio: 6.1 per 100 nM lysoGb3 increase (95% CI: 1.4-25.9, p=0.015). In females, plasma lysoGb3 concentration correlated with overall disease severity. Furthermore, plasma lysoGb3 level was related to left ventricular mass (19.5+/-5.5 g increase per 10 nM lysoGb3 increase; p=0.001). In addition, it was assessed whether lifetime exposure to lysoGb3 correlates with disease manifestations. Male Fabry patients with a high lysoGb3 exposure (>10,000 U), were moderately or severely affected, only one mildly. Female patients with a low exposure (1000 U showed disease complications. Plasma lysoGb3 is useful for the diagnosis of Fabry disease. LysoGb3 is an independent risk factor for development of cerebrovascular white matter lesions in male patients and left ventricular hypertrophy in females. Disease severity correlates with exposure to plasma lysoGb3.

  15. Myelofibrosis-associated complications: pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and effects on outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mughal TI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tariq I Mughal,1 Kris Vaddi,2 Nicholas J Sarlis,2 Srdan Verstovsek31Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, 2Incyte Corporation, Wilmington, DE, 3Department of Leukemia, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Myelofibrosis (MF is a rare chronic BCR-ABL1 (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue 1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by progressive bone marrow fibrosis, inefficient hematopoiesis, and shortened survival. The clinical manifestations of MF include splenomegaly, consequent to extramedullary hematopoiesis, cytopenias, and an array of potentially debilitating abdominal and constitutional symptoms. Dysregulated Janus kinase (JAK-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling underlies secondary disease-associated effects in MF, such as myeloproliferation, bone marrow fibrosis, constitutional symptoms, and cachexia. Common fatal complications of MF include transformation to acute leukemia, thrombohemorrhagic events, organ failure, and infections. Potential complications from hepatosplenomegaly include portal hypertension and variceal bleeding, whereas extramedullary hematopoiesis outside the spleen and liver – depending on the affected organ – may result in intracranial hypertension, spinal cord compression, pulmonary hypertension, pleural effusions, lymphadenopathy, skin lesions, and/or exacerbation of abdominal symptoms. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation is the only potentially curative therapy, it is suitable for few patients. The JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib is effective in improving splenomegaly, MF-related symptoms, and quality-of-life measures. Emerging evidence that ruxolitinib may be associated with a survival benefit in intermediate- or high-risk MF suggests the possibility of a disease-modifying effect. Consequently, ruxolitinib could provide a treatment backbone to which other (conventional and novel

  16. NITRATE TOXICITY IN GROUNDWATER: ITS CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, PREVENTIVE MEASURES AND MITIGATION STRATEGIES

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    Raaz K. Maheshwari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater pollution has become a drastic problem principally because of nature and wide spread use of modern chemicals viz. pesticides and fertilizers. Excessive application of fertilizers as well as organic wastes and sewage has been implicated in the nitrogen pollution of groundwater. Therefore, the issue of rising nitrate concentration in groundwater has become a subject of extensive research in India and Rajasthan in particular. In natural water, nitrate ((NO3- N is usually 100ppm and in organic matters (amine and /or amides resulting in the production of nitrosamines (carcinogens. Number of cases (human and livestock, suffering from gastric cancer have been observed. Reverse osmosis (RO process has great potential in the mitigation of nitrate ion containing waters. Generally, the presence of particular substances may affect the removal of specific ions. The presence of di-hydrogen phosphate ions (DHP-ions in the feed solution enhances the nitrate removal efficiency of the polyamide RO membrane. In this present research work, a Flmtec TW30, polyamide thin-film composite, RO membrane was used for nitrate removal through RO set up. The rejection of individual nitrate was found to be around 76%. After addition of KH2¬PO4 to the feed containing nitrate ions the rejection was improved up to 84. This high level of increment in rejection of nitrate ion indicates the possible usage of KH2¬PO4 in RO for nitrate removal. This fact of removal is due to the K+ ions binding to the electronic lone-pairs of polyamide membrane holding di-hydrogen phosphate ions. This establishes a negative layer on the surface of the membrane. The diffusion of nitrate through the membrane is diminished by the formed layer. Present manuscript delineates clinical manifestations of nitrate toxicity and mitigation of nitrate ion by means of state-of-the-art reverse osmosis technology.

  17. Clinical Manifestations in Individuals with Recent Diagnosis of HTLV Type I Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetker, Shelene K.W.; Porto, Aurelia F.; Giozza, Silvana P.; Muniz, Andre L.; Caskey, Marina F.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is known to cause HTLV-associated myelopathy (HAM)/tropical spastic paraparesis and adult T cell leukemia. A growing body of evidence links HTLV-1 infection with an increasing spectrum of disease, including uveitis, periodontal disease, arthropathy, sicca syndrome, and neurologic deficits. Objectives Despite recent findings, the natural history of HTLV-1 infection remains poorly defined. This study was designed to better characterize initial clinical and neurological findings in individuals diagnosed with HTLV-1 infection. Study Design We conducted a cross-sectional study of 71 individuals recently diagnosed with HTLV-1 and 71 uninfected age- and sex-matched blood donors in Salvador, Brazil. Subjects were administered a standardized questionnaire and underwent physical exam. Results HTLV-1 infected subjects were significantly more likely than controls to report complaints of hand and foot numbness (OR=5.3; 95% CI: 1.8-15.3; p=0.002 and OR=4.0; 95% CI: 1.3-12; p=0.013 respectively), difficulty running (OR=4.0; 95% CI: 1.1-14.2, p=0.032), nocturia (OR=5.0, 95% CI: 1.1-22.8, p=0.038), arthralgia (OR 3.3, 95% CI: 1.4-7.7, p=0.006), and photophobia (OR 3.3, 95% CI: 1.4-7.7, p=0.006). Conclusions Neurologic, ocular and rheumatologic complaints may be the first manifestations of HTLV-1 infection. Therefore, all patients presenting with initial diagnosis should be rigorously screened for these symptoms. PMID:21388871

  18. THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND COURSE OF DUODENAL ULCER DISEASE AFTER PERFORATED ULCER

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    L. A. Lyubskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare clinical manifestations, course, mental status in duodenal ulcer (DU patients with a history of perforated ulcer and its uncomplicated course.Subjects and methods. One hundred and thirteen patents with DU were examined. Group 1 included 61 patients with uncomplicated DUand Group 2 comprised 52 patients with a history of perforated ulcer. A comparison group consisted of 20 patients who had undergone laparotomy. Physical and mental status examinations, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS, and 24-hour pH-metry were performed.Results. Classical pain syndrome was observed in 75 % of the patients with uncomplicated DU. Prior to perforation, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes were distinguished only by a significantly lower degree in Group 2; following perforation, the pain syndrome was recorded more frequently, it was more extensive, meal-unrelated, and similar to that in the patients who had undergone laparotomy and had diminished appetite (36.5 %. EGDS showed that the complicated course was accompanied by the significantly higher incidence of erosive esophagitis (21.2 %, gastritis (51.9 %, duodenitis (25.0 %, multiple ulcers (28.8 %, and larger ulcers. 24-hour pH-metry indicated that the level of hyperacidity in Group 2 was higher and the circadian intragastric pH variations were less marked than those in uncomplicated DU. The patients with a history of perforated ulcer showed a high rate of anxiety and depressive changes. Conclusion. In complicated DU, marked monotonic hyperacidity causes common erosive-ulcerative lesions in the gastroduodenal area in relatively mild pain syndrome, late referrals, and long-term ulcer healing. After perforation followed by wound closure, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes become more pronounced, which is associated with anxiety and depressive changes in the mental status, as well as with early referrals and less healing time.

  19. NAFLD and Increased Aortic Stiffness: Parallel or Common Physiopathological Mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A.; Leite, Nathalie C.; Cardoso, Claudia R. L.; Salles, Gil F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. Liver inflammation and fibrosis related to NAFLD contribute to disease progression and increasing liver-related mortality and morbidity. Increasing data suggest that NAFLD may be linked to atherosclerotic vascular disease independent of other established cardiovascular risk factors. Central arterial stiffness has been recognized as a measure of cumulative cardiovascular risk marker load, and the measure of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) is regarded as the gold standard assessment of aortic stiffness. It has been shown that increased aortic stiffness predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several clinical settings, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, a well-known condition associated with advanced stages of NAFLD. Furthermore, recently-published studies reported a strong association between NAFLD and increased arterial stiffness, suggesting a possible link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and NAFLD. We sought to review the published data on the associations between NAFLD and aortic stiffness, in order to better understand the interplay between these two conditions and identify possible common physiopathological mechanisms. PMID:27104526

  20. [Hypertension and pregnancy. Diagnosis, physiopathology and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, A; Fievet, P; el Esper, I; el Esper, N; Vaillant, P; Gondry, J

    1995-11-25

    This review on hypertension in pregnancy focuses mainly on the pathophysiology and prevention of pregnancy induced hypertension which, when associated with proteinuria, is usually called preeclampsia. Rather than a genuine hypertensive disease, preeclampsia is mainly a systemic endothelial disease causing activation of platelets and diffuse ischemic disorders whose most obvious clinical manifestations involve the kidney (hence the proteinuria, edema and hyperuricemia), the liver (hence the hemolytic elevated liver enzymes and low platelets, or HELLP syndrome), and the brain (hence eclamptic convulsions). Hypertension is explained by increased vascular reactivity rather than by an imbalance between vasoconstrictive and vasodilating circulating hormones. This increased reactivity is due to endothelial dysfunction with imbalance between prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 and possibly dysfunction of NO and endothelin synthesis. The aggressive substances for endothelium are thought to be of placentar origin and the cause of their release is explained by placentar ischemia related to a defect of trophoblastic invasion of the spiral arteries. The etiology of this latter defect is unknown but involves immunologic mechanisms with genetic predisposition. The only effective treatment for PIH is extraction of the baby with the whole placenta. The decision for extraction is often a very delicate obstetric problem. Antihypertensive drugs are mainly indicated in severe hypertension (> 160-100 mm Hg), with the aim of preventing cerebral hemorrhage in the mother, but have not been shown to improve fetal morbidity or mortality. Eclamptic seizures can be prevented and treated more effectively with magnesium sulfate than with diazepam or phenytoin. Prevention of preeclampsia remains the main challenge. Whereas antihypertensive drugs are ineffective, calcium supplementation and low dose aspirin have proven effective but mainly in selected populations with a relatively high incidence of

  1. Cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prejbisz, A.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Eisenhofer, G.; Januszewicz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical expression of phaeochromocytoma may involve numerous cardiovascular manifestations, but usually presents as sustained or paroxysmal hypertension associated with other signs and symptoms of catecholamine excess. Most of the life-threatening cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma,

  2. Cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prejbisz, A.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Eisenhofer, G.; Januszewicz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical expression of phaeochromocytoma may involve numerous cardiovascular manifestations, but usually presents as sustained or paroxysmal hypertension associated with other signs and symptoms of catecholamine excess. Most of the life-threatening cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma,

  3. Norovirus infection: features of epidemiology and clinical and laboratory manifestations at the present stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pronko

    2017-04-01

    . Among 156 patients with NVI, there were 75 boys (48.1 % and 81 girls (51.9 %, and no significant differences were noticed in the sex of the patients. There were 95 organized (60.9 % and 61 unorganized children (39.1 %. In the majority of cases, NVI manifes­ted itself as monoinfection (92.9 %, while mixed infection occurred in 7.1 % of the cases. The mixed infection was due to a combination of two viruses — norovirus-rotavirus associated with pathogenic flora (Staphylococcus, Proteus. The analysis of the age structure of the group of children with noroviral infection showed that children aged up to 1 year amounted to 31 patients (19.9 %, those of 1 to 3 years of age — to 93 patients (59.6 %, there were 21 children aged 4–6 years (13.5 % and 7 patients aged 7–10 years (3.8 %, whereas the number of 1–14-year olds amounted to 5 patients (3.2 %. At the moment of disease, the majority of the children examined were at the age of the first three years of life (76.9 %. Acute gastroenteritis was diagnosed in 132 (84.6 % patients, acute gastroenterocolitis — in 9 patients (5.8 %, and 15 patients had acute enteritis. The analysis of the clinical course of NVI enabled us to identify such symptoms, as general infectious and gastroenteritis. The clinical picture of NVI showed that the leading syndrome was that of acute gastroenteritis. The disease started from vomiting, changing of stool characteristics and frequency, and increasing of temperature. Manifestations of intoxication were noted in 136 (87.29 % patients. The patients had also sluggishness, weakness, decreased appetite and I to II degree water-deficient exsicosis. The assessment of the premorbid background established that the majority of children with NVI had the appropriate pathology and a compromised premorbid background. Conclusions. Viral intestinal diseases are one of the leading causes of infectious gastroenteritis in children of the first three years of age in Grodno region. NVI were characterized by

  4. [Thrombotic microangiopathies: HUS/TTP. Physiopathological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Avalos, J C

    2000-01-01

    In thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and in the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) fibrin-platelet thrombi occlude arterioles and capillaries. The mechanism of endothelial cell injury and the mechanism of thrombosis are the most important physiopathological events in this pathology and are largely unknown. In HUS due to the Shiga toxin, the lesion of the endothelial cells is due to penetration of the toxin into the cell via the Gb3 receptor. Endothelial cell death is a consequence of altered protein synthesis at the ribosomal level. Cytokines released during the inflammatory process, possibly enhance the endothelial damage. Genetic and immunologic predisposing factors for the development of HUS have also been postulated. In idiopathic, secondary and familial HUS/TTP the mechanism of endothelial lesion is unknown, but multiple responsible factors have been advocated such as infections, drugs, pregnancy, autoantibodies, apoptosis inducing molecules, etc. and other genetic, hormonal or immunologic predisposing factors may also be involved. Factor H deficiency has been blamed in familiar cases. The most important cause of microcirculation thrombosis is the thrombogenic capacity of endothelial cell "activation" or injury induced by multiple mechanisms. The predominant source of plasma vW factor multimers is apparent in the altered endothelial cell. The unusually large vWF multimers are more effective at binding to platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX and IIb-IIIa complexes and inducing aggregation, as also occurred with the low weight multimers formed with excessive proteolysis, as described in the acute phase of HUS/TTP. The recent report of congenital deficiency of a vWF protease in familial TTP and its functional inhibition by autoantibodies in acquired cases is characteristic of TTP. This protease inhibition has never been described in HUS and might represent pathogenetic differences between TTP and HUS, and contribute to the differential diagnosis, but further

  5. Diagnosis and clinical manifestations of calcium pyrophosphate and basic calcium phosphate crystal deposition diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ea, Hang-Korng; Lioté, Frédéric

    2014-05-01

    Basic calcium phosphate and pyrophosphate calcium crystals are the 2 main calcium-containing crystals that can deposit in all skeletal tissues. These calcium crystals give rise to numerous manifestations, including acute inflammatory attacks that can mimic alarming and threatening differential diagnoses, osteoarthritis-like lesions, destructive arthropathies, and calcific tendinitis. Awareness of uncommon localizations and manifestations such as intraspinal deposition (eg, crowned dens syndrome, tendinitis of longus colli muscle, massive cervical myelopathy compression) prevents inappropriate procedures and cares. Coupling plain radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and synovial fluid analysis allow accurate diagnosis by directly or indirectly identifying the GRAAL of microcrystal-related symptoms.

  6. [The extrahepatic site of hepatitis C virus: clinical manifestations and prognostic value].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krel', P E; Tsinzerling, O D

    2009-01-01

    The high incidence of recurrent chronic hepatitis C after a course of antiviral therapy determines the urgency of determining the extrahepatic reservoirs of hepatitis C virus (HCV). The most extrahepatic site for the virus is peripheral mononuclear cells (PMC). Assuming that there may be HCV replication in the PMC), these cells can be considered as a potential reservoir of HCV infection. The most common extrahepatic manifestation of HCV is cryoglobulinemia, the genesis of which may be active viral replication in the cells of the immune system. There is evidence that HCV is detectable just in the tissues of the involved organs. Thus, most systemic manifestations may be directly associated with extrahepatic HCV replication.

  7. Clinical manifestations and predictors of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized adults with dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshatha Rao Aroor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is one of the seven identified Southeast Asian countries reporting frequent outbreaks of dengue fever (DF. Aims: This study was to analyze clinical and laboratory profile and predictive markers of thrombocytopenia and length of hospital stay in DF. Materials and Methods: This record-based retrospective study conducted in a coastal district of Karnataka, South India, included all dengue cases in adults aged >18 years, admitted during period of January 2011 to December 2014. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to compute odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI to assess independent associations of variables with low platelet count and longer duration of hospital stay. Results: Among 207 dengue immunoglobulin M (IgM antibody confirmed cases (mean age of 36.94 ± 14.61 years, 143 (69.1% were males and 64 were females. The mean duration of illness and hospital stay were 4.94 ± 3.58 days and 5.98 ± 2.58 days, respectively. Abdominal symptoms included nausea and vomiting (53.6%, abdominal pain (25.1%, and diarrhea (13.5%. Bleeding manifestations were seen in 24 (11.6% cases and fluid accumulation was revealed in 18 (8.7% cases. The mean platelet count was 110,159.42 ± 68,397.32 (cells/mm 3 . Low platelet count on admission was associated with the presence of rash (OR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.23-0.81, high aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels (OR = 3.14, 95% CI 1.58-6.23, high alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels (OR = 2.91, 95% CI 1.55-5.47, and low albumin levels (OR = 4.48, 95% CI 1.02-19.75. The duration of hospital stay was associated with diarrhea (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.18-0.9, abdominal pain (OR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.27-1.00, ascites (OR = 0.26, 95% CI 0.09-0.69, and low hemoglobin (OR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.25-0.86 level on admission. Conclusions: Though thrombocytopenia on admission was associated with the presence of rash, high AST and ALT levels, and low albumin levels, it was not predictive of length of

  8. Clinical manifestations of colorectal cancer patients from a large multicenter study in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohorquez, Mabel; Sahasrabudhe, Ruta; Criollo, Angel; Sanabria-Salas, María Carolina; Vélez, Alejandro; Castro, Jorge Mario; Marquez, Juan Ricardo; Mateus, Gilbert; Bolaños, Fernando; Panqueva, Cesar; Restrepo, Jose Ignacio; Puerta, Juan Dario; Murillo, Raul; Bravo, María Mercedes; Hernández, Gustavo; Rios, Angela; Prieto, Rodrigo; Tomlinson, Ian; Echeverry, Magdalena; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major public health problem, and its incidence is rising in developing countries. However, studies characterizing CRC clinicopathological features in cases from developing countries are still lacking. The goal of this study was to evaluate clinicopathological and demographic features in one of the largest CRC studies in Latin America.The study involved over 1525 CRC cases recruited in a multicenter study in Colombia between 2005 and 2014 as part of ongoing genetic and epidemiological studies. We gathered clinicopathological data such as age at diagnosis, sex, body mass index, tobacco and alcohol consumption, family history of cancer, and tumor features including location, histological type, and stage. Statistical analyses were performed to test the association between age of onset, sex, and clinical manifestations.The average age at CRC diagnosis was 57.4 years, with 26.5% of cases having early-onset CRC (diagnosed by age 50 years). Most cases were women (53.2%; P = 0.009), 49.2% were overweight or obese, 49.1% were regular alcohol drinkers, 52% were smokers/former smokers, and 12.2% reported relatives with cancer. Most tumors in the study were located in the rectum (42.7%), were adenocarcinomas (91.5%), and had advanced stage (T3-T4, 79.8%). Comparisons by sex found that male cases were more likely to be obese (36.5% vs 31.1%; P = 0.001), less likely to have a family history of cancer (9.7% vs 15.3%; P = 0.016), and more likely to have advanced-stage tumors (83.9% vs 76.1%; P = 0.036). Comparisons by age of onset found that early-onset cases were more likely to be women (59.3% vs 51.0%; P = 0.005) and report a family history of cancer (17.4% vs 10.2%; P = 0.001).To our knowledge, our study is the largest report of clinicopathological characterization of Hispanic CRC cases, and we suggest that further studies are needed to understand CRC etiology in diverse Hispanic populations.

  9. A multicentre study of Shigella diarrhoea in six Asian countries: disease burden, clinical manifestations, and microbiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenz von Seidlein

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The burden of shigellosis is greatest in resource-poor countries. Although this diarrheal disease has been thought to cause considerable morbidity and mortality in excess of 1,000,000 deaths globally per year, little recent data are available to guide intervention strategies in Asia. We conducted a prospective, population-based study in six Asian countries to gain a better understanding of the current disease burden, clinical manifestations, and microbiology of shigellosis in Asia.Over 600,000 persons of all ages residing in Bangladesh, China, Pakistan, Indonesia, Vietnam, and Thailand were included in the surveillance. Shigella was isolated from 2,927 (5% of 56,958 diarrhoea episodes detected between 2000 and 2004. The overall incidence of treated shigellosis was 2.1 episodes per 1,000 residents per year in all ages and 13.2/1,000/y in children under 60 months old. Shigellosis incidence increased after age 40 years. S. flexneri was the most frequently isolated Shigella species (1,976/2,927 [68%] in all sites except in Thailand, where S. sonnei was most frequently detected (124/146 [85%]. S. flexneri serotypes were highly heterogeneous in their distribution from site to site, and even from year to year. PCR detected ipaH, the gene encoding invasion plasmid antigen H in 33% of a sample of culture-negative stool specimens. The majority of S. flexneri isolates in each site were resistant to amoxicillin and cotrimoxazole. Ciprofloxacin-resistant S. flexneri isolates were identified in China (18/305 [6%], Pakistan (8/242 [3%], and Vietnam (5/282 [2%].Shigella appears to be more ubiquitous in Asian impoverished populations than previously thought, and antibiotic-resistant strains of different species and serotypes have emerged. Focusing on prevention of shigellosis could exert an immediate benefit first by substantially reducing the overall diarrhoea burden in the region and second by preventing the spread of panresistant Shigella strains. The

  10. Fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever in adults: emphasizing the evolutionary pre-fatal clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing-Kit Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A better description of the clinical and laboratory manifestations of fatal patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF is important in alerting clinicians of severe dengue and improving management. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Of 309 adults with DHF, 10 fatal patients and 299 survivors (controls were retrospectively analyzed. Regarding causes of fatality, massive gastrointestinal (GI bleeding was found in 4 patients, dengue shock syndrome (DSS alone in 2; DSS/subarachnoid hemorrhage, Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis/bacteremia, ventilator associated pneumonia, and massive GI bleeding/Enterococcus faecalis bacteremia each in one. Fatal patients were found to have significantly higher frequencies of early altered consciousness (≤24 h after hospitalization, hypothermia, GI bleeding/massive GI bleeding, DSS, concurrent bacteremia with/without shock, pulmonary edema, renal/hepatic failure, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among those experienced early altered consciousness, massive GI bleeding alone/with uremia/with E. faecalis bacteremia, and K. pneumoniae meningitis/bacteremia were each found in one patient. Significantly higher proportion of bandemia from initial (arrival laboratory data in fatal patients as compared to controls, and higher proportion of pre-fatal leukocytosis and lower pre-fatal platelet count as compared to initial laboratory data of fatal patients were found. Massive GI bleeding (33.3% and bacteremia (25% were the major causes of pre-fatal leukocytosis in the deceased patients; 33.3% of the patients with pre-fatal profound thrombocytopenia (<20,000/µL, and 50% of the patients with pre-fatal prothrombin time (PT prolongation experienced massive GI bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: Our report highlights causes of fatality other than DSS in patients with severe dengue, and suggested hypothermia, leukocytosis and bandemia may be warning signs of severe dengue. Clinicians should be alert to the potential development of massive GI bleeding

  11. Nephrolithiasis as a common urinary system manifestation of inflammatory bowel diseases; a clinical review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji-Arjenaki, Mahboube; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    The extra-intestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are common and involve other organs or systems for example; urinary system. For this review, we used a variety of sources by searching through Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and directory of open access journals (DOAJ). Urinary complications may occur in up to 22% of patients and nephrolithiasis or renal/kidney stones have been suggested to be a common manifestation of disease in forms of uric acid, calcium phosphate or calcium oxalate. We performed a meta-analysis on five clinical trials and reported that correlation between IBD and formation of stone in renal system is positive and significant (Fix-effect model; CI: 95%, P <0.001, and randomeffect model; CI: 95%, P = 0.03). Based on the reports of the clinical trials, calcium oxalate is more prevalent in Crohn's disease (CD) than in ulcerative colitis (UC).

  12. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy : pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhasmana, Devesh J; Dheda, Keertan; Ravn, Pernille;

    2008-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to treat HIV infection, by restoring CD4+ cell count and immune function, is associated with significant reductions in morbidity and mortality. Soon after ART initiation, there is a rapid phase of restoration of pathogen-specific immunity. In certain patients...... to a heterogeneous range of clinical manifestations. The commonest forms of IRIS are associated with mycobacterial infections, fungi and herpes viruses. In most patients, ART should be continued and treatment for the associated condition optimized, and there is anecdotal evidence for the use of corticosteroids...... in patients who are severely affected. In this review, we discuss research relating to pathogenesis, the range of clinical manifestations, treatment options and prevention issues....

  13. Cutaneous Manifestations in Dermatomyositis: Key Clinical and Serological Features-a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Yoshinao; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Akiyama, Masashi

    2016-12-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a common idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. The pathogenesis is considered to be microangiopathy affecting skin and muscle. The cutaneous manifestations of DM are the most important aspect of this disease, and their correct evaluation is important for early diagnosis. The skin signs are various: Some are pathognomonic or highly characteristic, and others are compatible with DM. Recently, DM has been categorized into several disease subsets based on the various autoantibodies present in patients. Sometimes, characteristic cutaneous manifestations are strongly associated with the presence of specific autoantibodies. For example, anti-Mi-2 antibody is associated with the classic features of DM, including heliotrope rash, Gottron's papules, the V-neck sign, the shawl sign, cuticular overgrowth, and photosensitivity. Frequent cutaneous features in anti-transcriptional intermediary factor 1 gamma (TIF1γ)-positive patients are diffuse photoerythema, including "dusky red face," while skin ulcerations, palmar papules (inverse Gottron), diffuse hair loss, panniculitis, and oral pain and/or ulcers are sometimes associated with anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 product (MDA5) antibody. Here, we review important cutaneous manifestations seen in patients with DM, and we examine the relationship between the skin changes and myositis-associated autoantibodies. Correct evaluation of cutaneous manifestations and myositis-associated autoantibodies should help the clinician in the early diagnosis of DM, for a quick recognition of cutaneous signs that may be the symptom of onset before muscle inflammation.

  14. Paediatric manifestations of Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a review of the clinical and radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilborn, T.N.; Teh, J.; Goodman, T.R

    2003-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease in children. However, its ability to present in many ways, to mimic other conditions, and to manifest itself in many organs makes it a fascinating disease for radiologists. This article reviews the history of the disease, the features that are most useful in determining prognosis, and the various radiological findings seen in paediatric patients.

  15. Enigmatic human tails: A review of their history, embryology, classification, and clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Malefant, Jason; Loukas, Marios; Jerry Oakes, W; Oskouian, Rod J; Fries, Fabian N

    2016-05-01

    The presence of a human tail is a rare and intriguing phenomenon. While cases have been reported in the literature, confusion remains with respect to the proper classification, definition, and treatment methods. We review the literature concerning this anatomical derailment. We also consider the importance of excluding underlying congenital anomalies in these patients to prevent neurological deficits and other abnormal manifestations.

  16. A multicentre study of 513 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. I. Disease manifestations and analyses of clinical subsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S; Petersen, J; Ullman, S

    1998-01-01

    duration of follow-up was 8.2 years from diagnosis and 12.8 years from first symptom. This paper describes the most common clinical and laboratory manifestations and their relationship to sex and age at the time of onset and diagnosis. Cluster analysis revealed three clinically defined clusters at the time...... cluster (25%) all had malar rash and half were photosensitive. Follow-up showed that the patients of cluster 2 developed azotaemia, large proteinuria, arterial hypertension and myositis significantly more often than did the rest of the patients, but the mortality was not increased. The risk of developing...

  17. A multicentre study of 513 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. I. Disease manifestations and analyses of clinical subsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Petersen, J; Ullman, S

    1998-01-01

    duration of follow-up was 8.2 years from diagnosis and 12.8 years from first symptom. This paper describes the most common clinical and laboratory manifestations and their relationship to sex and age at the time of onset and diagnosis. Cluster analysis revealed three clinically defined clusters at the time...... of disease onset. Cluster 1 (57% of patients) consisted of relatively elderly patients without nephropathy or malar rash, but with a high prevalence of discoid lesions. Cluster 2 (18%) consisted of patients with nephropathy, a third of whom also developed serositis and lymphopenia. The patients of the third...

  18. Generalized subcutaneous edema as a rare manifestation of dermatomyositis: clinical lesson from a rare feature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-04-01

    Generalized subcutaneous edema is a very rare manifestation of inflammatory myopathies. A 61-year-old woman presented with classic signs and symptoms of dermatomyositis. She was also noted to have generalized edema that was so florid that an alternative diagnosis was considered. Her disease was resistant to corticosteroids, azathioprine, and mycophenolate mofetil. Intravenous administration of immunoglobulins was started because of marked worsening of her disease-muscle weakness, generalized anasarca, and involvement of her bulbar muscles. This led to dramatic resolution of her subcutaneous edema and significant improvement of her skin and muscle disease. As the initial screen for malignancy was negative, a positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was requested, which interestingly showed a metabolically active cervical tumor. Anasarca is an unusual manifestation of dermatomyositis. In treatment-refractory cases, it seems reasonable to consider positron emission tomography scan in excluding underlying malignant disease.

  19. [Clinical analysis of nasal sinus mucocele with eye symptoms as main manifestation: 3 cases report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu Qingjia; Li Jingxian; Fan Jiangang

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery is effective to nasal sinus mucocele with eye symptoms as main manifestation. It is very importment to raise the awareness of the disease and to prompt imaging examination. Three cases were reviewed. One mucocele was found in the frontal sinus ethmoid sinus,1 in the fronto-ethmoid sinus and 1 in the spheno-ethmoid sinus. All cases were preoperatively diagnosed by CT, MRI or intranasal endoscopy. Nasal sinus mucocele with eye symptoms as main manifestation should be early diagnosed. Endoscopic sinus surgery is a safe and effective method for the treatment of nasal sinus mucocele,and could be the primary choice for it. All cases were treated by nasal endoscopic sinus surgery. The majority of symptoms, such as exophthalmos, epiphora and diplopia, disappeared in all patients. However, vision recovery was observed only in some patients.

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody–positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  1. Clinical and Neurologic Manifestation of Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy and Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, P Patrick; Shah, Niraj James

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) shows a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric manifestations. A combined effort with neuropsychological and psychometric evaluation has to be performed to recognize the syndrome, whereas minimal HE (MHE) is largely under-recognized. Subtle symptoms of MHE can only be diagnosed through specialized neuropsychiatric testing. Early diagnosis and treatment may drastically improve the quality of life for many cirrhotic patients. Further research to gain better insight into the pathophysiology and diagnostic accuracy of HE will help determine future management strategies.

  2. Clinical and Laboratory Features and Extraintestinal Manifestations of Celiac Disease in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mete Akın

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Celiac disease an autoimmune disorder resulting from an immune response to the gluten in genetically predisposed patients. Although, diarrhea is the most common finding at presentation in adults, disease may present with extraintestinal manifestations such as anemia, osteoporosis, elevated transaminase levels and growth retardation. In this article, symptoms, extraintestinal manifestations and coexistence with other autoimmune disorders of adult patients with celiac disease were evaluated. Material and Method: 22 patients whose followed with the diagnosis of celiac disease in Suleyman Demirel University Department of Gastroenterology, between January 2007 and Semptember 2010, were evaluated retrospectively. Symptoms, extraintestinal manifestations and coexistence with other autoimmune disorders of patients at presentation were investigated. Results: 13 (59% of all cases were female and 9 (41% were male. Mean age at presentation was 38,5 years. Most common complaints were diarrhea and weakness . Tissue transglutaminase and/or antiendomysium antibody were positive, and diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic examination in all patients. Iron deficiency, vitamine B12 deficiency and folic acid deficiency were detected in 17 (77%, 8 (36% and 6 (27% patients, respectively. There were elevated transaminase levels in 8 (36% patients. Osteoporosis was detected in 4 female and 1 male patients. Sensorimotor polineuropathy was detected in 2 patients. There was growth retardation in 2 patients. Autoimmune hypothyroidism and Type 1 diabetes mellitus were detected in 2 and 1 patients, respectively. Coexistence with Crohn%u2019s disease was detected in a patient. Discussion: Celiac disease may present with extraintestinal manifestations in adults. It should be remembered, especially in patients with iron deficiency and mild to moderate transaminase elevations with unexplained etiology. It should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and

  3. Systemic primary carnitine deficiency: an overview of clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magoulas Pilar L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic primary carnitine deficiency (CDSP is an autosomal recessive disorder of carnitine transportation. The clinical manifestations of CDSP can vary widely with respect to age of onset, organ involvement, and severity of symptoms, but are typically characterized by episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, elevated transaminases, and hyperammonemia in infants; skeletal myopathy, elevated creatine kinase (CK, and cardiomyopathy in childhood; or cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, or fatigability in adulthood. The diagnosis can be suspected on newborn screening, but is established by demonstration of low plasma free carnitine concentration (SLC22A5 gene. The incidence of CDSP varies depending on ethnicity; however the frequency in the United States is estimated to be approximately 1 in 50,000 individuals based on newborn screening data. CDSP is caused by recessive mutations in the SLC22A5 gene. This gene encodes organic cation transporter type 2 (OCTN2 which transport carnitine across cell membranes. Over 100 mutations have been reported in this gene with the c.136C > T (p.P46S mutation being the most frequent mutation identified. CDSP should be differentiated from secondary causes of carnitine deficiency such as various organic acidemias and fatty acid oxidation defects. CDSP is an autosomal recessive condition; therefore the recurrence risk in each pregnancy is 25%. Carrier screening for at-risk individuals and family members should be obtained by performing targeted mutation analysis of the SLC22A5 gene since plasma carnitine analysis is not a sufficient methodology for determining carrier status. Antenatal diagnosis for pregnancies at increased risk of CDSP is possible by molecular genetic testing of extracted DNA from chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis if both mutations in SLC22A5 gene are known. Once the diagnosis of CDSP is established in an individual, an echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, CK concentration

  4. Novel clinical manifestations in Pallister-Killian syndrome: comprehensive evaluation of 59 affected individuals and review of previously reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Alisha; Liu, Hongbin; Park, Kristen; Campbell, Lindsey B; Jackson, Marie; Kostanecka, Anna; Pipan, Mary; Izumi, Kosuke; Pallister, Phillip; Krantz, Ian D

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome is a rare, multi-system developmental diagnosis typically caused by tetrasomy of chromosome 12p that exhibits tissue-limited mosaicism. The spectrum of clinical manifestations in Pallister-Killian syndrome is wide and includes craniofacial anomalies, clefts, ophthalmologic, audiologic, cardiac, musculoskeletal, diaphragmatic, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and cutaneous anomalies in association with intellectual disability and seizures. Growth parameters are often normal to elevated at birth with deceleration of growth postnatally. No formal estimate of the prevalence of Pallister-Killian syndrome has been made. Here, we report the clinical findings in 59 individuals with Pallister-Killian syndrome who were ascertained at Pallister-Killian syndrome Foundation family meetings held in the summers of 2006, 2008, 2009, and 2010. In addition, the clinical findings of 152 cases reported in the medical literature were reviewed and compared to the cohort examined here. Several novel clinical characteristics were identified through detailed dysmorphology examinations of this cohort and reassertion of a mild developmental variant is described. This report expands the clinical manifestations of Pallister-Killian syndrome and highlights the variable expressivity of this diagnosis with important implications for diagnosis and counseling.

  5. Clinical, biochemical and radiological manifestations of severe vitamin d deficiency in adolescents versus children: response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, A; De Sanctis, V; Adel, A; El Awwa, A; Bedair, S

    2012-09-01

    to compare clinical, biochemical and radiological manifestations of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD - serum 25 OH - vitamin D level weight bearing joints, back, thighs, knees, and calves (30/36) difficulty walking and/or climbing stairs and/or running (8/36), muscle cramps and/or facial twitches and/or carpopedal spasms (2/36) and genu valgum (2/36). Biochemical serum abnormalities included high ALP (31/36), low phosphate (10/36) and low Ca (4/36). Variable radiological manifestations due to VDD were detected in all children (45/45) and in some of adolescents (19/35). Two different radiological patterns have been recognized in adolescents. Three months after injecting a mega dose of cholecalciferol all biochemical abnormalities were corrected with significant improvement of symptoms related to VDD had been reported in all children (45/45) and in the majority (33/36) of adolescents with VDD. 3-6 months after the injection, complete healing of the radiological evidence of VDD was achieved in all rachitic children and the majority of adolescents (16/19). it appears that adolescents adapt better to severe VDD compared to infants, with less severe clinical, biochemical and radiological manifestations. An IM mega dose of cholecalciferol is effective therapy for treatment of VDD in children and adolescents for 3 months but not for 6 months.;

  6. The Prevalence of Anticardiolipin Antibody in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Its Association with Clinical Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Basiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The central immunological disturbance in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is autoantibody production. Some of these antibodies affecting components of the cell nucleus are the major characteristics of SLE. The present study was aimed to assess importance of anticardiolipin (ACL antibody and its association with clinical state in SLE patients. A cross sectional study was performed on 100 patients with SLE referred to rheumatology outpatient clinic in Ekbatan hospital in Hamadan (Iran between 2007 and 2008. Serum samples were extracted and screened for IgG and IgM using an ACL enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Up to 36% of patients were positive for ACL antibody that was more frequent in women than men (39.8% versus 8.3%. No association was revealed between ACL antibody and age. Clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome were observed in 23.0% of patients that was more prevalent in ACL positive group compared with ACL negative group (41.7% versus 125%. The prevalence of other manifestations including pregnancy-related disorders (recurrent abortion, central nervous system defects, and deep vein thrombosis was 33.3%, 25.0%, and 30.6% in ACL positive group and was 9.4%, 7.8%, and 7.8% in ACL negative group that all were more frequent in the former group. The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was also higher in ACL positive group than another group (22.2% versus 15.6%. Among ACL positive patients with clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, 86.6% had medium to high titer of ACL. Our study emphasized value of (ACL antibody to assess clinical status in SLE patients

  7. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of chikungunya fever: Lessons learned from the re-emerging epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Alladi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya fever, caused by "Chikungunya virus," is an arbovirus disease transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes belonging to the genus Aedes. Chikungunya fever epidemics have been reported from several countries around the world. The disease that was silent for nearly 32 years re-emerged in the October 2005 outbreak in India that is still ongoing. The incubation period ranges from 3 to 12 days. The onset is usually abrupt and the acute stage is characterized by sudden onset with high-grade fever, severe arthralgias, myalgias, and skin rash. Swollen tender joints and crippling arthritis are usually evident. In the chronic stage, relapses that include sensation of fever, asthenia, exacerbation of arthralgias, inflammatory polyarthritis, and stiffness may be evident. Neurological, ocular, and mucocutaneous manifestations have also been described. Chronic arthritis may develop in about 15% of the patients. Viral culture is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Chikungunya fever. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification have also been found to be useful. Serodiagnostic methods for the detection of immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies against Chikungunya virus are more frequently used. Chikungunya is a self-limiting disease; however, severe manifestations such as meningoencephalitis, fulminant hepatitis, and bleeding manifestations may sometimes be life-threatening. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. Prevention by educating the community and public health officials, vector control measures appear to be the best approach at controlling Chikungunya fever as no commercially available vaccine is available for public use in India for this condition presently.

  8. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of Chikungunya fever: lessons learned from the re-emerging epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Alladi; Kiran, D H N; Manohar, I Chiranjeevi; Kumar, D Prabath

    2010-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, caused by "Chikungunya virus," is an arbovirus disease transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes belonging to the genus Aedes. Chikungunya fever epidemics have been reported from several countries around the world. The disease that was silent for nearly 32 years re-emerged in the October 2005 outbreak in India that is still ongoing. The incubation period ranges from 3 to 12 days. The onset is usually abrupt and the acute stage is characterized by sudden onset with high-grade fever, severe arthralgias, myalgias, and skin rash. Swollen tender joints and crippling arthritis are usually evident. In the chronic stage, relapses that include sensation of fever, asthenia, exacerbation of arthralgias, inflammatory polyarthritis, and stiffness may be evident. Neurological, ocular, and mucocutaneous manifestations have also been described. Chronic arthritis may develop in about 15% of the patients. Viral culture is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Chikungunya fever. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification have also been found to be useful. Serodiagnostic methods for the detection of immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies against Chikungunya virus are more frequently used. Chikungunya is a self-limiting disease; however, severe manifestations such as meningoencephalitis, fulminant hepatitis, and bleeding manifestations may sometimes be life-threatening. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. Prevention by educating the community and public health officials, vector control measures appear to be the best approach at controlling Chikungunya fever as no commercially available vaccine is available for public use in India for this condition presently.

  9. EPIDEMIOLOGY, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, AND DIAGNOSIS OF CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER: LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE RE-EMERGING EPIDEMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Alladi; Kiran, DHN; Manohar, I Chiranjeevi; Kumar, D Prabath

    2010-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, caused by “Chikungunya virus,” is an arbovirus disease transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes belonging to the genus Aedes. Chikungunya fever epidemics have been reported from several countries around the world. The disease that was silent for nearly 32 years re-emerged in the October 2005 outbreak in India that is still ongoing. The incubation period ranges from 3 to 12 days. The onset is usually abrupt and the acute stage is characterized by sudden onset with high-grade fever, severe arthralgias, myalgias, and skin rash. Swollen tender joints and crippling arthritis are usually evident. In the chronic stage, relapses that include sensation of fever, asthenia, exacerbation of arthralgias, inflammatory polyarthritis, and stiffness may be evident. Neurological, ocular, and mucocutaneous manifestations have also been described. Chronic arthritis may develop in about 15% of the patients. Viral culture is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Chikungunya fever. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification have also been found to be useful. Serodiagnostic methods for the detection of immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies against Chikungunya virus are more frequently used. Chikungunya is a self-limiting disease; however, severe manifestations such as meningoencephalitis, fulminant hepatitis, and bleeding manifestations may sometimes be life-threatening. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. Prevention by educating the community and public health officials, vector control measures appear to be the best approach at controlling Chikungunya fever as no commercially available vaccine is available for public use in India for this condition presently. PMID:20418981

  10. Effect of HLA-B*27 and its subtypes on clinical manifestations and severity of ankylosing spondylitis in Iranian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Fallahi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the role of HLA-B*27 and it's subtypes in determining severity and clinical manifestations of ankylosing spondylitis (AS.A total of 163 AS patients were assessed for clinical manifestations and severity using structured questionnaires. HLA-B*27 screening and B*27 sub-typing were performed by PCR.One hundred twenty two patients (74.8% were B*27 positive. The male to female ratio, peripheral arthritis, steroid use, intense dorsal kyphosis and decrease of cervical slope had a significantly higher frequency in B*27 positive patients compared to B*27 negative ones (p=0.01, 0.001, 0.01, 0.04 and 0.04, respectively. However, the age of diagnosis was significantly lower in B*27 positive patients (p=0.005. Trend in uveitis and some severity markers including: BASMI and ASQoL were toward higher values in B*27 positive group with no significant difference. After controlling confounding variables, significant relationship was found only between B*27 and BASMI (p=0.01. B*27 subtypes in patients were included B*2705: 48.4%, B*2702: 42.6%, B*2704: 5.7% and B*2707: 3.3%. No significant differences were seen for severity markers and clinical manifestations between subtypes; although trend toward lower values of severity markers, less intense dorsal kyphosis and less decrease of cervical slope were observed in B*2704 and B*2707 versus other polymorphisms.Clinical features and severity of AS is influenced by HLA-B*27. Trend toward higher severity markers in B*2705 and B*2702 versus other polymorphisms might be subject of interest for evaluation in other ethnicities with concentration to other novel susceptibility genes co-inherited in each B*27 subtype.

  11. [Characteristics of immunologic changes and clinical manifestations of allergy in children with impaired thyroid function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illek, Ia Iu; Ganiev, A G; Makhmudzhanova, K A; Alimdzhanova, I I

    1990-01-01

    The majority of children with allergic diathesis, living in the Andizhan region of the Uzbek SSR manifest the signs of stable abnormalities of thyroid function, that aggravate immunological alterations and the course of the process. This prompts the use in these children of therapeutic measures aimed at correction of the activity of the thyroid apparatus. With this purpose in view, the children with allergic diathesis associated with increased thyroid function may be administered aqueous solution of potassium iodide whereas those with functional thyroid deficiency may be given thyroidin in proper age-associated doses.

  12. Graduated clinical manifestations according to mutation type in patients with severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus; Møller, Rikke Steensbjerre; Dahl, Hans Atli

    Background Severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI) is a severe form of generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures (GEFS+). SMEI is a rare disorder characterized by generalized tonic, clonic, and tonic-clonic seizures that are initially induced by fever and begin during the first year of life....... Later, patients also manifest other seizure types, including absence, myoclonic, and simple and complex partial seizures. Psychomotor development stagnates around the second year of life. SME is considered to be the most severe phenotype within the spectrum of GEFS+. SME is a malignant epileptic...

  13. Incidence and clinical manifestations of rotavirus infection among children with acute diarrhea admitted at Buri Ram Hospital, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungkapalee, Thrissawan; Puntukosit, Puntawee; Eunsuwan, Orapun; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Chongsrisawat, Voranush; Poovorawan, Yong

    2006-11-01

    To study the incidence and clinical manifestations of rotavirus among children at Buri Ram Hospital, admitted with the diagnosis of acute diarrhea between November 2005 and February 2006. In the course of a cross sectional descriptive study, 103 stool samples obtained from inpatients below the age of 5 years were examined for rotavirus by RT- PCR. Data on clinical manifestations, complications, administration of antibiotics, length of admission and hospital cost were obtained by means of questionnaires distributed among physicians. The statistics used were presented as percentage, mean and 95% confidence interval, while chi-square and unpaired t-test were used to establish significant differences at p < 0.05. Rotavirus was detected in 45 of 103 stool samples (43.68%, 95%CI = 33.93, 53.81). No significant differences were found between clinical manifestations of children with rotavirus infection and non-rotavirus infection as both groups displayed acute watery diarrhea (p = 0.33), fever (p = 0.80), nausea or vomiting (p = 0.08), predominant lymphocytes (p = 0.54), absence of red blood cells (p = 0.63) or white blood cells (p = 0.57) in the stool examination, moderate or severe dehydration (p = 0.06), lactose intolerance (p = 0.41), hypokalemia (p = 0.55), metabolic acidosis (0.18) Administration of antibiotics was significantly reduced for treatment of rotavirus acute diarrhea (31.1% vs 63.8%, p = 0.001). Hospital cost and length of admission were significantly reduced in rotavirus acute diarrhea (1,845.04 baht vs 2,297.00 baht, p < 0.01) (2.09 days vs 2.81 days, p < 0.001). Compared to previous studies, no differences were found in the percentage of rotavirus acute diarrhea. Rotavirus infection is a major cause for hospitalization of children below the age of 5 years with acute diarrhea. Clinical characteristics of rotavirus acute diarrhea were not significantly different from those due to other etiologies. Diagnosis of rotavirus infection should be based on

  14. Carney complex and McCune Albright syndrome: an overview of clinical manifestations and human molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpea, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2014-04-05

    Endocrine neoplasia syndromes feature a wide spectrum of benign and malignant tumors of endocrine and non-endocrine organs associated with other clinical manifestations. This study outlines the main clinical features, genetic basis, and molecular mechanisms behind two multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes that share quite a bit of similarities, but one can be inherited whereas the other is always sporadic, Carney complex (CNC) and McCune-Albright (MAS), respectively. Spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac and other myxomas, and different types of endocrine tumors and other characterize Carney complex, which is caused largely by inactivating Protein kinase A, regulatory subunit, type I, Alpha (PRKAR1A) gene mutations. The main features of McCune-Albright are fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD), café-au-lait macules and precocious puberty; the disease is caused by activating mutations in the Guanine Nucleotide-binding protein, Alpha-stimulating activity polypeptide (GNAS) gene which are always somatic. We review the clinical manifestations of the two syndromes and provide an update on their molecular genetics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. [Specific clinical and functional features in the patients presenting with neurologic manifestations of deforming dorsopathies and concomitant osteoarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriutova, N F; Zaĭtsev, A A; Popova, A V

    2012-01-01

    The present study has revealed some specific clinical and functional features in the patients presenting with neurologic manifestations of deforming dorsopathies and concomitant osteoarthrosis. The negative influence of the latter condition on the pain intensity, microcirculation, and duration of the exacerbation of neurologic syndrome has been demonstrated based on the analysis of correlational relationships between the severity of referred projectional nerve root pain and articular pain syndrome. Special emphasis is laid on the interrelation between the duration of pain syndrome and characteristics of microcirculation.

  16. The clinical manifestation of MCAD deficiency: challenges towards adulthood in the screened population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Ulrich A; Ensenauer, Regina

    2010-10-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common fatty acid oxidation disorder. Typically, undiagnosed individuals are asymptomatic until an episode of increased energy demand and fasting occurs, resulting in metabolic derangement. Phenotypic heterogeneity has been increasingly realized, with reports of both neonates and adults manifesting with life-threatening symptoms including encephalopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and cardiac failure. If diagnosed presymptomatically, outcome is favorable basically by avoidance of fasting. Early detection by newborn screening (NBS) has significantly reduced the incidence of severe adverse events including deaths. In this manuscript we focus on the natural course of the disease in both children and adults. Although NBS for MCADD has been successfully established, continuing efforts need to be made to avoid acute crises and deterioration of outcome in screened patients entering adolescence and adulthood.

  17. [Complete atrioventricular block as the first clinical manifestation of a tick bite (Lyme disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacino, Luca; Gazzarata, Massimo; Siri, Giambattista; Cordone, Stefano; Bellotti, Paolo

    2011-03-01

    A 52-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department because of malaise and frequent dizziness. The ECG revealed high-grade atrioventricular block that required placement of a temporary pacemaker. There were no other abnormalities in physical and echocardiographic examination, and coronary angiography excluded the presence of coronary artery disease. IgM and IgG antibodies against Borrelia were positive, and antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone at the dose of 2 g/die for 15 days resulted in rapid regression of atrioventricular block. Seven-day ECG recording immediately after discharge and 24h ECG monitoring at 40 days confirmed the total disappearance of atrioventricular block. This represents a case of atrioventricular block as the first manifestation of Borrelia infection (Lyme disease). A prompt diagnosis and antibiotic therapy usually result in complete resolution of atrioventricular block without the need for a permanent pacemaker.

  18. KIR : HLA association with clinical manifestations of HBV infection in Madurai, south India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narayanan Kalyanaraman; Lakshmikanthan Thayumanavan; Mariakuttikan Jayalakshmi

    2016-03-01

    The antiviral action of natural killer (NK) cells is regulated by a wide repertoire of germ-line encoded membrane receptors which recognize the expression of certain self-molecules on target cells. Among the receptors, killer cell immunoglobulinlikereceptor (KIR) which recognizes the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I has a predominant role in regulating the effector functions of NK cells, particularly in viral infections. We studied a total of 128 hepatitis B virus (HBV)patients (15 acute, 43 asymptomatic, 27 chronic and 43 with other liver diseases) while attending the Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, India, and 128 ethnic matched control to find the association between the KIR : HLA genes and differential manifestations of HBV. KIR and its ligand HLA polymorphism were identified by DNAPCR methods. The activatory receptor KIR-2DS1 was significantly elevated in various disease categories, namely asymptomatic, chronic and other HBV, except acute HBV infection. Whereas, KIR 2DS3 in acute and chronic patients and KIR 2DS5 and 3DS1 in asymptomatic individuals. Among various KIR–HLA combinations, homozygous 2DS2:C1 and individuals with 3DSI:BW4 (OR = 3.23, CI = 1.55–6.7, Pc = 0.02) are associated with HBV asymptomatism, while most of the two domain inhibitory receptors with their ligands showed significant risk in other liver diseases. Further, KIR3DL1 : HLA Bw4Iso80 (OR = 3.89, 95% CI = 1.58–9.55, Pc = 0.004) is related with higher risk for asymptomatic infection when compared with chronic HBV. Thus, the select KIR : HLA alleles and combinations seem to direct the NK cell activities and immune response in different directions resulting in varied symptoms and manifestations in the subgroups of HBV-infected patientsstudied.

  19. KIR : HLA association with clinical manifestations of HBV infection in Madurai, south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanaraman, Narayanan; Thayumanavan, Lakshmikanthan; Jayalakshmi, Mariakuttikan

    2016-03-01

    The antiviral action of natural killer (NK) cells is regulated by a wide repertoire of germ-line encoded membrane receptors which recognize the expression of certain self-molecules on target cells. Among the receptors, killer cell immunoglobulinlike receptor (KIR) which recognizes the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I has a predominant role in regulating the effector functions of NK cells, particularly in viral infections.We studied a total of 128 hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients (15 acute, 43 asymptomatic, 27 chronic and 43 with other liver diseases) while attending the Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, India, and 128 ethnic matched control to find the association between the KIR : HLA genes and differential manifestations of HBV. KIR and its ligand HLA polymorphism were identified by DNAPCR methods. The activatory receptor KIR-2DS1 was significantly elevated in various disease categories, namely asymptomatic, chronic and other HBV, except acute HBV infection. Whereas, KIR 2DS3 in acute and chronic patients and KIR 2DS5 and 3DS1 in asymptomatic individuals. Among various KIR-HLA combinations, homozygous 2DS2:C1 and individuals with 3DSI:BW4 (OR = 3.23, CI = 1.55-6.7, Pc = 0.02) are associated with HBV asymptomatism, while most of the two domain inhibitory receptors with their ligands showed significant risk in other liver diseases. Further, KIR3DL1 : HLA Bw4Iso80 (OR = 3.89, 95% CI = 1.58-9.55, Pc = 0.004) is related with higher risk for asymptomatic infection when compared with chronic HBV. Thus, the select KIR : HLA alleles and combinations seem to direct the NK cell activities and immune response in different directions resulting in varied symptoms and manifestations in the subgroups of HBV-infected patients studied.

  20. Clinical manifestation and humoral immuno-function of myasthenia gravis patients with abnormal and normal thymus gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuhua Peng; Yongqiang Dai; Wei Qiu; Xueqiang Hu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease which mainly affects neuromuscular junctions. The ages, modified Osserman classification and clinical manifestation and humoral immunol function of MG with and without thymic abnormality are different.OBJECTIVE: To explore the clinical manifestation and humoral immuno-function of MG with abnormal and normal thymus gland.DESIGN: Contrast observation.SETTING: Department of Neurology, the Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 49 inpatients with MG were selected from the Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University from March 2000 to August 2005. All the patients had typical clinical manifestation of MG and positive neostigmine test. All the patients knew and agreed the laboratory examinations. There were 22 males and 27 females of 2-69 years old. Chest MRI or CT scan were performed to reveal thymus gland abnormality. According to whether there was tumor in superior mediastinum, all patients were divided into 2 groups, abnormal and normal groups. Normal thymus gland group (n=30) contained 16 males and 14 famales of 6-43 years old. Abnormal thymus gland group (n=19) contained 6 male and 13 female of 2-69years old.METHODS: ① All patients were questioned about initial symptoms. Meanwhile, main clinical manifestations were recorded at hospital admission. ② 7180A automatic biochemical analyzer and automatic microplate reader were used in detecting seroimmunity index. The levels of C3, C4, IgG, IgA, IgM and CH50 in blood serum were analyzed by nephelometry. ③ Clinical classification is based on modified Osserman classification. The patients with MG were divided into six types: Ⅰ (Ocular myasthenia), Ⅱ a (Mild generalized myasthenia), Ⅱ b (Moderately severe generalized myasthenia), Ⅲ (Acute fulminating myasthenia), Ⅳ (Late severe myasthenia).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Differences of initial symptoms and clinical manifestation of two group patients.

  1. Clinical Manifestations of Nontyphoid Salmonellosis in Children Younger than 2 Years Old—Experiences of a Tertiary Hospital in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Fei Huang

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: The clinical manifestations of nontyphoid salmonellosis are more severe in younger children <2 years of age than older children. Local susceptibility patterns could serve as a guide for the prescription of antibiotics by clinicians.

  2. Distinct features of circulating microparticles and their relationship to clinical manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer T; Østergaard, Ole; Johnsen, Christina;

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of the abundance, origin, and annexin V (AnxV)-binding capabilities of circulating microparticles (MPs) in SLE patients and healthy controls and to determine any associations with clinical parameters.......Characterization of the abundance, origin, and annexin V (AnxV)-binding capabilities of circulating microparticles (MPs) in SLE patients and healthy controls and to determine any associations with clinical parameters....

  3. Sexual dimorphism in Parkinson’s disease: differences in clinical manifestations, quality of life and psychosocial functioning between males and females

    OpenAIRE

    Farhadi, Farzaneh; Vosoughi, Kia; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Delbari, Ahmad; Lökk, Johan; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sex-related differences in clinical manifestations and consequences of Parkinson’s disease (PD) have been poorly explored. Better understanding of sexual dimorphism in neurologic diseases such as PD has been announced as a research priority. The aim of our study was to determine independent sex differences in clinical manifestations and subtypes, psychosocial functioning, quality of life (QoL) and its domains between male and female individuals with PD. Patients and methods A com...

  4. Genetic variation in Micro-RNA genes of host genome affects clinical manifestation of symptomatic Human Cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Maneesh Kumar; Mishra, Aditi; Pandey, Shashi Kant; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2015-10-01

    Micro-RNAs are implicated in various physiological and pathologic processes. In this study, we tested whether Micro-RNA gene variants of host-genome affect clinical manifestation of symptomatic HCMV infection. HCMV infection was detected by fluorescent PCR and immuno-histochemistry. The detection of genetic variants of four studied Micro-RNA tag-SNPs was done through PCR-RFLP assay and validated with DNA sequencing. We observed an increased risk ranged from 3-folds to 5-folds among symptomatic HCMV cases for mutant genotype of rs2910164 (crude OR=3.11, p=0.009 and adjusted OR=3.25, p=0.007), rs11614913 (crude OR=3.20, p=0.006 and adjusted OR=3.48, p=0.004) and rs3746444 (crude OR=4.91, p=0.002 and adjusted OR=5.28, p=0.002) tag-SNPs. Interestingly, all the tag-SNPs that were significant after multiple comparisons at a FDR of 5% in symptomatic HCMV cases remained significant even after bootstrap analysis, providing internal validation to these results. Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) analysis revealed 5-folds increased risk for symptomatic HCMV cases under the four-factor model (rs2910164, rs2292832, rs11614913 and rs3746444). These results suggest that Micro-RNA gene variants of host-genome may affect clinical manifestation of symptomatic HCMV infection. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions and Its Clinical Manifestation of Pediatric Prescription on 2 Pharmacies in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa I. Barliana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI in prescription have high incidence around the world, including Indonesia. However, scientific evidence regarding DDI in Indonesia is not available. Therefore, in this study we have conducted survey in 2 pharmacies in Bandung against pediatric prescription given by pediatrician. These prescriptions then analyzed the potential for DDI contained in the prescription and clinical manifestation. The analysis showed that in pharmacy A, there are 33 prescriptions (from a total of 155 prescriptions that have potential DDI, or approximately 21.19% (2 prescriptions have the potential DDI major categories, 23 prescriptions categorized as moderate, and 8 prescriptions as minor. In Pharmacy B, there are 6 prescriptions (from a total of 40 prescriptions or 15% of potential DDI (4 prescriptions categorized as moderate and 2 prescriptions as minor. This result showed that potential DDI happened less than 50% in pediatric prescription from both pharmacies. However, this should get attention because DDI should not happen in a prescription considering its clinical manifestations caused by DDI. Moreover, current pharmaceutical care refers to patient oriented than product oriented. In addition, further study for the pediatric prescription on DDI incidence in large scale need to be investigated.

  6. Serum levels of Th1/Th2 cytokines in aged patients and their correlation with eczema development and clinical manifestation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Gang Wang; Feng-Lin Hou; Xiu-Ming Zhang; Shi-Wu Ma; Jin-Jun Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate variations of Th1/Th2 cytokine levels, as well as their correlation with eczema development and clinical manifestation in aged patients.Methods: A total of 92 patients (above 60 years old) with eczema diagnosed by the outpatient department of dermatology and venerology of our hospital were included as the eczema group, while 60 aged patients without eczema as the healthy group. Patients' serum levels of Th1/Th2 cytokines were examined for inter-group comparison and stratified analysis as per clinical manifestation. Results:Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were all significantly higher in patients of the eczema group than the healthy group. Acute stage levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ were significantly higher in patients of the eczema group than the healthy group. There was no significant difference in the levels of IL-12 and TNF-α between patients of the acute stage and those of the chronic stage. And no significant difference existed in the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ between generalized and localized eczema patients.Conclusion:Compared with the healthy population, Th1/Th2 cytokine levels are significantly different in eczema patients, especially those in the acute stage.

  7. Mucocutaneous Manifestations of HIV and the Correlation with WHO Clinical Staging in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olumayowa Abimbola Oninla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin diseases are indicators of HIV/AIDS which correlates with WHO clinical stages. In resource limited environment where CD4 count is not readily available, they can be used in assessing HIV patients. The study aims to determine the mucocutaneous manifestations in HIV positive patients and their correlation with WHO clinical stages. A prospective cross-sectional study of mucocutaneous conditions was done among 215 newly diagnosed HIV patients from June 2008 to May 2012 at adult ART clinic, Wesley Guild Hospital Unit, OAU Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ilesha, Osun State, Nigeria. There were 156 dermatoses with oral/oesophageal/vaginal candidiasis (41.1%, PPE (24.4%, dermatophytic infections (8.9%, and herpes zoster (3.8% as the most common dermatoses. The proportions of dermatoses were 4.5%, 21.8%, 53.2%, and 20.5% in stages 1–4, respectively. A significant relationship (using Pearson’s Chi square with P value <0.05 was obtained between dermatoses and WHO clinical stages. Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed a positive correlation between the number of dermatoses and the WHO clinical stages. Dermatoses can therefore serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers in resource limited settings to initiate HAART in clinical stages 3 and 4.

  8. Etiopathogenetic consideration and definition of the clinical manifestation of erosive dental defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojšin Ivana M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental defects of erosive nature are defined as irreversible losses of dental tissue, caused by long lasting and repeated action of acids that dissolve top layer of hydroxyapatite and fluorideapatites crystal structure, under assumption that aggressive factor is not of bacterial nature. Acids that cause changes on teeth according to their origin are gastric, dietetic, or they are of environmental origin. Current way of life, as well as nutritional habits create potentially dangerous conditions for the hard dental tissue, for prevention of mineralization process causes defects of oral system homeostasis. Defects occur on primary teeth, as well as on permanent teeth. However, this happens once and a half time more frequently on primary teeth due to the weaker primary maturation. In initial phases, changes are localized in enamel and by their development the bottom locates in dentine. Defects appear as smooth, shiny, round concavities on caries immune positions, or as cupping of occlusal surfaces. The depth of an eroded lesion consists of the depth of the crater plus the depth of tissue demineralization at the base of the lesion. Early verification of the etiological factor, together with good knowledge of the manifested shape change has influence to the prevention of the crown of tooth loss, complete occlusion, mastication and speech.

  9. [Vertebrogenic chest pain--"pseudoangina pectoris": etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrogenic pain localised in the anterior thorax can imitate anginal pain ("pseudoangina pectoris"). The most common causes of vertebrogenic chest pain are segmental dysfunction and degenerative changes at the level of the lower cervical and upper middle thoracic spine. Segmental dysfunction is a source of pseudoradicular pain, and degenerative changes, before all disc hernia and dorsal osteophytes which are compressing corresponding nerve roots, are the sources of radicular pain which irradiates in the chest. Because of its similarity with angina pectoris, the intense chest pain caused by the cervical radiculopathy which is often followed by heart rhythm disorders and nonspecific changes of the ST-T-segment in ECG, is called "cervicogenic angina". The attacks of vertebrogenic chest pain are not rare even in patients with angina pectoris. Because of superimposed vertebrogenic pain, the manifestation of pain in patients with angina pectoris can be considerably changed which can be misinterpreted as unstable angina. From therapeutic aspect it is very important to distinguish vertebrogenic from anginal pain. That is, the change of cardiological therapy will not eliminate possible attacks of vertebrogenic pain in patients with angina pectoris. From the aspect of most recent understandings, the article describes etiopathogenesis, characteristics, diagnosis and therapy of vertebrogenic chest pain, and also the differences between vertebrogenic and anginal pain.

  10. Nitroglycerin reverts clinical manifestations of poor peripheral perfusion in patients with circulatory shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.P. Lima (Alexandre ); M.E. van Genderen (Michel); J. van Bommel (Jasper); E. Klijn (Elko); T. Jansem (Tim); J. Bakker (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Recent clinical studies have shown a relationship between abnormalities in peripheral perfusion and unfavorable outcome in patients with circulatory shock. Nitroglycerin is effective in restoring alterations in microcirculatory blood flow. The aim of this study was to

  11. Thrombocytopenia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Clinical Manifestations, Treatment, and Prognosis in 230 Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jung, Jin-Hee; Soh, Moon-Seung; Ahn, Young-Hwan; Um, Yoo-Jin; Jung, Ju-Yang; Suh, Chang-Hee; Kim, Hyoun-Ah

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the clinical characteristics and prognosis according to severity of thrombocytopenia and response to treatment for thrombocytopenia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE...

  12. Distinct features of circulating microparticles and their relationship to clinical manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer T; Østergaard, Ole; Johnsen, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of the abundance, origin, and annexin V (AnxV)-binding capabilities of circulating microparticles (MPs) in SLE patients and healthy controls and to determine any associations with clinical parameters....

  13. Influence of the bacterial phenotypes on the clinical manifestations in Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togawa, Atsushi; Toh, Hiromi; Onozawa, Kyoko; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Tokushige, Chiemi; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Takata, Tohru; Tamura, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    Ninety-four episodes of Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infection were identified at a university hospital in Japan. After excluding extended-spectrum beta lactamase-producing strains, 83 blood isolates from these patients were assayed in terms of their bacterial phenotypes such as the mucoid and hypermucoviscosity phenotypes. Bacterial phenotypes were correlated with the patients' clinical manifestations. The hypermucoviscosity phenotype was significantly associated with septic shock at the onset of infections (odds ratio, 15.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-468.12), but was not associated with liver abscess formation. Mortality was determined by the presence of septic shock. RmpA gene was associated with the induction of the hypermucoviscosity phenotype. These results reveal unique roles of bacterial phenotypes on the patient's clinical condition in K. pneumoniae bacteremia.

  14. Clinical manifestations of Helicobacter-associated chronic gastroduodenitis in children with giardiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolnyk, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the nature of the clinical course of chronic gastroduodenitis (CGD) in children with giardiasis invasion. Patients and methods. A complex clinical, instrumental and laboratory examination of children in the age 7–18 years with Helicobacter-associated chronic gastroduodenitis is conducted. The first group consisted of 62 children with CGD without giardiasis invasion, the second group consisted of 43 children with CGD and giardiasis. Results. In the presence of giardiasis...

  15. Spondylodiscitis as the only clinical manifestation of the onset of psoriatic spondyloarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bruzzese

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis falls within the family of seronegative spondyloarthritis given that the involvement of the spine, whether in combination with peripheral arthritis or not, is one of the most common clinical fi ndings of the disease. Symptomatological polymorphism of the disease, however, still includes several clinical subsets ranging from peripheral arthritis, mono-, oligo- and polyarticular, to enthesitis and dactylitis, all the way to crippling arthritis. Despite the frequent

  16. Clinical manifestations of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD): kidney-related and non-kidney-related phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büscher, Rainer; Büscher, Anja K; Weber, Stefanie; Mohr, Julia; Hegen, Bianca; Vester, Udo; Hoyer, Peter F

    2014-10-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), although less frequent than the dominant form, is a common, inherited ciliopathy of childhood that is caused by mutations in the PKHD1-gene on chromosome 6. The characteristic dilatation of the renal collecting ducts starts in utero and can present at any stage from infancy to adulthood. Renal insufficiency may already begin in utero and may lead to early abortion or oligohydramnios and lung hypoplasia in the newborn. However, there are also affected children who have no evidence of renal dysfunction in utero and who are born with normal renal function. Up to 30 % of patients die in the perinatal period, and those surviving the neonatal period reach end stage renal disease (ESRD) in infancy, early childhood or adolescence. In contrast, some affected patients have been diagnosed as adults with renal function ranging from normal to moderate renal insufficiency to ESRD. The clinical spectrum of ARPKD is broader than previously recognized. While bilateral renal enlargement with microcystic dilatation is the predominant clinical feature, arterial hypertension, intrahepatic biliary dysgenesis remain important manifestations that affect approximately 45 % of infants. All patients with ARPKD develop clinical findings of congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF); however, non-obstructive dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts in the liver (Caroli's disease) is seen at the histological level in only a subset of patients. Cholangitis and variceal bleeding, sequelae of portal hypertension, are life-threatening complications that may occur more often in advanced cases of liver disease. In this review we focus on common and uncommon kidney-related and non-kidney-related phenotypes. Clinical management of ARPKD patients should include consideration of potential problems related to these manifestations.

  17. Alternative mitochondrial functions in cell physiopathology: beyond ATP production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowaltowski A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mitochondria are the main site for ATP generation within most tissues. However, mitochondria also participate in a surprising number of alternative activities, including intracellular Ca2+ regulation, thermogenesis and the control of apoptosis. In addition, mitochondria are the main cellular generators of reactive oxygen species, and may trigger necrotic cell death under conditions of oxidative stress. This review concentrates on these alternative mitochondrial functions, and their role in cell physiopathology.

  18. 梅毒少见的临床表现%Rare clinical manifestations of syphilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲新露; 季必华

    2013-01-01

    Due to non-standardized administration of antibiotics,changes in homosexual behavior,human immunodeficiency virus co-infection,missed diagnosis of syphilis during pregnancy,and non-administration of benzathine benzylpenicillin for syphilis treatment in the first and last three months of pregnancy,many uncommon or rare manifestations haven been observed in syphilitic patients with the involvement of skin,mucous membrane,bone,joints,cardiovascular system,nervous system,alimentary system and respiratory system,which increases difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of syphilis.This paper presents atypical syphilis cases reported at home and abroad in recent years,in hope to enhance clinicians' understanding of syphilis,so as to facilitate early diagnosis of syphilis and reduce systemic damages caused by syphilis.%由于抗生素的不规范使用,同性恋人群性行为的变化,合并HIV感染,孕期梅毒未发现及孕期前后3个月内未给予苄星青霉素治疗等因素,均可导致梅毒感染者发生皮肤黏膜、骨关节、心血管系统、神经系统、消化系统及呼吸系统少见或不典型病变,给诊断及治疗带来困难.概述近年来报道的梅毒少见临床表现,为临床医生提供更广泛的思路,及早发现及诊断梅毒,减少梅毒引起的系统性损害.

  19. Comparison of clinical features and health manifestations in lean vs. obese Indian women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Majumdar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the prevalence of clinical manifestations in obese and lean polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS women and their health hazards. Settings and Design: This prospective study was carried out in a tertiary care infertility clinic from 1.7.2005 till 31.12.2007. Materials and Methods: These women were diagnosed to have PCOS by the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology and the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, Rotterdam 2003 criteria. They were further divided into two groups according to their body mass index (BMI: Group A (n = 300, overweight and obese with BMI> 23 and Group B (n = 150, normal weight and lean with BMI ≤23. Stastical Analysis and Results: The prevalence of menstrual irregularities [79.2% vs. 44%, P = 0.000, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.26-0.44] and clinical hyperandrogenism (74.2% vs. 50.6%, P = 0.000, 95% CI=0.14-0.32 was signifi cantly higher in the obese group, whereas android central obesity (waist to hip ratio> 0.85 was similar in both groups, irrespective of body weight (47.7% vs. 38%, P = 0.056, 95% CI=0.06 to +0.18. Comparative data of various health manifestations in lean vs. obese women with POCS [Table 4]. Of the health risk manifestations, hypertension occurred in both groups with a similar frequency (41% vs. 35.5%, P = 0.261, 95% CI=0.03 to +0.15. Group A showed an increased prevalence of IGT (25% vs. 10%, P = 0.000, 95% CI= 0.13-0.29 and type two diabetes mellitus (11.7% vs. 6%, P = 0.000, 95% CI= 0.13-0.29 as compared with group B. endometrial hyperplasia (EH also showed an increase prevalence in Group A compared with Group B (5.6% vs. 2%, P = 0.055, 95% CI= 0.01-0.08, although not statistically significant. Conclusion: PCOS emerges as a clinically heterogeneous condition with increased prevalence of health risks such as hypertension, diabetes and EH. Of these, diabetes and EH appear to be more prevalent in the obese, putting them at a greater risk of morbid problems at a much

  20. CT findings of acute pyelonephritis in children; correlation with clinical manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Kyong; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Jung Eun; Lee, Seung Joo [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT findings of acute pyelonephritis (APN) in children and to assess the correlation between these findings, clinical parameters and renal scar development, as seen on follow-up CT scans. Contrast-enhanced CT scans of thirty children in whom APN had been diagnosed were assigned to one of three groups according to whether an abscess had formed, and then to subgroups on the basis of the number of lesions in the renal parenchyme. Initial CT findings were retrospectively correlated with five clinical parameters (maximal body temperature, fever duration, leukocytosis, pyuria and admission period) and renal scar development, as seen on follow-up CT (n=12). CT scans demonstrated linear, wedge-shaped, low-density renal parenchymal lesions in 35 kidneys of 25 patients and abscesses in seven kidneys of seven patients, but no abnormal lesions in five patients. In the three groups there was correlation between these findings and some clinical parameters(maximal body temperature, fever duration and admission period), but no subgroup showed significant correlation with any clinical parameter. Renal cortical scars detected by follow-up CT were more prevalent in patients in whom initial CT demonstrated the presence of an abscess. Clinical parameters correlated with the presence of renal parenchymal hypoenhancing lesions and abscess formation, as seen on CT scans, rather than the number of renal parenchymal lesions. Renal cortical scars were more prevalent in patients in whom initial CT revealed the presence of an abscess. Enhanced CT is thought to be useful both for diagnosing APN and for predicting its clinical course in children.

  1. Long-Term Clinical Outcomes According to Previous Manifestations of Atherosclerotic Disease (from the FAST-MI 2010 Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puymirat, Etienne; Aissaoui, Nadia; Lemesle, Gilles; Cottin, Yves; Coste, Pierre; Schiele, François; Ferrières, Jean; Simon, Tabassome; Danchin, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has notably improved in the past 20 years. Using the French Registry of ST-Elevation and Non-ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (FAST-MI) 2010 registry, we investigated whether previous manifestations of atherosclerotic disease (i.e., previous MI, or a history of any form of atherosclerotic disease) are at truly increased risk compared with those in whom AMI is the first manifestation of the disease. FAST-MI 2010 is a nationwide French registry including 3,079 patients with AMI, among whom 1,062 patients had a history of cardiovascular atherosclerotic disease and 498 patients had a history of MI. Overall, patients with a history of atherosclerotic disease (or MI) were older compared with patients without known cardiovascular disease (71 ± 13 vs 63 ± 14 years) and had higher cardiovascular risk profiles and co-morbidities. Using fully adjusted Cox multivariate analysis, previous manifestations of atherosclerotic disease were associated with higher 3-year mortality (hazard ratio 1.80, 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 2.31; p <0.001) as history of previous MI alone (hazard ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 1.73; p = 0.048). Similar results were found in patients discharged alive. In conclusion, previous cardiovascular atherosclerotic disease represents 1/3 of patients with AMI and are strongly associated with worse long-term clinical outcomes. Intensive follow-up and therapy should be encouraged in this high-risk population.

  2. Lesão muscular: fisiopatologia, diagnóstico, tratamento e apresentação clínica Muscle injury: physiopathology, diagnostic, treatment and clinical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Lazzaretti Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O tecido muscular esquelético possui a maior massa do corpo humano, com 45% do peso total. As lesões musculares podem ser causadas por contusões, estiramentos ou lacerações. A atual classificação separa as lesões entre leve, moderada e grave. Os sinais e sintomas das lesões grau I são edema e desconforto; grau II, perda de função, gap e equimose eventual; grau III, rotura completa, dor intensa e hematoma extenso. O diagnóstico pode ser confirmado por: ultrassom - dinâmico, barato, porém examinador-dependente; tomografia ou ressonância magnética - maior definição anatômica, porém estático. A fase inicial do tratamento se resume ao protocolo PRICE. AINH, ultrassom terapêutico, fortalecimento e alongamento após a fase inicial e amplitudes de movimento sem dor são utilizados no tratamento clínico. Já o cirúrgico possui indicações precisas: drenagem do hematoma, reinserção e reforço musculotendíneos.Skeletal muscle tissue has the largest mass in the human body, accounting for 45% of the total weight. Muscle injuries can be caused by bruising, stretching or laceration. The current classification divides such injuries into mild, moderate and severe. The signs and symptoms of grade I lesions are edema and discomfort; grade II, loss of function, gaps and possible ecchymosis; and grade III, complete rupture, severe pain and extensive hematoma. The diagnosis can be confirmed by: ultrasound, which is dynamic and cheap, but examiner dependent; and tomography or magnetic resonance, which gives better anatomical definition, but is static. Initial phase of the treatment can be summarized as the "PRICE" protocol. NSAIDs, ultrasound therapy, strengthening and stretching after the initial phase and range of motion without pain are used in clinical treatment. On the other hand, surgery has precise indications: hematoma drainage and muscle-tendon reinsertion and reinforcement.

  3. Clinical Manifestations of HIV/AIDS in Children in Northwest Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yemane Berhane

    Objective: To study the clinical profile of HIV/AIDS in children. ... complaint were cough and/or difficult breathing 52 (58.4%) and diarrhea 47 ... first one year of life and almost all cases of perinatal ..... In contrast to acute gastroenteritis in.

  4. Early clinical manifestations and eating patterns in patients with urea cycle disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardeitchik, T.; Humphrey, M.; Nation, J.; Boneh, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize dietary habits and eating patterns in patients with a urea cycle disorder (UCD), and to identify dietary habits that may serve as clues to lead to earlier diagnosis of these disorders. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective study of clinical and dietary data from hospital

  5. Hyposplenism: a comprehensive review. Part II: clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, Basem M; Thawani, Nitika; Sae-Tia, Sutthichai; Corazza, Gino R

    2007-04-01

    In the first part of this review, we described the physiological basis of splenic function and hypofunction. We also described the wide spectrum of diseases that can result in functional hyposplenism. In the second part of this review, we will be discussing the clinical picture, including complications, diagnostic methods, and management of hyposplenism.

  6. Early clinical manifestations and eating patterns in patients with urea cycle disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardeitchik, T.; Humphrey, M.; Nation, J.; Boneh, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize dietary habits and eating patterns in patients with a urea cycle disorder (UCD), and to identify dietary habits that may serve as clues to lead to earlier diagnosis of these disorders. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective study of clinical and dietary data from hospital

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  9. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL FEATURES OF KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS WITH CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION MANIFESTATION IN THE EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Limareva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To optimize the management of postoperative renal allograft recipients through the introduction of methods for predicting risk of manifestation of cytomegalovirus infection on the basis of a comprehensive assessment of the clinical and immunological status. Materials and methods. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 303 patients with end-stage renal disease, among them – were the recipients of renal allograft – 136, among whom 29 within 2 months after the operation had clinical signs of CMV infection. Assessable "CMV syndrome", laboratory evidence of CMV infection, the incidence of antigens (genes of HLA A, B and DRB *1, calculated goodness of fit χ2 and relative risk RR, changes MCP-1 in urine. Results. In renal allograft recipients with clinical and laboratory evidence of CMV infection in the early postoperative period, significantly more (χ2 > 3,8 met antigen B35. A positive association with CMV infection was detected also for DRB1 * 08, B21, B22, B41, A24 (9, B51 (5, DRB1*14 and DRB1*15. Protective effects possessed antigens / alleles of genes A26 (10, B14, B38 (16 B61 (40 and DRB1*16. MCP-1 levels in this group of recipients were raised to 2174,7 ± 296,3 pg/ml with a strong negative correlation with the levels of urea and creatinine in serum (r = 0,9, p < 0.001. Conclusion. Immunological markers of risk manifestation of CMV infection in recipients of kidneys in the early postoperative period are: the carriage of В35 и В55,56(22, В49(21, В41, DRB1*08 и DRB1*15, an increase of levels of MCP-1 in urine without increasing the levels of urea and creatinine in the serum. 

  10. Polymorphic sites at the immunoregulatory CTLA-4 gene are associated with chronic chagas disease and its clinical manifestations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício C Dias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease affects approximately 10 million people mainly in Latin America. The immune regulation by the host seems to be an essential factor for disease evolution, and immune system inhibitory molecules such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 favor the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Considering that polymorphisms at the immunoregulatory CTLA-4 and PDCD1 genes may alter their inhibitory function, we investigated the association of alleles, genotypes and haplotypes of polymorphic sites observed at the CTLA-4 and PDCD1 genes with different clinical manifestations of chronic Chagas disease (indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and mixed. METHODS: The polymorphisms at the CTLA-4 (-1722T/C, -318C/T and +49A/G and PDCD1 (PD-1.3G/A genes were typed using TaqMan methodology in 277 chronic Chagas disease patients classified into four groups, according to clinical characteristics, and 326 non-infected controls. RESULTS: Our results showed that CTLA-4 -1722CC genotype (22%, -1722C allele (27% and CTLA-4 TCG (8.6%, TCA (26% and CCA (15% haplotypes were strongly associated with the indeterminate form, while the CTLA-4-318CT genotype (82% and CTLA-4-318T allele (47% were found mainly in patients with the mixed form of the disease. The CTLA-4 TCG haplotype (10.2% was associated with the digestive form. On the other hand, the PD-1.3G/A polymorphism was not associated with chronic Chagas disease and its clinical manifestations. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we showed that alleles, genotypes and haplotypes reported to increase the expression of the regulatory molecule CTLA-4 were associated with the indeterminate form of the disease. Taken together, our data support the idea that polymorphic sites at immunoregulatory genes may influence the development of Chagas disease variants.

  11. Diabetic neuropathic pain: Physiopathology and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne K Schreiber; Carina FM Nones; Renata C Reis; Juliana G Chichorro; Joice M Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of bothtype 1 and type 2 diabetes, which affects over 90% ofthe diabetic patients. Although pain is one of the mainsymptoms of diabetic neuropathy, its pathophysiologicalmechanisms are not yet fully known. It is widelyaccepted that the toxic effects of hyperglycemia play animportant role in the development of this complication,but several other hypotheses have been postulated.The management of diabetic neuropathic pain consistsbasically in excluding other causes of painful peripheral neuropathy, improving glycemic control as a prophylactic therapy and using medications to alleviate pain. First line drugs for pain relief include anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin and gabapentin and antidepressants, especially those that act to inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenaline. In addition, there is experimental and clinical evidence that opioids can be helpful in pain control, mainly if associated with first line drugs. Other agents, including for topical application, such as capsaicin cream and lidocaine patches, have also been proposed to be useful as adjuvants in the control of diabetic neuropathic pain, but the clinical evidence is insufficient to support their use. In conclusion, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathic pain will contribute to the search of new therapies, but also to the improvement of the guidelines to optimize pain control with the drugs currently available.

  12. Clinical Evaluation of Specific Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Ascertained versus Potential Coeliac Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Ennio Bramanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients involved on coeliac disease (CD have atypical symptoms and often remain undiagnosed. Specific oral manifestations are effective risk indicators of CD and for this reason an early diagnosis with a consequent better prognosis can be performed by the dentist. There are not researches analysing the frequency of these oral manifestations in potential coeliac patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the oral hard and soft tissue lesions in potential and ascertained coeliac children in comparison with healthy controls. 50 ascertained children, 21 potential coeliac patients, and 54 controls were recruited and the oral examination was performed. The overall oral lesions were more frequently present in CD patients than in controls. The prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions was 62% in ascertained coeliac, 76.2% in potential coeliac patients, and 12.96% in controls (P<0.05. Clinical dental delayed eruption was observed in 38% of the ascertained coeliac and 42.5% of the potential coeliac versus 11.11% of the controls (P<0.05. The prevalence of specific enamel defects (SED was 48% in ascertained coeliac and 19% in potential coeliac versus 0% in controls (P<0.05; OR=3.923. The SED seem to be genetically related to the histological damage and villous atrophy.

  13. Anti-TNFα-therapy as an evidence-based treatment option for different clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhm, Michaela; Burkhardt, Harald; Behrens, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The development programmes of different TNF-blocking agents in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) not only provided substantial evidence for the therapeutic benefits of the specific treatment options, but also enabled new insights into the differential treatment effects on distinct disease manifestations. For the first time, specific robust evidence for distinctive effects on different manifestations of PsA, as a distinct entity separate from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has been generated in a standardized way. The clearest evidence was shown for an effect on peripheral arthritis (polyarticular) with ACR20 response rates from 45 up to 58% (vs. 9-24% for placebo), and an inhibition of radiographic progression demonstrated for the first time for a treatment principle in PsA. However, as PsA does not remain confined to the peripheral joints, it was necessary to address diverse patterns of PsA-subtypes in the outcome measurements of the anti-TNF trials. Accordingly, the results of the clinical studies on anti-TNF treatment also have demonstrated efficacy on enthesitis, dactylitis and skin psoriasis, either in sub analysis of results from phase III RCTs, or in additional prospective studies.

  14. Zika and Spondweni Viruses: Historic Evidence of Misidentification, Misdiagnosis and Serious Clinical Disease Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    3-5). Consequently, the clinical case 42 reports by MacNamara (2), the work by Bearcroft (6) involving the experimental infection of a 43 human ...and utilize a mosquito/host (non- human 52 primate and/or human ) transmission cycle. ZIKV has a wide geographic distribution that 53 includes East...unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED 5 reproductive years. The extent of cross-protection exhibited within the Spondweni Serogroup is 70 unknown, and cross

  15. Clinical and allergological analysis of ocular manifestations of sick building syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Yusuke; Kadonosono, Kazuaki; Uchio, Eiichi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The disease concept of sick building syndrome (SBS) is still unclear. Ocular mucous membrane irritation is one of the major symptoms of SBS. However, the immunological aspects of the ocular complications of SBS are not yet clarified. The clinical and allergological aspects of SBS cases with ocular disorders with special reference to allergic conjunctival diseases (ACD) were analyzed, especially with respect to local immunological features. Methods Twelve cases of SBS with ocular findings and 49 cases of ACD (allergic conjunctivitis [AC], atopic keratoconjunctivitis [AKC], and vernal keratoconjunctivitis [VKC]) for comparison were evaluated. The clinical findings in SBS and ACD were scored, and tear film breakup time (BUT) was measured. Cytokine (interferon-γ [IFN-γ], interleukin [IL]-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-13) concentrations in tears were analyzed by cytometric bead arrays. Eosinophil count in peripheral blood, total IgE in serum, and multiple allergen simultaneous test (MAST) for antigen-specific IgE were also measured. Results In SBS, conjunctival lesions were observed in all cases, and corneal abnormalities were found in two-thirds of the cases. Limbal lesions were observed in 2 pediatric cases. Mean serum total IgE level in SBS was significantly higher than that in AC; however, it was significantly lower than that in AKC and VKC. Eosinophil count in peripheral blood and number of positive allergens in MAST were significantly lower in SBS than in AKC and VKC. Significant elevation of tear IL-4 was observed in SBS and ACD. However, in contrast to ACD, elevation of other cytokines in tears was not observed in SBS. Mean tear BUT in SBS was in the normal range. Conclusion From these results, SBS is thought to be partially induced by an allergic response. However, clinical dissociation of the ocular clinical findings and local immunological features in tear cytokines may suggest that SBS belongs to a different entity from ACD. PMID:28352150

  16. Correlation between radiologic and ultrasonographic patterns and clinical manifestations in symptomatic hip osteoarthritis

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    A. Alimonti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing amounts of data have recenlty been published regarding ultrasonographic (US findings of osteoarthritic joints, but very few data concern hip joints. In the current study we described US patterns concerning 490 patients affected by symptomatic hip osteoarthritis (OA who underwent to intra-articular injections of hyaluronic products under US guidance. All patients were studied by US and X-ray of hip, clinical evaluation was assessed by the followings indexes: Lequesne, pain VAS, ICED, Global Physician Assessment and Global Patient Assessment. US findings were summarized in four main patterns, effusion and synovial proliferation were also detected. The aim of this study was to correlate US findings with clinical assessment and radiographic findings (according to Kellegren- Lawrence classification. Pearson’s r correlation coefficient were computed and come out significant and positive between X ray and US patterns and between clinical indexes and US patterns. Also the correlation between K-L score and US patterns showed a significant positive correlation indicating that higher K-L scores are associated with increasing abnormal US findings. Our data suggest that ultrasonography of the hip may give useful information about the state of synovial membrane, synovial fluid, joint margins and bone profile in hip OA. Further studies are needed to evaluate their prevalence in hip OA symptomatic and not-symptomatic patients and their correlation to treatment outcome.

  17. [Piriformis muscle syndrome: etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2013-01-01

    The term 'piriformis syndrome' (PS), introduced by Robinson in 1947, implies a group of signs and symptoms caused by piriformis muscle (PM) disorders. Since PM disorders lead to irritation/compression of the anatomic structures passing under its belly, the main clinical PS signs and symptoms are actually the clinical signs and symptoms of irritation/ compression of neural and vascular structures passing through the infrapiriform foramen: sciatic nerve/SN, inferior gluteal nerve, posterior femoral cutaneous nerve, pudendal nerve, inferior gluteal artery and vein and inferior pudendal artery and vein. The clinical picture is usually dominated by signs and symptoms of irritation/compression of SN (SN irritation --> low back and buttock pain, sciatica,paresthesias in distribution of SN; SN compression --> low back and buttock pain,sciatica, paresthesias and neurologic deficit in distribution of SN). Irritation/compression of other structures can result in the following signs and symptoms: inferior gluteal nerve --> atrophy of gluteal muscles; posterior femoral cutaneous nerve --> pain, paresthesias and sensory disturbances in the posterior thigh; pudendal nerve --> pudendal neuralgia, painful sexual intercourse (dyspareunia), sexual dysfunction, urination and defecation problems; inferior gluteal artery --> ischemic buttock pain; inferior pudendal artery --> ischemic pain in the area of external sex organs, perineum and rectum, sexual dysfunction, urination and defecation problems; inferior gluteal vein --> venous stasis in gluteal area; inferior pudendal vein --> venous stasis in external sex organs and rectum. Functional/non-organic and organic PM disorders can cause PS: spasm, shortening, hypertrophy, anatomic variations, edema, fibrosis, adhesions, hematoma, atrophy, cyst, bursitis, abscess, myositis ossificans, endometriosis, tumors (functional disorders: PM spasm and shortening). The most common causes for PS are PM spasm, shortening and hypertrophy and anatomic

  18. Extrahepatic manifestations of HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignoli, R; Goossens, N; Negro, F

    2015-03-01

    The hepatic consequences of an infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are well recognised, but extrahepatic manifestations of HCV may be just as severe. Here we have reviewed various extrahepatic manifestations of HCV such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, lymphoma, metabolic features and neurologic consequences and we discuss pathogenesis and management of these clinical problems. We concluded with important aspects of therapy with novel anti-HCV agents and its effects on extrahepatic manifestations.

  19. A SONOGRAPHIC SHORT CERVIX AS THE ONLY CLINICAL MANIFESTATION OF INTRA-AMNIOTIC INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    HASSAN, SONIA; ROMERO, ROBERTO; HENDLER, ISRAEL; GOMEZ, RICARDO; KHALEK, NAHLA; ESPINOZA, JIMMY; NIEN, JYH KAE; BERRY, STANLEY M.; BUJOLD, EMMANUEL; CAMACHO, NATALIA; SOROKIN, YORAM

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A sonographically short cervix is a powerful predictor of spontaneous preterm delivery. However, the etiology and optimal management of a patient with a short cervix in the mid-trimester of pregnancy remain uncertain. Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and intra-amniotic inflammation are frequently present in patients with spontaneous preterm labor or acute cervical insufficiency. This study was conducted to determine the rate of MIAC and intra-amniotic inflammation in patients with a cervical length <25 mm in the mid-trimester. STUDY DESIGN A retrospective cohort study was conducted of patients referred to our high risk clinic because of a sonographic short cervix or a history of a previous preterm birth. Amniocenteses were performed for the evaluation of MIAC and for karyotype analysis in patients with a short cervix. Fluid was cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, as well as genital mycoplasmas. Patients with MIAC were treated with antibiotics selected by their physician. RESULTS Of 152 patients with a short cervix at 14–24 weeks, 57 had amniotic fluid analysis. The prevalence of MIAC was 9% (5/57). Among these patients, the rate of preterm delivery (<32 weeks) was 40% (2/5). Microorganisms isolated from amniotic fluid included Ureaplasma urealyticum (n=4) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (n=1). Patients with a positive culture for Ureaplasma urealyticum received intravenous Azithromycin. Three patients with Ureaplasma urealyticum had a sterile amniotic fluid culture after treatment, and subsequently delivered at term. The patient with Fusobacterium nucleatum developed clinical chorioamnionitis and was induced. CONCLUSION 1) Sub-clinical MIAC was detected in 9% of patients with a sonographically short cervix (<25 mm); and 2) maternal parenteral treatment with antibiotics can eradicate MIAC caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum. This was associated with delivery at term in the three patients whose successful treatment was documented by

  20. Temporal bone trauma: correlative study between CT findings and clinical manifestations

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    Kim, Jung Hee; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jae Hyoung [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    To assess how accurately computed tomography (CT) can demonstrate the abnormal findings which are believed to cause the clinical signs and symptoms of hearing loss (HL), vertigo and facial paralysis (FP) in patients with temporal bone trauma. The authors studied CT scans of 39 ears in 35 patients with temporal bone trauma. CT scans were performed with 1-1.5 mm slice thickness and table incrementation. Both axial and coronal scans were obtained in 32 patients and in three patients only axial scans were obtained. We analyzed CT with special reference to the structural abnormalities of the external auditory canal, middle ear cavity, bony labyrinth, and facial nerve canal, and correlated these findings with the actual clinical signs and symptoms. As to hearing loss, we evaluated 32 ears in which pure tone audiometry or brainstem evoked response audiometry had been performed. With respect to the specific types of HL, CT accurately showed the abnormalities in 84% (16/19) in conductive HL, 100% (2/2) in sensorineural HL, and 25% (2/8) for mixed HL. When we categorized HL simply as conductive and sensorineural, assuming that mixed be the result of combined conductive and sensorineural HL, CT demonstrated the abnormalities in 89% (24/27) for conductive HL and 50% (5/10) for sensorineural HL. Concerning vertigo and FP, CT demonstrated abnormalities in 67%(4/6), and 29% (4/14), respectively. Except for conductive HL, CT seems to have a variable degree of limitation for the demonstration of the structural abnormalities resulting sensorineural HL, vertigo or facial paralysis. It is imperative to correlate the CT findings with the signs and symptoms in those clinical settings.

  1. VGKC-complex/LGI1-antibody encephalitis: clinical manifestations and response to immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Won; Lee, Soon-Tae; Shin, Jung-Won; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Byun, Jung-Ick; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Kim, Young-Su; Park, Kyung-Il; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2013-12-15

    Leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) was recently identified as a target protein in autoimmune synaptic encephalitis, a rare condition associated with autoantibodies against structures in the neuronal synapse. Studies dealing with LGI1 are small in number and the various outcomes of different therapeutic regimens are not well studied. Here, we analyzed clinical characteristics of 14 patients with LGI1 antibodies, and outcomes according to therapeutic strategies. Most patients exhibited abnormal brain positron emission tomography and that patients treated with steroids alone were more likely to relapse and had less favorable outcomes than those treated with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulins.

  2. The black widow spider bite: differential diagnosis, clinical manifestations, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackleford, Rodney; Veillon, Diana; Maxwell, Nicole; LaChance, Lisa; Jusino, Tamara; Cotelingam, James; Carrington, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Unrecognized and untreated black widow spider bites cause significant pain, impairment, and rarely death. The widow venom, a powerful neurotoxin known as a-latrotoxin, causes muscle pain, diaphoresis, tachycardia, flushing, and hypertension. Treatment is usually symptomatic with a combination of opioid analgesics and muscle relaxants. If symptom resolution fails, an equine IgG antiserum is available, but a high index of clinical suspicion coupled with a knowledgeable patient history often allows successful treatment, especially when the treating physician possesses awareness of this type of bite and its usual course and possible complications.

  3. Progress in the research of genetics and clinical manifestation of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

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    HUANG Xiao-jun

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD is a disorder characterized by recurrent and brief attacks that are induced by sudden voluntary movement with highly clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Familial PKD are mostly autosomal dominant inherited and proline-rich transmembrare protein 2 (PRRT2 gene has been identified as the causative gene for PKD. So far 56 mutations have been documented and most of them are nonsense ones. No obvious genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed and the function of PRRT2 is still unclear, but the interaction between PRRT2 and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25 will shed the light on the research of PKD mechanism.

  4. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CLINICAL MANIFESTATION, PLAIN FILM RADIOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR DIAGNOSIS OF MAXILLOFACIAL TRAUMA

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    Amit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Maxillofacial injuries are one of commonest injuries encountered. Roentgenographic evaluation of maxillofacial trauma is of prime importance for diagnosis and treatment of these injuries. STUDY DESIGN: Forty patients were evaluated in prospective four year study. We studied and evaluated the demography and diagnostic efficacy of clinical, plain radiography, and computed scan in maxillofacial trauma. RESULT: Road traffic accidents were commonest cause of maxillofacial injuries. Patients having multiple fractures, mandibular fractures was commonest. CONCLUSION: Computed tomography proved a useful adjunct in mid facial trauma.

  5. Acromegaly with Normal Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Levels and Congestive Heart Failure as the First Clinical Manifestation

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    Hyae Min Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with acromegaly is cardiovascular complications. Myocardial exposure to excessive growth hormone can cause ventricular hypertrophy, hypertension, arrhythmia, and diastolic dysfunction. However, congestive heart failure as a result of systolic dysfunction is observed only rarely in patients with acromegaly. Most cases of acromegaly exhibit high levels of serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1. Acromegaly with normal IGF-1 levels is rare and difficult to diagnose. Here, we report a rare case of an acromegalic patient whose first clinical manifestation was severe congestive heart failure, despite normal IGF-1 levels. We diagnosed acromegaly using a glucose-loading growth hormone suppression test. Cardiac function and myocardial hypertrophy improved 6 months after transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary adenoma.

  6. Acromegaly with Normal Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Levels and Congestive Heart Failure as the First Clinical Manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyae Min; Lee, Sun Hee; Yang, In Ho; Hwang, In Kyoung; Hwang, You Cheol; Ahn, Kyu Jeung; Chung, Ho Yeon; Hwang, Hui Jeong; Jeong, In Kyung

    2015-09-01

    The leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with acromegaly is cardiovascular complications. Myocardial exposure to excessive growth hormone can cause ventricular hypertrophy, hypertension, arrhythmia, and diastolic dysfunction. However, congestive heart failure as a result of systolic dysfunction is observed only rarely in patients with acromegaly. Most cases of acromegaly exhibit high levels of serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Acromegaly with normal IGF-1 levels is rare and difficult to diagnose. Here, we report a rare case of an acromegalic patient whose first clinical manifestation was severe congestive heart failure, despite normal IGF-1 levels. We diagnosed acromegaly using a glucose-loading growth hormone suppression test. Cardiac function and myocardial hypertrophy improved 6 months after transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary adenoma.

  7. [Andersen-Tawil syndrome: a review of its clinical and genetic diagnosis with emphasis on cardiac manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Manlio F; Totomoch-Serra, Armando; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Cruz-Robles, David; Pellizzon, Oscar A; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The Andersen-Tawil syndrome is a cardiac ion channel disease that is inherited in an autosomal dominant way and is classified as type 7 of the congenital long QT syndromes. Affected gene is KCNJ2, which forms the inward rectifier potassium channel designated Kir2.1. This protein is involved in stabilizing the resting membrane potential and controls the duration of the action potential in skeletal muscle and heart. It also participates in the terminal repolarization phase of the action potential in ventricular myocytes and is a major component responsible for the correction in the potassium current during phase 3 of the action potential repolarization. Kir 2.1 channel has a predominant role in skeletal muscle, heart and brain. Alterations in this channel produce flaccid paralysis, arrhythmias, impaired skeletal development primarily in extremities and facial area. In this review we address the disease from the point of view of clinical and molecular diagnosis with emphasis on cardiac manifestations.

  8. The GABAergic System and the Gastrointestinal Physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auteri, Michelangelo; Zizzo, Maria Grazia; Serio, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report about the presence of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, accumulating evidence strongly supports the widespread representation of the GABAergic system in the enteric milieu, underlining its potential multifunctional role in the regulation of GI functions in health and disease. GABA and GABA receptors are widely distributed throughout the GI tract, constituting a complex network likely regulating the diverse GI behaviour patterns, cooperating with other major neurotransmitters and mediators for maintaining GI homeostasis in physiologic and pathologic conditions. GABA is involved in the circuitry of the enteric nervous system, controlling GI secretion and motility, as well as in the GI endocrine system, possibly acting as a autocrine/paracrine or hormonal agent. Furthermore, a series of investigations addresses the GABAergic system as a potential powerful modulator of GI visceral pain processing, enteric immune system and carcinogenesis. Although overall such actions may imply the consideration of the GABAergic system as a novel therapeutic target in different GI pathologic states, including GI motor and secretory diseases and different enteric inflammatory- and pain-related pathologies, current clinical applications of GABAergic drugs are scarce. Thus, in an attempt to propel novel scientific efforts addressing the detailed characterization of the GABAergic signaling in the GI tract, and consequently the development of novel strategies for the treatment of different GI disorders, we reviewed and discussed the current evidence about GABA actions in the enteric environment, with a particular focus on their possible therapeutic implications.

  9. Postperfusion lung syndrome: physiopathology and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but can be lethal. The underlying mechanism remains uncertain but triggering inflammatory cascades have become an accepted etiology. A better understanding of the pathophysiology and the roles of inflammatory mediators in the development of the syndrome is imperative in the determination of therapeutic options and promotion of patients' prognosis and survival. Postperfusion lung syndrome is similar to adult respiratory distress syndrome in clinical features, diagnostic approaches and management strategies. However, the etiologies and predisposing risk factors may differ between each other. The prognosis of the postperfusion lung syndrome can be poorer in comparison to acute respiratory distress syndrome due to the secondary multiple organ failure and triple acid-base imbalance. Current management strategies are focusing on attenuating inflammatory responses and preventing from pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury. Choices of cardiopulmonary bypass circuit and apparatus, innovative cardiopulmonary bypass techniques, modified surgical maneuvers and several pharmaceutical agents can be potential preventive strategies for acute lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  10. Pheochromocytoma: physiopathologic implications and diagnostic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapanti, Evangelia; Ilias, Ioannis

    2006-11-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PHEO) is a chromaffin cell tumor embryologically arising from the neural crest tissue. The dominant secretory products of PHEO are catecholamines: noradrenaline (norepinephrine), adrenaline (epinephrine), and to a lesser extent dopamine. In addition to catecholamines, PHEO cells also elaborate and release several neuropeptides and inflammatory cytokines which can exert intra-adrenal and extra-adrenal systemic effects and cause characteristic clinical syndromes. In a concise review we present the intra-adrenal and extra-adrenal pathophysiologic implications of PHEO and the nuclear medicine modalities that permit functional imaging of physiological processes and help localize these tumors. The specific pathways of synthesis, metabolism, and inactivation of catecholamines (of PHEOs and paragangliomas) can be used as means to develop suitable tracers for positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. In this review we focus on imaging with PET using [(18)F]-fluorodopamine, [(18)F]-fluorohydroxyphenylalanine, [(11)C]-epinephrine, or [(11)C]-hydroxyephedrine and examine how functional imaging can often complement traditional anatomical imaging modalities and other scintigraphic techniques.

  11. Functional state of kidneys in patients with clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism

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    Marina M. Orlova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to study the function of kidneys and serum concentration of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 in conditions of thyroid hormone deficit. Methods – The character and severity of renal dysfunction were investigated in patients with primary hypothyroidism. The clinical examination included study of serum concentration of creatinine, urea level, potassium and natrium in blood serum, blood and urine analyses, total cholesterol, high and low density lipoproteins, daily microalbuminuria, the performing of Zimnitsky test, urinary excretion of chemokines MCP-1, RANTES, rate calculation of glomerular filtration, thyroid hormone state. Results – The renal function in clinical hypothyroidism without concomitant kidney disturbances was characterized by normal parameters of the concentrational kidney function, reduction of glomerular filtration rate, increased of serum creatinine, urea excretion level of chemokineMCP-1 and level of cytokines IL-6, IL-8 in patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism were revealed. Conclusion – It was revealed that autoimmune hypothyroidism effected balance disturbance of cytokine-producing activity of Th1 and Th2 type therefore developing autoimmune state and disease progression.

  12. Functional state of kidneys in patients with clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism

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    Rodionova T.I.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to study the function of kidneys and serum concentration of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-1ГА, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 in conditions of thyroid hormone deficit. Methods: The character and severity of renal dysfunction were investigated in patients with primary hypothyroidism. The clinical examination included study of serum concentration of creatinine, urea level, potassium and natrium in blood serum, blood and urine analyses, total cholesterol, high and low density lipoproteins, daily microalbuminuria, the performing of Zimnitsky test, urinary excretion of chemokines MCP-1, RANTES, rate calculation of glomerular filtration, thyroid hormone state. Results: The renal function in clinical hypothyroidism without concomitant kidney disturbances was characterized by normal parameters of the concentra-tional kidney function, reduction of glomerular filtration rate, increased of serum creatinine, urea excretion level of chemokine MCP-1 and level of cytokines IL-6, IL-8 in patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism were revealed. Conclusion: It was revealed that autoimmune hypothyroidism effected balance disturbance of cytokine-producing activity of Th1 and Th2 type therefore developing autoimmune state and disease progression

  13. Hair and Scalp Manifestations in Secondary Syphilis: Epidemiology, Clinical Features and Trichoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraccini, Bianca Maria; Broccoli, Alessandro; Starace, Michela; Gaspari, Valeria; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Dika, Emi; Patrizi, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    Syphilitic alopecia (SA) is mainly described in single case reports, and there are only a few epidemiological studies. To investigate the clinical and dermoscopic features of SA in patients with secondary syphilis and to record its actual prevalence. All patients with a diagnosis of secondary syphilis were clinically and trichoscopically evaluated in search of hair and scalp alterations. Five of 12 patients (41.6%) diagnosed with secondary syphilis had SA. The 'moth-eaten' pattern was detected in 4 patients (80% of cases): 1 had 'essential' SA, whereas 3 patients had 'symptomatic' SA. The 'diffuse' SA pattern was found in 1 patient. Trichoscopy of the 'moth-eaten' areas showed that alopecia is mainly due to a reduction in the number of terminal hairs. One patient with secondary syphilis showed trichodynia that regressed completely after antibiotic therapy. The small number of patients included and the fact that none of our patients accepted to be biopsied in an affected area. Since SA appears to be present much more frequently than reported in the literature, when secondary syphilis is suspected, the patient should be examined for the presence of signs compatible with SA and the scalp should be examined by dermoscopy.

  14. Osteogenesis imperfecta type V: clinical and radiographic manifestations in mutation confirmed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hwa; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Kosaki, Keisuke; Kim, Jung-Wook; Cho, Sung Yoon; Yoo, Won Joon; Choi, In Ho; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2013-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type V is a specific OI phenotype with interosseous membrane calcification of the forearm and hyperplastic callus formation as typical features. The causative gene mutation for OI type V has been recently discovered. The purpose of this report is to review the clinical and radiographic characteristics of mutation confirmed OI type V in detail. Sixteen (nine familial and seven sporadic) patients were enrolled in the study. Blue sclera and dentinogenesis imperfecta were not evident in any patient. However, hypodontia in the permanent teeth, ectopic eruption, and short roots in molars were additionally observed in 11 patients. Of the radiographic abnormalities, cortical thickening and bony excrescence of interosseous margin of the ulna was the most common finding, followed by overgrowth of the olecranon and/or coronoid process of the ulna. Slender ribs and sloping of the posterior ribs with or without fractures were also a consistent finding. Hyperplastic callus was detected in 75% of patients and was commonly encountered at the femur. Heterotopic ossification in the muscles and tendon insertion sites were noted in four patients, which resulted in bony ankylosis or contracture of joints. The current study confirms common clinical and radiographic findings of OI type V and reports additional phenotypic information. These observations provide clues to recognize OI type V more promptly and guide to direct targeted molecular study. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [The clinical manifestations and diagnostics of otitis media caused by tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriukov, A I; Garov, E V; Ivoĭlov, A Y U; Shadrin, G B; Sidorina, N G; Lavrova, A S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the characteristic pathognomonic features of middle ear lesions associated with tuberculosis and the approaches to their diagnostics under the present-day conditions. The study included 11 cases (18 ears) of tuberculosis otitis media and the related lesions of the mastoid process diagnosed with the use of clinical, roentgenological, cytological, bacteriological, pathomorphological, and molecular-genetic methods (including PCR diagnostics). The primary localization of tuberculosis in the middle ear was documented in 6 patients; in 5 patients, it was associated with pulmonary involvement. Five patients presented with smoldering exudative otitis media and the remaining six ones with suppurative perforating otitis media. The tuberculous process was diagnosed with the use of various methods including clinical examination, bacteriological (9%), cytological (27.3%), pathomorphological (18%) studies, and PCR diagnostics (55%). Diagnosis was made within a period from 1 month to 1.5 years after the application of the patients for medical assistance which suggests the difficulty of verification of tuberculous etiology of the disease of the middle ear. It is concluded that the high index of suspicion in the case of smoldering middle ear pathology facilitates its early diagnostics and successful treatment.

  16. Altered E-Cadherin Levels and Distribution in Melanocytes Precede Clinical Manifestations of Vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Roselyne Y; Luciani, Flavie; Cario-André, Muriel; Rubod, Alain; Petit, Valérie; Benzekri, Laila; Ezzedine, Khaled; Lepreux, Sébastien; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Taieb, A; Gauthier, Yvon; Larue, Lionel; Delmas, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting disorder resulting from the loss of melanocytes from the basal epidermal layer. The pathogenesis of the disease is likely multifactorial and involves autoimmune causes, as well as oxidative and mechanical stress. It is important to identify early events in vitiligo to clarify pathogenesis, improve diagnosis, and inform therapy. Here, we show that E-cadherin (Ecad), which mediates the adhesion between melanocytes and keratinocytes in the epidermis, is absent from or discontinuously distributed across melanocyte membranes of vitiligo patients long before clinical lesions appear. This abnormality is associated with the detachment of the melanocytes from the basal to the suprabasal layers in the epidermis. Using human epidermal reconstructed skin and mouse models with normal or defective Ecad expression in melanocytes, we demonstrated that Ecad is required for melanocyte adhesiveness to the basal layer under oxidative and mechanical stress, establishing a link between silent/preclinical, cell-autonomous defects in vitiligo melanocytes and known environmental stressors accelerating disease expression. Our results implicate a primary predisposing skin defect affecting melanocyte adhesiveness that, under stress conditions, leads to disappearance of melanocytes and clinical vitiligo. Melanocyte adhesiveness is thus a potential target for therapy aiming at disease stabilization.

  17. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: Clinical, laboratory, and imaging manifestations in patients with hepatic involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gi Beom; Lee, Jong Min; Sung, Yeong Soon; Kang, Duk Sik [Kyungpook Natioanl University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ok Hwoa [Dongkang general Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    The hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) commonly involves liver and spleen but only a few literature has reported the imaging features. In this article, we present the imaging features of the liver and spleen in HES patients together with clinical and laboratory features. This study included 5 HES patients with hepatic involvement. Extensive laboratory tests including multiple hematologic, serologic, parasitological, and immunologic examinations were performed. Imaging studies included CT, ultrasound (US)of upper abdomen and hepatosplenic scintigraphy. All patients were periodically examined by laboratory and imaging studies for 4 to 24 months. The common clinical presentations were weakness, mild fever, and dry cough. All patients revealed leukocytosis with eosinophilia of 40 to 80% and benign eosinophilic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. The percutaneous biopsy of the hepatic focal lesions performed in 2 patients showed numerous benigin eosinophilic infiltrates and one of them revealed combined calibration necrosis of hepatocytes. All cases revealed hepatomegaly with multiple focal lesions on at least on of CT, US, or scintigraphy. These findings completely disappeared in 2 to 6 months following medication of corticosteroid or antihistamines. The HES involved the liver and CT, US, or scintigraphic studies showed hepatic multifocal lesions with hepatomegaly. Differential diagnosis of these findings should include metastatic disease, lymphoma, leukemia, candidiasis or other opportunistic infections.

  18. Ringo: discordance between the molecular and clinical manifestation in a golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, Eder; Valadares, Marcos Costa; Vieira, Natássia M; Bueno, Carlos R; Secco, Mariane; Jazedje, Tatiana; da Silva, Helga Cristina Almeida; Vainzof, Mariz; Zatz, Mayana

    2010-01-01

    Of the various genetic homologues to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog, which presents a variable but usually severe and progressive muscle weakness, has the closest relevance to DMD in both clinical severity and histopathological change. Among 77 GRMD dogs born in our colony in Brazil, we have identified a very mildly affected dog, Ringo, born July 2003. Among his descendants, at least one male, Suflair, is also showing a mild course. In an attempt to better characterize these two dogs, we studied the pattern of muscle proteins expression in Ringo and Suflair, as compared to severely affected and normal control dogs. Dystrophin was absent in both and utrophin was overexpressed in a pattern similar to the observed in severely affected dogs. Understanding the mechanism that is protecting Ringo and Suflair from the deleterious effect of the dystrophin gene mutation is of utmost interest. In addition it points out that the clinical impact of therapeutic trials should be interpreted with caution.

  19. Epidemiological and clinical manifestations of patients hospitalized with brown recluse spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, P; Ziv, M; Rozenman, D

    2006-10-01

    Necrotic arachnidism represents a common health problem and standard treatments are usually safe and effective. The aim of this study was to review documented Loxosceles species spider envenomations and identify the natural history of affected patients. A retrospective single-centre study included 52 patients with necrotic arachnidism hospitalized in the dermatology department between 1997 and 2004. We examined the relationship between the epidemiological, clinical and laboratory parameters and degree of lesion severity, length of hospitalization and time to complete healing. The bites occurred predominantly in rural areas, 67% between April and August. Only 35% of the patients sought medical care within 24 h post bite. Most bites were of the extremities (67%). Time to complete healing ranged from 14 days to more than 8 weeks (mean, 4.8 weeks). A marked relationship was found between age, comorbidities, lesion severity and time to complete healing (P spider bites frequently induce necrotic, slowly healing ulcers on the fatty areas of the body. Early, appropriate systemic therapy may provide clinical benefit.

  20. The challenge of Clostridium difficile infection: Overview of clinical manifestations, diagnostic tools and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Nynke; Kiers, Dorien; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The most important infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis is Clostridium difficile, which is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, toxin-producing bacillus. In this overview we will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients presenting with suspected or proven C. difficile infection (CDI). The clinical spectrum varies from asymptomatic C. difficile carriers to fulminant colitis with multi-organ failure. The onset of symptoms is usually within 2 weeks after initiation of antibiotic treatment. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical symptoms and either a positive stool test for C. difficile toxins or endoscopic or histological findings of pseudomembranous colitis. There is no indication for treatment of asymptomatic carriers, but patients with proven CDI should be treated. Treatment consists of cessation of the provoking antibiotic treatment, secondary prevention by infection control strategies, and treatment with metronidazole or vancomycin. Treatment of recurring CDI, severe infection, the need for surgery, and novel alternative potential treatment strategies will be discussed. The concurrent increase in multiresistant colonisation and increasing numbers of asymptomatic carriers of C. difficile will lead to an increase of the situation in which patients with severe infections, treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, will develop concurrent severe CDI. We will discuss possible therapy strategies for these patients.

  1. [Clinical manifestation and influential factors in patients with acute arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Wei; Yang, Zhi-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yi-Li; Jiang, Wen-Zhong; Wu, Yi-Xing; Liu, Yi-Min; Gu, Li-Cheng

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics of acute arsenic poisoning and its influential factors. Clinical data of 47 cases of arsenic poisoning were collected and analyzed. Two cases of observation, 40 cases of mild acute poisoning, and 5 severe acute poisoning were investigated in this group. Myocardial enzyme activity was correlated with age and urine arsenic concentrations. Myocardial enzyme, the liver ALT, total bilirubin (TBil) and indirect bilirubin (IBil) were negatively correlated with vomiting frequency, with statistical significance (P arsenic concentration was correlated with vomiting frequency and amount of soup drunk, with statistically significant difference (P arsenic concentrations, cardiac enzymes and liver enzyme concentration. Acute arsenic poisoning can lead to multiple organ damage. The damage is relevant with amount of arsenic intake, vomiting, diarrhea and urinary frequency arsenic concentration. So early use of gastric lavage, vomiting, poison discharges, and adequate application of effective antidote (Na-DMPS) as soon as possible, symptomatic treatment and the reinforced monitoring, are the rescue key for patients with acute arsenic poisoning.

  2. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and outcomes of Streptococcus suis infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, Vu Thi Lan; Ha, Ngo; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Horby, Peter; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Zhu, Xiaotong; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Hien, Tran Tinh; Zamora, Javier; Schultsz, Constance; Wertheim, Heiman Frank Louis; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcus suis, a bacterium that affects pigs, is a neglected pathogen that causes systemic disease in humans. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize global estimates of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of this zoonosis. We searched main literature databases for all studies through December 2012 using the search term "streptococcus suis." The prevalence of S. suis infection is highest in Asia; the primary risk factors are occupational exposure and eating of contaminated food. The pooled proportions of case-patients with pig-related occupations and history of eating high-risk food were 38.1% and 37.3%, respectively. The main clinical syndrome was meningitis (pooled rate 68.0%), followed by sepsis, arthritis, endocarditis, and endophthalmitis. The pooled case-fatality rate was 12.8%. Sequelae included hearing loss (39.1%) and vestibular dysfunction (22.7%). Our analysis identified gaps in the literature, particularly in assessing risk factors and sequelae of this infection.

  3. Nephrotic syndrome as a clinical manifestation of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in a marrow transplant recipient after cyclosporine withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J S; Bahia, D; Franco, M; Balda, C; Stella, S; Kerbauy, J

    1999-01-01

    GVHD is one of the most frequent complications of BMT and recently nephrotic syndrome (NS) has been described as a manifestation of chronic GVHD. Here, we present an AA patient who developed NS 1 year after BMT when cyclosporine was stopped. Renal biopsy showed focal sclerosis associated with membranous deposits. He also had other clinical manifestations of chronic GVHD: sicca-like syndrome and colestasis. After 15 days of CsA therapy, he experienced a remarkable improvement in the NS and GVHD as a whole. We comment on immunological mechanisms that could be involved in the pathogenesis of this manifestation.

  4. Hypofibrinolytic State in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Aggravated by the Metabolic Syndrome before Clinical Manifestations of Atherothrombotic Disease

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    Elsa Aburto-Mejía

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metabolic and genetic factors induce plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 overexpression; higher PAI-1 levels decrease fibrinolysis and promote atherothrombosis. Aim. To assess PAI-1 antigen levels among subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM plus Metabolic Syndrome (MetS before clinical manifestations of atherothrombosis and the contribution of metabolic factors and 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene on the variability of PAI-1. Methods. We conducted an observational, cross-sectional assay in a hospital in Mexico City from May 2010 to September 2011. MetS was defined by the International Diabetes Federation criteria. PAI-1 levels and 4G/5G polymorphism were determined by ELISA and PCR-RFLP analysis. Results. We enrolled 215 subjects with T2DM plus MetS and 307 controls. Subjects with T2DM plus MetS had higher PAI-1 levels than the reference group (58.4 ± 21 versus 49.9 ± 16 ng/mL, p=0.026. A model with components of MetS explained only 12% of variability on PAI-1 levels (R2 = 0.12; p=0.001, with β=0.18 (p=0.03 for hypertension, β=-0.16 (p=0.05 for NL HDL-c, and β=0.15 (p=0.05 for NL triglycerides. Conclusion. Subjects with T2DM plus MetS have elevated PAI-1 levels before clinical manifestations of atherothrombotic disease. Metabolic factors have a more important contribution than 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1 plasma variability.

  5. Hypofibrinolytic State in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Aggravated by the Metabolic Syndrome before Clinical Manifestations of Atherothrombotic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburto-Mejía, Elsa; Santiago-Germán, David; Martínez-Marino, Manuel; María Eugenia Galván-Plata; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Hernández-Juárez, Jesús; Alvarado-Moreno, Antonio; Leaños-Miranda, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Background. Metabolic and genetic factors induce plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) overexpression; higher PAI-1 levels decrease fibrinolysis and promote atherothrombosis. Aim. To assess PAI-1 antigen levels among subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) plus Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) before clinical manifestations of atherothrombosis and the contribution of metabolic factors and 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene on the variability of PAI-1. Methods. We conducted an observational, cross-sectional assay in a hospital in Mexico City from May 2010 to September 2011. MetS was defined by the International Diabetes Federation criteria. PAI-1 levels and 4G/5G polymorphism were determined by ELISA and PCR-RFLP analysis. Results. We enrolled 215 subjects with T2DM plus MetS and 307 controls. Subjects with T2DM plus MetS had higher PAI-1 levels than the reference group (58.4 ± 21 versus 49.9 ± 16 ng/mL, p = 0.026). A model with components of MetS explained only 12% of variability on PAI-1 levels (R2 = 0.12; p = 0.001), with β = 0.18 (p = 0.03) for hypertension, β = −0.16 (p = 0.05) for NL HDL-c, and β = 0.15 (p = 0.05) for NL triglycerides. Conclusion. Subjects with T2DM plus MetS have elevated PAI-1 levels before clinical manifestations of atherothrombotic disease. Metabolic factors have a more important contribution than 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1 plasma variability. PMID:28271069

  6. Serum Vaspin Levels Are Associated with the Development of Clinically Manifest Arthritis in Autoantibody-Positive Individuals.

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    Karen I Maijer

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that overweight may increase the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA in autoantibody positive individuals. Adipose tissue could contribute to the development of RA by production of various bioactive peptides. Therefore, we examined levels of adipokines in serum and synovial tissue of subjects at risk of RA.Fifty-one individuals positive for immunoglobulin M rheumatoid factor (IgM-RF and/or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA, without arthritis, were included in this prospective study. Levels of adiponectin, vaspin, resistin, leptin, chemerin and omentin were determined in baseline fasting serum samples (n = 27. Synovial tissue was obtained by arthroscopy at baseline and we examined the expression of adiponectin, resistin and visfatin by immunohistochemistry.The development of clinically manifest arthritis after follow-up was associated with baseline serum vaspin levels (HR1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.2; p = 0.020, also after adjustment for overweight (HR1.7 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.5; p = 0.016. This association was not seen for other adipokines. Various serum adipokine levels correlated with BMI (adiponectin r = -0.538, leptin r = 0.664; chemerin r = 0.529 and systemic markers of inflammation such as CRP levels at baseline (adiponectin r = -0.449, omentin r = -0.557, leptin r = 0.635, chemerin r = 0.619, resistin r = 0.520 and ESR (leptin r = 0.512, chemerin r = 0.708, p-value<0.05. Synovial expression of adiponectin, resistin and visfatin was not associated with development of clinically manifest arthritis.In this exploratory study, serum adipokines were associated with an increased inflammatory state in autoantibody-positive individuals at risk of developing RA. Furthermore, serum vaspin levels may assist in predicting the development of arthritis in these individuals.

  7. Fisiopatologia do melasma Physiopathology of melasma

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    Luciane Donida Bartoli Miot

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Melasma é uma dermatose comum que cursa com alteração da cor da pele normal, resultante da hiperatividade melanocítica focal epidérmica de clones de melanócitos hiperfuncionantes, com consequente hiperpigmentação melânica induzida, principalmente, pela radiação ultravioleta. Clinicamente, caracteriza-se por manchas acastanhadas, localizadas preferencialmente na face, embora possa acometer também região cervical, torácica anterior e membros superiores.Mulheres em período fértil e de fototipos intermediários representam as populações mais acometidas. Grande parte de sua fisiopatogenia permanece desconhecida, havendo relação com fatores genéticos, hormonais, uso de medicamentos, cosméticos, endocrinopatias e fotoexposição. Os autores discutem os principais elementos relacionados à pigmentação da pele e ao desenvolvimento do melasma.Melasma is a common dermatosis that involves changes in normal skin pigmentation, resulting from the hyperactivity of epidermal melanocytes. The consequent hyperpigmentation is mostly induced by ultraviolet radiation. Clinically, melasma is characterized by light to dark brown macules that usually occur on the face, although they can also affect the cervical and anterior thoracic regions and upper members.Fertile age women and those with intermediate skin phototypes are most likely to develop melasma. Most of its physiopathogenics is not yet fully understood, but there is a relation with genetic and hormonal factors, drugs and cosmetics use, endocrinopathies and sun exposure. The authors discuss the main aspects associated with skin pigmentation and the development of melasma.

  8. Epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations of acute non-A-E hepatitis

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    Delić Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Acute non-A, non-B, non-C, non-D, non-E hepatitis (non-A-E AH is an acute disease of the liver of unknown etiology for which one or more new, so far undetected, hepatotropic viruses may be responsible. The frequency of non-A-E AH ranges from 3.8% to 33.9%, and therefore it has a significant place within current infectology and hepatology. The aim of our study was to establish the frequency, clinical and biochemical characteristics, natural course and outcome of non-A-E AH and compare them with control groups affected by acute viral hepatitis A, B and C. Methods. This descriptive-analytic prospective study included 31 patients with non-A-E AH treated at the Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, from 2003 to 2008. They were followed up during the period not less than 6 months. The controls involved randomly selected patients, treated at the same time with a definite diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis A, B and C. Statistical data analysis used Mann-Whitney Utest, Student's t-test and variance analysis. The value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. The frequency of non-A-E AH was 7.6%. Almost no difference was found between sexes (male/female ratio was 1 : 1.07; it was developed in all age groups, with the highest incidence in the middle age (mean age was 38.32 ± 15.3 years. It appeared equally throughout the whole year. Out of risk factors, inoculation risk was predominant (before all, dental interventions, mostly involving urban population living in comfortable conditions. The duration of incubation varied much ranging from 20 to 180 days (median 60 days. By clinical course, moderate and icteric forms were most common, mostly corresponding to acute hepatitis A and C. On the other hand, by duration of the disease (mean duration was 67.1 ± 27.1 and chronic transformation, non-A-E AH resembled to acute hepatitis B. Progression to chronicity was recorded in 9

  9. Clinical manifestations of syncope in children depending on the type of cardiovascular disease

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    N. A. Tonkikh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Syncope in children is a topical multidisciplinary medical and social problem all over the world. Syncope occurrence in children population is about 15%. Despite modern equipment of European clinics it is not possible to determine the cause of syncope in about 1/3 of cases. Our objective was to determine special features in clinical presentation of cardiovascular syncope in children. The study was conducted on 144 children (80 females, 64 males from 2 to 18 years with diagnosed syncope of cardiovascular origin. Methods of vibrational and alternative statistics were used to perform research data analysis using licensed program package “MedStat” (serial number MS 000065 Structure of cardiovascular syncope causes was the following: prevalence of vasovagal syncope was 72,9±3,7 %, prevalence of heart rate and conduction abnormalities was 22,2±3,5 %, prevalence of structural heart pathology was 4,9±1,8%. In all patients cardiovascular disease was diagnosed first time in their life. This indicates insufficient awareness level of physicians about differential diagnostic algorithm of pathology which cause syncope in children. The length of syncopal anamnesis in children was varied from 1 month to 6 years. Only 16,7±3,1 % of cardiovascular pathology was diagnosed within first 6 months after first syncope episode, 47,9±4,2 % of cardiovascular pathology was diagnosed after 3 and more years. In 82,6±3,2 % of patients cause of syncope was established after few years. Prevalent cause of late diagnosed syncope in children with cardiovascular pathology was vasovagal syncope: in 55,2±4,9 % of patients after 3 years and more from the first syncope episode. Nonetheless, according to European cardiologist association (2009 year guidelines vasovagal syncope has benign prognosis, our analysis demonstrate that in 16,0±3,1 % of cases vasovagal syncope occurs during swimming, bicycle ride, road crossing, standing near open sewer manhole, that means, in this

  10. Diagnosis and clinical manifestations of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord:Analysis of 21 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhong Shou; Caifeng Li; Dongsheng Fan; Yang Shen; Jun Zhang; Weizhong Xiao; Shuqing Zhao; Jinsheng Liu; Wei Sui

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord is caused by vitamin B12 deficiency and is a kind of degenerative disease owing the characteristics of nervous system diseases. In addition,different patients have variously clinical manifestations and various prognoses after vitamin B12 therapy.OBJECTIVE: To investigate and analyze diagnosis, clinical manifestations and prognosis of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord.DESIGN: Case analysis.SETTING: Department of Neurology, the Third Hospital of Peking University.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 21 subacute combined dcgeneration of the spinal cord patients including 14 males and 7 females aged from 33 to 82 years were selected from Department of Neurology, the Third Hospital of Peking University from January 1999 to December 2005. Duration from onset to final diagnosis lasted for 1.5 - 108 months. All patients had typically clinical manifestations; meanwhile, level of serum vitamin B12 was decreased and/or vitamin B12 therapy was effective. All patients provided the confirmed consent.METHODS: Clinical data of 21 subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord patients were retrospectively analyzed, while general data and clinical characteristics were recorded at the same time.Levels of blood routine, serum vitamin B12 and homocysteine were measured at the phase of hospitalization.Normal value of serum vitamin B12 was 187 - 1 059 ng/L and normal value of serum homocysteine was 5 -15 μ mol/L. All patients received neuroelectrophysiological examination and 15 patients received MRI examinations of spinal cord. After final diagnosis, patients were given vitamin B12 therapy. And follow-up was performed to investigate the prognosis.prognosis.RESULTS: Clinical data of 21 patients and follow-up data of 20 patients were involved in the final analysis typically clinical manifestations. The original symptoms included numbness of lower and/or upper limbs (5 cases), unstable gait (3 cases), limb asthenia (4

  11. Eosinophilic granuloma of the temporal bone- its clinical manifestations and management

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    Kirtane Jyotsna

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic granuloma is a variety of Histiocytosis-X. Its etio-logy is unknown. When it involves the temporal bone it may mimic chronic otitis media, or a mastoid abscess, very often leading to an erroneous diagnosis. Its X-ray appearance and histopathology are characteristic. Infiltration with eosinophils and histiocytes is a constant feature. Very good results are achieved with surgery accompanied by radiotherapy. In this series of 3 patients, one pa-tient presented with facial paralysis and another one with bilateral post-auricular swellings. The first 2 cases were diagnosed only after surgery and histopathological examination of the tissue removed, while the third case was diagnosed pre-operatively on clinical and radiological findings.

  12. Pulmonary endarterectomy: part I. Pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic evaluation of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Dalia A; Pretorius, Gert Victor D; Kerr, Kim M; Manecke, Gerard R

    2014-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) results from recurrent or incomplete resolution of pulmonary embolism. CTEPH is much more common than generally appreciated. Although pulmonary embolism (PE) affects a large number of Americans, chronic pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains underdiagnosed. It is imperative that all patients with PH be screened for the presence of CTEPH since this form of PH is potentially curable with pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) surgery. The success of this procedure depends greatly on the collaboration of a multidisciplinary team approach that includes pulmonary medicine, cardiothoracic surgery, and cardiac anesthesiology. This review, based on the experience of more than 3000 pulmonary endarterectomy surgeries, is divided into 2 parts. Part I focuses on the clinical history and pathophysiology, diagnostic workup, and intraoperative echocardiography. Part II focuses on the surgical approach, anesthetic management, postoperative care, and complications. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Triple manifestation of extramedullary plasmacytoma in the upper airway: an unusual clinical entity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morariu, I

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: We report an extremely rare case of extramedullary plasmacytoma. METHOD: Case report and review of the English-literature concerning extramedullary plasmacytoma and multiple myeloma. RESULT: We present an unusual case of multiple extramedullary plasmacytomas, which, over a protracted course of 30 years, presented on different occasions at three separate sites in the head and neck. The patient was managed surgically on all occasions, and was disease-free at the time of writing. CONCLUSION: Following review of the literature, we believe this to be the only case with this extremely unusual presentation. This case is noteworthy, not only because of the rarity of extramedullary plasmacytoma, but also because it highlights a number of important clinical issues. The diagnosis and management of extramedullary plasmacytoma require close cooperation between multiple disciplines.

  14. Infant Hip Joint Diagnostic Support System Based on Clinical Manifestations in X-ray Images

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    Honda,Mitsugi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Plain X-ray radiography is frequently used for the diagnosis of developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH. The aim of this study was to construct a diagnostic support system for DDH based on clinical findings obtained from the X-ray images of 154 female infants with confirmed diagnoses made by orthopedists. The data for these subjects were divided into 2 groups. The Min-Max method of nonlinear analysis was applied to the data from Group 1 to construct the diagnostic support system based on the measurement of 4 items in X-ray images:the outward displacement rate, upward displacement rate, OE angle, and alpha angle. This system was then applied to the data from Group 2, and the results were compared between the 2 groups to verify the reliability of the system. We obtained good results that matched the confirmed diagnoses of orthopedists with an accuracy of 85.9%.

  15. Parkin disease in a Brazilian kindred: Manifesting heterozygotes and clinical follow-up over 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naheed L; Horta, Wagner; Eunson, Louise; Graham, Elizabeth; Johnson, Janel O; Chang, Shannon; Davis, Mary; Singleton, Andrew; Wood, Nicholas W; Lees, Andrew J

    2005-04-01

    We report on a large Brazilian kindred with young-onset parkinsonism due to either a homozygous or heterozygous mutation in parkin. A total of 6 members were affected: 5 were homozygous and 1 heterozygous for a deletion in exon 4. Two other heterozygotes also had extrapyramidal signs. All affected subjects showed characteristic features of parkin disease with foot dystonia and an excellent response to levodopa complicated by motor fluctuations and dyskinesia within 3 years of therapy. Careful clinical follow-up over 10 years showed the phenotype was similar in all the homozygotes with asymmetrical limb bradykinesia and early walking difficulties. Some acceleration of disability was observed in some of the cases as they entered the third decade of illness, but dementia was absent.

  16. Genetic bases and clinical manifestations of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ 10) deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbats, Maria Andrea; Lunardi, Giada; Doimo, Mara; Trevisson, Eva; Salviati, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) is a remarkable lipid involved in many cellular processes such as energy production through the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC), beta-oxidation of fatty acids, and pyrimidine biosynthesis, but it is also one of the main cellular antioxidants. Its biosynthesis is still incompletely characterized and requires at least 15 genes. Mutations in eight of them (PDSS1, PDSS2, COQ2, COQ4, COQ6, ADCK3, ADCK4, and COQ9) cause primary CoQ(10) deficiency, a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable age of onset (from birth to the seventh decade) and associated clinical phenotypes, ranging from a fatal multisystem disease to isolated steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) or isolated central nervous system disease. The pathogenesis is complex and related to the different functions of CoQ(10). It involves defective ATP production and oxidative stress, but also an impairment of pyrimidine biosynthesis and increased apoptosis. CoQ(10) deficiency can also be observed in patients with defects unrelated to CoQ(10) biosynthesis, such as RC defects, multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, and ataxia and oculomotor apraxia.Patients with both primary and secondary deficiencies benefit from high-dose oral supplementation with CoQ(10). In primary forms treatment can stop the progression of both SRNS and encephalopathy, hence the critical importance of a prompt diagnosis. Treatment may be beneficial also for secondary forms, although with less striking results.In this review we will focus on CoQ(10) biosynthesis in humans, on the genetic defects and the specific clinical phenotypes associated with CoQ(10) deficiency, and on the diagnostic strategies for these conditions.

  17. Blastocystis and urticaria: Examination of subtypes and morphotypes in an unusual clinical manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casero, Rodolfo Daniel; Mongi, Florencia; Sánchez, Angie; Ramírez, Juan David

    2015-08-01

    Blastocystis is a human common enteric protist that may colonize a large variety of non-human hosts linked to symptoms and diseases such as abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, urticaria, flatulence and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Blastocystis exhibits remarkable genetic diversity and multiple subtypes (STs) within the genus with no absolute associations with clinical symptomatology. Here we analyzed fecal samples from Argentinean patients (n=270) belonging to symptomatic (urticaria and non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms, n=39) and asymptomatic control (n=28). Those patients infected with Blastocystis (n=67) were submitted for morphological analysis, DNA extraction, 18S PCR, sequencing and STs identification according to DNA barcoding. Blastocystis vacuolar forms were the predominant morphotype (75%), ameboid-like forms were evidenced in 1.5% of samples. Blastocystis ST3 was detected in 71.6% (n=48), of which 71.4%, (n=35) and 28.6% (n=14) belonged to symptomatic and asymptomatic respectively. Other subtypes identified were ST1 (14.9%), ST6 (7.5%) and ST2 (5.9%). Blastocystis 18S barcoding evidenced in non-urticaria symptomatic patients and asymptomatic control group the presence of allele 134 (ST3) (p<0.0001), while allele 34 (ST3) was detected in 85.7% (18/21) of symptomatic uricaria as compared with control group (1/21) (p<0.0001). The presence of a particular allele (a34) significantly associated with urticaria patients was detected and the clinical implications of these findings are herein discussed.

  18. CT classification of small thalamic hemorrhages. Topographic localization and clinical manifestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, Nobutaka; Kaneko, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Keisei; Muraki, Masaaki; Sato, Kengo (Hamamatsu Medical Center Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1984-06-01

    The thalamus is located deep in the cerebral hemispheres, and most of its nuclei have reciprocal fiber connections with specific areas over the cerebral cortex. Localized lesions in the thalamus, therefore, can cause specific neurological deficits, depending on their locations. From this point of view, we reviewed 110 cases, admitted over the past 7 years, with thalamic hemorrhages 37 (34%) of which were small hematomas less than 2 cm in diameter. These small hematomas could be divided into 4 types depending on their locations as follows: antero-lateral type, postero-lateral type, medial type, and dorsal type. Each type had the peculiar clinical features described below: 1) Postero-lateral Type (PL type, 28 cases, 76%): The original symptom was a sudden onset of moderate to severe sensori-motor deficits in most cases. The patients were mostly alert or only slightly confused. 2) Antero-lateral Type (AL type, 4 cases, 11%): The patients of this type first presented with sensori-motor disturbance and prefrontal signs. Both were generally mild and often disappeared early. 3) Medial Type (M type, 3 cases, 8%): The main symptom at onset was either a disturbance of consciousness or dementia. 4) Dorsal Type (D type, 2 cases, 5%): One patient with a right thalamic hematoma of this type showed geographical agnosia and visuo-constructive apraxia. The other patient, with a left-sided hematoma, exhibited transient clumsiness of the right hand and mild dysphasia. In our experience, the above classification of small hematomas clearly delineated the clinical symptoms and neurological signs of the different types; therefore, the symptoms and signs in larger hematoma could be explained by a combination of those of each type.

  19. The relevance of "non-criteria" clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome: 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Technical Task Force Report on Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Mirhelen M; Danowski, Adriana; Wahl, Denis G; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Tektonidou, Maria; Pacheco, Marcelo S; Fleming, Norma; Domingues, Vinicius; Sciascia, Savino; Lyra, Julia O; Petri, Michelle; Khamashta, Munther; Levy, Roger A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this task force was to critically analyze nine non-criteria manifestations of APS to support their inclusion as APS classification criteria. The Task Force Members selected the non-criteria clinical manifestations according to their clinical relevance, that is, the patient-important outcome from clinician perspective. They included superficial vein thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, renal microangiopathy, heart valve disease, livedo reticularis, migraine, chorea, seizures and myelitis, which were reviewed by this International Task Force collaboration, in addition to the seronegative APS (SN-APS). GRADE system was used to evaluate the quality of evidence of medical literature of each selected item. This critical appraisal exercise aimed to support the debate regarding the clinical picture of APS. We found that the overall GRADE analysis was very low for migraine and seizures, low for superficial venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, chorea, longitudinal myelitis and the so-called seronegative APS and moderate for APS nephropathy, heart valve lesions and livedo reticularis. The next step can be a critical redefinition of an APS gold standard, for instance derived from the APS ACTION registry that will include not only current APS patients but also those with antiphospholipid antibodies not meeting current classification criteria.

  20. Lower Functional Connectivity of the Periaqueductal Gray Is Related to Negative Affect and Clinical Manifestations of Fibromyalgia

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    Marie-Andrée Coulombe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM syndrome is characterized by chronic widespread pain, muscle tenderness and emotional distress. Previous studies found reduced endogenous pain modulation in FM. This deficiency of pain modulation may be related to the attributes of chronic pain and other clinical symptoms experienced in patients with FM. Thus, we tested whether there is a link between the clinical symptoms of FM and functional connectivity (FC of the periaqueductal gray (PAG, a key node of pain modulation. We acquired resting state 3T functional MRI (rsfMRI data from 23 female patients with FM and 16 age- and sex- matched healthy controls (HC and assessed FM symptoms with the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS. We found that patients with FM exhibit statistically significant disruptions in PAG FC, particularly with brain regions implicated in negative affect, self-awareness and saliency. Specifically, we found that, compared to HCs, the FM patients had stronger PAG FC with the lingual gyrus and hippocampus but weaker PAG FC with regions associated with motor/executive functions, the salience (SN and default mode networks (DMN. The attenuated PAG FC was also negatively correlated with FIQ scores, and positively correlated with the magnification subscale of the PCS. These alterations were correlated with emotional and behavioral symptoms of FM. Our study implicates the PAG as a site of dysfunction contributing to the clinical manifestations and pain in FM.

  1. Borrelia persica infection in dogs and cats: clinical manifestations, clinicopathological findings and genetic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneth, Gad; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Halperin, Tamar; Hershko, Yizhak; Kleinerman, Gabriela; Anug, Yigal; Abdeen, Ziad; Lavy, Eran; Aroch, Itamar; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2016-05-10

    Relapsing fever (RF) is an acute infectious disease caused by arthropod-borne spirochetes of the genus Borrelia. The disease is characterized by recurrent episodes of fever that concur with spirochetemia. The RF borrelioses include louse-borne RF caused by Borrelia recurrentis and tick-borne endemic RF transmitted by argasid soft ticks and caused by several Borrelia spp. such as B. crocidurae, B. coriaceae, B. duttoni, B. hermsii, B. hispanica and B. persica. Human infection with B. persica is transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani and has been reported from Iran, Israel, Egypt, India, and Central Asia. During 2003-2015, five cats and five dogs from northern, central and southern Israel were presented for veterinary care and detected with borrelia spirochetemia by blood smear microscopy. The causative infective agent in these animals was identified and characterized by PCR from blood and sequencing of parts of the flagellin (flab), 16S rRNA and glycerophosphodiester phosphodiestrase (GlpQ) genes. All animals were infected with B. persica genetically identical to the causative agent of human RF. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that DNA sequences from these pet carnivores clustered together with B. persica genotypes I and II from humans and O. tholozani ticks and distinctly from other RF Borrelia spp. The main clinical findings in cats included lethargy, anorexia, anemia in 5/5 cats and thrombocytopenia in 4/5. All dogs were lethargic and anorectic, 4/5 were febrile and anemic and 3/5 were thrombocytopenic. Three dogs were co-infected with Babesia spp. The animals were all treated with antibiotics and the survival rate of both dogs and cats was 80 %. The cat and dog that succumbed to disease died one day after the initiation of antibiotic treatment, while survival in the others was followed by the rapid disappearance of spirochetemia. This is the first report of disease due to B. persica infection in cats and the first case series in dogs. Infection was

  2. Amalgam tattoo (amalgam pigmentation) of the oral mucosa: clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, A

    2004-07-01

    Amalgam tattoo is an iatrogenic lesion caused by traumatic implantation of dental amalgam into soft tissue. Amalgam tattoo is the most common localized pigmented lesion in the mouth. In a study of a mass screening oral examination in the United States, it was found in about 0.4-0.9% of the adult population and in Sweden in about 8%. Clinically, amalgam tattoo presents as a dark gray or blue, flat macule located adjacent to a restored tooth. Most are located on the gingiva and alveolar mucosa followed by the buccal mucosa and the floor of the mouth. Microscopic examination reveals that amalgam is present in the tissues in two forms: as irregular dark, solid fragments of metal or as numerous, discrete fine, brown or black granules dispersed along collagen bundles and around small blood vessels and nerves. In most lesions, it is presented in both forms. The biologic response to the amalgam is related to particle size, quantity and elemental composition of the amalgam. Large fragments often become surrounded by dense fibrous connective tissue. Smaller particles are associated with mild to moderate chronic inflammatory response with individual macrophages engulfing small amalgam particles. Occasionally, the reaction takes the form of foreign body granuloma in which macrophages and multinucleated giant cells are present. Some of the multinucleated giant cells also contain amalgam particles. Diagnosis of amalgam tattoo is usually obvious from the location and clinical appearance. A radiograph is recommended to confirm the presence of metallic particles, but absence of radiographic evidence does not rule out the possibility, since particles are often too fine or widely dispersed to be visible on radiographs. When there is no radiographic evidence or an adjacent restored tooth, biopsy is recommended to rule out an early melanoma. Once the diagnosis of amalgam tattoo has been established, no additional treatment is necessary except for cosmetic reasons. If the pigmentation

  3. Clinical and Haematological Manifestations of Typhoid Fever in Children in Eastern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbayram, S; Parlak, M; Dogan, M; Karasin, G; Akbayram, H T; Karaman, K

    2016-01-12

    Typhoid fever can involve various organs, leading to a wide range of presentations: from uncomplicated to complicated typhoid fever. The haematological changes are common in typhoid fever and include anaemia, leucopaenia, thrombocytopaenia and bleeding diathesis. This study was undertaken in order to determine the clinical and haematological presentation of typhoid fever in children. In this study, records of children and adolescents with typhoid fever aged under or equal to 16 years, admitted to Yuzuncu Yil University Hospital between 2010 and 2014, were analysed retrospectively. The cases (56%) were admitted to our hospital in July and October. Major symptoms of patients were abdominal pain (24%), arthralgia (21%) and fever (11%). In our study, decreased mean platelet volume (31%), eosinopaenia 20%), abnormal platelet count (19%), anaemia (16%), leucocytosis (16%) and eosinophilia (12%) were the most common haematological findings in the children. Typhoid fever is predominant in children at school age with a slight male predominance. Decreased mean platelet volume and abdominal pain might be useful as early diagnostic clues.

  4. Clinical and radiological manifestations of the rheumatoid wrist after the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momohara, Shigeki; Mamizuka, Kyoko; Yonemoto, Kouichi; Tomatsu, Taisuke; Inoue, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to investigate the clinical and radiological results of the Sauvé-Kapandji (S-K) procedure for the rheumatoid wrist. One hundred and eight rheumatoid wrists in 98 patients were operated on in our institute from 1992 to 2000, and in 82 wrists we used the S-K procedure. In other cases, synovectomy alone was performed on 16 wrists, and partial and total arthrodeses were performed concurrently on 5 wrists each. Carpal bones and/or radiocarpal joints in which the union could not be assessed radiologically were found in 49 wrists (59.8%) after the S-K procedure, and among them there was definite non-fusion of the carpal bone and radiocarpal joints in 29 wrists (35.4%). However, definite fusion of carpal bones and/or radiocarpal joints was found in 33 wrists (40.2%). The formation of carpal bones and partial radiocarpal fusion with some mobility was detected in some cases. Therefore, the S-K procedure may stabilize the carpus in the rheumatoid wrist to some extent while maintaining a functionally important range of motion and relieving pain. However, it does not stop the disease process and cannot reestablish or maintain carpal height. We concluded that the S-K procedure is the treatment of choice for the rheumatoid wrist, and if the wrist is unstable, as seen with arthritis mutilans, we then perform either radio-lunate partial arthrodesis or total wrist arthrodesis.

  5. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Children with Primary Immunodeficiencies: Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Management, Belarusian Experience

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    Alina Fedorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL is the most frequent malignancy associated with primary immune deficiency disease (PID. We aimed to present the clinical characteristics and outcomes of Belarusian children with PID who developed NHL. Procedure. We reviewed 16 patients with PID and NHL. Eight patients had combined PID: 5—Nijmegen breakage syndrome, 1—Bloom syndrome, 1—Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and 1—Х-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. Results. In 75% cases PID was diagnosed simultaneously or after the NHL was confirmed. PID-associated NHL accounted for 5.7% of all NHL and was characterized by younger median age (6.3 versus 10.0 years, P<0.05 and by prevalence of large-cell types (68.8% versus 24.5%, P<0.001. Children with combined PID had median age of 1.3 years; 5 of them developed EBV-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with lung involvement. Five of 6 patients with chromosomal breakage syndrome developed T-NHL. Six patients died of infections; two died after tumor progression; one child had early relapse; two died of second NHL and one of secondary hemophagocytic syndrome. Overall, 4 children are alive and disease-free after a follow-up from 1.4 to 5.7 years. Conclusions. PID needs to be diagnosed early. Individualized chemotherapy, comprehensive supportive treatment, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may improve survival of children with PID and NHL.

  6. Molecular cytogenetic analysis and clinical manifestations of a case with de novo mosaic ring chromosome 7

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    Fang Jye-Siung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Clinical and molecular cytogenetic investigations of a newborn girl exhibiting facial dysmorphism with developmental delay. Methods Phenotypic evaluation was first applied to examine the proband's developmental status. Computed tomography and colour transcranial Doppler were used then to investigate her brain structure and function. Subsequently, chromosomal abnormalities were examined by karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization was performed to investigate size of fragments lost at the two distal ends of the ring chromosome 7. In addition, multicolour banding was applied to rule out structural rearrangement occurs in between the ring chromosome 7. Results The proband was born with mosaic supernumerary ring chromosome 7, without a normal karyotype detected in the peripheral blood lymphocytes. The distal arm of chromosome 7p (at least 255 kb from the telomere was part of an extra ring chromosome 7. In addition, the distal arm of 7q, at least 8 kb from the telomere, was missing. There was no other chromosomal rearrangement detected by multicolour banding. Interpretation This is the 19th reported case of complete ring chromosome 7 mosaicism and the first survived case with mosaic supernumerary ring 7 without a normal karyotype detected in the peripheral lymphocytes.

  7. The Most Common Microbial Causes of Gastroenteritis in Patients With Clinical Manifestations

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    Kazemian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroenteritis is a remarkable hygiene problem worldwide. Bacteria and parasites can cause gastroenteritis-associated disorders. Objectives The aims of study were to survey the most common cause of gastroenteritis in patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital of Ilam, Iran. Patients and Methods This descriptive-analytical study was performed during 2012 to 2013. After collecting 2376 stool samples, standard biochemical and microbiological tests were performed. Susceptibility was tested by disc diffusion method agreeing with clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI guidelines. The protozoa were detected by sediment wet-mount method. Results Of 2376 patients, 466 (19.6% were contaminated with pathogenic bacteria or protozoa.The frequency of microorganisms isolated from the patients were 10.3%, 2.5%, 2.5%, 2.1%, 46.4%, 30.9%, 2.5% and 2.5% for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, Shigella dysenteriae, Klebsiella pneumonia, Yersinia enterocolitica, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, E. coli and Candida spp., respectively. Sensitivities to ciprofloxacin in E. coli and S. dysenteriae strains were 100% and 91.66%, respectively. Conclusions The results showed that some patients were probably contaminated with nonbacterial and nonparasitic agents. All the parasitic isolates were resistant to most antibiotics. Therefore determination of microbial isolates and antibiotic susceptibility is necessary before treatment procedures.

  8. A spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by host immune responses against Epstein-Barr virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwatsuki K

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, or human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4, infects the vast majority of adults worldwide, and establishes both nonproductive (latent and productive (lytic infections. Host immune responses directed against both the lytic and latent cycle-associated EBV antigens induce a diversity of clinical symptoms in patients with chronic active EBV infections who usually contain an oligoclonal pool of EBV-infected lymphocyte subsets in their blood. Episomal EBV genes in the latent infection utilize an array of evasion strategies from host immune responses: the minimized expression of EBV antigens targeted by host cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, the down-regulation of cell adhesion molecule expression, and the release of virokines to inhibit the host CTLs. The oncogenic role of latent EBV infection is not yet fully understood, but latent membrane proteins (LMPs expressed during the latency cycle have essential biological properties leading to cellular gene expression and immortalization, and EBV-encoded gene products such as viral interleukin-10 (vIL-10 and bcl-2 homologue function to survive the EBV-infected cells. The subsequent oncogenic DNA damage may lead to the development of neoplasms. EBV-associated NK/T cell lymphoproliferative disorders are prevalent in Asia, but quite rare in Western countries. The genetic immunological background, therefore, is closely linked to the development of EBV-associated neoplasms.

  9. Coexistence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis with papillary thyroid carcinoma: clinical manifestation and prognostic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jun Soo; Kim, Hyun Ki; Lee, Cho-Rok; Park, Seulkee; Park, Jae Hyun; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Chung, Woong Youn; Park, Cheong Soo

    2012-08-01

    The study aimed to identify the clinical characteristics of coexisting chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and to evaluate the influence on prognosis. A total of 1,357 patients who underwent thyroid surgery for PTC were included. The clinicopathological characteristics were identified. Patients who underwent total thyroidectomy (n = 597) were studied to evaluate the influence of coexistent CLT on prognosis. Among the total 1,357 patients, 359 (26.5%) had coexistent CLT. In the CLT group, the prevalence of females was higher than in the control group without CLT (P < 0.001). Mean tumor size and mean age in the patients with CLT were smaller than without CLT (P = 0.040, P = 0.047, respectively). Extrathyroidal extension in the patients with CLT was significantly lower than without CLT (P = 0.016). Among the subset of 597 patients, disease-free survival rate in the patients with CLT was significantly higher than without CLT (P = 0.042). However, the multivariate analysis did not reveal a negative association between CLT coexistence and recurrence. Patients with CLT display a greater female preponderance, smaller size, younger and lower extrathyroidal extension. CLT is not a significant independent negative predictive factor for recurrence, although presence of CLT indicates a reduced risk of recurrence.

  10. Clinical manifestations and diagnostic approach to metastatic cancer of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, C; Lang, S; Pruckmayer, M; Millesi, W; Rasse, M; Marosi, C; Leitha, T

    1997-10-01

    In a 12-month period, metastatic cancer was diagnosed in eight patients. Six of them presented with pain mimicking toothache, temporomandibular joint disorders or trigeminal neuralgia, while two showed osteopenic bone lesions in the panoramic radiography, and perimandibular swelling. Anesthesia of the lower lip was the only common clinical feature. In seven of the eight patients, a whole body bone scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the skull in combination with a whole body and SPECT anti-granulocyte (Tc-99m MAK 250/183) bone marrow scintigraphy was performed. One patient did not have combined scintigraphy performed secondary to severe systemic illness. In six of the seven, the results were conclusive for a metastatic bone lesion. Biopsies confirmed three patients to have a previously unrecognized primary cancer, one patient to have previously unrecognized recurrent cancer, and three patients to exhibit new metastatic spread of an already diagnosed cancer. Histology revealed breast, lung, renal cancer and a malignancy of inconclusive origin. In the remaining patient, combined scintigraphy suggested osteomyelitis, yet biopsy revealed a prostate cancer metastasis with acute inflammatory cell infiltration. Thus, the scintigraphy pattern of a hot spot in the bone scan and a cold lesion in the bone marrow scintigraphy is highly suggestive of a mandibular metastasis, if accompanied by anesthesia of the lower lip.

  11. The epidemiology and clinical manifestations of dysexecutive syndrome in Parkinson’s disease

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    Roberto eCeravolo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review summarizes the evidence of the cognitive and behavioural features of dysexecutive syndrome in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Deficits in response inhibition, set-shifting, mental flexibility and strategy have been frequently described from the earliest stages of PD, although there are inconsistencies in study findings due to the complexity of the executive function (EF construct and methodological limitations. Behavioural disorders of PD, e.g. apathy, distractibility, perseverative behaviour and impulse-control disorders, may be viewed as the other side of dysexecutive syndrome. Despite the interrelationship between the cognitive and behavioural domains, some reports reveal that the two syndromes may be dissociated, suggesting that both aspects must be clinically assessed. EFs are widely associated with the prefrontal areas, although dysexecutive syndrome may be observed in patients with damage to other brain regions. EFs drive numerous abilities essential to daily life, such as prospective remembering and language comprehension, which may be impaired in PD subjects. Considering the impact of dysexecutive syndrome on independence and quality of life, early detection of executive impairment is crucial in the management of PD.

  12. The Clinical Manifestations, Treatment Efficacy and Adverse Drug Reactions in 62 Iranian Child with Wilson Disease

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    Mehri Najafi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disease in which the liver, central nervous system, eyes, blood and other parts of the body involved. Timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the disease requires awareness of the clinical presentations of this disease in children.Methods: This case series study included 62 patients with Wilson disease who admitted to children's Medical Center in the years 2012-2003.Results: 56% of patients were male. The average age of diagnosis was 9.73 years old (5-17 years and this was higher in patients with early neurologic symptoms (P = 0.85.( 64.5% of the patients had the hepatic symptoms at the time of diagnosis and the most common type of hepatic involvement was cirrhosis (39.3% and hepatitis (17.5% respectively. 17.7% of the patients also had early neurological symptoms. A positive family history for the Wilson Disease were found in 27.4% of patients. 74.2% of patients had KF ring and the frequency of these symptom was higher in patients with early neurological involvement. 83.9% of patients were treated successfully with D-penicillamine and In 30% of patients, adverse drug reactions were seen.Conclusion: Children with unknown liver disease should be evaluated for Wilson disease and the first-degree relatives of patients should be screened. . D-penicillamine have important side effects, but due to the low cost and the availability is an appropriate drug to treat the Wilson disease..Key words: Wilson Disease, Hepatic Involvement, Neurologic Involvement , KF ring ,D-Penicillamine.

  13. Alternating hemiplegia of childhood in Denmark: clinical manifestations and ATP1A3 mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Dali, Christine Í; Lyngbye, Troels J B; Duno, Morten; Uldall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by early-onset recurrent distinctive hemiplegic episodes commonly accompanied by other paroxysmal features and developmental impairment. De novo mutations in ATP1A3 were recently identified as a genetic cause of AHC. To describe the entire Danish cohort of paediatric AHC patients we approached neuropaediatricians nationwide. All currently acknowledged Danish patients ≤16 years with AHC were genetically tested and seen by the same child neurologist (PU). Ten patients; seven girls and three boys were identified. Mean present age was 10.0 years (range 1-16). Mean age at presentation was 7.4 months (range 1-18 months). Sequencing of ATP1A3 in all ten patients revealed a pathogenic mutation in seven. Two females with moderate psychomotor impairment were heterozygous for the known p.G947R mutation, whereas one severely retarded boy was heterozygous for the common p.E815K mutation. The prevalent p.D801N mutation was identified in two moderate to severely retarded children. Interestingly, in a set of monochorionic male twins a novel p.D801E mutation was identified, underscoring that the asparagine at position 801 is a mutation hotspot. Three girls aged 5-13 years did not reveal any ATP1A3 mutations. They were rather mildly clinically affected and displayed a normal or near-normal psychomotor development. This is the first study of AHC in the Danish paediatric population. The patients harboured a wide range of psychomotor difficulties. Patients with no mutation detected tended to be less severely affected. Prevalence was approximately 1 per 100,000 children.

  14. Clinical manifestations of bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species in southern Taiwan.

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    Hung-Jen Tang

    Full Text Available This study is conducted to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species.Patients with bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species during the period 2009 to 2013 were identified from a computerized database of a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed.A total of 91 patients with bacteremia due to Aeromonas species were identified. In addition to 16 (17.6% primary bacteremia, the most common source of secondary infection is peritonitis (n = 27, 29.7%, followed by biliary tract infection (n = 18, 19.8%, and SSTI (n = 12, 13.2%, pneumonia (n = 9, 9.9%, catheter-related bloodstream infection (n =  5, 5.5%, and genitourinary tract infection (n = 4, 4.4%. A. hydrophila (n = 35, 38.5% was the most common pathogen, followed by A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 31, 34.1%, A. caviae (n = 14, 15.4%, and A. veronii biovar veronii (n = 9, 9.9%. Forty-three (47.3% patients were classified as healthcare-associated infections (HCAI causes by Aeromonas species, and patients with HCAI were more likely to have cancer, and receive immunosuppressant than patients with community-acquired bacteremia. The overall outcomes, including rate of ICU admission, acute respiratory failure, and mortality were 33.3%, 28.6%, and 23.1%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the in-hospital day mortality was significantly associated only with underlying cancer (P <.001, and initial shock (P <.001.Aeromonas species should be considered one of the causative pathogens of healthcare-associated bacteremia, especially in immunocompromised patients. In addition, it can be associated with high fatality. Cancer and initial shock were the poor prognostic factors.

  15. Clinical manifestations in 105 persons with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimonis, V.E.; Yang, M.L.; Bale, S.J. [National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCC; Gorlin syndrome), an autosomal dominant disorder linked to 9q22.3-q31, and caused by mutations in PTC, the human homologue of the Drosophila patched gene, comprises multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratocysts of the jaw, palmar/plantar pits, spine and rib anomalies and calcification of the falx cerebri. We reviewed the findings on 105 affected individuals examined at the NIH since 1985. The data included 48 males and 57 females ranging in age from 4 months to 87 years. Eighty percent of whites (71/90) and 38% (5/13) of African-Americans had at least one basal cell carcinoma (BCC), with the first tumor occurring at a mean age of 23 (median 20) years and 21 (median 20) years, respectively. Excluding individuals exposed to radiation therapy, the number of BCCs ranged from 1 to >1,000 (median 8) and 1 to 3 (median 2), respectively, in the 2 groups. Jaw cysts occurred in 78/105 (74%) with the first tumor occurring in 80% by the age of 20 years. The number of total jaw cysts ranged from 1 to 28 (median 3). Palmar pits and plantar pits were seen in 87%. Ovarian fibromas were diagnosed by ultrasound in 9/52 (17%) at a mean age of 30 years. Medulloblastoma occurred in 4 patients at a mean age of 2.3 years. Three patients had cleft lip or palate. Physical findings include {open_quotes}coarse face{close_quotes} in 54%, relative macrocephaly in 50%, hypertelorism in 42%, frontal bossing in 27%, pectus deformity in 13%, and Sprengel deformity in 11%. This study delineates the frequency of the clinical and radiological anomalies in NBCC in a large population of US patients and discusses guidelines for diagnosis and management. 48 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Arginase deficiency manifesting delayed clinical sequelae and induction of a kidney arginase isozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grody, W W; Kern, R M; Klein, D; Dodson, A E; Wissman, P B; Barsky, S H; Cederbaum, S D

    1993-03-01

    Deficiency of liver arginase (AI) is characterized clinically by hyperargininemia, progressive mental impairment, growth retardation, spasticity, and periodic episodes of hyperammonemia. The rarest of the inborn errors of urea cycle enzymes, it has been considered the least life-threatening, by virtue of the typical absence of catastrophic neonatal hyperammonemia and its compatibility with a longer life span. This has been attributed to the persistence of some ureagenesis in these patients through the activity of a second isozyme of arginase (AII) located predominantly in the kidney. We have treated a number of arginase-deficient patients into young adulthood. While they are severely retarded and wheelchair-bound, their general medical care has been quite tractable. Recently, however, two of the oldest (M.U., age 20, and M.O., age 22) underwent rapid deterioration, ending in hyperammonemic coma and death, precipitated by relatively minor viral respiratory illnesses inducing a catabolic state with increased endogenous nitrogen load. In both cases, postmortem examination revealed severe global cerebral edema and aspiration pneumonia. Enzyme assays confirmed the absence of AI activity in the livers of both patients. In contrast, AII activity (identified by its different cation cofactor requirements and lack of precipitation with anti-AI antibody) was markedly elevated in kidney tissues, 20-fold in M.O. and 34-fold in M.U. Terminal plasma arginine (1500 mumols/l) and ammonia (1693 mmol/l) levels of M.U. were substantially higher than those of M.O. (348 mumols/l and 259 mumols/l, respectively). By Northern blot analysis, AI mRNA was detected in M.O.'s liver but not in M.U.'s; similarly, anti-AI crossreacting material was observed by Western blot in M.O. only. These findings indicate that, despite their more long-lived course, patients with arginase deficiency remain vulnerable to the same catastrophic events of hyperammonemia that patients with other urea cycle

  17. Analysis of Clinical Manifestations and Prognosis of 92 Cases with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianlin Duan; Ming Jiang

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the risk factors and influence of various treatments on the prognosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma(NHL).METHODS Clinical data of 92 patients with NHL from our hospital were retrOspectjvely reviewed.Kaplan-Meier statistics were used to analyze the differences in survival times of the patients receiving various treatments.Cox regression model was employed for analyzing the prognostic factors.RESULTS Among our patients,the 2 and 5-year disease-free survivals (DFS)were respectively 68% and 51%.The 5-year cancer-specific survival (CSS)was 55%.Mono-factorial analysis showed that the main independent prognostic factors included Ann Arbor Staging,B symptoms,lactate dehydrogenase(LDH),the international prognostic index(IPI)and age.Concerning the IPI,the 5-year CSS for the low-risk factors(0~1),lower-moderate risk(2),higher-moderate(3)and high-risk(4~5)were respectively 60%,62%,42% and 33%.Analysis of the prognoses,based on treatment of the patients with different stages,was as follows:the 5-year survival rates of the Stage-Ⅰ and Ⅱ patients,receiving surgery or chemotherapy alone,or a combined therapy,were respectively 19%,72% and 68%,showing that the survival rates of the group with a combined therapy and the chemotherapy alone were superior to the group with surgery alone;the 5-year survival rates of the Stage-Ⅲ and Ⅳ patients,receiving surgery or chemotherapy alone or a combined therapy,were respectively 50%,35% and 60%,indicating that the survival rate of the group with a combined therapy was superior compared to the group with chemotherapy alone.CONCLUSION Long-term survival of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients is closely related with multiple factors.Rational detection and assessment of the risk factors may prolong the living time of the patients.Different methods of treatment can influence the patient's prognosis.Correct evaluation of the prognostic factors,and rational and effective therapy can prolong the patient's survival.

  18. Correlation of the KISA% index and Scheimpflug tomography in 'normal', 'subclinical', 'keratoconus-suspect' and 'clinically manifest' keratoconus eyes.

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    Steinberg, Johannes; Aubke-Schultz, Silke; Frings, Andreas; Hülle, Jan; Druchkiv, Vasyl; Richard, Gisbert; Katz, Toam; Linke, Stephan J

    2015-05-01

    To analyse tomographic changes in eyes classified as 'normal', 'keratoconus-suspect' and 'clinically manifest keratoconus' based on the established KISA% definition of Rabinowitz and Rasheed and to develop the category of 'subclinical keratoconus eyes' to expand the classification into a 'subtopographic' range. Tomographic and topographic analyses of 670 eyes performed with a rotating Scheimpflug imaging system (Pentacam(®), Oculus Inc., Wetzlar, Germany) were retrospectively analysed. Based on the KISA% keratoconus classification system, eyes were assigned to a 'normal', 'keratoconus-suspect' or 'manifest keratoconus' group. In addition, a new group of 'subclinical keratoconus eyes' was analysed, comprising unsuspicious fellow eyes of patients with keratoconus. T-tests, Wilcoxon rank-sum test, receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and robust regression analyses were performed to correlate tomographic parameters with the increasing KISA% index. KISA%-grouped keratoconus eyes showed robust tomographic changes. By adding the subclinical group, although the concurrent topography was unchanged, we were able to demonstrate statistically significant changes for almost all tomographic parameters (parameters with highest sensitivity/specificity: ART_max, [0.69/0.69], BAD_D [0.66/0.66]). The highest coefficient of determination (R(2)) with the KISA% index was demonstrated for Ele_f_max (R(2) = 0.70), Ele_f_TP (R(2) = 0.69), Ele_b_TP (R(2) = 0.69) and BAD_D (R(2) = 0.68). We recommend the use of the expanded KISA% index (eKISA% index) as the basis for the definition of keratoconus and normal groups in future keratoconus research projects. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and molecular typing of salmonella typhi isolated from patients with typhoid fever in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanj, Souha S; Kanafani, Zeina A; Shehab, Marwa; Sidani, Nisreen; Baban, Tania; Baltajian, Kedak; Dakdouki, Ghenwa K; Zaatari, Mohamad; Araj, George F; Wakim, Rima Hanna; Dbaibo, Ghassan; Matar, Ghassan M

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the epidemiology and the clinical manifestations of typhoid fever as well as the susceptibility and strain relatedness of Salmonella typhi isolates in Lebanon from 2006 to 2007. A total of 120 patients with typhoid fever were initially identified from various areas of the country based on positive culture results for S. typhi from blood, urine, stools, bone marrow and/or positive serology. Clinical, microbiological and molecular analysis was performed on cases with complete data available. These results indicated that drinking water was an unlikely mode of transmission of the infection. Despite increasing reports of antimicrobial resistance among S. typhi isolates, the vast majority of these isolates were susceptible to various antibiotic agents, including ampicillin, cephalosporins, quinolones, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Molecular analysis of the isolates revealed a predominance of one single genotype with no variation in distribution across the geographical regions. Copyright © 2014 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A recently isolated Lassa virus from Mali demonstrates atypical clinical disease manifestations and decreased virulence in cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronetz, David; Strong, James E; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Sogoba, Nafomon; Brining, Douglas; Geisbert, Thomas W; Scott, Dana P; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-04-15

    The virulence of Soromba-R, a Lassa virus strain recently isolated from southern Mali, was assessed in 2 animal models of Lassa fever: inbred strain 13 guinea pigs and cynomolgus macaques. In both models, the Malian isolate demonstrated tissue tropism and viral titers similar to those of historical Lassa virus isolates from Sierra Leone (Josiah) and Liberia (Z-132); however, the Soromba-R isolate was found to be less pathogenic, as determined by decreased mortality and prolonged time to euthanasia in macaques. Interestingly, in addition to the classic indicators of Lassa fever, Soromba-R infection presented with moderate to severe pulmonary manifestations in the macaque model. Analysis of host responses demonstrated increased immune activation in Soromba-R-infected macaques, particularly in neutrophil-activating or -potentiating proinflammatory cytokines or growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, interleukin 1β, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, as well as interleukin 5, which may be responsible for the decreased lethality and uncharacteristic clinical presentation. These results suggest that the strain of Lassa virus circulating in Mali might be less pathogenic than strains circulating in the historical region of endemicity and may result in an atypical presentation for Lassa fever, which could complicate clinical diagnosis.

  1. A STUDY OF THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, BIOCHEMICAL FINDINGS, PRECIPITATING FACTORS AND COMPLICATIONS IN 56 EPISODES OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS

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    M. Rafii

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Fifty six episodes of DKA occurred in 33 patients during the period between 1998 -96. These patients were admitted and treated in Bahrami children hospital, a Tehran University teaching medical center. The most frequent clinical manifestations consisted of polyuria and polydipsia (66%, nausea and vomiting (64%, reduction in consciousness (53%, and Kussmaul respiration (53.5%. 54.6% of DKA episodes showed a pH below 7.1. There was a relationship between the severity of acidosis and the time needed for its correction. Complications during treatment appeared in 47.5% of DKA attacks, hypokalemia (18.8%, hyperkalemia (16% , hypoglycemia (10% were the most common. No brain edema or death occurred in our patients. The most common precipitating factors of DKA include unavailability of insulin or syringes (39.4%, infections (32%, and unknown causes (28.6%. The patients were divided in two different groups. The first group experienced 31 episodes of DKA in known patients suffering from diabetes mellitus and receiving insulin treatment. 25 episodes of DKA occurred in the second group with no previous history of diabetes; of interest is the finding that in 75% of recurrent attacks in group 1, the unavailability of insulin or syringes was the precipitating factor. The clinical, laboratory and complications of these two groups of patients were studied and the results obtained were compared with similar studies in other countries.

  2. Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) spectrum: clinical manifestations and SCN1A mutations in Indonesian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herini, Elisabeth Siti; Gunadi; Harahap, Indra Sari Kusuma; Yusoff, Surini; Morikawa, Satoru; Patria, Suryono Yudha; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Sunartini; Sutaryo; Takada, Satoshi; Matsuo, Masafumi; Nishio, Hisahide

    2010-06-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a childhood genetic epilepsy syndrome. GEFS+ includes a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, and SCN1A mutations have frequently been reported among the GEFS+-related gene abnormalities. In this study, to clarify the distributions of the clinical subtypes, we analyzed 34 families with GEFS+ in Indonesia using the hospital records of the patients and questionnaires for the family members. The number of patients with febrile seizures plus (FS+), FS+ and afebrile generalized/partial seizures, borderline severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEB) and severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI) were 9, 11, 7, and 7, respectively. Most patients had a family history of febrile seizures. Next, we performed molecular analyses to clarify the contributions of SCN1A mutations to the development of the GEFS+ subtypes. Only 3 of 34 probands showed SCN1A mutations. These mutations were two missense mutations, p.V1612I and p.C1756G, in two patients with SMEI and SMEB, and one silent mutation, p.G1762G, in a patient with FS+ and afebrile partial seizures. In conclusion, the majority of GEFS+ patients in Indonesia were not associated with SCN1A mutations. To detect the GEFS+-causing mutations, we must search and analyze other genes in these patients. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Atypical manifestations of leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Balaji, Krishan; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2015-05-01

    Leptospirosis is an illness with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and severe illness affects nearly all organ systems. Serious and potentially life-threatening clinical manifestations of acute leptospirosis are caused by both direct tissue invasion by spirochaetes and by the host immune responses. In its severe form, leptospirosis can cause multi-organ dysfunction and death in a matter of days. Therefore it is critical to suspect and recognize the disease early, in order to initiate timely treatment. While the classical presentation of the disease is easily recognized by experienced clinicians practising in endemic regions, rarer manifestations can be easily missed. In this systematic review, we summarize the atypical manifestations reported in literature in patients with confirmed leptospirosis. Awareness of these unusual manifestations would hopefully guide clinicians towards early diagnosis.

  4. Laboratory diagnosis, clinical manifestations, epidemiological situation and public health importance of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Shushtar County, Southwestern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Kassiri; Ali kassiri; Masoud Lotfi; Parvaneh Farajifard; Elnaz Kassiri

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate as a descriptive and cross sectional study on epidemiology, the laboratory diagnosis and clinical manifestation ofCutaneousLeishmaniasis(CL) inShushtar County.Methods:The investigation was carried out on referrals from different districts of ShushtarCounty and was diagnosed based on their ulcer clinical manifestations withCL using laboratory method.This study was actively developed over the period of2008 to2010.Surface of a clean slide was pressed on to the scraped part of the lesions and moved along to produce a smear on the slide.The slides were fixed with methanol, stained with standardGiemsa, and examined carefully under high magnification for an hour or more to look for amastigotes by a trained person.Two smears were prepared and examined from each patient and data were collected using different correlative patients characteristics to analyze information.The essential records including residential area, type and location of lesion, age, sex, the number of ulcers, season, and the history of traveling to endemic areas for this disease were carefully gathered. Results:Parasites presumed to beLeishmania major (L. major) based on the existence of a large vacuole in the cytoplasm.Totally206 patients were referred to the central laboratory and their manifestation lesions were clinically examined.Of these,64 cases(31.1%) were female and142 cases(68.9%) were male.The findings documented that the rate of incidence ofCL was in fall61 cases(29/6%) and winter80 cases(38/8%), which is one of the most important characteristics of zoonoticCL.Sixty-eight cases(33%) had ulcers on hands,63 cases(30.6%) on feet and30 cases (14.6%) on hands and feet.A total of120 patients(58.3%) had only one ulcer.But70 cases(34%) had2 ulcers.The highest incidence was found among patients with two age groups of20-29 years old(43.2%) and10-19 years old(18%).The most cases resided in rural areas with164 cases(79.6%). Conclusions:Analyzing of the composed results revealed

  5. Follow-up survey of the prevalence, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and treatment of Spirocerca lupi in South Africa

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    Remo Lobetti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Spirocercosis is an important disease in South Africa. The object of this study was to determine if there had been a change in the prevalence, clinical manifestations and treatment of Spirocerca lupi over a 14-year period. A questionnaire was sent to 577 veterinary practices throughout South Africa in 2012. Of responders, 76% indicated that S. lupi occurred in their area, whilst 24% indicated that it did not; 84% considered S. lupi not to be a new phenomenon, whereas 16% considered it to be new. Monthly or seasonal distribution of the disease was not reported, and 76% of responders reported it to occur in no specific breed of dog, whereas 24% reported a breed risk, most considering large breeds to be at greater risk. No specific age or sex was identified as at higher risk. Common owner complaints were vomiting, weight loss, cough, or regurgitation. Reported clinical findings tended to mirror the clinical signs reported by owners. Most common diagnostic methods used were radiology, endoscopy, faecal flotation, and post mortem examination. Forty-four percent did not report seeing asymptomatic cases, 40% reported asymptomatic cases and 16% did not know. Associated complications were reported by 85% of responders, and included oesophageal neoplasia, hypertrophic osteopathy and acute haemothorax. Four different drugs were used as therapy: doramectin, ivermectin, milbemycin and Advocate®, with 9% of the responders using a combination of these four; 85% considered treatment to be effective and 15% ineffective. Treatment was considered more effective if the disease was diagnosed early and there were no complications. Two important conclusions were that more cases are being seen and that efficacy of therapy has increased, with a decrease in the mortality rate.

  6. Epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations of hepatitis E virus infection in Bulgaria: A report on 20 patients

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    Baymakova Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hepatitis E is one of the leading clinical manifestations of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries. In industrialized countries, during the past several years, sporadic “autochthonous” cases of HEV infection have been increased. Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiological, clinical and laboratory features of HEV infection among patients hospitalized at the Department of Infectious Diseases in Military Medical Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria. Methods. A retrospective study of 806 cases of acute viral hepatitis was performed at the Department of Infectious Diseases in Military Medical Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria, between December 2004 and September 2012. The etiological diagnosis was established by ELISA. The statistical analysis was performed using Excel 2007 (Microsoft, Redmond, Washington, USA and SPSS Statistics 19.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, New York, USA. Results. Specific reaction to anti-HEV-IgM and anti-HEV-IgG antibodies were detected in 20 (2.48% of 806 patients. The most observed clinical presentations were jaundice (85%, fatigue (85%, anorexia (65%, abdominal discomfort (55% and fever (40%. The mean values of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were 521 IU/l and 881 IU/l, respectively. The cholestasis was slight, marked with mean values of gamma-glutamyl transferase and alkaline phosphatase, respectively 418 IU/l and 486 IU/l. Conclusion. We report twenty autochthonous sporadic cases of acute infection with HEV. The zoonotic etiology of the virus as well as the foodborne transmission of the infection is discussed. We found that aging and pre-existing underlying diseases are risk factors for a severe course of the HEV infection.

  7. Duplex-Doppler spectral analysis in the physiopathology of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, M; Odoardi, G L; Bolle, G; Tartaglia, P

    1994-01-01

    We introduce a new method of analysis of the normal and abnormal behavior of the TMJ, using a duplex-doppler spectral analysis. The method consists in monitoring the joint movement by means of a study of the Fourier transformed signals, which give information on the velocity distribution of the condylo-meniscal complex during the opening and closing phases of the jaw. Using repeated sampling over short time intervals we get a detailed description of the motion which allows to discriminate the normal and abnormal action of the condylomeniscal complex. We are able to identify various physiopathological conditions, among which opening and/or closing clicks, complex locking conditions and anomalies related to an asymmetrical behavior during the operation cycle. Duplex-doppler spectral analysis is correlated to a clinical examination in order to define various classes of anomalies.

  8. Relations of nuclear factor-kappa B activity in the kidney of children with primary nephrotic syndrome to clinical manifestations, pathological types, and urinary protein excretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hong-yang; SUN Ruo-peng; DONG Jun-hua; ZHEN Jun-hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ The pathogenesis of childhood primary nephrotic syndrome (PNS) is unclear. However, an immune mechanism has generally been accepted as a cause. Imbalance of T lymphocyte and a variety of inflammatory cytokines, chemotactic and transcription factors are involved in the pathophysiology and manifestations of PNS,1,2 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptionally regulates the expression of these factors.3 Research has been focused on NF-κB and inflammatory regulated mediators of renal diseases, but seldom on different clinical manifestations and histopathological changes. In order to explore a potential mechanism for the pathogenesis of PNS in children and a basis for preventing its advance, we determined NF-κB activity in the kidney of children with PNS in vitro using immunohistochemical staining and the multimedia coloured pathological image analysis system and its relations to clinical manifestations, histopathological changes and 24-hour urinary protein excretion.

  9. Cat-scratch disease in Northern Italy: atypical clinical manifestations in humans and prevalence of Bartonella infection in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, E; Fabbi, M; Ferraioli, G; Prati, P; Filice, C; Sassera, D; Dalla Valle, C; Bandi, C; Vicari, N; Marone, P

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation on cat-scratch disease (CSD) in Northern Italy. Seventy-four cases of CSD were diagnosed at the San Matteo hospital, Pavia, during the period 2005-2010. Of these 74 patients, 18 (24.3 %) reported atypical clinical manifestations such as ocular papillitis, maculopapular eruptions, vertebral infection, pulmonary infiltrates, and granulomatous hepatitis. Contact with cats was documented for 61 patients (82.4 %), while cat-related trauma was reported for 49 patients (66.2 %). We subsequently investigated the presence of Bartonella infection in cats belonging to the above patients and in other domestic and stray cats from three provinces of Northern Italy. Among the 27 domestic cats tested, nine of the 11 belonging to the CSD patients and two of the remaining 16 were infected by B. henselae (81.8 % vs. 12.5 %). Out of over 1,300 stray cats examined, 23.1 % were seropositive for B. henselae; after culturing and genotyping, 17 % were found to be infected by B. henselae (15.5 %) or B. clarridgeiae (1.5 %).

  10. Polyalanine repeat expansion mutation of the HOXD13 gene in a Chinese family with unusual clinical manifestations of synpolydactyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Licheng; Wang, Binbin; Wang, Jing; Yu, Haibo; Ma, Xu; Yang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Synpolydactyly (SPD) is an autosomal dominant limb malformation caused by mutations in the gene HOXD13. We investigated a Chinese family in which three individuals across three generations were affected with distinctive limb malformations. We extracted genomic DNA from the affected and three unaffected individuals from this family as well as 100 unrelated controls, for mutation detection by DNA sequencing. The family was characterized by camptodactyly and symphalangism of fingers two to five, transverse phalanx and osseous fusion of the third metacarpal with the proximal phalanx, as well as the coexistence of mild and more severe bilateral phenotypes. We identified a duplication mutation, c. 186-212dup, in exon 1 of the HOXD13 gene in the affected individuals from this family; it was not present in the unaffected individuals or the 100 unrelated individuals. And we also did not find polymorphism among the controls. This study has expanded the phenotypic spectrum of known HOXD13 polyalanine repeat mutations and provided more information about the polymorphic nature of the polyalanine repeat. In addition, new clinical manifestations have been added to the spectrum of possible synpolydactyly phenotypes.

  11. Recent Perspectives on Genome, Transmission, Clinical Manifestation, Diagnosis, Therapeutic Strategies, Vaccine Developments, and Challenges of Zika Virus Research

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    Apoorva Shankar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the potential threats to public health microbiology in 21st century is the increased mortality rate caused by Zika virus (ZIKV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus. The severity of ZIKV infection urged World Health Organization (WHO to declare this virus as a global concern. The limited knowledge on the structure, virulent factors, and replication mechanism of the virus posed as hindrance for vaccine development. Several vector and non-vector-borne mode of transmission are observed for spreading the disease. The similarities of the virus with other flaviviruses such as dengue and West Nile virus are worrisome; hence, there is high scope to undertake ZIKV research that probably provide insight for novel therapeutic intervention. Thus, this review focuses on the recent aspect of ZIKV research which includes the outbreak, genome structure, multiplication and propagation of the virus, current animal models, clinical manifestations, available treatment options (probable vaccines and therapeutics, and the recent advancements in computational drug discovery pipelines, challenges and limitation to undertake ZIKV research. The review suggests that the infection due to ZIKV became one of the universal concerns and an interdisciplinary environment of in vitro cellular assays, genomics, proteomics, and computational biology approaches probably contribute insights for screening of novel molecular targets for drug design. The review tried to provide cutting edge knowledge in ZIKV research with future insights required for the development of novel therapeutic remedies to curtail ZIKV infection.

  12. Pharyngeal squamous cell papilloma in adult Japanese: comparison with laryngeal papilloma in clinical manifestations and HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Ryoji; Makiyama, Kiyoshi; Higuti, Yusho; Ikeda, Atsuo; Miura, Masatoshi; Hasegawa, Hisashi; Kinukawa, Noriko; Ikeda, Minoru

    2012-10-01

    A number of reports have investigated the relationship between laryngeal papilloma and human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. On the other hand, it is unclear whether the HPV infection is involved in the occurrence of pharyngeal papilloma. We hypothesized that HPV infection was involved in the occurrence of pharyngeal papilloma similarly to laryngeal papilloma. To verify this hypothesis, we investigated the presence of HPV infection. Furthermore, clinical manifestations of pharyngeal papilloma, which had rarely been reported, were discussed. A male-to-female ratio, solitary or multiple occurrences, and koilocytosis were examined in cases with pharyngeal papilloma. HPV DNA was examined with unfixed surgically resected specimens of pharyngeal papilloma. A screening test by the liquid-phase hybridization method was carried out for the HPV high-risk group (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 56, 58, 59, and 68) and HPV low-risk group (6, 11, 42, 43, 44). As a control, 15 cases with laryngeal papilloma for which the same screening test was carried out were employed. Pharyngeal papilloma occurred as a solitary lesion more often, whereas laryngeal papilloma occurred as multiple tumors more frequently. The HPV infection rate was 0% in pharyngeal papilloma cases, which was in stark contrast with 66.7% in the HPV low-risk group in laryngeal papilloma cases. Pharyngeal papilloma occurred as a solitary lesion in females more frequently. Contrary to our hypothesis, the involvement of HPV infection was unlikely in the occurrence of pharyngeal papilloma.

  13. Clinical manifestations of the deletion of Down syndrome critical region including DYRK1A and KCNJ6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Matsuo, Mari; Ito, Masahiro; Imai, Katsumi

    2011-01-01

    A relatively small region of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) is considered to play a major role in Down syndrome (DS) phenotypes, and the concept of a Down syndrome critical region (DSCR) has been proposed. The goal of the phenotype-genotype correlation study is to discover which genes are responsible for each DS phenotype. Loss of the genomic copy numbers of Hsa21 can give us important suggestion to understand the functions of the involved genes. Genomic copy number aberrations were analyzed by micro-array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in 300 patients with developmental delay. Partial deletions of Hsa21 were identified in three patients with developmental delay, epilepsy, microcephaly, and distinctive manifestations. Two of the patients had mosaic deletions of 21q22-qter including a part of DSCR; one of whom whose mosaic ratio was higher than the other showed more severe brain morphogenic abnormality with colpocephaly, which was similar to the previously reported patients having pure deletions of 21q22-qter, indicating the critical region for cortical dysplasia at this region. The remaining patient had the smallest microdeletion with 480 kb in DSCR including DYRK1A and KCNJ6. Although we could not identify any nucleotide alteration in DYRK1A and KCNJ6 in our cohort study for 150 patients with mental retardation with/without epilepsy, this study underscores the clinical importance of DSCR not only for DS but also for developmental disorders.

  14. The Spectrum of Infectious Diseases in Kidney Transplantation: A Review of the Classification, Pathogens and Clinical Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopoulos, Nikolaos-Andreas; Duni, Anila; Peschos, Dimitrios; Agnantis, Niki; Dounousi, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment-of-choice for a significant number of patients with end-stage renal disease. Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) benefit from a longer life expectancy, with a better quality of life. Despite, recent accomplishments in the field of kidney transplantation, both short- and long-term, surgical and medical complications still exist. Among these complications, cardiovascular disease, carcinogenesis and infections are the most important. Infectious diseases constitute the most common complications after renal transplantation and the second most common cause of death among RTRs with a functioning graft. Theoretically, all infectious pathogens could cause disease in immunocompromised RTRs, yet among these, one could identify more important ones, such as the Enterobacteriaceae, causing urinary tract infections; pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii; Candida species which cause invasive fungal infections; herpes viruses; hepatitis viruses and parasites. Early diagnosis and effective treatment are key elements in salvaging both the allograft and the patient. However, clinical manifestations and diagnosis of such infectious diseases are not easily identified due to the altered state of immune response of the RTR. Thus, apart from possessing a deep knowledge of the etiology and the treatment options in each case, transplant physicians should also always remain alert when dealing with RTRs.

  15. Frequency of Macroprolactinemia in Hyperprolactinemic Women Presenting with Menstrual Irregularities, Galactorrhea, and/or Infertility: Etiology and Clinical Manifestations

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    Alfredo Leaños-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the frequency of macroprolactinemia, its etiology, and the clinical manifestations in patients with hyperprolactinemia presenting with menstrual irregularities, galactorrhea, and/or infertility who were attended by the gynecology-endocrinology service. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, 326 hyperprolactinemic women were tested for serum prolactin (PRL concentrations before and after chromatographic separation (gel filtration and affinity with protein G and extraction of free PRL with polyethylene glycol (PEG. Results. Sera from 57 patients (17.5% were found to have macroprolactinemia. The presence of macroprolactinemia was attributable to anti-PRL autoantibodies in 54 (94.7% patients. The median serum PRL levels were similar in patients with or without macroprolactinemia (42.0 versus 38.1 ng/mL. In contrast, patients with macroprolactinemia had lower serum-free PRL levels (median 9.2 versus 31.7 ng/mL, . Patients without macroprolactinemia had a higher frequency of galactorrhea and abnormal pituitary imagine findings (. Conclusions. We can conclude that macroprolactinemia should be considered as a benign variant, and it must be ruled out in women presenting with menstrual irregularities, galactorrhea, and/or infertility in order to investigate other causes different than hyperprolactinemia. Serum PRL precipitated with PEG is a convenient and simple procedure to screen for the presence of macroprolactinemia.

  16. Clinical manifestations and endoscopic findings of amebic colitis in a United States-Mexico border city: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Rhonda; Cooper, Chad J; Ramirez-Vega, Ruben; Huerta-Alardin, Ana; Boman, Darius; Zuckerman, Marc J

    2015-12-14

    Invasive amebiasis is not frequently seen in the United States. It is associated with considerable morbidity in patients residing in or traveling to endemic areas. We report a case series of patients with amebic colitis in a United States-Mexico border city to alert physicians to the varied clinical manifestations. Nine patients were diagnosed with amebic colitis. Mean age was 56 (38-83), 6 were males, and all were Hispanic. Common symptoms were diarrhea (56 %), hematochezia (33 %) and abdominal bloating (11 %). The diagnosis of amebic colitis was established in the following ways: 8 patients by colonoscopy with biopsy, 1 by surgery for colonic obstruction. The diagnosis of amebic colitis was confirmed in 8 patients (89 %) by amebic trophozoites present in histopathologic sections. One patient was diagnosed with amebic colitis based upon clinical symptoms, colitis on colonoscopy and visualization of amebic trophozoites on stool examination. In the 8 patients in whom colonoscopy was done, 6 (75 %) had inflammation with rectosigmoid involvement and 5 (62.5 %) had ulcerations. Infection resolved after treatment with metronidazole in most patients; however, one patient developed a liver abscess and another had a colonic perforation and later developed a liver abscess. The occurrence of amebic colitis in this United States-Mexico border city hospital population was low, but in some cases potentially life-threatening. Physicians should be alert to the less common presentations of amebic colitis, such as overt gastrointestinal bleeding, exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease, and the incidental finding of association with colon cancer, or a surgical abdomen. Rectosigmoid involvement was typically found on colonoscopy.

  17. Effect of Proinflammatory Cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β) on Clinical Manifestations in Indian SLE Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Vandana; Nadkar, Milind; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali; Patwardhan, Manisha; Ghosh, Kanjaksha K.; Nadkarni, Anita H.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by production of autoantibodies and organ damage. Elevated levels of cytokines have been reported in SLE patients. In this study we have investigated the effect of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β) on clinical manifestations in 145 Indian SLE patients. One hundred and forty-five healthy controls of the same ethnicity served as a control group. Clinical disease activity was scored according to SLEDAI score. Accordingly, 110 patients had active disease and 35 patients had inactive disease. Mean levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β were found to be significantly higher in SLE patients than healthy controls (P < 0.001). Mean level of IL-6 for patients with active disease (70.45±68.32 pg/mL) was significantly higher (P = 0.0430) than those of inactive disease patients (43.85±63.36 pg/mL). Mean level of TNF-α was 44.76±68.32 pg/mL for patients with active disease while it was 25.97±22.03 pg/mL for those with inactive disease and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.0161). Similar results were obtained for IL-1β (P = 0.0002). Correlation between IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β serum levels and SLEDAI score was observed (r = 0.20, r = 0.27, and r = 0.38, resp.). This study supports the role of these proinflammatory cytokines as inflammatory mediators in active stage of disease. PMID:25548434

  18. Effect of Proinflammatory Cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β on Clinical Manifestations in Indian SLE Patients

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    Vinod Umare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by production of autoantibodies and organ damage. Elevated levels of cytokines have been reported in SLE patients. In this study we have investigated the effect of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β on clinical manifestations in 145 Indian SLE patients. One hundred and forty-five healthy controls of the same ethnicity served as a control group. Clinical disease activity was scored according to SLEDAI score. Accordingly, 110 patients had active disease and 35 patients had inactive disease. Mean levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β were found to be significantly higher in SLE patients than healthy controls (P<0.001. Mean level of IL-6 for patients with active disease (70.45±68.32 pg/mL was significantly higher (P=0.0430 than those of inactive disease patients (43.85±63.36 pg/mL. Mean level of TNF-α was 44.76±68.32 pg/mL for patients with active disease while it was 25.97±22.03 pg/mL for those with inactive disease and this difference was statistically significant (P=0.0161. Similar results were obtained for IL-1β (P=0.0002. Correlation between IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β serum levels and SLEDAI score was observed (r=0.20, r=0.27, and r=0.38, resp.. This study supports the role of these proinflammatory cytokines as inflammatory mediators in active stage of disease.

  19. Methods of Correcting Intestine Dysbiosis and Their Influence on the Dynamics of Clinical Manifestations of Hepatic Encephalopathy among Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

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    YE.S. SIRCHAK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Here are given the results of a complex survey of 169 patients with liver cirrhosis having signs of liver encephalopathy. We found more significant positive dynamics of clinical manifestations of liver encephalopathy in patients (n = 70, for whom for correcting microbiocenosis of the colon we prescribed in complex therapy not only prebiotics, but also probiotics.

  20. Clinical Manifestations of Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Lytic Activation: Multicentric Castleman Disease (KSHV–MCD and the KSHV Inflammatory Cytokine Syndrome

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    Mark N. Polizzotto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Soon after the discovery of Kaposi sarcoma (KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, it was appreciated that this virus was associated with most cases of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD arising in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. It has subsequently been recognized that KSHV–MCD is a distinct entity from other forms of MCD. Like MCD that is unrelated to KSHV, the clinical presentation of KSHV–MCD is dominated by systemic inflammatory symptoms including fevers, cachexia, and laboratory abnormalities including cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hyponatremia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Pathologically KSHV–MCD is characterized by polyclonal, IgM-lambda restricted plasmacytoid cells in the intrafollicular areas of affected lymph nodes. A portion of these cells are infected with KSHV and a sizable subset of these cells express KSHV lytic genes including a viral homolog of interleukin-6 (vIL-6. Patients with KSHV–MCD generally have elevated KSHV viral loads in their peripheral blood. Production of vIL-6 and induction of human (h IL-6 both contribute to symptoms, perhaps in combination with overproduction of IL-10 and other cytokines. Until recently, the prognosis of patients with KSHV–MCD was poor. Recent therapeutic advances targeting KSHV-infected B cells with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and utilizing KSHV enzymes to target KSHV-infected cells have substantially improved patient outcomes. Recently another KSHV-associated condition, the KSHV inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS has been described. Its clinical manifestations resemble those of KSHV–MCD but lymphadenopathy is not prominent and the pathologic nodal changes of KSHV–MCD are absent. Patients with KICS exhibit elevated KSHV viral loads and elevation of vIL-6, homolog of human interleukin-6 and IL-10 comparable to those seen in KSHV–MCD; the cellular origin of these is a matter of investigation. KICS may contribute to the inflammatory symptoms

  1. Physio-pathological roles of transglutaminase-catalyzed reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariangela; Ricotta; Maura; Iannuzzi; Giulia; De; Vivo; Vittorio; Gentile

    2010-01-01

    Transglutaminases(TGs) are a large family of related and ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins.The main activity of these enzymes is the cross-linking of a glutaminyl residue of a protein/peptide substrate to a lysyl residue of a protein/peptide co-substrate.In addition to lysyl residues,other second nucleophilic co-substrates may include monoamines or polyamines(to form mono-or bi-substituted/crosslinked adducts) or-OH groups(to form ester linkages) .In the absence of co-substrates,the nucleophile may be water,resulting in the net deamidation of the glutaminyl residue.The TG enzymes are also capable of catalyzing other reactions important for cell viability.The distribution and the physiological roles of TG enzymes have been widely studied in numerous cell types and tissues and their roles in several diseases have begun to be identified."Tissue" TG(TG2) ,a member of the TG family of enzymes,has definitely been shown to be involved in the molecular mechanisms responsible for a very widespread human pathology:i.e.celiac disease(CD) .TG activity has alsobeen hypothesized to be directly involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for several other human diseases,including neurodegenerative diseases,which are often associated with CD.Neurodegenerative diseases,such as Alzheimer’s disease,Parkinson’s disease,supranuclear palsy,Huntington’s disease and other recently identified polyglutamine diseases,are characterized,in part,by aberrant cerebral TG activity and by increased cross-linked proteins in affected brains.In this review,we discuss the physio-pathological role of TG-catalyzed reactions,with particular interest in the molecular mechanisms that could involve these enzymes in the physio-pathological processes responsible for human neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Coronary heart disease clinical manifestation and risk factors in Japanese immigrants and their descendents in the city of São Paulo

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    Amato Reynaldo Vicente

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess whether a difference exists in coronary heart disease clinical manifestations and the prevalence of risk factors between Japanese immigrants and their descendents in the city of São Paulo. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of coronary artery disease clinical manifestations and the prevalence of risk factors, comparing 128 Japanese immigrants (Japanese group with 304 Japanese descendents (Nisei group. RESULTS: The initial manifestation of the disease was earlier in the Nisei group (mean = 53 years, a difference of 12 years when compared with that in the Japanese group (mean = 65 years (P<0.001. Myocardial infarction was the first manifestation in both groups (P = 0.83. The following parameters were independently associated with early coronary events: smoking (OR = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.35-3.77; P<0.002; Nisei group (OR = 10.22; 95% CI = 5.64-18.5; P<0.001; and female sex (OR = 5.04; 95% CI = 2.66-9.52; P<0.001. CONCLUSION: The clinical presentation of coronary heart disease in the Japanese and their descendents in the city of São Paulo was similar, but coronary heart disease onset occurred approximately 12 years earlier in the Nisei group than in the Japanese group.

  3. Clinical and serological manifestations associated with interferon-α levels in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Mariana Postal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the serum levels of interferon alpha in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients, their first-degree relatives and healthy controls and to evaluate the associations between serum interferon alpha and disease activity, laboratory findings and treatment features. METHODS: We screened consecutive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients in a longitudinal cohort at the pediatric rheumatology unit of the State University of Campinas between 2009 and 2010. All patients demonstrated disease onset before the age of 16. Disease status was assessed according to the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI. Interferon alpha levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. RESULTS: We included 57 childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients (mean age 17.33±4.50, 64 firstdegree relatives (mean age 39.95±5.66, and 57 healthy (mean age 19.30±4.97 controls. Serum interferon alpha levels were significantly increased in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to their firstdegree relatives and healthy controls. Interferon alpha levels were significantly increased in patients with positive dsDNA antibodies, patients with cutaneous vasculitis, patients with new malar rash and patients who were not receiving medication. Interferon alpha levels correlated with C3 levels and systemic lupus erythematosus Disease Activity Index scores. In addition, we observed an inverse correlation between patient age and interferon alpha levels. CONCLUSION: Interferon alpha may play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus, especially in cutaneous manifestations and dsDNA antibody formation. The observation that interferon alpha levels are increased in patients who are not taking medication should be investigated in

  4. A case series of children with apparent mercury toxic encephalopathies manifesting with clinical symptoms of regressive autistic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, David A; Geier, Mark R

    2007-05-15

    Impairments in social relatedness and communication, repetitive behaviors, and stereotypic abnormal movement patterns characterize autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). It is clear that while genetic factors are important to the pathogenesis of ASDs, mercury exposure can induce immune, sensory, neurological, motor, and behavioral dysfunctions similar to traits defining or associated with ASDs. The Institutional Review Board of the Institute for Chronic Illnesses (Office for Human Research Protections, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, IRB number IRB00005375) approved the present study. A case series of nine patients who presented to the Genetic Centers of America for a genetic/developmental evaluation are discussed. Eight of nine patients (one patient was found to have an ASD due to Rett's syndrome) (a) had regressive ASDs; (b) had elevated levels of androgens; (c) excreted significant amounts of mercury post chelation challenge; (d) had biochemical evidence of decreased function in their glutathione pathways; (e) had no known significant mercury exposure except from Thimerosal-containing vaccines/Rho(D)-immune globulin preparations; and (f) had alternate causes for their regressive ASDs ruled out. There was a significant dose-response relationship between the severity of the regressive ASDs observed and the total mercury dose children received from Thimerosal-containing vaccines/Rho (D)-immune globulin preparations. Based upon differential diagnoses, 8 of 9 patients examined were exposed to significant mercury from Thimerosal-containing biologic/vaccine preparations during their fetal/infant developmental periods, and subsequently, between 12 and 24 mo of age, these previously normally developing children suffered mercury toxic encephalopathies that manifested with clinical symptoms consistent with regressive ASDs. Evidence for mercury intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis as contributing to some regressive ASDs.

  5. 婴幼儿百日咳的临床特征%Clinical manifestations of Bordetella pertussis infection in infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄建琼; 马卓娅; 郑跃杰; 刘恩梅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical manifestations and epidemiological profiles of hospitalized infants with Bordetella pertussis infection and to improve the knowledge for its early diagnosis and treatment.Methods Using a retrospective analysis method,the data of 142 hospitalized infants with Bordetella pertussis infection in Shenzhen Children's Hospital from 2011 to 2013 were collected,which was confirmed by a real-time polymerase chain reaction(PCR) of nasopharyngeal secretion.The SPSS 16.0 software was used for statistical analysis.Results Of the 142hospitalized infants with Bordetella pertussis infection,the ratio of male to female was 2.1∶ 1.0 (96/41 cases).Ninetythree (65.5%) cases were aged less than 3 months old,26 cases (18.3%) were 3-6 months old and 23 cases (16.2%) were 6-36 months old.One hundred and twenty-six (88.7%) patients were unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated.The most common clinical manifestation was paroxysmal cough which accounts for 104/142 (73.2%) cases,and 6 cases of which had roaring(4.2%).Peripheral blood WBC level of 83 cases increased,and 75 (90.4%) cases were lymphocytosis.The positive rate of X-ray was 60.6%.Eighty-one cases were complicated with bacteria,respiratory virus or mycoplasma pneumonia infection.There were significant differences in symptom of fever and infection of respiratory tract pathogen among 3 groups.The symptom of fever in the group aged less than 3 months old group was significantly lower than the other 2 groups (x2 =11.45,P < 0.01 ;x2 =34.56,P < 0.01),and 6-36 months old group was significantly higher than the other 2 groups(x2 =7.590,P < 0.01 ;x2 =6.928,P < 0.01).Conclusions Bordetella pertussis is an important pathogen for the infants with persistent cough,especially in unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated infants,but the clinical manifestation and signs of pertussis are atypical,which may lead to a misdiagnosis and delay proper treatment.As a rapid and sensitive method of

  6. DQ2, DQ7 and DQ8 Distribution and Clinical Manifestations in Celiac Cases and Their First-Degree Relatives

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    Magdalena Araya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available HLA-linked genes are relevant to celiac disease (CD; the potential genetic differences present worldwide are not fully understood. Previous results suggest that the distribution of HLA-DQ2/DQ7/DQ8 in Chile may differ from that in Europe and North America. In celiac patients and their first-degree relatives (FDRS, we assessed their clinical, serological and histological characteristics, determined HLA-DQ2, HLA-DQ7 and HLA-DQ8 alleles and genotypes, and evaluated the relations between them. A total of 222 individuals were assessed (56 cases, 166 FDRs. 16.9% of FDRs were tTG positive; 53.6% of them showed overweight/obesity and 3% undernourishment; they spontaneously declared being asymptomatic, but detailed questioning revealed that 60.7% experienced symptoms, which had not been investigated. DQ2 was present in 53.9% and 43.9.0% of cases and FDRs (p < 0.05. The most frequent genotype distribution was DQ2/DQ7 (fr 0.392 (cases and 0.248 (FDRs, respectively, p < 0.02. The next most common genotypes were HLA-DQ2/DQ8 (fr 0.236 in FDRs and 0.176 in cases, p < 0.05. 3.92% cases were not HLA-DQ2/DQ8 carriers. Among tTG positive FDRs, 57.4%, 22.3% and 20.2% carried DQ2, DQ7 and DQ8, respectively. In cases, 72.7% of the biopsies classified Marsh ≥3 carried at least one DQ2; 91.7% of DQ2/DQ2 and 88.3% of DQ2/DQ7 were Marsh ≥3. Thus, DQ2 frequency is lower than reported; the higher frequency found for DQ8 and DQ7 concur with recent publications from Argentine and Brazil. These results suggest that although CD may manifest clinically in ways similar to those described in other populations, some genetic peculiarities in this region deserve further study.

  7. HLA-B5/51 GENOTYPE: AN ASSOCIATION WITH THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF BEHCET’S DISEASE

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    Z. S. Alekberova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the contribution of HLA-B5/51 genotype to the clinical manifestations and risk of Behcet’s disease (BD in two ethnic groups.Subjects and methods. 146 BD patients fulfilling the International Criteria for BD (ICBD were divided into two ethnic groups: 1 86 patients from Dagestan (representatives of 8 ethnic nationalities in this region with mean age 30.7±9.6 years; disease duration – 8.8±10.1 years; 2 60 ethnic Russian patients, nonresidents of Dagestan with mean age 32.9±11.1 years; disease duration – 11.2±10.1 years. All patients were examined at the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology in 1990 to 2014. HLA class I antigens were typed by a microlymphocytotoxic technique using a Gisans anti-leukocyte sera kit (Saint Petersburg.Results. HLA-B5/51 was detected in 87 (59.6% patients, much more often in men than in women (70 and 38%, respectively; p<0.01. Genital ulcers and erythema nodosum were significantly more common in HLA-B5/51-positive Dagestani (87.3 and 57% than in HLA-B5/51-negative ones (56.5 and 26%; p=0.0019 and р=0.01; respectively. There were no significant differences in these signs in the Russian group of patients with BD depending on the presence of this allele. In HLA-B5/51-positive male Dagestani patients with BD, the risk of erythema nodosum was twice as high as that in HLA-B5/51-negative patients (p=0.054. In HLA-B5/51 female Dagestani carriers, the risk of genital ulcers and generalized uveitis proved to be 3.5 (p=0.057 and 2.7 times higher than that in HLA-B5/51 noncarriers. Frequency of HLA-B5/51 was 73.2% among the Dagestanis and 40% among the Russians. Furthermore, this investigation revealed HLA-B5/51 carriage mainly in the male BD patients. Therefore, in addition to ethnicity, gender should be borne in mind when analyzing the clinical associations with HLA-B5/51.

  8. Atypical clinical manifestations of hepatitis a among children aged 1-16 years in South-Eastern Region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz-Çiftdoğan, Dilek; Köse, Engin; Aslan, Selda; Gayyurhan, Efgan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection has several atypical manifestations, including fulminant hepatitis, relapsing hepatitis, prolonged cholestasis and extrahepatic manifestations. In this study, we aimed to describe the characteristics and outcomes of the pediatric patients with atypical manifestations of HAV infection. Four hundred twelve children with symptomatic hepatitis A infection admitted to Gaziantep Children's Hospital Department of Pediatric Infectious Disease between August 2011 and January 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Atypical presentations were present in 53 (12.8%) children of 412 children with HAV infection. Patients with atypical presentations (8.3±3.7 years) were older than patients with typical presentations (5.9±3.1 years) (p=0.001). Children with atypical features of hepatitis A statistically had higher initial and peak values of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), international normalized ratio (INR), serum total and direct bilirubin than typical manifested group. We can conclude that older age is the major risk factor for atypical presentation of HAV infections. Higher initial and peak levels of AST, ALT, INR, total and direct bilirubin could predict the atypical manifestation.

  9. Discriminant validity of constructs derived from the self-regulative model for evaluation anxiety for predicting clinical manifestations of test anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzer, Frank; Wendt, Julia; Hamm, Alfons O

    2015-10-01

    Test anxiety is a highly prevalent and impairing syndrome. However, research on clinically relevant manifestations of test anxiety and especially on effective treatment components is still very sparse. In the present study we examined the predictive validity of constructs derived from the self-regulative model for evaluation anxiety proposed by Zeidner and Matthews (2007) for discriminating clinical and non-clinical levels of test anxiety. We compared self-report data from 47 clinically test anxious patients with those from 41 healthy university students. Results showed that learning goals, self-concept of abilities, self-incrimination, elaboration and perfectionism were the constructs that independently separated clinical from non-clinical levels of test anxiety, thus providing the strongest discriminant validity even when controlling for an effect of the global severity of mental health problems. These constructs spread across all three domains proposed in the model, thus providing important implications for possible targets of interventions to reduce clinical levels of test anxiety.

  10. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the United States in 1986: etiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and dental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anneroth, G; Anneroth, I; Lynch, D P

    1986-12-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) results from a lymphotropic retrovirus (HTLV-III) infection and is characterized by specific opportunistic infections and malignancies. The virus is transmitted primarily by semen and blood. Infection is limited principally to defined risk groups, i.e., homosexual men and intravenous drug users. Head and neck manifestations include cervical lymphadenopathy and Kaposi's sarcoma. Oral manifestations include Kaposi's sarcoma, candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, precocious periodontal disease, xerostomia, herpes simplex, recurrent aphthae, erythema multiforme, and venereal warts. Although HTLV-III is present in saliva, there are no reported cases of transmission secondary to dental procedures. Appropriate precautions and techniques are recommended in treating patients at risk for AIDS.

  11. Adult Onset Still’s Disease: A Case Report with a Rare Clinical Manifestation and Pathophysiological Correlations

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    Katerina M. Antoniou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult-onset Still’s disease is an inflammatory multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Pleuritis is the most common pulmonary manifestation and pleural effusions are usually exudates with a predominance of neutrophils. We report a case of an eosinophilic pleural effusion as a novel and hitherto unrecognized manifestation of active adult-onset Still’s disease. We also observed a marked NLRP3 inflammasome activation with increased production of IL-1β which coincided with the development and resolved upon remission of the pleural effusion suggesting a possible novel pathogenetic pathway for the development of pleural effusions in the context of the auto-inflammatory disorders.

  12. Manifestaciones clínicas de la oftalmopatía tiroidea Clinical manifestations of thyroid ophthalmopathy

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    R. V. Fernández-Hermida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La oftalmopatía es una manifestación común de la enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune. El edema periorbitario, la retracción palpebral, el exoftalmos y las alteraciones visuales son signos y síntomas frecuentes. De un 25 a un 50% de los pacientes con hipertiroidismo de Graves tendrán algunas manifestaciones de oftalmopatía. Todos los síntomas clínicos visuales significativos y los hallazgos de los pacientes con oftalmopatía de Graves pueden ser englobados dentro de dos fenómenos: el engrosamiento del espacio retrobulbar debido al depósito de glicosaminoglicanos (GAG o a la restricción de la motilidad extraocular, que se atribuye a un engrosamiento inicial y posterior fibrosis. Los pacientes con enfermedad de Graves típicamente se quejan de dolor ocular o periocular, lagrimeo, fotofobia, visión borrosa, diplopia, o percepción cromática alterada. A la exploración, muestran congestión orbitaria, proptosis, neuropatía óptica, restricción de la motilidad ocular extrínseca, ejes visuales divergentes, exposición corneal, retracción palpebral y edema periorbitario. En este trabajo se describen las principales manifestaciones clínicas de la oftalmopatía de Graves con el objetivo de establecer unas clasificaciones medibles y reproducibles que puedan ser empleadas en la clínica diaria para objetivar cambios y guiar y adecuar la terapia. Finalmente, recomendamos el uso de medidas objetivas para la proptosis, movimientos extraoculares, alteraciones corneales y del nervio óptico, usando una escala de actividad clínica o cambios en medidas objetivas para poder establecer la actividad de la enfermedad, y finalmente, reflejar la percepción de los pacientes de su estado de enfermedad.Ophthalmopathy is a common manifestation of autoimmune thyroid disease. Periorbital swelling, eyelid lag, exophthalmos, and impaired vision may occur. From 25% to 50% of patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism will have some features of ophthalmopathy. All of

  13. The presentation and evaluation of a case of systemic Lupus erythematosus and anthiphospholipid antibody syndrome with primary clinical manifestation of chorea

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    Asgary S

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Manifestation of chorea in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APA synd. is not common. Moreover, primary presentation of the disease with chorea is rare and only few such cases are reported in literature in recent years. We report here the case of a 28 year old woman who was first seen at the age of 10 with clinical manifestations of chorea. Later she developed deep vein thrombosis, thrombocytpenia, stroke, cardiac valve involvement and recurrent abortions. Laboratory investigations confirmed the diagnosis of SLE and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. We present this patient as a case of SLE and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with chorea being her primary clinical presentation

  14. Fisiopatologia da esquizofrenia: aspectos atuais Physiopathology of schizophrenia: current aspects

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    Ary Gadelha de Alencar Araripe Neto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A esquizofrenia é uma das mais intrigantes doenças psiquiátricas e, talvez por isso, a mais pesquisada, com grandes avanços sobre sua fisiopatologia no último século. OBJETIVO: Revisar os principais avanços na compreensão fisiopatológica da esquizofrenia. MÉTODO: Revisão da literatura para cada tópico proposto a partir de artigos levantados no Medline e/ou considerados importantes a partir da experiência dos autores. RESULTADOS: A hipótese dopaminérgica representa uma das primeiras teorias etiológicas e permanece até os dias atuais como uma das que apresenta evidências mais consistentes. No entanto, essa teoria falha em explicar a história natural, os prejuízos cognitivos e as alterações estruturais encontradas na esquizofrenia. A demonstração de estudos epidemiológicos de fatores de risco genéticos e ambientais, somados aos estudos neuropatológicos e de neuroimagem, sugerem um modelo interativo em que inúmeros fatores atuam conjuntamente para alterações mais globais do desenvolvimento cerebral. CONCLUSÃO: A compreensão fisiopatológica da esquizofrenia avançou bastante no último século, evoluindo de teorias etiológicas unicausais para modelos mais complexos que consideram a interação de inúmeros fatores genéticos e ambientais.BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is one of the most intriguing and studied psychiatric diseases and its physiopathology has advanced a lot in the last century. OBJECTIVE: To review the most important advances in the physiopathology of schizophrenia. METHOD: Review of the literature of each proposed topic by articles searched in Medline and/or chosen accordingly the authors’ experience. RESULTS: The dopaminergic hypothesis was one of the first ethiological theories and until today is among the ones that presents the most consistent evidences. However, it fails to explain important features found in schizophrenia, such as the natural history, the cognitive impairments and the

  15. Interleukin-6: the missing element of the neurocognitive deterioration in schizophrenia? The focus on genetic underpinnings, cognitive impairment and clinical manifestation

    OpenAIRE

    Frydecka, Dorota; Misiak, Błażej; Pawlak-Adamska,Edyta; Karabon, Lidia; Tomkiewicz, Anna; Sedlaczek, Paweł; Kiejna, Andrzej; Beszłej, Jan Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the immune system deregulation on the risk of schizophrenia is increasingly recognized. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) level together with the polymorphism in its gene (IL6 -174G/C) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels on clinical manifestation and cognition in schizophrenia patients. We recruited 151 patients with schizophrenia and 194 healthy control subjects. Psychopathology was evaluated using Operational ...

  16. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  17. Expanding role for the apelin/APJ system in physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpéné, C; Dray, C; Attané, C; Valet, P; Portillo, M P; Churruca, I; Milagro, F I; Castan-Laurell, I

    2007-12-01

    Apelin is a bioactive peptide known as the ligand of the G protein-coupled receptor APJ. Diverse active apelin peptides exist under the form of 13, 17 or 36 amino acids, originated from a common 77-amino-acid precursor. Both apelin and APJ mRNA are widely expressed in several rodent and human tissues and have functional effects in both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Apelin has been shown to be involved in the regulation of cardiovascular functions, fluid homeostasis, vessel formation and cell proliferation. More recently, apelin has been described as an adipocyte-secreted factor (adipokine), up-regulated in obesity. By acting as circulating hormone or paracrine factor, adipokines are involved in physiological regulations (fat depot development, energy storage, metabolism or eating behavior) or in the promotion of obesity-associated disorders (type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular dysfunctions). In this regard, expression of apelin gene in adipose tissue is increased by insulin and TNFalpha. This review will consider the main roles of apelin in physiopathology with particular attention on its role in energy balance regulation and in obesity-associated disorders.

  18. Hepatocytes Polyploidization and Cell Cycle Control in Liver Physiopathology

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    Géraldine Gentric

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cells in mammalian tissues usually contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. However, numerous studies have demonstrated a major role of “diploid-polyploid conversion” during physiopathological processes in several tissues. In the liver parenchyma, progressive polyploidization of hepatocytes takes place during postnatal growth. Indeed, at the suckling-weaning transition, cytokinesis failure events induce the genesis of binucleated tetraploid liver cells. Insulin signalling, through regulation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, is essential in the establishment of liver tetraploidization by controlling cytoskeletal organisation and consequently mitosis progression. Liver cell polyploidy is generally considered to indicate terminal differentiation and senescence, and both lead to a progressive loss of cell pluripotency associated to a markedly decreased replication capacity. Although adult liver is a quiescent organ, it retains a capacity to proliferate and to modulate its ploidy in response to various stimuli or aggression (partial hepatectomy, metabolic overload (i.e., high copper and iron hepatic levels, oxidative stress, toxic insult, and chronic hepatitis etc.. Here we review the mechanisms and functional consequences of hepatocytes polyploidization during normal and pathological liver growth.

  19. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of atopic manifestations in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in a Brazilian urban community

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    Rosa Leonora Salerno Soares

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common chronic disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain, bowel movement changes, diarrhea, constipation, or both and affect approximately 10-20% of the general population. Today, IBS is considered a disorder of dysregulation of the so called brain-gut axis and evidence also suggests that gastrointestinal inflammation may be of great importance in the majority of cases of IBS. In addition to gastrointestinal symptoms, many patients have atopic symptoms. The aim of this study was to study the prevalence of atopic manifestations in volunteers with IBS in a Brazilian urban community. Volunteers over 18 years of age were enrolled and evaluated. The participants were evaluated by a gastroenterologist of the Group of Study of Intestinal Diseases at Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro. All volunteers were evaluated to determine if patients had symptoms compatible with the diagnosis of IBS based on Rome III criteria. The identification of the atopic manifestations was based in a structured questionnaire for atopy. Three hundred and fifty volunteers were enrolled. Of them, 330 volunteers were evaluated: 78 (23.6% of the volunteers had symptoms compatible with IBS (Group I and 252 (76.3% without symptoms compatible with IBS (Group II. Atopic manifestations were present in 46 (65.3% in Group I and 105 (41. 0% in Group II (P=0.0107, OR-2.01 95%CI -1. 20-3. 37. The association between atopic manifestations and the presence of IBS was relevant in patients in this Brazilian urban community. This fact may have implications for diagnosis and treatment of patients with IBS.

  20. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palekar, Nicole A; Harrison, Stephen A

    2005-10-01

    Hepatitis C affects approximately 170 million people worldwide. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C infection are clinically evident in nearly 40% of patients. Much research has been done over the last decade to better understand their incidence, clinical presentation, mechanism of disease, and the role of antiviral therapy in their treatment. Of the commonly reported manifestations, cryoglobulinemia, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and porphyria cutanea tarda remain the best understood manifestations. More recently, the association of insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus with chronic hepatitis C has been demonstrated. This paper serves to review the growing body of literature detailing the extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C.

  1. Clinical manifestations of cluster headache accompanied by chronic asosinusitis%慢性鼻窦炎伴原发性头痛的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨弋; 黄魏宁

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To master the clinical manifestations of rhinogenic headache and improve the diagnostic ability of chronic rhinosinusitis accompanied by primary headache. Method:The clinical manifestations,the diagnostic process,and the treatment of 1 patient with headache were analyzed, and also the related articles were studied. Result:Rhinogenic headache and primary headache had different clinical features and different treatment. In clinical work misdiagnosis were easily made if not being carefully analyzed. Conclusion: Diagnosis of rhinogenic headache don't need strong clinical evidence, but the differential diagnosis of other headache should be made.%目的:探讨鼻源性头痛的临床特征,提高对伴原发性头痛的鼻源性头痛的认识.方法:对1例慢性鼻窦炎伴原发性头痛患者的临床特征及诊疗过程等进行分析.结果:鼻源性头痛与原发性头痛有不同的临床特点及治疗方法,在临床工作中若不仔细分析鉴别极易造成误诊.结论:鼻源性头痛的诊断需要严格的临床证据支持,但仍应该排除其他性质的头痛.

  2. Pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis

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    Sameer Gulati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has a spectrum of presentation which ranges from mild disease to a severe form comprising of jaundice and renal failure. Involvement of the lung can vary from subtle clinical features to deadly pulmonary hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Of late, it has been identified that leptospirosis can present atypically with predominant pulmonary manifestations. This can delay diagnosis making and hence optimum treatment. The purpose of this review is to bring together all the reported pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis and the recent trends in the management.

  3. Gastrointestinal manifestations of endocrine disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina Maser; Arnbjorn Toset; Sanziana Roman

    2006-01-01

    The hormonal interactions among the systems throughout the body are not fully understood; many vague clinical symptoms may in fact be manifestations of underlying endocrine diseases. The aim of the following review is to discuss gastrointestinal manifestations of surgically correctable endocrine diseases, focusing on abnormalities of thyroid function, cancer and finally autoimmune diseases. We also review manifestations of pancreatic endocrine tumors, and multiple endocrine neoplasia.

  4. [Extrahepatic manifestations in hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risum, Malene

    2011-05-09

    Hepatitis C does not only affect the liver, but also manifests outside the liver. The skin, kidneys and nervous system are often involved due to mixed cryoglobulinaemia. Porphyria cutanea tarda, lymphoma and thyroid diseases among others can also attend a chronic infection, but the exact pathogenesis behind these manifestations is not clearly mapped. Antiviral treatment is reported to induce sustained virological response in more than half of the treated patients with a variable clinical response in the extrahepatic manifestations.

  5. Friedreich's ataxia 1980. An overview of the physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, A

    1980-11-01

    Phase three of the Quebec Cooperative Study of Friedreich's Ataxia was devoted to an understanding of the physiopathology of individual symptoms on the basis of previously discovered biochemical leads. The present paper attempts to pull these results together by presenting, as a hypothesis, a unifying scheme of possible interactions and relationships. The central core of this hypothesis is the demonstration in Friedreich's ataxia of a state of mitochondrial energy deprivation. This is indirectly responsible for such associated and important symptoms as muscle weakness, dying-back neuropathy, scoliosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Secondarily, and possibly as an independent but linked-event, the entry of glucose into cells and pyruvate oxidation, are slowed down, favoring the development of diabetes. As a consequence, tissue concentrations of glutamic acid and aspartic acid are decreased, particularly in more vulnerable areas such as the cerebellum, brain stem and dorsal root ganglia. This tissue deficiency in putative excitatory neurotransmitters is directly responsible for the symptom of ataxia. This conclusion is reinforced by the correction of the ataxia in experimental animals, by the intraventricular injection of the same amino acids, and not by the injection of other stimulants of motricity. The observed mitochondrial energy deprivation could be the metabolic consequence of major changes in the linoleic acid (18.2) composition of inner mitochondrial membrane phospholipids, such as cardiolipin. Such decreases in membrane 18:2 could be the result of interference with the normal incorporation of this fatty acid to lipoproteins and/or cell membranes. It is at this level that the search for the specific enzyme defect in Friedreich's ataxia is continuing.

  6. Hemoglobinúria paroxística noturna: da fisiopatologia ao tratamento Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: from physiopathology to treatment

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    Martha Mariana de Almeida Santos Arruda

    2010-01-01

    , recurrent infections, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and episodes of venous thrombosis. Its clinical course is highly variable. It frequently arises in association with bone marrow failure, particularly aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. It is also an acquired thrombophilia, presenting with a variety of venous thrombosis, mainly manifested with intra-abdominal thrombosis, here the major cause of mortality. The triad of hemolytic anemia, pancytopenia, and thrombosis makes a truly unique clinical syndrome of PNH, which was reclassified from a purely acquired hemolytic anemia to a hematopoietic stem cell mutation defect of the phosphatidyl inositol glycanclass-A gene. This mutation results in an early block in the synthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchors, responsible for binding membrane functional proteins. Among these proteins are the complement inhibitors, especially CD55 and CD59, that play a key role in protecting blood cells from complement cascade attack. Therefore, in PNH occurs an increased susceptibility of red cells to complement, and consequently, hemolysis. We here review PNH physiopathology, clinical course, and treatment options, especially eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that blocks the activation of terminal complement at C5 and prevents formation of the terminal complement complex, the first effective drug therapy for PNH.

  7. Massive Bleeding as the First Clinical Manifestation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer due to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation with Enhanced Fibrinolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, João Madeira; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Meneses Santos, João

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is the most frequent coagulation disorder associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. However, DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as an initial presentation of prostate cancer is extremely rare. The appropriate treatment to control bleeding in these situations is challenging, controversial, and based on isolated case reports in the literature. A 66-year-old male presented at the emergency department with acute severe spontaneous ecchymoses localized to the limbs, laterocervical hematoma, and hemothorax. Prostate specific antigen level was 385 μg/L, bone scintigraphy revealed multiple bone metastases, and prostate biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma (Gleason 9; 4 + 5). Laboratory investigation showed a pattern of enhanced fibrinolysis rather than the more common intravascular coagulation mechanism. Epsilon aminocaproic acid in monotherapy was initiated with a clear and rapid control of bleeding manifestations. This rare case of massive bleeding due to DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as the first manifestation of prostate cancer suggests that in selected cases where the acute bleeding dyscrasia is clearly associated with a dominant fibrinolysis mechanism it is possible to use an approach of monotherapy with antifibrinolytics. PMID:27803823

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Specific Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Ascertained versus Potential Coeliac Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matacena, Giada; Costa, Stefano; Magazzù, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Patients involved on coeliac disease (CD) have atypical symptoms and often remain undiagnosed. Specific oral manifestations are effective risk indicators of CD and for this reason an early diagnosis with a consequent better prognosis can be performed by the dentist. There are not researches analysing the frequency of these oral manifestations in potential coeliac patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the oral hard and soft tissue lesions in potential and ascertained coeliac children in comparison with healthy controls. 50 ascertained children, 21 potential coeliac patients, and 54 controls were recruited and the oral examination was performed. The overall oral lesions were more frequently present in CD patients than in controls. The prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions was 62% in ascertained coeliac, 76.2% in potential coeliac patients, and 12.96% in controls (P coeliac and 42.5% of the potential coeliac versus 11.11% of the controls (P coeliac and 19% in potential coeliac versus 0% in controls (P < 0.05; OR = 3.923). The SED seem to be genetically related to the histological damage and villous atrophy. PMID:25197270

  9. Trigeminal Neuralgia as the First Clinical Manifestation of Anti-Hu Paraneoplastic Syndrome Induced by a Borderline Ovarian Mucinous Tumor

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    Hossein Kalanie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome (PNS is an uncommon manifestation of cancer that is not caused by the tumor or metastasis. Trigeminal neuralgia (TN is an initial symptom of this disease, but it has rarely been reported in the literature. Here, we report the case of a 76-year-old woman who presented with classic TN, followed by limbic encephalitis due to an underlying ovarian intestinal-type mucinous borderline tumor, with the presence of anti-Hu antibodies. She recovered quickly after removal of the tumor and was essentially free of symptoms 2 weeks after surgery. Because PNS precedes the tumor in approximately 60% of cases, its rapid detection and treatment are crucial. Therefore, we propose that PNS be considered during the management of TN when brain imaging is normal, as it is followed by other central and/or peripheral neurological manifestations as well as the presence of systemic symptoms such as anemia, fatigability, loss of appetite, or weight loss.

  10. Clinical Evaluation of Specific Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Ascertained versus Potential Coeliac Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramanti, Ennio; Cicciù, Marco; Matacena, Giada; Costa, Stefano; Magazzù, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Patients involved on coeliac disease (CD) have atypical symptoms and often remain undiagnosed. Specific oral manifestations are effective risk indicators of CD and for this reason an early diagnosis with a consequent better prognosis can be performed by the dentist. There are not researches analysing the frequency of these oral manifestations in potential coeliac patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the oral hard and soft tissue lesions in potential and ascertained coeliac children in comparison with healthy controls. 50 ascertained children, 21 potential coeliac patients, and 54 controls were recruited and the oral examination was performed. The overall oral lesions were more frequently present in CD patients than in controls. The prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions was 62% in ascertained coeliac, 76.2% in potential coeliac patients, and 12.96% in controls (P coeliac and 42.5% of the potential coeliac versus 11.11% of the controls (P coeliac and 19% in potential coeliac versus 0% in controls (P villous atrophy.

  11. Treatment of cellulite based on the hypothesis of a novel physiopathology

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    Pereira de Godoy JM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available José Maria Pereira de Godoy1, Maria de Fátima Guerreiro de Godoy21Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Lymphovenous Rehabilitation, FAMERP, São José do Rio Preto, BrazilBackground: The aim of the current study is to report on a new form of treatment for cellulite based on a novel physiological hypothesis.Methods: A novel treatment for cellulite was evaluated in 14 patients aged 19–36 (mean 27.5 years. The only inclusion criterion was clinically diagnosed cellulite, and the exclusion criteria were history of edema, obesity, or any other disease diagnosed during the physical examination. Perimetry was performed at the gluteal fold, at 5 cm and 10 cm below the gluteal fold for both legs, and 5 cm and 10 cm below the navel. Additionally, standard photographs were taken and a questionnaire of satisfaction was applied. The patients were submitted to a treatment regimen of 1.5 hours per day adapted for the treatment of cellulite, consisting of manual and mechanical lymph drainage and cervical stimulation using the Godoy and Godoy technique. After 10 sessions over two weeks, the patients were evaluated again.Results: Reductions were identified at both points below the navel, the points on the thighs, and at the gluteal fold (P < 0.0001.Conclusion: This technique of lymphatic system stimulation is efficacious in the treatment of cellulite.Keywords: cellulite, treatment, physiopathology

  12. Cerebrovascular manifestations following scorpion sting

    OpenAIRE

    Nataraja P; Naveen Prasad SV; Obulareddy G; Anil Ch; Naveen T; Vengamma B

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion sting is a common clinical problem in Rayalaseema area of Andhra Pradesh State in India. Clilnical presentation of scorpion envenomation can range from mild local pain to systemic manifestations involving almost all systems. Cerebrovascular manifestations of scorpion sting have been sparsely documented. We report two cases who presented with ischaemic stroke and haemorrhagic stroke following scorpion sting.

  13. Brain single-photon emission tomography with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: relations with EEG and MRI findings and clinical manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colamussi, P. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Giganti, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Cittanti, C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Dovigo, L. [Inst. of Neurology, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Trotta, F. [Inst. of Neurology, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Tola, M.R. [Div. of Rheumatology, S. Anna Hospital, Ferrara (Italy); Tamarozzi, R. [Radiology Dept., S. Anna Hospital, Ferrara (Italy); Lucignani, G. [INB-CNR Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, H.S. Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Piffanelli, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy)

    1995-01-01

    In the reported study the role of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) in the evaluation of CNS involvement in SLE was assessed and the relations between SPET perfusion defects, EEG examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical presentation were examined. Twenty SLE patients with different NP manifestations were studied. Multiple areas of hypoperfusion, especially in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, were demonstrated by SPET analysis in all 20 patients. The number of hypoperfused areas and the degree of hypoperfusion, expressed by an asymmetry index (AI), were more marked in patients with multiple NP manifestations. MRI and EEG evaluations were positive for 14 of 18 and for 12 of 20 patients, respectively. In the patients with positive SPET and MRI, 87 MRI focal lesions and 63 hypoperfused areas were found, and for 51 of these 63 at least one MRI lesion was found in the same anatomical region. SPET examination of patients with a normal EEG showed fewer hypoperfused areas and a lower degree of asymmetry compared to patients with an abnormal EEG. SPET of patients with focal EEG abnormalities showed more hypoperfused areas (difference not statistically significant) and a higher AI than did SPET of the patients with diffuse EEG abnormalities. Seven of 11 anatomical regions with focal EEG abnormalities. Seven of 11 anatomical regions with focal EEG abnormalities had co-localized hypoperfused areas and in two of these seven no detectable MRI lesions were found. The analysis of SPET and NP manifestations showed that 12 of 20 patients had at least one positive correlation, always involving the areas with the highest AI. In total, 51/88 (58%) hypoperfused areas correlated with the MRI findings and 31/88 (35%) with NP manifestations; for seven of the latter no concurrent MRI lesions were detected in the same anatomical region. (orig.)

  14. A CLINICAL STUDY OF PATTERN OF SKIN MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS ATTENDING DERMATOLOGY OPD IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

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    Bhaskar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune connective tissue disease with multi-organ involvement with skin being the second most commonly affected organ. SLE with skin lesions can produce considerable morbidity resulting from painful skin lesions, oral ulcers, disfigurement or toxic epidermal necrolysis like manifestations, etc. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific (LE specific or non-specific (LE non-specific as per the Gilliam classification of skin lesion associated with Lupus Erythematosus (LE. Patients with acute cutaneous LE (Lupus specific have high chances of having systemic disease. OBJECTIVE To see most common cutaneous manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE in patients of North-East India. METHODS It was a case-series collected from Department of Dermatology, Silchar Medical College, Silchar, Assam. Total 38 patients with SLE fulfilling the clinical and laboratory criteria of the American Rheumatology Association (Updated 1997 were examined and followed-up for cutaneous manifestations between April 2013 and March 2016. RESULTS The mean age of patients was 26 years; 92% patients were female and 8% were male. Out of 38 patients, oral ulcers were seen in 26 (68.42%, malar rash in 21 (55.26%, photosensitivity in 21 (55.26% patients, discoid rash in 14 (36.84%, alopecia in 20 (52.63%, palpable purpura in 10 (26.31%, nail changes in 10 (26.31%, erythema multiforme in 7 (18.42%, Raynaud’s phenomenon in 5 (13.15%, subacute cutaneous LE in 3 (07.89%, bullous eruptions in 3 (07.89%, telangiectasia in 2 (05.26%, facial oedema in 2 (05.26%, lupus panniculitis in 1 (02.63%, cheilitis in 1 (02.63%, lichen planus in 1 (02.63%. CONCLUSION SLE is predominantly seen among young female patients. Oral ulcer was the most common manifestation followed by malar rash and photosensitivity in our study

  15. Zatrucie tlenkiem węgla – drogi narażenia, obraz kliniczny, metody leczenia = Carbon monoxide poisoning, routes of exposure, clinical manifestation, treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sowa, Magdalena; Winnicki, Andrzej; Wójcik, Kamil; Tarkowski, Michał; Gnatowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Sowa Magdalena, Winnicki Andrzej, Wójcik Kamil, Tarkowski Michał, Gnatowski Tomasz. Zatrucie tlenkiem węgla – drogi narażenia, obraz kliniczny, metody leczenia = Carbon monoxide poisoning, routes of exposure, clinical manifestation, treatment. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2015;5(4):345-354. ISSN 2391-8306. DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.17251 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/2015%3B5%284%29%3A345-354 https://pbn.nauka.gov.pl/works/556252 http://dx.doi...

  16. [Hyperparathyroidism secondary to renal insufficiency. Physiopathology, clinicoradiological aspects and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hamida, F; Ghazali, A; Boudzernidj, M; Amar, M; Morinière, P; Westeel, P; Fournier, A

    1994-01-01

    Stimulation of PTH secretion and synthesis in chronic renal failure involves direct and indirect factors. The indirect ones are those contributing to a decrease of plasma ionized calcium concentration which stimulates the release of PTH (1) primarily the negative calcium balance due to the iatrogenic reduction of dietary calcium intake associated with an inadequate synthesis of calcitriol, this latter being explained by a reduction in the nephronic mass, the phosphate retention, the acidosis and the retention of uremic toxins (2) more accessorily, the physicochemical dysequilibrium induced by the late occurring hyperphosphatemia. The factors acting directly on the parathyroid gland stimulating synthesis of prepro PTH at its transcription level: not only hypocalcitriolemia but also hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. The clinicoradiological manifestations appear late, mostly only after the patient has been put on dialysis. The most precocious sign is the subperiosteal resorption assessed on the hand X-rays. Therefore diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism relies mainly on the measurement of plasma concentration of intact PTH. In dialysis patients the optimal range corresponding to the best bone histology is between 1 an 3 times the upper limit of normal. No such data exist for predialysis patients. Medical treatment of hyperparathyroidism should primarily be preventive, probably in predialysis lipin patient as soon as plasma intact PTH is greater than the normal upper limit. This treatment is based primarily on the prevention of phosphate retention, of negative calcium balance and acidosis by the use of oral alkaline salts of calcium given with the meals in association with appropriate dietary protein and phosphate restriction. Native vitamin D depletion should also be prevented but use of 1 alpha OH vitamin D3 metabolites in controversial: it is reasonable to administer them only when plasma intent PTH is above 3-7 the normal upper limit and when plasma phosphate is

  17. The presence of some humoral immunologic indicators and clinical manifestations in cryoglobulin positive heroin addicts without evidence of hepatitis virus infection

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    Simonovska Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cryoglobulins are single or mixed immunoglobulins that are subject to reversible precipitation at low temperatures. Objective. The aims of this paper were: 1. Comparison of cryoglobulin positive (CP, cryoglobulin negative (CN heroin addicts and the control group (CG in terms of serum immunoglobulins IgG, IgA and IgM and complement components C3 and C4; 2. Comparison of CP and CN heroin addicts in terms of rheumatoid factor (RF and circulating immune complexes (CIC; 3. Assessment of clinical manifestations in CP heroin addicts. Methods. This is a comparative study of cases (outpatients treated at the University Clinic of Toxicology in Skopje over 3.5 years, from January 2009 to June 2012. In this study 140 heroin addicts without HbsAg were examined, seronegative for HCV and HIV infections. They were divided into 2 groups: 70 CP and 70 CN heroin addicts. A previously designed self-administered questionnaire was used as a data source on participants. All heroin addicts underwent the following analyses: urea and creatinine in serum; creatinine in urine; proteinuria; 24-hour proteinuria; IgM, IgG, IgA, C3, C4 ; RF; CIC; creatinine clearance; ECG; toxicological analyses for opioids in a urine sample; cryoglobulins. In addition to these 2 groups, IgG, IgA, IgM, C3 and C4 were also examined in 70 healthy subjects (CG. Results. The study showed that there was no statistically significant difference between CP, CN heroin addicts and CG regarding the concentration of IgA, IgG, IgM, C3 and C4, and between CP and CN regarding the concentration of CIC. There was significant difference between CP and CN regarding the concentration of RF. The following conditions were significantly more frequently manifested in CP than in CN heroin addicts: arthralgia, Raynaud’s phenomenon, respiratory difficulties, neurological disorders, manifested skin changes, hematuria, 24-hour proteinuria levels, and decreased renal clearance. Conclusion. There were no

  18. 不同年龄阶段结直肠息肉的临床表现探讨%Clinical manifestations of colorectal polyps in different age periods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓治平; 谢丽华; 丁亚琼

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解不同年龄段结、直肠息肉患者的临床表现。方法选取2011年1月至2013年12月于忠县第二人民医院就诊的结、直肠息肉患者99例,回顾性分析患者的基本情况、临床表现及息肉生长情况等临床资料。结果结、直肠息肉男性患者多于女性,但各年龄段性别差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);以中老年患者居多,其中老年患者的住院时间最长。腹痛、腹部不适为最主要的临床表现,以中年患者多见;15岁及以下患者均为幼儿,临床表现以便血为主;各年龄组的临床表现差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。不同年龄组患者的息肉个数及息肉生长部位比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。但随着年龄的增长,腺瘤性息肉的发生率逐渐增高,炎性及增生性息肉的发生率逐渐下降。结论不同年龄结、直肠息肉患者在性别、临床表现等方面无明显差异,在出现相应的临床症状时应做结、直肠息肉检查,以避免疾病的发展。%Objective To understand the clinical manifestations of colorectal polyps in different age periods . Methods 99 patients with colorectal polyps in our hospital from Jan .2011 to Dec .2013 were selected .The clinical data of basic information ,clinical manifestations and polyp growth situation were retrospectively analyzed .Results The male patients with colorectal polyps were more than the female patients ,but the difference in genders among dif‐ferent age groups had no statistical significance(P>0 .05);the majority were middle age and elderly patients ,among them the elderly patients had the longest hospitalization duration .Abdominal pain and abdominal discomfort were the most common clinical manifestations ,which were dominated by the middle age patients ;the patients aged 15 years or below were young children ,their manifestation was dominated by bloody stool;the difference in the clinical manifesta

  19. Health impact of supplying safe drinking water on patients having various clinical manifestations of fluorosis in an endemic village of West Bengal

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    Kunal K Majumdar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive fluoride in drinking water causes dental, skeletal and non-skeletal fluorosis which is encountered in endemic proportions in several parts of the world. The World Health Organization (WHO guideline value and the permissible limit of fluoride as per the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS is 1.5 mg/L. Studies showed that withdrawal of sources identified for fluoride, often leads to reduction of fluoride in the body fluids (re-testing urine and serum after a week or ten days and results in the disappearance of non-skeletal fluorosis within a short duration of 10-15 days. Objective: To determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of suspected dental, skeletal and non-skeletal fluorosis along with food habits, addictions and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste among participants taking water with fluoride concentration above permissible limit and to assess the changes in clinical manifestations of the above participants after consumption of safe drinking water with fluoride concentration below permissible limit. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal intervention study was conducted from October 2010 to December 2011 in a village selected randomly in Purulia District of West Bengal which is endemic for fluorosis. Thirty-six families with 104 family members in the above village having history of taking unsafe water containing high level of fluoride were selected for the study. The occurrence of various dental, skeletal and non-skeletal manifestations of fluorosis along with food habits, addictions and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste among the study population was assessed; the impact of taking safe water with fluoride concentration below permissible limit from a supplied community filter on these clinical manifestations was studied by follow-up examination of the above participants for six months. The data obtained is compared with the collected data from the baseline survey. Results: The prevalence of signs and symptoms of

  20. Chinese SLE Treatment and Research Group Registry: III. Association of Autoantibodies with Clinical Manifestations in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Jing Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the characteristics of Chinese SLE patients by analyzing the association between specific autoantibodies and clinical manifestations of 2104 SLE patients from registry data of CSTAR cohort. Significant (P<0.05 associations were found between anti-Sm antibody, anti-rRNP antibody, and malar rash; between anti-RNP antibody, anti-SSA antibody, and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH; between anti-SSB antibody and hematologic involvement; and between anti-dsDNA antibody and nephropathy. APL antibody was associated with hematologic involvement, interstitial lung disease, and a lower prevalence of oral ulcerations (P<0.05. Associations were also found between anti-dsDNA antibody and a lower prevalence of photosensitivity, and between anti-SSA antibody and a lower prevalence of nephropathy (P<0.05. Most of these findings were consistent with other studies in the literature but this study is the first report on the association between anti-SSA and a lower prevalence of nephropathy. The correlations of specific autoantibodies and clinical manifestations could provide clues for physicians to predict organ damages in SLE patients. We suggest that a thorough screening of autoantibodies should be carried out when the diagnosis of SLE is established, and repeated echocardiography annually in SLE patients with anti-RNP or anti-SSA antibody should be performed.

  1. 各型眼皮肤白化病遗传基因的相关研究%The research on genes of ocular albinism and clinical manifestations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张忠寿

    2011-01-01

    白化病是一种单基因隐性遗传性疾病.眼皮肤白化病可分为4型,临床表现主要是全身各部位色素缺乏,根据其色素缺乏部位及其他系统异常,可分为眼白化病、眼皮肤白化病及白化病相关综合征.白化病的发生与12种基因的突变有关.本文对其临床表现及其对视力、皮肤、心理各方面危害及各型眼皮肤白化病遗传基因的相关研究进展进行详细的综述.%Albinism is a single-gene recessive genetic disease.Ocular albinism can be divided into 4 types, clinical manifestations, mainly whole body pigment deficiency, according to their pigment lack of parts and other system abnormalities can be divided into the whites of the disease, ocular albinism, and albinism-related syndrome.Albinism occurs with 12 gene mutation.In this paper, the clinical manifestation of the vision, skin, and the various aspects of psychological type ocular albinisn progress in genetic research were reviewed.

  2. 不典型性心肌梗死的临床表现及鉴别%Clinical Manifestations and Identification of Atypical Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宏

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析不典型心肌梗死的临床表现,探讨有效的鉴别方法。方法:以本院收治的46例不典型心肌梗死患者为观察组,另46例典型心肌梗死患者为对照组,比较其一般资料、临床症状、心电图、误诊情况、危险因素、并发症及死亡率等。结果:观察组患者临床表现不具典型性,心电图改变不典型;观察组患者误诊率、并发症发生率、死亡率以及不良反应发生率均明显高于对照组(P<0.05)。结论:不典型性心肌梗死临床表现无特异性,诊断时要通过严密观察其体征、辅助心电图变化和血清酶学检查等多种手段来确诊,以提高临床治愈率。%Objective:To analyze the clinical manifestations of atypical myocardial infarction and explore effective methods of identification.Method:46 cases of atypical myocardial infarction patients admitted to our hospital as the observation group,another 46 cases of typical myocardial infarction patients admitted to our hospital as the control group.The general data,clinical symptoms,ECG,misdiagnosis,risk factors,morbidity and mortality and so on of two groups were compared.Result:Patients in clinical manifestation of observation group was not typical,ECG changes were not typical;The rate of misdiagnosis,diabetes pulation,incidence of complications mortality and adverse effects rate of patients in the observation group were significantly higher than the control group(P<0.05).Conclusion:The clinical manifestations of atypical myocardial infarction are not specific.In order to improve the clinical cure rate,close observation of patients’signs combined with ECG changes inspection,serum enzymes inspection and other methods is necessary to make a definite diagnosis during the diagnosis.

  3. Disease history and medication use as risk factors for the clinical manifestation of type 1 diabetes in children and young adults: an explorative case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soulmaz Fazeli Farsani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is a highly variable asymptomatic period of beta cell destruction prior to the clinical presentation of type1 diabetes. It is not well known what triggers type 1 diabetes to become a clinically overt disease. This explorative study aimed to identify the association between disease history/medication use and the clinical manifestation of type 1 diabetes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An explorative case control study was conducted in the Dutch PHARMO Record Linkage System. Cases (n = 1,107 were younger than 2