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Sample records for physiological volume regulation

  1. Cell volume regulation: physiology and pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, I H; Hoffmann, E K; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig

    2008-01-01

    not only under physiological conditions, e.g. following accumulation of nutrients, during epithelial absorption/secretion processes, following hormonal/autocrine stimulation, and during induction of apoptosis, but also under pathophysiological conditions, e.g. hypoxia, ischaemia and hyponatremia....../hypernatremia. On the other hand, it has recently become clear that an increase or reduction in cell volume can also serve as a specific signal in the regulation of physiological processes such as transepithelial transport, cell migration, proliferation and death. Although the mechanisms by which cell volume perturbations...... are sensed are still far from clear, significant progress has been made with respect to the nature of the sensors, transducers and effectors that convert a change in cell volume into a physiological response. In the present review, we summarize recent major developments in the field, and emphasize...

  2. Physiology of cell volume regulation in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Lambert, Ian H; Pedersen, Stine F

    2009-01-01

    cases, activation of volume regulatory osmolyte transport. After acute swelling, cell volume is regulated by the process of regulatory volume decrease (RVD), which involves the activation of KCl cotransport and of channels mediating K(+), Cl(-), and taurine efflux. Conversely, after acute shrinkage......, cell volume is regulated by the process of regulatory volume increase (RVI), which is mediated primarily by Na(+)/H(+) exchange, Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransport, and Na(+) channels. Here, we review in detail the current knowledge regarding the molecular identity of these transport pathways...... and their regulation by, e.g., membrane deformation, ionic strength, Ca(2+), protein kinases and phosphatases, cytoskeletal elements, GTP binding proteins, lipid mediators, and reactive oxygen species, upon changes in cell volume. We also discuss the nature of the upstream elements in volume sensing in vertebrate...

  3. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume...... transporters and channels with key physiological functions in epithelia and known roles in the development of cancer in these tissues. Their roles in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and development of drug resistance in epithelial cancers will be discussed....... such as cancer, transepithelial and cell volume regulatory ion transport are dys-regulated. Furthermore, epithelial architecture and coordinated ion transport function are lost, cell survival/death balance is altered, and new interactions with the stroma arise, all contributing to drug resistance. Since altered...

  4. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume...... expression of ion transporters and channels is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer, it is timely to consider this especially for epithelia. Epithelial cells are highly proliferative and epithelial cancers, carcinomas, account for about 90% of all cancers. In this review we will focus on ion...... transporters and channels with key physiological functions in epithelia and known roles in the development of cancer in these tissues. Their roles in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and development of drug resistance in epithelial cancers will be discussed....

  5. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume...... but are also essential for a number of physiological processes such as proliferation, controlled cell death, migration and endocrinology. The thesis have been focusing on two Channels, namely the swelling activated Cl- channel (ICl, swell) and the transient receptor potential Vanilloid (TRPV4) channel. I: Cl......- serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...

  6. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    - serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...... of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume......, controlled cell death and cellular migration. Volume regulatory mechanisms has long been in focus for regulating cellular proliferation and my thesis work have been focusing on the role of Cl- channels in proliferation with specific emphasis on ICl, swell. Pharmacological blockage of the ubiquitously...

  7. Volume regulation in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2016-01-01

    function of iso-osmotic fluid transport that depends on Na+ recirculation. The causative relationship is discussed for a fluid-absorbing and a fluid-secreting epithelium of which the Na+ recirculation mechanisms have been identified. A large number of transporters and ion channels involved in cell volume...... regulation are cloned. The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) exhibiting specific electrophysiological characteristics seems exclusive to serve cell volume regulation. This is contrary to K+ channels as well as cotransporters and exchange mechanisms that may serve both transepithelial transport and cell...

  8. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  9. Regulation of amniotic fluid volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, M H; van den Wijngaard, J P H M; van Gemert, M J C; Ross, M G

    2007-01-01

    Water arrives in the mammalian gestation from the maternal circulation across the placenta. It then circulates between the fetal water compartments, including the fetal body compartments, the placenta and the amniotic fluid. Amniotic fluid is created by the flow of fluid from the fetal lung and bladder. A major pathway for amniotic fluid resorption is fetal swallowing; however, in many cases the amounts of fluid produced and absorbed do not balance. A second resorption pathway, the intramembranous pathway (across the amnion to the fetal circulation), has been proposed to explain the maintenance of normal amniotic fluid volume. Amniotic fluid volume is thus a function both of the amount of water transferred to the gestation across the placental membrane, and the flux of water across the amnion. Water flux across biologic membranes may be driven by osmotic or hydrostatic forces; existing data suggest that intramembranous flow in humans is driven by the osmotic difference between the amniotic fluid and the fetal serum. The driving force for placental flow is more controversial, and both forces may be in effect. The mechanism(s) responsible for regulating water flow to and from the amniotic fluid is unknown. In other parts of the body, notably the kidney, water flux is regulated by the expression of aquaporin water channels on the cell membrane. We hypothesize that aquaporins have a role in regulating water flux across both the amnion and the placenta, and present evidence in support of this theory. Current knowledge of gestational water flow is sufficient to allow prediction of fetal outcome when water flow is abnormal, as in twin-twin transfusion syndrome. Further insight into these mechanisms may allow novel treatments for amniotic fluid volume abnormalities with resultant improvement in clinical outcome.

  10. Physiology of temperature regulation: comparative aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicego, Kênia C; Barros, Renata C H; Branco, Luiz G S

    2007-07-01

    Few environmental factors have a larger influence on animal energetics than temperature, a fact that makes thermoregulation a very important process for survival. In general, endothermic species, i.e., mammals and birds, maintain a constant body temperature (Tb) in fluctuating environmental temperatures using autonomic and behavioural mechanisms. Most of the knowledge on thermoregulatory physiology has emerged from studies using mammalian species, particularly rats. However, studies with all vertebrate groups are essential for a more complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of Tb. Ectothermic vertebrates-fish, amphibians and reptiles-thermoregulate essentially by behavioural mechanisms. With few exceptions, both endotherms and ectotherms develop fever (a regulated increase in Tb) in response to exogenous pyrogens, and regulated hypothermia (anapyrexia) in response to hypoxia. This review focuses on the mechanisms, particularly neuromediators and regions in the central nervous system, involved in thermoregulation in vertebrates, in conditions of euthermia, fever and anapyrexia.

  11. Physiological regulation of NEFA availability: lipolysis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, V; Berlan, M

    2004-05-01

    Plasma NEFA are an important energy substrate and, furthermore, play a key role in the induction of insulin resistance in the body. The availability of NEFA is determined predominantly by their mobilization from adipose tissue triacylglycerol stores by the process of lipolysis. Adipose tissue lipolysis in man is regulated by a number of hormonal and paracrine and/or autocrine signals. The main hormonal signals may be represented by catecholamines, insulin, growth hormone, natriuretic peptides and some adipocytokines. The absolute levels and relative importance and contribution of these signals vary in different physiological situations, with diet and physical exercise being the main physiological variables that affect the hormonal signalling. Thus, modulations in hormonal signals induce an increase in NEFA mobilization in the post-absorptive state and during an acute bout of exercise, and suppress NEFA mobilization in the postprandial state. In addition, hormonal regulation is modified by long-term interventions in energy balance, such as dietary restriction and/or physical training, and is disturbed in some pathological states, such as obesity or diabetes. The question that remains is whether disturbances in lipolysis regulation in obese and diabetic subjects may be 'corrected' by the long-term interventions in diet and physical activity.

  12. A simple physiologic algorithm for managing hemodynamics using stroke volume and stroke volume variation: physiologic optimization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, William T

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular volume status and volume responsiveness continue to be important questions for the management of critically ill or injured patients. Goal-directed hemodynamic therapy has been shown to be of benefit to patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, acute lung injury and adult respiratory distress syndrome, and for surgical patients in the operating room. Static measures of fluid status, central venous pressure (CVP), and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) are not useful in predicting volume responsiveness. Stroke volume variation and pulse pressure variation related to changes in stroke volume during positive pressure ventilation predict fluid responsiveness and represent an evolving practice for volume management in the intensive care unit (ICU) or operating room. Adoption of dynamic parameters for volume management has been inconsistent. This manuscript reviews some of the basic physiology regarding the use of stroke volume variation to predict fluid responsiveness in the ICU and operating room. A management algorithm using this physiology is proposed for the critically ill or injured in various settings.

  13. Ion Channels Involved in Cell Volume Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume...

  14. 7 CFR 984.49 - Volume regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulating Handling Marketing Policy § 984.49 Volume regulation. (a) Free, reserve, and export percentages... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... during a marketing year will tend to effectuate the declared policy of the act, he shall establish a...

  15. Cell swelling and volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    1992-01-01

    been reported. The role of the different channels was discussed. A taurine leak pathway is clearly activated after cell swelling both in astrocytes and in neurones. The relations between the effect of glutamate and cell swelling were discussed. Discussion on the clearance of potassium from...... the extracellular space was continued. Neither the spatial buffering mechanism nor the role of the Na+/K+ pump was discussed here, but additional possibilities for K+ removal were discussed. At a high extracellular K+ concentration there is a possibility of channel-mediated KCl uptake by the glia cells, and a Na......-K-2Cl cotransport system is present in astrocytes and seems to play a role at relatively low extracellular K+ concentrations (6-20 mM). The cotransport system is likely to be regulated, but little is known about its regulation in glia cells....

  16. Cell Volume Regulation and Apoptotic Volume Decrease in Rat Distal Colon Superficial Enterocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Antico

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The colon epithelium is physiologically exposed to osmotic stress, and the activation of cell volume regulation mechanisms is essential in colonocyte physiology. Moreover, colon is characterized by a high apoptotic rate of mature cells balancing the high division rate of stem cells. Aim: The aim of the present work was to investigate the main cell volume regulation mechanisms in rat colon surface colonocytes and their role in apoptosis. Methods: Cell volume changes were measured by light microscopy and video imaging on colon explants; apoptosis sign appearance was monitored by confocal microscopy on annexin V/propidium iodide labeled explants. Results: Superficial colonocytes showed a dynamic regulation of their cell volume during anisosmotic conditions with a Regulatory Volume Increase (RVI response following hypertonic shrinkage and Regulatory Volume Decrease (RVD response following hypotonic swelling. RVI was completely inhibited by bumetanide, while RVD was completely abolished by high K+ or iberiotoxin treatment and by extracellular Ca2+ removal. DIDS incubation was also able to affect the RVD response. When colon explants were exposed to H2O2 as apoptotic inducer, colonocytes underwent an isotonic volume decrease ascribable to Apoptotic Volume Decrease (AVD within about four hours of exposure. AVD was shown to precede annexin V positivity. It was also inhibited by high K+ or iberiotoxin treatment. Interestingly, treatment with iberiotoxin significantly inhibited apoptosis progression. Conclusions: In rat superficial colonocytes K+ efflux through high conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK channels was demonstrated to be the main mechanism of RVD and to plays also a crucial role in the AVD process and in the progression of apoptosis.

  17. Regulation and function of AMPK in physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang-Min

    2016-07-15

    5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase that was originally identified as the key player in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. Intensive research over the last decade has identified diverse molecular mechanisms and physiological conditions that regulate the AMPK activity. AMPK regulates diverse metabolic and physiological processes and is dysregulated in major chronic diseases, such as obesity, inflammation, diabetes and cancer. On the basis of its critical roles in physiology and pathology, AMPK is emerging as one of the most promising targets for both the prevention and treatment of these diseases. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular and physiological regulation of AMPK and its metabolic and physiological functions. In addition, we discuss the mechanisms underlying the versatile roles of AMPK in diabetes and cancer.

  18. Aquaporins in sperm osmoadaptation: an emerging role for volume regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi CHEN; En-kui DUAN

    2011-01-01

    Upon ejaculation, mammalian sperm experience a natural osmotic decrease during male to female reproductive tract transition. This hypo-osmotic exposure not only activates sperm motility, but also poses potential harm to sperm structure and function by inducing unwanted cell swelling. In this physiological context, regulatory volume decrease (RVD) is the major mechanism that protects cells from detrimental swelling, and is essential to sperm survival and normal function. Aquaporins are selective water channels that enable rapid water transport across cell membranes. Aquaporins have been implicated in sperm osmoregulation. Recent discoveries show that Aquaporin-3 (AQP3), a water channel protein, is localized in sperm tail membranes and that AQP3 mutant sperm show defects in volume regulation and excessive cell swelling upon physiological hypotonic stress in the female reproductive tract, thereby highlighting the importance of AQP3 in the postcopulatory sperm RVD process. In this paper, we discuss current knowledge, remaining questions and hypotheses about the function and mechanismic basis of aquaporins for volume regulation in sperm and other cell types.

  19. Regulation, Signaling, and Physiological Functions of G-Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Alegre, Kamela O; Dey, Raja; Huang, Xin-Yun

    2016-09-25

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) mainly relay the information from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on the plasma membrane to the inside of cells to regulate various biochemical functions. Depending on the targeted cell types, tissues, and organs, these signals modulate diverse physiological functions. The basic schemes of heterotrimeric G-proteins have been outlined. In this review, we briefly summarize what is known about the regulation, signaling, and physiological functions of G-proteins. We then focus on a few less explored areas such as the regulation of G-proteins by non-GPCRs and the physiological functions of G-proteins that cannot be easily explained by the known G-protein signaling pathways. There are new signaling pathways and physiological functions for G-proteins to be discovered and further interrogated. With the advancements in structural and computational biological techniques, we are closer to having a better understanding of how G-proteins are regulated and of the specificity of G-protein interactions with their regulators.

  20. 76 FR 2447 - Gulf War and Health, Volume 6, Physiologic, Psychologic, and Psychosocial Effects of Deployment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War and Health, Volume 6, Physiologic, Psychologic, and Psychosocial Effects of Deployment... authority granted by the Persian Gulf War Veterans Act of 1998, Public Law 105-277, title XVI, 112 Stat..., ``Gulf War and Health, Volume 6, Physiologic, Psychologic, and Psychosocial Effects of Deployment-Related...

  1. Membrane mechanisms and intracellular signalling in cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Dunham, Philip B.

    1995-01-01

    Volume regulation, Signal transduction, Calcium-calmodulin, Stretch-activated channels, Eicosanoids, Macromolecular crowding, Cytoskeleton, Protein phosphorylation, dephosphorylation.......Volume regulation, Signal transduction, Calcium-calmodulin, Stretch-activated channels, Eicosanoids, Macromolecular crowding, Cytoskeleton, Protein phosphorylation, dephosphorylation....

  2. Journal of Gravitational Physiology, Volume 12, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles A. (Editor); Cogoli, Augusto (Editor); Hargens, Alan R. (Editor); Smith, Arthur H. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    The following topics were covered: System Specificity in Responsiveness to Intermittent -Gx Gravitation during Simulated Microgravity in Rats; A Brief Overview of Animal Hypergravity Studies; Neurovestibular Adaptation to Short Radius Centrifugation; Effect of Artificial Gravity with Exercise Load by Using Short-Arm Centrifuge with Bicycle Ergometer as a Countermeasure Against Disused Osteoporosis; Perception of Body Vertical in Microgravity during Parabolic Flight; Virtual Environment a Behavioral and Countermeasure Tool for Assisted Gesture in Weightlessness: Experiments during Parabolic Flight; Artificial Gravity: Physiological Perspectives for Long-Term Space Exploration; Comparison of the Effects of DL-threo-Beta-Benzyloxyaspartate on the Glutamate Release from Synaptosomes before and after Exposure of Rats to Artificial Gravity; Do Perception and Postrotatory Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Share the Same Gravity Reference?; Vestibular Adaptation to Changing Gravity Levels and the Orientation of Listing's Plane; Compound Mechanism Hypothesis on +Gz - Induced Brain Injury and Dysfunction of Learning and Memory; Environmental Challenge Impairs Prefrontal Brain Functions; Effect of 6-Days of Support Withdrawal on Characteristics of Balance Function; Hypergravity-Induced Changes of Neuronal Activities in CA1 Region of Rat Hippocampus; Audiological Findings in Antiorthostatic Position Modelling Microgravitation; Investigating Human Cognitive Performance during Spaceflight; The Relevance of the Minimization of Torque Exchange with the Environment in Weightlessness is Confirmed by Asimulation Study; Characteristics of the Eyes Pursuit Function during Readaptation to Terrestrial Gravity after Prolonged Flights Aboard the International Space Station; Comparison of Cognitive Performance Tests for Promethazine Pharmacodynamics in Human Subjects; Structural Reappraisal of Dendritic Tree of Cerebellar Purkinje Cell for Novel Functional Modeling of Elementary Sensorimotor Adaptive

  3. Vascular regulation of adult neurogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato eSawada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells in the mammalian adult brain continuously produce new neurons throughout life. Accumulating evidence in rodents suggests that various aspects of adult neurogenesis, including the genesis, migration, and maturation of new neurons, are regulated by factors derived from blood vessels and their microenvironment. Brain injury enhances both neurogenesis and angiogenesis, thereby promoting the cooperative regeneration of neurons and blood vessels. In this paper, we briefly review the mechanisms for the vascular regulation of adult neurogenesis in the ventricular-subventricular zone under physiological and pathological conditions, and discuss their clinical potential for brain regeneration strategies.

  4. Cell volume-regulated cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Considering the enormous turnover rates of ion channels when compared to carriers it is quite obvious that channel-mediated ion transport may serve as a rapid and efficient mechanism of cell volume regulation. Whenever studied in a quantitative fashion the hypertonic activation of non-selective cation channels is found to be the main mechanism of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Some channels are inhibited by amiloride (and may be related to the ENaC), others are blocked by Gd(3) and flufenamate (and possibly linked to the group of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels). Nevertheless, the actual architecture of hypertonicity-induced cation channels remains to be defined. In some preparations, hypertonic stress decreases K(+) channel activity so reducing the continuous K(+) leak out of the cell; this is equivalent to a net gain of cell osmolytes facilitating RVI. The hypotonic activation of K(+) selective channels appears to be one of the most common principles of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and, in most instances, the actual channels involved could be identified on the molecular level. These are BKCa (or maxi K(+)) channels, IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) channels (of intermediate and small conductance, respectively), the group of voltage-gated (Kv) channels including their Beta (or Kv ancilliary) subunits, two-pore K(2P) channels, as well as inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channels (also contributing to K(ATP) channels). In some cells, hypotonicity activates non-selective cation channels. This is surprising, at first sight, because of the inside negative membrane voltage and the sum of driving forces for Na(+) and K(+) diffusion across the cell membrane rather favouring net cation uptake. Some of these channels, however, exhibit a P(K)/P(Na) significantly higher than 1, whereas others are Ca(++) permeable linking hypotonic stress to the activation of Ca(++) dependent ion channels. In particular, the latter holds for the group of TRPs which are specialised in the

  5. A comprehensive Guyton model analysis of physiologic responses to preadapting the blood volume as a countermeasure to fluid shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Myrick, E. E.; Blomkalns, A. L.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Guyton model of fluid, electrolyte, and circulatory regulation is an extensive mathematical model capable of simulating a variety of experimental conditions. It has been modified for use at NASA to simulate head-down tilt, a frequently used analog of weightlessness. Weightlessness causes a headward shift of body fluids that is believed to expand central blood volume, triggering a series of physiologic responses resulting in large losses of body fluids. We used the modified Guyton model to test the hypothesis that preadaptation of the blood volume before weightless exposure could counteract the central volume expansion caused by fluid shifts, and thereby attenuate the circulatory and renal responses that result in body fluid losses. Simulation results show that circulatory preadaptation, by a procedure resembling blood donation immediately before head-down bedrest, is effective in damping the physiologic responses to fluid shifts and reducing body fluid losses. After 10 hours of head-down tilt, preadaptation also produces higher blood volume, extracellular volume, and total body water for 20 to 30 days of bedrest, compared with non-preadapted control. These results indicate that circulatory preadaptation before current Space Shuttle missions may be beneficial for the maintenance of reentry and postflight orthostatic tolerance in astronauts. This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the simulation results pertaining to changes in relevant physiologic variables produced by blood volume reduction before a prolonged head-down tilt. The objectives were to study and develop the countermeasure theoretically, to aid in planning experimental studies of the countermeasure, and to identify potentially disadvantageous physiologic responses that may be caused by the countermeasure.

  6. A comprehensive Guyton model analysis of physiologic responses to preadapting the blood volume as a countermeasure to fluid shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Myrick, E. E.; Blomkalns, A. L.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Guyton model of fluid, electrolyte, and circulatory regulation is an extensive mathematical model capable of simulating a variety of experimental conditions. It has been modified for use at NASA to simulate head-down tilt, a frequently used analog of weightlessness. Weightlessness causes a headward shift of body fluids that is believed to expand central blood volume, triggering a series of physiologic responses resulting in large losses of body fluids. We used the modified Guyton model to test the hypothesis that preadaptation of the blood volume before weightless exposure could counteract the central volume expansion caused by fluid shifts, and thereby attenuate the circulatory and renal responses that result in body fluid losses. Simulation results show that circulatory preadaptation, by a procedure resembling blood donation immediately before head-down bedrest, is effective in damping the physiologic responses to fluid shifts and reducing body fluid losses. After 10 hours of head-down tilt, preadaptation also produces higher blood volume, extracellular volume, and total body water for 20 to 30 days of bedrest, compared with non-preadapted control. These results indicate that circulatory preadaptation before current Space Shuttle missions may be beneficial for the maintenance of reentry and postflight orthostatic tolerance in astronauts. This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the simulation results pertaining to changes in relevant physiologic variables produced by blood volume reduction before a prolonged head-down tilt. The objectives were to study and develop the countermeasure theoretically, to aid in planning experimental studies of the countermeasure, and to identify potentially disadvantageous physiologic responses that may be caused by the countermeasure.

  7. Circadian regulation of hormone signaling and plant physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamian, Hagop S; Harmer, Stacey L

    2016-08-01

    The survival and reproduction of plants depend on their ability to cope with a wide range of daily and seasonal environmental fluctuations during their life cycle. Phytohormones are plant growth regulators that are involved in almost every aspect of growth and development as well as plant adaptation to myriad abiotic and biotic conditions. The circadian clock, an endogenous and cell-autonomous biological timekeeper that produces rhythmic outputs with close to 24-h rhythms, provides an adaptive advantage by synchronizing plant physiological and metabolic processes to the external environment. The circadian clock regulates phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling pathways to generate daily rhythms in hormone activity that fine-tune a range of plant processes, enhancing adaptation to local conditions. This review explores our current understanding of the interplay between the circadian clock and hormone signaling pathways.

  8. Physiological roles of Regulated Ire1 Dependent Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina S. Coelho

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ire1 is an important transducer of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR that is activated by the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the Endoplamic Reticulum (ER stress. Activated Ire1 mediates the splicing of an intron from the mRNA of Xbp1, causing a frame-shift during translation and introducing a new carboxyl domain in the Xbp1 protein, which only then becomes a fully functional transcription factor. Studies using cell culture systems demonstrated that Ire1 also promotes the degradation of mRNAs encoding mostly ER-targeted proteins, to reduce the load of incoming ER client proteins during ER stress. This process was called RIDD (regulated Ire1-dependent decay, but its physiological significance remained poorly characterized beyond cell culture systems. Here we review several recent studies that have highlighted the physiological roles of RIDD in specific biological paradigms, such as photoreceptor differentiation in Drosophila or mammalian liver and endocrine pancreas function. These studies demonstrate the importance of RIDD in tissues undergoing intense secretory function and highlight the physiologic role of RIDD during UPR activation in cells and organisms.

  9. Physiological regulation of epithelial sodium channel by proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Friis, Ulla G; Bistrup, Claus

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Activation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by proteolysis appears to be relevant for day-to-day physiological regulation of channel activity in kidney and other epithelial tissues. Pathophysiogical, proteolytic activation of ENaC in kidney has been demonstrated in proteinuric...... disease. RECENT FINDINGS: A variation in sodium and potassium intake or plasma aldosterone changes the number of cleaved α and γ-ENaC subunits and is associated with changes in ENaC currents. The protease furin mediates intracellular cleavage, whereas the channel-activating protease prostasin (CAP-1...... opens the way for new understanding of the pathogenesis of proteinuric sodium retention, which may involve plasmin and present several potential new drug targets....

  10. Increased physiological dead space/tidal volume ratio during exercise in burned children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlcak, R P; Desai, M H; Robinson, E; McCauley, R L; Richardson, J; Herndon, D N

    1995-08-01

    Exercise testing enables the simultaneous evaluation of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems' ability to perform gas exchange. The physiological responses to exercise have not been previously reported in the postburn child. This investigation was designed to evaluate residual cardiopulmonary impairment in patients convalescing from severe burns. Spirometry, lung volumes and exercise stress testing were completed on 40 children with a mean time postburn injury of 2.6 +/- 1.9 years and mean burn size of 44 +/- 22 per cent TBSA. Respiratory variables studied during exercise included expired volume, tidal volume and respiratory rate, and physiological dead space/tidal volume (VD/VT) ratios. Stress testing revealed an increased VD/VT ratio consistent with uneven ventilation-perfusion relationships. The data indicate that patients who survive thermal injury may not regain normal cardiopulmonary homeostasis.

  11. MDRl/P-Glycoprotein Function. II. Effect of Hypotonicity and Inhibitors on Cl- Efflux and Volume Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    ability of MDR1-expressing vs. parental cells multidrug resistance; P-glycoprotein; chloride channel. chlo- to carry out a regulatory volume decrease...NIH/ fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTR ), 3T3MDR murine fibroblasts, FEM-X and FEM-XvMDR which is a Cl- channel (20). The MDR1...the fact chloride channels in volume regulation by T lymphocytes. In: that valinomycin is also an inhibitor of MDR1 trans- Cell Physiology of Blood

  12. Biomass chemicals: improvement in quality and quantity with physiological regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossuth, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    The search for alternative biomass energy forms has centered on two approaches: (1) production of cellulose fiber in biomass of low net energy value per unit weight, such as wood and bagasse, and (2) hydrocarbons of high net energy value per unit weight for use as chemical feedstocks and substitutes for petroleum. Major plant chemical products include oleoresin from pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm., P. palustris Mill.) rubber from the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell.), and guayule shrub (Parthenium argentatum Gray) and sugar from sugarcane (Saccharum species). Ethylene may be a unifying natural bioregulator that can increase deposition of biomass chemicals in all four of these systems. Examples of bioregulators include the use of paraquat, diquat, and 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid (CEPA) for stimulating the synthesis of oleoresin, CEPA for prolonging the flow of rubber and increasing rubber synthesis in the rubber tree, and triethylamines of chlorinated phenoxy compounds for stimulating rubber production in guayule. In sugarcane, gibberellic acid (GA3) increases internodal elongation. Glyphosate, CEPA and other regulators increase the deposition of sucrose, diquat and CEPA inhibit flowering, and paraquat desiccates leaves to facilitate leaf removal or burning just prior to harvest. The cellular compartmentalization for the synthesis of these plant chemicals is unique for each species, and dictates cultural and harvest techniques. The mode of action and pathways for the success of these physiological regulators are discussed. 42 references.

  13. Circadian clock-regulated physiological outputs: dynamic responses in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A; Golembeski, Greg S; Imaizumi, Takato

    2013-05-01

    The plant circadian clock is involved in the regulation of numerous processes. It serves as a timekeeper to ensure that the onset of key developmental events coincides with the appropriate conditions. Although internal oscillating clock mechanisms likely evolved in response to the earth's predictable day and night cycles, organisms must integrate a range of external and internal cues to adjust development and physiology. Here we introduce three different clock outputs to illustrate the complexity of clock control. Clock-regulated diurnal growth is altered by environmental stimuli. The complexity of the photoperiodic flowering pathway highlights numerous nodes through which plants may integrate information to modulate the timing of flowering. Comparative analyses among ecotypes that differ in flowering response reveal additional environmental cues and molecular processes that have developed to influence flowering. We also explore the process of cold acclimation, where circadian inputs, light quality, and stress responses converge to improve freezing tolerance in anticipation of colder temperatures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Physiological adaptation of maternal plasma volume during pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, S.; Ghossein-Doha, C.; Kuijk, S.M. van; Drongelen, J. van; Spaanderman, M.E.A.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the physiological pattern of gestational plasma volume adjustments in normal singleton pregnancy and compare this with the pattern in pregnancies complicated by pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia or fetal growth restriction. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of

  15. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Rioult, Damien; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Marin, Matthieu; Le Foll, Frank

    2015-06-24

    The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading), we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation.

  16. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Pasquier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp. The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading, we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation.

  17. Replication Regulates Volume Weighting in Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Hartle, James

    2009-01-01

    Probabilities for observations in cosmology are conditioned both on the universe's quantum state and on local data specifying the observational situation. We show the quantum state defines a measure for prediction through such conditional probabilities that is well behaved for spatially large or infinite universes when the probabilities that our data is replicated are taken into account. In histories where our data are rare volume weighting connects top-down probabilities conditioned on both the data and the quantum state to the bottom-up probabilities conditioned on the quantum state alone. We apply these principles to a calculation of the number of inflationary e-folds in a homogeneous, isotropic minisuperspace model with a single scalar field moving in a quadratic potential. We find that volume weighting is justified and the top-down probabilities favor a large number of e-folds.

  18. Regulation of body fluid volume and electrolyte concentrations in spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Krauhs, J. M.; Leach, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Despite a number of difficulties in performing experiments during weightlessness, a great deal of information has been obtained concerning the effects of spaceflight on the regulation of body fluid and electrolytes. Many paradoxes and questions remain, however. Although body mass, extracellular fluid volume, and plasma volume are reduced during spaceflight and remain so at landing, the changes in total body water are comparatively small. Serum or plasma sodium and osmolality have generally been unchanged or reduced during the spaceflight, and fluid intake is substantially reduced, especially during the first of flight. The diuresis that was predicted to be caused by weightlessness, has only rarely been observed as an increased urine volume. What has been well established by now, is the occurrence of a relative diuresis, where fluid intake decreases more than urine volume does. Urinary excretion of electrolytes has been variable during spaceflight, but retention of fluid and electrolytes at landing has been consistently observed. The glomerular filtration rate was significantly elevated during the SLS missions, and water and electrolyte loading tests have indicated that renal function is altered during readaptation to Earth's gravity. Endocrine control of fluid volumes and electrolyte concentrations may be altered during weightlessness, but levels of hormones in body fluids do not conform to predictions based on early hypotheses. Antidiuretic hormone is not suppressed, though its level is highly variable and its secretion may be affected by space motion sickness and environmental factors. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone are generally elevated at landing, consistent with sodium retention, but inflight levels have been variable. Salt intake may be an important factor influencing the levels of these hormones. The circadian rhythm of cortisol has undoubtedly contributed to its variability, and little is known yet about the influence of spaceflight on circadian

  19. Physiological Regulation and Infantile Anorexia: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatoor, Irene; Ganiban, Jody; Surles, Jaclyn; Doussard-Roosevelt, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether infantile anorexia is associated with physiological dysregulation. Method: This study included eight toddlers with infantile anorexia and eight healthy eaters matched for age, race, socioeconomic status, and gender. Physiological measures of heart period and respiratory sinus arrhythmia were assessed across three…

  20. Physiological Modeling of Responses to Upper vs Lower Lobe Lung Volume Reduction in Homogeneous Emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arschang eValipour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: In clinical trials, homogeneous emphysema patients have responded well to upper lobe volume reduction but not lower lobe volume reduction. Materials/Methods: To understand the physiological basis for this observation, a computer model was developed to simulate the effects of upper and lower lobe lung volume reduction on RV/TLC and lung recoil in homogeneous emphysema.Results: Patients with homogeneous emphysema received either upper or lower lobe volume reduction therapy based on findings of radionucleotide scintigraphy scanning. CT analysis of lobar volumes showed that patients undergoing upper (n=18; -265 mL/site and lower lobe treatment (n=11; -217 mL/site experienced similar reductions in lung volume. However, only upper lobe treatment improved FEV1 (+11.1±14.7% vs -4.4±15.8% and RV/TLC (-5.4± 8.1% vs -2.4±8.6%. Model simulations provided an unexpected explanation for this response. Increases in transpulmonary pressure subsequent to volume reduction increased RV/TLC in upper lobe alveoli, while caudal shifts in airway closure decreased RV/TLC in lower lobe alveoli. Upper lobe treatment, which eliminates apical alveoli with high RV/TLC values, lowers the average RV/TLC of the lung. Conversely, lower lobe treatment, which eliminates caudal alveoli with low RV/TLC values, has less effect. Conclusions: Lower lobe treatment in homogeneous emphysema is uniformly less effective than upper lobe treatment.

  1. The negative regulation of red cell mass by neocytolysis: physiologic and pathophysiologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P

    2005-01-01

    We have uncovered a physiologic process which negatively regulates the red cell mass by selectively hemolyzing young circulating red blood cells. This allows fine control of the number of circulating red blood cells under steady-state conditions and relatively rapid adaptation to new environments. Neocytolysis is initiated by a fall in erythropoietin levels, so this hormone remains the major regulator of red cell mass both with anemia and with red cell excess. Physiologic situations in which there is increased neocytolysis include the emergence of newborns from the hypoxic uterine environment and the descent of polycythemic high-altitude dwellers to sea level. The process first became apparent while investigating the mechanism of the anemia that invariably occurs after spaceflight. Astronauts experience acute central plethora on entering microgravity resulting in erythropoietin suppression and neocytolysis, but the reduced blood volume and red cell mass become suddenly maladaptive on re-entry to earth's gravity. The pathologic erythropoietin deficiency of renal disease precipitates neocytolysis, which explains the prolongation of red cell survival consistently resulting from erythropoietin therapy and points to optimally efficient erythropoietin dosing schedules. Implications should extend to a number of other physiologic and pathologic situations including polycythemias, hemolytic anemias, 'blood-doping' by elite athletes, and oxygen therapy. It is likely that erythropoietin influences endothelial cells which in turn signal reticuloendothelial phagocytes to destroy or permit the survival of young red cells marked by surface molecules. Ongoing studies to identify the molecular targets and cytokine intermediaries should facilitate detection, dissection and eventual therapeutic manipulation of the process. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity and volume regulating factors in healthy pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkoudian, Nisha; Usselman, Charlotte W; Skow, Rachel J; Staab, Jeffery S; Julian, Colleen Glyde; Stickland, Michael K; Chari, Radha S; Khurana, Rshmi; Davidge, Sandra T; Davenport, Margie H; Steinback, Craig D

    2017-07-21

    Healthy, normotensive human pregnancies are associated with striking increases in both plasma volume and vascular sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). In non-pregnant humans, volume regulatory factors including plasma osmolality, vasopressin and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have important modulatory effects on control of sympathetic outflow. We hypothesized that pregnancy would be associated with changes in the relationships between SNA (measured as muscle SNA) and volume regulating factors, including plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity and arginine vasopressin (AVP). We studied 46 healthy, normotensive young women (23 pregnant and 23 non-pregnant). We measured SNA, arterial pressure, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity, AVP and other volume regulatory factors in resting, semi-recumbent posture. Pregnant women had significantly higher resting SNA (38 ± 12 vs. non-pregnant: 23 ± 6 bursts/minute), lower osmolality and higher plasma renin activity and aldosterone (all P pregnant] vs. 5.17 ± 2.03 [pregnant], P > 0.05). However, regression analysis detected a significant relationship between individual values for SNA and AVP in pregnant (r = 0.71, P pregnant women (r = 0.04). No relationships were found for other variables. These data suggest that the link between AVP release and resting SNA becomes stronger in pregnancy, which may contribute importantly to blood pressure regulation in healthy women during pregnancy. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

  3. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  4. Transient receptor potential channels in mechanosensing and cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Nilius, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are unique cellular sensors responding to a wide variety of extra- and intracellular signals, including mechanical and osmotic stress. In recent years, TRP channels from multiple subfamilies have been added to the list of mechano- and/or osmosensitive...... and involvement in cell volume regulation....

  5. Osmosensory mechanisms in cellular and systemic volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Kapus, András; Hoffmann, Else K

    2011-01-01

    Perturbations of cellular and systemic osmolarity severely challenge the function of all organisms and are consequently regulated very tightly. Here we outline current evidence on how cells sense volume perturbations, with particular focus on mechanisms relevant to the kidneys and to extracellular...

  6. Whole-body volume regulation and escape from antidiuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbalis, Joseph G

    2006-07-01

    Both individual cells and organs regulate their volume in response to sustained hypo-osmolality via solute and water losses. Similar processes occur in the whole body to regulate the volumes of extracellular fluid (ECF) and intravascular spaces toward normal levels. Body water losses occur via the phenomena "escape from antidiuresis"; solute losses occur through the secondary natriuresis induced by water retention. As a result of resistance to arginine vasopressin (AVP) signaling, escape from antidiuresis is caused by downregulation of kidney aquaporin-2 expression despite high AVP plasma levels. Recent data have implicated downregulation of vasopressin V2R as a potential mechanism of resistance, and suggest that this may be a result of decreased intrarenal angiotensin II signaling in combination with increased intrarenal nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 signaling. The natriuresis that results in volume regulation of the ECF and vascular spaces is the result of intrarenal hemodynamic changes produced by volume expansion, but the degree to which these effects are modulated by aldosterone secretion and the activity of distal sodium cotransporters and channels remains to be elucidated. The clinical implication of these volume-regulatory processes is that the chronic hyponatremic state is one of water retention and solute losses from intracellular fluid and ECF compartments. The degree to which solute losses versus water retention contribute to hyponatremia will vary in association with many factors, including the etiology of the hyponatremia, the rapidity of development of the hyponatremia, the chronicity of the hyponatremia, the volume of daily water loading, and individual variability. Understanding these volume-regulatory processes allows a better understanding of many aspects of the conundrum of patients with "clinical euvolemia" and dilutional hyponatremia from AVP-induced water retention.

  7. Physiological Functions and Regulation of the Na+/H+ Exchanger [NHE1] in Renal Tubule Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia G Vallés

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform-1 [NHE1] is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane protein that plays a central role in intracellular pH and cell volume homeostasis by catalyzing an electroneutral exchange of extracellular sodium and intracellular hydrogen. Outside of this important physiological function, the NHE1 cytosolic tail domain acts as a molecular scaffold regulating cell survival and actin cytoskeleton organization through NHE1-dependent signaling proteins. NHE1 plays main roles in response to physiological stress conditions which in addition to cell shrinkage and acidification, include hypoxia and mechanical stimuli, such as cell stretch. NHE1-mediated modulation of programmed cell death results from the exchanger-mediated changes in pHi, cell volume, and/or [Na+]I; and, it has recently become known that regulation of cellular signaling pathways are involved as well. This review focuses on NHE1 functions and regulations. We describe evidence showing how these structural actions integrate with ion translocation in regulating renal tubule epithelial cell survival.

  8. Preliminary physiological evidence for impaired emotion regulation in depersonalization disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monde, Kai-Mosadi; Ketay, Sarah; Giesbrecht, Timo; Braun, Ashley; Simeon, Daphne

    2013-09-30

    Depersonalization disorder is associated with emotional responding deficits. Ability to regulate emotion was measured by heart rate, skin conductance, and subjective responses to pictures. Compared to controls, depersonalized participants were better able to suppress, but not enhance, emotions irrespective of valence (heart rate). Emotion regulation in depersonalization merits further study.

  9. Mechanisms of Physiological Regulation for Improving Dryland Crop Water Use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANGGUAN Zhou-ping; XUE Qing-wu

    2003-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the physiological mechanisms for improving crop water use and water use efficiency in dryland farming regions of Loess Plateau on the basis of its environmental conditions and progress in crop water relations and the biological basis of water-saving agriculture, especially in non-uniform stomatal closure, ABA effects, communication between root and shoot, and water use efficiency. Root chemical signals about water shortage are feedforward effect which contributes to balanced water relations within the plant compartment of the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. ABA production is increased in tissues during these stresses, and this causes a variety of physiological effects, including stomata closure in leaves. It is concluded that the root chemical signal ABA is very important to improve the crop water use efficiency in semi-arid area of Loess Plateau.

  10. Regulation by arbuscular mycorrhizae of the integrated physiological response to salinity in plants: new challenges in physiological and molecular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Porcel, Rosa; Azcón, Charo; Aroca, Ricardo

    2012-06-01

    Excessive salt accumulation in soils is a major ecological and agronomical problem, in particular in arid and semi-arid areas. Excessive soil salinity affects the establishment, development, and growth of plants, resulting in important losses in productivity. Plants have evolved biochemical and molecular mechanisms that may act in a concerted manner and constitute the integrated physiological response to soil salinity. These include the synthesis and accumulation of compatible solutes to avoid cell dehydration and maintain root water uptake, the regulation of ion homeostasis to control ion uptake by roots, compartmentation and transport into shoots, the fine regulation of water uptake and distribution to plant tissues by the action of aquaporins, the reduction of oxidative damage through improved antioxidant capacity and the maintenance of photosynthesis at values adequate for plant growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis can help the host plants to cope with the detrimental effects of high soil salinity. There is evidence that AM symbiosis affects and regulates several of the above mentioned mechanisms, but the molecular bases of such effects are almost completely unknown. This review summarizes current knowledge about the effects of AM symbiosis on these physiological mechanisms, emphasizing new perspectives and challenges in physiological and molecular studies on salt-stress alleviation by AM symbiosis.

  11. Individual differences in trajectories of emotion regulation processes: the effects of maternal depressive symptomatology and children's physiological regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandon, Alysia Y; Calkins, Susan D; Keane, Susan P; O'Brien, Marion

    2008-07-01

    Trajectories of emotion regulation processes were examined in a community sample of 269 children across the ages of 4 to 7 using hierarchical linear modeling. Maternal depressive symptomatology (Symptom Checklist-90) and children's physiological reactivity (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]) and vagal regulation (Delta RSA) were explored as predictors of individual differences in trajectories of emotion regulation and negativity (mother-reported Emotion Regulation Checklist; A. M. Shields & D. Cicchetti, 1997). In addition, the authors explored whether children's physiological regulation would moderate the effect of maternal depressive symptomatology on children's emotion regulation trajectories. Results indicated that over time, emotion regulation increased whereas negativity decreased, though considerable individual variability in the pattern of change was observed. Greater maternal depressive symptomatology was associated with less steep emotion regulation trajectories. There was a significant Maternal Depressive Symptomatology x Baseline RSA x Age interaction predicting emotion regulation trajectories. Overall, it appears that the development of emotion regulation over time is compromised when mothers report greater depressive symptomatology. There is also evidence that children's capacity for physiological regulation can buffer some of the adverse consequences associated with maternal depressive symptomatology.

  12. Individual Differences in Trajectories of Emotion Regulation Processes: The Effects of Maternal Depressive Symptomatology and Children's Physiological Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandon, Alysia Y.; Calkins, Susan D.; Keane, Susan P.; O'Brien, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Trajectories of emotion regulation processes were examined in a community sample of 269 children across the ages of 4 to 7 using hierarchical linear modeling. Maternal depressive symptomatology (Symptom Checklist-90) and children's physiological reactivity (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]) and vagal regulation ([delta]RSA) were explored as…

  13. An in vitro model of skeletal muscle volume regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wibberley

    Full Text Available Hypertonic media causes cells to shrink due to water loss through aquaporin channels. After acute shrinkage, cells either regulate their volume or, alternatively, undergo a number of metabolic changes which ultimately lead to cell death. In many cell types, hypertonic shrinkage is followed by apoptosis. Due to the complex 3D morphology of skeletal muscle and the difficulty in obtaining isolated human tissue, we have begun skeletal muscle volume regulation studies using the human skeletal muscle cell line TE671RD. In this study we investigated whether hypertonic challenge of the human skeletal muscle cell line TE671RD triggered cell death or evoked a cell volume recovery response.The cellular volume of TE671RD cells was calculated from the 2D surface area. Cell death was assessed by both the trypan blue live/dead assay and the TUNEL assay.Medium osmolality was increased by addition of up to 200 mM sucrose. Addition of 200 mM sucrose resulted in mean cell shrinkage of 44±1% after 30 mins. At later time points (2 and 4 hrs two separate cell subpopulations with differing mean cell volume became apparent. The first subpopulation (15±2% of the total cell number continued to shrink whereas the second subpopulation had an increased cell volume. Cell death was observed in a small proportion of cells (approximately 6-8%.We have established that a substantial proportion of TE671RD cells respond to hypertonic challenge with RVI, but that these cells are resistant to hypertonicity triggered cell death.

  14. Domestic Violence and Longitudinal Associations with Children's Physiological Regulation Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigterink, Tami; Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Hessler, Danielle M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of domestic violence (DV) on children's emotion regulation abilities measured via baseline vagal tone (VT). Specifically, the authors examined the relationship between DV exposure and children's regulatory functioning over time, investigating whether DV exposure was related to the trajectory of children's…

  15. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  16. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  17. Drosophila glia use a conserved cotransporter mechanism to regulate extracellular volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiserson, William M; Forbush, Biff; Keshishian, Haig

    2011-02-01

    The nervous system is protected by blood barriers that use multiple systems to control extracellular solute composition, osmotic pressure, and fluid volume. In the human nervous system, misregulation of the extracellular volume poses serious health threats. Here, we show that the glial cells that form the Drosophila blood-nerve barrier have a conserved molecular mechanism that regulates extracellular volume: the Serine/Threonine kinase Fray, which we previously showed is an ortholog of mammalian PASK/SPAK; and the Na-K-Cl cotransporter Ncc69, which we show is an ortholog of human NKCC1. In mammals, PASK/SPAK binds to NKCC1 and regulates its activity. In Drosophila, larvae mutant for Ncc69 develop a peripheral neuropathy, where fluid accumulates between glia and axons. The accumulation of fluid has no detectable impact on action potential conduction, suggesting that the role of Ncc69 is to maintain volume or osmotic homeostasis. Drosophila Ncc69 has kinetics similar to human NKCC1, and NKCC1 can rescue Ncc69, suggesting that they function in a conserved physiological mechanism. We show that fray and Ncc69 are coexpressed in nerve glia, interact in a yeast-two-hybrid assay, and have an essentially identical bulging nerve phenotype. We propose that normally functioning nerves generate extracellular solutes that are removed by Ncc69 under the control of Fray. This mechanism may perform a similar role in humans, given that NKCC1 is expressed at the blood-brain barrier.

  18. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  19. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  20. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  1. Mapping the MRI voxel volume in which thermal noise matches physiological noise--implications for fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodurka, J; Ye, F; Petridou, N; Murphy, K; Bandettini, P A

    2007-01-15

    This work addresses the choice of the imaging voxel volume in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Noise of physiological origin that is present in the voxel time course is a prohibitive factor in the detection of small activation-induced BOLD signal changes. If the physiological noise contribution dominates over the temporal fluctuation contribution in the imaging voxel, further increases in the voxel signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) will have diminished corresponding increases in temporal signal-to-noise (TSNR), resulting in reduced corresponding increases in the ability to detect activation induced signal changes. On the other hand, if the thermal and system noise dominate (suggesting a relatively low SNR) further decreases in SNR can prohibit detection of activation-induced signal changes. Here we have proposed and called the "suggested" voxel volume for fMRI the volume where thermal plus system-related and physiological noise variances are equal. Based on this condition we have created maps of fMRI suggested voxel volume from our experimental data at 3T, since this value will spatially vary depending on the contribution of physiologic noise in each voxel. Based on our fast EPI segmentation technique we have found that for gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) brain compartments the mean suggested cubical voxel volume is: (1.8 mm)3, (2.1 mm)3 and (1.4 mm)3, respectively. Serendipitously, (1.8 mm)3 cubical voxel volume for GM approximately matches the cortical thickness, thus optimizing BOLD contrast by minimizing partial volume averaging. The introduced suggested fMRI voxel volume can be a useful parameter for choice of imaging volume for functional studies.

  2. Nasal versus oronasal raised volume forced expirations in infants--a real physiologic challenge.

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    Morris, Mohy G

    2012-08-01

    Raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression (RTC) generates forced expiration (FE) in infants typically from an airway opening pressure of 30 cm H(2)O (V(30)). We hypothesized that the higher nasal than pulmonary airway resistance limits forced expiratory flows (FEF(%)) during (nasal) FE(n), which an opened mouth, (oronasal) FE(o), would resolve. Measurements were performed during a brief post-hyperventilation apnea on 12 healthy infants aged 6.9-104 weeks. In two infants, forced expiratory (FEFV) flow volume (FV) curves were generated using a facemask that covered the nose and a closed mouth, then again with a larger mask with the mouth opened. In other infants (n = 10), the mouth closed spontaneously during FE. Oronasal passive expiration from V(30) generated either the inspiratory capacity (IC) or by activating RTC before end-expiration, the slow vital capacity ((j) SVC). Peak flow (PF), FEF(25), FEF(50), FEF(25-75), FEV(0.4), and FEV(0.5) were lower via FE(n) than FE(o) (P vital capacity (FVC) as percent was higher (P 0.05). FEFV curves generated via FE(o) exhibited higher PF than FV curves of IC (P 0.05) but lower than those of (j) SVC (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the higher nasal than pulmonary airways resistance unequivocally affects the FEFV curves by consistently reducing PF and decreases mid-expiratory flows. A monitored slightly opened mouth and a gentle anterior jaw thrust are physiologically integral for raised volume RTC in order to maximize the oral and minimize nasal airways contribution to FE so that flow limitation would be in the pulmonary not nasal airways.

  3. Physiological adaptation of maternal plasma volume during pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    de Haas, S; Ghossein-Doha, C; van Kuijk, S M J; van Drongelen, J; Spaanderman, M E A

    2017-02-01

    To describe the physiological pattern of gestational plasma volume adjustments in normal singleton pregnancy and compare this with the pattern in pregnancies complicated by pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia or fetal growth restriction. We performed a meta-analysis of the current literature on plasma volume adjustments during physiological and complicated pregnancies. Literature was retrieved from PubMed (NCBI) and EMBASE (Ovid) databases. Included studies reported both reference plasma volume measurements (non-pregnant, prepregnancy or postpartum) and measurements obtained during predetermined gestational ages. Mean differences bet ween the reference and pregnancy plasma volume measurements were calculated for predefined intervals of gestational age using a random-effects model described by DerSimonian and Laird. Thirty studies were included in the meta-analysis with publication dates ranging from 1934 to 2007. Plasma volume increased in the first weeks of pregnancy, with the steepest increase occurring during the second trimester. Plasma volume continued to increase in the third trimester with a pooled maximum increase of 1.13 L (95% CI, 1.07-1.19 L), an increase of 45.6% (95% CI, 43.0-48.1%) in physiological pregnancies compared with the reference value. The plasma volume expansion in gestational hypertensive and growth-restricted pregnancies was 0.80 L (95% CI, 0.59-1.02 L), an increase of 32.3% (95% CI, 23.6-41.1%) in the third trimester, a smaller increase than in physiological pregnancies (P literatura actual sobre los cambios en el volumen de plasma durante embarazos complicados y fisiológicos. La literatura se obtuvo de las bases de datos PubMed (NCBI) y EMBASE (Ovid). Los estudios incluidos mencionaban tanto mediciones de referencia del volumen plasmático (no embarazada, antes del embarazo o después del parto) como mediciones tomadas a edades gestacionales predeterminadas. Se calcularon las medias de las diferencias entre las

  4. Volume regulation and shape bifurcation in the cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Li, Bo; Si, Fangwei; Phillip, Jude M; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X

    2015-09-15

    Alterations in nuclear morphology are closely associated with essential cell functions, such as cell motility and polarization, and correlate with a wide range of human diseases, including cancer, muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy and progeria. However, the mechanics and forces that shape the nucleus are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that when an adherent cell is detached from its substratum, the nucleus undergoes a large volumetric reduction accompanied by a morphological transition from an almost smooth to a heavily folded surface. We develop a mathematical model that systematically analyzes the evolution of nuclear shape and volume. The analysis suggests that the pressure difference across the nuclear envelope, which is influenced by changes in cell volume and regulated by microtubules and actin filaments, is a major factor determining nuclear morphology. Our results show that physical and chemical properties of the extracellular microenvironment directly influence nuclear morphology and suggest that there is a direct link between the environment and gene regulation. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Physiological Self-Regulation and Information Processing in Infancy: Cardiac Vagal Tone and Habituation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Suess, Patricia E.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the role of physiological self-regulation (cardiac vagal tone) in information processing (habituation) in infants. Found that decreases in vagal tone consistently related to habituation efficiency at 2 and 5 months. Within- and between- age suppression of vagal tone predicted accumulated looking time (ALT), but ALT did not predict…

  6. The Role of Physiological Arousal in Time Perception: Psychophysiological Evidence from an Emotion Regulation Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella, N.; Conty, L.; Pouthas, V.

    2011-01-01

    Time perception, crucial for adaptive behavior, has been shown to be altered by emotion. An arousal-dependent mechanism is proposed to account for such an effect. Yet, physiological measure of arousal related with emotional timing is still lacking. We addressed this question using skin conductance response (SCR) in an emotion regulation paradigm.…

  7. FGF21 as an Endocrine Regulator in Lipid Metabolism: From Molecular Evolution to Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Murata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The FGF family comprises twenty-two structurally related proteins with functions in development and metabolism. The Fgf21 gene was generated early in vertebrate evolution. FGF21 acts as an endocrine regulator in lipid metabolism. Hepatic Fgf21 expression is markedly induced in mice by fasting or a ketogenic diet. Experiments with Fgf21 transgenic mice and cultured cells indicate that FGF21 exerts pharmacological effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in hepatocytes and adipocytes via cell surface FGF receptors. However, experiments with Fgf21 knockout mice indicate that FGF21 inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes during fasting and attenuates torpor induced by a ketogenic diet but maybe not a physiological regulator for these hepatic functions. These findings suggest the pharmacological effects to be distinct from the physiological roles. Serum FGF21 levels are increased in patients with metabolic diseases having insulin resistance, indicating that FGF21 is a metabolic regulator and a biomarker for these diseases.

  8. A new approach to homeostatic regulation: towards a unified view of physiological and ecological concepts.

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    Cédric L Meunier

    Full Text Available Stoichiometric homeostasis is the ability of an organism to keep its body chemical composition constant, despite varying inputs. Stoichiometric homeostasis therefore constrains the metabolic needs of consumers which in turn often feed on resources not matching these requirements. In a broader context, homeostasis also relates to the capacity of an organism to maintain other biological parameters (e.g. body temperature at a constant level over ambient environmental variations. Unfortunately, there are discrepancies in the literature and ecological and physiological definitions of homeostasis are disparate and partly contradictory. Here, we address this matter by reviewing the existing knowledge considering two distinct groups, regulators and conformers and, based on examples of thermo- and osmoregulation, we propose a new approach to stoichiometric homeostasis, unifying ecological and physiological concepts. We suggest a simple and precise graphical way to identify regulators and conformers: for any given biological parameter (e.g. nutrient stoichiometry, temperature, a sigmoidal relation between internal and external conditions can be observed for conformers while an inverse sigmoidal response is characteristic of regulators. This new definition and method, based on well-studied physiological mechanisms, unifies ecological and physiological approaches and is a useful tool for understanding how organisms are affected by and affect their environment.

  9. Baseline and strategic effects behind mindful emotion regulation: behavioral and physiological investigation.

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    Alessandro Grecucci

    Full Text Available One of the consequences of extensive mindfulness practice is a reduction of anxiety and depression, but also a capacity to regulate negative emotions. In this study, we explored four key questions concerning mindfulness training: (1 What are the processes by which mindfulness regulates our emotions? (2 Can mindfulness be applied to social emotions? (3 Does mindfulness training affect emotionally driven behavior towards others? (4 Does mindfulness alter physiological reactivity? To address these questions, we tested, in two experiments, the ability of mindfulness meditators to regulate interpersonal emotions (Experiment 1 and interactive behaviors (Experiment 2 as compared to naïve controls. To better understand the mechanisms by which mindfulness regulates emotions, we asked participants to apply two strategies: a cognitive strategy (mentalizing, a form of reappraisal focused on the intentions of others and an experiential strategy derived from mindfulness principles (mindful detachment. Both groups were able to regulate interpersonal emotions by means of cognitive (mentalizing and experiential (mindful detachment strategies. In Experiment 1, a simple effect of meditation, independent from the implementation of the strategies, resulted in reduced emotional and physiological reactivity, as well as in increased pleasantness for meditators when compared to controls, providing evidence of baseline regulation. In Experiment 2, one visible effect of the strategy was that meditators outperformed controls in the experiential (mindful detachment but not in the cognitive (mentalize strategy, showing stronger modulation of their interactive behavior (less punishments and providing evidence of a strategic behavioral regulation. Based on these results, we suggest that mindfulness can influence interpersonal emotional reactions through an experiential mechanism, both at a baseline level and a strategic level, thereby altering the subjective and physiological

  10. Measurements of intracellular volumes by 59Co and 2H/1H NMR and their physiological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir; Navon, Gil

    2005-04-01

    Determination of the intracellular water volumes using NMR spectroscopy was performed using the NMR-visible nuclei: 59Co and 2H or 1H. Accurate measurement of intracellular water in cell suspensions and perfused organs is an important physiological parameter in the context of electrolyte homeostasis and energy metabolism, in particular when these parameters are monitored by non-invasive NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, repeated or continuous monitoring of intracellular water provided significant insights into the physiology of cardiac muscle and sarcolemmal membrane permeability and integrity.

  11. dFatp regulates nutrient distribution and long-term physiology in Drosophila.

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    Sujkowski, Alyson; Saunders, Samantha; Tinkerhess, Martin; Piazza, Nicole; Jennens, Joanna; Healy, Lindsey; Zheng, Li; Wessells, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Nutrient allocation and usage plays an important part in regulating the onset and progression of age-related functional declines. Here, we describe a heterozygous mutation in Drosophila (dFatp) that alters nutrient distribution and multiple aspects of physiology. dFatp mutants have increased lifespan and stress resistance, altered feeding behavior and fat storage, and increased mobility. Concurrently, mutants experience impairment of cardiac function. We show that endurance exercise reverses increased lipid storage in the myocardium and the deleterious cardiac function conferred by dFatp mutation. These findings establish a novel conserved genetic target for regulating lifespan and physiology in aging animals. These findings also highlight the importance of varying exercise conditions in assessing aging functions of model organisms.

  12. Novel Molecules Regulating Energy Homeostasis: Physiology and Regulation by Macronutrient Intake and Weight Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gavrieli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Excess energy intake, without a compensatory increase of energy expenditure, leads to obesity. Several molecules are involved in energy homeostasis regulation and new ones are being discovered constantly. Appetite regulating hormones such as ghrelin, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine and amylin or incretins such as the gastric inhibitory polypeptide have been studied extensively while other molecules such as fibroblast growth factor 21, chemerin, irisin, secreted frizzle-related protein-4, total bile acids, and heme oxygenase-1 have been linked to energy homeostasis regulation more recently and the specific role of each one of them has not been fully elucidated. This mini review focuses on the above mentioned molecules and discusses them in relation to their regulation by the macronutrient composition of the diet as well as diet-induced weight loss.

  13. TASK-2: a K2P K+ channel with complex regulation and diverse physiological functions

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    Luis Pablo Cid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available TASK-2 (K2P5.1 is a two-pore domain K+ channel belonging to the TALK subgroup of the K2P family of proteins. TASK-2 has been shown to be activated by extra- and intracellular alkalinisation. Extra- and intracellular pH-sensors reside at arginine 224 and lysine 245 and might affect separate selectivity filter and inner gates respectively. TASK-2 is modulated by changes in cell volume and a regulation by direct G-protein interaction has also been proposed. Activation by extracellular alkalinisation has been associated with a role of TASK-2 in kidney proximal tubule bicarbonate reabsorption, whilst intracellular pH-sensitivity might be the mechanism for its participation in central chemosensitive neurons. In addition to these functions TASK-2 has been proposed to play a part in apoptotic volume decrease in kidney cells and in volume regulation of glial cells and T-lymphocytes. TASK-2 is present in chondrocytes of hyaline cartilage, where it is proposed to play a central role in stabilizing the membrane potential. Additional sites of expression are dorsal root ganglion neurons, endocrine and exocrine pancreas and intestinal smooth muscle cells. TASK-2 has been associated with the regulation of proliferation of breast cancer cells and could become target for breast cancer therapeutics. Further work in native tissues and cells together with genetic modification will no doubt reveal the details of TASK-2 functions that we are only starting to suspect.

  14. A surface acoustic wave-driven micropump for particle uptake investigation under physiological flow conditions in very small volumes

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    Florian G. Strobl

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Static conditions represent an important shortcoming of many in vitro experiments on the cellular uptake of nanoparticles. Here, we present a versatile microfluidic device based on acoustic streaming induced by surface acoustic waves (SAWs. The device offers a convenient method for introducing fluid motion in standard cell culture chambers and for mimicking capillary blood flow. We show that shear rates over the whole physiological range in sample volumes as small as 200 μL can be achieved. A precise characterization method for the induced flow profile is presented and the influence of flow on the uptake of Pt-decorated CeO2 particles by endothelial cells (HMEC-1 is demonstrated. Under physiological flow conditions the particle uptake rates for this system are significantly lower than at low shear conditions. This underlines the vital importance of the fluidic environment for cellular uptake mechanisms.

  15. The molecular machinery regulating apoptosis signal transduction and its implication in human physiology and pathophysiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, C T; Passante, E; Rehm, M

    2011-02-01

    The regulation of apoptotic cell death, a terminal and fatal cell fate decision, has been intensely investigated and, due to its paramount implications for human health and disease, has sparked one of the most prolific and competitive research fields in biological and biomedical sciences of the past decades. Many key components of the molecular machinery processing and transducing apoptotic cell death signals have been described in great detail by now, dramatically advancing our understanding of how the network of apoptosis signaling proteins integrates and regulates cell death signals, and ultimately executes apoptosis. Building on the latest significant advances in deciphering apoptosis signal transduction as well as on the central original groundbreaking discoveries in cell death research, we here present an in-depth description of the current knowledge on the core molecular machinery of apoptotic signaling and how it is implicated in human physiology and pathophysiologies.

  16. Physiological Role of TNF in MucosalImmunology: Regulation of Macrophage/Dendritic Cell Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Marsal, J.; Agace, William Winston

    2015-01-01

    to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In this review, we discuss the role of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) in regulating multiple aspects of intestinal Mϕ and DC physiology, including their differentiation, migration, maturation, survival and effector functions. In inflammatory bowel disease, TNF...... signaling has been implicated in reprogramming monocyte differentiation from the anti-inflammatory Mϕ lineage towards the pro-inflammatory mononuclear phagocyte lineage.These cells become a major source of TNF and, thus,may contribute to the chronic inflammatory process. Finally,we highlight some......Intestinal mononuclear phagocytes, comprising macrophages(Mϕs) and dendritic cells (DCs), play important roles in the generation and the regulation of immune responses to intestinal antigens, and alterations in the development and/or the function of these cells are thought to contribute...

  17. Neuropeptides and anticipatory changes in behaviour and physiology: seasonal body weight regulation in the Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Julian G; Tups, Alexander

    2003-11-01

    The Siberian hamster, Phodopus sungorus, is a powerful model of physiological body weight regulation. This seasonal model offers the potential to distinguish between the compensatory neuroendocrine systems that defend body weight against imposed negative energy balance, and those that are involved in the programming of the level of body weight that will be defended-a seasonally appropriate body weight. Of the known, studied, components of the hypothalamic energy balance system, the anorexogenic peptide, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), is the only candidate where gene expression changes in a manner consistent with a role in initiating or sustaining photoperiod-induced differences in body weight trajectory. Siberian hamsters effect a reversible biannual switch in leptin sensitivity in which only short day (SD)-acclimated hamsters that have undergone a reduction in body weight, adiposity and plasma leptin are sensitive to peripheral exogenous leptin. The suppressor of cytokine signalling protein, SOCS3, appears to be the molecular correlate of this seasonal sensitivity.

  18. THERMAL REGULATION OF THE BRAIN -AN ANATOMICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL REVIEW FOR CLINICAL NEUROSCIENTISTS

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    Huan (John eWang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans, like all mammals and birds, maintain a nearly constant core body temperature (36 -37.5°C over a wide range of environmental conditions and are thus referred to as endotherms. The evolution of the brain and its supporting structures in mammals and birds coincided with this development of endothermy. Despite the recognition that a more evolved and complicated brain with all of its temperature-dependent cerebral circuitry and neuronal processes would require more sophisticated thermal control mechanisms, the current understanding of brain temperature regulation remains limited. To optimize the development and maintenance of the brain in health and to accelerate its healing and restoration in illness, focused and committed efforts are much needed to advance the fundamental understanding of brain temperature. In order to effectively study and examine brain temperature regulation, it is critical to first understand the relevant anatomical and physiological properties in the head-neck regions.

  19. Thermal Regulation of the Brain-An Anatomical and Physiological Review for Clinical Neuroscientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Kim, Miri; Normoyle, Kieran P; Llano, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Humans, like all mammals and birds, maintain a near constant core body temperature of 36-37.5°C over a broad range of environmental conditions and are thus referred to as endotherms. The evolution of the brain and its supporting structures in mammals and birds coincided with this development of endothermy. Despite the recognition that a more evolved and complicated brain with all of its temperature-dependent cerebral circuitry and neuronal processes would require more sophisticated thermal control mechanisms, the current understanding of brain temperature regulation remains limited. To optimize the development and maintenance of the brain in health and to accelerate its healing and restoration in illness, focused, and committed efforts are much needed to advance the fundamental understanding of brain temperature. To effectively study and examine brain temperature and its regulation, we must first understand relevant anatomical and physiological properties of thermoregulation in the head-neck regions.

  20. CRISPR/Cas systems: new players in gene regulation and bacterial physiology

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    David eWeiss

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems are bacterial defenses against foreign nucleic acids derived from bacteriophages, plasmids or other sources. These systems are targeted in an RNA-dependent, sequence-specific manner, and are also adaptive, providing protection against previously encountered foreign elements. In addition to their canonical function in defense against foreign nucleic acid, their roles in various aspects of bacterial physiology are now being uncovered. We recently revealed a role for a Cas9-based Type II CRISPR-Cas system in the control of endogenous gene expression, a novel form of prokaryotic gene regulation. Cas9 functions in association with two small RNAs to target and alter the stability of an endogenous transcript encoding a bacterial lipoprotein (BLP. Since BLPs are recognized by the host innate immune protein Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2, CRISPR-Cas-mediated repression of BLP expression facilitates evasion of TLR2 by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida, and is essential for its virulence. Here we describe the Cas9 regulatory system in detail, as well as data on its role in controlling virulence traits of Neisseria meningitidis and Campylobacter jejuni. We also discuss potential roles of CRISPR-Cas systems in the response to envelope stress and other aspects of bacterial physiology. Since ~45% of bacteria and ~83% of Archaea encode these machineries, the newly appreciated regulatory functions of CRISPR-Cas systems are likely to play broad roles in controlling the pathogenesis and physiology of diverse prokaryotes.

  1. Extravehicular activities limitations study. Volume 1: Physiological limitations to extravehicular activity in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Paul A.; Monson, Conrad B.; Santoro, Robert L.; Sears, William J.; Peterson, Donald H.; Smith, Malcolm

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a comprehensive literature search on physiological aspects of EVA. Specifically, the topics covered are: (1) Oxygen levels; (2) Optimum EVA work; (3) Food and Water; (4) Carbon dioxide levels; (5) Repetitive decompressions; (6) Thermal, and (7) Urine collection. The literature was assessed on each of these topics, followed by statements on conclusions and recommended future research needs.

  2. Physiological function of the maltose operon regulator, MalR, in Lactococcus lactis

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    Rådström Peter

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maltose metabolism is initiated by an ATP-dependent permease system in Lactococcus lactis. The subsequent degradation of intracellular maltose is performed by the concerted action of Pi-dependent maltose phosphorylase and β-phosphoglucomutase. In some Gram-positive bacteria, maltose metabolism is regulated by a maltose operon regulator (MalR, belonging to the LacI-GalR family of transcriptional regulators. A gene presumed to encode MalR has been found directly downstream the maltose phosphorylase-encoding gene, malP in L. lactis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological role of the MalR protein in maltose metabolism in L. lactis. Results A L. lactis ssp. lactis mutant, TMB5004, deficient in the putative MalR protein, was physiologically characterised. The mutant was not able to ferment maltose, while its capability to grow on glucose as well as trehalose was not affected. The activity of maltose phosphorylase and β-phosphoglucomutase was not affected in the mutant. However, the specific maltose uptake rate in the wild type was, at its lowest, five times higher than in the mutant. This difference in maltose uptake increased as the maltose concentration in the assay was increased. Conclusion According to amino acid sequence similarities, the presumed MalR is a member of the LacI-GalR family of transcriptional regulators. Due to the suggested activating effect on maltose transport and absence of effect on the activities of maltose phosphorylase and β-phosphoglucomutase, MalR of L. lactis is considered rather as an activator than a repressor.

  3. Positive Regulation of Interleukin-1β Bioactivity by Physiological ROS-Mediated Cysteine S-Glutathionylation

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    Xue Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced cysteine S-glutathionylation is an important posttranslational modification (PTM that controls a wide range of intracellular protein activities. However, whether physiological ROS can modulate the function of extracellular components via S-glutathionylation is unknown. Using a screening approach, we identified ROS-mediated cysteine S-glutathionylation on several extracellular cytokines. Glutathionylation of the highly conserved Cys-188 in IL-1β positively regulates its bioactivity by preventing its ROS-induced irreversible oxidation, including sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid formation. We show this mechanism protects IL-1β from deactivation by ROS in an in vivo system of irradiation-induced bone marrow (BM injury. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1, an enzyme that catalyzes deglutathionylation, was present and active in the extracellular space in serum and the BM, physiologically regulating IL-1β glutathionylation and bioactivity. Collectively, we identify cysteine S-glutathionylation as a cytokine regulatory mechanism that could be a therapeutic target in the treatment of various infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  4. Saline volume expansion and cardiovascular physiology: novel observations, old explanations, and new questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, James L

    2004-10-01

    In a clinical investigation, Kumar and coworkers reported the hemodynamic events that accompany plasma volume expansion over 3 hours in healthy adult volunteers, and found that increases in stroke volume (SV) may be related to increases in left ventricular (LV)/right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume, as they expected, but also to decreases in LV/RV end-systolic volume. The latter finding suggests increased contractility and/or decreased afterload, which do not fit with their perception that clinicians ascribe increases in SV to increases in end-diastolic volume based on Starling's work. Increased ejection fraction and decreased vascular resistances were also observed. The same authors recently reported novel data suggesting that reduced blood viscosity may account for the observed reduction in vascular resistances with saline volume expansion. However, the variances in preload and afterload, along with uncertainty in estimates of contractility, substantially limit their ability to define a primary mechanism to explain decreases in LV end-systolic volume. A focus on using ejection fraction to evaluate the integrated performance of the cardiovascular system is provided to broaden this analytic perspective. Sagawa and colleagues described an approach to estimate the relationship, under clinical conditions, between ventricular and arterial bed elastances (i.e. maximal ventricular systolic elastance [Emax] and maximal arterial systolic elastance [Ea]), reflecting ventricular-arterial coupling. I used the mean data provided in one of the reports from Kumar and coworkers to calculate that LV Emax decreased from 1.09 to 0.96 mmHg/ml with saline volume expansion, while Ea decreased from 1.1 to 0.97 mmHg/ml and the SV increased (i.e. the increase in mean SV was associated with a decrease in mean afterload while the mean contractility decreased). The results reported by Kumar and coworkers invite further studies in normal and critically ill patients during acute saline

  5. Acetylome regulation by sirtuins in the brain: from normal physiology to aging and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michan, Shaday

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the magnitude and physiological significance of proteome lysine acetylation remained incipient for five decades since it was first described. State-of-the-art methodologies, ranging from functional genomics to large-scale proteomics, have recently uncovered that this modification is more broadly represented in proteins than previously recognized, thus constituting the "acetylome." At present, it is estimated that acetylome covers only one tenth of the proteome, however, due its potential significance in physiology is capturing great attention. The first components of the cellular machinery, which finely orchestrate acetylome homeostasis, were identified by the end of last century. Since then, the majority of our growing knowledge concerning the physiological relevance of proteome reversible acetylation comes from the study of sirtuins, a unique type of lysine deacetylase that uses NAD(+). Sirtuins participate in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from transcription, DNA repair, energy balance, mitochondrial biogenesis and cell division, to apoptosis, autophagy and aging. Within the brain, besides their widespread epigenetic effects of dynamically modifying histones, sirtuins also target a variety of non-histone proteins either commonly deregulated in pathologies, or that participate in normal cerebral functions. For example, they modulate critical elements of the circadian rhythms, neurogenesis, synapses, cognition, serotonin synthesis, myelination, and proteins involved in neuropathology. Acetylome dynamics, and its regulation by sirtuins, may also help to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying brain aging. This work reviews the pathways as orchestrated by the interplay between acetylome and sirtuins in the brain, from physiology involvement, to aging processes, and pathological settings.

  6. Physiological framework for the regulation of quorum sensing-dependent public goods in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellbye, Brett; Schuster, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Many bacteria possess cell density-dependent quorum-sensing (QS) systems that often regulate cooperative secretions involved in host-microbe or microbe-microbe interactions. These secretions, or "public goods," are frequently coregulated by stress and starvation responses. Here we provide a physiological rationale for such regulatory complexity in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Using minimal-medium batch and chemostat cultures, we comprehensively characterized specific growth rate-limiting macronutrients as key triggers for the expression of extracellular enzymes and metabolites directly controlled by the las and rhl QS systems. Expression was unrelated to cell density, depended on the secreted product's elemental composition, and was induced only when the limiting nutrient was not also a building block of the product; rhl-dependent products showed the strongest response, caused by the largely las-independent induction of the regulator RhlR and its cognate signal. In agreement with the prominent role of the rhl system, slow growth inverted the las-to-rhl signal ratio, previously considered a characteristic distinguishing between planktonic and biofilm lifestyles. Our results highlight a supply-driven, metabolically prudent regulation of public goods that minimizes production costs and thereby helps stabilize cooperative behavior. Such regulation would be beneficial for QS-dependent public goods that act broadly and nonspecifically, and whose need cannot always be accurately assessed by the producing cell. Clear differences in the capacities of the las and rhl systems to integrate starvation signals help explain the existence of multiple QS systems in one cell.

  7. ChIP-on-chip analysis of thyroid hormone-regulated genes and their physiological significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Huang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Chang-Ching; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Triiodothyronine (T3) and its receptor (TR) modulate several physiological processes, including cell development, proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. The regulatory mechanism of T3/TR involves binding to the thyroid hormone response element (TRE) within the target gene promoter. However, the number of target genes directly regulated by TRα1 and the specific pathways of TR-regulated target genes remain largely unknown. Here, we expressed TRα1 in a HepG2 cell line and used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with microarray to determine the genes that are directly regulated by TRα1 and also involved in cell metabolism and proliferation. Our analysis identified E74-like factor 2 (ELF2), a transcription factor associated with tumor growth, as a direct target downregulated by T3/TR. Overexpression of ELF2 enhanced tumor cell proliferation, and conversely, its knockdown suppressed tumor growth. Additionally, ELF2 restored the proliferative ability of hepatoma cells inhibited by T3/TR. Our findings collectively support a potential role of T3/TR in tumor growth inhibition through regulation of ELF2. PMID:26968954

  8. Skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase: molecular regulation and physiological effects in relation to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seip, R L; Semenkovich, C F

    1998-01-01

    LPL directs the body wide distribution of fatty acids derived from circulating triglycerides. This is accomplished by tissue-specific regulation. In adipose tissue, LPLA per gram is higher than in muscle tissue. Eating increases adipose tissue LPLA and may increase blood flow. Exercise greatly increases SM blood flow and LPLA over a longer time frame as compared to the effect of eating on adipose tissue LPLA. The regulation of LPLA occurs at several levels and is better understood in adipose tissue models. In muscle, the study of regulation has been neglected. LPL expression in muscle may be more complex than in adipose tissue owing to the changes in blood flow and metabolism associated with contractile activity, as well as to other factors intrinsic to contraction, such as electrical events and cellular deformation. Sixty to 90 minutes of continuous leg exercise at 60% of VO2 max induces muscle LPL expression, increases LPL mRNA in humans with 4 hours of exercise, and raises immunoreactive mass by 8 hours post-exercise. Within 24 hours, both LPL and mRNA and mass have returned to normal levels. Increased muscle LPL mass following exercise may serve to replenish intramyofibral stores of triglyceride, which are depleted with endurance exercise and are greater in aerobically-trained individuals as compared to untrained individuals. The post-exercise increase in muscle LPL mass coincides with the post-exercise acute fall in circulating triglycerides typically observed in subjects capable of exercising for 60-90 minutes at 60% of VO2 max. The low fasting triglyceride levels often seen in highly trained individuals are due in part to their high levels of muscle LPLA. Both the physiological mediator and the molecular mediator of the exercised-induced induction of muscle LPL expression are known. Hopefully, the next decade will see careful studies aimed at better defining the molecular physiology of LPL expression in muscle.

  9. The role of the cytoskeleton in volume regulation and beading transitions in PC12 neurites

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We present investigations on volume regulation and beading shape transitions in PC12 neurites conducted using a flow-chamber technique. By disrupting the cell cytoskeleton with specific drugs we investigate the role of its individual components in the volume regulation response. We find that microtubule disruption increases both swelling rate and maximum volume attained, but does not affect the ability of the neurite to recover its initial volume. In addition, investigation of axonal beading --also known as pearling instability-- provides additional clues on the mechanical state of the neurite. We conclude that the initial swelling phase is mechanically slowed down by microtubules, while the volume recovery is driven by passive diffusion of osmolites. Our experiments provide a framework to investigate the role of cytoskeletal mechanics in volume homeostasis.

  10. Sensors and signal transduction pathways in vertebrate cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2006-01-01

    will be discussed. In contrast to the simple pathway of osmosensing in yeast, cells from vertebrate organisms appear to exhibit multiple volume sensing systems, the specific mechanism(s) activated being cell type- and stimulus-dependent. Candidate sensors include integrins and growth factor receptors, while other...

  11. A Review of Electrical Impedance Spectrometry Methods for Parametric Estimation of Physiologic Fluid Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewberry, B.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical impedance spectrometry involves measurement of the complex resistance of a load at multiple frequencies. With this information in the form of impedance magnitude and phase, or resistance and reactance, basic structure or function of the load can be estimated. The "load" targeted for measurement and estimation in this study consisted of the water-bearing tissues of the human calf. It was proposed and verified that by measuring the electrical impedance of the human calf and fitting this data to a model of fluid compartments, the lumped-model volume of intracellular and extracellular spaces could be estimated, By performing this estimation over time, the volume dynamics during application of stimuli which affect the direction of gravity can be viewed. The resulting data can form a basis for further modeling and verification of cardiovascular and compartmental modeling of fluid reactions to microgravity as well as countermeasures to the headward shift of fluid during head-down tilt or spaceflight.

  12. Digestive physiology of the Burmese python: broad regulation of integrated performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Stephen M

    2008-12-01

    As an apparent adaptation to predictably long episodes of fasting, the sit-and-wait foraging Burmese python experiences unprecedented regulation of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular performance with feeding and fasting. The ingestion of a meal signals the quiescent gut tissues to start secreting digestive acid and enzymes, to upregulate intestinal brush-border enzymes and nutrient transporters, and to grow. An integrated phenomenon, digestion is also characterized by increases in the mass, and presumably the function, of the heart, pancreas, liver and kidneys. Once digestion is complete, the python's stomach and small intestine rapidly downregulate performance. Much of the modulation of intestinal function can be explained by the 5-fold increase in microvillus length and apical surface area with feeding, and the subsequent shortening of the microvilli after digestion has finished. Digestion for the Burmese python is a relatively expensive endeavor, evident by the as much as a 44-fold increase in metabolic rate and equivalent in cost to as much as 37% of the meal's energy. Their large metabolic response is supported by substantial increases in ventilation and cardiac output and the apparent catabolism of glucose and lipids. Unmatched in the magnitude of its numerous physiological responses to feeding, the Burmese python is a very attractive model for examining the capacities and regulatory mechanisms of physiological performance.

  13. Physiological regulation of laccase and manganese peroxidase production by white-rot Basidiomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva

    2009-10-12

    This review integrates recent literature and our own data on the physiology of laccase and manganese peroxidase synthesis, focusing on the common characteristics and unique properties of individual fungi as well as on several approaches providing enhanced enzyme secretion. Firstly, the enzyme yield is species-dependent and strain-dependent and selection of new organisms with tremendous synthesis of these enzymes is possible. For example, in screening program the laccase activity of tested basidiomycetes varied from 0.5Uml(-1) to 75Uml(-1). Secondly, the carbon source and lignocellulosic substrate play a crucial role in enzyme production. Thus, laccase activity of Pseudotrametes gibbosa varied from 0.3Uml(-1) (Avicel) to 13.7Uml(-1) (lactose), while the substitution of wheat bran with walnut pericarp increased Cerrena unicolor manganese peroxidase yield from 0.7Uml(-1) to 8.3Uml(-1). Thirdly, aromatic compounds regulate the ligninolytic enzyme synthesis although their effect is very specific depending on fungi physiological peculiarities. 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) supplemented to the medium at appropriate concentration significantly accelerated C. unicolor laccase production and 4-fold increased laccase specific activity. Fourthly, co-cultivation of appropriate fungi shows considerable promise as a strategy to highly enhance the enzyme production. For example, pairing of C. unicolor and Phellinus robustus 2-fold increased the total laccase yield.

  14. Physiological and Immunological Regulations in Caenorhabditis elegans Infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2014-03-01

    Studies pertaining to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by utilizing model systems failed to mimic the essential aspects of immunity induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, as the determinants of innate immunity are distinct. The present study investigated the physiological and innate immune responses of S. Typhi infected Caenorhabditis elegans and also explored the Ty21a mediated immune enhancement in C. elegans. Ty21a is a known live vaccine for typhoidal infection in human beings. Physiological responses of C. elegans infected with S. Typhi assessed by survival and behavioral assays revealed that S. Typhi caused host mortality by persistent infection. However, Ty21a exposure to C. elegans was not harmful. Ty21a pre-exposed C. elegans, exhibited significant resistance against S. Typhi infection. Elevated accumulation of S. Typhi inside the infected host was observed when compared to Ty21a exposures. Transcript analysis of candidate innate immune gene (clec-60, clec-87, lys-7, ilys-3, scl-2, cpr-2, F08G5.6, atf-7, age-1, bec-1 and daf-16) regulations in the host during S. Typhi infection have been assessed through qPCR analysis to understand the activation of immune signaling pathways during S. Typhi infections. Gene silencing approaches confirmed that clec-60 and clec-87 has a major role in the defense system of C. elegans during S. Typhi infection. In conclusion, the study revealed that preconditioning of host with Ty21a protects against subsequent S. Typhi infection.

  15. Indirect Interspecies Regulation: Transcriptional and Physiological Responses of a Cyanobacterium to Heterotrophic Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Ryan S.; Thiel, Vera; Sadler, Natalie C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms by which microbes interact in communities remain poorly understood. Here, we interrogated specific interactions between photoautotrophic and heterotrophic members of a model consortium to infer mechanisms that mediate metabolic coupling and acclimation to partnership. This binary consortium was composed of a cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1, which supported growth of an obligate aerobic heterotroph, Meiothermus ruber strain A, by providing organic carbon, O2, and reduced nitrogen. Species-resolved transcriptomic analyses were used in combination with growth and photosynthesis kinetics to infer interactions and the environmental context under which they occur. We found that the efficiency of biomass production and resistance to stress induced by high levels of dissolved O2 increased, beyond axenic performance, as a result of heterotrophic partnership. Coordinated transcriptional responses transcending both species were observed and used to infer specific interactions resulting from the synthesis and exchange of resources. The cyanobacterium responded to heterotrophic partnership by altering expression of core genes involved with photosynthesis, carbon uptake/fixation, vitamin synthesis, and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). IMPORTANCE This study elucidates how a cyanobacterial primary producer acclimates to heterotrophic partnership by modulating the expression levels of key metabolic genes. Heterotrophic bacteria can indirectly regulate the physiology of the photoautotrophic primary producers, resulting in physiological changes identified here, such as increased intracellular ROS. Some of the interactions inferred from this model system represent putative principles of metabolic coupling in phototrophic-heterotrophic partnerships. PMID:28289730

  16. Long non-coding RNAs, a new important regulator of cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yidi; Ma, Wenya; Huang, Lina; Feng, Dan; Cai, Benzhi

    2015-06-01

    LncRNAs were previously considered to be the 'noise' of gene transcription having no biological functions, but now it has become evident that lncRNAs function as modulators of gene expression network. LncRNAs may regulate diverse gene expression levels which were roughly summarized to epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. It has been clarified that some lncRNAs were expressed differentially in cardiovascular diseases, and aberrant changes of those lncRNAs were involved in the development of heart disorders. The role of lncRNAs in this process transcended the tradition of protein regulatory platform to be the orchestrator of cardiac sophisticated governing system of heart development, adaptation and pathological reaction. This review summarizes recent advances in the study of functions and mechanisms of lncRNAs in cardiovascular physiology and pathology. The regulatory roles of lncRNAs in cardiovascular diseases provide new strategy for interventional therapy of heart diseases.

  17. Fractalkine regulation of microglial physiology and consequences on the brain and behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Chiara Paolicelli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits are constantly monitored and supported by the surrounding microglial cells, using finely tuned mechanisms which include both direct contact and release of soluble factors. These bidirectional interactions are not only triggered by pathological conditions as a S.O.S. response to noxious stimuli, but they rather represent an established repertoire of dynamic communication for ensuring continuous immune surveillance and homeostasis in the healthy brain. In addition, recent studies are revealing key tasks for microglial interactions with neurons during normal physiological conditions, especially in regulating the maturation of neural circuits and shaping their connectivity in an activity- and experience-dependent manner.Chemokines, a family of soluble and membrane-bound cytokines, play an essential role in mediating neuron-microglia crosstalk in the developing and mature brain. As part of this special issue on Cytokines as players of neuronal plasticity and sensitivity to environment in healthy and pathological brain, our review focuses on the fractalkine signalling pathway, involving the ligand CX3CL1 which is mainly expressed by neurons, and its receptor CX3CR1 that is exclusively found on microglia within the brain. An extensive literature largely based on transgenic mouse models has revealed that fractalkine signalling plays a critical role in regulating a broad spectrum of microglial properties during normal physiological conditions, especially their migration and dynamic surveillance of the brain parenchyma, in addition to influencing the survival of developing neurons, the maturation, activity and plasticity of developing and mature synapses, the brain functional connectivity, adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as well as learning and memory, and the behavioural outcome.

  18. Silicon Regulates Potential Genes Involved in Major Physiological Processes in Plants to Combat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinaya Manivannan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si, the quasi-essential element occurs as the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. Biological importance of Si in plant kingdom has become inevitable particularly under stressed environment. In general, plants are classified as high, medium, and low silicon accumulators based on the ability of roots to absorb Si. The uptake of Si directly influence the positive effects attributed to the plant but Si supplementation proves to mitigate stress and recover plant growth even in low accumulating plants like tomato. The application of Si in soil as well as soil-less cultivation systems have resulted in the enhancement of quantitative and qualitative traits of plants even under stressed environment. Silicon possesses several mechanisms to regulate the physiological, biochemical, and antioxidant metabolism in plants to combat abiotic and biotic stresses. Nevertheless, very few reports are available on the aspect of Si-mediated molecular regulation of genes with potential role in stress tolerance. The recent advancements in the era of genomics and transcriptomics have opened an avenue for the determination of molecular rationale associated with the Si amendment to the stress alleviation in plants. Therefore, the present endeavor has attempted to describe the recent discoveries related to the regulation of vital genes involved in photosynthesis, transcription regulation, defense, water transport, polyamine synthesis, and housekeeping genes during abiotic and biotic stress alleviation by Si. Furthermore, an overview of Si-mediated modulation of multiple genes involved in stress response pathways such as phenylpropanoid pathway, jasmonic acid pathway, ABA-dependent or independent regulatory pathway have been discussed in this review.

  19. Physiological and health-related adaptations to low-volume interval training: influences of nutrition and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibala, Martin J; Gillen, Jenna B; Percival, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Interval training refers to the basic concept of alternating periods of relatively intense exercise with periods of lower-intensity effort or complete rest for recovery. Low-volume interval training refers to sessions that involve a relatively small total amount of exercise (i.e. ≤10 min of intense exercise), compared with traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) protocols that are generally reflected in public health guidelines. In an effort to standardize terminology, a classification scheme was recently proposed in which the term 'high-intensity interval training' (HIIT) be used to describe protocols in which the training stimulus is 'near maximal' or the target intensity is between 80 and 100 % of maximal heart rate, and 'sprint interval training' (SIT) be used for protocols that involve 'all out' or 'supramaximal' efforts, in which target intensities correspond to workloads greater than what is required to elicit 100 % of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Both low-volume SIT and HIIT constitute relatively time-efficient training strategies to rapidly enhance the capacity for aerobic energy metabolism and elicit physiological remodeling that resembles changes normally associated with high-volume MICT. Short-term SIT and HIIT protocols have also been shown to improve health-related indices, including cardiorespiratory fitness and markers of glycemic control in both healthy individuals and those at risk for, or afflicted by, cardiometabolic diseases. Recent evidence from a limited number of studies has highlighted potential sex-based differences in the adaptive response to SIT in particular. It has also been suggested that specific nutritional interventions, in particular those that can augment muscle buffering capacity, such as sodium bicarbonate, may enhance the adaptive response to low-volume interval training.

  20. Physiological roles of mitogen-activated-protein-kinase-activated p38-regulated/activated protein kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergiy; Kostenko; Gianina; Dumitriu; Kari; Jenssen; Lgreid; Ugo; Moens

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases(MAPKs)are a family of proteins that constitute signaling pathways involved in processes that control gene expression,cell division, cell survival,apoptosis,metabolism,differentiation and motility.The MAPK pathways can be divided into conventional and atypical MAPK pathways.The first group converts a signal into a cellular response through a relay of three consecutive phosphorylation events exerted by MAPK kinase kinases,MAPK kinase,and MAPK.Atypical MAPK pathways are not organized into this three-tiered cascade.MAPK that belongs to both conventional and atypical MAPK pathways can phosphorylate both non-protein kinase substrates and other protein kinases.The latter are referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases.This review focuses on one such MAPK-activated protein kinase,MAPK-activated protein kinase 5(MK5)or p38-regulated/activated protein kinase(PRAK).This protein is highly conserved throughout the animal kingdom and seems to be the target of both conventional and atypical MAPK pathways.Recent findings on the regulation of the activity and subcellular localization,bona fide interaction partners and physiological roles of MK5/PRAK are discussed.

  1. Type 2 cannabinoid receptor contributes to the physiological regulation of spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Daniele; De Domenico, Emanuela; Sette, Claudio; Geremia, Raffaele; Grimaldi, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2) has been proposed to play a pivotal role in meiotic entry of male germ cells, similar to retinoic acid (RA). In this study, we showed that activation of CB2with the specific agonist JWH133 [3-(1',1'-dimethylbutyl)-1-deoxy-8-THC] (IC5010(-6)M) mimics epigenetic events induced by RA (IC5010(-7)M) in spermatogonia. Both JWH133 and RA treatments stimulate the expression of the meiotic genes c-KitandStra8, by up-regulating H3K4me3 and down-regulating H3K9me2 levels in genomic regions flanking the transcription start site. Moreover, both agents increase the expression ofPrdm9, the gene encoding a meiosis-specific histone, H3K4me3 methyltransferase, which marks hotspots of recombination in prophase I, thus resulting in a global increase in H3K4me3. Notably, prolonged administration of JWH133 to immature 7 dpp CD-1 mice induced an acceleration of the onset of spermatogenesis, whereas the specific CB2antagonist delayed germ cell differentiation. Thus, both hyper- and hypostimulation of CB2disrupted the temporal dynamics of the spermatogenic cycle. These findings highlight the importance of proper CB2signaling for the maintenance of a correct temporal progression of spermatogenesis and suggest a possible adverse effect of cannabis in deregulating this process.-Di Giacomo, D., De Domenico, E., Sette, C., Geremia, R., Grimaldi, P. Type 2 cannabinoid receptor contributes to the physiological regulation of spermatogenesis.

  2. Cellular volume regulation by anoctamin 6: Ca²⁺, phospholipase A2 and osmosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianant, Lalida; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2016-02-01

    During cell swelling, Cl(-) channels are activated to lower intracellular Cl(-) concentrations and to reduce cell volume, a process termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD). We show that anoctamin 6 (ANO6; TMEM16F) produces volume-regulated anion currents and controls cell volume in four unrelated cell types. Volume regulation is compromised in freshly isolated intestinal epithelial cells from Ano6-/- mice and also in lymphocytes from a patient lacking expression of ANO6. Ca(2+) influx is activated and thus ANO6 is stimulated during cell swelling by local Ca(2+) increase probably in functional nanodomains near the plasma membrane. This leads to stimulation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and generation of plasma membrane lysophospholipids, which activates ANO6. Direct application of lysophospholipids also activates an anion current that is inhibited by typical ANO6 blocker. An increase in intracellular Ca(2+) supports activation of ANO6, but is not required when PLA2 is fully activated, while re-addition of arachidonic acid completely blocked ANO6. Moreover, ANO6 is activated by low intracellular Cl(-) concentrations and may therefore operate as a cellular osmosensor. High intracellular Cl(-) concentration inhibits ANO6 and activation by PLA2. Taken together, ANO6 supports volume regulation and volume activation of anion currents by action as a Cl(-) channel or by scrambling membrane phospholipids. Thereby, it may support the function of LRRC8 proteins.

  3. Regulation of intramembranous absorption and amniotic fluid volume by constituents in fetal sheep urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Debra F; Jonker, Sonnet S; Louey, Samantha; Cheung, Cecilia Y; Brace, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    Our objective was to test the hypothesis that fetal urine contains a substance(s) that regulates amniotic fluid volume by altering the rate of intramembranous absorption of amniotic fluid. In late gestation ovine fetuses, amniotic fluid volumes, urine, and lung liquid production rates, swallowed volumes and intramembranous volume and solute absorption rates were measured over 2-day periods under control conditions and when urine was removed and continuously replaced at an equal rate with exogenous fluid. Intramembranous volume absorption rate decreased by 40% when urine was replaced with lactated Ringer solution or lactated Ringer solution diluted 50% with water. Amniotic fluid volume doubled under both conditions. Analysis of the intramembranous sodium and chloride fluxes suggests that the active but not passive component of intramembranous volume absorption was altered by urine replacement, whereas both active and passive components of solute fluxes were altered. We conclude that fetal urine contains an unidentified substance(s) that stimulates active intramembranous transport of amniotic fluid across the amnion into the underlying fetal vasculature and thereby functions as a regulator of amniotic fluid volume.

  4. Aquaporin expression and cell volume regulation in the SV40 immortalized rat submandibular acinar cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ann-Kristin; Galtung, Hilde Kanli

    2007-03-01

    The amount of aquaporins present and the cellular ability to perform regulatory volume changes are likely to be important for fluid secretions from exocrine glands. In this work these phenomena were studied in an SV40 immortalized rat submandibular acinar cell line. The regulatory cell volume characteristics have not previously been determined in these cells. Cell volume regulation following hyposmotic exposure and aquaporin induction was examined with Coulter counter methodology, radioactive efflux studies, fura-2 fluorescence, and polymerase chain reaction and Western blot techniques. Cell volume regulation was inhibited by the K(+) channel antagonists quinine and BaCl(2) and the Cl(-) channel blocker 5-nitro-2-(3-phenypropylamino)benzoic acid. A concomitant increase in cellular (3)H-taurine release and Ca(2+) concentration was also observed. Chelation of both intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) with EGTA and the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 did not, however, affect cell volume regulation. Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in hyperosmotic conditions and downregulated upon return to isosmotic solutions, but were reduced by the mitogen-activated ERK-activating kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126. A 24-h MEK inhibition also diminished hyposmotically induced cell swelling and cell volume regulation. In conclusion, it was determined that regulatory volume changes in this immortalized cell line are due to KCl and taurine efflux. In conditions that increased AQP5 levels, the cells showed a faster cell swelling and a more complete volume recovery following hyposmotic exposure. This response could be overturned by MEK inhibition.

  5. The mask of sanity: facial expressive, self-reported, and physiological consequences of emotion regulation in psychopathic offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nentjes, L.; Bernstein, D.P.; Meijer, E.; Arntz, A.; Wiers, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the physiological, self-reported, and facial correlates of emotion regulation in psychopathy. Specifically, we compared psychopathic offenders (n = 42), nonpsychopathic offenders (n = 42), and nonoffender controls (n = 26) in their ability to inhibit and express emotion while

  6. Non-photoperiodic regulation of reproductive physiology in the flexibly breeding pine siskin (Spinus pinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Heather E; Hahn, Thomas P

    2012-09-01

    In order to time reproduction to coincide with favorable conditions, animals use environmental cues to up- and down-regulate the reproductive axis appropriately. Although photoperiodic cues are one of the best studied of such environmental cues, animals also attend to others such as temperature, food availability, rainfall and social cues. Such non-photic cues are expected to be particularly important for tropical species and temperate-zone species that exhibit flexible or opportunistic breeding schedules. In this study, we investigate the use of non-photic cues, specifically food availability and social cues, to time the initiation of reproductive development in the pine siskin (Spinus pinus), a temperate-zone songbird with a flexible breeding schedule. Following winter solstice, males were housed on a 12L:12D photoperiod with either access to a preferred food, a potential mate (social cue), or both. Control birds received only maintenance diet and no mate. Access to a preferred food had a significant positive effect on testis size and circulating luteinizing hormone (LH). However, we found no effect of social treatment on reproductive development. The effect of the food treatment on reproductive development did not appear to result from effects on body mass or fat, as neither measure differed across treatments. The food treatment influenced not only reproductive physiology, but also reproductive behavior in this species, as access to seeds had a positive effect on affiliation of pairs. This study demonstrates that food is a potent stimulus for the initiation of reproductive development in pine siskins.

  7. Comparative physiological and proteomic analysis reveal distinct regulation of peach skin quality traits by altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Karagiannis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of environment in fruit physiology has been established; however, knowledge regarding the effect of altitude in fruit quality traits is still lacking. Here, skin tissue quality characters were analysed in peach fruit (cv. June Gold, harvested in 16 orchards located in low (71.5 m mean or high (495. m mean altitutes sites. Data indicated that soluble solids concentration and fruit firmness at commercial harvest stage were unaffected by alitute. Peach grown at high-altitude environment displayed higher levels of pigmentation and specific antioxidant-related activity in their skin at the commercial harvest stage. Skin extracts from distinct developmental stages and growing altitudes exhibited different antioxidant ability against DNA strand-scission. The effects of altitude on skin tissue were further studied using a proteomic approach. Protein expression analysis of the mature fruits depicted altered expression of 42 proteins that are mainly involved in the metabolic pathways of defense, primary metabolism, destination/storage and energy. The majority of these proteins were up-regulated at the low-altitude region. High-altitude environment increased the accumulation of several proteins, including chaperone ClpC, chaperone ClpB, pyruvate dehydrogenase E1, TCP domain class transcription factor and lipoxygenase. We also discuss the altitude-affected protein variations, taking into account their potential role in peach ripening process. This study provides the first characterization of the peach skin proteome and helps to improve our understanding of peach’s response to altitude.

  8. EFFECT OF PHYSIOLOGICAL AGE AND GROWTH REGULATORS ON CALLUS BROWNING OF COCONUT ENDOSPERM CULTURE IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAZARUS AGUS SUKAMTO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of physiological age and growth regulators affecting callus browning ofcoconut endosperm was investigated. Solid endosperm explants of four coconut fruits fromsame brunches of two coconut cultivars “Samoan Dwarf ” were grown on modified Murashigeand Skoog (MS formula with addition of 10 mg l putresine, 2.50 g l activated charcoal (AC,1.70 g l phytagel, 0, 10 , 10 , 10 , 10 M 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D or 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropicolinic acid (Picloram combined with 10 M 6-benzylaminopurine (BA.Callogenesis occurred on 98.83% of explants. Callus browning between different physiologicalages (antipodal and micropylar tissues of coconut endosperm at 9, 26 and 31 weeks of culture(WOC was significantly different, but not at 16 and 21 WOC. Auxins of 2,4-D and Picloramdid not affect significantly callus browning of endosperm cultures. Auxin doses at 10 , 10 , and10 M decreased significantly callus browning at 9 and 16 WOC, respectively, but at 10 Mbrowning was less significant compared to other doses at 21 WOC. Auxin dose at 10 M causedless significant browning compared to other doses at 31 WOC. The addition of BA decreasedsignificantly callus browning at 9 WOC, but did not affect callus browning thereafter.

  9. Review of the Technical Metrological Regulation for flow computers and volume converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, R. O.; Aguiar Júnior, E. A.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    With the publication of Inmetro's regulation n° 373/2014, Inmetro presented the proposal to review the regulation of flow computers and volume converters, whose scope now includes fiscal measurement, ownership, custody transfer, among others, of hydrocarbons liquids and natural gas. This new proposal provides improvements to the legal metrological control of these instruments in Brazil, while also broaden the scope from the previous regulation, the Inmetro's regulation n° 64/2003. The purpose of this paper is to present these changes from a metrological point of view, and also clarify the transitional rules for the process.

  10. The effect of duty hour regulation on resident surgical case volume in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Stuart H; Miller, Robert H; Weng, Cindy; Gurgel, Richard K

    2014-10-01

    Evaluate the effect of duty hour regulation on graduating otolaryngology resident surgical case volume and analyze trends in surgical case volume for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) key indicator cases from 1996 to 2011. Time-trend analysis of surgical case volume. Nationwide sample of otolaryngology residency programs. Operative logs from the American Board of Otolaryngology and ACGME for otolaryngology residents graduating in the years 1996 to 2011. Key indicator volumes and grouped domain volumes before and after resident duty hour regulations (2003) were calculated and compared. Independent t test was performed to evaluate overall difference in operative volume. Wilcoxon rank sum test evaluated differences between procedures per time period. Linear regression evaluated trend. The average total number of key indicator cases per graduating resident was 440.8 in 1996-2003 compared to 500.4 cases in 2004-2011, and overall average per number of key indicators was 31.5 and 36.2, respectively (P = .067). Four key indicator cases showed statistically significant (P otolaryngology residents. The overall trend in operative volume is increasing for several specific key indicators. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  11. Listening to music and physiological and psychological functioning: the mediating role of emotion regulation and stress reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, M V; Scholz, U; Ehlert, U; Nater, U M

    2012-01-01

    Music listening has been suggested to have short-term beneficial effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the association and potential mediating mechanisms between various aspects of habitual music-listening behaviour and physiological and psychological functioning. An internet-based survey was conducted in university students, measuring habitual music-listening behaviour, emotion regulation, stress reactivity, as well as physiological and psychological functioning. A total of 1230 individuals (mean = 24.89 ± 5.34 years, 55.3% women) completed the questionnaire. Quantitative aspects of habitual music-listening behaviour, i.e. average duration of music listening and subjective relevance of music, were not associated with physiological and psychological functioning. In contrast, qualitative aspects, i.e. reasons for listening (especially 'reducing loneliness and aggression', and 'arousing or intensifying specific emotions') were significantly related to physiological and psychological functioning (all p = 0.001). These direct effects were mediated by distress-augmenting emotion regulation and individual stress reactivity. The habitual music-listening behaviour appears to be a multifaceted behaviour that is further influenced by dispositions that are usually not related to music listening. Consequently, habitual music-listening behaviour is not obviously linked to physiological and psychological functioning.

  12. MiRNAs with apoptosis regulating potential are differentially expressed in chronic exercise-induced physiologically hypertrophied hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbiah Ramasamy

    Full Text Available Physiological cardiac hypertrophy is an adaptive mechanism, induced during chronic exercise. As it is reversible and not associated with cardiomyocyte death, it is considered as a natural tactic to prevent cardiac dysfunction and failure. Though, different studies revealed the importance of microRNAs (miRNAs in pathological hypertrophy, their role during physiological hypertrophy is largely unexplored. Hence, this study is aimed at revealing the global expression profile of miRNAs during physiological cardiac hypertrophy. Chronic swimming protocol continuously for eight weeks resulted in induction of physiological hypertrophy in rats and histopathology revealed the absence of tissue damage, apoptosis or fibrosis. Subsequently, the total RNA was isolated and small RNA sequencing was executed. Analysis of small RNA reads revealed the differential expression of a large set of miRNAs during physiological hypertrophy. The expression profile of the significantly differentially expressed miRNAs was validated by qPCR. In silico prediction of target genes by miRanda, miRdB and TargetScan and subsequent qPCR analysis unraveled that miRNAs including miR-99b, miR-100, miR-19b, miR-10, miR-208a, miR-133, miR-191a, miR-22, miR-30e and miR-181a are targeting the genes that primarily regulate cell proliferation and cell death. Gene ontology and pathway mapping showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs and their target genes were mapped to apoptosis and cell death pathways principally via PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK signaling. In summary, our data indicates that regulation of these miRNAs with apoptosis regulating potential can be one of the major key factors in determining pathological or physiological hypertrophy by controlling fibrosis, apoptosis and cell death mechanisms.

  13. MiRNAs with apoptosis regulating potential are differentially expressed in chronic exercise-induced physiologically hypertrophied hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Subbiah; Velmurugan, Ganesan; Shanmugha Rajan, K; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Kalpana, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Physiological cardiac hypertrophy is an adaptive mechanism, induced during chronic exercise. As it is reversible and not associated with cardiomyocyte death, it is considered as a natural tactic to prevent cardiac dysfunction and failure. Though, different studies revealed the importance of microRNAs (miRNAs) in pathological hypertrophy, their role during physiological hypertrophy is largely unexplored. Hence, this study is aimed at revealing the global expression profile of miRNAs during physiological cardiac hypertrophy. Chronic swimming protocol continuously for eight weeks resulted in induction of physiological hypertrophy in rats and histopathology revealed the absence of tissue damage, apoptosis or fibrosis. Subsequently, the total RNA was isolated and small RNA sequencing was executed. Analysis of small RNA reads revealed the differential expression of a large set of miRNAs during physiological hypertrophy. The expression profile of the significantly differentially expressed miRNAs was validated by qPCR. In silico prediction of target genes by miRanda, miRdB and TargetScan and subsequent qPCR analysis unraveled that miRNAs including miR-99b, miR-100, miR-19b, miR-10, miR-208a, miR-133, miR-191a, miR-22, miR-30e and miR-181a are targeting the genes that primarily regulate cell proliferation and cell death. Gene ontology and pathway mapping showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs and their target genes were mapped to apoptosis and cell death pathways principally via PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK signaling. In summary, our data indicates that regulation of these miRNAs with apoptosis regulating potential can be one of the major key factors in determining pathological or physiological hypertrophy by controlling fibrosis, apoptosis and cell death mechanisms.

  14. Energy study of railroad freight transportation. Volume 3. Regulation and tariff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-08-01

    Volume 1 described the history of the railroad industry and pointed out that the number of separate companies, their monopoly power, and their trade and labor practices invited regulation by outsiders from the early days. Even though new regulations have been added over the years, few have been removed. Tariffs have been modified to fit a number of needs, not all of them economic. The effects of government regulation on the energy efficiency of railroad operations are examined. The development of railroad regulation is examined and the governmental legislation, policies, and procedures that make up the regulatory environment within which the railroads must operate are briefly described. The relationship among regulations, energy usage, and costs in three specific areas of regulation: long-haul rates, empty car distribution, and rates on low-density rail traffic are examined.

  15. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel blockers: Pharmacological, biophysical and physiological relevance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul; Linsdell

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane con-ductance regulator(CFTR) chloride channel causes cys-tic fibrosis, while inappropriate activity of this channeloccurs in secretory diarrhea and polycystic kidney dis-ease. Drugs that interact directly with CFTR are there-fore of interest in the treatment of a number of diseasestates. This review focuses on one class of small mol-ecules that interacts directly with CFTR, namely inhibi-tors that act by directly blocking chloride movementthrough the open channel pore. In theory such com-pounds could be of use in the treatment of diarrheaand polycystic kidney disease, however in practice allknown substances acting by this mechanism to inhibitCFTR function lack either the potency or specificity forin vivo use. Nevertheless, this theoretical pharmaco-logical usefulness set the scene for the developmentof more potent, specific CFTR inhibitors. Biophysically,open channel blockers have proven most useful as ex-perimental probes of the structure and function of theCFTR chloride channel pore. Most importantly, the useof these blockers has been fundamental in developing afunctional model of the pore that includes a wide innervestibule that uses positively charged amino acid sidechains to attract both permeant and blocking anionsfrom the cell cytoplasm. CFTR channels are also subjectto this kind of blocking action by endogenous anionspresent in the cell cytoplasm, and recently this blocking effect has been suggested to play a role in the physio-logical control of CFTR channel function, in particular as a novel mechanism linking CFTR function dynamically to the composition of epithelial cell secretions. It has also been suggested that future drugs could target this same pathway as a way of pharmacologically increasing CFTR activity in cystic fibrosis. Studying open channel blockers and their mechanisms of action has resulted in significant advances in our understanding of CFTR as a pharmacological target in disease states, of

  16. Physiological implications of the regulation of vacuolar H+-ATPase by chloride ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Carraro-Lacroix

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Vacuolar H+-ATPase is a large multi-subunit protein that mediates ATP-driven vectorial H+ transport across the membranes. It is widely distributed and present in virtually all eukaryotic cells in intracellular membranes or in the plasma membrane of specialized cells. In subcellular organelles, ATPase is responsible for the acidification of the vesicular interior, which requires an intraorganellar acidic pH to maintain optimal enzyme activity. Control of vacuolar H+-ATPase depends on the potential difference across the membrane in which the proton ATPase is inserted. Since the transport performed by H+-ATPase is electrogenic, translocation of H+-ions across the membranes by the pump creates a lumen-positive voltage in the absence of a neutralizing current, generating an electrochemical potential gradient that limits the activity of H+-ATPase. In many intracellular organelles and cell plasma membranes, this potential difference established by the ATPase gradient is normally dissipated by a parallel and passive Cl- movement, which provides an electric shunt compensating for the positive charge transferred by the pump. The underlying mechanisms for the differences in the requirement for chloride by different tissues have not yet been adequately identified, and there is still some controversy as to the molecular identity of the associated Cl--conducting proteins. Several candidates have been identified: the ClC family members, which may or may not mediate nCl-/H+ exchange, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. In this review, we discuss some tissues where the association between H+-ATPase and chloride channels has been demonstrated and plays a relevant physiologic role.

  17. Physical activity and exercise in the regulation of human adipose tissue physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dylan; Karpe, Fredrik; Lafontan, Max; Frayn, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity and exercise are key components of energy expenditure and therefore of energy balance. Changes in energy balance alter fat mass. It is therefore reasonable to ask: What are the links between physical activity and adipose tissue function? There are many complexities. Physical activity is a multifaceted behavior of which exercise is just one component. Physical activity influences adipose tissue both acutely and in the longer term. A single bout of exercise stimulates adipose tissue blood flow and fat mobilization, resulting in delivery of fatty acids to skeletal muscles at a rate well-matched to metabolic requirements, except perhaps in vigorous intensity exercise. The stimuli include adrenergic and other circulating factors. There is a period following an exercise bout when fatty acids are directed away from adipose tissue to other tissues such as skeletal muscle, reducing dietary fat storage in adipose. With chronic exercise (training), there are changes in adipose tissue physiology, particularly an enhanced fat mobilization during acute exercise. It is difficult, however, to distinguish chronic "structural" changes from those associated with the last exercise bout. In addition, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of training per se and negative energy balance. Epidemiological observations support the idea that physically active people have relatively low fat mass, and intervention studies tend to show that exercise training reduces fat mass. A much-discussed effect of exercise versus calorie restriction in preferentially reducing visceral fat is not borne out by meta-analyses. We conclude that, in addition to the regulation of fat mass, physical activity may contribute to metabolic health through beneficial dynamic changes within adipose tissue in response to each activity bout.

  18. Calcium signaling and cell volume regulation are altered in Sjögren's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enger, Tone Berge; Aure, Marit Høyberg; Jensen, Janicke Liaaen; Galtung, Hilde Kanli

    2014-10-01

    Sjögren's Syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease, leading to deficient secretion from salivary and lacrimal glands. Saliva production is normally increased by cholinergic innervation, giving rise to intracellular calcium signaling and water transport through water channels (aquaporins, AQPs). The aim of this study was to investigate possible pathophysiological changes in cell volume regulation, AQP expression and localization, and intracellular calcium signaling in glandular cells from SS patients compared to controls. A total of 35 SS patients and 41 non-SS controls were included. Real time qPCR was combined with immunohistochemistry to analyze the mRNA expression and cellular distribution of AQP1, 3 and 5. Cell volume regulation and intracellular calcium signaling were examined in fresh acinar cells. We show for the first time a reduced mRNA expression of AQP1 and 5 in SS compared to controls, accompanied by a decrease in staining intensity of AQP1, 3 and 5 in areas adjacent to local lymphocytic infiltration. Furthermore, we observed that the SS cells' capacity for volume regulation was abnormal. Similarly, the calcium response after parasympathetic agonist (carbachol) stimulation was markedly decreased in SS cells. It is concluded that mRNA expression of AQP1 and 5, protein distribution of AQP1, 3 and 5, glandular cell volume regulation and intracellular calcium signaling are all altered in SS, pointing to possible pathophysiological mechanisms in SS.

  19. 7 CFR 930.52 - Establishment of districts subject to volume regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE TART CHERRIES GROWN IN THE STATES OF MICHIGAN, NEW YORK, PENNSYLVANIA, OREGON, UTAH, WASHINGTON... cherries over the prior 3 years has exceeded 6 million pounds. Handlers shall become subject to volume... handled cherries which were grown in a district subject to regulation as specified in paragraph (a)...

  20. Pancreas Volume and Fat Deposition in Diabetes and Normal Physiology: Consideration of the Interplay Between Endocrine and Exocrine Pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisho, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas is comprised of exocrine and endocrine components. Despite the fact that they are derived from a common origin in utero, these two compartments are often studied individually because of the different roles and functions of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas. Recent studies have shown that not only type 1 diabetes (T1D), but also type 2 diabetes (T2D), is characterized by a deficit in beta-cell mass, suggesting that pathological changes in the pancreas are critical events in the natural history of diabetes. In both patients with T1D and those with T2D, pancreas mass and exocrine function have been reported to be reduced. On the other hand, pancreas volume and pancreatic fat increase with obesity. Increased beta-cell mass with increasing obesity has also been observed in humans, and ectopic fat deposits in the pancreas have been reported to cause beta-cell dysfunction. Moreover, neogenesis and transdifferentiation from the exocrine to the endocrine compartment in the postnatal period are regarded as a source of newly formed beta-cells. These findings suggest that there is important interplay between the endocrine and exocrine pancreas throughout life. This review summarizes the current knowledge on physiological and pathological changes in the exocrine and endocrine pancreas (i.e., beta-cell mass), and discusses the potential mechanisms of the interplay between the two compartments in humans to understand the pathophysiology of diabetes better. PMID:28012279

  1. Volume regulation in rat pheochromocytoma cultured cells submitted to hypoosmotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpire, E; Cornet, M; Gilles, R

    1991-02-01

    The mechanisms at work in cell volume regulation have been studied in PC12 cultured cells. Results show, for the first time to our knowledge, that the volume readjustment process occurring after application of a hypoosmotic saline is sensitive to amiloride, IBMX and forskoline. The process is also inhibited by quinine hydrochloride and trifluoperazine. Volume readjustment is concomtant with a decrease in K+ and Cl- intracellular levels. The decrease in K+ level can be related to an assymetrical change in the fluxes in and out of the ion as shown by flux kinetics studies using Rb86. These results are interpreted considering that the control of the activity of the ion channel pathways associated with volume readjustment in PC12 cells may implicate the Ca(2+)-calmodulin - cAMP system.

  2. [Systematic analysis and metabolic regulation of physiological functions for lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Liming

    2012-01-01

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, medicine and other industries, and play a great role in industrial processes. However, lactic acid bacteria encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial processes and in the gastrointestinal tract, which impair their physiological functions and food manufacture efficiency. Recently, the development of metabolic engineering and system biology brings unprecedented opportunity for the physiological modification of lactic acid bacteria. In this review, we addresses the progress of lactic acid bacterium system biology, and based on this, the metabolic engineering strategies for manipulating and optimizing lactic acid bacteria physiological function were summarized.

  3. TGF-b superfamily cytokine MIC-1/GDF15 is a physiological appetite and body weight regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Wang-Wei Tsai

    Full Text Available The TGF-b superfamily cytokine MIC-1/GDF15 circulates in all humans and when overproduced in cancer leads to anorexia/cachexia, by direct action on brain feeding centres. In these studies we have examined the role of physiologically relevant levels of MIC-1/GDF15 in the regulation of appetite, body weight and basal metabolic rate. MIC-1/GDF15 gene knockout mice (MIC-1(-/- weighed more and had increased adiposity, which was associated with increased spontaneous food intake. Female MIC-1(-/- mice exhibited some additional alterations in reduced basal energy expenditure and physical activity, possibly owing to the associated decrease in total lean mass. Further, infusion of human recombinant MIC-1/GDF15 sufficient to raise serum levels in MIC-1(-/- mice to within the normal human range reduced body weight and food intake. Taken together, our findings suggest that MIC-1/GDF15 is involved in the physiological regulation of appetite and energy storage.

  4. Impaired migration and cell volume regulation in aquaporin 5-deficient SPC-A1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Ziqiang; Gu, Yutong; Bai, Chunxue

    2011-05-31

    Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is widely expressed in various organ and tissues. In light of the novel oncogenic properties of aquaporins (AQPs), here we investigated the effect of AQP5 knockdown by RNAi on transmembrane osmotic water permeability, cell migration potential and cell volume regulation ability. AQP5 expression was inhibited by short hairpin RNA in SPC-A1 cells, a lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Cells loaded with a fluoroprobe (calcein-AM) were immersed in either isosmotic, hyperosmotic or hyposmotic solutions, and fluorescence intensity was recorded using confocal microscopy. These measurements were used to calculate osmotic water permeability coefficients (Pf) and to monitor regulated volume decrease (RVD). Tumor cell migration and invasion assays were performed in a modified Boyden chamber. Wound healing and colony forming ability were also tested. Although self-quenching was not found in SPC-A1 cells, we observed a linear relationship between fluorescence intensity and cell water volume, suggesting that this method is a sensitive and reproducible way to measure single-cell transmembrane water permeability. Cells in which the AQP5 gene was silenced showed a 49.4% decrease in osmotic water permeability, a 55.3% decrease in migration and a 28.4% decrease in invasion potential. In addition, RVD decreased remarkably with reduced osmotic water permeability. Our results suggest that AQP5, which mediates water permeability and thus regulates cell shape and volume, is a potentially important determinant in cell migration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuropeptide Y regulation of LHRH release in the median eminence: immunocytochemical and physiological evidence in hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contijoch, A M; Malamed, S; McDonald, J K; Advis, J P

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that hypothalamic median eminence (ME) might be a control site for luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) release. Thus, stimulatory and/or inhibitory inputs acting at this site might be involved in regulating LHRH release from the ME and, therefore, luteinizing hormone (LH) release from the anterior pituitary. Since a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY) on LH release has been suggested, we have hypothesized that NPY might act in the ME to control preovulatory LHRH release in hens. To examine this possibility we have determined: (a) the immunocytochemical distribution of LHRH and NPY in the ME of the hen, (b) the basal and NPY-stimulated release of LHRH in vitro from the ME of hens undergoing a natural or a premature preovulatory surge of LH, and (c) the tissue content of LHRH and NPY in microdissected MEs, at various times before and during a natural or a premature preovulatory surge of LH. A potential role for NPY on LHRH release in the ME is suggested for the following reasons. (a) There are opportunities for synaptic interactions between NPY and LHRH-containing axons at this site. LHRH-containing cell bodies localized in the anterior hypothalamus/medial preoptic area project to the ME. NPY-containing perikarya, concentrated in the ventromedial aspect of the arcuate nucleus, might contact LHRH processes going to the ME and/or might themselves send axons to the ME, (b) Addition of NPY to the incubation media increases LHRH release from microdissected ME tissue of hens killed at the time of the natural preovulatory surge of LH, but not in hens killed 7 h before the occurrence of this surge. However, the stimulatory effect of NPY on LHRH release can be induced at this latter time when a premature LH surge is elicited. While the natural preovulatory surge of LH occurs 4 h before the second ovulation in a sequence (C2 ovulation), administration of progesterone (P4) 10-14 h before the expected natural C2 ovulation advances the natural LH surge by

  6. Method and Apparatus for Encouraging Physiological Self-Regulation Through Modulation of an Operator's Control Input to a Video Game or Training Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsson, Olafur S. (Inventor); Harris, Randall L., Sr. (Inventor); Pope, Alan T. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for modulating the control authority (i.e., control function) of a computer simulation or game input device (e.g., joystick, button control) using physiological information so as to affect the user's ability to impact or control the simulation or game with the input device. One aspect is to use the present invention, along with a computer simulation or game, to affect physiological state or physiological self-regulation according to some programmed criterion (e.g., increase, decrease, or maintain) in order to perform better at the game task. When the affected physiological state or physiological self-regulation is the target of self-regulation or biofeedback training, the simulation or game play reinforces therapeutic changes in the physiological signal(s).

  7. Real-time cardiac synchronization with fixed volume frame rate for reducing physiological instabilities in 3D FMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijssen, Rob H N; Okell, Thomas W; Miller, Karla L

    2011-08-15

    Although 2D echo-planar imaging (EPI) remains the dominant method for functional MRI (FMRI), 3D readouts are receiving more interest as these sequences have favorable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and enable imaging at a high isotropic resolution. Spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) and balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) are rapid sequences that are typically acquired with highly segmented 3D readouts, and thus less sensitive to image distortion and signal dropout. They therefore provide a powerful alternative for FMRI in areas with strong susceptibility offsets, such as deep gray matter structures and the brainstem. Unfortunately, the multi-shot nature of the readout makes these sequences highly sensitive to physiological fluctuations, and large signal instabilities are observed in the inferior regions of the brain. In this work a characterization of the source of these instabilities is given and a new method is presented to reduce the instabilities observed in 3D SPGR and bSSFP. Rapidly acquired single-slice data, which critically sampled the respiratory and cardiac waveforms, showed that cardiac pulsation is the dominant source of the instabilities. Simulations further showed that synchronizing the readout to the cardiac cycle minimizes the instabilities considerably. A real-time synchronization method was therefore developed, which utilizes parallel-imaging techniques to allow cardiac synchronization without alteration of the volume acquisition rate. The implemented method significantly improves the temporal stability in areas that are affected by cardiac-related signal fluctuations. In bSSFP data the tSNR in the brainstem increased by 45%, at the cost of a small reduction in tSNR in the cortical areas. In SPGR the temporal stability is improved by approximately 20% in the subcortical structures and as well as cortical gray matter when synchronization was performed.

  8. Infant negative reactivity defines the effects of parent-child synchrony on physiological and behavioral regulation of social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Maayan; Singer, Magi; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Feldman, Ruth

    2015-11-01

    How infants shape their own development has puzzled developmentalists for decades. Recent models suggest that infant dispositions, particularly negative reactivity and regulation, affect outcome by determining the extent of parental effects. Here, we used a microanalytic experimental approach and proposed that infants with varying levels of negative reactivity will be differentially impacted by parent-infant synchrony in predicting physiological and behavioral regulation of increasing social stress during an experimental paradigm. One hundred and twenty-two mother-infant dyads (4-6 months) were observed in the face-to-face still face (SF) paradigm and randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: SF with touch, standard SF, and SF with arms' restraint. Mother-infant synchrony and infant negative reactivity were observed at baseline, and three mechanisms of behavior regulation were microcoded; distress, disengagement, and social regulation. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia baseline, reactivity, and recovery were quantified. Structural equation modeling provided support for our hypothesis. For physiological regulation, infants high in negative reactivity receiving high mother-infant synchrony showed greater vagal withdrawal, which in turn predicted comparable levels of vagal recovery to that of nonreactive infants. In behavioral regulation, only infants low in negative reactivity who received high synchrony were able to regulate stress by employing social engagement cues during the SF phase. Distress was reduced only among calm infants to highly synchronous mothers, and disengagement was lowest among highly reactive infants experiencing high mother-infant synchrony. Findings chart two pathways by which synchrony may bolster regulation in infants of high and low reactivity. Among low reactive infants, synchrony builds a social repertoire for handling interpersonal stress, whereas in highly reactive infants, it constructs a platform for repeated reparation of

  9. Interleukin-1 inhibits osmotically-induced calcium signaling and volume regulation in articular chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Scott; Votta, Bartholomew J.; Kumar, Sanjay; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Articular chondrocytes respond to osmotic stress with transient changes in cell volume and the intracellular concentration of calcium ion ([Ca2+]i). The goal of this study was to examine the hypothesis that interleukin-1 (IL-1), a pro-inflammatory cytokine associated with osteoarthritis, influences osmotically-induced Ca2+ signaling. METHODS Fluorescence ratio imaging was used to measure [Ca2+]i and cell volume in response to hypo- or hyper-osmotic stress in isolated porcine chondrocytes, with or without pre-exposure to 10 ng/ml IL-1α. Inhibitors of IL-1 (IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-Ra), Ca2+ mobilization (thapsigargin, an inhibitor of Ca-ATPases), and cytoskeletal remodeling (Toxin B, an inhibitor of the Rho family of small GTPases) were used to determine the mechanisms involved in increased [Ca2+]i, F-actin remodeling, volume adaptation and active volume recovery. RESULTS In response to osmotic stress, chondrocytes exhibited transient increases in [Ca2+]i, generally followed by decaying oscillations. Pre-exposure to IL-1 significantly inhibited regulatory volume decrease following hypo-osmotic swelling and reduced the change in cell volume and the time to peak [Ca2+]i in response to hyper-osmotic stress, but did not affect the peak magnitudes of [Ca2+]i in those cells that did response. Co-treatment with IL-1Ra, thapsigargin, or Toxin B restored these responses to control levels. The effects were associated with alterations in F-actin organization. CONCLUSIONS IL-1 alters the normal volumetric and Ca2+ signaling response of chondrocytes to osmotic stress through mechanisms involving F-actin remodeling via small Rho GTPases. These findings provide further insights into the mechanisms by which IL-1 may interfere with normal physiologic processes in the chondrocyte, such as the adaptation or regulatory responses to mechanical and osmotic loading. PMID:18495501

  10. Cell Volume Regulation and Signaling in 3T3-L1 Pre-adipocytes and Adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eduardsen, Kathrine; Larsen, Susanne; Novak, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Caveolae have been implicated in sensing of cell volume perturbations, yet evidence is still limited and findings contradictory. Here, we investigated the possible role of caveolae in cell volume regulation and volume sensitive signaling in an adipocyte system with high (3T3-L1 adipocytes......) and osmotic cell shrinkage (RVI), accompanied by increased swelling-activated taurine efflux. However, caveolin-1 distribution was not detectably altered after osmotic swelling or shrinkage, and caveolae integrity, as studied by cholesterol depletion or expression of dominant negative Cav-1, was not required...... no detectable effect on InsR, yet increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In conclusion, differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes exhibit greatly accelerated RVD and RVI responses and increased swelling-activated taurine efflux compared to pre-adipocytes. Furthermore, in pre-adipocytes, Cav-1/caveolae integrity...

  11. Do Acartia tonsa (Dana) eggs regulate their volume and osmolality as salinity changes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni Winding; Drillet, Guillaume; Pedersen, Morten Foldager;

    2012-01-01

    Subitaneous eggs from an euryhaline calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa were challenged by changes in salinity within the range from full strength salinity, down to zero and up to >70 psu. Egg volume changed immediately, increasing from 2.8 × 105 μm3 at full strength salinity (35 psu) to 3.8 × 105 μm3...... at 0 psu and back to its initial volume when gradually being returned to full strength salinity. Egg osmolality followed the molality of the surrounding water when challenged within a salinity range from 2 to 50 psu. Egg respiration was not affected when eggs kept at 35 psu was exposed to low salinity...... (2 psu). These results suggest that eggs are unable to regulate their volume or osmolality when challenged with changes in salinity. Gradual changes in salinity from 35 to 2 psu and back did not harm the eggs (embryos), since the hatching success remained unaffected by such changes in salinity...

  12. Foundations of space biology and medicine. Volume 2, book 2: Ecological and physiological bases of space biology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, M. (Editor); Gazenko, O. G. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    The influence on living organisms of radiant energy, the psychophysical problems of space flight, methods of physiological investigations in flight, and the transmission of information are considered.

  13. The Akt-mTOR axis is a pivotal regulator of eccentric hypertrophy during volume overload

    OpenAIRE

    Masataka Ikeda; Tomomi Ide; Takeo Fujino; Yuka Matsuo; Shinobu Arai; Keita Saku; Takamori Kakino; Yasuhiro Oga; Akiko Nishizaki; Kenji Sunagawa

    2015-01-01

    The heart has two major modalities of hypertrophy in response to hemodynamic loads: concentric and eccentric hypertrophy caused by pressure and volume overload (VO), respectively. However, the molecular mechanism of eccentric hypertrophy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that the Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) axis is a pivotal regulator of eccentric hypertrophy during VO. While mTOR in the heart was activated in a left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP)-depende...

  14. Swelling-Activated Anion Channels Are Essential for Volume Regulation of Mouse Thymocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravshan Z. Sabirov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Channel-mediated trans-membrane chloride movement is a key process in the active cell volume regulation under osmotic stress in most cells. However, thymocytes were hypothesized to regulate their volume by activating a coupled K-Cl cotransport mechanism. Under the patch-clamp, we found that osmotic swelling activates two types of macroscopic anion conductance with different voltage-dependence and pharmacology. At the single-channel level, we identified two types of events: one corresponded to the maxi-anion channel, and the other one had characteristics of the volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR chloride channel of intermediate conductance. A VSOR inhibitor, phloretin, significantly suppressed both macroscopic VSOR-type conductance and single-channel activity of intermediate amplitude. The maxi-anion channel activity was largely suppressed by Gd3+ ions but not by phloretin. Surprisingly, [(dihydroindenyloxy] alkanoic acid (DIOA, a known antagonist of K-Cl cotransporter, was found to significantly suppress the activity of the VSOR-type single-channel events with no effect on the maxi-anion channels at 10 μM. The regulatory volume decrease (RVD phase of cellular response to hypotonicity was mildly suppressed by Gd3+ ions and was completely abolished by phloretin suggesting a major impact of the VSOR chloride channel and modulatory role of the maxi-anion channel. The inhibitory effect of DIOA was also strong, and, most likely, it occurred via blocking the VSOR Cl− channels.

  15. Impaired Cell Volume Regulation in Intestinal Crypt Epithelia of Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, M. A.; O'Brien, J. A.; Sepulveda, F. V.; Ratcliff, R. A.; Evans, M. J.; Colledge, W. H.

    1995-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a disease characterized by abnormalities in the epithelia of the lungs, intestine, salivary and sweat glands, liver, and reproductive systems, often as a result of inadequate hydration of their secretions. The primary defect in cystic fibrosis is the altered activity of a cAMP-activated Cl^- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. However, it is not clear how a defect in the CFTR Cl^- channel function leads to the observed pathological changes. Although much is known about the structural properties and regulation of the CFTR, little is known of its relationship to cellular functions other than the cAMP-dependent Cl^- secretion. Here we report that cell volume regulation after hypotonic challenge is also defective in intestinal crypt epithelial cells isolated from CFTR -/- mutant mice. Moreover, the impairment of the regulatory volume decrease in CFTR -/- crypts appears to be related to the inability of a K^+ conductance to provide a pathway for the exit of this cation during the volume adjustments. This provides evidence that the lack of CFTR protein may have additional consequences for the cellular function other than the abnormal cAMP-mediated Cl^- secretion.

  16. Aquaporin 2-increased renal cell proliferation is associated with cell volume regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giusto, Gisela; Flamenco, Pilar; Rivarola, Valeria; Fernández, Juan; Melamud, Luciana; Ford, Paula; Capurro, Claudia

    2012-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that in renal cortical collecting duct cells (RCCD(1)) the expression of the water channel Aquaporin 2 (AQP2) raises the rate of cell proliferation. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms involved in this process, focusing on the putative link between AQP2 expression, cell volume changes, and regulatory volume decrease activity (RVD). Two renal cell lines were used: WT-RCCD(1) (not expressing aquaporins) and AQP2-RCCD(1) (transfected with AQP2). Our results showed that when most RCCD(1) cells are in the G(1)-phase (unsynchronized), the blockage of barium-sensitive K(+) channels implicated in rapid RVD inhibits cell proliferation only in AQP2-RCCD(1) cells. Though cells in the S-phase (synchronized) had a remarkable increase in size, this enhancement was higher and was accompanied by a significant down-regulation in the rapid RVD response only in AQP2-RCCD(1) cells. This decrease in the RVD activity did not correlate with changes in AQP2 function or expression, demonstrating that AQP2-besides increasing water permeability-would play some other role. These observations together with evidence implying a cell-sizing mechanism that shortens the cell cycle of large cells, let us to propose that during nutrient uptake, in early G(1), volume tends to increase but it may be efficiently regulated by an AQP2-dependent mechanism, inducing the rapid activation of RVD channels. This mechanism would be down-regulated when volume needs to be increased in order to proceed into the S-phase. Therefore, during cell cycle, a coordinated modulation of the RVD activity may contribute to accelerate proliferation of cells expressing AQP2. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Emotion regulation in heavy smokers: experiential, expressive and physiological consequences of cognitive reappraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lingdan; Winkler, Markus H.; Wieser, Matthias J.; Andreatta, Marta; Li, Yonghui; Pauli, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation dysfunctions are assumed to contribute to the development of tobacco addiction and relapses among smokers attempting to quit. To further examine this hypothesis, the present study compared heavy smokers with non-smokers (NS) in a reappraisal task. Specifically, we investigated whether non-deprived smokers (NDS) and deprived smokers (DS) differ from non-smokers in cognitive emotion regulation and whether there is an association between the outcome of emotion regulation and the cigarette craving. Sixty-five participants (23 non-smokers, 22 NDS, and 20 DS) were instructed to down-regulate emotions by reappraising negative or positive pictorial scenarios. Self-ratings of valence, arousal, and cigarette craving as well as facial electromyography and electroencephalograph activities were measured. Ratings, facial electromyography, and electroencephalograph data indicated that both NDS and DS performed comparably to nonsmokers in regulating emotional responses via reappraisal, irrespective of the valence of pictorial stimuli. Interestingly, changes in cigarette craving were positively associated with regulation of emotional arousal irrespective of emotional valence. These results suggest that heavy smokers are capable to regulate emotion via deliberate reappraisal and smokers’ cigarette craving is associated with emotional arousal rather than emotional valence. This study provides preliminary support for the therapeutic use of reappraisal to replace maladaptive emotion-regulation strategies in nicotine addicts. PMID:26528213

  18. Physiological and clinical significance of enterochromaffin-like cell activation in the regulation of gastric acid secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanglin Cui; Helge L Waldum

    2007-01-01

    Gastric acid plays an important role in digesting food (especially protein), iron absorption, and destroying swallowed micro-organisms. H+ is secreted by the oxyntic parietal cells and its secretion is regulated by endocrine, neurocrine and paracrine mechanisms.Gastrin released from the antral G cell is the principal physiological stimulus of gastric acid secretion. Activation of the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell is accepted as the main source of histamine participating in the regulation of acid secretion and is functionally and trophically controlled by gastrin, which is mediated by gastrin/CCK-2 receptors expressed on the ECL cell. However, longterm hypergastrinemia will induce ECL cell hyperplasia and probably carcinoids. Clinically, potent inhibitors of acid secretion have been prescribed widely to patients with acid-related disorders. Long-term potent acid inhibition evokes a marked increase in plasma gastrin levels,leading to enlargement of oxyntic mucosa with ECL cell hyperplasia. Accordingly, the induction of ECL cell hyperplasia and carcinoids remains a topic of considerable concern, especially in long-term use. In addition, the activation of ECL cells also induces another clinical concern, i.e., rebound acid hypersecretion after acid inhibition. Recent experimental and clinical findings indicate that the activation of ECL cells plays a critical role both physiologically and clinically in the regulation of gastric acid secretion.

  19. Tissue-specific activities of an immune signaling module regulate physiological responses to pathogenic and nutritional bacteria in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Robert P; Kooistra, Tristan; Chu, Stephanie W; Pagano, Daniel J; Kim, Dennis H

    2009-10-22

    Microbes represent both an essential source of nutrition and a potential source of lethal infection to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Immunity in C. elegans requires a signaling module comprised of orthologs of the mammalian Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain protein SARM, the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) ASK1, and MAPKK MKK3, which activates p38 MAPK. We determined that the SARM-ASK1-MKK3 module has dual tissue-specific roles in the C. elegans response to pathogens--in the cell-autonomous regulation of innate immunity and the neuroendocrine regulation of serotonin-dependent aversive behavior. SARM-ASK1-MKK3 signaling in the sensory nervous system also regulates egg-laying behavior that is dependent on bacteria provided as a nutrient source. Our data demonstrate that these physiological responses to bacteria share a common mechanism of signaling through the SARM-ASK1-MKK3 module and suggest the co-option of ancestral immune signaling pathways in the evolution of physiological responses to microbial pathogens and nutrients.

  20. Cross-talk between heme oxygenase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in the regulation of physiological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndisang, Joseph Fomusi

    2014-06-01

    Peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptors (PPARs) are transcription factors belonging to the superfamily of nuclear receptors. The isoforms of PPAR include PPAR alpha, PPAR gamma and PPAR delta (also known as PPAR beta). Generally, PPARs potentiate insulin sensitivity, improve glucose/lipid metabolism, suppress inflammation/oxidative stress, attenuate excessive immune responses, regulate cell-growth and differentiation. Interestingly, agonists of PPAR gamma and PPAR alpha have been shown to upregulate the heme-oxygenase (HO)-system. Conversely, the HO-system also enhances PPAR alpha, and potentiates the expression and activity of PPAR gamma. Moreover, the HO-system and related products including bilirubin, biliverdin, carbon monoxide and ferritin have been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, improve glucose/lipid metabolism, suppress inflammation/oxidative stress, abate immune response, and modulate cell-growth/differentiation. Therefore, an intimate, reciprocal, stimulatory and synergistic relationship between PPAR-signaling and the HO-system can be envisaged in the regulation of physiological functions. Thus, both the HO-system and PPARs-signaling participate in fine-tuning similar physiological functions, so novel pharmacological agents capable of optimizing this interaction should be sought. The coordinated regulation of PPAR-signaling and the HO-system may constitute the basis for future drug design.

  1. Physiological and clinical studies of calcium-regulating hormones calcitonin and parathyroid hormone-related protein

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The present studies were performed to elucidate several physiological and clinical questions of calcitonin (CT) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) such as: a) Does age influence the basal and calcium-stimulated levels and circulating molecular forms of CT in healthy females? b) Are osteoporotic patients lacking circulating monomeric CT? c) How is salmon CT (sCT) absorbed and cleared during treatment of diseases? d) Is there any effect of acute physical activity ...

  2. Regulation and physiological roles of the calpain system in muscular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Calpains, a family of Ca2+-dependent cytosolic cysteine proteases, can modulate their substrates' structure and function through limited proteolytic activity. In the human genome, there are 15 calpain genes. The most-studied calpains, referred to as conventional calpains, are ubiquitous. While genetic studies in mice have improved our understanding about the conventional calpains' physiological functions, especially those essential for mammalian life as in embryogenesis, many reports have poi...

  3. Intracellular Ca2+ responses and cell volume regulation upon cholinergic and purinergic stimulation in an immortalized salivary cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aure, Marit H; Røed, Asbjørn; Galtung, Hilde Kanli

    2010-06-01

    The water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5) seems to play a key role in salivary fluid secretion and appears to be critical in the cell volume regulation of acinar cells. Recently, the cation channel transient potential vanilloid receptor 4 (TRPV4) was shown to be functionally connected to AQP5 and also to cell volume regulation in salivary glands. We used the Simian virus 40 (SV40) immortalized cell line SMG C10 from the rat submandibular salivary gland to investigate the effect of ATP and the neurotransmitter analogue carbachol on Ca(2+) signalling and cell volume regulation, as well as the involvement of TRPV4 in the responses. We used fura-2-AM imaging, cell volume measurements, and western blotting. Both carbachol and ATP increased the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+), but no volume changes could be measured. Inhibition of TRPV4 with ruthenium red impaired both ATP- and carbachol-stimulated Ca(2+) signals. Peak Ca(2+) signalling during hyposmotic exposure was significantly decreased following inhibition of TRPV4, while the cells' ability to volume regulate appeared to be unaffected. These results show that in the SMG C10 cells, simulation of nervous stimulation did not induce cell swelling, although the cells had intact volume regulatory mechanisms. Furthermore, even though Ca(2+) signals were not needed for this volume regulation, TRPV4 seems to play a role during ATP and carbachol stimulation.

  4. [Human physiology: kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  5. [Luminescent and physiological indices of triticale under the treatment of seeds with growth regulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmatskaia, O A; Karavaev, V A; Gunar, L É; Miakin'kov, A G

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the before-sowing treatment of triticale seeds with growth regulators epin and zircon resulted in the increase in the F742/F686 ratio of the stationary fluorescence intensities of the plant leaves at the wavelength bands, 742 and 686 nm, corresponding to the maxima in the leaf fluorescence spectrum. Triticale under the treatment of seeds with growth regulators showed higher chlorophyll content, higher productivity and higher indices of the crop yield.

  6. Physiology regulates the relationship between coccosphere geometry and growth phase in coccolithophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheward, Rosie M.; Poulton, Alex J.; Gibbs, Samantha J.; Daniels, Chris J.; Bown, Paul R.

    2017-03-01

    Coccolithophores are an abundant phytoplankton group that exhibit remarkable diversity in their biology, ecology and calcitic exoskeletons (coccospheres). Their extensive fossil record is a testament to their important biogeochemical role and is a valuable archive of biotic responses to environmental change stretching back over 200 million years. However, to realise the full potential of this archive for (palaeo-)biology and biogeochemistry requires an understanding of the physiological processes that underpin coccosphere architecture. Using culturing experiments on four modern coccolithophore species (Calcidiscus leptoporus, Calcidiscus quadriperforatus, Helicosphaera carteri and Coccolithus braarudii) from three long-lived families, we investigate how coccosphere architecture responds to shifts from exponential (rapid cell division) to stationary (slowed cell division) growth phases as cell physiology reacts to nutrient depletion. These experiments reveal statistical differences in coccosphere size and the number of coccoliths per cell between these two growth phases, specifically that cells in exponential-phase growth are typically smaller with fewer coccoliths, whereas cells experiencing growth-limiting nutrient depletion have larger coccosphere sizes and greater numbers of coccoliths per cell. Although the exact numbers are species-specific, these growth-phase shifts in coccosphere geometry demonstrate that the core physiological responses of cells to nutrient depletion result in increased coccosphere sizes and coccoliths per cell across four different coccolithophore families (Calcidiscaceae, Coccolithaceae, Isochrysidaceae and Helicosphaeraceae), a representative diversity of this phytoplankton group. Building on this, the direct comparison of coccosphere geometries in modern and fossil coccolithophores enables a proxy for growth phase to be developed that can be used to investigate growth responses to environmental change throughout their long evolutionary

  7. Identification of a physiological role for leptin in the regulation of ambulatory activity and wheel running in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Gregory J; Kaiyala, Karl J; Fisher, Jonathan D; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Schwartz, Michael W; Wisse, Brent E

    2011-02-01

    Mechanisms regulating spontaneous physical activity remain poorly characterized despite evidence of influential genetic and acquired factors. We evaluated ambulatory activity and wheel running in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and in wild-type mice rendered hypoleptinemic by fasting in both the presence and absence of subcutaneous leptin administration. In ob/ob mice, leptin treatment to plasma levels characteristic of wild-type mice acutely increased both ambulatory activity (by 4,000 ± 200 beam breaks/dark cycle, P Fasting potently increased ambulatory activity and wheel running in wild-type mice (AA: +25%, P fasting was more pronounced in ob/ob mice (AA: +400%, P fasting-induced increases of ambulatory activity and wheel running in both wild-type and ob/ob mice. Thus, plasma leptin is a physiological regulator of spontaneous physical activity, but the nature of leptin's effect on activity is dependent on food availability.

  8. Silicon Mitigates Salinity Stress by Regulating the Physiology, Antioxidant Enzyme Activities, and Protein Expression in Capsicum annuum 'Bugwang'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Abinaya; Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Muneer, Sowbiya; Ko, Chung Ho; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Silicon- (Si-) induced salinity stress resistance was demonstrated at physiological and proteomic levels in Capsicum annuum for the first time. Seedlings of C. annuum were hydroponically treated with NaCl (50 mM) with or without Si (1.8 mM) for 15 days. The results illustrated that saline conditions significantly reduced plant growth and biomass and photosynthetic parameters and increased the electrolyte leakage potential, lipid peroxidation, and hydrogen peroxide level. However, supplementation of Si allowed the plants to recover from salinity stress by improving their physiology and photosynthesis. During salinity stress, Si prevented oxidative damage by increasing the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Furthermore, Si supplementation recovered the nutrient imbalance that had occurred during salinity stress. Additionally, proteomic analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) revealed that Si treatment upregulated the accumulation of proteins involved in several metabolic processes, particularly those associated with nucleotide binding and transferase activity. Moreover, Si modulated the expression of vital proteins involved in ubiquitin-mediated nucleosome pathway and carbohydrate metabolism. Overall, the results illustrate that Si application induced resistance against salinity stress in C. annuum by regulating the physiology, antioxidant metabolism, and protein expression.

  9. Cell physiology regulation by hypoxia inducible factor-1: Targeting oxygen-related nanomachineries of hypoxic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandani, Morteza; Vandghanooni, Somayeh; Barar, Jaleh; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-06-01

    Any dysfunctionality in maintaining the oxygen homeostasis by mammalian cells may elicit hypoxia/anoxia, which results in inescapable oxidative stress and possible subsequent detrimental impacts on certain cells/tissues with high demands to oxygen molecules. The ischemic damage in turn can trigger initiation of a number of diseases including organs ischemia, metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, different types of malignancies, and alteration in wound healing process. Thus, full comprehension of molecular mechanism(s) and cellular physiology of the oxygen homeostasis is the cornerstone of the mammalian cells metabolism, energetic pathways and health and disease conditions. An imbalance in oxygen content within the cellular microenvironment activates a cascade of molecular events that are often compensated, otherwise pathologic condition occurs through a complexed network of biomolecules. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) plays a key transcriptional role in the adaptation of cell physiology in relation with the oxygen content within a cell. In this current study, we provide a comprehensive review on the molecular mechanisms of oxygen sensing and homeostasis and the impacts of HIF-1 in hypoxic/anoxic conditions. Moreover, different molecular and biochemical responses of the cells to the surrounding environment are discussed in details. Finally, modern technological approaches for targeting the hypoxia related proteins are articulated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Regulation of lipid deposition in farm animals: Parallels between agriculture and human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Werner G; Brandebourg, Terry D

    2016-06-01

    For many years, clinically oriented scientists and animal scientists have focused on lipid metabolism and fat deposition in various fat depots. While dealing with a common biology across species, the goals of biomedical and food animals lipid metabolism research differ in emphasis. In humans, mechanisms and regulation of fat synthesis, accumulation of fat in regional fat depots, lipid metabolism and dysmetabolism in adipose, liver and cardiac tissues have been investigated. Further, energy balance and weight control have also been extensively explored in humans. Finally, obesity and associated maladies including high cholesterol and atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, hypertension, metabolic syndrome and health outcomes have been widely studied. In food animals, the emphasis has been on regulation of fatty acid synthesis and lipid deposition in fat depots and deposition of intramuscular fat. For humans, understanding the regulation of energy balance and body weight and of prevention or treatment of obesity and associated maladies have been important clinical outcomes. In production of food animals lowering fat content in muscle foods while enhancing intramuscular fat (marbling) have been major targets. In this review, we summarize how our laboratories have addressed the goal of providing lean but yet tasty and juicy muscle food products to consumers. In addition, we here describe efforts in the development of a new porcine model to study regulation of fat metabolism and obesity. Commonalities and differences in regulation of lipid metabolism between humans, rodents and food animals are emphasized throughout this review.

  11. Neural plasticity in hypocretin neurons: the basis of hypocretinergic regulation of physiological and behavioral functions in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bing eGao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The neuronal system that resides in the perifornical and lateral hypothalamus (Pf/LH and synthesizes the neuropeptide hypocretin/orexin participates in critical brain functions across species from fish to human. The hypocretin system regulates neural activity responsible for daily functions (such as sleep/wake homeostasis, energy balance, appetite, etc and long-term behavioral changes (such as reward seeking and addiction, stress response, etc in animals. The most recent evidence suggests that the hypocretin system undergoes substantial plastic changes in response to both daily fluctuations (such as food intake and sleep-wake regulation and long-term changes (such as cocaine seeking in neuronal activity in the brain. The understanding of these changes in the hypocretin system is essential in addressing the role of the hypocretin system in normal physiological functions and pathological conditions in animals and humans. In this review, the evidence demonstrating that neural plasticity occurs in hypocretin-containing neurons in the Pf/LH will be presented and possible physiological behavioral, and mental health implications of these findings will be discussed.

  12. Sleep Regulation, Physiology and Development, Sleep Duration and Patterns, and Sleep Hygiene in Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool-Age Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathory, Eleanor; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2017-02-01

    Sleep problems are common, reported by a quarter of parents with children under the age of 5 years, and have been associated with poor behavior, worse school performance, and obesity, in addition to negative secondary effects on maternal and family well-being. Yet, it has been shown that pediatricians do not adequately address sleep in routine well-child visits, and underdiagnose sleep issues. Pediatricians receive little formal training in medical school or in residency regarding sleep medicine. An understanding of the physiology of sleep is critical to a pediatrician׳s ability to effectively and confidently counsel patients about sleep. The biological rhythm of sleep and waking is regulated through both circadian and homeostatic processes. Sleep also has an internal rhythmic organization, or sleep architecture, which includes sleep cycles of REM and NREM sleep. Arousal and sleep (REM and NREM) are active and complex neurophysiologic processes, involving both neural pathway activation and suppression. These physiologic processes change over the life course, especially in the first 5 years. Adequate sleep is often difficult to achieve, yet is considered very important to optimal daily function and behavior in children; thus, understanding optimal sleep duration and patterns is critical for pediatricians. There is little experimental evidence that guides sleep recommendations, rather normative data and expert recommendations. Effective counseling on child sleep must account for the child and parent factors (child temperament, parent-child interaction, and parental affect) and the environmental factors (cultural, geographic, and home environment, especially media exposure) that influence sleep. To promote health and to prevent and manage sleep problems, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that parents start promoting good sleep hygiene, with a sleep-promoting environment and a bedtime routine in infancy, and throughout childhood. Thus, counseling

  13. Evaluation of Low versus High Volume per Minute Displacement CO2 Methods of Euthanasia in the Induction and Duration of Panic-Associated Behavior and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra L. Hickman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Current recommendations for the use of CO 2 as a euthanasia agent for rats require the use of gradual fill protocols (such as 10% to 30% volume displacement per minute in order to render the animal insensible prior to exposure to levels of CO 2 that are associated with pain. However, exposing rats to CO 2 , concentrations as low as 7% CO 2 are reported to cause distress and 10%–20% CO 2 induces panic-associated behavior and physiology, but loss of consciousness does not occur until CO 2 concentrations are at least 40%. This suggests that the use of the currently recommended low flow volume per minute displacement rates create a situation where rats are exposed to concentrations of CO 2 that induce anxiety, panic, and distress for prolonged periods of time. This study first characterized the response of male rats exposed to normoxic 20% CO 2 for a prolonged period of time as compared to room air controls. It demonstrated that rats exposed to this experimental condition displayed clinical signs consistent with significantly increased panic-associated behavior and physiology during CO 2 exposure. When atmospheric air was then again delivered, there was a robust increase in respiration rate that coincided with rats moving to the air intake. The rats exposed to CO 2 also displayed behaviors consistent with increased anxiety in the behavioral testing that followed the exposure. Next, this study assessed the behavioral and physiologic responses of rats that were euthanized with 100% CO 2 infused at 10%, 30%, or 100% volume per minute displacement rates. Analysis of the concentrations of CO 2 and oxygen in the euthanasia chamber and the behavioral responses of the rats suggest that the use of the very low flow volume per minute displacement rate (10% may prolong the duration of panicogenic ranges of ambient CO 2 , while the use of the higher flow volume per minute displacement rate (100% increases agitation. Therefore, of the volume displacement per

  14. The Physiological Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Supply and Oxidation During Moderate-Intensity Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    involved in the regulation of the active muscle NEFA uptake include (1) increased energy demand; (2) delivery of NEFA to the muscle; (3) transport of NEFA into the muscle by NEFA transporters; and (4) activation of the NEFAs and either oxidation or re-esterification into IMTAG. The increased metabolic...

  15. The relation between emotion regulation strategies and physiological stress responses in middle childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, D.M.J. de; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.; Weerth, C. de

    2012-01-01

    The current study sought to examine whether children's spontaneous use of the emotion regulation strategies suppression and reappraisal during a psychosocial stress task was related to their cortisol and alpha-amylase responses to that task. Salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase responses to a

  16. Ccr5 deficiency regulates the proliferation and trafficking of natural killer cells under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ido D; Shoham, Hadas; Wald, Ori; Wald, Hanna; Beider, Katia; Abraham, Michal; Barashi, Neta; Galun, Eithan; Nagler, Arnon; Peled, Amnon

    2011-06-01

    Chemokines were shown to govern the trafficking of immune cells and may also play important roles in the survival and activation of these cells. We report here that under physiological conditions, the bone marrow (BM), spleen, blood and liver of Ccr5, but not of Ccr1-deficient mice, contain reduced numbers of NK cells. NK cells in the BM of Ccr5-deficient mice proliferate to a lesser extent compared to WT mice. Furthermore, spleen NK cells derived from Ccr5-deficient mice that were transplanted into irradiated recipients failed to proliferate in the host. Ccr5, but not Ccr1-deficient NK cells, failed to migrate in vitro in response to RANTES and MIP-1β but not MIP-1β or SDF-1 and had reduced activation, lower expression levels of NK cell markers and a slightly reduced capacity to adhere to target cells and stimulate their killing. Using the polyI:C mouse model for NK trafficking, we found that in the absence of Ccr5, but not Ccr1, NK cells failed to accumulate in the liver. In contrast, using the influenza viral infection as a model to evaluate NK cell proliferation, we found that Ccr5-deficient NK cells in the BM had a higher proliferation rate than WT NK cells. These results suggest a role for Ccr5 in NK cell proliferation and circulation under physiological conditions and a complex role for Ccr5 in determining the fate of NK cells under pathological conditions. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. [Effect of plant growth regulators on physiological activity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, N O; Tytova, L V; Tantsiurenko, O V; Antypchuk, A F

    2005-01-01

    Influence of plant growth regulators Ivin, Emistim C, Eney and Agrostimulin on the biomass production and exopolymers synthesis of soybean nodule bacteria, which have contrasting symbiotic properties, and glutamine synthetase activity of their cell-free extracts were studied. It was shown that the processes of the biomass and exopolymers accumulation had an opposite direction. Of all preparations only Ivin and Agrostimulin intensificol growth activity of the microorganisms under study. The level of glutamine synthetase activity and this enzymatic reaction specificity to the bivalent metal ions were determined by the special features of Bradyrhizobium strains and nature of the plant growth regulators. Only in the presence of Eney the increase of glutamine synthetase activity of both cultures of Bradyrhizobium japonicum was established.

  18. PHYSIOLOGY AND GENETIC ASPECTS OF THE REGULATION OF EXPRESSION MILK PROTEIN GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Bulla

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For the genetic improvement of milk composition and milk yield, both the typing of different protein variants and knowledge about the regulation of expression of the different milk protein genes are important. Some of the processing properties of milk are dependent on the milk composition. Information about the DNA sequence and genes involved in the expression of the milk protein genes,therefore,is big importance for genetic improvement of these traits in animals breeding programmes.In recent years more data has become available concerning the regulation of expression of the milk protein genes and as might have been expected from the complex multihormonal control of these genes it appears to be rather complex. Although several mammary gland specific factors that play a role in expression of some of these genes have been identified,none of these factors has been shown to be involved in the expression of all or the majority of the milk protein genes.

  19. Regulation of amniotic fluid volume: mathematical model based on intramembranous transport mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Robert A; Anderson, Debra F; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2014-11-15

    Experimentation in late-gestation fetal sheep has suggested that regulation of amniotic fluid (AF) volume occurs primarily by modulating the rate of intramembranous transport of water and solutes across the amnion into underlying fetal blood vessels. In order to gain insight into intramembranous transport mechanisms, we developed a computer model that allows simulation of experimentally measured changes in AF volume and composition over time. The model included fetal urine excretion and lung liquid secretion as inflows into the amniotic compartment plus fetal swallowing and intramembranous absorption as outflows. By using experimental flows and solute concentrations for urine, lung liquid, and swallowed fluid in combination with the passive and active transport mechanisms of the intramembranous pathway, we simulated AF responses to basal conditions, intra-amniotic fluid infusions, fetal intravascular infusions, urine replacement, and tracheoesophageal occlusion. The experimental data are consistent with four intramembranous transport mechanisms acting in concert: 1) an active unidirectional bulk transport of AF with all dissolved solutes out of AF into fetal blood presumably by vesicles; 2) passive bidirectional diffusion of solutes, such as sodium and chloride, between fetal blood and AF; 3) passive bidirectional water movement between AF and fetal blood; and 4) unidirectional transport of lactate into the AF. Further, only unidirectional bulk transport is dynamically regulated. The simulations also identified areas for future study: 1) identifying intramembranous stimulators and inhibitors, 2) determining the semipermeability characteristics of the intramembranous pathway, and 3) characterizing the vesicles that are the primary mediators of intramembranous transport.

  20. Hemorrhagic shock impairs myocardial cell volume regulation and membrane integrity in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, J.W.

    1987-06-01

    An in vitro myocardial slice technique was used to quantitate alterations in cell volume regulation and membrane integrity after 2 h or hemorrhagic shock. After in vitro incubation in Krebs-Ringer-phosphate medium containing trace (/sup 14/C)inulin, values (ml H/sub 2/O/g dry wt) for control nonshocked myocardial slices were 4.03 /plus minus/ 0.11 (SE) for total water, 2.16 /plus minus/ 0.07 for inulin impermeable space, and 1.76 /plus minus/ 0.15 for inulin diffusible space. Shocked myocardial slices showed impaired response to cold incubation. After 2 h of in vivo shock, total tissue water, inulin diffusible space, and inulin impermeable space increased significantly for subendocardium, whereas changes in subepicardium parameters were minimal. Shock-induced cellular swelling was accompanied by an increased total tissue sodium, but no change in tissue potassium. Calcium entry blockade in vivo significantly reduced subendocardial total tissue water as compared with shock-untreated dogs. In addition, calcium entry blockade reduced shock-induced increases in inulin diffusible space. In vitro myocardial slice studies confirm alterations in subendocardial membrane integrity after 2 h of in vivo hemorrhagic shock. Shock-induced abnormalities in myocardial cell volume regulation are reduced by calcium entry blockade in vivo.

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF POLYMERIC GROWTH REGULATORS ON MORPHOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF RICE IN SALINE CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tretyakova O. I.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the influence of polymeric in the form of formers and growth regulators on the growth and development of rice plants when grown in saline conditions. We controlled the effect of salinity on grows regulators and vigor, seed germination, root and shoot weight, the content of photosynthetic pigments parameters, induction curves of delayed fluorescence, the indicators of structure of harvest, grain yield. It was found, that pre-sowing seed soaking in solutions of polymer grows regulators has a stimulating effect on the growth and development of rice plants in the early stages: we significantly increased germination and emergence, dry weight of root and shoot compared to control. At different stages of ontogeny rice, the absolute content of pigments in the leaves and the relationship between the individual variants change. The absolute content of pigments in leaves and their relationship between experiences at different stages of ontogeny change. In the period of intensive vegetative growth from seedling stage the content of total chlorophyll is maximum, and by the end of the growing season it decreases. It can be assumed that the salinity of the substrate significantly reduces the productivity of photosynthesis in young plants, possibly due to imbalance of ions in the cell, the older it gets – the weaker the phenomenon is and even becomes reversed. The second maximum IR ZF increases during the growing season from germination to flowering, then decreases to the beginning of ripening in all embodiments. The same dynamics is characteristic of the magnitude of the proton gradient in the membranes of chloroplasts tylakoids. Salt protection effect of growth regulators on grain yield is significant on both backgrounds of mineral nutrition

  2. The complex contribution of NOS interneurons in the physiology of cerebrovascular regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eDuchemin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Following the discovery of the vasorelaxant properties of nitric oxide (NO by Furchgott and Ignarro, the finding by Bredt and coll. of a constitutively expressed NO synthase in neurons (nNOS led to the presumption that neuronal NO may control cerebrovascular functions. Consequently, numerous studies have sought to determine whether neuraly-derived NO is involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow. Anatomically, axons, dendrites or somata of NO neurons have been found to contact the basement membrane of blood vessels or perivascular astrocytes in all segments of the cortical microcirculation. Functionally, various experimental approaches support a role of neuronal NO in the maintenance of resting cerebral blood flow as well as in the vascular response to neuronal activity. Since decades, it has been assumed that neuronal NO simply diffuses to the local blood vessels and produce vasodilation through a cGMP-PKG dependent mechanism. However, NO is not the sole mediator of vasodilation in the cerebral microcirculation and is known to interact with a myriad of signaling pathways also involved in vascular control. In addition, cerebrovascular regulation is the result of a complex orchestration between all components of the neurovascular unit (i.e. neuronal, glial and vascular cells also known to produce NO. In this review article, the role of NO interneuron in the regulation of cortical microcirculation will be discussed in the context of the neurovascular unit.

  3. Mechanism of regulation of 'chromosome kissing' induced by Fob1 and its physiological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Malay; Zaman, Shamsu; Jiang, James C; Jazwinski, S Michal; Bastia, Deepak

    2015-06-01

    Protein-mediated "chromosome kissing" between two DNA sites in trans (or in cis) is known to facilitate three-dimensional control of gene expression and DNA replication. However, the mechanisms of regulation of the long-range interactions are unknown. Here, we show that the replication terminator protein Fob1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae promoted chromosome kissing that initiated rDNA recombination and controlled the replicative life span (RLS). Oligomerization of Fob1 caused synaptic (kissing) interactions between pairs of terminator (Ter) sites that initiated recombination in rDNA. Fob1 oligomerization and Ter-Ter kissing were regulated by intramolecular inhibitory interactions between the C-terminal domain (C-Fob1) and the N-terminal domain (N-Fob1). Phosphomimetic substitutions of specific residues of C-Fob1 counteracted the inhibitory interaction. A mutation in either N-Fob1 that blocked Fob1 oligomerization or C-Fob1 that blocked its phosphorylation antagonized chromosome kissing and recombination and enhanced the RLS. The results provide novel insights into a mechanism of regulation of Fob1-mediated chromosome kissing. © 2015 Choudhury et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Mechanism of regulation of ‘chromosome kissing’ induced by Fob1 and its physiological significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Malay; Zaman, Shamsu; Jiang, James C.; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2015-01-01

    Protein-mediated “chromosome kissing” between two DNA sites in trans (or in cis) is known to facilitate three-dimensional control of gene expression and DNA replication. However, the mechanisms of regulation of the long-range interactions are unknown. Here, we show that the replication terminator protein Fob1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae promoted chromosome kissing that initiated rDNA recombination and controlled the replicative life span (RLS). Oligomerization of Fob1 caused synaptic (kissing) interactions between pairs of terminator (Ter) sites that initiated recombination in rDNA. Fob1 oligomerization and Ter–Ter kissing were regulated by intramolecular inhibitory interactions between the C-terminal domain (C-Fob1) and the N-terminal domain (N-Fob1). Phosphomimetic substitutions of specific residues of C-Fob1 counteracted the inhibitory interaction. A mutation in either N-Fob1 that blocked Fob1 oligomerization or C-Fob1 that blocked its phosphorylation antagonized chromosome kissing and recombination and enhanced the RLS. The results provide novel insights into a mechanism of regulation of Fob1-mediated chromosome kissing. PMID:26063576

  5. The Endocrine Regulation of Stem Cells: Physiological Importance and Pharmacological Potentials for Cell-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Ahmad; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat

    2016-01-01

    Throughout life, different types of stem cells participate in tissue generation, maintenance, plasticity, and repair. Their abilities to secrete growth factors, to proliferate and differentiate into several cell lineages, and to migrate and home into the damaged tissues have made them attractive candidates for cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. Normal stem cell function is tied to the cell-intrinsic mechanisms and extrinsic signals derived from the surrounding microenvironment or circulation. Understanding the regulatory signals that govern stem cell functions is essential in order to have full knowledge about organogenesis, tissue maintenance and tissue plasticity in the physiological condition. It is also important for optimizing tissue engineering and improving the therapeutic efficiency of stem cells in regenerative medicine. A growing body of evidence indicates that hormonal signals can critically influence stem cell functions in fetal, postnatal, and adult tissues. This review focuses on recent studies revealing how growth hormone, insulin, thyroid hormone, parathormone, adrenocorticotropin, glucocorticoids, erythropoietin, and gastrointestinal hormones control stem cell behavior through influencing survival, proliferation, migration, homing, and differentiation of these cells. Moreover, how environmental factors such as exercise, hypoxia, and nutrition might affect stem cell functions through influencing the endocrine system is discussed. Some of the current limitations of cell therapy and how hormones can help overcoming these limitations are briefly outlined.

  6. Cell volume regulation in cultured human retinal Muller cells is associated with changes in transmembrane potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Fernández

    Full Text Available Müller cells are mainly involved in controlling extracellular homeostasis in the retina, where intense neural activity alters ion concentrations and osmotic gradients, thus favoring cell swelling. This increase in cell volume is followed by a regulatory volume decrease response (RVD, which is known to be partially mediated by the activation of K(+ and anion channels. However, the precise mechanisms underlying osmotic swelling and subsequent cell volume regulation in Müller cells have been evaluated by only a few studies. Although the activation of ion channels during the RVD response may alter transmembrane potential (Vm, no studies have actually addressed this issue in Müller cells. The aim of the present work is to evaluate RVD using a retinal Müller cell line (MIO-M1 under different extracellular ionic conditions, and to study a possible association between RVD and changes in Vm. Cell volume and Vm changes were evaluated using fluorescent probe techniques and a mathematical model. Results show that cell swelling and subsequent RVD were accompanied by Vm depolarization followed by repolarization. This response depended on the composition of extracellular media. Cells exposed to a hypoosmotic solution with reduced ionic strength underwent maximum RVD and had a larger repolarization. Both of these responses were reduced by K(+ or Cl(- channel blockers. In contrast, cells facing a hypoosmotic solution with the same ionic strength as the isoosmotic solution showed a lower RVD and a smaller repolarization and were not affected by blockers. Together, experimental and simulated data led us to propose that the efficiency of the RVD process in Müller glia depends not only on the activation of ion channels, but is also strongly modulated by concurrent changes in the membrane potential. The relationship between ionic fluxes, changes in ion permeabilities and ion concentrations -all leading to changes in Vm- define the success of RVD.

  7. Effect of radiologic contrast media on cell volume regulation in rabbit proximal renal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtung, H K; Løken, M; Sakariassen, K S

    2001-05-01

    Most radiographic contrast media are hyperosmotic and able to shrink cells with which they are in contact. The authors studied cell volume control in rabbit proximal renal tubules after incubation with three contrast media: iohexol, ioxaglate, and iodixanol. Proximal renal tubules were isolated from rabbit kidneys. The tubules were exposed to Ringer solutions containing 5% vol/vol iohexol (final osmolality, 330 mOsm), ioxaglate (323 mOsm), iodixanol (305 mOsm), or mannitol (control solutions with identical osmolalities), and tubule volumes were monitored. After 2 hours of incubation, the tubules were stimulated with a hyposmotic Ringer solution (165 mOsm). Three groups of 10 experiments were performed. All solutions induced cell shrinkage (8.3%+/-3.8 [standard error] to 15.4%+/-0.5), which was completely or partly reversible in most experiments (volume increase, 44.8%+/-14.7 to 149.9%+/-107.3) but not those with iohexol and iodixanol. With exposure to the hyposmotic solution, the cells swelled by 11.0%+/-1.8 to 39.7%+/-4.8. In general, the tubules that had been exposed to the most hyperosmotic solution swelled the most. Those exposed to contrast media showed less swelling than the mannitol-exposed controls. In all control experiments, the cells exhibited a gradual shrinkage (43.6%+/-28.5 to 87.0%+/-13). This regulatory response was partly inhibited in tubules exposed to iohexol (39.9%+/-15.8 shrinkage) or iodixanol (8.9%+/-15.8) and completely inhibited in those exposed to ioxaglate. Iohexol and ioxaglate exposure also led to a decrease in water permeability. Exposure to hyperosmotic contrast medium tends to induce prolonged cell shrinkage, decrease the water permeability of the cellular plasma membranes, and compromise the ability to regulate cellular volume. These changes seem to reflect both the hyperosmolality of the solutions and their inherent chemical properties.

  8. Physiological function, expression pattern, and transcriptional regulation of a Caenorhabditis elegans insulin-like peptide, INS-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Yohei; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Mitani, Shohei; Iwasaki, Takashi; Kawano, Tsuyoshi

    2012-07-06

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signaling (IIS) is an important pathway that controls larval diapause and adult lifespan. The IIS pathway is modulated by many insulin-like peptides (ILPs) through the DAF-2 receptor, the sole insulin/IGF-1 receptor-like protein in C. elegans. We previously identified the ILP, INS-18, and predicted its tertiary structure to be similar to the crystal structures of human insulin and IGF-1. In this study, the physiological function of INS-18 was first examined by gene disruption and overexpression, and we identified INS-18 as a DAF-2 antagonist required for larval diapause and longevity. Analysis of the INS-18 expression pattern using a reporter gene showed it to be expressed in nerve cells, including hermaphrodite-specific neurons (HSNs) at the adult stage. Other ILP expressions have not been previously observed in HSNs, and we believe that INS-18 expression in these cells may contribute to longevity by regulating reproduction. Loss of the DAF-16 transcription factor located downstream of the IIS pathway completely blocked ins-18 expression. We propose a positive feedback model for the regulation of ins-18 expression in which an antagonist binding to the DAF-2 receptor increases ins-18 gene expression, thus leading to increased INS-18 protein levels and increased DAF-2 receptor binding. Thus, this study provides a new insight into the hormonal regulation of insulin, an important and widespread process in the animal kingdom.

  9. Astrocyte-like glial cells physiologically regulate olfactory processing through the modification of ORN-PN synaptic strength in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Zhou, Bangyu; Yan, Wenjun; Lei, Zhengchang; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Ke; Guo, Aike

    2014-09-01

    Astrocyte-like glial cells are abundant in the central nervous system of adult Drosophila and exhibit morphology similar to astrocytes of mammals. Previous evidence has shown that astrocyte-like glial cells are strongly associated with synapses in the antennal lobe (AL), the first relay of the olfactory system, where olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) transmit information into projection neurons (PNs). However, the function of astrocyte-like glia in the AL remains obscure. In this study, using in vivo calcium imaging, we found that astrocyte-like glial cells exhibited spontaneous microdomain calcium elevations. Using simultaneous manipulation of glial activity and monitoring of neuronal function, we found that the astrocyte-like glial activation, but not ensheathing glial activation, could inhibit odor-evoked responses of PNs. Ensheathing glial cells are another subtype of glia, and are of functional importance in the AL. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that astrocyte-like glial activation decreased the amplitude and slope of excitatory postsynaptic potentials evoked through electrical stimulation of the antennal nerve. These results suggest that astrocyte-like glial cells may regulate olfactory processing through negative regulation of ORN-PN synaptic strength. Beyond the antennal lobe we observed astrocyte-like glial spontaneous calcium activities in the ventromedial protocerebrum, indicating that astrocyte-like glial spontaneous calcium elevations might be general in the adult fly brain. Overall, our study demonstrates a new function for astrocyte-like glial cells in the physiological modulation of olfactory information transmission, possibly through regulating ORN-PN synapse strength.

  10. Atlas based brain volumetry: How to distinguish regional volume changes due to biological or physiological effects from inherent noise of the methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opfer, Roland; Suppa, Per; Kepp, Timo; Spies, Lothar; Schippling, Sven; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Fully-automated regional brain volumetry based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in quantitative neuroimaging. In clinical trials as well as in clinical routine multiple MRIs of individual patients at different time points need to be assessed longitudinally. Measures of inter- and intrascanner variability are crucial to understand the intrinsic variability of the method and to distinguish volume changes due to biological or physiological effects from inherent noise of the methodology. To measure regional brain volumes an atlas based volumetry (ABV) approach was deployed using a highly elastic registration framework and an anatomical atlas in a well-defined template space. We assessed inter- and intrascanner variability of the method in 51 cognitively normal subjects and 27 Alzheimer dementia (AD) patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative by studying volumetric results of repeated scans for 17 compartments and brain regions. Median percentage volume differences of scan-rescans from the same scanner ranged from 0.24% (whole brain parenchyma in healthy subjects) to 1.73% (occipital lobe white matter in AD), with generally higher differences in AD patients as compared to normal subjects (e.g., 1.01% vs. 0.78% for the hippocampus). Minimum percentage volume differences detectable with an error probability of 5% were in the one-digit percentage range for almost all structures investigated, with most of them being below 5%. Intrascanner variability was independent of magnetic field strength. The median interscanner variability was up to ten times higher than the intrascanner variability.

  11. Carbenoxolone inhibits volume-regulated anion conductance in cultured rat cortical astroglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfenati, Valentina; Caprini, Marco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Rossi, Andrea; Dovizio, Melania; Cervetto, Chiara; Nobile, Mario; Ferroni, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicate that the gap-junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) regulates neuronal synchronization, depresses epileptiform activity and has a neuroprotective action. These CBX effects do not depend solely on its ability to inhibit gap junction channels formed by connexins (Cx), but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we addressed the questions whether CBX modulates volume-regulated anion channels (VRAC) involved in the regulatory volume decrease and regulates the associated release of excitatory amino acids in cultured rat cortical astrocytes. We found that CBX inhibits VRAC conductance with potency comparable to that able to depress the activity of the most abundant astroglial gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43). However, the knock down of Cx43 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligonucleotides and the use of various pharmacological tools revealed that VRAC inhibition was not mediated by interaction of CBX with astroglial Cx proteins. Comparative experiments in HEK293 cells stably expressing another putative target of CBX, the purinergic ionotropic receptor P2X7, indicate that the presence of this receptor was not necessary for CBX-mediated depression of VRAC. Finally, we show that in COS-7 cells, which are not endowed with pannexin-1 protein, another astroglial plasma membrane interactor of CBX, VRAC current retained its sensitivity to CBX. Complementary analyses indicate that the VRAC-mediated release of excitatory amino acid aspartate was decreased by CBX. Collectively, these findings support the notion that CBX could affect astroglial ability to modulate neuronal activity by suppressing excitatory amino acid release through VRAC, thereby providing a possible mechanistic clue for the neuroprotective effect of CBX in vivo.

  12. The endoparasitoid, Cotesia vestalis, regulates host physiology by reprogramming the neuropeptide transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Min; Dong, Shuai; Li, Ming-tian; Yang, Yan-yan; Stanley, David; Chen, Xue-xin

    2015-02-02

    Endoparasitoids develop inside another insect by regulating host immunity and development via maternal factors injected into hosts during oviposition. Prior results have provided insights into parasitism-induced immunosuppression, including the neuropeptide accumulation in parasitized insects. Nonetheless, our understanding of neuropeptide influence on host development and behavior is not yet complete. We posed the hypothesis that parasitization alters expression of genes encoding pro-neuropeptides and used larvae of Plutella xylostella and its endoparasitoid, Cotesia vestalis to test our hypothesis. We prepared transcriptomes from the larval P. xylostella brain-CC-CA complex and identified transcripts encoding 19 neuropeptides. All corresponding cDNAs were confirmed by RACE. Our results demonstrate that parasitism significantly down-regulated, or delayed, expression of genes encoding pro-neuropeptides within 48 h post-parasitization. Changing expression of these genes may account for the previously reported decreased feeding behavior, reduced growth rates and aborted development in the host larvae. In effect, parasitization may operate at the molecular level within the CNS to create global changes in larval host biology. The significance of our finding is that, in addition to the known effects on immunity, parasitoids influence host pro-neuropeptide gene transcription. This finding reveals a new mechanism operating in host-parasitoid relationships to the advantage of the parasitoid.

  13. PHYSIOLOGICAL REGULATION OF PROTEASE AND ANTIBIOTICS IN PENICILLIUM SP. USING SUBMERGED AND SOLID STATE FERMENTATION TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAIDER M. HAMZAH

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A fungal strain belonging to the genus Penicillium was isolated from soil sample and has been diagnosed as Penicillium sp. according to its morphological characteristics of the colonies on solid media and also microscopical examination of the fungal parts. Antibiotics, protease activity and pH values were determined after cultivation of the fungus using submerged fermentation (SF and solid state fermentation (SSF. The two different patterns of fermentation processes seem to influence the physiological behavior of the fungus differently. Experiments were made using nutrient broth medium (N.B for SF and wheat bran in SSF. The pH values were adjacent to 5.5. Wheat bran was enriched with fish scales and egg shale in a ratio of (1:2:0.005 w/w and the mixture was moistened by adding (30 ml whey solution. After 7 days of incubation, the pH value of SF was increased to 8.0 at 30ºC. The SF was appeared efficient for antibiotics production. Using well diffusion technique the extracted antibiotics solution was active against some pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, Proteus sp., Salmonella sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus sp. In SSF relative proteases concentrations were found to be highly reactive than SF. This was proved by the appearance of the zone (20 mm and 32 mm due to the hydrolysis of milk and blood proteins respectively using pH 5.5 at 30ºC for 24 hrs. The activity of proteases was (10.4 U/ml.

  14. Physiological Basis of Photosynthetic Function and Senescence of Rice Leaves as Regulated by Controlled-Release Nitrogen Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Jun; ZHENG Sheng-xian; DAI Pin-gan; XIAO Jian; YI Guo-ying

    2005-01-01

    The physiological mechanism of photosynthetic function and senescence of rice leaves was studied by using early rice variety Baliangyou 100 and late rice variety Weiyou 46, treated with controlled-release nitrogen fertilizer (CRNF), urea and no nitrogen fertilizer. CRNF showed obvious effects on delaying the senescence and prolonging photosynthetic function duration of rice leaves. Compared with urea, CRNF could significantly increase the chlorophyll content of functional leaves in both early and late rice varieties, and this difference between the treatments became larger as rice growth progressed; CRNF increased the activities of active oxygen scavenging enzymes super oxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD), and decreased the accumulation amount of malondialdehyde (MDA) in functional leaves during leaf aging; Photosynthetic rate of functional leaves in CRNF treatment was significantly higher than that in urea treatment. The result also indicated that CRNF could effectively regulate the contents of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) in functional leaves; IAA content was higher and ABA content was lower in CRNF treatment than those in urea treatment. Therefore, application of CRNF could increase the rice yield significantly due to these physiological changes in the functional leaves.

  15. Physiological Mechanisms Only Tell Half Story: Multiple Biological Processes are involved in Regulating Freezing Tolerance of Imbibed Lactuca sativa Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganathan, Ganesh K; Han, Yingying; Li, Weijie; Song, Danping; Song, Xiaoyan; Shen, Mengqi; Zhou, Qiang; Zhang, Chenxue; Liu, Baolin

    2017-03-13

    The physiological mechanisms by which imbibed seeds survive freezing temperatures in their natural environment have been categorized as freezing avoidance by supercooling and freezing tolerance by extracellular freeze-desiccation, but the biochemical and molecular mechanisms conferring seed freezing tolerance is unexplored. In this study, using imbibed Lactuca sativa seeds we show that fast cooled seeds (60 °C h(-1)) suffered significantly higher membrane damage at temperature between -20 °C and -10 °C than slow cooled (3 °Ch(-1)) seeds (P  0.05). However, both SOD activity and accumulation of free proline were induced significantly after slow cooling to -20 °C compared with fast cooling. RNA-seq demonstrated that multiple pathways were differentially regulated between slow and fast cooling. Real-time verification of some differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that fast cooling caused mRNA level changes of plant hormone and ubiquitionation pathways at higher sub-zero temperature, whilst slow cooling caused mRNA level change of those pathways at lower sub-zero ttemperatures. Thus, we conclude that imbibed seed tolerate low temperature not only by physiological mechanisms but also by biochemical and molecular changes.

  16. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl- ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate...... permeability for Cl- ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl- ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl- transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl- lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions—high membrane conductance...... muscle excitability. Data from ClC-1 expression systems suggest that this ClC-1 activation may arise from loss of regulation by adenosine nucleotides and/or oxidation. The present review summarizes the current knowledge of the physiological factors that control ClC-1 function in active muscle....

  17. Acute physiological stress down-regulates mRNA expressions of growth-related genes in coho salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Nakano

    Full Text Available Growth and development in fish are regulated to a major extent by growth-related factors, such as liver-derived insulin-like growth factor (IGF -1 in response to pituitary-secreted growth hormone (GH binding to the GH receptor (GHR. Here, we report on the changes in the expressions of gh, ghr, and igf1 genes and the circulating levels of GH and IGF-1 proteins in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch in response to handling as an acute physiological stressor. Plasma GH levels were not significantly different between stressed fish and prestressed control. Plasma IGF-1 concentrations in stressed fish 1.5 h post-stress were the same as in control fish, but levels in stressed fish decreased significantly 16 h post-stress. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR analysis showed that ghr mRNA levels in pituitary, liver, and muscle decreased gradually in response to the stressor. After exposure to stress, hepatic igf1 expression transiently increased, whereas levels decreased 16 h post-stress. On the other hand, the pituitary gh mRNA level did not change in response to the stressor. These observations indicate that expression of gh, ghr, and igf1 responded differently to stress. Our results show that acute physiological stress can mainly down-regulate the expressions of growth-related genes in coho salmon in vivo. This study also suggests that a relationship between the neuroendocrine stress response and growth-related factors exists in fish.

  18. Stay calm! Regulating emotional responses by implementation intentions: Assessing the impact on physiological and subjective arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbel-Jackson, Lena; Butler, Laurie T; Ellis, Judi A; van Reekum, Carien M

    2016-09-01

    Implementation intention (IMP) has recently been highlighted as an effective emotion regulatory strategy. Most studies examining the effectiveness of IMPs to regulate emotion have relied on self-report measures of emotional change. In two studies we employed electrodermal activity (EDA) and heart rate (HR) in addition to arousal ratings (AR) to assess the impact of an IMP on emotional responses. In Study 1, 60 participants viewed neutral and two types of negative pictures (weapon vs. non-weapon) under the IMP "If I see a weapon, then I will stay calm and relaxed!" or no self-regulatory instructions (Control). In Study 2, additionally to the Control and IMP conditions, participants completed the picture rating task either under goal intention (GI) to stay calm and relaxed or warning instructions highlighting that some pictures contain weapons. In both studies, participants showed lower EDA, reduced HR deceleration and lower AR to the weapon pictures compared to the non-weapon pictures. In Study 2, the IMP was associated with lower EDA compared to the GI condition for the weapon pictures, but not compared to the weapon pictures in the Warning condition. ARs were lower for IMP compared to GI and Warning conditions for the weapon pictures.

  19. [Catabolism of methylphosphonic acid and its physiological regulation in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, S V; Laurinavichius, K S; Nesmeianova, M A

    1996-01-01

    It was found that methyl phosphonic acid (Pn) was degraded by different Escherichia coli strains, which utilized it as the sole phosphorus source with resulting methane formation. This ability was influenced by mutations in the regulatory genes of the pho regulon. Thus, Pn was not degraded by an E. coli mutant defective in the regulatory phoB gene, responsible for the induction of pho-regulon proteins during phosphorus starvation. The intensity of Pn degradation depended on the age and concentration of the inoculum. Preincubation of bacteria in the presence of Pn accelerated subsequent degradation of both methyl phosphonic acid and its esters. Cultures developing from a small amount of inoculum degraded Pn more efficiently than heavily inoculated cultures that underwent only one cell division. However, cultures heavily inoculated with adapted cells degraded Pn as efficiently as cultures developing from a small amount of inoculum. Aeration was an important factor regulating Pn degradation: Pn was degraded more efficiently under anaerobic conditions regardless of the amount of inoculum.

  20. Does marital conflict predict infants' physiological regulation? A short-term prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Christin L; Dyer, W Justin

    2017-06-01

    Prior research has linked marital conflict to children's internalizing/externalizing disorders, insecure attachment, and poor emotional regulation (e.g., Cummings & Davies, 2010; Cummings, Iannotti, & Zahn-Waxler, 1985). Although investigators have examined the impact of marital discord on older children (e.g., Crockenberg & Langrock, 2001), few have explored direct links in infancy (e.g., Cowan & Cowan, 1999). This study extends earlier work by examining linkages between marital functioning (conflict and harmony) and infants' cardiac vagal tone and developmental status across 2 time points using a cross-lag approach. Differential findings were found for boys and girls, with concurrent linkages between marital love and vagal tone at 6 months for boys and girls but only for boys at 12 months. In addition, marital conflict at 6 months predicted lower cardiac vagal tone in girls at 12 months but not boys. Finally, infants' developmental status at 6 months was found to predict marital conflict at 12 months. Higher scores on the Psychomotor Development Index (PDI) predicted greater marital conflict whereas higher scores on the Mental Development Index (MDI) predicted lower conflict. These findings are discussed in the context of the emotional security hypothesis and the spillover framework as well as differential susceptibilities to early developmental contexts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Effects of physiological hypercortisolemia on the regulation of lipolysis in subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, J S; Clark, M L; Humphreys, S M; MacDonald, I A; Bannister, P A; Frayn, K N

    1998-02-01

    Cortisol is known to increase whole body lipolysis, yet chronic hypercortisolemia results in increased fat mass. The main aim of the study was to explain these two apparently opposed observations by examining the acute effects of hypercortisolemia on lipolysis in subcutaneous adipose tissue and in the whole body. Six healthy subjects were studied on two occasions. On one occasion hydrocortisone sodium succinate was infused i.v. to induce hypercortisolemia (mean plasma cortisol concentrations, 1500 +/- 100 vs. 335 +/- 25 nmol/L; P adipose tissue of the anterior abdominal wall was studied by measurement of arterio-venous differences, and lipolysis in the whole body was studied by constant infusion of [1,2,3-2H5]glycerol for measurement of the systemic glycerol appearance rate. Hypercortisolemia led to significantly increased arterialized plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA; P adipose tissue, hypercortisolemia decreased veno-arterialized differences for NEFA (P adipose depot. Hypercortisolemia caused a reduction in arterialized plasma TAG concentrations (P adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase). There was no significant difference in plasma insulin concentrations between the control and hypercortisolemia study. Site-specific regulation of the enzymes of intracellular lipolysis (hormone-sensitive lipase) and intravascular lipolysis (lipoprotein lipase) may explain the ability of acute cortisol treatment to increase systemic glycerol and NEFA appearance rates while chronically promoting net central fat deposition.

  2. Positive and Negative Regulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Physiologic Conditions and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Viganò

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system has evolved to allow robust responses against pathogens while avoiding autoimmunity. This is notably enabled by stimulatory and inhibitory signals which contribute to the regulation of immune responses. In the presence of a pathogen, a specific and effective immune response must be induced and this leads to antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, cytokines production, and induction of T-cell differentiation toward an effector phenotype. After clearance or control of the pathogen, the effector immune response must be terminated in order to avoid tissue damage and chronic inflammation and this process involves coinhibitory molecules. When the immune system fails to eliminate or control the pathogen, continuous stimulation of T cells prevents the full contraction and leads to the functional exhaustion of effector T cells. Several evidences both in vitro and in vivo suggest that this anergic state can be reverted by blocking the interactions between coinhibitory molecules and their ligands. The potential to revert exhausted or inactivated T-cell responses following selective blocking of their function made these markers interesting targets for therapeutic interventions in patients with persistent viral infections or cancer.

  3. Physiological and Health-Related Adaptations to Low-Volume Interval Training: Influences of Nutrition and Sex

    OpenAIRE

    Gibala, Martin J.; Gillen, Jenna B.; Michael E Percival

    2014-01-01

    Interval training refers to the basic concept of alternating periods of relatively intense exercise with periods of lower-intensity effort or complete rest for recovery. Low-volume interval training refers to sessions that involve a relatively small total amount of exercise (i.e. ≤10 min of intense exercise), compared with traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) protocols that are generally reflected in public health guidelines. In an effort to standardize terminology, a cla...

  4. Role of AQP2 in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity: implications in cell volume regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galizia, L; Flamenco, M P; Rivarola, V; Capurro, C; Ford, P

    2008-03-01

    We previously reported in a rat cortical collecting duct cell line (RCCD(1)) that the presence of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the cell membrane is critical for the rapid activation of regulatory volume decrease mechanisms (RVD) (Ford et al. Biol Cell 97: 687-697, 2005). The aim of our present work was to investigate the signaling pathway that links AQP2 to this rapid RVD activation. Since it has been previously described that hypotonic conditions induce intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases in different cell types, we tested the hypothesis that AQP2 could have a role in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity and its implication in cell volume regulation. Using a fluorescent probe technique, we studied [Ca(2+)](i) and cell volume changes in response to a hypotonic shock in WT-RCCD(1) (not expressing aquaporins) and in AQP2-RCCD(1) (transfected with AQP2) cells. We found that after a hypotonic shock only AQP2-RCCD(1) cells exhibit a substantial increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This [Ca(2+)](i) increase is strongly dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and is partially inhibited by thapsigargin (1 muM) indicating that the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) reflects both influx from the extracellular medium and release from intracellular stores. Exposure of AQP2-RCCD(1) cells to 100 muM gadolinium reduced the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) suggesting the involvement of a mechanosensitive calcium channel. Furthermore, exposure of cells to all of the above described conditions impaired rapid RVD. We conclude that the expression of AQP2 in the cell membrane is critical to produce the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) which is necessary to activate RVD in RCCD(1) cells.

  5. EGF stimulates IClswell by a redistribution of proteins involved in cell volume regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Grazia; Dossena, Silvia; Nofziger, Charity; Valenti, Giovanna; Svelto, Maria; Paulmichl, Markus

    2011-01-01

    ICln is a multifunctional protein involved in the generation of chloride currents activated during regulatory volume decrease (RVD) after cell swelling (ICl(swell)). Growth factor receptors play a key role in different cellular processes and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulates swelling-activated chloride permeability. We set out to investigate if the EGF-induced upregulation of ICl(swell) could be explained by a rearrangement of ICln subcellular distribution and interaction with its molecular partners. NIH-3T3 fibroblasts were serum-deprived for 24 hours and stimulated with EGF (40 ng/ml) for 30 minutes. ICl(swell) activation, ICln distribution and interaction with its molecular partner HSPC038 were assessed by whole cell patch clamp and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). EGF treatment significantly enhanced the direct molecular interaction between ICln and HSPC038 and also resulted in an increase of ICln and HSPC038 association with the plasma membrane. Importantly, these events are associated with a significant increase of ICl(swell). The present data indicate that EGF might exert its role in the modulation of volume-sensitive chloride currents in part through activation and translocation of ICln and HSPC038 to the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Circadian organization of the mammalian retina: from gene regulation to physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Douglas G; Iuvone, P Michael; Tosini, Gianluca

    2014-03-01

    The retinal circadian system represents a unique structure. It contains a complete circadian system and thus the retina represents an ideal model to study fundamental questions of how neural circadian systems are organized and what signaling pathways are used to maintain synchrony of the different structures in the system. In addition, several studies have shown that multiple sites within the retina are capable of generating circadian oscillations. The strength of circadian clock gene expression and the emphasis of rhythmic expression are divergent across vertebrate retinas, with photoreceptors as the primary locus of rhythm generation in amphibians, while in mammals clock activity is most robust in the inner nuclear layer. Melatonin and dopamine serve as signaling molecules to entrain circadian rhythms in the retina and also in other ocular structures. Recent studies have also suggested GABA as an important component of the system that regulates retinal circadian rhythms. These transmitter-driven influences on clock molecules apparently reinforce the autonomous transcription-translation cycling of clock genes. The molecular organization of the retinal clock is similar to what has been reported for the SCN although inter-neural communication among retinal neurons that form the circadian network is apparently weaker than those present in the SCN, and it is more sensitive to genetic disruption than the central brain clock. The melatonin-dopamine system is the signaling pathway that allows the retinal circadian clock to reconfigure retinal circuits to enhance light-adapted cone-mediated visual function during the day and dark-adapted rod-mediated visual signaling at night. Additionally, the retinal circadian clock also controls circadian rhythms in disk shedding and phagocytosis, and possibly intraocular pressure. Emerging experimental data also indicate that circadian clock is also implicated in the pathogenesis of eye disease and compelling experimental data

  7. Glycine increases cold tolerance in rice via the regulation of N uptake, physiological characteristics, and photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaochuang, Cao; Chu, Zhong; Lianfeng, Zhu; Junhua, Zhang; Hussain, Sajid; Lianghuan, Wu; Qianyu, Jin

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the response of rice growth and photosynthesis to different nitrogen (N) sources under cold stress, hydroponic cultivation of rice was done in greenhouse, with glycine, ammonium, and nitrate as the sole N sources. The results demonstrate that exposure to low temperature reduced the rice biomass and leaf chlorophyll content, but their values in the glycine-treated plants were significantly higher than in the ammonium- and nitrate-treated plants. This might be attributed to the higher N uptake rate and root area and activity in the glycine-treated plants. The glycine-treated plants also maintained high contents of soluble proteins, soluble sugars, and proline as well as enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities to protect themselves against chilling injury. Under cold stress, reduced stomatal conductance (gs) and effective quantum efficiency of PSII (ΦPSII) significantly inhibited the leaf photosynthesis; however, glycine treatment alleviated these effects compared to the ammonium and nitrate treatments. The high non-photochemical quenching (qN) and excess energy dissipative energy (Ex) in the glycine-treated plants were beneficial for the release of extra energy, thereby, strengthening their photochemical efficiency. We, therefore, conclude that the strengthened cold tolerance of glycine-treated rice plants was closely associated with the higher accumulation of dry matter and photosynthesis through the up-regulation of N-uptake, and increase in the content of osmoprotectants, activities of the antioxidant defense enzymes, and photochemical efficiency. The results of the present study provide new ideas for improving the plant tolerance to extreme temperatures by nutrient resource management in the cold regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Acid trehalase in yeasts and filamentous fungi: localization, regulation and physiological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrou, Jean Luc; Jules, Matthieu; Beltran, Gemma; François, Jean

    2005-04-01

    Yeasts and filamentous fungi are endowed with two different trehalose-hydrolysing activities, termed acid and neutral trehalases according to their optimal pH for enzymatic activity. A wealth of information already exists on fungal neutral trehalases, while data on localization, regulation and function of fungal acid trehalases have remained elusive. The gene encoding the latter enzyme has now been isolated from two yeast species and two filamentous fungi, and sequences encoding putative acid trehalase can be retrieved from available public sequences. Despite weak similarities between amino acids sequences, this type of trehalase potentially harbours either a transmembrane segment or a signal peptide at the N-terminal sequence, as deduced from domain prediction algorithms. This feature, together with the demonstration that acid trehalase from yeasts and filamentous fungi is localized at the cell surface, is consistent with its main role in the utilisation of exogenous trehalose as a carbon source. The growth on this disaccharide is in fact pretty effective in most fungi except in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This yeast species actually exhibits a "Kluyver effect" on trehalose. Moreover, an oscillatory behaviour reminiscent of what is observed in aerobic glucose-limited continuous cultures at low dilution rate is also observed in batch growth on trehalose. Finally, the S. cerevisiae acid trehalase may also participate in the catabolism of endogenous trehalose by a mechanism that likely requires the export of the disaccharide, its extracellular hydrolysis, and the subsequent uptake of the glucose released. Based on these recent findings, we suggest to rename "acid" and "neutral" trehalases as "extracellular" and "cytosolic" trehalases, which is more adequate to describe their localization and function in the fungal cell.

  9. Physiological and Pathogenic Roles of Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 in Metabolic Regulations via Multiple Signal Transduction Pathway Modulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Nakatsu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolyl isomerases are divided into three groups, the FKBP family, Cyclophilin and the Parvulin family (Pin1 and Par14. Among these isomerases, Pin1 is a unique prolyl isomerase binding to the motif including pSer/pThr-Pro that is phosphorylated by kinases. Once bound, Pin1 modulates the enzymatic activity, protein stability or subcellular localization of target proteins by changing the cis- and trans-formations of proline. Several studies have examined the roles of Pin1 in the pathogenesis of cancers and Alzheimer’s disease. On the other hand, recent studies have newly demonstrated Pin1 to be involved in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Interestingly, while Pin1 expression is markedly increased by high-fat diet feeding, Pin1 KO mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and diabetic vascular dysfunction. These phenomena result from the binding of Pin1 to several key factors regulating metabolic functions, which include insulin receptor substrate-1, AMPK, Crtc2 and NF-κB p65. In this review, we focus on recent advances in elucidating the physiological roles of Pin1 as well as the pathogenesis of disorders involving this isomerase, from the viewpoint of the relationships between signal transductions and metabolic functions.

  10. Physiological and Pathogenic Roles of Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 in Metabolic Regulations via Multiple Signal Transduction Pathway Modulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Yasuka; Yamamotoya, Takeshi; Ueda, Koji; Inoue, Yuki; Mori, Keiichi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Ono, Hiraku; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-09-07

    Prolyl isomerases are divided into three groups, the FKBP family, Cyclophilin and the Parvulin family (Pin1 and Par14). Among these isomerases, Pin1 is a unique prolyl isomerase binding to the motif including pSer/pThr-Pro that is phosphorylated by kinases. Once bound, Pin1 modulates the enzymatic activity, protein stability or subcellular localization of target proteins by changing the cis- and trans-formations of proline. Several studies have examined the roles of Pin1 in the pathogenesis of cancers and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have newly demonstrated Pin1 to be involved in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Interestingly, while Pin1 expression is markedly increased by high-fat diet feeding, Pin1 KO mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and diabetic vascular dysfunction. These phenomena result from the binding of Pin1 to several key factors regulating metabolic functions, which include insulin receptor substrate-1, AMPK, Crtc2 and NF-κB p65. In this review, we focus on recent advances in elucidating the physiological roles of Pin1 as well as the pathogenesis of disorders involving this isomerase, from the viewpoint of the relationships between signal transductions and metabolic functions.

  11. Role of ACTH in the interactive/paracrine regulation of adrenal steroid secretion in physiological and pathophysiological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herve Lefebvre

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the normal human adrenal gland, steroid secretion is regulated by a complex network of autocrine/paracrine interactions involving bioactive signals released by endothelial cells, nerve terminals, chromaffin cells, immunocompetent cells and adrenocortical cells themselves. ACTH can be locally produced by medullary chromaffin cells and is therefore a major mediator of the corticomedullary functional interplay. Plasma ACTH also triggers the release of angiogenic and vasoactive agents from adrenocortical cells and adrenal mast cells, and thus indirectly regulates steroid production through modulation of the adrenal blood flow. Adrenocortical neoplasms associated with steroid hypersecretion exhibit molecular and cellular defects which tend to reinforce the influence of paracrine regulatory loops on corticosteroidogenesis. Especially, ACTH has been found to be abnormally synthesized in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia responsible for hypercortisolism. In these tissues, ACTH is detected in a subpopulation of adrenocortical cells which express gonadal markers. This observation suggests that ectopic production of ACTH may result from impaired embryogenesis leading to abnormal maturation of the adrenogonadal primordium. Globally, the current literature indicates that ACTH is a major player in the autocrine/paracrine processes occurring in the adrenal gland in both physiological and pathological conditions.

  12. Role of ACTH in the Interactive/Paracrine Regulation of Adrenal Steroid Secretion in Physiological and Pathophysiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Hervé; Thomas, Michaël; Duparc, Céline; Bertherat, Jérôme; Louiset, Estelle

    2016-01-01

    In the normal human adrenal gland, steroid secretion is regulated by a complex network of autocrine/paracrine interactions involving bioactive signals released by endothelial cells, nerve terminals, chromaffin cells, immunocompetent cells, and adrenocortical cells themselves. ACTH can be locally produced by medullary chromaffin cells and is, therefore, a major mediator of the corticomedullary functional interplay. Plasma ACTH also triggers the release of angiogenic and vasoactive agents from adrenocortical cells and adrenal mast cells and, thus, indirectly regulates steroid production through modulation of the adrenal blood flow. Adrenocortical neoplasms associated with steroid hypersecretion exhibit molecular and cellular defects that tend to reinforce the influence of paracrine regulatory loops on corticosteroidogenesis. Especially, ACTH has been found to be abnormally synthesized in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia responsible for hypercortisolism. In these tissues, ACTH is detected in a subpopulation of adrenocortical cells that express gonadal markers. This observation suggests that ectopic production of ACTH may result from impaired embryogenesis leading to abnormal maturation of the adrenogonadal primordium. Globally, the current literature indicates that ACTH is a major player in the autocrine/paracrine processes occurring in the adrenal gland in both physiological and pathological conditions.

  13. The impact of culture on physiological processes of emotion regulation: a comparison of US and Chinese preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabell, Adam S; Olson, Sheryl L; Miller, Alison L; Kessler, Daniel A; Felt, Barbara; Kaciroti, Niko; Wang, Li; Tardif, Twila

    2015-05-01

    Cognitive determinants of emotion regulation, such as effortful control, have been hypothesized to modulate young children's physiological response to emotional stress. It is unknown, however, whether this model of emotion regulation generalizes across Western and non-Western cultures. The current study examined the relation between both behavioral and questionnaire measures of effortful control and densely sampled, stress-induced cortisol trajectories in U.S. and Chinese preschoolers. Participants were 3- to 5- year-old children recruited from the United States (N = 57) and Beijing, China (N = 60). Consistent with our hypothesis, U.S. children showed a significant negative relation between maternal-rated inhibitory control and both cortisol reactivity and recovery. However, this was not replicated in the Chinese sample. Children in China showed a significant positive relation between maternal-rated attentional focusing and cortisol reactivity that was not seen in the U.S. Results suggest that children who reside in Western and non-Western cultures have different predictors of their emotion-related stress response. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  15. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aklujkar Muktak

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second putative succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology and regulation of gene expression in G. metallireducens may be dramatically different from other Geobacteraceae.

  16. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aklujkar, Muktak; Krushkal, Julia; DiBartolo, Genevieve; Lapidus, Alla; Land, Miriam L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2008-12-01

    Background: The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results: The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE) regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion: The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology and regulation of gene expression in G. metallireducens may be dramatically different from other Geobacteraceae.

  17. An Investigation on Physiological and Photosynthetic Parameters of Forage Maize at Regulated Deficit Irrigation and Partial Root Zone Draying Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Naderi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Water shortage is the most important factor affecting crop production in the world. The deficit irrigation is a way to reduce water consumption in farming. The Partial Root- zone Drying (PRD irrigation is a new improvement in deficit irrigation in which the half of the root zone is irrigated alternatively in scheduled irrigation events. In the fixed partial root zone drying (FPRD the irrigation is fixed to one side of the root zone in the growing season. Maize is a drought sensitive crop. In maize, secondary traits related to drought resistance are considered in producing tolerate cultivars. Materials and Methods: An experiment was conducted in order to investigate the effects of regulated deficit irrigation, variable partial root zone drying (PRD and fixed partial root zone drying (FPRD on the yield, physiological and photosynthetic parameters of forage maize (KSC 704 during the growing seasons of 2014 in Mashhad region. A factorial experiment based on randomized complete block design with four replications was carried out. The treatments included the full irrigation (FI and the deficit irrigations (regulated deficit irrigation (DI and the replacements of 80 % (DI80 and 60 % (DI60 of total water requirement, fixed PRD (FPRD at 100% (FPRD100, 80% (FPRD80 and 60%(FPRD60 of water requirement, and variable PRD at 100% (PRD100, 80% (PRD80 and 60% (PRD60 of water requirement. Drip irrigation tapes were placed between plant rows. In the full irrigation and regulated deficit irrigation treatments, the plants were irrigated from two sides for every irrigation. In the PRD, one of two neighboring tapes was alternatively used for irrigation. In FPRD, a drip tape was used for two plant rows and irrigation was fixed to one side of the root. The irrigation interval was 3 days for all treatments. Dry and fresh forage yield, leaf area index (LAI, stomatal conductance, leaf relative water content (RWC and chlorophyll content were measured. Results

  18. Disorders of Erythrocyte Volume Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Glogowska, Edyta; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited disorders of erythrocyte volume homeostasis are a heterogeneous group of rare disorders with phenotypes ranging from dehydrated to overhydrated erythrocytes. Clinical, laboratory, physiologic, and genetic heterogeneity characterize this group of disorders. A series of recent reports have provided novel insights into our understanding of the genetic bases underlying some of these disorders of red cell volume regulation. This report reviews this progress in understanding determinants ...

  19. Neuroprotective effects of volume-regulated anion channel blocker DCPIB on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ammar ALIBRAHIM; Li-yan ZHAO; Christine You-jin BAE; Andrew BARSZCZYK; Christopher LF SUN; Guan-lei WANG; Hong-shuo SUN

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the role of swelling-induced activation of volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) in a neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury model using the selective VRAC blocker 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentyl-indan-1-on5-yl) oxobutyric acid (DCPIB).Methods:Cerebral hypoxic-ischemic injury was induced in 7-day-old mouse pups with Rice-Vannucci method.Prior to the onset of ischemia,the animals were ip administered DCPIB (10 mg/kg).The animals were sacrificed 24 h afterwards,coronal sections of the brains were cut and the areas of infarct were examined using TTC staining and an image-analysis system.Cultured PC12 cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 4 h.The cellular viability was assessed using Cell Counting Kit 8.Intracellular chloride concentration [Clˉ]i was measured using 6-methoxy-N-ethylquinolinium iodide.Results:DCPIB-treated mice showed a significant reduction in hemispheric corrected infarct volume (26.65%+2.23%) compared to that in vehicle-treated mice (45.52%+1.45%,P<O.O01).DCPIB-treated mice also showed better functional recovery as they were more active than vehicle-treated mice at 4 and 24 h post injury.In cultured PC12 cells,DCPIB (10 μmol/L) significantly reduced OGD-induced cell death.Moreover,DCPIB (20 μmol/L) blocked hypotonic-induced decrease in [Clˉ]i in PC12 cells of both control and OGD groups.Conclusion:The results further support the pathophysiological role of VRACs in ischemic brain injury,and suggest DCPIB as a potential,easily administrable agent targeting VRACs in the context of perinatal and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  20. Pro-apoptotic BIM is an essential initiator of physiological endothelial cell death independent of regulation by FOXO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, M N; Naik, E; Rohrbeck, L; Herold, M J; Trounson, E; Bouillet, P; Thomas, T; Voss, A K; Strasser, A; Coultas, L

    2014-11-01

    The growth of new blood vessels by angiogenesis is essential for normal development, but can also cause or contribute to the pathology of numerous diseases. Recent studies have shown that BIM, a pro-apoptotic BCL2-family protein, is required for endothelial cell apoptosis in vivo, and can contribute to the anti-angiogenic effect of VEGF-A inhibitors in certain tumor models. Despite its importance, the extent to which BIM is autonomously required for physiological endothelial apoptosis remains unknown and its regulation under such conditions is poorly defined. While the transcription factor FOXO3 has been proposed to induce Bim in response to growth factor withdrawal, evidence for this function is circumstantial. We report that apoptosis was reduced in Bim(-/-) primary endothelial cells, demonstrating a cell-autonomous role for BIM in endothelial death following serum and growth factor withdrawal. In conflict with in vitro studies, BIM-dependent endothelial death in vivo did not require FOXO3. Moreover, endothelial apoptosis proceeded normally in mice lacking FOXO-binding sites in the Bim promoter. Bim mRNA was upregulated in endothelial cells starved of serum and growth factors and this was accompanied by the downregulation of miRNAs of the miR-17∼92 cluster. Bim mRNA levels were also elevated in miR-17∼92(+/-) endothelial cells cultured under steady-state conditions, suggesting that miR-17∼92 cluster miRNAs may contribute to regulating overall Bim mRNA levels in endothelial cells.

  1. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes.

  2. Activation of volume-regulated Cl− channels by ACh and ATP in Xenopus follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Samartín, Alberto L; Miledi, Ricardo; Arellano, Rogelio O

    2000-01-01

    Osmolarity-dependent ionic currents from follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes (follicles) were studied using electrophysiological techniques. Whole follicle currents were monitored using a two-electrode voltage clamp and single-channel activity was measured using the patch-clamp technique.In follicles held at -60 mV two chloride currents were activated in external hyposmotic solutions. One was the habitual volume-regulated current elicited by external hyposmolarity (ICl,swell), and the second was a slow and smooth current (Sin) generated by ACh or ATP application.In follicles, the permeability ratios for different anions with respect to Cl− were similar for both ICl,swell and Sin, with a sequence of: SCN− > I− > Br−≥ NO3−≥ Cl− > gluconate ≥ cyclamate > acetate > SO42−.Extracellular ATP blocked the outward component of Sin. Also, extracellular pH modulated the inactivation kinetics of Sin elicited by ACh; e.g. inactivation at +80 mV was ∼100% slower at pH 8.0 compared with that at pH 6.0.Lanthanides inhibited ICl,swell and Sin. La3+ completely inhibited ICl,swell with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 17 ± 1.9 μm, while Sin was blocked up to 55% with an apparent IC50 of 36 ± 2.6 μm.Patch-clamp recordings in follicular cells showed that hyposmotic challenge opened inward single-channel currents. The single channel conductance (4.7 ± 0.4 pS) had a linear current-voltage relationship with a reversal membrane potential close to −20 mV. This single-channel activity was increased by application of ACh or ATP.The ICl,swell generation was not affected by pirenzepine or metoctramine, and did not affect the purinergic activation of the chloride current named Fin. Thus, ICl,swell was not generated via neurotransmitters released during cellular swelling.All together, equal discrimination for different anions, similar modulatory effects by extracellular pH, the blocking effects by ATP and La3+, and the same single-channel activity

  3. The role of vascular and interstitial compliance and vascular volume in the regulation of blood volume in two species of anuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Stanley S; Degrauw, Edward A; Hoagland, Todd; Hancock, Thomas; Withers, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to measure plasma (V(p)), blood (V(b)), extracellular (V(e)), and interstitial fluid (V(ist)) volumes using the same techniques; (2) to measure the rate of plasma turnover; and (3) to characterize the three important variables required to interpret transvascular flux at an organismal level (vascular compliance [C(vas)], interstitial compliance [C(ist)], and the whole-body transvascular filtration coefficient [F(c)]) in two species of anurans that differ in their capacity to regulate blood volume during dehydrational and hemorrhagic stress. The disappearance curve of Evans blue-labeled native plasma protein fitted a two-component exponential decay model for both species, indicating that plasma proteins exchanged quickly between two kinetically distinct compartments, V(p) and V(e). V(p) calculated using serial sampling times change data). Functionally, these circulatory/interstitial exchange variables of both anuran species exemplify a circulatory system with high rates of filtration (lymph formation) and with no capacity for transcapillary fluid uptake, hence requiring substantial lymphatic return to maintain vascular volume. The large C(ist) of both species provides a capacity to store extravascular volume with little perturbation of vascular pressure, but the resulting low interstitial pressures would create difficulties for extravascular fluid return to the dorsally located lymph hearts. The principal interspecific differences of greater V(b), V(p), V(ist), and C(vas) for the more terrestrial species, C. marinus, would stabilize cardiac function during hypovolemia (e.g., hemorrhage) and increase resistance to dehydration. This is consistent with this species' enhanced capacity to manage dehydrational and hemorrhagic challenges to blood volume regulation compared to L. catesbeiana.

  4. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aklujkar, Muktak [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Krushkal, Julia [University of Texas, Austin; DiBartolo, Genevieve [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2009-01-01

    differences. Results. The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE) regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion. The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology and regulation of gene expression in G. metallireducens may be dramatically different from other Geobacteraceae.

  5. Volume regulation of intestinal cells of echinoderms: Putative role of ion transporters (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and NKCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Giovanna C; Souza, Marta M; Freire, Carolina A

    2016-11-01

    Echinoderms are exclusively marine osmoconformer invertebrates. Some species occupy the challenging intertidal region. Upon salinity changes, the extracellular osmotic concentration of these animals also varies, exposing tissues and cells to osmotic challenges. Cells and tissues may then respond with volume regulation mechanisms, which involve transport of ions and water into and/or out of the cells, through ion transporters, such as the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and NKCC. The goal of this study was to relate the cell volume regulation capacity of echinoderm intestinal cells Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and NKCC activities, in three echinoderm species: Holothuria grisea, Arbacia lixula, and Echinometra lucunter. Isolated cells of these species displayed some control of their cell volume upon exposure to anisosmotic media (isolated intestinal cells, calcein fluorescence as indicator of volume change), with a distinct higher capacity shown by H. grisea, which did not swell even upon 50% hyposmotic shock. The holothuroid cells showed indirect evidence (effect of furosemide) of the participation of NKCC in this process, with a secretory function, and of a secondary role by the NKA (effect of ouabain). Other mechanisms are probably responsible for this function in the urchins. Variable expression of these transporters, and others not examined here, may to some extent account for the variability in cell volume regulation capacity in echinoderm cells.

  6. Physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase and the role of 2-oxoglutarate in Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; López-Lozano, Antonio; Diez, Jesús; Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Rangel-Zúñiga, Oriol Alberto; García-Fernández, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate, to produce 2-oxoglutarate. The incompleteness of the tricarboxylic acids cycle in marine cyanobacteria confers a special importance to isocitrate dehydrogenase in the C/N balance, since 2-oxoglutarate can only be metabolized through the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway. The physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase was studied in cultures of Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511, by measuring enzyme activity and concentration using the NADPH production assay and Western blotting, respectively. The enzyme activity showed little changes under nitrogen or phosphorus starvation, or upon addition of the inhibitors DCMU, DBMIB and MSX. Azaserine, an inhibitor of glutamate synthase, induced clear increases in the isocitrate dehydrogenase activity and icd gene expression after 24 h, and also in the 2-oxoglutarate concentration. Iron starvation had the most significant effect, inducing a complete loss of isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, possibly mediated by a process of oxidative inactivation, while its concentration was unaffected. Our results suggest that isocitrate dehydrogenase responds to changes in the intracellular concentration of 2-oxoglutarate and to the redox status of the cells in Prochlorococcus.

  7. Physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase and the role of 2-oxoglutarate in Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Agustina Domínguez-Martín

    Full Text Available The enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42 catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate, to produce 2-oxoglutarate. The incompleteness of the tricarboxylic acids cycle in marine cyanobacteria confers a special importance to isocitrate dehydrogenase in the C/N balance, since 2-oxoglutarate can only be metabolized through the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway. The physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase was studied in cultures of Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511, by measuring enzyme activity and concentration using the NADPH production assay and Western blotting, respectively. The enzyme activity showed little changes under nitrogen or phosphorus starvation, or upon addition of the inhibitors DCMU, DBMIB and MSX. Azaserine, an inhibitor of glutamate synthase, induced clear increases in the isocitrate dehydrogenase activity and icd gene expression after 24 h, and also in the 2-oxoglutarate concentration. Iron starvation had the most significant effect, inducing a complete loss of isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, possibly mediated by a process of oxidative inactivation, while its concentration was unaffected. Our results suggest that isocitrate dehydrogenase responds to changes in the intracellular concentration of 2-oxoglutarate and to the redox status of the cells in Prochlorococcus.

  8. The Role of Circadian Rhythms in Muscular and Osseous Physiology and Their Regulation by Nutrition and Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Shinya; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock regulates the day and night cycles of various physiological functions. The circadian clock system consists of a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks in peripheral tissues. According to the results of circadian transcriptomic studies in several tissues, the majority of rhythmic genes are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and are influenced by tissue-specific circadian rhythms. Here we review the diurnal variations of musculoskeletal functions and discuss the impact of the circadian clock on homeostasis in skeletal muscle and bone. Peripheral clocks are controlled by not only photic stimulation from the central clock in the SCN but also by external cues, such as feeding and exercise. In this review, we discuss the effects of feeding and exercise on the circadian clock and diurnal variation of musculoskeletal functions. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of chrono-nutrition and chrono-exercise on circadian disturbances and the failure of homeostasis in skeletal muscle and bone.

  9. Interaction of the endocrine system with inflammation: a function of energy and volume regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    During acute systemic infectious disease, precisely regulated release of energy-rich substrates (glucose, free fatty acids, and amino acids) and auxiliary elements such as calcium/phosphorus from storage sites (fat tissue, muscle, liver, and bone) are highly important because these factors are needed by an energy-consuming immune system in a situation with little or no food/water intake (sickness behavior). This positively selected program for short-lived infectious diseases is similarly applied during chronic inflammatory diseases. This review presents the interaction of hormones and inflammation by focusing on energy storage/expenditure and volume regulation. Energy storage hormones are represented by insulin (glucose/lipid storage and growth-related processes), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (muscle and bone growth), androgens (muscle and bone growth), vitamin D (bone growth), and osteocalcin (bone growth, support of insulin, and testosterone). Energy expenditure hormones are represented by cortisol (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides/muscle protein, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), noradrenaline/adrenaline (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), growth hormone (glucogenic, lipolytic; has also growth-related aspects; water retention), thyroid gland hormones (increase metabolic effects of adrenaline/noradrenaline), and angiotensin II (induce insulin resistance and retain water). In chronic inflammatory diseases, a preponderance of energy expenditure pathways is switched on, leading to typical hormonal changes such as insulin/IGF-1 resistance, hypoandrogenemia, hypovitaminosis D, mild hypercortisolemia, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Though necessary during acute inflammation in the context of systemic infection or trauma, these long-standing changes contribute to increased mortality in chronic

  10. Interaction of the endocrine system with inflammation: a function of energy and volume regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H

    2014-02-13

    During acute systemic infectious disease, precisely regulated release of energy-rich substrates (glucose, free fatty acids, and amino acids) and auxiliary elements such as calcium/phosphorus from storage sites (fat tissue, muscle, liver, and bone) are highly important because these factors are needed by an energy-consuming immune system in a situation with little or no food/water intake (sickness behavior). This positively selected program for short-lived infectious diseases is similarly applied during chronic inflammatory diseases. This review presents the interaction of hormones and inflammation by focusing on energy storage/expenditure and volume regulation. Energy storage hormones are represented by insulin (glucose/lipid storage and growth-related processes), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (muscle and bone growth), androgens (muscle and bone growth), vitamin D (bone growth), and osteocalcin (bone growth, support of insulin, and testosterone). Energy expenditure hormones are represented by cortisol (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides/muscle protein, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), noradrenaline/adrenaline (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), growth hormone (glucogenic, lipolytic; has also growth-related aspects; water retention), thyroid gland hormones (increase metabolic effects of adrenaline/noradrenaline), and angiotensin II (induce insulin resistance and retain water). In chronic inflammatory diseases, a preponderance of energy expenditure pathways is switched on, leading to typical hormonal changes such as insulin/IGF-1 resistance, hypoandrogenemia, hypovitaminosis D, mild hypercortisolemia, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Though necessary during acute inflammation in the context of systemic infection or trauma, these long-standing changes contribute to increased mortality in chronic

  11. Autonomic cardiac regulation and morpho-physiological responses to eight week training preparation in junior soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Botek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Training preparation in soccer is thought to improve body composition and performance level, especially the maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max. However, an enhancement in performance may be attenuated by the increase of fatigue. Heart rate variability (HRV as a non-invasive index of autonomic nervous system (ANS activity has been considered to be a sensitive tool in fatigue assessment. Objective: This study was focused to evaluate the response of ANS activity and morpho-physiological parameters to eight week training preparation. Methods: Study included 12 trained soccer players aged 17.2 ± 1.2 years. Athletes underwent pre- and post-preparation testing that included the ANS activity assessment by spectral analysis of HRV in supine and upright position. Further, body composition was analyzed via electrical bio-impedance method and physiological parameters were assessed during maximal stress tests. ANS activity and subjective feeling of fatigue was assessed continuously within subsequent weeks of preparation. Results: No significant differences in all HRV variables within weeks were found. Pre vs. post analyses revealed a significant (p < .05 increase in body weight, fat free mass, body mass index, and peak power. A significant decline in mean maximal heart rate (HR and resting HR at standing was identified at the end of preparation. Since no significant changes between pre- post-preparation in the mean VO2max occurred, the positive correlation between the individual change in VO2max and the vagally related HRV [supine LnHF (r = .78, Ln rMSSD (r = .63, and the standing LnHF (r = .73, p < .05] was found. Conclusions: This study showed that an 8 week training program modified particularly fat free mass and short-term endurance, whereas both the autonomic cardiac regulation and the feeling of fatigue remained almost unaffected. Standing position seems to be more sensitive in terms of the HR response in relation to fatigue

  12. A Novel Egr-1-Agrin Pathway and Potential Implications for Regulation of Synaptic Physiology and Homeostasis at the Neuromuscular Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryen MacDonald

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission requires intricate coordination of the components involved in processing of incoming signals, formation and stabilization of synaptic machinery, neurotransmission and in all related signaling pathways. Changes to any of these components cause synaptic imbalance and disruption of neuronal circuitry. Extensive studies at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ have greatly aided in the current understanding of synapses and served to elucidate the underlying physiology as well as associated adaptive and homeostatic processes. The heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin is a vital component of the NMJ, mediating synaptic formation and maintenance in both brain and muscle, but very little is known about direct control of its expression. Here, we investigated the relationship between agrin and transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1, as Egr-1 regulates the expression of many genes involved in synaptic homeostasis and plasticity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, cell culture with cell lines derived from brain and muscle, and animal models, we show that Egr-1 binds to the AGRN gene locus and suppresses its expression. When compared with wild type (WT, mice deficient in Egr-1 (Egr-1−/− display a marked increase in AGRN mRNA and agrin full-length and cleavage fragment protein levels, including the 22 kDa, C-terminal fragment in brain and muscle tissue homogenate. Because agrin is a crucial component of the NMJ, we explored possible physiological implications of the Egr-1-agrin relationship. In the diaphragm, Egr-1−/− mice display increased NMJ motor endplate density, individual area and area of innervation. In addition to increased density, soleus NMJs also display an increase in fragmented and faint endplates in Egr-1−/− vs. WT mice. Moreover, the soleus NMJ electrophysiology of Egr-1−/− mice revealed increased quantal content and motor testing showed decreased movement and limb muscle strength compared with

  13. A Novel Egr-1-Agrin Pathway and Potential Implications for Regulation of Synaptic Physiology and Homeostasis at the Neuromuscular Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ryen; Barbat-Artigas, Sebastien; Cho, Chulmin; Peng, Huashan; Shang, Jijun; Moustaine, Ayman; Carbonetto, Salvatore; Robitaille, Richard; Chalifour, Lorraine E; Paudel, Hemant

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic transmission requires intricate coordination of the components involved in processing of incoming signals, formation and stabilization of synaptic machinery, neurotransmission and in all related signaling pathways. Changes to any of these components cause synaptic imbalance and disruption of neuronal circuitry. Extensive studies at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) have greatly aided in the current understanding of synapses and served to elucidate the underlying physiology as well as associated adaptive and homeostatic processes. The heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin is a vital component of the NMJ, mediating synaptic formation and maintenance in both brain and muscle, but very little is known about direct control of its expression. Here, we investigated the relationship between agrin and transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1), as Egr-1 regulates the expression of many genes involved in synaptic homeostasis and plasticity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), cell culture with cell lines derived from brain and muscle, and animal models, we show that Egr-1 binds to the AGRN gene locus and suppresses its expression. When compared with wild type (WT), mice deficient in Egr-1 (Egr-1-/-) display a marked increase in AGRN mRNA and agrin full-length and cleavage fragment protein levels, including the 22 kDa, C-terminal fragment in brain and muscle tissue homogenate. Because agrin is a crucial component of the NMJ, we explored possible physiological implications of the Egr-1-agrin relationship. In the diaphragm, Egr-1-/- mice display increased NMJ motor endplate density, individual area and area of innervation. In addition to increased density, soleus NMJs also display an increase in fragmented and faint endplates in Egr-1-/- vs. WT mice. Moreover, the soleus NMJ electrophysiology of Egr-1-/- mice revealed increased quantal content and motor testing showed decreased movement and limb muscle strength compared with WT. This study provides

  14. Effect of radiologic contrast material on cell volume regulation in proximal renal tubules from trout (Salmo trutta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtung, H K; Løken, M; Sakariassen, K S

    2000-11-01

    Most radiographic contrast media (CM) are hyperosmotic and pose an osmotic threat to cells they are in contact with. To study these effects at the cellular level, cell volume regulatory mechanisms were observed in proximal renal tubules following exposure to the CM iohexol, ioxaglate, and iodixanol. Isolated renal tubules from trout (Salmo trutta) were exposed to 5% vol/vol iohexol (326 mOsm), ioxaglate (314 mOsm), or iodixanol (300 mOsm) or mannitol (to achieve the same osmolalities), and cell volume changes were observed videometrically. Iohexol and ioxaglate solutions induced a rapid shrinkage (12%-13%) not followed by cell volume regulation. Without CM (same osmolality), the cells shrank 11% but then showed a 77%-88% volume recovery. This reswelling was inhibited by 55% with the Na+, K+, Cl- symporter inhibitor bumetanide (50 micromol/L). Iodixanol did not significantly affect cell volume. Tubules preincubated with CM or mannitol were then stimulated with a hypoosmotic Ringer solution (160 mOsm) resulting in a 26%-36% cellular volume increase. Compared with results of experiments without mannitol and CM, preexposure to iohexol or ioxaglate almost completely inhibited the expected regulatory shrinkage phase, while previous exposure to hyperosmotic solutions with mannitol reduced the shrinkage response by 40%-53%. In this system, the hyperosmotic iohexol and ioxaglate cause cell shrinkage followed by an impaired cell volume regulatory response. Exposure to these two CM also inhibits cell volume regulation on hypoosmotic stimulation. The isosmotic iodixanol has no such effects. These changes appear to some extent to be a result of the CM's degree of hyperosmolality, but this property alone does not explain these findings.

  15. Exogenously Applied Plant Growth Regulators Enhance the Morpho-Physiological Growth and Yield of Rice under High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Ihsan, Zahid; Shah, Adnan N; Wu, Chao; Yousaf, Muhammad; Nasim, Wajid; Alharby, Hesham; Alghabari, Fahad; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR) on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT) and high night temperature (HNT). Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan) were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc), alpha-tocopherol (Ve), brassinosteroids (Br), methyl jasmonates (MeJA), and triazoles (Tr) were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above-, and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  16. Exogenously applied plant growth regulators enhance the morpho-physiological growth and yield of rice under high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Fahad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A two-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT and high night temperature (HNT. Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc, alpha-tocopherol (Ve, brassinosteroids (Br, methyl jasmonates (MeJA and triazoles (Tr were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above- and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  17. Detailed Physiologic Characterization Reveals Diverse Mechanisms for Novel Genetic Loci Regulating Glucose and Insulin Metabolism in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelsson, Erik; Langenberg, Claudia; Hivert, Marie-France; Prokopenko, Inga; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Dupuis, Josée; Mägi, Reedik; Sharp, Stephen; Jackson, Anne U.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Shrader, Peter; Knowles, Joshua W.; Zethelius, Björn; Abbasi, Fahim A.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Antje; Berne, Christian; Boehnke, Michael; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Chines, Peter; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Cyrus C.; Dennison, Elaine M.; Erdos, Michael R.; Ferrannini, Ele; Fox, Caroline S.; Graessler, Jürgen; Hao, Ke; Isomaa, Bo; Jameson, Karen A.; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Ladenvall, Claes; Mohlke, Karen L.; Morken, Mario A.; Narisu, Narisu; Nathan, David M.; Pascoe, Laura; Payne, Felicity; Petrie, John R.; Sayer, Avan A.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Scott, Laura J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tönjes, Anke; Valle, Timo T.; Williams, Gordon H.; Lind, Lars; Barroso, Inês; Quertermous, Thomas; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Meigs, James B.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Groop, Leif; Watanabe, Richard M.; Florez, Jose C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed loci associated with glucose and insulin-related traits. We aimed to characterize 19 such loci using detailed measures of insulin processing, secretion, and sensitivity to help elucidate their role in regulation of glucose control, insulin secretion and/or action. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated associations of loci identified by the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) with circulating proinsulin, measures of insulin secretion and sensitivity from oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), euglycemic clamps, insulin suppression tests, or frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests in nondiabetic humans (n = 29,084). RESULTS The glucose-raising allele in MADD was associated with abnormal insulin processing (a dramatic effect on higher proinsulin levels, but no association with insulinogenic index) at extremely persuasive levels of statistical significance (P = 2.1 × 10−71). Defects in insulin processing and insulin secretion were seen in glucose-raising allele carriers at TCF7L2, SCL30A8, GIPR, and C2CD4B. Abnormalities in early insulin secretion were suggested in glucose-raising allele carriers at MTNR1B, GCK, FADS1, DGKB, and PROX1 (lower insulinogenic index; no association with proinsulin or insulin sensitivity). Two loci previously associated with fasting insulin (GCKR and IGF1) were associated with OGTT-derived insulin sensitivity indices in a consistent direction. CONCLUSIONS Genetic loci identified through their effect on hyperglycemia and/or hyperinsulinemia demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in associations with measures of insulin processing, secretion, and sensitivity. Our findings emphasize the importance of detailed physiological characterization of such loci for improved understanding of pathways associated with alterations in glucose homeostasis and eventually type 2 diabetes. PMID:20185807

  18. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rajib; Liu, Deng; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Liberton, Michelle; Yu, Jingjie; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Balassy, Andrea; Zhang, Fuzhong; Moon, Tae Seok; Maranas, Costas D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-05-03

    synthetic biology and metabolic engineering applications. Such strains are being developed as a chassis for the sustainable production of food, feed, and fuel. To this end, a holistic knowledge of cyanobacterial physiology and its correlation with gene expression patterns under the diurnal cycle is warranted. In this report, a genomewide transcriptional analysis of Synechocystis PCC 6803, the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, sheds light on the global coordination of cellular processes during diurnal periods. Furthermore, we found that, in addition to light, the redox level of NADP(H) is an important endogenous regulator of diurnal entrainment of Synechocystis PCC 6803. Copyright © 2016 Saha et al.

  19. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death.

  20. Dynamic Regulation of Cell Volume and Extracellular ATP of Human Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal Denis, M. Florencia; Alvarez, H. Ariel; Lauri, Natalia; Alvarez, Cora L.; Chara, Osvaldo; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7) triggered in human erythrocytes (rbcs) the release of ATP and swelling. Since swelling is a well-known inducer of ATP release, and extracellular (ATPe), interacting with P (purinergic) receptors, can affect cell volume (Vr), we explored the dynamic regulation between Vr and ATPe. Methods and Treatments We made a quantitative assessment of MST7-dependent kinetics of Vr and of [ATPe], both in the absence and presence of blockers of ATP efflux, swelling and P receptors. Results In rbcs 10 μM MST7 promoted acute, strongly correlated changes in [ATPe] and Vr. Whereas MST7 induced increases of 10% in Vr and 190 nM in [ATPe], blocking swelling in a hyperosmotic medium + MST7 reduced [ATPe] by 40%. Pre-incubation of rbcs with 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two inhibitors of the ATP conduit pannexin 1, reduced [ATPe] by 40–50% and swelling by 40–60%, while in the presence of 80 U/mL apyrase, an ATPe scavenger, cell swelling was prevented. While exposure to 10 μM NF110, a blocker of ATP-P2X receptors mediating sodium influx, reduced [ATPe] by 48%, and swelling by 80%, incubation of cells in sodium free medium reduced swelling by 92%. Analysis and Discussion Results were analyzed by means of a mathematical model where ATPe kinetics and Vr kinetics were mutually regulated. Model dependent fit to experimental data showed that, upon MST7 exposure, ATP efflux required a fast 1960-fold increase of ATP permeability, mediated by two kinetically different conduits, both of which were activated by swelling and inactivated by time. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that, following MST7 exposure, ATP is released via two conduits, one of which is mediated by pannexin 1. The accumulated ATPe activates P2X receptors, followed by sodium influx, resulting in cell swelling, which in turn further activates ATP release. Thus swelling and P2X receptors constitute essential components of a positive feedback loop

  1. Dynamic Regulation of Cell Volume and Extracellular ATP of Human Erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Florencia Leal Denis

    Full Text Available The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7 triggered in human erythrocytes (rbcs the release of ATP and swelling. Since swelling is a well-known inducer of ATP release, and extracellular (ATPe, interacting with P (purinergic receptors, can affect cell volume (Vr, we explored the dynamic regulation between Vr and ATPe.We made a quantitative assessment of MST7-dependent kinetics of Vr and of [ATPe], both in the absence and presence of blockers of ATP efflux, swelling and P receptors.In rbcs 10 μM MST7 promoted acute, strongly correlated changes in [ATPe] and Vr. Whereas MST7 induced increases of 10% in Vr and 190 nM in [ATPe], blocking swelling in a hyperosmotic medium + MST7 reduced [ATPe] by 40%. Pre-incubation of rbcs with 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two inhibitors of the ATP conduit pannexin 1, reduced [ATPe] by 40-50% and swelling by 40-60%, while in the presence of 80 U/mL apyrase, an ATPe scavenger, cell swelling was prevented. While exposure to 10 μM NF110, a blocker of ATP-P2X receptors mediating sodium influx, reduced [ATPe] by 48%, and swelling by 80%, incubation of cells in sodium free medium reduced swelling by 92%.Results were analyzed by means of a mathematical model where ATPe kinetics and Vr kinetics were mutually regulated. Model dependent fit to experimental data showed that, upon MST7 exposure, ATP efflux required a fast 1960-fold increase of ATP permeability, mediated by two kinetically different conduits, both of which were activated by swelling and inactivated by time. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that, following MST7 exposure, ATP is released via two conduits, one of which is mediated by pannexin 1. The accumulated ATPe activates P2X receptors, followed by sodium influx, resulting in cell swelling, which in turn further activates ATP release. Thus swelling and P2X receptors constitute essential components of a positive feedback loop underlying ATP-induced ATP release of rbcs.

  2. Volume regulation in mammalian skeletal muscle: the role of sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporters during exposure to hypertonic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindinger, Michael I; Leung, Matthew; Trajcevski, Karin E; Hawke, Thomas J

    2011-06-01

    Controversy exists as to whether mammalian skeletal muscle is capable of volume regulation in response to changes in extracellular osmolarity despite evidence that muscle fibres have the required ion transport mechanisms to transport solute and water in situ. We addressed this issue by studying the ability of skeletal muscle to regulate volume during periods of induced hyperosmotic stress using single, mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibres and intact muscle (soleus and EDL). Fibres and intact muscles were loaded with the fluorophore, calcein, and the change in muscle fluorescence and width (single fibres only) used as a metric of volume change. We hypothesized that skeletal muscle exposed to increased extracellular osmolarity would elicit initial cellular shrinkage followed by a regulatory volume increase (RVI) with the RVI dependent on the sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporter (NKCC). We found that single fibres exposed to a 35% increase in extracellular osmolarity demonstrated a rapid, initial 27–32% decrease in cell volume followed by a RVI which took 10-20 min and returned cell volume to 90–110% of pre-stimulus values. Within intact muscle, exposure to increased extracellular osmolarity of varying degrees also induced a rapid, initial shrinkage followed by a gradual RVI, with a greater rate of initial cell shrinkage and a longer time for RVI to occur with increasing extracellular tonicities. Furthermore, RVI was significantly faster in slow-twitch soleus than fast-twitch EDL. Pre-treatment of muscle with bumetanide (NKCC inhibitor) or ouabain (Na+,K+-ATPase inhibitor), increased the initial volume loss and impaired the RVI response to increased extracellular osmolarity indicating that the NKCC is a primary contributor to volume regulation in skeletal muscle. It is concluded that mouse skeletal muscle initially loses volume then exhibits a RVI when exposed to increases in extracellular osmolarity. The rate of RVI is dependent on the

  3. Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Vacuolar Volumes by Plant Cells in Suspension Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Poole, Ronald J

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative microscopical measurements have been made of the proportion of cell volume occupied by cytoplasm in a cell suspension culture derived from cotyledons of bush bean (cv. Contender). On a 7-day culture cycle, the content of cytoplasm varies from 25% at the time of transfer to 45......% at the start of the phase of rapid cell division. If the culture is continued beyond 7 days, the vacuole volume reaches 90% of cell volume by day 12.Attempts to measure relative cytoplasmic volumes by compartmental analysis of nonelectrolyte efflux were unsuccessful. The proportion of cell volume occupied...... by cytoplasm is roughly correlated with protein content, but shows no correlation with cell size or with intracellular concentrations of K or Na. The most striking observation is that the growth of cytoplasmic volume for the culture as a whole appears to be constant throughout the culture cycle, despite...

  4. A noninvasive method to study regulation of extracellular fluid volume in rats using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NMR fluid measurements of commonly used rat strains when subjected to SQ normotonic or hypertonic salines, as well as physiologic comparisons to sedentary and...

  5. Volume regulated anion channel currents of rat hippocampal neurons and their contribution to oxygen-and-glucose deprivation induced neuronal death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaqiu Zhang

    Full Text Available Volume-regulated anion channels (VRAC are widely expressed chloride channels that are critical for the cell volume regulation. In the mammalian central nervous system, the physiological expression of neuronal VRAC and its role in cerebral ischemia are issues largely unknown. We show that hypoosmotic medium induce an outwardly rectifying chloride conductance in CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices. The induced chloride conductance was sensitive to some of the VRAC inhibitors, namely, IAA-94 (300 µM and NPPB (100 µM, but not to tamoxifen (10 µM. Using oxygen-and-glucose deprivation (OGD to simulate ischemic conditions in slices, VRAC activation appeared after OGD induced anoxic depolarization (AD that showed a progressive increase in current amplitude over the period of post-OGD reperfusion. The OGD induced VRAC currents were significantly inhibited by inhibitors for glutamate AMPA (30 µM NBQX and NMDA (40 µM AP-5 receptors in the OGD solution, supporting the view that induction of AD requires an excessive Na(+-loading via these receptors that in turn to activate neuronal VRAC. In the presence of NPPB and DCPIB in the post-OGD reperfusion solution, the OGD induced CA1 pyramidal neuron death, as measured by TO-PRO-3-I staining, was significantly reduced, although DCPIB did not appear to be an effective neuronal VRAC blocker. Altogether, we show that rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons express functional VRAC, and ischemic conditions can initial neuronal VRAC activation that may contribute to ischemic neuronal damage.

  6. Function curve of the membranes that regulate amniotic fluid volume in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Job; Anderson, Debra; Hohimer, Roger; Yang, Qin; Giraud, George; Davis, Lowell

    2005-07-01

    Seven singleton 120-day fetal lambs were prepared with a shunt from the lung to the gastric end of the esophagus, a bladder catheter, and multiple amniotic fluid and vascular catheters. The urachus was ligated. Beginning 7 days later, amniotic fluid volumes were determined by drainage, followed by replacement with 1 liter of lactated Ringer (LR) solution. Urine flow into the amnion was measured continuously. In 14 of 27 experiments, amniotic fluid volumes were determined again 2 days after the inflow into the amnion had consisted of urine only and in 13 experiments after the inflow of urine had been supplemented by an intraamniotic infusion of LR solution. Intramembranous absorption was calculated from the inflows and the changes in volume between the beginning and end of each experiment. The relations between absorption rate and amniotic fluid volume, the "function curves," were highly individual. Urine production during the infusion of LR solution did not decrease, fetal plasma renin activity decreased (P amniotic fluid volume increased by 140% [SE (27%), P amniotic fluid per day. During the infusion of LR solution, the increase in the rate of absorption matched the rate of infusion (both in ml/h), with a regression coefficient of 0.75 (P amniotic fluid volumes, volume is not limited by the absorptive capacity of the amniochorion, and, at least in these preparations, the position of the function curve and not the natural rate of inflow was the major determinant of resting amniotic fluid volume.

  7. Virtual patients and sensitivity analysis of the Guyton model of blood pressure regulation: towards individualized models of whole-body physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Moss

    Full Text Available Mathematical models that integrate multi-scale physiological data can offer insight into physiological and pathophysiological function, and may eventually assist in individualized predictive medicine. We present a methodology for performing systematic analyses of multi-parameter interactions in such complex, multi-scale models. Human physiology models are often based on or inspired by Arthur Guyton's whole-body circulatory regulation model. Despite the significance of this model, it has not been the subject of a systematic and comprehensive sensitivity study. Therefore, we use this model as a case study for our methodology. Our analysis of the Guyton model reveals how the multitude of model parameters combine to affect the model dynamics, and how interesting combinations of parameters may be identified. It also includes a "virtual population" from which "virtual individuals" can be chosen, on the basis of exhibiting conditions similar to those of a real-world patient. This lays the groundwork for using the Guyton model for in silico exploration of pathophysiological states and treatment strategies. The results presented here illustrate several potential uses for the entire dataset of sensitivity results and the "virtual individuals" that we have generated, which are included in the supplementary material. More generally, the presented methodology is applicable to modern, more complex multi-scale physiological models.

  8. Virtual patients and sensitivity analysis of the Guyton model of blood pressure regulation: towards individualized models of whole-body physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Grosse, Thibault; Marchant, Ivanny; Lassau, Nathalie; Gueyffier, François; Thomas, S Randall

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical models that integrate multi-scale physiological data can offer insight into physiological and pathophysiological function, and may eventually assist in individualized predictive medicine. We present a methodology for performing systematic analyses of multi-parameter interactions in such complex, multi-scale models. Human physiology models are often based on or inspired by Arthur Guyton's whole-body circulatory regulation model. Despite the significance of this model, it has not been the subject of a systematic and comprehensive sensitivity study. Therefore, we use this model as a case study for our methodology. Our analysis of the Guyton model reveals how the multitude of model parameters combine to affect the model dynamics, and how interesting combinations of parameters may be identified. It also includes a "virtual population" from which "virtual individuals" can be chosen, on the basis of exhibiting conditions similar to those of a real-world patient. This lays the groundwork for using the Guyton model for in silico exploration of pathophysiological states and treatment strategies. The results presented here illustrate several potential uses for the entire dataset of sensitivity results and the "virtual individuals" that we have generated, which are included in the supplementary material. More generally, the presented methodology is applicable to modern, more complex multi-scale physiological models.

  9. Positron emission tomographic evaluation of regulation of myocardial perfusion in physiological (elite athletes) and pathological (systemic hypertension) left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas; Meyer, Christian; Wachtell, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion (MP) may differ in physiologic and pathologic left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We compared MP in LVH in elite athletes and patients with hypertension with healthy, age-matched subjects. We included 12 rowers with LVH, 19 patients with hypertension with LVH, and 2 age-match...

  10. Dissociation of Blood Volume and Flow in Regulation of Salt and Water Balance in Burn Patients,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    arterial capacity, which is underfilled at sites of lower than in the patients in the present study (276 versus hormone control. 286 mosm/kg). The serum...well as looking at given ability to concentrate their urine and lower their voiding volume 02 consumption measured by indirect calorimetry. at night, I

  11. Energy saving system of terminal regulated air volume in intelligent building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIJiangtao; WANGPu

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the application and the prominent energy saving of the new tecnnique Terminai Reguiation Air Volume(TRAV) air conditioning systems in intelligent building. Furthermore, it studies the problem taking full advantage of the Building Automation System(BAS) to save energy and to meet with demands of the intelligent building individuation.

  12. Physiological and brain activity after a combined cognitive behavioral treatment plus video game therapy for emotional regulation in bulimia nervosa: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundo, Ana Beatriz; Via, Esther; Sánchez, Isabel; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Forcano, Laura; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Giner-Bartolomé, Cristina; Santamaría, Juan J; Ben-Moussa, Maher; Konstantas, Dimitri; Lam, Tony; Lucas, Mikkel; Nielsen, Jeppe; Lems, Peter; Cardoner, Narcís; Menchón, Jose M; de la Torre, Rafael; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando

    2014-08-12

    PlayMancer is a video game designed to increase emotional regulation and reduce general impulsive behaviors, by training to decrease arousal and improve decision-making and planning. We have previously demonstrated the usefulness of PlayMancer in reducing impulsivity and improving emotional regulation in bulimia nervosa (BN) patients. However, whether these improvements are actually translated into brain changes remains unclear. The aim of this case study was to report on a 28-year-old Spanish woman with BN, and to examine changes in physiological variables and brain activity after a combined treatment of video game therapy (VGT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Ten VGT sessions were carried out on a weekly basis. Anxiety, physiological, and impulsivity measurements were recorded. The patient was scanned in a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner, prior to and after the 10-week VGT/CBT combined treatment, using two paradigms: (1) an emotional face-matching task, and (2) a multi-source interference task (MSIT). Upon completing the treatment, a decrease in average heart rate was observed. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results indicated a post-treatment reduction in reaction time along with high accuracy. The patient engaged areas typically active in healthy controls, although the cluster extension of the active areas decreased after the combined treatment. These results suggest a global improvement in emotional regulation and impulsivity control after the VGT therapy in BN, demonstrated by both physiological and neural changes. These promising results suggest that a combined treatment of CBT and VGT might lead to functional cerebral changes that ultimately translate into better cognitive and emotional performances.

  13. Minimal volume regulation after shrinkage of red blood cells from five species of reptiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Karina; Berenbrink, Michael; Koldkjær, Pia

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from most vertebrates restore volume upon hypertonic shrinkage and the mechanisms underlying this regulatory volume increase (RVI) have been studied extensively in these cells. Despite the phylogenetically interesting position of reptiles, very little is known about their red...... cell function. The present study demonstrates that oxygenated RBCs in all major groups of reptiles exhibit no or a very reduced RVI upon ~ 25% calculated hyperosmotic shrinkage. Thus, RBCs from the snakes Crotalus durissus and Python regius, the turtle Trachemys scripta and the alligator Alligator...... was not characterized. It seems, therefore, that the RVI response based on NHE activation was lost among the early sauropsids that gave rise to modern reptiles and birds, while it was retained in mammals. An RVI response has then reappeared in birds, but based on activation of the NKCC. Alternatively, the absence...

  14. Physiological and genetic analysis of the carbon regulation of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coschigano, P W; Miller, S M; Magasanik, B

    1991-09-01

    We found that cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an elevated level of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH; encoded by the GDH2 gene) when grown with a nonfermentable carbon source or with limiting amounts of glucose, even in the presence of the repressing nitrogen source glutamine. This regulation was found to be transcriptional, and an upstream activation site (GDH2 UASc) sufficient for activation of transcription during respiratory growth conditions was identified. This UAS was found to be separable from a neighboring element which is necessary for the nitrogen source regulation of the gene, and strains deficient for the GLN3 gene product, required for expression of NAD-GDH during growth with the activating nitrogen source glutamate, were unaffected for the expression of NAD-GDH during growth with activating carbon sources. Two classes of mutations which prevented the normal activation of NAD-GDH in response to growth with nonfermentable carbon sources, but which did not affect the nitrogen-regulated expression of NAD-GDH, were found and characterized. Carbon regulation of GDH2 was found to be normal in hxk2, hap3, and hap4 strains and to be only slightly altered in a ssn6 strain; thus, in comparison with the regulation of previously identified glucose-repressed genes, a new pathway appears to be involved in the regulation of GDH2.

  15. Drinking-Water Standards and Regulations. Volume 2. Manual for 1982-88

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L.K.; Wang, M.H.S.

    1988-04-10

    The following 11 important documents are compiled for Drinking Water Standards and Regulations: (1) U.S. Environmental Agency Water Programs, National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations; (2) New Jersey Safe Drinking Water Act; (3) Summary of New Jersey Drinking Water Standards; (4) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Safe Drinking Water Act of 1986 Amendments; (5) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Primary Drinking Water Standards; (6) Canadian National Health and Welfare Drinking Water Quality Guidelines--Maximum Acceptable Concentrations; (7) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, Filtration and Disinfection Turbidity, Giardia Lamblia, Viruses, Legionella, and Heterotrophic Bacteria; (8) Public Water Supply Manual--Guide to the Safe Drinking Water Program; (9) Public Water Supply Manual--Emergency Response; (10) U.S. EPA Approved Krofta Chemicals; (11) NY-DOH Approved Krofta Chemicals.

  16. Attenuation of smoke induced neuronal and physiological changes by bacoside rich extract in Wistar rats via down regulation of HO-1 and iNOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T

    2014-01-01

    Bacopa monniera is well known herbal medicine for its neuropharmacological effects. It alleviates variety of disorders including neuronal and physiological changes. Crackers smoke is a potent risk factor that leads to free radical mediated oxidative stress in vivo. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the protective efficacy of B. monniera extract (BME) against crackers smoke induced neuronal and physiological changes via modulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in rats. Rats were exposed to smoke for 1h for a period of 3 weeks and consecutively treated with BME at three different dosages (i.e., 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg b.wt.). Our results elucidate that BME treatment ameliorates histopathalogical changes, reactive oxygen species levels, lipid peroxidation, acetylcholine esterase activity and brain neurotransmitter levels to normal. BME supplementation efficiently inhibited HO-1 expression and nitric oxide generation by down-regulating iNOS expression. Smoke induced depletion of antioxidant enzyme status, monoamine oxidase activity was also replenished by BME supplementation. Thus the present study indicates that BME ameliorates various impairments associated with neuronal and physiological changes in rats exposed to crackers smoke by its potent neuromodulatory, antioxidant and adaptogenic propensity.

  17. Nasal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Contact ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > ANATOMY > Nasal Physiology Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy ...

  18. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  19. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  20. Energy use in the marine transportation industry: Task II. Regulations and Tariffs. Final report, Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    The evaluation of the energy impacts of regulations and tariffs is structured around three sequential steps: identification of agencies and organizations that impact the commercial marine transportation industry; identification of existing or proposed regulations that were perceived to have a significant energy impact; and quantification of the energy impacts. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter II describes the regulatory structure of the commercial marine transportation industry and includes a description of the role of each organization and the legislative basis for their jurisdiction and an identification of major areas of regulation and those areas that have an energy impact. Chapters III through IX each address one of the 7 existing or proposed regulatory or legislative actions that have an energy impact. Energy impacts of the state of Washington's tanker regulations, of tanker segregated ballast requirements, of inland waterway user charges, of cargo pooling and service rationalization, of the availability of intermodal container transportation services, of capacity limitations at lock and dam 26 on the Mississippi River and the energy implications of the transportation alternatives available for the West Coast crude oil supplies are discussed. (MCW)

  1. APEX (Air Pollution Exercise) Volume 21: Legal References: Air Pollution Control Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Office of Manpower Development.

    The Legal References: Air Pollution Control Regulations Manual is the last in a set of 21 manuals (AA 001 009-001 029) used in APEX (Air Pollution Exercise), a computerized college and professional level "real world" game simulation of a community with urban and rural problems, industrial activities, and air pollution difficulties. The manual…

  2. Identification of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a novel bioactive amphibian neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity, and its physiological roles in the regulation of locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Haraguchi, Shogo; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Koyama, Teppei; Do Rego, Jean-Luc; Vaudry, Hubert

    2010-09-01

    We now know that steroids can be synthesized de novo by the brain and the peripheral nervous system. Such steroids are called neurosteroids and de novo neurosteroidogenesis from cholesterol is a conserved property of vertebrate brains. Our studies over the past decade have demonstrated that the brain expresses several kinds of steroidogenic enzymes and produces a variety of neurosteroids in sub-mammalian species. However, neurosteroid biosynthetic pathways in amphibians, as well as other vertebrates may still not be fully mapped. We first found that the newt brain actively produces 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a previously undescribed amphibian neurosteroid. We then demonstrated that 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone acts as a novel bioactive neurosteroid to stimulate locomotor activity of newt by means of the dopaminergic system. Subsequently, we analyzed the physiological roles of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone in the regulation of locomotor activity of newt. This paper summarizes the advances made in our understanding of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a newly discovered bioactive amphibian neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity, and its physiological roles in the regulation of locomotion in newt.

  3. Combinatorial control of diverse metabolic and physiological functions by transcriptional regulators of the yeast sulfur assimilation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Allegra A; McIsaac, R Scott; Ho-Shing, Olivia; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Botstein, David

    2012-08-01

    Methionine abundance affects diverse cellular functions, including cell division, redox homeostasis, survival under starvation, and oxidative stress response. Regulation of the methionine biosynthetic pathway involves three DNA-binding proteins-Met31p, Met32p, and Cbf1p. We hypothesized that there exists a "division of labor" among these proteins that facilitates coordination of methionine biosynthesis with diverse biological processes. To explore combinatorial control in this regulatory circuit, we deleted CBF1, MET31, and MET32 individually and in combination in a strain lacking methionine synthase. We followed genome-wide gene expression as these strains were starved for methionine. Using a combination of bioinformatic methods, we found that these regulators control genes involved in biological processes downstream of sulfur assimilation; many of these processes had not previously been documented as methionine dependent. We also found that the different factors have overlapping but distinct functions. In particular, Met31p and Met32p are important in regulating methionine metabolism, whereas p functions as a "generalist" transcription factor that is not specific to methionine metabolism. In addition, Met31p and Met32p appear to regulate iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis through direct and indirect mechanisms and have distinguishable target specificities. Finally, CBF1 deletion sometimes has the opposite effect on gene expression from MET31 and MET32 deletion.

  4. Preventing AID, a physiological mutator, from deleterious activation: regulation of the genomic instability that is associated with antibody diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Tran, Thinh Huy; Kobayashi, Maki; Aida, Masatoshi; Honjo, Tasuku

    2010-04-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential and sufficient to accomplish class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, which are two genetic events required for the generation of antibody-mediated memory responses. However, AID can also introduce genomic instability, giving rise to chromosomal translocation and/or mutations in proto-oncogenes. It is therefore important for cells to suppress AID expression unless B lymphocytes are stimulated by pathogens. The mechanisms for avoiding the accidental activation of AID and thereby avoiding genomic instability can be classified into three types: (i) transcriptional regulation, (ii) post-transcriptional regulation and (iii) target specificity. This review summarizes the recently elucidated comprehensive transcriptional regulation mechanisms of the AID gene and the post-transcriptional regulation that may be critical for preventing excess AID activity. Finally, we discuss why AID targets not only Igs but also other proto-oncogenes. AID targets many genes but it is not totally promiscuous and the criteria that specify its targets are unclear. A recent finding that a non-B DNA structure forms upon a decrease in topoisomerase 1 expression may explain this paradoxical target specificity determination. Evolution has chosen AID as a mutator of Ig genes because of its efficient DNA cleavage activity, even though its presence increases the risk of genomic instability. This is probably because immediate protection against pathogens is more critical for species survival than complete protection from the slower acting consequences of genomic instability, such as tumor formation.

  5. Disorders of erythrocyte volume homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogowska, E; Gallagher, P G

    2015-05-01

    Inherited disorders of erythrocyte volume homeostasis are a heterogeneous group of rare disorders with phenotypes ranging from dehydrated to overhydrated erythrocytes. Clinical, laboratory, physiologic, and genetic heterogeneities characterize this group of disorders. A series of recent reports have provided novel insights into our understanding of the genetic bases underlying some of these disorders of red cell volume regulation. This report reviews this progress in understanding determinants that influence erythrocyte hydration and how they have yielded a better understanding of the pathways that influence cellular water and solute homeostasis.

  6. Nitrogen as a key regulator of flowering in Fagus crenata: understanding the physiological mechanism of masting by gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yuko; Maruyama, Yosuke; Chiba, Yukako; Kobayashi, Masaki J; Joseph, Benesh; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Mochida, Keiichi; Hiura, Tsutom; Kon, Hirokazu; Satake, Akiko

    2014-10-01

    The role of resource availability in determining the incidence of masting has been widely studied, but how floral transition and initiation are regulated by the resource level is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that floral transition is stimulated by high resource availabiltiy in Fagus crenata based on a new technique, the expression analyses of flowering genes. We isolated F. crenata orthologues of FLOWERING LOCUS T, LEAFY and APETALA1, and confirmed their functions using transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. We monitored the gene expression levels for 5 years and detected a cycle of on and off years, which was correlated with fluctuations of the shoot-nitrogen concentration. Nitrogen fertilisation resulted in the significantly higher expression of flowering genes than the control, where all of the fertilised trees flowered, whereas the control did not. Our findings identified nitrogen as a key regulator of mast flowering, thereby providing new empirical evidence to support the resource budget model.

  7. Physiological and genetic analysis of the carbon regulation of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Coschigano, P W; Miller, S. M; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    We found that cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an elevated level of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH; encoded by the GDH2 gene) when grown with a nonfermentable carbon source or with limiting amounts of glucose, even in the presence of the repressing nitrogen source glutamine. This regulation was found to be transcriptional, and an upstream activation site (GDH2 UASc) sufficient for activation of transcription during respiratory growth conditions was identified. This U...

  8. Role of ACTH in the Interactive/Paracrine Regulation of Adrenal Steroid Secretion in Physiological and Pathophysiological Conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Herve Lefebvre; Michael Thomas; Duparc, Céline; Jerome Bertherat; Estelle Louiset

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In the normal human adrenal gland, steroid secretion is regulated by a complex network of autocrine/paracrine interactions involving bioactive signals released by endothelial cells, nerve terminals, chromaffin cells, immunocompetent cells, and adrenocortical cells themselves. ACTH can be locally produced by medullary chromaffin cells and is, therefore, a major mediator of the corticomedullary functional interplay. Plasma ACTH also triggers the release of angiogenic and...

  9. Swelling-activated ion channels: functional regulation in cell-swelling, proliferation and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stutzin, A; Hoffmann, E K

    2006-01-01

    Cell volume regulation is one of the most fundamental homeostatic mechanisms and essential for normal cellular function. At the same time, however, many physiological mechanisms are associated with regulatory changes in cell size meaning that the set point for cell volume regulation is under phys...... as key players in the maintenance of normal steady-state cell volume, with particular emphasis on the intracellular signalling pathways responsible for their regulation during hypotonic stress, cell proliferation and apoptosis....

  10. Free D-aspartate regulates neuronal dendritic morphology, synaptic plasticity, gray matter volume and brain activity in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, F; Nisticò, R; Di Giorgio, A; Squillace, M; Vitucci, D; Galbusera, A; Piccinin, S; Mango, D; Fazio, L; Middei, S; Trizio, S; Mercuri, N B; Teule, M A; Centonze, D; Gozzi, A; Blasi, G; Bertolino, A; Usiello, A

    2014-01-01

    D-aspartate (D-Asp) is an atypical amino acid, which is especially abundant in the developing mammalian brain, and can bind to and activate N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs). In line with its pharmacological features, we find that mice chronically treated with D-Asp show enhanced NMDAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and basal cerebral blood volume in fronto-hippocampal areas. In addition, we show that both chronic administration of D-Asp and deletion of the gene coding for the catabolic enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) trigger plastic modifications of neuronal cytoarchitecture in the prefrontal cortex and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and promote a cytochalasin D-sensitive form of synaptic plasticity in adult mouse brains. To translate these findings in humans and consistent with the experiments using Ddo gene targeting in animals, we performed a hierarchical stepwise translational genetic approach. Specifically, we investigated the association of variation in the gene coding for DDO with complex human prefrontal phenotypes. We demonstrate that genetic variation predicting reduced expression of DDO in postmortem human prefrontal cortex is mapped on greater prefrontal gray matter and activity during working memory as measured with MRI. In conclusion our results identify novel NMDAR-dependent effects of D-Asp on plasticity and physiology in rodents, which also map to prefrontal phenotypes in humans.

  11. Integrating the cell stress response: a new view of molecular chaperones as immunological and physiological homeostatic regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The response of cells to stress was first documented in the 1960s and 1970s and the molecular nature of the families of proteins that subserve this vital response, the molecular chaperones, were identified and subjected to critical study in the period from the late 1980s. This resulted in the rapidly advancing new field of protein folding and its role in cellular function. Emerging at the same time, but initially largely ignored, were reports that molecular chaperones could be released by cells and exist on the outer plasma membrane or in the body fluids. These secreted molecular chaperones were found to have intercellular signalling functions. There is now a growing body of evidence to support the hypothesis that molecular chaperones have properties ascribed to the Roman god Janus, the god of gates, doors, beginnings and endings, whose two faces point in different directions. Molecular chaperones appear to have one set of key functions within the cell and, potentially, a separate set of functions when they exist on the cell surface or in the various fluid phases of the body. Thus, it is a likely hypothesis that secreted molecular chaperones act as an additional level of homeostatic control possibly linking cellular stress to physiological systems such as the immune system. This review concentrates on three key molecular chaperones: Hsp10, Hsp60 and the Hsp70 family for which most information is available. An important consideration is the role that these proteins may play in human disease and in the treatment of human disease.

  12. Within-catchment variation in regulation of water use by eucalypts, and the roles of stomatal anatomy and physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharun, Mana; Turnbull, Tarryn; Adams, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how environmental cues impact water use of forested catchments is crucial for accurate calculation of water balance and effective catchment management in terrestrial ecosystems. We characterised structural and physiological properties of leaves and canopies of Eucalyptus delegatensis, E. pauciflora and E. radiata, the most common species in high-country catchments in temperate Australia. These properties were related to whole-tree water transport to assess differences in water use strategies among the three species. Stomatal conductance, instantaneous transpiration efficiency, stomatal occlusion (through cuticular ledges) and leaf area index differed significantly among species. Whole-tree water use of all species was strongly coupled to changes in vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and photosynthetically active radiation (Q), yet stomatal closure reduced water transport at VPD > 1 kPa in all species, even when soil water was not limiting. The observed differences in leaf traits and related water use strategies reflect species-specific adaptations to dominant environmental conditions within the landscape matrix of catchments. The generalist E. radiata seems to follow an opportunistic, while the two more spatially restricted species have adopted a pessimistic water use strategy. Catchment-scale models of carbon and water fluxes will need to reflect such variation in structure and function, if they are to fully capture species effects on water balance and yield.

  13. Unity in diversity, a systems approach to regulating plant cell physiology by 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Could a disjoint group of enzymes synchronize their activities and execute a complex multi-step, measurable, and reproducible response? Here, I surmise that the alpha-ketoglutarate dependent superfamily of non-haem iron (II) dioxygenases could influence cell physiology as a cohesive unit, and that the broad spectra of substrates transformed is an absolute necessity to this portrayal. This eclectic group comprises members from all major taxa, and participates in pesticide breakdown, hypoxia signaling, and osmotic stress neutralization. The oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinate is coupled with a concomitant substrate hydroxylation and, in most cases, is followed by an additional specialized conversion. The domain profile of a protein sequence was used as an index of miscellaneous reaction chemistry and interpreted alongside existent kinetic data in a linear model of integrated function. Statistical parameters were inferred by the creation of a novel, empirically motivated flat-file database of over 3800 sequences (DB2OG) with putative 2-oxoglutarate dependent activity. The collated information was categorized on the basis of existing annotation schema. The data suggests that 2OG-dependent enzymes incorporate several desirable features of a systems level player. DB2OG, is free, accessible without a login to all users, and available at the following URL (http://comp-biol.theacms.in/DB2OG.html).

  14. Endocrine factors in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake in females: a review of the physiological roles and interactions of ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, V; Gyorffy, A; Scalise, T J; Kiss, D S; Goszleth, G; Bartha, T; Frenyo, V L; Zsarnovszky, A

    2011-06-01

    Controlling energy homeostasis involves modulating the desire to eat and regulating energy expenditure. The controlling machinery includes a complex interplay of hormones secreted at various peripheral endocrine endpoints, such as the gastrointestinal tract, the adipose tissue, thyroid gland and thyroid hormone-exporting organs, the ovary and the pancreas, and, last but not least, the brain itself. The peripheral hormones that are the focus of the present review (ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin) play integrated regulatory roles in and provide feedback information on the nutritional and energetic status of the body. As peripheral signals, these hormones modulate central pathways in the brain, including the hypothalamus, to influence food intake, energy expenditure and to maintain energy homeostasis. Since the growth of the literature on the role of various hormones in the regulation of energy homeostasis shows a remarkable and dynamic expansion, it is now becoming increasingly difficult to understand the individual and interactive roles of hormonal mechanisms in their true complexity. Therefore, our goal is to review, in the context of general physiology, the roles of the five best-known peripheral trophic hormones (ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin, respectively) and discuss their interactions in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake.

  15. Potassium physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thier, S O

    1986-04-25

    Potassium is the most abundant exchangeable cation in the body. It exists predominantly in the intracellular fluid at concentrations of 140 to 150 meq/liter and in the extracellular fluid at concentrations of 3.5 to 5 meq/liter. The maintenance of the serum potassium concentration is a complex bodily function and results from the balance between intake, excretion, and distribution between intracellular and extracellular space. Ingested potassium is virtually completely absorbed from and minimally excreted through the intestine under nonpathologic circumstances. Renal excretion of potassium, which is the major chronic protective mechanism against abnormalities in potassium balance, depends on filtration, reabsorption, and a highly regulated distal nephron secretory process. Factors regulating potassium secretion include prior potassium intake, intracellular potassium, delivery of sodium chloride and poorly reabsorbable anions to the distal nephron, the urine flow rate, hormones such as aldosterone and beta-catecholamines, and the integrity of the renal tubular cell. The maintenance of distribution between the inside and outside of cells depends on the integrity of the cell membrane and its pumps, osmolality, pH, and the hormones insulin, aldosterone, beta 2-catecholamines, alpha-catecholamines, and prostaglandins. Both distribution across cell membranes and/or renal excretion of potassium may be altered by pharmacologic agents such as diuretics, alpha- and beta-catechol antagonists and agonists, depolarizing agents, and digitalis. Problems with hypokalemia and hyperkalemia can be analyzed on the basis of potassium physiology and pharmacology; proper treatment depends on an accurate analysis.

  16. Mechanism and regulation of peroxidase-catalyzed nitric oxide consumption in physiological fluids: critical protective actions of ascorbate and thiocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Martin D; Maiocchi, Sophie L; Kettle, Anthony J; Thomas, Shane R

    2014-07-01

    Catalytic consumption of nitric oxide (NO) by myeloperoxidase and related peroxidases is implicated as playing a key role in impairing NO bioavailability during inflammatory conditions. However, there are major gaps in our understanding of how peroxidases consume NO in physiological fluids, in which multiple reactive enzyme substrates and antioxidants are present. Notably, ascorbate has been proposed to enhance myeloperoxidase-catalyzed NO consumption by forming NO-consuming substrate radicals. However, we show that in complex biological fluids ascorbate instead plays a critical role in inhibiting NO consumption by myeloperoxidase and related peroxidases (lactoperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase) by acting as a competitive substrate for protein-bound redox intermediates and by efficiently scavenging peroxidase-derived radicals (e.g., urate radicals), yielding ascorbyl radicals that fail to consume NO. These data identify a novel mechanistic basis for how ascorbate preserves NO bioavailability during inflammation. We show that NO consumption by myeloperoxidase Compound I is significant in substrate-rich fluids and is resistant to competitive inhibition by ascorbate. However, thiocyanate effectively inhibits this process and yields hypothiocyanite at the expense of NO consumption. Hypothiocyanite can in turn form NO-consuming radicals, but thiols (albumin, glutathione) readily prevent this. Conversely, where ascorbate is absent, glutathione enhances NO consumption by urate radicals via pathways that yield S-nitrosoglutathione. Theoretical kinetic analyses provide detailed insights into the mechanisms by which ascorbate and thiocyanate exert their protective actions. We conclude that the local depletion of ascorbate and thiocyanate in inflammatory microenvironments (e.g., due to increased metabolism or dysregulated transport) will impair NO bioavailability by exacerbating peroxidase-catalyzed NO consumption.

  17. A physiologically regulated multidomain cystatin of wheat shows stage-dependent immunity against Karnal Bunt (Tilletia indica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Shalini; Sundaram, Shanthy; Verma, Praveen; Srivastava, Shaili; Kumar, Anil

    2012-12-01

    To identify novel components of basal resistance against the Tellitia indica of wheat, breeding for disease resistance was carried out on resistant and susceptible genotype of Karnal Bunt. The different members of wheat cystatin gene families were cloned, and their role in triggering differential resistance through co-expression was analyzed in our lab. The multidomain wheat cystatin (WCM) is a proteinase inhibitor characterized by cloning the gene from susceptible (WH542) and resistant genotype (HD 29). A WCM cDNA was isolated from both genotypes and sequenced. The WCM had a highly conserved N-terminal cystatin domain and a long C-terminal extension containing a second region, which exhibited similarity to the cystatin domain. The expression level was significantly (P > 0.001) higher in resistant compared to susceptible genotype at all the physiological stages of wheat spikes. In order to characterize the biochemical properties of WCM, the coding sequence was expressed in Escherichia coli using pET expression vector. The recombinant WCM was purified from soluble fraction of the cell extract by using affinity chromatography. WCM, with 23 KDa molecular mass, showed cysteine proteinase inhibitory activity against papain (Ki 3.039 × 10(-7) M) as determined by using BAPNA as substrate. Furthermore, it was able to arrest the fungal mycelial growth of T. indica. Hyphae growth was inhibited, and morphological changes such as swelling and fragmentation of the fungus were observed. Overall, these observations suggest an endogenous high expression of cystatin, possibly associated with the resistance of wheat against Karnal bunt.

  18. Blood volume-monitored regulation of ultrafiltration in fluid-overloaded hemodialysis patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hecking Manfred

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data generated with the body composition monitor (BCM, Fresenius show, based on bioimpedance technology, that chronic fluid overload in hemodialysis patients is associated with poor survival. However, removing excess fluid by lowering dry weight can be accompanied by intradialytic and postdialytic complications. Here, we aim at testing the hypothesis that, in comparison to conventional hemodialysis, blood volume-monitored regulation of ultrafiltration and dialysate conductivity (UCR and/or regulation of ultrafiltration and temperature (UTR will decrease complications when ultrafiltration volumes are systematically increased in fluid-overloaded hemodialysis patients. Methods/design BCM measurements yield results on fluid overload (in liters, relative to extracellular water (ECW. In this prospective, multicenter, triple-arm, parallel-group, crossover, randomized, controlled clinical trial, we use BCM measurements, routinely introduced in our three maintenance hemodialysis centers shortly prior to the start of the study, to recruit sixty hemodialysis patients with fluid overload (defined as ≥15% ECW. Patients are randomized 1:1:1 into UCR, UTR and conventional hemodialysis groups. BCM-determined, ‘final’ dry weight is set to normohydration weight −7% of ECW postdialysis, and reached by reducing the previous dry weight, in steps of 0.1 kg per 10 kg body weight, during 12 hemodialysis sessions (one study phase. In case of intradialytic complications, dry weight reduction is decreased, according to a prespecified algorithm. A comparison of intra- and post-dialytic complications among study groups constitutes the primary endpoint. In addition, we will assess relative weight reduction, changes in residual renal function, quality of life measures, and predialysis levels of various laboratory parameters including C-reactive protein, troponin T, and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, before and after the first study

  19. Transcriptional regulation of the outer membrane porin gene ompW reveals its physiological role during the transition from the aerobic to the anaerobic lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minfeng eXiao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in E. coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli.

  20. Changes in the physiological regulation of transpiration caused by the effects of industrial air pollution. [Cucumis sativus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozinka, V.; Klasova, A.; Niznansky, A.

    1963-01-01

    Through Hygen's method of quantitative analysis of transpiration curves, the authors studied the intensity of stomatal and cuticular transpiration of germinating leaves of Cucumis sativus which were experimentally exposed to solid impurities containing F. The difference between the control and experimental plants shows that the impurities not only blocked the regulating system of breathing but also caused increased cuticular transpiration. Numerous lesions were observed; cuticle damage also spread to the inner tissues. A direct relationship between microscopic and macroscopic symptoms was not proven. The creation of conditions adverse to the normal development of the water balance was intensified when the impurities were dropped onto the surface of the leaves. The possible protective function of trichomes is mentioned, but applies only when the impurities settle on a dry surface.

  1. Insights into Enzyme Catalysis and Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Cerebral Ketimine Reductase/μ-Crystallin Under Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen, André; Cooper, Arthur J L; Jamie, Joanne F; Karuso, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Mammalian ketimine reductase is identical to μ-crystallin (CRYM)-a protein that is also an important thyroid hormone binding protein. This dual functionality implies a role for thyroid hormones in ketimine reductase regulation and also a reciprocal role for enzyme catalysis in thyroid hormone bioavailability. In this research we demonstrate potent sub-nanomolar inhibition of enzyme catalysis at neutral pH by the thyroid hormones L-thyroxine and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine, whereas other thyroid hormone analogues were shown to be far weaker inhibitors. We also investigated (a) enzyme inhibition by the substrate analogues pyrrole-2-carboxylate, 4,5-dibromopyrrole-2-carboxylate and picolinate, and (b) enzyme catalysis at neutral pH of the cyclic ketimines S-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine ketimine (owing to the complex nomenclature trivial names are used for the sulfur-containing cyclic ketimines as per the original authors' descriptions) (AECK), Δ(1)-piperideine-2-carboxylate (P2C), Δ(1)-pyrroline-2-carboxylate (Pyr2C) and Δ(2)-thiazoline-2-carboxylate. Kinetic data obtained at neutral pH suggests that ketimine reductase/CRYM plays a major role as a P2C/Pyr2C reductase and that AECK is not a major substrate at this pH. Thus, ketimine reductase is a key enzyme in the pipecolate pathway, which is the main lysine degradation pathway in the brain. In silico docking of various ligands into the active site of the X-ray structure of the enzyme suggests an unusual catalytic mechanism involving an arginine residue as a proton donor. Given the critical importance of thyroid hormones in brain function this research further expands on our knowledge of the connection between amino acid metabolism and regulation of thyroid hormone levels.

  2. Adiponectin and adiponectin receptor system in the rat adrenal gland: ontogenetic and physiologic regulation, and its involvement in regulating adrenocortical growth and steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Lukasz; Zemleduch, Tomasz; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2010-09-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is a regulatory peptide secreted mostly by adipose tissue and acting via two receptors: AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Our aim was to investigate expression of adiponectin system genes in the rat adrenal gland as well as its ontogenetic and physiological control. Furthermore, we examined the effects of acute and prolonged activation of HPA axis on ADN system in adipose tissue. By means of QPCR, ADN and AdipoR1 expression was demonstrated in rat adrenal cortex both at mRNA and protein levels, while AdipoR2 could only be detected at mRNA levels. ADN expression level was significantly upregulated in a developing and regenerating adrenal cortex. Globular domain of adiponectin at 10(-9) M stimulated corticosterone output and BrdU incorporation by cultured rat adrenocortical cells. Moreover, both acute (ACTH and ether stress) and prolonged (ACTH) adrenal stimulation resulted in lowered ADN levels, while expression of AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 was upregulated by the acute treatment. Depending on its site of origin, visceral (VAT) or subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue responded differently to alterations in HPA axis. VAT expression of ADN and its receptors remained almost unchanged by experimental manipulations. In SAT, on the other hand, expression of ADN and AdipoR2 was markedly increased by ACTH treatment and stress, while dexamethasone suppressed ADN and AdipoR1 mRNA levels. The results of this study provide new evidence for direct and indirect interactions between adipokines and HPA axis.

  3. Physiology of Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, David W; Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF Far from a simple absence of wakefulness, sleep is an active, regulated, and metabolically distinct state, essential for health and well-being. In this article, the authors review the fundamental anatomy and physiology of sleep and its regulation, with an eye toward interactions between sleep and metabolism.

  4. Regulation of phosphorylase kinase by low concentrations of Ca ions upon muscle contraction: the connection between metabolism and muscle contraction and the connection between muscle physiology and Ca-dependent signal transduction

    OpenAIRE

    OZAWA, Eijiro

    2011-01-01

    It had long been one of the crucial questions in muscle physiology how glycogenolysis is regulated in connection with muscle contraction, when we found the answer to this question in the last half of the 1960s. By that time, the two principal currents of muscle physiology, namely, the metabolic flow starting from glycogen and the mechanisms of muscle contraction, had already been clarified at the molecular level thanks to our senior researchers. Thus, the final question we had to answer was h...

  5. Human Milk Cells Contain Numerous miRNAs that May Change with Milk Removal and Regulate Multiple Physiological Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alsaweed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human milk (HM is a complex biofluid conferring nutritional, protective and developmental components for optimal infant growth. Amongst these are maternal cells, which change in response to feeding and were recently shown to be a rich source of miRNAs. We used next generation sequencing to characterize the cellular miRNA profile of HM collected before and after feeding. HM cells conserved higher miRNA content than the lipid and skim HM fractions or other body fluids, in accordance with previous studies. In total, 1467 known mature and 1996 novel miRNAs were identified, with 89 high-confidence novel miRNAs. HM cell content was higher post-feeding (p < 0.05, and was positively associated with total miRNA content (p = 0.014 and species number (p < 0.001. This coincided with upregulation of 29 known and 2 novel miRNAs, and downregulation of 4 known and 1 novel miRNAs post-feeding, but no statistically significant change in expression was found for the remaining miRNAs. These findings suggest that feeding may influence the miRNA content of HM cells. The most highly and differentially expressed miRNAs were key regulators of milk components, with potential diagnostic value in lactation performance. They are also involved in the control of body fluid balance, thirst, appetite, immune response, and development, implicating their functional significance for the infant.

  6. Effects of regulated deficit irrigation on physiology, yield and fruit quality in apricot trees under Mediterranean conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Pérez-Sarmiento

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Scarce water resources mainly in arid and semi-arid areas have caused an increasing interest for applying irrigation protocols aiming to reduce water spends. The effects of regulated deficit irrigation (RDI on the performance of apricot trees (Prunus armeniaca L. cv. “Búlida” were assessed in Murcia (SE Spain, during three consecutive growing seasons (2008-2010. The hypothesis was that RDI would not restrict yield but increase fruit quality while saving water. Two irrigation treatments were established: i control, irrigated to fully satisfy crop water requirements (100% ETc and ii RDI, that reduced the amount of applied water to: a 40% of ETc at flowering and stage I of fruit growth; b 60% of ETc during the stage II of fruit growth and c 50% and 25% of ETc during the late postharvest period (from 60 days after harvest. Stem water potential, gas exchanges, trunk cross-sectional area (TCSA, fruit diameter, yield and fruit quality traits were determined. Vegetative growth was decreased by the use of RDI (12% less TCSA on average for the three years, whereas yield was unaffected. In addition, some qualitative characteristics of the fruits, such as the level of soluble solids, sweetness/acidity relation and fruit colour, were improved by the use of RDI. These results and average water savings of approximately 30%, lead us to conclude that RDI strategies are a possible solution for irrigation management in areas with water shortages, such as arid and semi-arid environments.

  7. Enterobacter asburiae KE17 association regulates physiological changes and mitigates the toxic effects of heavy metals in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S-M; Radhakrishnan, R; You, Y-H; Khan, A-L; Lee, K-E; Lee, J-D; Lee, I-J

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the role played by Enterobacter asburiae KE17 in the growth and metabolism of soybeans during copper (100 μm Cu) and zinc (100 μm Zn) toxicity. When compared to controls, plants grown under Cu and Zn stress exhibited significantly lower growth rates, but inoculation with E. asburiae KE17 increased growth rates of stressed plants. The concentrations of plant hormones (abscisic acid and salicylic acid) and rates of lipid peroxidation were higher in plants under heavy metal stress, while total chlorophyll, carotenoid content and total polyphenol concentration were lower. While the bacterial treatment reduced the abscisic acid and salicylic acid content and lipid peroxidation rate of Cu-stressed plants, it also increased the concentration of photosynthetic pigments and total polyphenol. Moreover, the heavy metals induced increased accumulation of free amino acids such as aspartic acid, threonine, serine, glycine, alanine, leucine, isoleucine, tyrosine, proline and gamma-aminobutyric acid, while E. asburiae KE17 significantly reduced concentrations of free amino acids in metal-affected plants. Co-treatment with E. asburiae KE17 regulated nutrient uptake by enhancing nitrogen content and inhibiting Cu and Zn accumulation in soybean plants. The results of this study suggest that E. asburiae KE17 mitigates the effects of Cu and Zn stress by reprogramming plant metabolic processes.

  8. Voltage-gated potassium channels involved in regulation of physiological function in MrgprA3-specific itch neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Wu, Guanyi; Wang, Zhongli; Yang, Niuniu; Shi, Hao; He, Qian; Zhu, Chan; Yang, Yan; Yu, Guang; Wang, Changming; Yuan, Xiaolin; Liu, Qin; Guan, Yun; Dong, Xinzhong; Tang, Zongxiang

    2016-04-01

    Itch is described as an unpleasant or irritating skin sensation that elicits the desire or reflex to scratch. MrgprA3, one of members of the Mrgprs family, is specifically expressed in a subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). These MrgprA3-expressing DRG neurons have been identified as itch-specific neurons. They can be activated by the compound, chloroquine, which is used as a drug to treat malaria. In the present study, we labeled these itch-specific neurons using the method of molecular genetic markers, and then studied their electrophysiological properties. We also recorded the cutaneous MrgprA3(-) neurons retrogradely labeled by Dil dye (MrgprA3(-)-Dil). We first found that MrgprA3(+) neurons have a lower excitability than MrgprA3(-) neurons (MrgprA3(-)-non-Dil and MrgprA3(-)-Dil). The number of action potential (AP) was reduced more obviously in MrgprA3(+) neurons than that of in MrgprA3(-) neurons. In most cases, MrgprA3(+) neurons only generated single AP; however, in MrgprA3(-) neurons, the same stimulation could induce multiple AP firing due to the greater voltage-gated potassium (Kv) current existence in MrgprA3(+) than in MrgprA3(-) neurons. Thus, Kv current plays an important role in the regulation of excitability in itch-specific neurons.

  9. Physiological Regulation of an Alkaline-Resistant Laccase Produced by Perenniporia tephropora and Efficiency in Biotreatment of Pulp Mill Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerapatsakul, Churapa

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of alkaline-resistant laccase from Perenniporia tephropora KU-Alk4 was proved to be controlled by several factors. One important factor was the initial pH, which drove the fungus to produce different kinds of ligninolytic enzymes. P. tephropora KU-Alk4 could grow at pH 4.5, 7.0, and 8.0. The fungus produced laccase and MnP at pH 7.0, but only laccase at pH 8.0. The specific activity of laccase in the pH 8.0 culture was higher than that in the pH 7.0 culture. At pH 8.0, glucose was the best carbon source for laccase production but growth was better with lactose. Low concentrations of glucose at 0.1% to 1.0% enhanced laccase production, while concentrations over 1% gave contradictory results. Veratryl alcohol induced the production of laccase. A trace concentration of copper ions was required for laccase production. Biomass increased with an increasing rate of aeration of shaking flasks from 100 to 140 rpm; however, shaking at over 120 rpm decreased laccase quantity. Highest amount of laccase produced by KU-Alk4, 360 U/mL, was at pH 8.0 with 1% glucose and 0.2 mM copper sulfate, unshaken for the first 3 days, followed by addition of 0.85 mM veratryl alcohol and shaking at 120 rpm. The crude enzyme was significantly stable in alkaline pH 8.0~10.0 for 24 hr. After treating the pulp mill effluent with the KU-Alk4 system for 3 days, pH decreased from 9.6 to 6.8, with reduction of color and chemical oxygen demand at 83.2% and 81%, respectively. Laccase was detectable during the biotreatment process. PMID:28154483

  10. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Saha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H, and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP+ showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium.

  11. More than just a vulnerable pipeline: xylem physiology in the light of ion-mediated regulation of plant water transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Andrea; Salleo, Sebastiano; Jansen, Steven

    2011-10-01

    Major restrictions to the hydraulic conductance of xylem (K(XYL)) in vascular plants have traditionally been attributed to anatomical constraints. More recently, changes in the cationic concentration of xylem sap have been suggested to be responsible for short-term changes in K(XYL) based on data for 35 dicot species, and very few gymnosperms and ferns, indicating that xylem water transport may no longer be considered as an entirely passive process. Recent studies have revealed that this so-called ionic effect: (i) varies from little or no increase to >30%, (ii) is species specific, (iii) changes on a seasonal basis, (iv) depends on the cationic concentration, (v) is enhanced in embolized stems, and (vi) is positively correlated with vessel grouping. Furthermore, the ionic effect has been suggested to play functional roles in planta with respect to: (i) phloem-mediated control of xylem hydraulic properties, (ii) compensation of cavitation-induced loss of hydraulic conductance, with the result of optimizing light and water utilization, and (iii) differential regulation of water delivery to branches exposed to different levels of light. Pits are likely to play a key role in the ionic effect, which has largely been explained as a consequence of the poly-electrolytic nature and hydrogel properties of the pectic matrix of interconduit pit membranes, despite little evidence that pit membrane pectins remain present after cell hydrolysis. More research is needed to address the ionic effect in more species, physico-chemical properties of pit membranes, and how the ionic effect may increase xylem hydraulic conductance 'on demand'.

  12. Daily expression of genes coding for neurotransmitters in central and peripheral tissues of redheaded bunting: Implication for circadian regulation of physiology in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ila; Singh, Devraj; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    In birds, circadian control of tissue level communication is not well understood. The present study investigated this, by monitoring daily oscillation of genes coding for peptides (neuropeptide Y, NPY; vasoactive intestinal peptide, VIP; somatostatis, SST) and intermediary enzymes of amine and amino acid neurotransmitters (dopamine [tyrosine hydroxylase, TH]; glutamate [glutaminase, GLS; glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase 2, GOT2]; gamma amino butyric actid, GABA [glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65]) biosynthetic pathway, along with c-FOS as an activation marker, in different tissues of migratory redheaded buntings, Emberiza bruniceps. We cloned a partial sequence of these genes, and measured their mRNA expression in the 'central' clock (retina, hypothalamus) and peripheral (heart, stomach, gut, liver) tissues, collected at six times (ZT 2, 6, 11, 13, 18 and 23; ZT 0 = lights on) from birds (n = 4/ ZT) in the 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle. There were daily mRNA oscillations of all genes, although with a tissue-specific expression pattern as well as with the differential phase relationships in genes within and between tissues. These results support a conserved tissue level circadian regulation of genes coding for peptide, amine and amino acid neurotransmitters, and substantiate the expression and plausible role of neurotransmitters in the peripheral tissues. We suggest a tissue-specific contribution of neurotransmitters in the circadian regulation of physiology and behaviour in a seasonal migratory species, the redheaded bunting.

  13. Fat Body dSir2 Regulates Muscle Mitochondrial Physiology and Energy Homeostasis Nonautonomously and Mimics the Autonomous Functions of dSir2 in Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kushal K.; Ayyub, Champakali; Sengupta, Samudra

    2013-01-01

    Sir2 is an evolutionarily conserved NAD+-dependent deacetylase which has been shown to play a critical role in glucose and fat metabolism. In this study, we have perturbed Drosophila Sir2 (dSir2) expression, bidirectionally, in muscles and the fat body. We report that dSir2 plays a critical role in insulin signaling, glucose homeostasis, and mitochondrial functions. Importantly, we establish the nonautonomous functions of fat body dSir2 in regulating mitochondrial physiology and insulin signaling in muscles. We have identified a novel interplay between dSir2 and dFOXO at an organismal level, which involves Drosophila insulin-like peptide (dILP)-dependent insulin signaling. By genetic perturbations and metabolic rescue, we provide evidence to illustrate that fat body dSir2 mediates its effects on the muscles via free fatty acids (FFA) and dILPs (from the insulin-producing cells [IPCs]). In summary, we show that fat body dSir2 is a master regulator of organismal energy homeostasis and is required for maintaining the metabolic regulatory network across tissues. PMID:23129806

  14. CD30 antigen: not a physiological marker for TH2 cells but an important costimulator molecule in the regulation of the balance between TH1/TH2 response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Patrizia; Berghella, Anna Maria; Contasta, Ida; Adorno, Domenico

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the physiological role of CD30 would be an important step forward in transplants because CD30+ T cells can be induced by alloantigens even in the presence of immunosuppressives such as cyclosporine (Csa) and hence can act as regulatory cells in allograft. The results of functional studies on purified T CD30+ cell populations led us to hypothesize that the CD30 costimulator molecule is not a specific marker for TH2 cells in normal conditions, as has been suggested, but rather a marker for an important immunoregulatory subpopulation that regulates the balance between TH1 and TH2 (TH1/TH2) type response. To substantiate this hypothesis we studied the TH1/TH2 cytokine network in peripheral whole blood cultures stimulate with M44 CD30 ligand (CD30L), an agonistic monoclonal antibody (mAb). Four types of whole blood culture were used: the first had been stimulated with anti-CD3 mAb which generates a CD30 cytokine profile similar to alloreactive stimulation; the second with anti-CD3 mAb+M81 (an anti-CD30L mAb) to inhibit CD30/CD30L interaction; the third with anti-CD3+anti-interleukin (IL)4 mAbs to counteract IL4 activity and the fourth with anti-CD3+anti-interferon (IFN)gamma mAbs to counteract IFNgamma activity. Network interactions between soluble CD30 (sCD30, a maker of CD30 expression), sBcl2 (a marker of cell survival) and TH1/TH2 cytokines (IFNgamma, IL2, IL12p70, IL12p40, IL4, IL5 and IL10) were then studied in the supernatants obtained. Our results confirm the hypothesis above by showing that CD30 signals trigger functional mechanisms responsible for changes in levels of production of several important TH1 and TH2 cytokines involved in the regulation of the physiological balance between TH1/TH2 functions. The CD30-stimulated network, in fact, induces IFNgamma production linked to TH1 activity (-->TH1) which is subsequently integrated by IL4 production linked to TH2 activity (-->TH2). This production appears to be regulated, respectively, by IL12p40

  15. Cell volume homeostatic mechanisms: effectors and signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, E K; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig

    2011-01-01

    . Later work addressed the mechanisms through which cellular signalling pathways regulate the volume regulatory effectors or flux pathways. These studies were facilitated by the molecular identification of most of the relevant channels and transporters, and more recently also by the increased...... understanding of their structures. Finally, much current research in the field focuses on the most up- and downstream components of these paths: how cells sense changes in cell volume, and how cell volume changes in turn regulate cell function under physiological and pathophysiological conditions....

  16. User's guide for PRISIM (Plant Risk Status Information Management System) Arkansas Nuclear One--Unit 1: Volume 2, Program for regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.J.; Guthrie, V.H.; Kirchner, J.R.; Kirkman, J.Q.; Paula, H.M.; Ellison, B.C.; Dycus, F.M.; Farquharson, J.A.; Flanagan, G.F.

    1988-03-01

    This user's guide is a two-volume document designed to teach NRC inspectors and NRC regulators how to access probabilistic risk assessment information from the two Plant Risk Status Information Management System (PRISIM) programs developed for Arkansas Nuclear One--Unit One (ANA-1). This document, Volume 2, describes how the PRA information available in Version 2.0 of PRISIM is useful as an evaluation tool for regulatory activities. Using PRISIM is useful as an evaluation tool for regulatory activities. Using PRISIM, regulators can both access PRA information and modify the information to assess the impact these changes may have on plant safety. Each volume is a stand-alone document.

  17. Monitoring water stress and fruit quality in an orange orchard under regulated deficit irrigation using narrow-band structural and physiological remote sensing indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagakis, S.; González-Dugo, V.; Cid, P.; Guillén-Climent, M. L.; Zarco-Tejada, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper deals with the monitoring of water status and the assessment of the effect of stress on citrus fruit quality using structural and physiological remote sensing indices. Four flights were conducted over a citrus orchard in 2009 using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) carrying a multispectral camera with six narrow spectral bands in the visible and near infrared. Physiological indices such as the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI570), a new structurally robust PRI formulation that uses the 515 nm as the reference band (PRI515), and a chlorophyll ratio (R700/R670) were compared against the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Renormalized Difference Vegetation Index (RDVI) and Modified Triangular Vegetation Index (MTVI) canopy structural indices for their performance in tracking water status and the effects of sustained water stress on fruit quality at harvest. The irrigation setup in the commercial orchard was compared against a treatment scheduled to satisfy full requirements (based on estimated crop evapotranspiration) using two regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) strategies. The water status of the trees throughout the experiment was monitored with frequent field measurements of stem water potential (Ψx), while titratable acidity (TA) and total soluble solids (TSS) were measured at harvest on selected trees from each irrigation treatment. The high spatial resolution of the multispectral imagery (30 cm pixel size) enabled identification of pure tree crown components, extracting the tree reflectance from shaded, sunlit and aggregated pixels. The physiological and structural indices were then calculated from each tree at the following levels: (i) pure sunlit tree crown, (ii) entire crown, aggregating the within-crown shadows, and (iii) simulating a lower resolution pixel, including tree crown, sunlit and shaded soil pixels. The resulting analysis demonstrated that both PRI formulations were able to track water status, except when water stress

  18. Living high training low induces physiological cardiac hypertrophy accompanied by down-regulation and redistribution of the renin-angiotensin system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei SHI; J Gary MESZAROS; Shao-ju ZENG; Ying-yu SUN; Ming-xue ZUO

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Living high training low" (LHTL) is an exercise-training protocol that refers living in hypoxia stress and training at normal level of O2.In this study,we investigated whether LHTL caused physiological heart hypertrophy accompanied by changes of biomarkers in reninangiotensin system in rats.Methods:Adult male SD rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups,and trained on living low-sedentary (LLS,control),living lowtraining low (LLTL),living high-sedentary (LHS) and living high-training low (LHTL) protocols,respectively,for 4 weeks.Hematological parameters,hemodynamic measurement,heart hypertrophy and plasma angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) level of the rats were measured.The gene and protein expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE),angiotensinogen (AGT) and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor Ⅰ (AT1) in heart tissue was assessed using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry,respectively.Results:LLTL,LHS and LHTL significantly improved cardiac function,increased hemoglobin concentration and RBC.At the molecular level,LLTL,LHS and LHTL significantly decreased the expression of ACE,AGT and AT1 genes,but increased the expression of ACE and AT1 proteins in heart tissue.Moreover,ACE and AT1 protein expression was significantly increased in the endocardium,but unchanged in the epicardium.Conclusion:LHTL training protocol suppresses ACE,AGT and AT1 gene expression in heart tissue,but increases ACE and AT1 protein expression specifically in the endocardium,suggesting that the physiological heart hypertrophy induced by LHTL is regulated by regionspecific expression of renin-angiotensin system components.

  19. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M.

    2017-01-01

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo–conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox–mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate–induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential. PMID:28289711

  20. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J; Chapleau, Mark W; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M

    2017-03-09

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo-conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox-mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential.

  1. Sulphonic acid derivatives as probes of pore properties of volume-regulated anion channels in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droogmans, G; Maertens, C; Prenen, J; Nilius, B

    1999-09-01

    1. We have used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to study the effects of 4-sulphonic-calixarenes and some other poly-sulphonic acid agents, such as suramin and basilen blue, on volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) currents in cultured endothelial cells (CPAE cells). 2. The 4-sulphonic-calixarenes induced a fast inhibition at positive potentials but were ineffective at negative potentials. At small positive potentials, 4-sulphonic-calix[4]arene was a more effective inhibitor than 4-sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene, which became more effective at more positive potentials. 3. Also suramin and basilen blue induced a voltage dependent current inhibition, reaching a maximum around +40 mV and declining at more positive potentials. 4. The voltage dependence of inhibition was modelled by assuming that these negatively charged molecules bind to a site inside VRAC that senses a fraction delta of the applied electrical field, ranging beween 0.16 to 0.32. 4-Sulphonic-calix[4]arene, suramin and basilen blue bind and occlude VRAC at moderate potentials, but permeate the channel at more positive potentials. 4-Sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene however do not permeate the channel. From the structural information of the calixarenes, we estimate a lower and upper limit of 11*12 and 17*12 A2 respectively for the cross-sectional area of the pore.

  2. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume III of III; Disease and Physiology Supplements, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slatick, Emil; Gilbreath, Lyle G.; Harmon, Jerrel R. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Centr, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-03

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Aquaculture Task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status of the stocks was quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains five previously published papers.

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis regulates physiology and performance of Digitaria eriantha plants subjected to abiotic stresses by modulating antioxidant and jasmonate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedranzani, H; Rodríguez-Rivera, M; Gutiérrez, M; Porcel, R; Hause, B; Ruiz-Lozano, J M

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluates antioxidant responses and jasmonate regulation in Digitaria eriantha cv. Sudafricana plants inoculated (AM) and non-inoculated (non-AM) with Rhizophagus irregularis and subjected to drought, cold, or salinity. Stomatal conductance, photosynthetic efficiency, biomass production, hydrogen peroxide accumulation, lipid peroxidation, antioxidants enzymes activities, and jasmonate levels were determined. Stomatal conductance and photosynthetic efficiency decreased in AM and non-AM plants under all stress conditions. However, AM plants subjected to drought, salinity, or non-stress conditions showed significantly higher stomatal conductance values. AM plants subjected to drought or non-stress conditions increased their shoot/root biomass ratios, whereas salinity and cold caused a decrease in these ratios. Hydrogen peroxide accumulation, which was high in non-AM plant roots under all treatments, increased significantly in non-AM plant shoots under cold stress and in AM plants under non-stress and drought conditions. Lipid peroxidation increased in the roots of all plants under drought conditions. In shoots, although lipid peroxidation decreased in AM plants under non-stress and cold conditions, it increased under drought and salinity. AM plants consistently showed high catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity under all treatments. By contrast, the glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of AM roots was lower than that of non-AM plants and increased in shoots. The endogenous levels of cis-12-oxophytodienoc acid (OPDA), jasmonic acid (JA), and 12-OH-JA showed a significant increase in AM plants as compared to non-AM plants. 11-OH-JA content only increased in AM plants subjected to drought. Results show that D. eriantha is sensitive to drought, salinity, and cold stresses and that inoculation with AM fungi regulates its physiology and performance under such conditions, with antioxidants and jasmonates being involved

  4. High efficiency cell-recycle continuous sodium gluconate production by Aspergillus niger using on-line physiological parameters association analysis to regulate feed rate rationally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Li, Chao; Wang, Zejian; Zhao, Wei; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a system of cell-recycle continuous fermentation for sodium gluconate (SG) production by Aspergillus niger (A. niger) was established. Based on initial continuous fermentation result (100.0h) with constant feed rate, an automatic feedback strategy to regulate feed rate using on-line physiological parameters (OUR and DO) was proposed and applied successfully for the first time in the improved continuous fermentation (240.5h). Due to less auxiliary time, highest SG production rate (31.05±0.29gL(-1)h(-1)) and highest yield (0.984±0.067molmol(-1)), overall SG production capacity (975.8±5.8gh(-1)) in 50-L fermentor of improved continuous fermentation increased more than 300.0% compared to that of batch fermentation. Improvement of mass transfer and dispersed mycelia morphology were the two major reasons responsible for the high SG production rate. This system had been successfully applied to industrial fermentation and SG production was greatly improved.

  5. Decreasing the mitochondrial synthesis of malate in potato tubers does not affect plastidial starch synthesis, suggesting that the physiological regulation of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase is context dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szecowka, Marek; Osorio, Sonia; Obata, Toshihiro; Araújo, Wagner L; Rohrmann, Johannes; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2012-12-01

    Modulation of the malate content of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit by altering the expression of mitochondrially localized enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle resulted in enhanced transitory starch accumulation and subsequent effects on postharvest fruit physiology. In this study, we assessed whether such a manipulation would similarly affect starch biosynthesis in an organ that displays a linear, as opposed to a transient, kinetic of starch accumulation. For this purpose, we used RNA interference to down-regulate the expression of fumarase in potato (Solanum tuberosum) under the control of the tuber-specific B33 promoter. Despite displaying similar reductions in both fumarase activity and malate content as observed in tomato fruit expressing the same construct, the resultant transformants were neither characterized by an increased flux to, or accumulation of, starch, nor by alteration in yield parameters. Since the effect in tomato was mechanistically linked to derepression of the reaction catalyzed by ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, we evaluated whether the lack of effect on starch biosynthesis was due to differences in enzymatic properties of the enzyme from potato and tomato or rather due to differential subcellular compartmentation of reductant in the different organs. The results are discussed in the context both of current models of metabolic compartmentation and engineering.

  6. Physiological Networks: towards systems physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-02-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate new dimensions to the field of systems physiology.

  7. Physiological regulation of lipoprotein lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL), originally identified as the clearing factor lipase, hydrolyzes triglycerides present in the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins VLDL and chylomicrons. LPL is primarily expressed in tissues that oxidize or store fatty acids in large quantities such as the heart, skele

  8. Evaluation of selected-ion flow-tube mass spectrometry for the measurement of ethanol, methanol and isopropanol in physiological fluids: effect of osmolality and sample volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowbottom, Lynn; Workman, Clive; Roberts, Norman B

    2009-09-01

    Selected-ion flow-tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) is particularly suited for the analysis of volatile low molecular weight compounds. We have evaluated this technique for the assay of different alcohols in aqueous solutions, including blood plasma, and in particular whether the osmolality or sample volume affected vapourisation. Solutions of three different alcohols (methanol, ethanol and isopropanol) ranging from 0.005 to 50 mmol/L were prepared in deionised water (0 milliosmol), phosphate-buffered saline (690 mOsm), isotonic saline (294 mOsm) and plasma (296 mOsm). The vapour above the sample (50 to 1000 microL) contained in air-tight tubes at 37 degrees C was aspirated into the instrument. The outputs for ethanol, methanol and isopropanol were linear over the concentration range and independent of the sample volume and relatively independent of the osmolar concentration. SIFT-MS can reliably and accurately measure common alcohols in the headspace above aqueous solutions, including serum/plasma. This novel application of SIFT-MS is easy to follow, requires no sample preparation and the wide dynamic range will facilitate measurement of alcohols present from normal metabolism as well as when taken in excess or in accidental poisoning.

  9. Research in Biological and Medical Sciences Including Biochemistry, Communicable Disease and Immunology, Internal Medicine, Nuclear Medicine, Physiology, Psychiatry, Surgery, and Veterinary Medicine. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-30

    coll using antibody affinity chromatography. ABSC Fed. Proc. 33: 1280, 197^. 13. Brenner, D. J., Panning , G. R., and Steigerwalt, A. G.: Deoxy...stricto). Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 24: 197-204, 1974. 14. Brenner, D. J., Panning , G. R., and Steigerwalt, A. G.: Poly- nucleotide sequence...in regulating the composition of the cerebro - spinal fluid, thereby maintaining the proper milieu Interieur for the brain by means of specialized

  10. Regulation of central blood volume and cardiac filling in endurance athletes: the Frank-Starling mechanism as a determinant of orthostatic tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance may result from either an abnormally large postural decrease in central blood volume, cardiac filling pressures, and stroke volume, or inadequate neurohumoral responses to orthostasis. Endurance athletes have been reported as having a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance, which has been attributed primarily to abnormalities in baroreflex regulation of heart rate and peripheral resistance. In this review, we present evidence that athletes also have structural changes in the cardiovascular system that although beneficial during exercise, lead to an excessively large decrease in stroke volume during orthostasis and contribute to orthostatic intolerance. A unifying hypothesis based on cardiac mechanics that may explain the divergence of findings in conditions such as bed rest or spaceflight, and short- and long-term endurance training is presented.

  11. Cholesterol modulates the volume-regulated anion current in Ehrlich-Lettre ascites cells via effects on Rho and F-actin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Hougaard, Charlotte; Hoffmann, Else K

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) are incompletely elucidated. Here, we investigate the modulation of VRAC by cellular cholesterol and the potential involvement of F-actin, Rho, Rho kinase, and phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2)] in this pr......The mechanisms controlling the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) are incompletely elucidated. Here, we investigate the modulation of VRAC by cellular cholesterol and the potential involvement of F-actin, Rho, Rho kinase, and phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2...... in cellular cholesterol content increased cortical and stress fiber-associated F-actin content in swollen cells. Cholesterol depletion increased VRAC activation rate and maximal current after a modest (15%), but not after a severe (36%) reduction in extracellular osmolarity. The cholesterol depletion...

  12. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  13. Physiological mechanisms of prosociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonas G

    2017-08-12

    Psychophysiological perspectives can provide unique insights into the nature and motivations of children's prosociality and inform our understanding of individual differences. Here, I review current research on prosociality involving some of the most common physiological measures in developmental psychology, including cortisol, various sympathetic nervous system measures, and high-frequency heart rate variability. The literature has been quite mixed, in part because the link between physiology and prosociality is context-dependent and person-dependent. However, recent advances are refining our understanding of the basic physiological mechanisms of prosociality. Resting physiology that contributes to a balance of regulation and vigilance prepares children to effectively cope with future social challenges, like noticing and attending to the needs of others. Experiencing some arousal is an important aspect of empathy-related responding, but physiological patterns of both heightened and hypoarousal can undermine prosociality. Physiological flexibility in response to others' needs may support emotional and behavioral flexibility important for prosociality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuropeptide-Y and Y-receptors in the autocrine-paracrine regulation of adrenal gland under physiological and pathophysiological conditions (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinazzi, Raffaella; Andreis, Paola G; Nussdorfer, Gastone G

    2005-01-01

    Neuropeptide-Y (NPY) is a 36-amino acid peptide, which belongs, along with peptide YY (PYY), to the pancreatic polypeptide (PP) family. The members of this family of peptides act via G protein-coupled receptors (Rs), six subtypes of which (from Y1- to Y6-R) have been identified. NPY and PYY preferentially bind the Y1-R, Y2-R and Y5-R, while PP mainly acts via the Y4-R. Evidence has been provided that the Y3-R is selective for NPY. NPY and Y-Rs are expressed in the adrenal gland (preferentially adrenal medulla) and pheochromocytomas, where they exert various autocrine-paracrine regulatory functions. Findings indicate that NPY is co-released with catecholamines under a variety of stimuli, including splanchnic nerve and cholinergic- and nicotinic-receptor activation. NPY, mainly acting via the Y1-R, Y2-R and Y3-R, either inhibits catecholamine secretion from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells or stimulates catecholamine secretion from adrenomedullary cells of humans and rats. NPY inhibits aldosterone secretion from dispersed zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells, but this effect has probably to be considered non-specific and toxic in nature, since it is obtained only using micromolar concentrations of the peptide. In contrast, NPY appears to modulate the secretory response of dispersed rat ZG cells to their main agonists (ACTH, angiotensin-II and potassium). However, there is indication that the main effect of NPY on the ZG in rats is indirect and involves the local release of catecholamines, which in turn, acting via beta-adrenoceptors, enhance the secretion of aldosterone. The prolonged treatment with NPY is also able to enhance the growth of the rat ZG. In contrast, the effects of NPY on glucocorticoid secretion from zona fasciculata-reticularis cells are negligible and doutbful. The physiological relevance of the effects of NPY on adrenal medulla and ZG remains to be addressed by future experimental studies employing more selective and potent Y-R antagonists. In contrast

  15. Cell volume regulation in the perfused liver of a freshwater air-breathing catfish Clarias batrachus under aniso-osmotic conditions: Roles of inorganic ions and taurine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carina Goswami; Nirmalendu Saha

    2006-12-01

    The roles of various inorganic ions and taurine, an organic osmolyte, in cell volume regulation were investigated in the perfused liver of a freshwater air-breathing catfish Clarias batrachus under aniso-osmotic conditions. There was a transient increase and decrease of liver cell volume following hypotonic (–80 mOsmol/l) and hypertonic (+80 mOsmol/l) exposures, respectively, which gradually decreased/increased near to the control level due to release/uptake of water within a period of 25–30 min. Liver volume decrease was accompanied by enhanced efflux of K+ (9.45 ± 0.54 mol/g liver) due to activation of Ba2+- and quinidine-sensitive K+ channel, and to a lesser extent due to enhanced efflux of Cl¯ (4.35 ± 0.25 mol/g liver) and Na+ (3.68 ± 0.37 mol/g liver). Conversely, upon hypertonic exposure, there was amiloride- and ouabain-sensitive uptake of K+ (9.78 ± 0.65 mol/g liver), and also Cl¯ (3.72 ± 0.25 mol/g liver). The alkalization/acidification of the liver effluents under hypo-/hypertonicity was mainly due to movement of various ions during volume regulatory processes. Taurine, an important organic osmolyte, appears also to play a very important role in hepatocyte cell volume regulation in the walking catfish as evidenced by the fact that hypo- and hyper-osmolarity caused transient efflux (5.68 ± 0.38 mol/g liver) and uptake (6.38 ± 0.45 mol/g liver) of taurine, respectively. The taurine efflux was sensitive to 4,4′-di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (DIDS, an anion channel blocker), but the uptake was insensitive to DIDS, thus indicating that the release and uptake of taurine during volume regulatory processes are unidirectional. Although the liver of walking catfish possesses the RVD and RVI mechanisms, it is to be noted that liver cells remain partly swollen and shrunken during anisotonic exposures, thereby possibly causing various volume-sensitive metabolic changes in the liver as reported earlier.

  16. Reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Russman, S.E.; Ellis, David H.; Gee, George F.; Mirande, Claire M.

    1996-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the general pattern of avian physiology applies to cranes, we have identified many physiological mechanisms (e.g., effects of disturbance) that need further study. Studies with cranes are expensive compared to those done with domestic fowl because of the crane's larger size, low reproductive rate, and delayed sexual maturity. To summarize, the crane reproductive system is composed of physiological and anatomical elements whose function is controlled by an integrated neural-endocrine system. Males generally produce semen at a younger age than when females lay eggs. Eggs are laid in clutches of two (1 to 3), and females will lay additional clutches if the preceding clutches are removed. Both sexes build nests and incubate the eggs. Molt begins during incubation and body molt may be completed annually in breeding pairs. However, remiges are replaced sequentially over 2 to 3 years, or abruptly every 2 to 3 years in other species. Most immature birds replace their juvenal remiges over a 2 to 3 year period. Stress interferes with reproduction in cranes by reducing egg production or terminating the reproductive effort. In other birds, stress elevates corticosterone levels and decreases LHRH release. We know little about the physiological response of cranes to stress.

  17. Exercise physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The passing of Professor Bengt Saltin on September 12, 2014 truly marks the end of an era. As editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology and one of Bengt’s many collaborators and colleagues, I wanted the Journal to celebrate his many seminal contributions by means of an Editorial. Professor Bent...

  18. A dual action of saturated fatty acids on electrical activity in rat pancreatic β-cells. Role of volume-regulated anion channel and KATP channel currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, L; Jarman, E; Brown, P D

    2011-03-15

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) exert complex actions on pancreatic β-cells. Typically, an initial potentiation of insulin release is followed by a gradual impairment of β-cell function, the latter effect being of possible relevance to hyperlipidaemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The molecular actions of FFAs are poorly understood. The present study investigated the acute effects of saturated FFAs on electrophysiological responses of rat pancreatic β-cells. Membrane potential and KATP channel activity were recorded using the perforated patch technique. Volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) activity was assessed from conventional whole-cell recordings. Cell volume regulation was measured using a video-imaging technique. Addition of octanoate caused a transient potentiation of glucose-induced electrical activity, followed by a gradual hyper-polarisation and a prolonged inhibition of electrical activity. Octanoate caused an initial increase in VRAC activity followed by a secondary inhibition coinciding with increased KATP channel activity. Similar effects were observed with palmitate and 2-bromopalmitate whereas butyrate was virtually ineffective. Octanoate and palmitate also exerted a dual effect on electrical activity evoked by tolbutamide. Octanoate significantly attenuated cell volume regulation in hypotonic solutions, consistent with VRAC inhibition. It is concluded that medium and long chain FFAs have a dual action on glucose-induced electrical activity in rat pancreatic β-cells: an initial stimulatory effect followed by a secondary inhibition. These effects appear to be the result of reciprocal actions on VRAC and KATP channel currents, and could contribute towards the stimulatory and inhibitory actions of FFAs on pancreatic β-cell function.

  19. Occupational physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Toomingas, Allan; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus

    2011-01-01

    In a clear and accessible presentation, Occupational Physiology focuses on important issues in the modern working world. Exploring major public health problems-such as musculoskeletal disorders and stress-this book explains connections between work, well-being, and health based on up-to-date research in the field. It provides useful methods for risk assessment and guidelines on arranging a good working life from the perspective of the working individual, the company, and society as a whole.The book focuses on common, stressful situations in different professions. Reviewing bodily demands and r

  20. Comparison of Three Methods for the Estimation of Pineal Gland Volume Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Niyazi Acer; Ahmet Turan Ilıca; Ahmet Tuncay Turgut; Özlem Özçelik; Birdal Yıldırım; Mehmet Turgut

    2012-01-01

    Pineal gland is a very important neuroendocrine organ with many physiological functions such as regulating circadian rhythm. Radiologically, the pineal gland volume is clinically important because it is usually difficult to distinguish small pineal tumors via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although many studies have estimated the pineal gland volume using different techniques, to the best of our knowledge, there has so far been no stereological work done on this subject. The objective of t...

  1. A Carbonic Anhydrase Serves as an Important Acid-Base Regulator in Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Exposed to Elevated CO2: Implication for Physiological Responses of Mollusk to Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudan; Wang, Mengqiang; Jia, Zhihao; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Anguo; Song, Linsheng

    2017-02-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have been demonstrated to play an important role in acid-base regulation in vertebrates. However, the classification and modulatory function of CAs in marine invertebrates, especially their responses to ocean acidification remain largely unknown. Here, a cytosolic α-CA (designated as CgCAII-1) was characterized from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and its molecular activities against CO2 exposure were investigated. CgCAII-1 possessed a conserved CA catalytic domain, with high similarity to invertebrate cytoplasmic or mitochondrial α-CAs. Recombinant CgCAII-1 could convert CO2 to HCO3(-) with calculated activity as 0.54 × 10(3) U/mg, which could be inhibited by acetazolamide (AZ). The mRNA transcripts of CgCAII-1 in muscle, mantle, hepatopancreas, gill, and hemocytes increased significantly after exposure to elevated CO2. CgCAII-1 could interact with the hemocyte membrane proteins and the distribution of CgCAII-1 protein became more concentrated and dense in gill and mantle under CO2 exposure. The intracellular pH (pHi) of hemocytes under CO2 exposure increased significantly (p ocean acidification and participate in acid-base regulation. Such cytoplasmic CA-based physiological regulation mechanism might explain other physiological responses of marine organisms to OA.

  2. KCNK5 in Physiology and Pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Signe Skyum

    to study the effect on physiology and channel expression patterns (Paper II). We found that 48 h of hypotonic stimulation reduced the maximum current through the channel and likewise decreased the cells ability to perform RVD. This impairment was found to be likely due to lowered KCNK5 protein expression...... proposed to play a role in T cell activation and in multiple sclerosis. When a cell experiences swelling do to osmotic changes in the extracellular or intracellular environment most mammalian cells will regulate their volume back towards the starting point – an important feature in keeping cellular...... to be an important player in RVD in different cell types and tissue e.g. in Ehrlich cells. It has been speculated that tyrosine phosphorylation is necessary for the swelling-activation of the channel and in “Paper I” we show how acute hypotonic swelling induces a time-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation upon...

  3. The Impact of Acute and Chronic Weight Restriction and Weight Regulation practices on Physiological, Osteogenic, Metabolic and Cognitive Function in Elite Jockeys

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Eimear

    2010-01-01

    Horse racing is a weight category sport. One of the key challenges facing jockeys is the pressure of “making weight” throughout the protracted racing season. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a chronically weight restrictive lifestyle and acute weight loss practices on aspects of physiological, osteogenic, metabolic and cognitive function in jockeys. Methods: The primary aim was achieved through the completion of four related studies. Study One: The effect of a 4% reduct...

  4. The physiology of ex vitro pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr. var MD-2) as CAM or C3 is regulated by the environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, C; Carvalho, L; González, J; Escalona, M; Amancio, S

    2012-04-01

    Many plant species grown under in vitro controlled conditions can be used as models for the study of physiological processes. Adult pineapple can display CAM physiology while in vitro it functions as a C3 plant. Ex vitro Ananas comosus has plastic morphology and physiology, both easy to modify from C3 to CAM by changing the environmental conditions. The yield of survival for a rentable propagation protocol of pineapple is closely related with the C3/CAM shift and the associated physiological characteristics. In the present work, ex vitro pineapple plants were divided in two sets and subjected to C3 and CAM-inducing environmental conditions, determined by light intensity and relative humidity, respectively, 40 μmol m(-2) s(-1)/85% and 260 μmol m(-2) s(-1)/50%. The results demonstrated that the stress imposed by the environmental conditions switched pineapple plants from C3 to CAM behavior. Comparing to CAM induced, C3-induced pineapple plants showed substandard growth parameters and morphological leaf characteristics but a better rooting process and a higher ABA production, a phenotype closer to adult plants, which are expected to produce fruits in a normal production cycle. We conclude that the upholding of these characteristics is conditioned by low light intensity plus high relative humidity, especially during the first 8 weeks of ex vitro growth. It is expected that the better understanding of pineapple acclimatization will contribute to the design of a protocol to apply as a rentable tool in the pineapple agronomic industry.

  5. Patterns of renal dopamine release to regulate diuresis and natriuresis during volume expansion. Role of renal monoamine-oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca Sarobe, Verónica; Di Ciano, Luis; Carranza, Andrea M; Levin, Gloria; Arrizurieta, Elvira E; Ibarra, Fernando R

    2010-01-01

    Diuretic and natriuretic effects of renal dopamine (DA) are well established. However, in volume expansion the pattern of renal DA release into urine (UDAV) and the role of enzymes involved in DA synthesis/degradation have not yet been defined. The objective was to determine the pattern of UDAV during volume expansion and to characterize the involvement of monoamine-oxidase (MAO) and aromatic amino-acid decarboxylase (AADC) in this response. In this study male Wistar rats were expanded with NaCl 0.9% at a rate of 5% BWt per hour. At the beginning of expansion three groups received a single drug injection as follows: C (vehicle, Control), IMAO (MAO inhibitor Pargyline, 20 mg/kg BWt, i.v.) and BNZ (AADC inhibitor Benserazide, 25 mg/kg BWt, i.v.). Results revealed that in C rats UDAV (ng/30 min/100g BWt) increased in the first 30 min expansion from 11.5 +/- 1.20 to 21.8 +/- 3.10 (p diuresis and natriuresis over controls. BNZ abolished the early UDAV peak to 3.2+/-0.72 (p diuresis were diminished by BNZ treatment. Results indicate that an increment in renal DA release into urine occurs early in expansion and in a peak-shaped way. In this response MAO plays a predominant role.

  6. Physiological age at harvest regulates the variability in postharvest ripening, sensory and nutritional characteristics of mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Coghshall due to growing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joas, Jacques; Vulcain, Emmanuelle; Desvignes, Claire; Morales, Emeline; Léchaudel, Mathieu

    2012-04-01

    Climacteric fruits are harvested at the green-mature stage and ripen during their marketing cycle. However, growing conditions induce variability into the maturity stage of mangoes at harvest, with an impact on their final quality. Assuming that the physiological age can be correctly evaluated by a criterion based on the variable chlorophyll fluorescence of the skin (F(v)) and that differences in physiological age depend on growing conditions, controlled stress experiments were carried out on mango fruit by manipulating either the leaf/fruit ratio or the light environment. Delays from 9 to 30 days were observed, depending on stress level and harvest stage, to obtain the same F(v) value. For moderate stress, fruit composition after ripening was partially compensated for, with little or no difference in sugar, dry matter, carotenoid and aroma contents. For more pronounced stress, the major metabolites were not particularly affected, but the synthesis capacity of carotenoids and aromas was lower after maturity. The ripening ability of a fruit is acquired on the tree and defines its postharvest changes. Control of the physiological age at harvest can minimise the variability observed under natural conditions and guarantee fruit batches whose postharvest changes will be relatively homogeneous. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Human Physiology in an Aquatic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, David R; Moon, Richard E; Krasney, John J; Held, Heather E; Zamparo, Paola

    2015-09-20

    Water covers over 70% of the earth, has varying depths and temperatures and contains much of the earth's resources. Head-out water immersion (HOWI) or submersion at various depths (diving) in water of thermoneutral (TN) temperature elicits profound cardiorespiratory, endocrine, and renal responses. The translocation of blood into the thorax and elevation of plasma volume by autotransfusion of fluid from cells to the vascular compartment lead to increased cardiac stroke volume and output and there is a hyperperfusion of some tissues. Pulmonary artery and capillary hydrostatic pressures increase causing a decline in vital capacity with the potential for pulmonary edema. Atrial stretch and increased arterial pressure cause reflex autonomic responses which result in endocrine changes that return plasma volume and arterial pressure to preimmersion levels. Plasma volume is regulated via a reflex diuresis and natriuresis. Hydrostatic pressure also leads to elastic loading of the chest, increasing work of breathing, energy cost, and thus blood flow to respiratory muscles. Decreases in water temperature in HOWI do not affect the cardiac output compared to TN; however, they influence heart rate and the distribution of muscle and fat blood flow. The reduced muscle blood flow results in a reduced maximal oxygen consumption. The properties of water determine the mechanical load and the physiological responses during exercise in water (e.g. swimming and water based activities). Increased hydrostatic pressure caused by submersion does not affect stroke volume; however, progressive bradycardia decreases cardiac output. During submersion, compressed gas must be breathed which introduces the potential for oxygen toxicity, narcosis due to nitrogen, and tissue and vascular gas bubbles during decompression and after may cause pain in joints and the nervous system.

  8. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-03-15

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting.

  9. Physiological Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric D.

    The analysis of physiological sound in the peripheral auditory system solves three important problems. First, sound energy impinging on the head must be captured and presented to the transduction apparatus in the ear as a suitable mechanical signal; second, this mechanical signal needs to be transduced into a neural representation that can be used by the brain; third, the resulting neural representation needs to be analyzed by central neurons to extract information useful to the animal. This chapter provides an overview of some aspects of the first two of these processes. The description is entirely focused on the mammalian auditory system, primarily on human hearing and on the hearing of a few commonly used laboratory animals (mainly rodents and carnivores). Useful summaries of non-mammalian hearing are available [1]. Because of the large size of the literature, review papers are referenced wherever possible.

  10. TRPV4 and AQP4 Channels Synergistically Regulate Cell Volume and Calcium Homeostasis in Retinal Müller Glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jo, Andrew O; Ryskamp, Daniel A; Phuong, Tam T T

    2015-01-01

    Brain edema formation occurs after dysfunctional control of extracellular volume partly through impaired astrocytic ion and water transport. Here, we show that such processes might involve synergistic cooperation between the glial water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and the transient receptor...... potential isoform 4 (TRPV4), a polymodal swelling-sensitive cation channel. In mouse retinas, TRPV4 colocalized with AQP4 in the end feet and radial processes of Müller astroglia. Genetic ablation of TRPV4 did not affect the distribution of AQP4 and vice versa. However, retinas from Trpv4(-/-) and Aqp4......(-/-) mice exhibited suppressed transcription of genes encoding Trpv4, Aqp4, and the Kir4.1 subunit of inwardly rectifying potassium channels. Swelling and [Ca(2+)]i elevations evoked in Müller cells by hypotonic stimulation were antagonized by the selective TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047 (2-methyl-1...

  11. Physiological Control of Germline Development

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard, E. Jane Albert; Korta, Dorota Z.; Dalfó, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The intersection between developmental programs and environmental conditions that alter physiology is a growing area of research interest. The C. elegans germ line is emerging as a particularly sensitive and powerful model for these studies. The germ line is subject to environmentally regulated diapause points that allow worms to withstand harsh conditions both prior to and after reproduction commences. It also responds to more subtle changes in physiological conditions. Recent studies demons...

  12. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume II Yakima (Overview, Report, Appendices).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  13. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume III (Overview and Tools).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  14. Apamin-Sensitive Small Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels were Negatively Regulated by Captopril in Volume-Overload Heart Failure Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongyuan, Bai; Xin, Dong; Jingwen, Zhang; Li, Gao; Yajuan, Ni

    2016-08-01

    In heart failure (HF), the malignant arrhythmias occur frequently; a study demonstrated that upregulation of I KAS resulted in recurrent spontaneous ventricular fibrillation in HF. However, the regulation of SK channels was poorly understood. The activation of SK channels depended on [Ca(2+)]i and PP2A; studies suggested that angiotensin II can regulate them. So, we hypothesized that in HF, the excess of angiotensin may regulate the SK channels and result in the remodeling of SK channels. To test the hypothesis, we used volume-overload-induced HF rat model, treated with captopril, performed whole-cell patch clamp to record apamin-sensitive currents (I KAS), and I-V curve was studied. The sensitivity of I KAS to [Ca(2+)]i was also explored by setting various [Ca(2+)]i (10, 100, 500, 900, 1000, and 10,000 nM), and the steady-state Ca(2+) response of I KAS was attained and performed Hill fitting with the equation (y = 1/[1 + (EC50/x) (n) ]). Immunofluorescent staining, real-time PCR, Western blot were also carried out to furtherly investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of the regulation. Captopril significantly decreased the mean density of I KAS when [Ca(2+)]i was 500, 900, 1000, and 10000 nM. The Hill fitting showed significantly different EC50 values and the Hill coefficients and showed captopril significantly shifted rightward the steady-state Ca(2+) response of I KAS. The results of real-time PCR and Western blot demonstrated captopril decreased the mRNA and protein expression of SK3 channels. Captopril significantly downregulated the sensitivity of SK channels to [Ca(2+)]i and the SK3 channels expression in HF, and reversed the SK channels remodeling.

  15. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  16. High-resolution mapping of a genetic locus regulating preferential carbohydrate intake, total kilocalories, and food volume on mouse chromosome 17.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Gularte-Mérida

    Full Text Available The specific genes regulating the quantitative variation in macronutrient preference and food intake are virtually unknown. We fine mapped a previously identified mouse chromosome 17 region harboring quantitative trait loci (QTL with large effects on preferential macronutrient intake-carbohydrate (Mnic1, total kilcalories (Kcal2, and total food volume (Tfv1 using interval-specific strains. These loci were isolated in the [C57BL/6J.CAST/EiJ-17.1-(D17Mit19-D17Mit50; B6.CAST-17.1] strain, possessing a ∼ 40.1 Mb region of CAST DNA on the B6 genome. In a macronutrient selection paradigm, the B6.CAST-17.1 subcongenic mice eat 30% more calories from the carbohydrate-rich diet, ∼ 10% more total calories, and ∼ 9% more total food volume per body weight. In the current study, a cross between carbohydrate-preferring B6.CAST-17.1 and fat-preferring, inbred B6 mice was used to generate a subcongenic-derived F2 mapping population; genotypes were determined using a high-density, custom SNP panel. Genetic linkage analysis substantially reduced the 95% confidence interval for Mnic1 (encompassing Kcal2 and Tfv1 from 40.1 to 29.5 Mb and more precisely established its boundaries. Notably, no genetic linkage for self-selected fat intake was detected, underscoring the carbohydrate-specific effect of this locus. A second key finding was the separation of two energy balance QTLs: Mnic1/Kcal2/Tfv1 for food intake and a newly discovered locus regulating short term body weight gain. The Mnic1/Kcal2/Tfv1 QTL was further de-limited to 19.0 Mb, based on the absence of nutrient intake phenotypes in subcongenic HQ17IIa mice. Analyses of available sequence data and gene ontologies, along with comprehensive expression profiling in the hypothalamus of non-recombinant, cast/cast and b6/b6 F2 controls, focused our attention on candidates within the QTL interval. Zfp811, Zfp870, and Btnl6 showed differential expression and also contain stop codons, but have no known biology

  17. Acute Response of Circulating Vascular Regulating MicroRNAs during and after High-Intensity and High-Volume Cycling in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Yvonne; Wehmeier, Udo F.; Wahl, Patrick; Mester, Joachim; Hilberg, Thomas; Sperlich, Billy

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to analyze the response of vascular circulating microRNAs (miRNAs; miR-16, miR-21, miR-126) and the VEGF mRNA following an acute bout of HIIT and HVT in children. Methods:Twelve healthy competitive young male cyclists (14.4 ± 0.8 years; 57.9 ± 9.4 ml·min−1·kg−1 peak oxygen uptake) performed one session of high intensity 4 × 4 min intervals (HIIT) at 90–95% peak power output (PPO), each interval separated by 3 min of active recovery, and one high volume session (HVT) consisting of a constant load exercise for 90 min at 60% PPO. Capillary blood from the earlobe was collected under resting conditions, during exercise (d1 = 20 min, d2 = 30 min, d3 = 60 min), and 0, 30, 60, 180 min after the exercise to determine miR-16, -21, -126, and VEGF mRNA. Results: HVT significantly increased miR-16 and miR-126 during and after the exercise compared to pre-values, whereas HIIT showed no significant influence on the miRNAs compared to pre-values. VEGF mRNA significantly increased during and after HIIT (d1, 30′, 60′, 180′) and HVT (d3, 0′, 60′). Conclusion: Results of the present investigation suggest a volume dependent exercise regulation of vascular regulating miRNAs (miR-16, miR-21, miR-126) in children. In line with previous data, our data show that acute exercise can alter circulating miRNAs profiles that might be used as novel biomarkers to monitor acute and chronic changes due to exercise in various tissues. PMID:27014090

  18. Acute response of circulating vascular regulating microRNAs during and after high-intensity and high-volume cycling in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne eKilian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present study was to analyze the response of vascular circulating microRNAs (miRNAs; miR-16, miR-21, miR-126 and the VEGF mRNA following an acute bout of HIIT and HVT in children. Methods: Twelve healthy competitive young male cyclists (14.4 ± 0.8 yrs; 57.9 ± 9.4 ml·min-1·kg-1 peak oxygen uptake performed one session of high intensity 4x4 min intervals (HIIT at 90-95% peak power output, each interval separated by 3 min of active recovery, and one high volume session (HVT consisting of a constant load exercise for 90 min at 60% peak power output. Capillary blood from the earlobe was collected under resting conditions, during exercise (d1 = 20 min, d2 = 30 min, d3 = 60 min, and 0, 30, 60, 180 min after the exercise to determine miR-16, -21, -126 and VEGF mRNA.Results: HVT significantly increased miR-16 and miR-126 during and after the exercise compared to pre values, whereas HIIT showed no significant influence on the miRNAs compared to pre values. VEGF mRNA significantly increased during and after HIIT (d1, 30`, 60`, 180` and HVT (d3, 0`, 60`. Conclusion: Results of the present investigation suggest a volume dependent exercise regulation of vascular regulating miRNAs (miR-16, miR-21, miR-126 in children. In line with previous data, our data show that acute exercise can alter circulating miRNAs profiles that might be used as novel biomarkers to monitor acute and chronic changes due to exercise in various tissues.

  19. Mechanosensitivity of wild-type and G551D cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) controls regulatory volume decrease in simple epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changyan; Cao, Xu; Chen, Xibing; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Wei Kevin; Sun, Ying; Hu, Wenbao; Zhou, Zijing; Wang, Yan; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-04-01

    Mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an epithelial ligand-gated anion channel, are associated with the lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. The CFTR G551D mutation impairs ATP hydrolysis and thereby makes CFTR refractory to cAMP stimulation. Both wild-type (WT) and G551D CFTR have been implicated in regulatory volume decrease (RVD), but the underlying mechanism remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that the channel activity of both WT and G551D CFTR is directly stimulated by mechanical perturbation induced by cell swelling at the single-channel, cellular, and tissue levels. Hypotonicity activated CFTR single channels in cell-attached membrane patches and WT-CFTR-mediated short-circuit current (Isc) in Calu-3 cells, and this was independent of Ca(2+)and cAMP/PKA signaling. Genetic suppression and ablation but not G551D mutation of CFTR suppressed the hypotonicity- and stretch-inducedIscin Calu-3 cells and mouse duodena. Moreover, ablation but not G551D mutation of the CFTR gene inhibited the RVD of crypts isolated from mouse intestine; more importantly, CFTR-specific blockers markedly suppressed RVD in both WT- and G551D CFTR mice, demonstrating for the first time that the channel activity of both WT and G551D CFTR is required for epithelial RVD. Our findings uncover a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying CFTR involvement in epithelial RVD and suggest that the mechanosensitivity of G551D CFTR might underlie the mild phenotypes resulting from this mutation.-Xie, C., Cao, X., Chen, X, Wang, D., Zhang, W. K., Sun, Y., Hu, W., Zhou, Z., Wang, Y., Huang, P. Mechanosensitivity of wild-type and G551D cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) controls regulatory volume decrease in simple epithelia.

  20. Physiological role of taurine--from organism to organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, I H; Kristensen, D M; Holm, J B; Mortensen, O H

    2015-01-01

    Taurine is often referred to as a semi-essential amino acid as newborn mammals have a limited ability to synthesize taurine and have to rely on dietary supply. Taurine is not thought to be incorporated into proteins as no aminoacyl tRNA synthetase has yet been identified and is not oxidized in mammalian cells. However, taurine contributes significantly to the cellular pool of organic osmolytes and has accordingly been acknowledged for its role in cell volume restoration following osmotic perturbation. This review describes taurine homeostasis in cells and organelles with emphasis on taurine biophysics/membrane dynamics, regulation of transport proteins involved in active taurine uptake and passive taurine release as well as physiological processes, for example, development, lung function, mitochondrial function, antioxidative defence and apoptosis which seem to be affected by a shift in the expression of the taurine transporters and/or the cellular taurine content. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effects of potentially acidic air pollutants on the intracellular distribution and transport of plant growth regulators in mesophyll cells of leaves. Consequences on stress- and developmental physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, H.; Pfanz, H.; Hartung, W.

    1987-07-11

    The influence of SO/sub 2/ on the intracellular distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-acetic acid (IAA) in mesophyll cells of Picea abies, Tsuga americana and Hordeum vulgare was investigated. The compartmentation of ABA and IAA depends on intracellular pH-gradients. The hydrophilic anions ABA and IAA are accumulated in the alkaline cell compartments cytosol and chloroplasts, which act as anion traps for weak acids. Uptake of sulfur dioxide into leaves leads to an acidification of alkaline cell compartments, thus decreasing intracellular pH-gradients. Consequently this results in an increased release of plant growth regulators from the cell interior into the apoplast. Therefore the target cells of plant hormones i.e. meristems and stomates are exposed to altered hormone concentrations. Obviously this influences the regulation of cellular metabolism plant development and growth.

  2. Renal renin secretion as regulator of body fluid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Mads; Isaksson, Gustaf L; Stubbe, Jane;

    2013-01-01

    intake, but the specific pathways involved and the relations between them are not well defined. In animals, renin secretion is a log-linear function of sodium intake. Close associations exist between sodium intake, total body sodium, extracellular fluid volume, and blood volume. Plasma volume increases...... by about 1.5 mL/mmol increase in daily sodium intake. Several lines of evidence indicate that central blood volume may vary substantially without measurable changes in arterial blood pressure. At least five intertwining feedback loops of renin regulation are identifiable based on controlled variables......The renin-angiotensin system is essential for body fluid homeostasis and blood pressure regulation. This review focuses on the homeostatic regulation of the secretion of active renin in the kidney, primarily in humans. Under physiological conditions, renin secretion is determined mainly by sodium...

  3. Net assimilation and photosynthate allocation of Populus clones grown under short-rotation intensive culture: Physiological and genetic responses regulating yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickmann, D.I.; Pregitzer, K.S.; Nguyen, P.V. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the differential responses of poplar clones from sections Tacamahaca and Aigeiros of the genus Populus to varying levels of applied water and nitrogen. Above- and below-ground phenology and morphology, photosynthate allocation, and physiological processes were examined. By manipulating the availability of soil resources, we have been able to separate inherent clonal differences from plastic responses, and to determine genotype-environment interactions. We also have been able to make some contrasts between trees grown from hardwood cuttings and coppice sprouts. Our overall hypothesis was that carbon allocation during growth is greatly influenced by interactions among moisture, nitrogen, and genotype, and that these interactions greatly influence yield in short-rotation plantations. As is true of any project, some of our original expectations were not realized, whereas other initially unforeseen results were obtained. The reduced funding from the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) during the last few years of the project slowed us down to some extent, so progress was not been as rapid as we might have hoped. The major problem associated with this funding shortfall was the inability to employ skilled and unskilled student labor. Nonetheless, we were able to accomplish most of our original goals. All of the principal investigators on this project feel that we have made progress in advancing the scientific underpinning of short-rotation woody biomass production.

  4. Global Kinetic Analysis of Mammalian E3 Reveals pH-dependent NAD+/NADH Regulation, Physiological Kinetic Reversibility, and Catalytic Optimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxley, Michael A; Beard, Daniel A; Bazil, Jason N

    2016-02-05

    Mammalian E3 is an essential mitochondrial enzyme responsible for catalyzing the terminal reaction in the oxidative catabolism of several metabolites. E3 is a key regulator of metabolic fuel selection as a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc). E3 regulates PDHc activity by altering the affinity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, an inhibitor of the enzyme complex, through changes in reduction and acetylation state of lipoamide moieties set by the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. Thus, an accurate kinetic model of E3 is needed to predict overall mammalian PDHc activity. Here, we have combined numerous literature data sets and new equilibrium spectroscopic experiments with a multitude of independently collected forward and reverse steady-state kinetic assays using pig heart E3. The latter kinetic assays demonstrate a pH-dependent transition of NAD(+) activation to inhibition, shown here, to our knowledge, for the first time in a single consistent data set. Experimental data were analyzed to yield a thermodynamically constrained four-redox-state model of E3 that simulates pH-dependent activation/inhibition and active site redox states for various conditions. The developed model was used to determine substrate/product conditions that give maximal E3 rates and show that, due to non-Michaelis-Menten behavior, the maximal flux is different compared with the classically defined kcat.

  5. p38α MAPK Regulates Lineage Commitment and OPG Synthesis of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Prevent Bone Loss under Physiological and Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Cong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs are capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Skewed differentiation of BM-MSCs contributes to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Yet how BM-MSC lineage commitment is regulated remains unclear. We show that ablation of p38α in Prx1+ BM-MSCs produced osteoporotic phenotypes, growth plate defects, and increased bone marrow fat, secondary to biased BM-MSC differentiation from osteoblast/chondrocyte to adipocyte and increased osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. p38α regulates BM-MSC osteogenic commitment through TAK1-NF-κB signaling and osteoclastogenesis through osteoprotegerin (OPG production by BM-MSCs. Estrogen activates p38α to maintain OPG expression in BM-MSCs to preserve the bone. Ablation of p38α in BM-MSCs positive for Dermo1, a later BM-MSC marker, only affected osteogenic differentiation. Thus, p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in Prx1+ BM-MSCs acts to preserve the bone by promoting osteogenic lineage commitment and sustaining OPG production. This study thus unravels previously unidentified roles for p38α MAPK in skeletal development and bone remodeling.

  6. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  7. Physiological mechanisms for high salt tolerance in wild soybean (Glycine soja) from Yellow River Delta, China: photosynthesis, osmotic regulation, ion flux and antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Yan, Kun; Shao, Hongbo; Zhao, Shijie

    2013-01-01

    Glycine soja (BB52) is a wild soybean cultivar grown in coastal saline land in Yellow River Delta, China. In order to reveal the physiological mechanisms adapting to salinity, we examined photosynthesis, ion flux, antioxidant system and water status in Glycine soja under NaCl treatments, taking a cultivated soybean, ZH13, as control. Upon NaCl exposure, higher relative water content and water potential were maintained in the leaf of BB52 than ZH13, which might depend on the more accumulation of osmotic substances such as glycinebetaine and proline. Compared with ZH13, activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and contents of ascorbate, glutathione and phenolics were enhanced to a higher level in BB52 leaf under NaCl stress, which could mitigate the salt-induced oxidative damage in BB52. Consistently, lipid peroxidation indicated by malondialdehyde content was lower in BB52 leaf. Photosynthetic rate (Pn) was decreased by NaCl stress in BB52 and ZH13, and the decrease was greater in ZH13. The decreased Pn in BB52 was mainly due to stomatal limitation. The inhibited activation of rubisco enzyme in ZH13 due to the decrease of rubisco activase content became an important limiting factor of Pn, when NaCl concentration increased to 200 mM. Rubisco activase in BB52 was not affected by NaCl stress. Less negative impact in BB52 derived from lower contents of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the tissues, and non-invasive micro-test technique revealed that BB52 roots had higher ability to extrude Na(+) and Cl(-). Wild soybean is a valuable genetic resource, and our study may provide a reference for molecular biologist to improve the salt tolerance of cultivated soybean in face of farmland salinity.

  8. Physiological mechanisms for high salt tolerance in wild soybean (Glycine soja from Yellow River Delta, China: photosynthesis, osmotic regulation, ion flux and antioxidant capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen

    Full Text Available Glycine soja (BB52 is a wild soybean cultivar grown in coastal saline land in Yellow River Delta, China. In order to reveal the physiological mechanisms adapting to salinity, we examined photosynthesis, ion flux, antioxidant system and water status in Glycine soja under NaCl treatments, taking a cultivated soybean, ZH13, as control. Upon NaCl exposure, higher relative water content and water potential were maintained in the leaf of BB52 than ZH13, which might depend on the more accumulation of osmotic substances such as glycinebetaine and proline. Compared with ZH13, activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and contents of ascorbate, glutathione and phenolics were enhanced to a higher level in BB52 leaf under NaCl stress, which could mitigate the salt-induced oxidative damage in BB52. Consistently, lipid peroxidation indicated by malondialdehyde content was lower in BB52 leaf. Photosynthetic rate (Pn was decreased by NaCl stress in BB52 and ZH13, and the decrease was greater in ZH13. The decreased Pn in BB52 was mainly due to stomatal limitation. The inhibited activation of rubisco enzyme in ZH13 due to the decrease of rubisco activase content became an important limiting factor of Pn, when NaCl concentration increased to 200 mM. Rubisco activase in BB52 was not affected by NaCl stress. Less negative impact in BB52 derived from lower contents of Na(+ and Cl(- in the tissues, and non-invasive micro-test technique revealed that BB52 roots had higher ability to extrude Na(+ and Cl(-. Wild soybean is a valuable genetic resource, and our study may provide a reference for molecular biologist to improve the salt tolerance of cultivated soybean in face of farmland salinity.

  9. Physiological function of gastrin-releasing peptide and neuromedin B receptors in regulating itch scratching behavior in the spinal cord of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devki D Sukhtankar

    Full Text Available Pruritus (itch is a severe side effect associated with the use of drugs as well as hepatic and hematological disorders. Previous studies in rodents suggest that bombesin receptor subtypes i.e. receptors for gastrin-releasing peptide (GRPr and neuromedin B (NMBr differentially regulate itch scratching. However, to what degree spinal GRPr and NMBr regulate scratching evoked by intrathecally administered bombesin-related peptides is not known. The first aim of this study was to pharmacologically compare the dose-response curves for scratching induced by intrathecally administered bombesin-related peptides versus morphine, which is known to elicit itch in humans. The second aim was to determine if spinal GRPr and NMBr selectively or generally mediate scratching behavior. Mice received intrathecal injection of bombesin (0.01-0.3 nmol, GRP (0.01-0.3 nmol, NMB (0.1-1 nmol or morphine (0.3-3 nmol and were observed for one hour for scratching activity. Bombesin elicited most profound scratching over one hour followed by GRP and NMB, whereas morphine failed to evoke scratching response indicating the insensitivity of mouse models to intrathecal opioid-induced itch. Intrathecal pretreatment with GRPr antagonist RC-3095 (0.03-0.1 nmol produced a parallel rightward shift in the dose response curve of GRP-induced scratching but not NMB-induced scratching. Similarly, PD168368 (1-3 nmol only attenuated NMB but not GRP-induced scratching. Individual or co-administration of RC-3095 and PD168368 failed to alter bombesin-evoked scratching. A higher dose of RC-3095 (0.3 nmol generally suppressed scratching induced by all three peptides but also compromised motor function in the rotarod test. Together, these data indicate that spinal GRPr and NMBr independently drive itch neurotransmission in mice and may not mediate bombesin-induced scratching. GRPr antagonists at functionally receptor-selective doses only block spinal GRP-elicited scratching but the suppression of

  10. Evidence for functional interaction of plasma membrane electron transport, voltage-dependent anion channel and volume-regulated anion channel in frog aorta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rashmi P Rao; J Prakasa Rao

    2010-12-01

    Frog aortic tissue exhibits plasma membrane electron transport (PMET) owing to its ability to reduce ferricyanide even in the presence of mitochondrial poisons, such as cyanide and azide. Exposure to hypotonic solution (108 mOsmol/kg H2O) enhanced the reduction of ferricyanide in excised aortic tissue of frog. Increment in ferricyanide reductase activity was also brought about by the presence of homocysteine (100 M dissolved in isotonic frog Ringer solution), a redox active compound and a potent modulator of PMET. Two plasma-membrane-bound channels, the volume regulated anion channel (VRAC) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), are involved in the response to hypotonic stress. The presence of VRAC and VDAC antagonists–tamoxifen, glibenclamide, fluoxetine and verapamil, and 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (DIDS), respectively–inhibited this enhanced activity brought about by either hypotonic stress or homocysteine. The blockers do not affect the ferricyanide reductase activity under isotonic conditions. Taken together, these findings indicate a functional interaction of the three plasma membrane proteins, namely, ferricyanide reductase (PMET), VDAC and VRAC.

  11. Adenosine A2A receptor regulation of microglia morphological remodeling-gender bias in physiology and in a model of chronic anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, L; Pinheiro, H; Patrício, P; Mateus-Pinheiro, A; Alves, N D; Coimbra, B; Baptista, F I; Henriques, S N; Cunha, C; Santos, A R; Ferreira, S G; Sardinha, V M; Oliveira, J F; Ambrósio, A F; Sousa, N; Cunha, R A; Rodrigues, A J; Pinto, L; Gomes, C A

    2016-10-11

    Developmental risk factors, such as the exposure to stress or high levels of glucocorticoids (GCs), may contribute to the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. The immunomodulatory role of GCs and the immunological fingerprint found in animals prenatally exposed to GCs point towards an interplay between the immune and the nervous systems in the etiology of these disorders. Microglia are immune cells of the brain, responsive to GCs and morphologically altered in stress-related disorders. These cells are regulated by adenosine A2A receptors, which are also involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety. We now compare animal behavior and microglia morphology in males and females prenatally exposed to the GC dexamethasone. We report that prenatal exposure to dexamethasone is associated with a gender-specific remodeling of microglial cell processes in the prefrontal cortex: males show a hyper-ramification and increased length whereas females exhibit a decrease in the number and in the length of microglia processes. Microglial cells re-organization responded in a gender-specific manner to the chronic treatment with a selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, which was able to ameliorate microglial processes alterations and anxiety behavior in males, but not in females.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 October 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.173.

  12. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF MEN DURING SLEEP DEPRIVATION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of 84 hours of sleep deprivation were examined in a group of six young men and compared with a group of six controls. Subjects were... sleep deprivation , physiological regulating systems are relatively unaffected by sleep loss. (Author)

  13. Physiology in Modelica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Mateják

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modelica is an object-oriented language, in which models can be created and graphically represented by connecting instances of classes from libraries. These connections are not only assignments of values; they can also represent acausal equality. Even more, they can model Kirchhoff’s laws of circuits. In Modelica it is possible to develop library classes which are an analogy of electrical circuit components. The result of our work in this field is Physiolibrary (www.physiolibrary.org – a free, open-source Modelica library for human physiology. By graphical joining instances of Physiolibrary classes, user can create models of cardiovascular circulation, thermoregulation, metabolic processes, nutrient distribution, gas transport, electrolyte regulation, water distribution, hormonal regulation and pharmacological regulation. After simple setting of the parameters, the models are ready to simulate. After simulation, the user can examine variables as their values change over time. Representing the model as a diagram has also great educational advantages, because students are able to better understand physical principles when they see them modeled graphically.

  14. Physiology of bile secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alejandro Esteller

    2008-01-01

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment,in different situations,results in the syndrome of cholestasis.The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed.Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane.This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation.The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bileduct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts.The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed.In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled,cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves.A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included.The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology.

  15. Regulating of various physiological and pathological processes by human GIT1/2 proteins%人GIT1/2蛋白调控多种生理和病理进程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦超; 贺福初; 王建

    2012-01-01

    G蛋白偶联受体激酶相互作用蛋白1/2 [G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase interacting protein 1/2,GIT1/2]属于多结构域蛋白质.它们参与多种细胞生物学过程:(1)通过其ARF GTPase-激活蛋白(ARF GTPase-activating protein,ARF-GAP)活性调节细胞骨架动态变化;(2)参与G蛋白偶联受体的内化及细胞膜转运;(3)作为支架蛋白调控信号转导.GIT蛋白家族在骨代谢、血管稳态、神经发育以及肿瘤等生理或病理条件下发挥关键的调控作用.本文着重就近年来GIT蛋白家族在生理与病理方面的调控作用作一综述.%The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase interacting protein 1 and 2 (GIT1 and GIT2) are multidomain proteins involved in diverse cellular processes, such as regulation of cytoskeleton dynamics by their ARF-GAP activity, modulation of receptor internalization and membrane trafficking, as well as controlling signaling transduction. The diversity of their functions plays significant roles during physiological and pathological conditions, such as bone metabolism, vascular stability, neuron development and cancer. Here we summarize the current understanding of GIT protein family in physiological and pathological processes.

  16. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow pot...

  17. Fat-Free Body Mass but not Fat Mass is Associated with Reduced Gray Matter Volume of Cortical Brain Regions Implicated in Autonomic and Homeostatic Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Christopher M; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Reiman, Eric M; Chen, Kewei; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with alterations of both functional and structural aspects of the human central nervous system. In obese individuals both fat mass (FM; primarily consisting of adipose tissue) and fat-free mass (FFM; all non-adipose tissues) are increased and it remains unknown whether these compartments have separate effects on human brain morphology. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the relationships between measures of body composition and regional gray matter volume (GMV) in 76 healthy adults with a wide range of adiposity (24F/52M; age 32.1±8.8y; percentage of body fat [PFAT%] 25.5±10.9%; BMI 29.8±8.9). Faf-free mass index (FFMI kg*m-2) showed negative associations in bilateral temporal regions, the bilateral medial and caudolateral OFC, and the left insula. Fat mass index (FMI kg*m-2) showed similar, but less extensive negative associations within temporal cortical regions and the left caudolateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). In addition, negative associations were seen for FMI with GMV of the cerebellum. Associations of FFMI with temporal and medial orbitofrontal GMV appeared to be independent of adiposity. No associations were seen between measures of adiposity (i.e. FM and PFAT) and GMV when adjusted for FFM. The majority of regions that we find associated with FFM have been implicated in the regulation of eating behavior and show extensive projections to central autonomic and homeostatic core structures. These data indicate that not adipose tissue or relative adiposity itself, but obesity related increases in absolute tissue mass and particularly FFM may have a more predominant effect on the human brain. This might be explained by the high metabolic demand of FFM and related increases in total energy needs. PMID:22974975

  18. Cholesterol modulates the volume-regulated anion current in Ehrlich-Lettre ascites cells via effects on Rho and F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Hougaard, Charlotte; Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2006-10-01

    The mechanisms controlling the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) are incompletely elucidated. Here, we investigate the modulation of VRAC by cellular cholesterol and the potential involvement of F-actin, Rho, Rho kinase, and phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2)] in this process. In Ehrlich-Lettre ascites (ELA) cells, a current with biophysical and pharmacological properties characteristic of VRAC was activated by hypotonic swelling. A 44% increase in cellular cholesterol content had no detectable effects on F-actin organization or VRAC activity. A 47% reduction in cellular cholesterol content increased cortical and stress fiber-associated F-actin content in swollen cells. Cholesterol depletion increased VRAC activation rate and maximal current after a modest (15%), but not after a severe (36%) reduction in extracellular osmolarity. The cholesterol depletion-induced increase in maximal VRAC current was prevented by F-actin disruption using latrunculin B (LB), while the current activation rate was unaffected by LB, but dependent on Rho kinase. Rho activity was decreased by approximately 20% in modestly, and approximately 50% in severely swollen cells. In modestly swollen cells, this reduction was prevented by cholesterol depletion, which also increased isotonic Rho activity. Thrombin, which stimulates Rho and causes actin polymerization, potentiated VRAC in modestly swollen cells. VRAC activity was unaffected by inclusion of a water-soluble PtdIns(4,5)P(2) analogue or a PtdIns(4,5)P(2)-blocking antibody in the pipette, or neomycin treatment to sequester PtdIns(4,5)P(2). It is suggested that in ELA cells, F-actin and Rho-Rho kinase modulate VRAC magnitude and activation rate, respectively, and that cholesterol depletion potentiates VRAC at least in part by preventing the hypotonicity-induced decrease in Rho activity and eliciting actin polymerization.

  19. Biomedical Signals and Sensors I Linking Physiological Phenomena and Biosignals

    CERN Document Server

    Kaniusas, Eugenijus

    2012-01-01

    This two-volume set focuses on the interface between physiologic mechanisms and diagnostic human engineering. Today numerous biomedical sensors are commonplace in clinical practice. The registered biosignals reflect mostly vital physiologic phenomena. In order to adequately apply biomedical sensors and reasonably interpret the corresponding biosignals, a proper understanding of the involved physiologic phenomena, their influence on the registered biosignals, and the technology behind the sensors is necessary. The first volume is devoted to the interface between physiologic mechanisms and arising biosignals, whereas the second volume is focussed on the interface between biosignals and biomedical sensors. The physiologic mechanisms behind the biosignals are described from the basic cellular level up to their advanced mutual coordination level during sleep. The arising biosignals are discussed within the scope of vital physiologic phenomena to foster their understanding and comprehensive analysis.

  20. Hypertension: physiology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John E; Granger, Joey P; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Dubinion, John; George, Eric; Hamza, Shereen; Speed, Joshua; Hall, Michael E

    2012-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension and availability of effective and safe antihypertensive drugs, suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control is still the most important risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and is globally responsible for more than 7 million deaths annually. Short-term and long-term BP regulation involve the integrated actions of multiple cardiovascular, renal, neural, endocrine, and local tissue control systems. Clinical and experimental observations strongly support a central role for the kidneys in the long-term regulation of BP, and abnormal renal-pressure natriuresis is present in all forms of chronic hypertension. Impaired renal-pressure natriuresis and chronic hypertension can be caused by intrarenal or extrarenal factors that reduce glomerular filtration rate or increase renal tubular reabsorption of salt and water; these factors include excessive activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, endothelin, and inflammatory cytokines, or decreased synthesis of nitric oxide and various natriuretic factors. In human primary (essential) hypertension, the precise causes of impaired renal function are not completely understood, although excessive weight gain and dietary factors appear to play a major role since hypertension is rare in nonobese hunter-gathers living in nonindustrialized societies. Recent advances in genetics offer opportunities to discover gene-environment interactions that may also contribute to hypertension, although success thus far has been limited mainly to identification of rare monogenic forms of hypertension. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  1. Smolt physiology and endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  2. δ44/40Ca From Coccolithophores May Reveal a Link Between the Ca and C Systems Upon Regulating the Physiological Adaptations of Calcification and Photosynthesis to Varying CO2 Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia Ramirez, L. M.; Paytan, A.; Eisenhauer, A.; Bolton, C. T.; Kolevica, A.; Stoll, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    The sedimentation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is the largest carbon (C) sink in the combined biosphere, atmosphere and ocean systems, and therefore influences the global C cycle. Coccolithophores are important contributors to CaCO3 sediment production, with contributions varying from 95% of the total marine CaCO3in the Cenozoic to 50% in the modern ocean. Consequently, physiological adaptations of coccolithophores' calcification and photosynthesis to varying ambient conditions have implications for the C cycle. It has been recently shown that under low CO2 concentrations (CO2 threshold of ~20 μM), coccolithophores reallocate HCO3- from the calcification vesicle to the chloroplast to cope with the decrease in CO2 available for photosynthesis. This adaptation was first observed in the late Miocene, as δ13C of the more sensitive larger coccoliths (with lower surface to volume ratios) became lighter due to the diminished use of HCO3- and increased use of CO2 as C source for calcification (Bolton and Stoll, 2013). Without further physiological adaptations to maintain calcification, reduced HCO3-availability for calcification may result in less calcified coccoliths (e.g. thinner and lighter). Here we report δ44/40Ca and δ13C measurements of cultured Emiliana huxleyi, Calcidiscus leptoporus and Gephyrocapsa oceanica grown under varying CO2 concentrations. We test the hypothesis whether Ca transport is influenced by coccolithophores to maintain calcification at low CO2 concentrations. It is possible that as the reallocation of HCO3- from the calcification vesicle to the chloroplast is increasing in response to low CO2 availability for photosynthesis, Ca transport and concentration would also increase to maintain high saturation at the site of calcification. We also present δ44/40Ca and δ13C from two coccolith size fractions from site 925 in the Western Equatorial Atlantic from the last ~11 Myr, to access how the Ca system of coccolithophores of different sizes may

  3. Effects of Three Plant Growth Regulators on the Physiological Indices of Hibiscus Rosa-sinensis%3种植物生长调节剂对七彩朱槿生理指标的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    玉舒中; 王美英; 李悦; 杨振德; 雷世满; 吕文玲

    2012-01-01

    [目的]探讨植物生长调节剂对七彩朱槿生长影响的生理机制.[方法]采用L16(43)的正交试验设计,研究多效唑( PP333)、矮壮素(CCC)、比久(B9)3种植物生长调节剂对盆栽七彩朱槿叶绿素含量以及POD、CAT、NR的影响.[结果]叶施与根施生长调节剂对七彩朱槿的生理影响效果不同.叶施生长调节剂对叶绿素含量、POD和CAT的影响大于根施;而根施对NR的促进作用大于叶施,含高浓,度CCC(4000mg/L)的(14)、(15)、(16)处理的NR明显高于对照.3种生长调节剂中,CCC对七彩朱槿NR的影响最显著,其中根施CCC处理的影响达极显著水平.[结论]合理使用植物生长调节剂,不仅能起到化学修剪的作用,同时可以增强七彩朱槿的光合作用能力、抗性以及对氮肥的利用能力.%[Objective] The research aimed to explore the physiological mechanism that plant growth regulators made effects on the growth of Hibiscus Rosa-sinensis. [Method] The experiments were conducted as the orthogonal design of L16 (4 ) to study the effects of three plant growth regulators , namely PP333, CCC, B9, on th e chlorophyll content, POD, CAT and NR of Hibiscus Rosa-sinensis grown in pot. [Result] The effects on the physiological indices of Hibiscus Rosa-sinensis between foliar fertilization and root fertilization of PP333 ,CCC and B9 were different. The effects on the chlorophyll content, POD and CAT made by foliage fertilization were more obvious than by root fertilization, but it was opposite to NR, and the values of NR of Hibiscus Rosa-sinensis treated by the (14), (15) and (16) combinations, which all contained CCC in high concentration (4 000 mg/L) ,were significantly higher than CK. Among the three plant growth regulators, CCC had made the most significant effect on NR of Hibiscus Rosa-sinensis, especially by the way of root fertilization, and the difference could reach extremely significant level compared with the others. [Conclusion] Rational use

  4. [C-peptide physiological effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, A O; Granstrem, O K

    2013-02-01

    In the recent years there were numerous evidences that C-peptide, which was previously considered as a product of insulin biosynthesis, is one of the key regulators of physiological processes. C-peptide via heterotrimeric G(i/o) protein-coupled receptors activates a wide range of intracellular effector proteins and transcription factors and, thus, controls the inflammatory and neurotrophic processes, pain sensitivity, cognitive function, macro- and microcirculation, glomerular filtration. These effects of C-peptide are mainly expressed in its absolute or relative deficiency occurred in type 1 diabetes mellitus and they are less pronounced when the level of C-peptide is close to normal. Replacement therapy with C-peptide prevents many complications of type 1 diabetes, such as atherosclerosis, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and nephropathy. C-peptide interacts with the insulin hexamer complexes and induces their dissociation and, as a result, regulates the functional activity of the insulin signaling system. At the same time, C-peptide at the concentrations above physiological may demonstrate pro-inflammatory effects on the endothelial cells and cause atherosclerotic changes in the vessels, which should be considered in the study of pathogenic mechanisms of complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus, where the level of C peptide is increased, as well as in the development of approaches for C-peptide application in clinic. This review is devoted contemporary achievements and unsolved problems in the study of C-peptide, as an important regulator of physiological and biochemical processes.

  5. Acquired cisplatin resistance in human ovarian A2780 cancer cells correlates with shift in taurine homeostasis and ability to volume regulate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur Arna; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance is a major challenge in the treatment of cancer and develops through reduced drug accumulation and an increased ability to avoid drug-induced cell damage, cell shrinkage, and hence initiation of apoptosis. Uptake and release of the semiessential amino acid taurine contribute...... to cell volume homeostasis, and taurine has been reported to have antiapoptotic effects. Here we find that volume-sensitive taurine release in cisplatin-sensitive [wild-type (WT)] human ovarian cancer A2780 cells is reduced in the presence of the phospholipase A2 inhibitor bromenol lactone, the 5......-induced cell death in RES A2780 cells correlates with an increased accumulation of taurine, due to an increased taurine uptake and a concomitant impairment of the volume-sensitive taurine release pathway, as well an inability to reduce cell volume after osmotic cell swelling. Downregulation of volume...

  6. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  7. The foundations of space biology and medicine. Volume 2: Ecological and physiological bases of space biology and medicine. Part 3: Effect on the organism of dynamic flight factors. Chapter 1: Principles of gravitational biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    The physical principles of gravitation are discussed, such as gravitational and intertial forces, weight and mass, weightlessness, size and scale effects, scale limits of gravitational effects, and gravity as a biogenic factor. The behavior of the accelerative force gravitation, is described. This law proposes and quantifies the mutual gravitational attraction existing between all bodies of matter, the force being proportional to the product of masses, and inversely related to the square of the distance separating them. Gravity orientation, chronic acceleration, and hematology are examined. Systematic responses, such as circulation and renal functions, are also considered, along with animal response to a decreased acceleration field and physiology of hyper- and hypodynamic fields.

  8. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase) are differentially regulated during cardiac volume and pressure overload hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopontammarak, Somkiat; Aliharoob, Assad; Ocampo, Catherina; Arcilla, Rene A; Gupta, Mahesh P; Gupta, Madhu

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pressure overload (PO) and volume overload (VO) result in morphologically and functionally distinct forms of myocardial hypertrophy. However, the molecular mechanism initiating these two types of hypertrophy is not yet understood. Data obtained from different cell types have indicated that the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) comprising c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38 play an important role in transmitting signals of stress stimuli to elicit the cellular response. We tested the hypothesis that early induction of MAPKs differs in two types of overload on the heart and associates with distinct expression of hypertrophic marker genes, namely ANF, alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MHC), and beta-MHC. In rats, VO was induced by aortocaval shunt and PO by constriction of the abdominal aorta. The PO animals were further divided into two groups depending on the severity of the constriction, mild (MPO) and severe pressure overload (SPO), having 35 and 85% aortic constriction, respectively. Early changes in MAPK activity (2-120 min and 1 to 2 d) were analyzed by the in vitro kinase assay using kinase-specific antibodies for p38, JNK, and ERK2. The change in expression of hypertrophy marker genes was examined by Northern blot analysis. In VO hypertrophy, the activity of p38 was markedly increased (10-fold), without changing the activity of ERK and JNK. However, during PO hypertrophy, the activity of JNK was significantly increased (two- to sixfold) and depended on the severity of the load. The activity of p38 was not changed in MPO hypertrophy, whereas it was slightly elevated (50%) in hearts with SPO. Similarly, ERK activity was not changed in hearts with MPO, but a transient rise in activity was observed in hearts with SPO. The expression of ANF and beta-MHC genes was elevated in both PO and VO hypertrophy; however, this change was much greater in hearts subjected to PO than VO hypertrophy. Alpha

  9. Effects of Growth Regulator on Yield and Nitrogen Physiological Efficiency of Rape%生长调节剂对油菜产量及氮素利用效率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨兰; 荣湘民; 宋海星; 刘强; 朱兆坤; 张鹏程; 龚蓉

    2012-01-01

    采用土培试验,以高氮素利用效率油菜品种2号及低氮素利用效率油菜品种6号为试验材料,在不同氮素水平上,研究了油菜生育后期涂抹生长素(IAA)、细胞分裂素(6-BA)及脱落酸(ABA)3种不同生长调节剂对产量及氮素利用效率的影响.结果表明:生长调节剂能提高油菜单株角果数、每角果粒数、千粒重、籽粒产量及生物产量.与低氮素利用效率油菜品种6号相比,高氮素利用效率油菜品种2号增加效果更加明显.同时生长调节剂对氮素生理效率的影响与品种及氮水平的高低有着密切的关系.%Using high nitrogen use efficiency rape cultivar 2 and low nitrogen use efficiency rape cultivar 6 as experimental materials for soil culture experiment to study the effect of using three different growth regulators, auxin (IAA), cytokinin (6-BA) and abscisic acid (ABA), at later growth stage on yield and nitrogen use efficiency of rape. The results showed that growth regulator can improve the number of pod per plant, the number of seed per pod, the 1000-grain weight, the grain yield and the biological yield. In comparison with low nitrogen use efficiency rape cultivar 6, the high nitrogen use efficiency rape cultivar 2 had more obvious increase effects. Meanwhile, the effects of growth regulator on physiological efficiency of rape had close relation with different varieties and nitrogen levels.

  10. Interacción entre proteínas y glicanos en la regulación fisiológica de las células T How do protein-glycan interactions regulate T-cell physiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta A. Toscano

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Las interacciones entre proteínas y glicanos juegan un papel fundamental en numerosos eventos de la regulación de la fisiología del sistema inmune, como maduración tímica, activación, migración y apoptosis de células T. Los carbohidratos son capaces de modular la fisiología linfocitaria a través de la interacción específica con lectinas endógenas como selectinas y galectinas. Estas lectinas endógenas son capaces de reconocer estructuras sacarídicas localizadas en glicoproteínas de la superficie celular y regular procesos tan diversos como proliferación, diferenciación y ciclo celular. Existen diversos niveles de control de la interacción entre lectinas y azúcares; en primer lugar podemos mencionar la expresión regulada de estas lectinas durante el desarrollo de una respuesta inmune, y en segundo lugar la regulación espacio-temporal de la actividad de glicosiltranferasas y glicosidasas cuya función es crear y modificar los azúcares específicos para estas lectinas. Existen evidencias de que la expresión y actividad de estas enzimas se regulan en forma positiva o negativa durante diferentes eventos del desarrollo, ejecución y finalización de la respuesta inmune. En este artículo se analizarán los mecanismos a través de los cuales las interacciones entre lectinas con sus carbohidratos específicos modulan en forma específica diversos procesos fisiológicos, como maduración de timocitos, migración linfocitaria, activación y diferenciación de células T y apoptosis.Recent evidence indicates that protein-glycan interactions play a critical role in different events associated with the physiology of T-cell responses including thymocyte maturation, T-cell activation, lymphocyte migration and T-cell apoptosis. Glycans decorating T-cell surface glycoproteins can modulate T-cell physiology by specifically interacting with endogenous lectins including selectins and galectins. These endogenous lectins are capable of

  11. Chewing Over Physiology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; de Arcisio Miranda, Manoel; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the differentareas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it…

  12. Chewing Over Physiology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; de Arcisio Miranda, Manoel; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the differentareas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it…

  13. Physiological considerations in radionuclide urodynamic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhuri, T.K.; Fink, S.; Burger, R.H.; Netto, I.C.; Palmer, J.D. (V.A. Medical Center, Hamptom, VA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Radionuclear imaging of micturition (RNIM) (Nuclear Uroflowmetry, Voiding Nuclear Cystogram) measures bladder volumes, bladder emptying times, and urinary flow rates. These data help to differentiate normal subjects from those with obstructive uropathy or neuromuscular failure and to quantify the deficit. We discuss the physiological considerations of importance to physicians ordering and interpreting this convenient and noninvasive diagnostic procedure. 39 references.

  14. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  15. Renormalized Volumes with Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    We develop a general regulated volume expansion for the volume of a manifold with boundary whose measure is suitably singular along a separating hypersurface. The expansion is shown to have a regulator independent anomaly term and a renormalized volume term given by the primitive of an associated anomaly operator. These results apply to a wide range of structures. We detail applications in the setting of measures derived from a conformally singular metric. In particular, we show that the anomaly generates invariant (Q-curvature, transgression)-type pairs for hypersurfaces with boundary. For the special case of anomalies coming from the volume enclosed by a minimal hypersurface ending on the boundary of a Poincare--Einstein structure, this result recovers Branson's Q-curvature and corresponding transgression. When the singular metric solves a boundary version of the constant scalar curvature Yamabe problem, the anomaly gives generalized Willmore energy functionals for hypersurfaces with boundary. Our approach ...

  16. Physiologic basis for understanding quantitative dehydration assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W; Charkoudian, Nisha; Sawka, Michael N

    2013-03-01

    Dehydration (body water deficit) is a physiologic state that can have profound implications for human health and performance. Unfortunately, dehydration can be difficult to assess, and there is no single, universal gold standard for decision making. In this article, we review the physiologic basis for understanding quantitative dehydration assessment. We highlight how phenomenologic interpretations of dehydration depend critically on the type (dehydration compared with volume depletion) and magnitude (moderate compared with severe) of dehydration, which in turn influence the osmotic (plasma osmolality) and blood volume-dependent compensatory thresholds for antidiuretic and thirst responses. In particular, we review new findings regarding the biological variation in osmotic responses to dehydration and discuss how this variation can help provide a quantitative and clinically relevant link between the physiology and phenomenology of dehydration. Practical measures with empirical thresholds are provided as a starting point for improving the practice of dehydration assessment.

  17. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow potential brain waves (contingent negativevariation, and eye blink rate or pupil functions, are used as indices for the measurement of the aroma effects

  18. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  19. Collaborative evolution algorithm based on physiological bi-regulation mechanism%一种基于生理双向调节机制的协同进化算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宝; 王君红; 丁永生; 夏伯锴

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the searching effect for the optimization of multi-parameters, a networked collaborative evolution algorithm (NCEA) was presented based on the bi-regulation mechanism of physiological system. Its structure was designed according to the relative physiological system, which included supper monitor level (SML), collaborative modulation level (CML) , and searching population level (SPL). The SPL sends collaborative command to CML, according to the value of individuals fitness and distribution density fed back from searching population level. According to the collaborative command, the CML adjusts the crossover and variation probability, and the individuals exchange probability and uniformity of SPL based on the change of performance index and the corresponding law of physiological modulation. SPL is composed of main searching population and supplement searching population. The supplement population can supply excellent individuals for main population to avoid the searching falling into some local peak. In the experiments, two typical nonlinear functions were firstly selected to examine the searching precision and convergence rate of NECA, and then it was applied to the optimizing process of a novel nonlinear optimization intelligent controller. The experimental results show that the NCEA has better convergence rate and searching precision than normal GA and CCA (an improved GA).%为了提高多参数寻优效果,基于人体生理双向协同网络调节机制,提出一种网络协同优化算法(NCEA).对应相应生理系统设计其体系结构,具体包括监控管理级、协同调节级和群体搜索级:监控管理级根据适应度和群体分布密度等信息,发送协同指令给协同调节级;协同调节级根据协同调节指令,基于生理调节规律实时调整各个搜索群体的交叉和变异概率因子和搜索群体之间的个体交换概率,以及辅助群体的个体均匀化;群体搜索级包括主搜索群体

  20. Upper gastrointestinal physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldum, Helge L; Kleveland, Per M; Fossmark, Reidar

    2015-06-01

    Nordic research on physiology and pathophysiology of the upper gastrointestinal tract has flourished during the last 50 years. Swedish surgeons and physiologists were in the frontline of research on the regulation of gastric acid secretion. This research finally led to the development of omeprazole, the first proton pump inhibitor. When Swedish physiologists developed methods allowing the assessment of acid secretion in isolated oxyntic glands and isolated parietal cells, the understanding of mechanisms by which gastric acid secretion is regulated took a great step forward. Similarly, in Trondheim, Norway, the acid producing isolated rat stomach model combined with a sensitive and specific method for determination of histamine made it possible to evaluate this regulation qualitatively as well as quantitatively. In Lund, Sweden, the identification of the enterochromaffin-like cell as the cell taking part in the regulation of acid secretion by producing and releasing histamine was of fundamental importance both physiologically and clinically. Jorpes and Mutt established a center at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm for the purification of gastrointestinal hormones in the 1960s, and Danes followed up this work by excelling in the field of determination and assessment of biological role of gastrointestinal hormones. A Finnish group was for a long period in the forefront of research on gastritis, and the authors' own studies on the classification of gastric cancer and the role of gastrin in the development of gastric neoplasia are of importance. It can, accordingly, be concluded that Nordic researchers have been central in the research on area of the upper gastrointestinal physiology and diseases.

  1. Effects of insemination quantity on honey bee queen physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Tarpy, David R; Grozinger, Christina M

    2007-10-03

    Mating has profound effects on the physiology and behavior of female insects, and in honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens, these changes are permanent. Queens mate with multiple males during a brief period in their early adult lives, and shortly thereafter they initiate egg-laying. Furthermore, the pheromone profiles of mated queens differ from those of virgins, and these pheromones regulate many different aspects of worker behavior and colony organization. While it is clear that mating causes dramatic changes in queens, it is unclear if mating number has more subtle effects on queen physiology or queen-worker interactions; indeed, the effect of multiple matings on female insect physiology has not been broadly addressed. Because it is not possible to control the natural mating behavior of queens, we used instrumental insemination and compared queens inseminated with semen from either a single drone (single-drone inseminated, or SDI) or 10 drones (multi-drone inseminated, or MDI). We used observation hives to monitor attraction of workers to SDI or MDI queens in colonies, and cage studies to monitor the attraction of workers to virgin, SDI, and MDI queen mandibular gland extracts (the main source of queen pheromone). The chemical profiles of the mandibular glands of virgin, SDI, and MDI queens were characterized using GC-MS. Finally, we measured brain expression levels in SDI and MDI queens of a gene associated with phototaxis in worker honey bees (Amfor). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that insemination quantity significantly affects mandibular gland chemical profiles, queen-worker interactions, and brain gene expression. Further research will be necessary to elucidate the mechanistic bases for these effects: insemination volume, sperm and seminal protein quantity, and genetic diversity of the sperm may all be important factors contributing to this profound change in honey bee queen physiology, queen behavior, and social interactions in the colony.

  2. Effects of insemination quantity on honey bee queen physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie-Jeanne Richard

    Full Text Available Mating has profound effects on the physiology and behavior of female insects, and in honey bee (Apis mellifera queens, these changes are permanent. Queens mate with multiple males during a brief period in their early adult lives, and shortly thereafter they initiate egg-laying. Furthermore, the pheromone profiles of mated queens differ from those of virgins, and these pheromones regulate many different aspects of worker behavior and colony organization. While it is clear that mating causes dramatic changes in queens, it is unclear if mating number has more subtle effects on queen physiology or queen-worker interactions; indeed, the effect of multiple matings on female insect physiology has not been broadly addressed. Because it is not possible to control the natural mating behavior of queens, we used instrumental insemination and compared queens inseminated with semen from either a single drone (single-drone inseminated, or SDI or 10 drones (multi-drone inseminated, or MDI. We used observation hives to monitor attraction of workers to SDI or MDI queens in colonies, and cage studies to monitor the attraction of workers to virgin, SDI, and MDI queen mandibular gland extracts (the main source of queen pheromone. The chemical profiles of the mandibular glands of virgin, SDI, and MDI queens were characterized using GC-MS. Finally, we measured brain expression levels in SDI and MDI queens of a gene associated with phototaxis in worker honey bees (Amfor. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that insemination quantity significantly affects mandibular gland chemical profiles, queen-worker interactions, and brain gene expression. Further research will be necessary to elucidate the mechanistic bases for these effects: insemination volume, sperm and seminal protein quantity, and genetic diversity of the sperm may all be important factors contributing to this profound change in honey bee queen physiology, queen behavior, and social interactions in the

  3. Physiologic and pharmacokinetic changes in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantine, Maged M

    2014-01-01

    Physiologic changes in pregnancy induce profound alterations to the pharmacokinetic properties of many medications. These changes affect distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and thus may impact their pharmacodynamic properties during pregnancy. Pregnant women undergo several adaptations in many organ systems. Some adaptations are secondary to hormonal changes in pregnancy, while others occur to support the gravid woman and her developing fetus. Some of the changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy include, for example, increased maternal fat and total body water, decreased plasma protein concentrations, especially albumin, increased maternal blood volume, cardiac output, and blood flow to the kidneys and uteroplacental unit, and decreased blood pressure. The maternal blood volume expansion occurs at a larger proportion than the increase in red blood cell mass, which results in physiologic anemia and hemodilution. Other physiologic changes include increased tidal volume, partially compensated respiratory alkalosis, delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility, and altered activity of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Understating these changes and their profound impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in pregnancy is essential to optimize maternal and fetal health.

  4. Physiologic and Pharmacokinetic Changes in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged eCostantine

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic changes in pregnancy induce profound alterations to the pharmacokinetic properties of many medications. These changes affect distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and thus may impact their pharmacodynamic properties during pregnancy. Pregnant women undergo several adaptations in many organ systems. Some adaptations are secondary to hormonal changes in pregnancy, while others occur to support the gravid woman and her developing fetus. Some of the changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy include, for example, increased maternal fat and total body water, decreased plasma protein concentrations, especially albumin, increased maternal blood volume, cardiac output and blood flow to the kidneys and uteroplacental unit, and decreased blood pressure. The maternal blood volume expansion occurs at a larger proportion than the increase in red blood cell mass, which results in physiologic anemia and hemodilution. Other physiologic changes include increased tidal volume, partially compensated respiratory alkalosis, delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility, and altered activity of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Understating these changes and their profound impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in pregnancy is essential to optimize maternal and fetal health.

  5. Dehydration: physiology, assessment, and performance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of dehydration assessment and presents a unique evaluation of the dehydration and performance literature. The importance of osmolality and volume are emphasized when discussing the physiology, assessment, and performance effects of dehydration. The underappreciated physiologic distinction between a loss of hypo-osmotic body water (intracellular dehydration) and an iso-osmotic loss of body water (extracellular dehydration) is presented and argued as the single most essential aspect of dehydration assessment. The importance of diagnostic and biological variation analyses to dehydration assessment methods is reviewed and their use in gauging the true potential of any dehydration assessment method highlighted. The necessity for establishing proper baselines is discussed, as is the magnitude of dehydration required to elicit reliable and detectable osmotic or volume-mediated compensatory physiologic responses. The discussion of physiologic responses further helps inform and explain our analysis of the literature suggesting a ≥ 2% dehydration threshold for impaired endurance exercise performance mediated by volume loss. In contrast, no clear threshold or plausible mechanism(s) support the marginal, but potentially important, impairment in strength, and power observed with dehydration. Similarly, the potential for dehydration to impair cognition appears small and related primarily to distraction or discomfort. The impact of dehydration on any particular sport skill or task is therefore likely dependent upon the makeup of the task itself (e.g., endurance, strength, cognitive, and motor skill).

  6. Cardiovascular physiology and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Narayana S; Svatikova, Anna; Somers, Virend K

    2003-05-01

    effects of sleep could be objectively differentiated from the effects of rest and recumbency. Furthermore, the specific effects of sleep onset and termination, and the effects of different sleep stages, could be assessed. Technological advances, with consequently enhanced and relatively non-invasive approaches to cardiovascular regulation, have greatly broadened our understanding of the effects of sleep stage on cardiovascular function. Continuous monitoring of simultaneous measures of polysomnographic and cardiovascular variables enables characterization of the effects of dynamic changes and rapid transitions in sleep stage, such as arousals. The capacity for measuring acute and immediate changes in autonomic, EEG and hemodynamic responses to sleep and arousal on a continuous basis has played an important role in enabling us to understand the interplay between changes in EEG and changes in the more peripheral measurements of neural and circulatory variables, such as sympathetic nerve traffic, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). Measurements of heart rate variability (HRV) (8-10), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) (11-16), and intraneural measurement of sympathetic nerve traffic to muscle (MSNA) (17-22) and skin (SSNA) (23-24) have further advanced our understanding of mechanisms linking sleep and cardiovascular physiology.

  7. Obesity and Asthma: Physiological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Brashier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity induces some pertinent physiological changes which are conducive to either development of asthma or cause of poorly controlled asthma state. Obesity related mechanical stress forces induced by abdominal and thoracic fat generate stiffening of the lungs and diaphragmatic movements to result in reduction of resting lung volumes such as functional residual capacity (FRC. Reduced FRC is primarily an outcome of decreased expiratory reserve volume, which pushes the tidal breathing more towards smaller high resistance airways, and consequentially results in expiratory flow limitation during normal breathing in obesity. Reduced FRC also induces plastic alteration in the small collapsible airways, which may generate smooth muscle contraction resulting in increased small airway resistance, which, however, is not picked up by spirometric lung volumes. There is also a possibility that chronically reduced FRC may generate permanent adaptation in the very small airways; therefore, the airway calibres may not change despite weight reduction. Obesity may also induce bronchodilator reversibility and diurnal lung functional variability. Obesity is also associated with airway hyperresponsiveness; however, the mechanism of this is not clear. Thus, obesity has effects on lung function that can generate respiratory distress similar to asthma and may also exaggerate the effects of preexisting asthma.

  8. The role of physiological elements in future therapies of rheumatoid arthritis. III. The role of the electromagnetic field in regulation of redox potential and life cycle of inflammatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Michał; Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Maśliński, Sławomir; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Each material consisting of charged particles can be influenced by a magnetic field. Polarized particles play an essential role in almost all physiological processes. Locally generated electromagnetic fields several physiological processes within the human body, for example: stimulation of nerves, muscles, and cardiac electrical activity. This phenomenon is used today in many medical applications. In this article, we discuss ways in which electromagnetic field affects the physiological and pathological processes in cells and tissues. This knowledge will help to better understand the electrophysiological phenomenon in connective tissue diseases and can bring new therapeutic strategies (in the form of "invisible drugs") for the treatment of rheumatic diseases?

  9. Advances in physiological computing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairclough, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    This edited collection will provide an overview of the field of physiological computing, i.e. the use of physiological signals as input for computer control. It will cover a breadth of current research, from brain-computer interfaces to telemedicine.

  10. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  11. Physiology of sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ron

    2007-07-01

    The elite athlete represents the extreme of the human gene pool, where genetic endowment is developed by an intensive training programme. Sport encompasses many different activities, calling for different physical and mental attributes. Understanding the physiology of exercise provides insights into normal physiological function.

  12. Physiological changes in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    SOMA-PILLAY, Priya; Catherine, Nelson-Piercy; Tolppanen, Heli; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Physiological changes occur in pregnancy to nurture the developing foetus and prepare the mother for labour and delivery. Some of these changes influence normal biochemical values while others may mimic symptoms of medical disease. It is important to differentiate between normal physiological changes and disease pathology. This review highlights the important changes that take place during normal pregnancy.

  13. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction.

  14. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eKagias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. Physiological stress can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, which result from an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level.

  15. Dynamical compensation in physiological circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Omer; Swisa, Avital; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval; Alon, Uri

    2016-11-08

    Biological systems can maintain constant steady-state output despite variation in biochemical parameters, a property known as exact adaptation. Exact adaptation is achieved using integral feedback, an engineering strategy that ensures that the output of a system robustly tracks its desired value. However, it is unclear how physiological circuits also keep their output dynamics precise-including the amplitude and response time to a changing input. Such robustness is crucial for endocrine and neuronal homeostatic circuits because they need to provide a precise dynamic response in the face of wide variation in the physiological parameters of their target tissues; how such circuits compensate their dynamics for unavoidable natural fluctuations in parameters is unknown. Here, we present a design principle that provides the desired robustness, which we call dynamical compensation (DC). We present a class of circuits that show DC by means of a nonlinear feedback loop in which the regulated variable controls the functional mass of the controlling endocrine or neuronal tissue. This mechanism applies to the control of blood glucose by insulin and explains several experimental observations on insulin resistance. We provide evidence that this mechanism may also explain compensation and organ size control in other physiological circuits.

  16. Cytokine hypothesis of overtraining: a physiological adaptation to excessive stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L L

    2000-02-01

    Overtraining syndrome (OTS) is a condition wherein an athlete is training excessively, yet performance deteriorates. This is usually accompanied by mood/behavior changes and a variety of biochemical and physiological alterations. Presently, there is no global hypothesis to account for OTS. The present paper will attempt to provide a unifying paradigm that will integrate previous research under the rubric of the cytokine hypothesis of overtraining. It is argued that high volume/intensity training, with insufficient rest, will produce muscle and/or skeletal and/or joint trauma. Circulating monocytes are then activated by injury-related cytokines, and in turn produce large quantities of proinflammatory IL-1beta, and/or IL-6, and/or TNF-alpha, producing systemic inflammation. Elevated circulating cytokines then co-ordinate the whole-body response by: a) communicating with the CNS and inducing a set of behaviors referred to as "sickness" behavior, which involves mood and behavior changes that support resolution of systemic inflammation: b) adjusting liver function, to support the up-regulation of gluconeogenesis, as well as de novo synthesis of acute phase proteins, and a concomitant hypercatabolic state; and c) impacting on immune function. Theoretically, OTS is viewed as the third stage of Selye's general adaptation syndrome, with the focus being on recovery/survival, and not adaptation, and is deemed to be "protective," occurring in response to excessive physical/physiological stress. Recommendations are made for potential markers of OTS, based on a systemic inflammatory condition.

  17. Chromatin remodeling in cardiovascular development and physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Pei; Hang, Calvin T.; Yang, Jin; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin regulation provides an important means of controlling cardiac gene expression under different physiological and pathological conditions. Processes that direct the development of normal embryonic hearts and pathology of stressed adult hearts may share general mechanisms that govern cardiac gene expression by chromatin-regulating factors. These common mechanisms may provide a framework for us to investigate the interactions among diverse chromatin remodelers/modifiers and various tran...

  18. Hormonal and electrolyte responses to acute isohemic volume expansion in unanesthetized rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenault, V. M.; Morris, M.; Lynch, C. D.; Maultsby, S. J.; Hutchins, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the time course of the metabolic response to isohemic blood volume expansion (30%) in normotensive, unanesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Whole blood, drawn from a femoral artery catheter of conscious donor rats, was infused into the jugular vein of recipient rats. Blood samples were drawn from a carotid artery of recipient rats at time points beginning immediately post-volume expansion (IPVE) up through 5 days post-volume expansion (PVE). To characterize the attendant compensatory mechanisms, the plasma concentrations of electrolytes and fluid regulatory hormones were determined. Hematocrit began to raise IPVE and was significantly elevated above control IPVE 20, 30, 40, 60, and 90 min, and 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hr PVE. Consistent with our current understanding of the hormonal response to excess volume, atrial natriuretic factor was significantly increased above the prevolume expansion (control) values 0-30 min PVE. Surprisingly, plasma aldosterone levels were significantly increased above control at 20 and 30 min and 6 hr PVE, whereas plasma renin activity was significantly decreased 30-40 min PVE. Plasma sodium was not changed from control values except for a significant increase at 6 hr post-volume expansion. Plasma potassium, osmolality, and arginine vasopressin levels were not altered by the volume expansion. These studies delineate the physiologic time scheme operative in the regulation of fluid volume during acute ischemic volume expansion.

  19. Community energy systems and the law of public utilities. Volume thirty-eight. Oklahoma. Final report of a study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of integrated community energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Oklahoma governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities, Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One: An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  20. Proper setpoint for CO{sub 2} control of Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems; Riktig set-punkt ved CO{sub 2}-regulering av VAV-anlegg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Bjoern R.; Jensen, Bjoernulf

    2003-07-01

    The article discusses some important issues relating to CO{sub 2}-control of VAV systems and demonstrates how to determine a setpoint that is in agreement with the regulations. Adjusting the setpoint is important both for the air quality and for the energy consumption. It is only when the need for ventilation is essentially determined by occupancy that controlling to 1000 ppm will give air quantities approaching the requirement of the regulations. In all other situations a setpoint of 1000 is too high.

  1. Fetal cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychik, J

    2004-01-01

    The cardiovascular system of the fetus is physiologically different than the adult, mature system. Unique characteristics of the myocardium and specific channels of blood flow differentitate the physiology of the fetus from the newborn. Conditions of increased preload and afterload in the fetus, such as sacrococcygeal teratoma and twin-twin transfusion syndrome, result in unique and complex pathophysiological states. Echocardiography has improved our understanding of human fetal cadiovasvular physiology in the normal and diseased states, and has expanded our capability to more effectively treat these disease processes.

  2. On pressure: volume relations in hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.Y. Ie (Eric)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractChapter 1 is a brief introduction to several aspects of cardiovascular pressure-volume relations in dialysis patients. The aims of the thesis are presented. In Chapter 2, an overview is presented of circulatory physiology in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Volume withdrawal by ultrafiltrati

  3. Annotation and prediction of stress and workload from physiological and inertial signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Danieli, Morena; Riccardi, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    Continuous daily stress and high workload can have negative effects on individuals' physical and mental well-being. It has been shown that physiological signals may support the prediction of stress and workload. However, previous research is limited by the low diversity of signals concurring to such predictive tasks and controlled experimental design. In this paper we present 1) a pipeline for continuous and real-life acquisition of physiological and inertial signals 2) a mobile agent application for on-the-go event annotation and 3) an end-to-end signal processing and classification system for stress and workload from diverse signal streams. We study physiological signals such as Galvanic Skin Response (GSR), Skin Temperature (ST), Inter Beat Interval (IBI) and Blood Volume Pulse (BVP) collected using a non-invasive wearable device; and inertial signals collected from accelerometer and gyroscope sensors. We combine them with subjects' inputs (e.g. event tagging) acquired using the agent application, and their emotion regulation scores. In our experiments we explore signal combination and selection techniques for stress and workload prediction from subjects whose signals have been recorded continuously during their daily life. The end-to-end classification system is described for feature extraction, signal artifact removal, and classification. We show that a combination of physiological, inertial and user event signals provides accurate prediction of stress for real-life users and signals.

  4. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  5. The speed of swelling kinetics modulates cell volume regulation and calcium signaling in astrocytes: A different point of view on the role of aquaporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola, Maria Grazia; Sparaneo, Angelo; Gargano, Concetta Domenica; Spray, David C; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Scemes, Eliana; Nicchia, Grazia Paola

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory volume decrease (RVD) is a process by which cells restore their original volume in response to swelling. In this study, we have focused on the role played by two different Aquaporins (AQPs), Aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and Aquaporin-1 (AQP1), in triggering RVD and in mediating calcium signaling in astrocytes under hypotonic stimulus. Using biophysical techniques to measure water flux through the plasma membrane of wild-type (WT) and AQP4 knockout (KO) astrocytes and of an astrocyte cell line (DI TNC1) transfected with AQP4 or AQP1, we here show that AQP-mediated fast swelling kinetics play a key role in triggering and accelerating RVD. Using calcium imaging, we show that AQP-mediated fast swelling kinetics also significantly increases the amplitude of calcium transients inhibited by Gadolinium and Ruthenium Red, two inhibitors of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels, and prevented by removing extracellular calcium. Finally, inhibition of TRPV4 or removal of extracellular calcium does not affect RVD. All together our study provides evidence that (1) AQP influenced swelling kinetics is the main trigger for RVD and in mediating calcium signaling after hypotonic stimulus together with TRPV4, and (2) calcium influx from the extracellular space and/or TRPV4 are not essential for RVD to occur in astrocytes.

  6. SODIUM-POTASSIUM-CHLORIDE COTRANSPORT IN THE REGULATION OF VASCULAR MYOGENIC TONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Orlov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the data on the functioning of Na+,K+,2Cl– cotransport – the carrier providing electroneutral symport of sodium, potassium and chloride, as well as molecular mechanisms of the regulation and physiological significance of this carrier. We analyzed the novel data on involvement of ubiquitous isoform of Na+,K+,2Cl–cotransporter (NKCC1 in regulation of vascular smooth muscle contraction, and role of this carrier in the regulation of cell volume and intracellular chloride concentration.

  7. Liechtenstein; Assessment of the Supervision and Regulation of the Financial Sector Volume II-Detailed Assessment of Observance of Standards and Codes

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2003-01-01

    This report on the offshore financial center program contains technical advice and recommendations given by the staff team of the International Monetary Fund in response to Liechtenstein’s request for technical assistance. It provides detailed assessment of observance of the Basel Core Principles for effective banking supervision, implementation of the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) Objectives And Principles Of Securities Regulation, and observance of the Inter...

  8. THERMOREGULATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank E Marino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Vol 53 (Medicine & Sport Science This collection on the latest interpretation of research data about the relationship between thermoregulation, exercise performance and fatigue is published as the 53rd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE The book aims to explain how the advances in technology and methodology allowed studying the affects of the changing body temperature on metabolism and the role played by the nervous system in shaping human performance under challenging thermal situations. FEATURES This publication provides different interpretations of recent research for a better understanding of the limitations of thermoregulation in nine titles. The presented titles are: The Evolutionary Basis of Thermoregulation and Exercise Performance; Comparative Thermoregulation and the Quest for Athletic Supremacy; Thermoregulation, Fatigue and Exercise Modality; Neuromuscular Response to Exercise Heat Stress; Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction, Endotoxemia and Gastrointestinal Symptoms: The 'Canary in the Coal Mine' during Exercise-Heat Stress?; Effects of Peripheral Cooling on Characteristics of Local Muscle; Cooling Interventions for the Protection and Recovery of Exercise Performance from Exercise-Induced Heat Stress; Ethnicity and Temperature Regulation; Exercise Heat Stress and Metabolism. The evidence for the human's ability to adjust their performance according to the thermal limits in order to preserve cellular homeostasis is particularly noteworthy. AUDIENCE This is a fundamental book for any students and/or researchers involved in the fields of medicine, exercise physiology and human performance with special reference to thermal regulation. ASSESSMENT This publication is a must-read text for all those working in thermal medicine, exercise physiology and human performance fields

  9. Integrative physiology of orexins and orexin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieda, Michihiro; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have established that the orexin system is a critical regulator of sleep/wake states. Deficiency of orexin signaling results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy-cataplexy in humans, dogs, and rodents. These findings have brought about the possibility of novel therapies for sleep disorders including narcolepsy-cataplexy. Furthermore, accumulating evidence has indicated that the orexin system regulates sleep and wakefulness through interactions with neuronal systems that regulate emotion, reward, and energy homeostasis. This review presents and discusses the current understanding of the integrative physiology of the orexin system.

  10. Neuropeptide physiology in helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousley, Angela; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic worms come from two distinct, distant phyla, Nematoda (roundworms) and Platyhelminthes (flatworms). The nervous systems of worms from both phyla are replete with neuropeptides and there is ample physiological evidence that these neuropeptides control vital aspects of worm biology. In each phyla, the physiological evidence for critical roles for helminth neuropeptides is derived from both parasitic and free-living members. In the nematodes, the intestinal parasite Ascaris suum and the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans have yielded most of the data; in the platyhelminths, the most physiological data has come from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) have many varied effects (excitation, relaxation, or a combination) on somatic musculature, reproductive musculature, the pharynx and motor neurons in nematodes. Insulin-like peptides (INSs) play an essential role in nematode dauer formation and other developmental processes. There is also some evidence for a role in somatic muscle control for the somewhat heterogeneous grouping ofpeptides known as neuropeptide-like proteins (NLPs). In platyhelminths, as in nematodes, FLPs have a central role in somatic muscle function. Reports of FLP physiological action in platyhelminths are limited to a potent excitation of the somatic musculature. Platyhelminths are also abundantly endowed with neuropeptide Fs (NPFs), which appear absent from nematodes. There is not yet any data linking platyhelminth NPF to any particular physiological outcome, but this neuropeptide does potently and specifically inhibit cAMP accumulation in schistosomes. In nematodes and platyhelminths, there is an abundance of physiological evidence demonstrating that neuropeptides play critical roles in the biology of both free-living and parasitic helminths. While it is certainly true that there remains a great deal to learn about the biology of neuropeptides in both phyla, physiological evidence presently available points

  11. The Water to Solute Permeability Ratio Governs the Osmotic Volume Dynamics in Beetroot Vacuoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Victoria; Sutka, Moira; Amodeo, Gabriela; Chara, Osvaldo; Ozu, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell vacuoles occupy up to 90% of the cell volume and, beyond their physiological function, are constantly subjected to water and solute exchange. The osmotic flow and vacuole volume dynamics relies on the vacuole membrane -the tonoplast- and its capacity to regulate its permeability to both water and solutes. The osmotic permeability coefficient (Pf) is the parameter that better characterizes the water transport when submitted to an osmotic gradient. Usually, Pf determinations are made in vitro from the initial rate of volume change, when a fast (almost instantaneous) osmolality change occurs. When aquaporins are present, it is accepted that initial volume changes are only due to water movements. However, in living cells osmotic changes are not necessarily abrupt but gradually imposed. Under these conditions, water flux might not be the only relevant driving force shaping the vacuole volume response. In this study, we quantitatively investigated volume dynamics of isolated Beta vulgaris root vacuoles under progressively applied osmotic gradients at different pH, a condition that modifies the tonoplast Pf. We followed the vacuole volume changes while simultaneously determining the external osmolality time-courses and analyzing these data with mathematical modeling. Our findings indicate that vacuole volume changes, under progressively applied osmotic gradients, would not depend on the membrane elastic properties, nor on the non-osmotic volume of the vacuole, but on water and solute fluxes across the tonoplast. We found that the volume of the vacuole at the steady state is determined by the ratio of water to solute permeabilites (Pf/Ps), which in turn is ruled by pH. The dependence of the permeability ratio on pH can be interpreted in terms of the degree of aquaporin inhibition and the consequently solute transport modulation. This is relevant in many plant organs such as root, leaves, cotyledons, or stems that perform extensive rhythmic growth movements

  12. The water to solute permeability ratio governs the osmotic volume dynamics in beetroot vacuoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Vitali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell vacuoles occupy up to 90% of the cell volume and, beyond their physiological function, are constantly subjected to water and solute exchange. The osmotic flow and vacuole volume dynamics relies on the vacuole membrane -the tonoplast- and its capacity to regulate its permeability to both water and solutes. The osmotic permeability coefficient (Pf is the parameter that better characterizes the water transport when submitted to an osmotic gradient. Usually, Pf determinations are made in vitro from the initial rate of volume change, when a fast (almost instantaneous osmolality change occurs. When aquaporins are present, it is accepted that initial volume changes are only due to water movements. However, in living cells osmotic changes are not necessarily abrupt but gradually imposed. Under these conditions, water flux might not be the only relevant driving force shaping the vacuole volume response. In this study, we quantitatively investigated volume dynamics of isolated Beta vulgaris root vacuoles under progressively applied osmotic gradients at different pH, a condition that modifies the tonoplast Pf. We followed the vacuole volume changes while simultaneously determining the external osmolality time-courses and analyzing these data with mathematical modelling. Our findings indicate that vacuole volume changes, under progressively applied osmotic gradients, would not depend on the membrane elastic properties, nor on the non-osmotic volume of the vacuole, but on water and solute fluxes across the tonoplast. We found that the volume of the vacuole at the steady state is determined by the ratio of water to solute permeabilites (Pf/Ps, which in turn is ruled by pH. The dependence of the permeability ratio on pH can be interpreted in terms of the degree of aquaporin inhibition and the consequently solute transport modulation. This is relevant in many plant organs such as root, leaves, cotyledons or stems that perform extensive rhythmic

  13. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume I Kootenai River (Overview, Report and Appendices).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  14. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume I Kootenai River (Overview, Report and Appendices).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  15. Human physiology in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, J.

    1996-01-01

    The universality of gravity (1 g) in our daily lives makes it difficult to appreciate its importance in morphology and physiology. Bone and muscle support systems were created, cellular pumps developed, neurons organised and receptors and transducers of gravitational force to biologically relevant signals evolved under 1g gravity. Spaceflight provides the only microgravity environment where systematic experimentation can expand our basic understanding of gravitational physiology and perhaps provide new insights into normal physiology and disease processes. These include the surprising extent of our body's dependence on perceptual information, and understanding the effect and importance of forces generated within the body's weightbearing structures such as muscle and bones. Beyond this exciting prospect is the importance of this work towards opening the solar system for human exploration. Although both appear promising, we are only just beginning to taste what lies ahead.

  16. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  17. Plant Physiology and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taiz, Lincoln; Zeiger, Eduardo; Møller, Ian Max

    Physiology and Development. As before, Unit III begins with updated chapters on Cell Walls and Signals and Signal Transduction. The latter chapter has been expanded to include a discussion of major signaling molecules, such as calcium ions and plant hormones. A new, unified chapter entitled Signals from......Throughout its twenty-two year history, the authors of Plant Physiology have continually updated the book to incorporate the latest advances in plant biology and implement pedagogical improvements requested by adopters. This has made Plant Physiology the most authoritative, comprehensive......, and widely used upper-division plant biology textbook. In the Sixth Edition, the Growth and Development section (Unit III) has been reorganized and expanded to present the complete life cycle of seed plants from germination to senescence. In recognition of this enhancement, the text has been renamed Plant...

  18. Comparison of three methods for the estimation of pineal gland volume using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acer, Niyazi; Ilıca, Ahmet Turan; Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Ozçelik, Ozlem; Yıldırım, Birdal; Turgut, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Pineal gland is a very important neuroendocrine organ with many physiological functions such as regulating circadian rhythm. Radiologically, the pineal gland volume is clinically important because it is usually difficult to distinguish small pineal tumors via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although many studies have estimated the pineal gland volume using different techniques, to the best of our knowledge, there has so far been no stereological work done on this subject. The objective of the current paper was to determine the pineal gland volume using stereological methods and by the region of interest (ROI) on MRI. In this paper, the pineal gland volumes were calculated in a total of 62 subjects (36 females, 26 males) who were free of any pineal lesions or tumors. The mean ± SD pineal gland volumes of the point-counting, planimetry, and ROI groups were 99.55 ± 51.34, 102.69 ± 40.39, and 104.33 ± 40.45 mm(3), respectively. No significant difference was found among the methods of calculating pineal gland volume (P > 0.05). From these results, it can be concluded that each technique is an unbiased, efficient, and reliable method, ideally suitable for in vivo examination of MRI data for pineal gland volume estimation.

  19. Electrocyte physiology: 50 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Michael R

    2013-07-01

    Weakly electric gymnotiform and mormyrid fish generate and detect weak electric fields to image their worlds and communicate. These multi-purpose electric signals are generated by electrocytes, the specialized electric organ (EO) cells that produce the electric organ discharge (EOD). Just over 50 years ago the first experimental analyses of electrocyte physiology demonstrated that the EOD is produced and shaped by the timing and waveform of electrocyte action potentials (APs). Electrocytes of some species generate a single AP from a distinct region of excitable membrane, and this AP waveform determines EOD waveform. In other species, electrocytes possess two independent regions of excitable membrane that generate asynchronous APs with different waveforms, thereby increasing EOD complexity. Signal complexity is further enhanced in some gymnotiforms by the spatio-temporal activation of distinct EO regions with different electrocyte properties. For many mormyrids, additional EOD waveform components are produced by APs that propagate along stalks that connect postsynaptic regions to the main body of the electrocyte. I review here the history of research on electrocyte physiology in weakly electric fish, as well as recent discoveries of key phenomena not anticipated during early work in this field. Recent areas of investigation include the regulation of electrocyte activity by steroid and peptide hormones, the molecular evolution of electrocyte ion channels, and the evolutionary selection of ion channels expressed in excitable cells. These emerging research areas have generated renewed interest in electrocyte function and clear future directions for research addressing a broad range of new and important questions.

  20. Efficacy and Correlation in Lumbar Physiological Curvature of Massage Combined with Traction of Regulating Curvature Treating Lumbar Disc herniation%推拿配合调曲牵引治疗腰椎间盘突出症疗效与腰椎生理曲度的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高群兴; 张盛强; 朱干

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the efficacy and correlation in lumbar physiological curvature of massage combined with traction of regulating curva-ture treating lumbar disc herniation. Methods:120 cases of lumbar disc herniation were randomly divided into treatment group and control group, treatment group were treated with massage and traction of regulating curvature, control group with treatment of massage and lumbar traction, lumbar physiological curvature (distance of lumbar vertebra arch) was measured with Seze method, to observe the curative effect of the two groups. Results:Lumbar physiological curvature of the two groups after treatment were both better than those before treatment, and treatment group was significantly better than control group (P<0.01); the excellent and good rate of treatment group was 81.7%, significantly higher than that of control group by 61.7%(P<0.01);L4~5 physiological curvature was better. Conclusion:Massage combined with traction of regulating curvature treating lumbar disc herniation is obviously effective, there is a close relationship between lumbar disc herniation and lumbar physiological curvature.%目的:研究推拿配合调曲牵引治疗腰椎间盘突出症的效果与腰椎生理曲度的关系。方法:120例腰椎间盘突出症住院患者随机分为治疗组与对照组,治疗组采用推拿配合调曲牵引治疗,对照组采用推拿及腰牵治疗,Seze法测量腰椎生理曲度(腰椎弓顶距离),观察两组患者疗效。结果:治疗后两组患者腰椎生理曲度均优于治疗前,且治疗组显著优于对照组(P<0.01);治疗组优良率为81.7%,显著高于对照组的61.7%(P<0.01);腰L4~5腰椎生理曲度较优。结论:推拿配合调曲牵引治疗腰椎间盘突出症效果显著,腰椎间盘突出症与腰椎生理曲度之间存在密切关系。

  1. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review......Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged...

  2. Impact of microbial inoculation on biomass accumulation by Sulla carnosa provenances, and in regulating nutrition, physiological and antioxidant activities of this species under non-saline and saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidri, R; Barea, J M; Mahmoud, O Metoui-Ben; Abdelly, C; Azcón, Rosario

    2016-08-20

    Bacteria (Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp.) and/or the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus intraradices were able to improve growth, physiological and biochemical characteristics of four Sulla carnosa Desf. provenances (Sidi khlif, Thelja, Kalbia and Kerker) from Tunisia under both saline and non-saline conditions. S. carnosa is a salt-tolerant legume plant, native from North Africa. The intrinsic bacterial characteristics evidenced the fitness of these bacteria to support salt stress and to stimulate plant growth. Bacillus sp. produced more indol acetic acid (IAA) than Pseudomonas sp. and showed a great surviving capacity under salt conditions supporting its capacity to improve plant growth under stress conditions. The microorganisms applied also have a different potential to increase the nutritional and related plant growth parameters. It is noticeable that some provenances reached the highest level of growth when inoculated with Bacillus sp. in Sidi khlif or by Bacillus plus AMF in Kalbia, which increased shoot by 318% and root by 774%. In contrast, in Thelja and Kerker the impact of the test microorganisms was mainly evidenced at increasing nutritional and physiological functions. Salinity reduced some growth and physiological variables as stomatal conductance, photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic efficiency and increased electrolyte leakage. However, the microbial inoculants compensated these detrimental effects in a degree depending on the S. carnosa provenance. These microorganisms also orchestrate antioxidant activities involved in adaptative responses in S. carnosa provenances. The intrinsic ability of inoculants allow us to select the provenance/microorganism combination which maximizes S. carnosa growth, nutrition and physiological/biochemical responses under salt and non-salt conditions. The results obtained support that the target microbial inocula are beneficial for the ecological stability if this Mediterranean legume.

  3. The normal increase in insulin after a meal may be required to prevent postprandial renal sodium and volume losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsik, Debra L; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie L; Staruschenko, Alexander; Brands, Michael W

    2017-06-01

    Despite the effects of insulinopenia in type 1 diabetes and evidence that insulin stimulates multiple renal sodium transporters, it is not known whether normal variation in plasma insulin regulates sodium homeostasis physiologically. This study tested whether the normal postprandial increase in plasma insulin significantly attenuates renal sodium and volume losses. Rats were instrumented with chronic artery and vein catheters, housed in metabolic cages, and connected to hydraulic swivels. Measurements of urine volume and sodium excretion (UNaV) over 24 h and the 4-h postprandial period were made in control (C) rats and insulin-clamped (IC) rats in which the postprandial increase in insulin was prevented. Twenty-four-hour urine volume (36 ± 3 vs. 15 ± 2 ml/day) and UNaV (3.0 ± 0.2 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2 mmol/day) were greater in the IC compared with C rats, respectively. Four hours after rats were given a gel meal, blood glucose and urine volume were greater in IC rats, but UNaV decreased. To simulate a meal while controlling blood glucose, C and IC rats received a glucose bolus that yielded peak increases in blood glucose that were not different between groups. Urine volume (9.7 ± 0.7 vs. 6.0 ± 0.8 ml/4 h) and UNaV (0.50 ± 0.08 vs. 0.20 ± 0.06 mmol/4 h) were greater in the IC vs. C rats, respectively, over the 4-h test. These data demonstrate that the normal increase in circulating insulin in response to hyperglycemia may be required to prevent excessive renal sodium and volume losses and suggest that insulin may be a physiological regulator of sodium balance. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Physiological stresses related to hypercapnia during patrols on submarines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, K E

    1979-01-01

    Physiological studies on hypercapnic effects carried out on 13 Polaris patrols are summarized. The average CO2 concentrations ranged from 0.7-1% CO2; CO2 was identified as the only environmental contaminant of the submarine atmosphere that has a direct effect on respiration in the concentration range found in the submarine atmosphere. A comparison has been made of physiological effects produced during 42 days of exposure to 1.5% CO2 during laboratory studies (L.S.) with those observed during 50 to 60 days of exposure to 0.7-1% CO2 on patrols (P.S.). A close similarity was found in the effects on respiration and blood electrolytes under both conditions. Respiratory minute volume was elevated by 50-63% because of increased tidal volume. The physiological dead space increased 60%. Vital capacity showed a trend toward a decrease. Studies of acid-base balance carried out during patrols demonstrated cyclic changes in blood pH and bicarbonate; pH and blood bicarbonate fell during the first 17 days of exposure, rose during the subsequent 20 days, and decreased again after 40 days. These cycles cannot be explained on the basis of known renal regulations in CO2-induced acidosis and were not found during exposure to 1.5% CO2. The hypothesis is advanced that these changes in acid-base balance are caused by cycles in CO2 uptake and release in bones. The time constants of the bond CO2 stores fit the observed length of cycles in acid-base balance. Correlation with cycles of calcium metabolism provides further support for this hypothesis. Red cell electrolytes showed similar changes under 1.5% CO2 (L.S.) and 0.7-1% CO2 (P.S.). Red cell sodium increased and potassium decreased. Moreover, red cell calcium also increased under both conditions. The significance of these red cell electrolyte changes in regard to changes in permeability and active transport remains to be clarified. An increased gastric acidity was found during patrol (exposure to 0.8-0.95% CO2). The changes observed

  5. Human insulin dynamics in women: a physiologically based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael; Tura, Andrea; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Pacini, Giovanni; D'Argenio, David Z

    2016-02-01

    Currently available models of insulin dynamics are mostly based on the classical compartmental structure and, thus, their physiological utility is limited. In this work, we describe the development of a physiologically based model and its application to data from 154 patients who underwent an insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance test (IM-IVGTT). To determine the time profile of endogenous insulin delivery without using C-peptide data and to evaluate the transcapillary transport of insulin, the hepatosplanchnic, renal, and peripheral beds were incorporated into the circulatory model as separate subsystems. Physiologically reasonable population mean estimates were obtained for all estimated model parameters, including plasma volume, interstitial volume of the peripheral circulation (mainly skeletal muscle), uptake clearance into the interstitial space, hepatic and renal clearance, as well as total insulin delivery into plasma. The results indicate that, at a population level, the proposed physiologically based model provides a useful description of insulin disposition, which allows for the assessment of muscle insulin uptake.

  6. Physiological roles of small RNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaux, Charlotte; Verneuil, Nicolas; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2014-06-01

    Unlike proteins, RNA molecules have emerged lately as key players in regulation in bacteria. Most reviews hitherto focused on the experimental and/or in silico methods used to identify genes encoding small RNAs (sRNAs) or on the diverse mechanisms of these RNA regulators to modulate expression of their targets. However, less is known about their biological functions and their implications in various physiological responses. This review aims to compile what is known presently about the diverse roles of sRNA transcripts in the regulation of metabolic processes, in different growth conditions, in adaptation to stress and in microbial pathogenesis. Several recent studies revealed that sRNA molecules are implicated in carbon metabolism and transport, amino acid metabolism or metal sensing. Moreover, regulatory RNAs participate in cellular adaptation to environmental changes, e.g. through quorum sensing systems or development of biofilms, and analyses of several sRNAs under various physiological stresses and culture conditions have already been performed. In addition, recent experiments performed with Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens showed that regulatory RNAs play important roles in microbial virulence and during infection. The combined results show the diversity of regulation mechanisms and physiological processes in which sRNA molecules are key actors.

  7. The Face of Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul White

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relationship between the physiology of the emotions and the display of character in Victorian Britain. Charles Bell and others had begun to link certain physiological functions, such as respiration, with the expression of feelings such as fear, regarding the heart and other internal organs as instruments by which the emotions were made visible. But a purely functional account of the emotions, which emerged through the development of reflex physiology during the second half of the century, would dramatically alter the nature of feelings and the means of observing them. At the same time, instinctual or acquired sympathy, which had long underpinned the accurate reading of expressions, became a problem to be surmounted by new 'objectively'. Graphic recording instruments measuring a variety of physiological functions and used with increasing frequency in clinical diagnostics became of fundamental importance for tracing the movement of feelings during the period prior to the development of cinematography. They remained, in the form of devices such as the polygraph, a crucial and controversial means of measuring affective states, beneath the potentially deceptive surface of the body.

  8. Starting Physiology: Bioelectrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-01-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The…

  9. Altered Resting and Exercise Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Akshay

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Obesity, particularly severe obesity, affects both resting and exercise-related respiratory physiology. Severe obesity classically produces a restrictive ventilatory abnormality, characterized by reduced expiratory reserve volume. However, obstructive ventilatory abnormality may also be associated with abdominal obesity. Decreased peak work rates are usually seen among obese subjects in a setting of normal or decreased ventilatory reserve and normal cardiovascular response to exercise. Weight loss may reverse many adverse physiological consequences of severe obesity on the respiratory system. PMID:19700043

  10. Ventricular hypertrophy--physiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1986-01-01

    Adult cardiac myocytes are incapable of mitosis. Dead cells are replaced by connective tissue so that after myocardial infarction (MI), function can only be restored by compensatory hypertrophy of the surviving myocardium. In physiological hypertrophy in response to exercise, high altitude, or mild hypertension, additional myoplasm expands cell diameter in an orderly fashion; Z-lines are in register and the normal ratio of volume densities of contractile elements, mitochondria, and capillaries is conserved. In hypertrophy induced by aortic or pulmonary artery banding or by experimental or congenital hypertension, the borderline between physiological and pathological hypertrophy may be crossed, causing disorganization of fibers and an unfavourable contractile element to capillary ratio. There was, therefore, a need for a graded model of hypertrophy, which involves simulating an altitude of 6,000 m at sea level by supplying rabbits with appropriate nitrogen/oxygen mixtures. In this environment, 50% right ventricular hypertrophy can be achieved without alteration of left ventricular weight or hematocrit. Longer exposures produced 100% right ventricular hypertrophy, with only moderate increases in hematocrit and left ventricular weight. It is well known that adrenergic stimulation causes cardiac hypertrophy, and it has been suggested that release of a trophic factor from sympathetic nerves, either noradrenaline or a protein, might be a necessary stimulus for growth. If so, long-term treatment of post-MI patients with beta-adrenergic blocking agents could inhibit a desirable compensatory hypertrophy of the surviving myocardium. In the above model it has been found, however, that neither beta-blockade nor chemical sympathectomy with guanethidine or 6-hydroxydopamine had any effect on the hypertrophy, nor did treatment with verapamil or nifedipine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  12. Physiological attributes of triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriano, R; Bishop, D

    2010-05-01

    Triathlons of all distances can be considered endurance events and consist of the individual disciplines of swimming, cycling and running which are generally completed in this sequential order. While it is expected that elite triathletes would possess high values for submaximal and maximal measures of aerobic fitness, little is known about how these values compare with those of single-sport endurance athletes. Earlier reviews, conducted in the 1980s, concluded that triathletes possessed lower V(O2(max)) values than other endurance athletes. An update of comparisons is of interest to determine if the physiological capacities of elite triathletes now reflect those of single-sport athletes or whether these physiological capacities are compromised by the requirement to cross-train for three different disciplines. It was found that although differences in the physiological attributes during swimming, cycling and running are evident among triathletes, those who compete at an international level possess V(O2(max)) values that are indicative of success in endurance-based individual sports. Furthermore, various physiological parameters at submaximal workloads have been used to describe the capacities of these athletes. Only a few studies have reported the lactate threshold among triathletes with the majority of studies reporting the ventilatory threshold. Although observed differences among triathletes for both these submaximal measures are complicated by the various methods used to determine them, the reported values for triathletes are similar to those for trained cyclists and runners. Thus, from the limited data available, it appears that triathletes are able to obtain similar physiological values as single-sport athletes despite dividing their training time among three disciplines.

  13. Hippocampal volume reduction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Children with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS, a genetic disorder characterized by diminished drive to breathe during sleep and impaired CO(2 sensitivity, show brain structural and functional changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans, with impaired responses in specific hippocampal regions, suggesting localized injury.We assessed total volume and regional variation in hippocampal surface morphology to identify areas affected in the syndrome. We studied 18 CCHS (mean age+/-std: 15.1+/-2.2 years; 8 female and 32 healthy control (age 15.2+/-2.4 years; 14 female children, and traced hippocampi on 1 mm(3 resolution T1-weighted scans, collected with a 3.0 Tesla MRI scanner. Regional hippocampal volume variations, adjusted for cranial volume, were compared between groups based on t-tests of surface distances to the structure midline, with correction for multiple comparisons. Significant tissue losses emerged in CCHS patients on the left side, with a trend for loss on the right; however, most areas affected on the left also showed equivalent right-sided volume reductions. Reduced regional volumes appeared in the left rostral hippocampus, bilateral areas in mid and mid-to-caudal regions, and a dorsal-caudal region, adjacent to the fimbria.The volume losses may result from hypoxic exposure following hypoventilation during sleep-disordered breathing, or from developmental or vascular consequences of genetic mutations in the syndrome. The sites of change overlap regions of abnormal functional responses to respiratory and autonomic challenges. Affected hippocampal areas have roles associated with memory, mood, and indirectly, autonomic regulation; impairments in these behavioral and physiological functions appear in CCHS.

  14. Regulation of the instantaneous inward rectifier and the delayed outward rectifier potassium channels by Captopril and Angiotensin II via the Phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway in volume-overload-induced hypertrophied cardiac myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvin, Zikiar; Laurence, Graham G.; Coleman, Bernell R.; Zhao, Aiqiu; Hajj-Moussa, Majd; Haddad, Georges E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Early development of cardiac hypertrophy may be beneficial but sustained hypertrophic activation leads to myocardial dysfunction. Regulation of the repolarizing currents can be modulated by the activation of humoral factors, such as angiotensin II (ANG II) through protein kinases. The aim of this work is to assess the regulation of IK and IK1 by ANG II through the PI3-K pathway in hypertrophied ventricular myocytes. Material/Methods Cardiac eccentric hypertrophy was induced through volume-overload in adult male rats by aorto-caval shunt (3 weeks). After one week half of the rats were given captopril (2 weeks; 0.5 g/l/day) and the other half served as control. The voltage-clamp and western blot techniques were used to measure the delayed outward rectifier potassium current (IK) and the instantaneous inward rectifier potassium current (IK1) and Akt activity, respectively. Results Hypertrophied cardiomyocytes showed reduction in IK and IK1. Treatment with captopril alleviated this difference seen between sham and shunt cardiomyocytes. Acute administration of ANG II (10−6M) to cardiocytes treated with captopril reduced IK and IK1 in shunts, but not in sham. Captopril treatment reversed ANG II effects on IK and IK1 in a PI3-K-independent manner. However in the absence of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition, ANG II increased both IK and IK1 in a PI3-K-dependent manner in hypertrophied cardiomyocytes. Conclusions Thus, captopril treatment reveals a negative effect of ANG II on IK and IK1, which is PI3-K independent, whereas in the absence of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition IK and IK1 regulation is dependent upon PI3-K. PMID:21709626

  15. Physiological regulatory networks: ecological roles and evolutionary constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alan A; Martin, Lynn B; Wingfield, John C; McWilliams, Scott R; Dunne, Jennifer A

    2012-08-01

    Ecological and evolutionary physiology has traditionally focused on one aspect of physiology at a time. Here, we discuss the implications of considering physiological regulatory networks (PRNs) as integrated wholes, a perspective that reveals novel roles for physiology in organismal ecology and evolution. For example, evolutionary response to changes in resource abundance might be constrained by the role of dietary micronutrients in immune response regulation, given a particular pathogen environment. Because many physiological components impact more than one process, organismal homeostasis is maintained, individual fitness is determined and evolutionary change is constrained (or facilitated) by interactions within PRNs. We discuss how PRN structure and its system-level properties could determine both individual performance and patterns of physiological evolution.

  16. Changes in the fatty acid composition and regulation of antioxidant enzymes and physiology of juvenile genetically improved farmed tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (L.), subjected to short-term low temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J; Qiang, J; Yang, H; Xu, P; Zhu, Z X; Yang, R Q

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of cold shock on the fatty acid composition, antioxidant enzymes, and physiological responses of genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT). Experimental GIFT tilapia, a warm-water teleost, were initially acclimated at 28°C and then transferred directly to 13°C. Stress responses were monitored for 120h. There was a significant change in all parameters in response to the cold stressor (Pfatty acids for energy needs during the early period of exposure to low-temperature stress. During this time, they primarily used saturated fatty acids for energy. However as the duration of the stressor and loss of muscle fat increased, the fish began to metabolize long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Increased malondialdehyde was produced by oxidation of these fatty acids leading to oxidative damage. Our results provide insight into the changes in fatty acid metabolism physiology that allow GIFT tilapia juveniles to adapt to short-term cold stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physiological Acceptance Criteria for Cold Weather Clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    been shown to decrease (3, 8, 11, 17, 23, 29, 33). Fanger describes this relationship mathematically as: ts M 35.7 - 0.032(H/AD), where ts - mean...1982. 6. Fanger , P. 0. Conditions for thermal comfort. Introducticn of a general comfort equation. In: Physiological and Behavioral Temperature...Regulation, edited by J. D. Hardy, A. P. Gagge, and J. A. J. Stolwijk. Springfield, Il.- Charles C. Thomas, 1970, p. 152-176. 7. Fanger , P. 0. Ansessment of

  18. Tuna comparative physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jeffrey B; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2004-11-01

    Thunniform swimming, the capacity to conserve metabolic heat in red muscle and other body regions (regional endothermy), an elevated metabolic rate and other physiological rate functions, and a frequency-modulated cardiac output distinguish tunas from most other fishes. These specializations support continuous, relatively fast swimming by tunas and minimize thermal barriers to habitat exploitation, permitting niche expansion into high latitudes and to ocean depths heretofore regarded as beyond their range.

  19. Neonatal cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael H

    2013-11-01

    The pediatric surgeon deals with a large number and variety of congenital defects in neonates that frequently involve early surgical intervention and care. Because the neonatal cardiac physiology is unique, starting with the transition from fetal circulation and including differences in calcium metabolism and myocardial microscopic structure and function, it serves the pediatric surgeon well to have a sound understanding of these principles and how they directly and indirectly affect their plans and treatments. In addition, many patients will have associated congenital heart disease that can also dramatically influence not only the surgical and anesthetic care but also the timing and planning of procedures. Finally, the pediatric surgeon is often called upon to treat conditions and complications associated with complex congenital heart disease such as feeding difficulties, bowel perforations, and malrotation in heterotaxy syndromes. In this article, we will review several unique aspects of neonatal cardiac physiology along with the basic physiology of the major groups of congenital heart disease to better prepare the training and practicing pediatric surgeon for care of these complex and often fragile patients.

  20. Regulation of L-type inward calcium channel activity by captopril and angiotensin II via the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase pathway in cardiomyocytes from volume-overload hypertrophied rat hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvin, Zikiar; Laurence, Graham G.; Coleman, Bernell R; Zhao, Aiqiu; Hajj-Moussa, Majd; Haddad, Georges E.

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure can be caused by pro-hypertrophic humoral factors such as angiotensin II (Ang II), which regulates protein kinase activities. The intermingled responses of these kinases lead to the early compensated cardiac hypertrophy, but later to the uncompensated phase of heart failure. We have shown that although beneficial, cardiac hypertrophy is associated with modifications in ion channels that are mainly mediated through mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation. This study evaluates the control of L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) by the Ang II/PI3K pathway in hypertrophied ventricular myocytes from volume-overload rats using the perforated patch-clamp technique. To assess activation of the ICa,L in cardiomyocytes, voltages of 350 ms in 10 mV increments from a holding potential of −85 mV were applied to cardiocytes, with a pre-pulse to −45 mV for 300 ms. Volume overload-induced hypertrophy reduces ICa,L, whereas addition of Ang II alleviates the hypertrophic-induced decrease in a PI3K-dependent manner. Acute administration of Ang II (10−6 mol/L) to normal adult cardiomyocytes had no effect; however, captopril reduced their basal ICa,L. In parallel, captopril regressed the hypertrophy and inverted the Ang II effect on ICa,L seemingly through a PI3K upstream effector. Thus, it seems that regression of cardiac hypertrophy by captopril improved ICa,L partly through PI3K. PMID:21423294

  1. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradleigh eHocking

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to ripening and the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g. blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples. This review works towards an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved

  2. Blood volume, blood pressure and total body sodium: internal signalling and output control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie, P

    2009-01-01

    , and under experimental conditions, ABP is a powerful, independent controller of NaEx. Blood volume is a function of dietary salt intake; however, ABP is not, at least not in steady states. A transient increase in ABP after a step-up in sodium intake could provide a causal relationship between ABP......Total body sodium and arterial blood pressure (ABP) are mutually dependent variables regulated by complex control systems. This review addresses the role of ABP in the normal control of sodium excretion (NaEx), and the physiological control of renin secretion. NaEx is a pivotal determinant of ABP...... and the regulation of NaEx via a hypothetical integrative control system. However, recent data show that subtle sodium loading (simulating salty meals) causes robust natriuresis without changes in ABP. Changes in ABP are not necessary for natriuresis. Normal sodium excretion is not regulated by pressure. Plasma...

  3. Social interactions affecting caste development through physiological actions in termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Dai; Gotoh, Hiroki; Miura, Toru; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2014-01-01

    A colony of social insects is not only an aggregation of individuals but also a functional unit. To achieve adaptive social behavior in fluctuating environmental conditions, in addition to coordination of physiological status in each individual, the whole colony is coordinated by interactions among colony members. The study on the regulation of social-insect colonies is termed "social physiology." Termites, a major group of social insects, exhibit many interesting phenomena related to social physiology, such as mechanisms of caste regulation in a colony. In their colonies, there are different types of individuals, i.e., castes, which show distinctive phenotypes specialized in specific colony tasks. Termite castes comprise reproductives, soldiers and workers, and the caste composition can be altered depending on circumstances. For the regulation of caste compositions, interactions among individuals, i.e., social interactions, are thought to be important. In this article, we review previous studies on the adaptive meanings and those on the proximate mechanisms of the caste regulation in termites, and try to understand those comprehensively in terms of social physiology. Firstly, we summarize classical studies on the social interactions. Secondly, previous studies on the pheromone substances that mediate the caste regulatory mechanisms are overviewed. Then, we discuss the roles of a physiological factor, juvenile hormone (JH) in the regulation of caste differentiation. Finally, we introduce the achievements of molecular studies on the animal sociality (i.e., sociogenomics) in terms of social physiology. By comparing the proximate mechanisms of social physiology in termites with those in hymenopterans, we try to get insights into the general principles of social physiology in social animals.

  4. Scaling soil organic matter formation with microbial physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) regulates multiple ecosystem processes, including the exchange of trace gases and primary productivity. Recently, there has been vigorous debate over the role that microbial products play in forming stable soil organic matter, with increasing analytical evidence using isotopes, molecular chemistry, and microcopy all showing that SOM possesses a strong microbial signature. However, scaling these observations - typically made at the molecular to nano or micron scales - to ecosystems or larger scales remains challenging. Here we show that microbial physiological processes such as growth efficiency and growth rate regulate the accumulation of microbial products. These processes are also strongly regulated by ecosystem disturbance and can be readily incorporated into microbial-explicit global C cycling models. In our experiments with model artificial soils accruing SOM and field soils with varying soil C concentrations, the accumulation of SOM is closely related to microbial physiology. Further, the rate and efficiency that isotopically labelled C is converted to soil C depends strongly on microbial physiological characteristics. Given the sensitivity of microbial physiological characteristics to disturbance, these physiological traits can help explain ecosystem-scale SOM responses to environmental changes. Variation in microbial physiology can also be directly incorporated into models, allowing us to scale microbial processes that regulate SOM formation to regional and global scales. Here we demonstrate the incorporation of microbial processes into MIMICS, the MIcrobial MIneral Carbon Stabilization model. Moving from ecosystem to larger scales, we demonstrate that MIMICS, a microbial-explicit model with output strongly dependent on microbial physiology is able to predict large-scale soil C dynamics as well as or better than conventional models. Microbial physiology, which varies among microbial groups and is highly sensitive disturbance, can

  5. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  6. Some physical, physiological and biochemical adaptations of ruminant livestock including buffaloes to different feeds and climates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Ørskov

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Some of the adaptations of ruminant livestock to climate and feed resources are discussed. 1. Physical. Various types of coat serve to protect animals from cold and from the sun’s heat. 2. Physiological. Large rumen volumes enables animals to consume large amounts of poor roughages; fat depots in distinct regions of the body allow them to withstand regulation and fluctuating supply of nutrients, seasonality of reproduction matches requirement to seasonal variation in food supply. 3. Biochemical. There are species differences in the ability to recycle N to the rumen (buffaloes in the requirement for glucose to accommodate several days of fasting (camels, and in adaptation to low atmospheric oxygen tension (yaks. Such adaptations are important and should be considered when animals exported to areas where climates and feeds are different.

  7. Physiological response in the European flounder (Platichthys flesus) to variable salinity and oxygen conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgreen, Kim; Kiilerich, Pia; Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk

    2008-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms involved in acclimation to variable salinity and oxygen levels and their interaction were studied in European flounder. The fish were acclimated for two weeks to freshwater (1 ‰ salinity), brackish water (11 ‰) or full strength seawater (35 ‰) under normoxic conditions...... (water Po2 = 158 mmHg) and then subjected to 48 h of continued normoxia or hypoxia at a level (Po2 = 54 mmHg) close to but above the critical Po2. Plasma osmolality, [Na+] and [Cl-] increased with increasing salinity, but the rises were limited, reflecting an effective extracellular osmoregulation....... Muscle water content was the same at all three salinities, indicating complete cell volume regulation. Gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity did not change with salinity, but hypoxia caused a 25 % decrease in branchial Na+/K+-ATPase activity at all three salinities. Furthermore, hypoxia induced a significant...

  8. Functional neural correlates of reduced physiological falls risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is currently unclear whether the function of brain regions associated with executive cognitive processing are independently associated with reduced physiological falls risk. If these are related, it would suggest that the development of interventions targeted at improving executive neurocognitive function would be an effective new approach for reducing physiological falls risk in seniors. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of 73 community-dwelling senior women aged 65 to 75 years old who participated in a 12-month randomized controlled trial of resistance training. Functional MRI data were acquired while participants performed a modified Eriksen Flanker Task - a task of selective attention and conflict resolution. Brain volumes were obtained using MRI. Falls risk was assessed using the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA. Results After accounting for baseline age, experimental group, baseline PPA score, and total baseline white matter brain volume, baseline activation in the left frontal orbital cortex extending towards the insula was negatively associated with reduced physiological falls risk over the 12-month period. In contrast, baseline activation in the paracingulate gyrus extending towards the anterior cingulate gyrus was positively associated with reduced physiological falls risk. Conclusions Baseline activation levels of brain regions underlying response inhibition and selective attention were independently associated with reduced physiological falls risk. This suggests that falls prevention strategies may be facilitated by incorporating intervention components - such as aerobic exercise - that are specifically designed to induce neurocognitive plasticity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00426881

  9. Network Physiology: Mapping Interactions Between Networks of Physiologic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bartsch, Ronny P.

    The human organism is an integrated network of interconnected and interacting organ systems, each representing a separate regulatory network. The behavior of one physiological system (network) may affect the dynamics of all other systems in the network of physiologic networks. Due to these interactions, failure of one system can trigger a cascade of failures throughout the entire network. We introduce a systematic method to identify a network of interactions between diverse physiologic organ systems, to quantify the hierarchical structure and dynamics of this network, and to track its evolution under different physiologic states. We find a robust relation between network structure and physiologic states: every state is characterized by specific network topology, node connectivity and links strength. Further, we find that transitions from one physiologic state to another trigger a markedly fast reorganization in the network of physiologic interactions on time scales of just a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. This reorganization in network topology occurs simultaneously and globally in the entire network as well as at the level of individual physiological systems, while preserving a hierarchical order in the strength of network links. Our findings highlight the need of an integrated network approach to understand physiologic function, since the framework we develop provides new information which can not be obtained by studying individual systems. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate the development of a new field, Network Physiology.

  10. The concept of function in modern physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    An overview of the scientific literature shows that the concept of function is central in physiology. However, the concept itself is not defined by physiologists. On the other hand, the teleological, namely, the 'goal-directed' dimension of function, and its subsequent explanatory relevance, is a philosophical problem. Intuitively, the function of a trait in a system explains why this trait is present, but, in the early 1960s, Ernest Nagel and Carl Hempel have shown that this inference cannot be logically founded. However, they showed that self-regulated systems are teleological. According to the selectionist theories, the function of an item is its effect that has been selected by natural selection, a process that explains its presence. As they restrict the functional attribution of a trait to its past selective value and not its current properties, these theories are inconsistent with the concept of function in physiology. A more adequate one is the causal role theory, for which a function of a trait in a system is its causal contribution to the functional capacity of the system. However, this leaves unsolved the question of the 'surplus meaning' of the teleological dimension of function. The significance of considering organisms as 'purpose-like' (teleological) systems may reside not in its explanatory power but in its methodological fruitfulness in physiology. In this view, the teleological dimension of physiological functions is convergent to but not imported from, the teleological dimension of evolutionary biology.

  11. The concept of function in modern physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the scientific literature shows that the concept of function is central in physiology. However, the concept itself is not defined by physiologists. On the other hand, the teleological, namely, the ‘goal-directed’ dimension of function, and its subsequent explanatory relevance, is a philosophical problem. Intuitively, the function of a trait in a system explains why this trait is present, but, in the early 1960s, Ernest Nagel and Carl Hempel have shown that this inference cannot be logically founded. However, they showed that self-regulated systems are teleological. According to the selectionist theories, the function of an item is its effect that has been selected by natural selection, a process that explains its presence. As they restrict the functional attribution of a trait to its past selective value and not its current properties, these theories are inconsistent with the concept of function in physiology. A more adequate one is the causal role theory, for which a function of a trait in a system is its causal contribution to the functional capacity of the system. However, this leaves unsolved the question of the ‘surplus meaning’ of the teleological dimension of function. The significance of considering organisms as ‘purpose-like’ (teleological) systems may reside not in its explanatory power but in its methodological fruitfulness in physiology. In this view, the teleological dimension of physiological functions is convergent to but not imported from, the teleological dimension of evolutionary biology. PMID:24882809

  12. Physiological functions of MTA family of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Nirmalya; Gui, Bin; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-12-01

    Although the functional significance of the metastasic tumor antigen (MTA) family of chromatin remodeling proteins in the pathobiology of cancer is fairly well recognized, the physiological role of MTA proteins continues to be an understudied research area and is just beginning to be recognized. Similar to cancer cells, MTA1 also modulates the expression of target genes in normal cells either by acting as a corepressor or coactivator. In addition, physiological functions of MTA proteins are likely to be influenced by its differential expression, subcellular localization, and regulation by upstream modulators and extracellular signals. This review summarizes our current understanding of the physiological functions of the MTA proteins in model systems. In particular, we highlight recent advances of the role MTA proteins play in the brain, eye, circadian rhythm, mammary gland biology, spermatogenesis, liver, immunomodulation and inflammation, cellular radio-sensitivity, and hematopoiesis and differentiation. Based on the growth of knowledge regarding the exciting new facets of the MTA family of proteins in biology and medicine, we speculate that the next burst of findings in this field may reveal further molecular regulatory insights of non-redundant functions of MTA coregulators in the normal physiology as well as in pathological conditions outside cancer.

  13. Effects of exercise on tumor physiology and metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line; Christensen, Jesper Frank; Hojman, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    , exercise training has the potential to be a beneficial and integrated component of cancer management, but has yet to fully elucidate its potential. Understanding the mechanistic effects of exercise on tumor physiology is warranted. Insight into these mechanistic effects is emerging, but experimental......Exercise is a potent regulator of a range of physiological processes in most tissues. Solid epidemiological data show that exercise training can reduce disease risk and mortality for several cancer diagnoses, suggesting that exercise training may directly regulate tumor physiology and metabolism....... Here, we review the body of literature describing exercise intervention studies performed in rodent tumor models and elaborate on potential mechanistic effects of exercise on tumor physiology. Exercise has been shown to reduce tumor incidence, tumor multiplicity, and tumor growth across numerous...

  14. Signal Transduction Involved in Cell Volume Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Th. van der Wijk (Thea)

    2001-01-01

    textabstract1.fammalian cells are surrounded by a selective permeable plasma membrane that allmvs the interior of the cell to differ in composition from the surrounding solution. The plasma membrane is formed by a bilayer of (phospho-) lipids and contains many different proteins. Hydrophobic molecul

  15. Chromatin remodeling in cardiovascular development and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pei; Hang, Calvin T; Yang, Jin; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2011-02-04

    Chromatin regulation provides an important means for controlling cardiac gene expression under different physiological and pathological conditions. Processes that direct the development of normal embryonic hearts and pathology of stressed adult hearts may share general mechanisms that govern cardiac gene expression by chromatin-regulating factors. These common mechanisms may provide a framework for us to investigate the interactions among diverse chromatin remodelers/modifiers and various transcription factors in the fine regulation of gene expression, essential for all aspects of cardiovascular biology. Aberrant cardiac gene expression, triggered by a variety of pathological insults, can cause heart diseases in both animals and humans. The severity of cardiomyopathy and heart failure correlates strongly with abnormal cardiac gene expression. Therefore, controlling cardiac gene expression presents a promising approach to the treatment of human cardiomyopathy. This review focuses on the roles of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors and chromatin-modifying enzymes in the control of gene expression during cardiovascular development and disease.

  16. Single Cell Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Pierre; Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Kettunen, Petronella; Vriz, Sophie; Jullien, Ludovic; Bensimon, David

    The possibility to control at specific times and specific places the activity of biomolecules (enzymes, transcription factors, RNA, hormones, etc.) is opening up new opportunities in the study of physiological processes at the single cell level in a live organism. Most existing gene expression systems allow for tissue specific induction upon feeding the organism with exogenous inducers (e.g., tetracycline). Local genetic control has earlier been achieved by micro-injection of the relevant inducer/repressor molecule, but this is an invasive and possibly traumatic technique. In this chapter, we present the requirements for a noninvasive optical control of the activity of biomolecules and review the recent advances in this new field of research.

  17. [Physiology of the neuropeptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M; Mayas, M D; Carrera, M P; Ramírez- Expósito, M J

    In the present review, the characteristics of mammalian neuropeptides have been studied. Neuropeptides are widely distributed not only in the nervous system but also in the periphery. They are synthesised by neurons as large precursor molecules (pre propeptides) which have to be cleaved and modified in order to form the mature neuropeptides. Neuropeptides may exert actions as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and/or neurohormones. In the neurons, they coexist with classic transmitters and often with other peptides. After their releasing, they bind to especific receptors to exert their action in the target cell. Most of these receptors belongs to a family of G protein coupled receptors. Finally, peptidases are the enzymes involved in the degradation of neuropeptides. Conclusions. In the last years, the number of known neuropeptides and the understanding of their functions have been increased. With these data, present investigations are looking for the treatment of different pathologies associated with alterations in the physiology of neuropeptides.

  18. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  19. Eliminating animal facility light-at-night contamination and its effect on circadian regulation of rodent physiology, tumor growth, and metabolism: a challenge in the relocation of a cancer research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchy, Robert T; Dupepe, Lynell M; Ooms, Tara G; Dauchy, Erin M; Hill, Cody R; Mao, Lulu; Belancio, Victoria P; Slakey, Lauren M; Hill, Steven M; Blask, David E

    2011-05-01

    Appropriate laboratory animal facility lighting and lighting protocols are essential for maintaining the health and wellbeing of laboratory animals and ensuring the credible outcome of scientific investigations. Our recent experience in relocating to a new laboratory facility illustrates the importance of these considerations. Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that animal room contamination with light-at-night (LAN) of as little as 0.2 lx at rodent eye level during an otherwise normal dark-phase disrupted host circadian rhythms and stimulated the metabolism and proliferation of human cancer xenografts in rats. Here we examined how simple improvements in facility design at our new location completely eliminated dark-phase LAN contamination and restored normal circadian rhythms in nontumor-bearing rats and normal tumor metabolism and growth in host rats bearing tissue-isolated MCF7(SR(-)) human breast tumor xenografts or 7288CTC rodent hepatomas. Reducing LAN contamination in the animal quarters from 24.5 ± 2.5 lx to nondetectable levels (complete darkness) restored normal circadian regulation of rodent arterial blood melatonin, glucose, total fatty and linoleic acid concentrations, tumor uptake of O(2), glucose, total fatty acid and CO(2) production and tumor levels of cAMP, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids, and cholesterol esters, as well as extracellular-signal-regulated kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, serine-threonine protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, γ-histone 2AX, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

  20. Physiology for engineers applying engineering methods to physiological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to qualitative and quantitative aspects of human physiology. It looks at biological and physiological processes and phenomena, including a selection of mathematical models, showing how physiological problems can be mathematically formulated and studied. It also illustrates how a wide range of engineering and physics topics, including electronics, fluid dynamics, solid mechanics and control theory can be used to describe and understand physiological processes and systems. Throughout the text there are introductions to measuring and quantifying physiological processes using both signal and imaging technologies. Physiology for Engineers describes the basic structure and models of cellular systems, the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and provides an overview of the structure and function of the respiratory and nervous systems. It also includes an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of reacti...

  1. Network Physiology reveals relations between network topology and physiological function

    CERN Document Server

    Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; 10.1038/ncomms1705

    2012-01-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate the development of a new field, Network Physiology.

  2. Dynamic volume changes in astrocytes are an intrinsic phenomenon mediated by bicarbonate ion flux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M Florence

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, the major type of non-neuronal cells in the brain, play an important functional role in extracellular potassium ([K(+](o and pH homeostasis. Pathological brain states that result in [K(+](o and pH dysregulation have been shown to cause astrocyte swelling. However, whether astrocyte volume changes occur under physiological conditions is not known. In this study we used two-photon imaging to visualize real-time astrocyte volume changes in the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus CA1 region. Astrocytes were observed to swell by 19.0±0.9% in response to a small physiological increase in the concentration of [K(+](o (3 mM. Astrocyte swelling was mediated by the influx of bicarbonate (HCO(3- ions as swelling was significantly decreased when the influx of HCO(3- was reduced. We found: 1 in HCO(3- free extracellular solution astrocytes swelled by 5.4±0.7%, 2 when the activity of the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC was blocked the astrocytes swelled by 8.3±0.7%, and 3 in the presence of an extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA inhibitor astrocytes swelled by 11.4±0.6%. Because a significant HCO(3- efflux is known to occur through the γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA channel, we performed a series of experiments to determine if astrocytes were capable of HCO(3- mediated volume shrinkage with GABA channel activation. Astrocytes were found to shrink -7.7±0.5% of control in response to the GABA(A channel agonist muscimol. Astrocyte shrinkage from GABA(A channel activation was significantly decreased to -5.0±0.6% of control in the presence of the membrane-permeant CA inhibitor acetazolamide (ACTZ. These dynamic astrocyte volume changes may represent a previously unappreciated yet fundamental mechanism by which astrocytes regulate physiological brain functioning.

  3. Network physiology reveals relations between network topology and physiological function

    OpenAIRE

    Bashan, Amir; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-01-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiological systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiological network. We find that each physiological state is...

  4. Using physiology to guide time to cord clamping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluckow, Martin; Hooper, Stuart B

    2015-08-01

    Immediate clamping and cutting of the umbilical cord at birth has been the accepted standard of care for decades. The physiologic rationale relating umbilical cord clamping (UCC) to the events of the circulatory transition is not considered in arbitrarily recommended cord clamping times. Systematic review of early versus deferred UCC shows significant hemodynamic benefits to the deferred group. Mechanisms for this protective effect are considered in this review. The original concept of a placental transfusion with a volume load and prevention of low cardiac output relies on the physiological end point of the amount of blood transfused. The newer concept of an ordered physiological transition is increasingly supported. This model places aeration of the lungs and an increase in pulmonary blood flow back at the centre of the circulatory transition with timing of UCC being related to establishment of respiration. The need for "physiologically based" UCC is discussed. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling mitochondrial bioenergetics with integrated volume dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason N Bazil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models of mitochondrial bioenergetics provide powerful analytical tools to help interpret experimental data and facilitate experimental design for elucidating the supporting biochemical and physical processes. As a next step towards constructing a complete physiologically faithful mitochondrial bioenergetics model, a mathematical model was developed targeting the cardiac mitochondrial bioenergetic based upon previous efforts, and corroborated using both transient and steady state data. The model consists of several modified rate functions of mitochondrial bioenergetics, integrated calcium dynamics and a detailed description of the K(+-cycle and its effect on mitochondrial bioenergetics and matrix volume regulation. Model simulations were used to fit 42 adjustable parameters to four independent experimental data sets consisting of 32 data curves. During the model development, a certain network topology had to be in place and some assumptions about uncertain or unobserved experimental factors and conditions were explicitly constrained in order to faithfully reproduce all the data sets. These realizations are discussed, and their necessity helps contribute to the collective understanding of the mitochondrial bioenergetics.

  6. Modeling mitochondrial bioenergetics with integrated volume dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazil, Jason N; Buzzard, Gregery T; Rundell, Ann E

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models of mitochondrial bioenergetics provide powerful analytical tools to help interpret experimental data and facilitate experimental design for elucidating the supporting biochemical and physical processes. As a next step towards constructing a complete physiologically faithful mitochondrial bioenergetics model, a mathematical model was developed targeting the cardiac mitochondrial bioenergetic based upon previous efforts, and corroborated using both transient and steady state data. The model consists of several modified rate functions of mitochondrial bioenergetics, integrated calcium dynamics and a detailed description of the K(+)-cycle and its effect on mitochondrial bioenergetics and matrix volume regulation. Model simulations were used to fit 42 adjustable parameters to four independent experimental data sets consisting of 32 data curves. During the model development, a certain network topology had to be in place and some assumptions about uncertain or unobserved experimental factors and conditions were explicitly constrained in order to faithfully reproduce all the data sets. These realizations are discussed, and their necessity helps contribute to the collective understanding of the mitochondrial bioenergetics.

  7. The physiological roles of primary phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong Ryoul; Follo, Matilde Y; Cocco, Lucio; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2013-09-01

    The roles of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) have been extensively investigated in diverse cell lines and pathological conditions. Among the PLC isozmes, primary PLCs, PLC-β and PLC-γ, are directly activated by receptor activation, unlike other secondary PLCs (PLC-ɛ, PLC-δ1, and PLC-η1). PLC-β isozymes are activated by G protein couple receptor and PLC-γ isozymes are activated by receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). Primary PLCs are differentially expressed in different tissues, suggesting their specific roles in diverse tissues and regulate a variety of physiological and pathophysiological functions. Thus, dysregulation of phospholipases contributes to a number of human diseases and primary PLCs have been identified as therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of diseases. Here we review the roles of primary PLCs in physiology and their impact in pathology. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Control volume based hydrocephalus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Wei, Timothy

    2008-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is a disease involving excess amounts of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) in the brain. Recent research has shown correlations to pulsatility of blood flow through the brain. However, the problem to date has presented as too complex for much more than statistical analysis and understanding. This talk will highlight progress on developing a fundamental control volume approach to studying hydrocephalus. The specific goals are to select physiologically control volume(s), develop conservation equations along with the experimental capabilities to accurately quantify terms in those equations. To this end, an in vitro phantom is used as a simplified model of the human brain. The phantom's design consists of a rigid container filled with a compressible gel. The gel has a hollow spherical cavity representing a ventricle and a cylindrical passage representing the aquaducts. A computer controlled piston pump supplies pulsatile volume fluctuations into and out of the flow phantom. MRI is used to measure fluid velocity, and volume change as functions of time. Independent pressure measurements and flow rate measurements are used to calibrate the MRI data. These data are used as a framework for future work with live patients.

  9. Cell and Tissue Organization in the Circulatory and Ventilatory Systems Volume 1 Signaling in Cell Organization, Fate, and Activity, Part A Cell Structure and Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The volumes in this authoritative series present a multidisciplinary approach to modeling and simulation of flows in the cardiovascular and ventilatory systems, especially multiscale modeling and coupled simulations. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are tightly coupled, as their primary function is to supply oxygen to and remove carbon dioxide from the body's cells. Because physiological conduits have deformable and reactive walls, macroscopic flow behavior and prediction must be coupled to nano- and microscopic events in a corrector scheme of regulated mechanisms. Therefore, investigation of flows of blood and air in physiological conduits requires an understanding of the biology, chemistry, and physics of these systems together with the mathematical tools to describe their functioning.  The present volume is devoted to cellular events that allow adaptation to environmental conditions, particularly mechanotransduction. It begins with cell organization and a survey of cell types in the vasculatur...

  10. Physiology of vitreous surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Einar

    2009-02-01

    Vitreous surgery has various physiological and clinical consequences, both beneficial and harmful. Vitrectomy reduces the risk of retinal neovascularization, while increasing the risk of iris neovascularization, reduces macular edema and stimulates cataract formation. These clinical consequences may be understood with the help of classical laws of physics and physiology. The laws of Fick, Stokes-Einstein and Hagen-Poiseuille state that molecular transport by diffusion or convection is inversely related to the viscosity of the medium. When the vitreous gel is replaced with less viscous saline, the transport of all molecules, including oxygen and cytokines, is facilitated. Oxygen transport to ischemic retinal areas is improved, as is clearance of VEGF and other cytokines from these areas, thus reducing edema and neovascularization. At the same time, oxygen is transported faster down a concentration gradient from the anterior to the posterior segment, while VEGF moves in the opposite direction, making the anterior segment less oxygenated and with more VEGF, stimulating iris neovascularization. Silicone oil is the exception that proves the rule: it is more viscous than vitreous humour, re-establishes the transport barrier to oxygen and VEGF, and reduces the risk for iris neovascularization in the vitrectomized-lentectomized eye. Modern vitreous surgery involves a variety of treatment options in addition to vitrectomy itself, such as photocoagulation, anti-VEGF drugs, intravitreal steroids and release of vitreoretinal traction. A full understanding of these treatment modalities allows sensible combination of treatment options. Retinal photocoagulation has repeatedly been shown to improve retinal oxygenation, as does vitrectomy. Oxygen naturally reduces VEGF production and improves retinal hemodynamics. The VEGF-lowering effect of photocoagulation and vitrectomy can be augmented with anti-VEGF drugs and the permeability effect of VEGF reduced with corticosteroids

  11. Physiological functions of plant cell coverings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki

    2002-08-01

    The cell coverings of plants have two important functions in plant life. Plant cell coverings are deeply involved in the regulation of the life cycle of plants: each stage of the life cycle, such as germination, vegetative growth, reproductive growth, and senescence, is strongly influenced by the nature of the cell coverings. Also, the apoplast, which consists of the cell coverings, is the field where plant cells first encounter the outer environment, and so becomes the major site of plant responses to the environment. In the regulation of each stage of the life cycle and the response to each environmental signal, some specific constituents of the cell coverings, such as xyloglucans in dicotyledons and 1,3,1,4-beta-glucans in Gramineae, act as the key component. The physiological functions of plant cell coverings are sustained by the metabolic turnover of these components. The components of the cell coverings are supplied from the symplast, but then they are modified or degraded in the apoplast. Thus, the metabolism of the cell coverings is regulated through the cross-talk between the symplast and the apoplast. The understanding of physiological functions of plant cell coverings will be greatly advanced by the use of genomic approaches. At the same time, we need to introduce nanobiological techniques for clarifying the minute changes in the cell coverings that occur in a small part within each cell.

  12. Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

    1998-01-01

    This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

  13. Steady-state solutions of cell volume in a cardiac myocyte model elaborated for membrane excitation, ion homeostasis and Ca2+ dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chae Young; Noma, Akinori

    2012-08-21

    The cell volume continuously changes in response to varying physiological conditions, and mechanisms underlying volume regulation have been investigated in both experimental and theoretical studies. Here, general formulations concerning cell volume change are presented in the context of developing a comprehensive cell model which takes Ca(2+) dynamics into account. Explicit formulas for charge conservation and steady-state volumes of the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are derived in terms of membrane potential, amount of ions, Ca(2+)-bound buffer molecules, and initial cellular conditions. The formulations were applied to a ventricular myocyte model which has plasma-membrane Ca(2+) currents with dynamic gating mechanisms, Ca(2+)-buffering reactions with diffusive and non-diffusive buffer proteins, and Ca(2+) uptake into or release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) accompanied by compensatory cationic or anionic currents through the SR membrane. Time-dependent volume changes in cardiac myocytes induced by varying extracellular osmolarity or by action potential generation were successfully simulated by the novel formulations. Through application of bifurcation analysis, the existence and uniqueness of steady-state solutions of the cell volume were validated, and contributions of individual ion channels and transporters to the steady-state volume were systematically analyzed. The new formulas are consistent with previous fundamental theory derived from simple models of minimum compositions. The new formulations may be useful for examination of the relationship between cell function and volume change in other cell types.

  14. Conservation physiology of marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian; Peck, Myron A.; Antognarelli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology...... to different extents, ranging from no explicit consideration to detailed physiological mechanisms, and across scales from a single fish to global fishery resources. Biologists from different sub-disciplines are collaborating to rise to the challenge of projecting future changes in distribution and productivity...

  15. Starting physiology: bioelectrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-12-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The topic of bioelectrogenesis encompasses multidisciplinary concepts, involves several mechanisms, and is a dynamic process, i.e., it never turns off during the lifetime of the cell. Therefore, to improve the transmission and acquisition of knowledge in this field, I present an alternative didactic model. The design of the model assumes that it is possible to build, in a series of sequential steps, an assembly of proteins within the membrane of an isolated cell in a simulated electrophysiology experiment. Initially, no proteins are inserted in the membrane and the cell is at a baseline energy state; the extracellular and intracellular fluids are at thermodynamic equilibrium. Students are guided through a sequence of four steps that add key membrane transport proteins to the model cell. The model is simple at the start and becomes progressively more complex, finally producing transmembrane chemical and electrical gradients. I believe that this didactic approach helps instructors with a more efficient tool for the teaching of the mechanisms of resting membrane potential while helping students avoid common difficulties that may be encountered when learning this topic.

  16. Polyamines in plant physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galston, A. W.; Sawhney, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The diamine putrescine, the triamine spermidine, and the tetramine spermine are ubiquitous in plant cells, while other polyamines are of more limited occurrence. Their chemistry and pathways of biosynthesis and metabolism are well characterized. They occur in the free form as cations, but are often conjugated to small molecules like phenolic acids and also to various macromolecules. Their titer varies from approximately micromolar to more than millimolar, and depends greatly on environmental conditions, especially stress. In cereals, the activity of one of the major polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, arginine decarboxylase, is rapidly and dramatically increased by almost every studied external stress, leading to 50-fold or greater increases in putrescine titer within a few hours. The physiological significance of this increase is not yet clear, although most recent work suggests an adaptive, protective role. Polyamines produced through the action of ornithine decarboxylase, by contrast, seem essential for DNA replication and cell division. The application of exogenous polyamines produces effects on patterns of senescence and morphogenesis, suggesting but not proving a regulatory role for polyamines in these processes. The evidence for such a regulatory role is growing.

  17. DOSHIC PHYSIOLOGY OF SKIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivprasad Chiplunkar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The balance of dosha  represents the healthy state and imbalance will cause various diseases. In normalcy doshas will be performing their own functions and individual doshas will be having their own specific sites. By telling the various sthana of each dosha, different function that is taken up by individual dosha in different sites has been highlighted.By mentioning ‘sparshanendriyam’ as one of the sthana of vata dosha the sensory functions of skin to vata dosha has been emphasised. By mentioning ‘sparshanam’ as one of the sthana of pittadosha, the function of colouring/pigmentation of skin, which is majorly carried out  by melanocytes by secreting melanin pigment has been highlighted. Meda is one among the sthanas of kapha dosha; this can be considered as the adipose tissue of skin/below skin. Since sweda is mala of meda it can be also considered as the secretions from the eccrine glands.With respect to skin, sensory functions, both tactile and thermal is carried out by vata dosha more specifically vyana vata, pigmentation to the skin carried out by meloncytes by secreting melanin, it is nothing but function of pitta dosha more specifically brajaka pitta with the help of udana vata and finally production of sweat in sweat glands is the function of kapha. So there is the need for further study and research regarding the sthanas of all three doshas in different structures/organs in the body and its physiology.

  18. Physiology of Volition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Mark

    The idea of free will is a conscious awareness of the brain concerning the nature of the movement that it produces. There is no evidence for it to be a driving force in movement generation. This review considers the physiology of movement generation and how the concepts of willing and agency might arise. Both the anatomical substrates and the timing of events are considered. Movement initiation and volition are not necessarily linked, and one line of evidence comes from consideration of patients with disorders of volition. Movement is generated subconsciously, and the conscious sense of willing the movement comes later, but the exact time of this event is difficult to assess because of the potentially illusory nature of introspection. The evidence suggests that movement is initiated in frontal lobe, particularly the mesial areas, and the sense of volition arises as the result of a corollary discharge from premotor and motor areas likely involving the parietal lobe. Agency probably involves a similar region in the parietal lobe and requires both the sense of volition and movement feedback.

  19. Evolution and physiology of neural oxygen sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauê Machado Costa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Major evolutionary trends in animal physiology have been heavily influenced by atmospheric O2 levels. Amongst other important factors, the increase in atmospheric O2 which occurred in the Pre-Cambrian and the development of aerobic respiration beckoned the evolution of animal organ systems that were dedicated to the absorption and transportation of O2, e.g., the respiratory and cardiovascular systems of vertebrates. Global variations of O2 levels in post-Cambrian periods have also been correlated with evolutionary changes in animal physiology, especially cardiorespiratory function. Oxygen transportation systems are, in our view, ultimately controlled by the brain related mechanisms, which senses changes in O2 availability and regulates autonomic and respiratory responses that ensure the survival of the organism in the face of hypoxic challenges. In vertebrates, the major sensorial system for oxygen sensing and responding to hypoxia is the peripheral chemoreflex neuronal pathways, which includes the oxygen chemosensitive glomus cells and several brainstem regions involved in the autonomic regulation to the cardiovascular system and respiratory control. In this review we discuss the concept that regulating O2 homeostasis was one of the primordial roles of the nervous system. We also review the physiology of the peripheral chemoreflex, focusing on the integrative repercussions of chemoreflex activation and the evolutionary importance of this system, which is essential for the survival of complex organisms such as vertebrates. The contribution of hypoxia and peripheral chemoreflex for the development of diseases associated to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems is also discussed in an evolutionary context.

  20. Physiology function of GLP-1 and its regulation factor of secretion%胰高血糖素样肽-1的生理作用及分泌调节因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许建萍; 肖新华

    2013-01-01

    胰高血糖素样肽-1(GLP-1)是于进食后由肠道L细胞释放的一种胃肠道激素。咀嚼行为本身可能刺激GLP-1的分泌。该激素可增强葡萄糖依赖的胰岛素合成和分泌,同时抑制胰高糖素的分泌,延缓胃排空。并且可以刺激β细胞再生和增殖。GLP-1可以通过迷走神经作用于下丘脑的受体起到控制食欲和增强饱感的作用。GLP-1还可以对神经系统和心血管系统起到保护作用。%GLP-1 is a gut hormone which is secreted by intestinal endocrine L cells in response to ingested nutrients. Chewing can stimulate secretion of GLP-1. GLP-1 regulates glucose levels by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion and biosynthesis, and by suppressing glucagon secretion, delaying gastric emptying. GLP-1 also increases beta cell proliferation and neogenesis. GLP-1 can control appetite and enhance satiety and fullness through vague to hypothalamic GLP-1 receptor. GLP-1 can also protect neuron system and cardiovascular system.

  1. Role of quercetin in vascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirumbolo, Salvatore

    2012-12-01

    A recent paper in the Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology has shown that quercetin has a vascular protective effect associated with eNOS up-regulation, blood GSH redox ratio, and reduction of oxidative stress. Recent reports have recommended the consumption of quercetin, as it may contribute to a reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms by which quercetin exerts its action have not been fully elucidated. The majority of these mechanisms have been identified with models using animals treated with quercetin, and relatively few have been corroborated in human studies, which indicates the need for further investigation.

  2. Rho kinases in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loirand, Gervaise; Guérin, Patrice; Pacaud, Pierre

    2006-02-17

    Rho kinases (ROCKs) are the first and the best-characterized effectors of the small G-protein RhoA. In addition to their effect on actin organization, or through this effect, ROCKs have been found to regulate a wide range of fundamental cell functions such as contraction, motility, proliferation, and apoptosis. Abnormal activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway has been observed in major cardiovascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy. This review, based on recent molecular, cellular, and animal studies, focuses on the current understanding of ROCK signaling and its roles in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.

  3. Conjoined twins: scientific cinema and Pavlovian physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krementsov, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    Through the lens of a 1957 documentary film, "Neural and humoral factors in the regulation of bodily functions (research on conjoined twins)," produced by the USSR Academy of Medical Sciences, this essay traces the entwined histories of Soviet physiology, studies of conjoined twins and scientific cinema. It examines the role of Ivan Pavlov and his students, including Leonid Voskresenkii, Dmitrii Fursikov and Petr Anokhin, in the development of "scientific film" as a particular cinematographic genre in Soviet Russia and explores numerous puzzles hidden behind the film's striking visuals. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biology of VO2 max: looking under the physiology lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundby, C; Montero, D; Joyner, M

    2017-06-01

    In this review, we argue that several key features of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) should underpin discussions about the biological and reductionist determinants of its interindividual variability: (i) training-induced increases in VO2 max are largely facilitated by expansion of red blood cell volume and an associated improvement in stroke volume, which also adapts independent of changes in red blood cell volume. These general concepts are also informed by cross-sectional studies in athletes that have very high values for VO2 max. Therefore, (ii) variations in VO2 max improvements with exercise training are also likely related to variations in these physiological determinants. (iii) All previously untrained individuals will respond to endurance exercise training in terms of improvements in VO2 max provided the stimulus exceeds a certain volume and/or intensity. Thus, genetic analysis and/or reductionist studies performed to understand or predict such variations might focus specifically on DNA variants or other molecular phenomena of relevance to these physiological pathways. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Causality in physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Kraemer, Jan F; Penzel, Thomas; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Kurths, Jürgen; Wessel, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Health is one of the most important non-material assets and thus also has an enormous influence on material values, since treating and preventing diseases is expensive. The number one cause of death worldwide today originates in cardiovascular diseases. For these reasons the aim of understanding the functions and the interactions of the cardiovascular system is and has been a major research topic throughout various disciplines for more than a hundred years. The purpose of most of today's research is to get as much information as possible with the lowest possible effort and the least discomfort for the subject or patient, e.g. via non-invasive measurements. A family of tools whose importance has been growing during the last years is known under the headline of coupling measures. The rationale for this kind of analysis is to identify the structure of interactions in a system of multiple components. Important information lies for example in the coupling direction, the coupling strength, and occurring time lags. In this work, we will, after a brief general introduction covering the development of cardiovascular time series analysis, introduce, explain and review some of the most important coupling measures and classify them according to their origin and capabilities in the light of physiological analyses. We will begin with classical correlation measures, go via Granger-causality-based tools, entropy-based techniques (e.g. momentary information transfer), nonlinear prediction measures (e.g. mutual prediction) to symbolic dynamics (e.g. symbolic coupling traces). All these methods have contributed important insights into physiological interactions like cardiorespiratory coupling, neuro-cardio-coupling and many more. Furthermore, we will cover tools to detect and analyze synchronization and coordination (e.g. synchrogram and coordigram). As a last point we will address time dependent couplings as identified using a recent approach employing ensembles of time series. The

  6. Applied physiology of cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, I E

    1984-01-01

    Historically, the bicycle has evolved through the stages of a machine for efficient human transportation, a toy for children, a finely-tuned racing machine, and a tool for physical fitness development, maintenance and testing. Recently, major strides have been made in the aerodynamic design of the bicycle. These innovations have resulted in new land speed records for human powered machines. Performance in cycling is affected by a variety of factors, including aerobic and anaerobic capacity, muscular strength and endurance, and body composition. Bicycle races range from a 200m sprint to approximately 5000km. This vast range of competitive racing requires special attention to the principle of specificity of training. The physiological demands of cycling have been examined through the use of bicycle ergometers, rollers, cycling trainers, treadmill cycling, high speed photography, computer graphics, strain gauges, electromyography, wind tunnels, muscle biopsy, and body composition analysis. These techniques have been useful in providing definitive data for the development of a work/performance profile of the cyclist. Research evidence strongly suggests that when measuring the cyclist's aerobic or anaerobic capacity, a cycling protocol employing a high pedalling rpm should be used. The research bicycle should be modified to resemble a racing bicycle and the cyclist should wear cycling shoes. Prolonged cycling requires special nutritional considerations. Ingestion of carbohydrates, in solid form and carefully timed, influences performance. Caffeine appears to enhance lipid metabolism. Injuries, particularly knee problems which are prevalent among cyclists, may be avoided through the use of proper gearing and orthotics. Air pollution has been shown to impair physical performance. When pollution levels are high, training should be altered or curtailed. Effective training programmes simulate competitive conditions. Short and long interval training, blended with long

  7. Physiology of Visceral Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, G F; Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Pain involving thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic organs is a common cause for physician consultations, including one-third of chronic pain patients who report that visceral organs contribute to their suffering. Chronic visceral pain conditions are typically difficult to manage effectively, largely because visceral sensory mechanisms and factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of visceral pain are poorly understood. Mechanistic understanding is particularly problematic in "functional" visceral diseases where there is no apparent pathology and pain typically is the principal complaint. We review here the anatomical organization of the visceral sensory innervation that distinguishes the viscera from innervation of all other tissues in the body. The viscera are innervated by two nerves that share overlapping functions, but also possess notably distinct functions. Additionally, the visceral innervation is sparse relative to the sensory innervation of other tissues. Accordingly, visceral sensations tend to be diffuse in character, are typically referred to nonvisceral somatic structures and thus are difficult to localize. Early arguments about whether the viscera were innervated ("sensate") and later, whether innervated by nociceptors, were resolved by advances reviewed here in the anatomical and functional attributes of receptive endings in viscera that contribute to visceral pain (i.e., visceral nociceptors). Importantly, the contribution of plasticity (i.e., sensitization) of peripheral and central visceral nociceptive mechanisms is considered in the context of persistent, chronic visceral pain conditions. The review concludes with an overview of the functional anatomy of visceral pain processing. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1609-1633, 2016. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Assessing prebaccalaureate human physiology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, V L

    1998-12-01

    Two surveys were conducted between 1994 and 1996. The purpose of the initial survey was to obtain demographic information about prebaccaulareate human physiology courses. Of the 117 responding physiology departments, 50% offered human physiology at the prebaccalaureate level to 14,185 students during the 1994-1995 academic year. The mean was 245 students per year (+/- 30 SE). Class size was limited by 44% of the respondents. Prebaccaluareate human physiology was offered as a separate course from anatomy by 93% of the departments. Sixty-one percent scheduled the course once a year. The purpose of the second survey was to determine how physiology departments evaluated prebaccalaureate physiology courses and faculty. All responding departments utilized student feedback; 38% of the departments included physiology chair review, 38% peer review, and 9% allied health faculty review. Twenty-eight percent of allied health programs evaluated the course. Results indicated that, whereas a significant number of undergraduate students are enrolled in prebaccaluareate physiology courses annually, those courses appear to lack formal, consistent formative evaluation.

  9. Sequential unilateral lung volume reduction for emphysema - Stretching the benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorramnia, Sadie; Holsworth, Lynda; Mestitz, Hugh; Westall, Glen P; Williams, Trevor J; Gooi, Julian H; Snell, Gregory I

    2017-01-01

    Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction (BLVR) and Surgical Lung Volume Reduction (SLVR) and are two different approaches used to remodel severely emphysematous lungs to improve lung function and quality-of-life. We present a case initially referred for lung transplantation, where sequential left upper lobe BLVR and 7 years later right upper lobe SLVR, providing enduring physiological and functional improvement. The potential for sustained benefit via sequential unilateral lung volume reduction is under-appreciated.

  10. Physiological and cognitive effects of expressive dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer L; Demaree, Heath A

    2007-02-01

    Emotional well-being depends in part on affect modulation. The present study extends research on emotion regulation by assessing the physiological and cognitive effects of a novel response-focused regulation strategy, termed 'expressive dissonance.' Expressive dissonance refers to the incongruence between an emotional state (e.g., sadness) and a behavioral expression (e.g., a smile). Fifty-five participants watched a series of sad film clips in which they were asked to either naturally watch or express the opposite of what they were feeling. Results suggest that persons using the expressive dissonant strategies evidenced greater sympathetic arousal and performed worse on subsequent memory tasks than persons in the natural-watch conditions.

  11. New concepts in white adipose tissue physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proença, A.R.G. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Laboratório de Biotecnologia, Faculdade de Ciências Aplicadas, Limeira, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Biotecnologia, Faculdade de Ciências Aplicadas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Limeira, SP (Brazil); Sertié, R.A.L. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, A.C. [Universidade Estadual do Ceará, Instituto Superior de Ciências Biomédicas, Fortaleza, CE, Brasil, Instituto Superior de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Estadual do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Campaãa, A.B.; Caminhotto, R.O.; Chimin, P.; Lima, F.B. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-03

    Numerous studies address the physiology of adipose tissue (AT). The interest surrounding the physiology of AT is primarily the result of the epidemic outburst of obesity in various contemporary societies. Briefly, the two primary metabolic activities of white AT include lipogenesis and lipolysis. Throughout the last two decades, a new model of AT physiology has emerged. Although AT was considered to be primarily an abundant energy source, it is currently considered to be a prolific producer of biologically active substances, and, consequently, is now recognized as an endocrine organ. In addition to leptin, other biologically active substances secreted by AT, generally classified as cytokines, include adiponectin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, resistin, vaspin, visfatin, and many others now collectively referred to as adipokines. The secretion of such biologically active substances by AT indicates its importance as a metabolic regulator. Cell turnover of AT has also recently been investigated in terms of its biological role in adipogenesis. Consequently, the objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive critical review of the current literature concerning the metabolic (lipolysis, lipogenesis) and endocrine actions of AT.

  12. Effects of Modifiers on Physiological Metabolism of Lolium perenne Seedlings in Diesel-Polluted Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Xuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The pot experiment for single-factor with diesel oil polluted soil and the pot experiment for three-factor orthogonal with sawdust-ammonium nitrate-monopotassium phosphate under diesel oil polluted soil with salt stress, were performed to analyze the activity of antioxidant enzymes and chlorophyll content in Lolium perenne seedlings, and to explore the physiological response of L. perenne seedlings under diesel oil polluted soil and its regulations. The results showed that, soil diesel pollution significantly decreased the biomass. Compared with control, activity of superoxide dismutases(SOD in leaf decreased significantly at 0.3% and 0.9% soil diesel pollution, peroxidases (POD and catalase(CAT in leaf decreased significantly at 0.6% and 0.9% soil diesel pollution, the root SOD activity increased significantly at 0.9% diesel concentration while the root POD activity decreased significantly at 0.6% and 0.9% soil diesel pollution. As for the salinity soil polluted by diesel oil, the activity of POD and CAT in leaf increased significantly at 10% volume fraction of sawdust, and the content of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b increased significantly as well. Meanwhile, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b content increased significantly at 0.3 g·kg-1 amount of ammonium nitrate. Thereby, sawdust and ammonium nitrate addition could effectively improve physiological metabolic of L. perenne seedlings.

  13. Drinking problems on a 'simple' diet: physiological convergence in nectar-feeding birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, Susan W; Fleming, Patricia A

    2014-04-01

    Regulation of energy and water are by necessity closely linked in avian nectarivores, because the easily available sugars in nectar are accompanied by an excess of water but few electrolytes. In general, there is convergence in morphology and physiology between three main lineages of avian nectarivores that have evolved on different continents - the hummingbirds, sunbirds and honeyeaters. These birds show similar dependence of sugar preferences on nectar concentration, high intestinal sucrase activity and rapid absorption of hexoses via mediated and paracellular routes. There are differences, however, in how these lineages deal with energy challenges, as well as processing the large volumes of preformed water ingested in nectar. While hummingbirds rely on varying renal water reabsorption, the passerine nectarivores modulate intestinal water absorption during water loading, thus reducing the impact on the kidneys. Hummingbirds do not generally cope with salt loading, and have renal morphology consistent with their ability to produce copious dilute urine; by contrast, as well as being able to deal with dilute diets, honeyeaters and sunbirds are more than capable of dealing with moderately high levels of added electrolytes. And finally, in response to energy challenge, hummingbirds readily resort to torpor, while the passerines show renal and digestive responses that allow them to deal with short-term fasts and rapidly restore energy balance without using torpor. In conclusion, sunbirds and honeyeaters demonstrate a degree of physiological plasticity in dealing with digestive and renal challenges of their nectar diet, while hummingbirds appear to be more constrained by this diet.

  14. Applied physiology of swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, J M; Montpetit, R R

    1986-01-01

    Scientific research in swimming over the past 10 to 15 years has been oriented toward multiple aspects that relate to applied and basic physiology, metabolism, biochemistry, and endocrinology. This review considers recent findings on: 1) specific physical characteristics of swimmers; 2) the energetics of swimming; 3) the evaluation of aerobic fitness in swimming; and 4) some metabolic and hormonal aspects related to swimmers. Firstly, the age of finalists in Olympic swimming is not much different from that of the participants from other sports. They are taller and heavier than a reference population of the same age. The height bias in swimming may be the reason for lack of success from some Asian and African countries. Experimental data point toward greater leanness, particularly in female swimmers, than was seen 10 years ago. Overall, female swimmers present a range of 14 to 19% body fat whereas males are much lower (5 to 10%). Secondly, the relationship between O2 uptake and crawl swimming velocity (at training and competitive speeds) is thought to be linear. The energy cost varies between strokes with a dichotomy between the 2 symmetrical and the 2 asymmetrical strokes. Energy expenditure in swimming is represented by the sum of the cost of translational motion (drag) and maintenance of horizontal motion (gravity). The cost of the latter decreases as speed increases. Examination of the question of size-associated effects on the cost of swimming using Huxley's allometric equation (Y = axb) shows an almost direct relationship with passive drag. Expressing energy cost in litres of O2/m/kg is proposed as a better index of technical swimming ability than the traditional expression of VO2/distance in L/km. Thirdly, maximal direct conventional techniques used to evaluate maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) in swimming include free swimming, tethered swimming, and flume swimming. Despite the individual peculiarities of each method, with similar experimental conditions

  15. Cassava biology and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Mabrouk A

    2004-11-01

    Cassava or manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), a perennial shrub of the New World, currently is the sixth world food crop for more than 500 million people in tropical and sub-tropical Africa, Asia and Latin America. It is cultivated mainly by resource-limited small farmers for its starchy roots, which are used as human food either fresh when low in cyanogens or in many processed forms and products, mostly starch, flour, and for animal feed. Because of its inherent tolerance to stressful environments, where other food crops would fail, it is often considered a food-security source against famine, requiring minimal care. Under optimal environmental conditions, it compares favorably in production of energy with most other major staple food crops due to its high yield potential. Recent research at the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) in Colombia has demonstrated the ability of cassava to assimilate carbon at very high rates under high levels of humidity, temperature and solar radiation,which correlates with productivity across all environments whether dry or humid. When grown on very poor soils under prolonged drought for more than 6 months, the crop reduce both its leaf canopy and transpiration water loss, but its attached leaves remain photosynthetically active, though at greatly reduced rates. The main physiological mechanism underlying such a remarkable tolerance to drought was rapid stomatal closure under both atmospheric and edaphic water stress, protecting the leaf against dehydration while the plant depletes available soil water slowly during long dry periods. This drought tolerance mechanism leads to high crop water use efficiency values. Although the cassava fine root system is sparse, compared to other crops, it can penetrate below 2 m soil,thus enabling the crop to exploit deep water if available. Leaves of cassava and wild Manihot possess elevated activities of the C4 enzyme PEP carboxylase but lack the leaf Kranz anatomy typical of C4

  16. KCNK5 is Functionally Down-Regulated Upon Long-Term Hypotonicity in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, S. S.; Wulff, Tune; Gammeltoft, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims: Regulatory volume decrease (RVD) in response to acute cell swelling is well described and KCNK5 (also known as TASK-2 or K2P5.1) has been shown to be the volume sensitive K+ channel in Ehrlich cells. Very little is, on the other hand, known about the effects of long-term hypotoni......Background/Aims: Regulatory volume decrease (RVD) in response to acute cell swelling is well described and KCNK5 (also known as TASK-2 or K2P5.1) has been shown to be the volume sensitive K+ channel in Ehrlich cells. Very little is, on the other hand, known about the effects of long......-term hypotonicity on expression and function of KCNK5, thus we have investigated the effect of long-term hypotonicity (24h - 48h) on KCNK5 in Ehrlich cells on the mRNA, protein and physiological levels. Methods: Physiological effects of long-term hypotonicity were measured using patch-clamp and Coulter counter...... physiological impairment of KCNK5 in Ehrlich cells after long-term hypotonic stimulation is predominantly due to down-regulation of the KCNK5 protein synthesis.© 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel...

  17. KCNK5 is Functionally Down-Regulated Upon Long-Term Hypotonicity in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, S. S.; Wulff, Tune; Gammeltoft, S.;

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims: Regulatory volume decrease (RVD) in response to acute cell swelling is well described and KCNK5 (also known as TASK-2 or K2P5.1) has been shown to be the volume sensitive K+ channel in Ehrlich cells. Very little is, on the other hand, known about the effects of long-term hypotoni......Background/Aims: Regulatory volume decrease (RVD) in response to acute cell swelling is well described and KCNK5 (also known as TASK-2 or K2P5.1) has been shown to be the volume sensitive K+ channel in Ehrlich cells. Very little is, on the other hand, known about the effects of long......-term hypotonicity on expression and function of KCNK5, thus we have investigated the effect of long-term hypotonicity (24h - 48h) on KCNK5 in Ehrlich cells on the mRNA, protein and physiological levels. Methods: Physiological effects of long-term hypotonicity were measured using patch-clamp and Coulter counter...... physiological impairment of KCNK5 in Ehrlich cells after long-term hypotonic stimulation is predominantly due to down-regulation of the KCNK5 protein synthesis.© 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel...

  18. Thiol redox state in apoptosis : physiological and toxicant modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Nobel, Stefan

    1997-01-01

    Apoptosis is a physiological type of cell death used to regulate the number of cells during development and im adult organs. However, apoptosis can also be inappropriately activated or inhibited under pathological conditions. One of the critical mechanisms of apoptosis is the activity of cysteine proteases belonging to the caspase family. The present study was designed to investigate the role of oxidative stress in apoptosis and how the apoptotic death program might be regul...

  19. Archaea: Evolution, Physiology, and Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Introduced by Crafoord Prize winner Carl Woese, this volume combines reviews of the major developments in archaeal research over the past 10-15 years with more specialized articles dealing with important recent breakthroughs. Drawing on major themes presented at the June 2005 meeting held in Muni...... and technological context, and include accounts of cutting-edge research developments. The book spans archaeal evolution, physiology, and molecular and cellular biology and will be an essential reference for both graduate students and researchers....... to honor the archaea pioneers Wolfram Zillig and Karl O. Stetter, the book provides a thorough survey of the field from its controversial beginnings to its ongoing expansion to include aspects of eukaryotic biology. The editors have assembled articles from the premier researchers in this rapidly burgeoning...

  20. Archaea: Evolution, Physiology, and Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Introduced by Crafoord Prize winner Carl Woese, this volume combines reviews of the major developments in archaeal research over the past 10-15 years with more specialized articles dealing with important recent breakthroughs. Drawing on major themes presented at the June 2005 meeting held in Muni...... and technological context, and include accounts of cutting-edge research developments. The book spans archaeal evolution, physiology, and molecular and cellular biology and will be an essential reference for both graduate students and researchers....... to honor the archaea pioneers Wolfram Zillig and Karl O. Stetter, the book provides a thorough survey of the field from its controversial beginnings to its ongoing expansion to include aspects of eukaryotic biology. The editors have assembled articles from the premier researchers in this rapidly burgeoning...

  1. Seasonal changes in reindeer physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Reeta Pösö

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal changes in the photoperiod, temperature and availability of food need to be converted to hormonal signals in order to induce adaptations in the physiology of the reindeer. The most reliable of the seasonal changes in the environment is the photoperiod, which affects the reindeer physiology through pineal gland and its hormone, melatonin. Usually there are large diurnal changes in the concentration of melatonin, but in the reindeer the daily rhythm disappears during the arctic summer to return again in the autumn. Seasonal changes in melatonin secretion are involved in the regulation of reproduction, the growth of pelage, thermogenesis, body mass and immune function. Melatonin may exert its effects through gene activation, but the mechanisms are not completely understood. Other hormones that show seasonality are thyroid hormones, insulin and leptin. Thus the observed physiological changes are a result of actions of several hormones. Appetite, energy production and thermogenesis are all vital for survival. During winter, when energy balance is negative, the reindeer uses mainly body fat for energy production. The use of fat stores is economical as the rate of lipolysis is controlled and the use of fatty acids in tissues such as muscle decreases. Only in severe starvation the rate of lipolysis increases enough to give rise to accumulation of ketone bodies. The protein mass is maintained and only in starved individuals muscle protein is used for energy production. The winter feed of the reindeer, the lichens, is poor in nitrogen and the nitrogen balance during winter is strongly negative. Reindeer responds to limited availability of nitrogen by increasing the recycling of urea into rumen. In general the adaptation of reindeer physiology enables the reindeer to survive the winter and although several aspects are known many others require further studies.Abstract in Finnish / Tiivistelmä: Valaistus, lämpötila ja ravinnon saatavuus

  2. [Physiology in XXI century: natural science and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-09-01

    Progress of physiology is closely connected with achievements of the adjacent sciences that developed particularly intensively at the end of the XX century. The key role in strategy of physiological investigations is played by study of the nature of regulation of individual processes providing activity of the organism as a whole. By the example of study of renal function there are discussed the issue of integration of its incretory and secretory functions, elucidation of the mechanism of activity of regulatory systems with taking into account the wide diversity of types and subtypes of receptors, interaction of numerous variants of cotransporters, pumps, water and ion channels, which eventually provides the amazing efficiency of the coordinated work of several organs and systems for stabilization of physical-chemical parameters of the internal environment. Development of physiology is of importance for progress of natural science and clinical medicine, as its achievements facilitate discovery of mechanisms of physiological functions, elucidation of defect of the locus underlying dysfunction.

  3. Homeostatic reinforcement learning for integrating reward collection and physiological stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramati, Mehdi; Gutkin, Boris

    2014-12-02

    Efficient regulation of internal homeostasis and defending it against perturbations requires adaptive behavioral strategies. However, the computational principles mediating the interaction between homeostatic and associative learning processes remain undefined. Here we use a definition of primary rewards, as outcomes fulfilling physiological needs, to build a normative theory showing how learning motivated behaviors may be modulated by internal states. Within this framework, we mathematically prove that seeking rewards is equivalent to the fundamental objective of physiological stability, defining the notion of physiological rationality of behavior. We further suggest a formal basis for temporal discounting of rewards by showing that discounting motivates animals to follow the shortest path in the space of physiological variables toward the desired setpoint. We also explain how animals learn to act predictively to preclude prospective homeostatic challenges, and several other behavioral patterns. Finally, we suggest a computational role for interaction between hypothalamus and the brain reward system.

  4. Physiological mechanisms of thermoregulation in reptiles: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E

    2005-11-01

    The thermal dependence of biochemical reaction rates means that many animals regulate their body temperature so that fluctuations in body temperature are small compared to environmental temperature fluctuations. Thermoregulation is a complex process that involves sensing of the environment, and subsequent processing of the environmental information. We suggest that the physiological mechanisms that facilitate thermoregulation transcend phylogenetic boundaries. Reptiles are primarily used as model organisms for ecological and evolutionary research and, unlike in mammals, the physiological basis of many aspects in thermoregulation remains obscure. Here, we review recent research on regulation of body temperature, thermoreception, body temperature set-points, and cardiovascular control of heating and cooling in reptiles. The aim of this review is to place physiological thermoregulation of reptiles in a wider phylogenetic context. Future research on reptilian thermoregulation should focus on the pathways that connect peripheral sensing to central processing which will ultimately lead to the thermoregulatory response.

  5. The Emergence of Physiology and Form: Natural Selection Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Torday

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural Selection describes how species have evolved differentially, but it is descriptive, non-mechanistic. What mechanisms does Nature use to accomplish this feat? One known way in which ancient natural forces affect development, phylogeny and physiology is through gravitational effects that have evolved as mechanotransduction, seen in the lung, kidney and bone, linking as molecular homologies to skin and brain. Tracing the ontogenetic and phylogenetic changes that have facilitated mechanotransduction identifies specific homologous cell-types and functional molecular markers for lung homeostasis that reveal how and why complex physiologic traits have evolved from the unicellular to the multicellular state. Such data are reinforced by their reverse-evolutionary patterns in chronic degenerative diseases. The physiologic responses of model organisms like Dictyostelium and yeast to gravity provide deep comparative molecular phenotypic homologies, revealing mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR as the final common pathway for vertical integration of vertebrate physiologic evolution; mTOR integrates calcium/lipid epistatic balance as both the proximate and ultimate positive selection pressure for vertebrate physiologic evolution. The commonality of all vertebrate structure-function relationships can be reduced to calcium/lipid homeostatic regulation as the fractal unit of vertebrate physiology, demonstrating the primacy of the unicellular state as the fundament of physiologic evolution.

  6. Understanding the physiology of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2013-03-01

    The physiology of schizophrenia includes complex genetic and environmental interactions. Current treatment largely focuses on positive symptoms, but many patients with schizophrenia present with additional symptoms and conditions that hinder their social and occupational functioning. The study of the physiology of this disorder has expanded beyond dopamine dysfunction to include the glutamate, serotonin, and nicotinic/acetylcholine systems, as well as physiologic abnormalities such as diabetes and inflammation. Clinicians who understand these additional problem areas can incorporate them into their assessment and treatment plans for patients with schizophrenia. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  7. Investigation of the physiological basis of the BOLD effect

    CERN Document Server

    Pears, J A

    2001-01-01

    The work described in this thesis is that undertaken by the carried out in the Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Nottingham, between October 1997 and September 2001. This thesis describes work performed with the aim of yielding further understanding of the physiological basis behind the BOLD effect. Chapter 1 introduces techniques for monitoring brain function and describes the physiology behind the BOLD effect. Chapter 2 then describes NMR, imaging and the hardware used in the experiments performed in this thesis. A method of measuring cerebral blood volume changes during a visual activation paradigm with high temporal resolution is described in Chapter 3, and the timecourse compared to that of the BOLD response. The slow return to baseline of CBV is discussed. Chapter 4 shows a method of simultaneously measuring blood oxygenation measurements and blood volume changes. The results are shown to be in agreement with published data. The controversial phenomenon know...

  8. The physiology of glucagon-like peptide 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)