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Sample records for physiological aspects

  1. Physiological aspects of paired stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Durrer, D.

    1966-01-01

    Starling's law of the heart states that "the energy of contraction, however measured, is a function of the length of the muscle fibre" (Starling, 1915). This physiological property of myocardial and skeletal muscle enables the heart, within certain limits, to eject during each systole the amount

  2. Physiological consequences : Cardiopulmonary, vestibular, and sensory aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welsch, H.; Albery, W.; Banks, R.D.; Bles, W.

    2000-01-01

    Discussing the physiological consequences of enhanced fighter manoeuvrability (EFM), aspects of cardiopulmonary reactions will be seen during high G manoeuvres, especially the combination of negative G-load followed by high G-onset manoeuvres ("push-pull"). The aircraft's capability to reach high al

  3. Language learning - physiological and psychological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Tarnoveanu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several stages in the linguistic development of a child; he will not merely reproduce the sentences he hears, but a personal production is often noticed. Children do not acquire the grammar of their native language through theoretical teaching; exposure to the speaking community will lead to the acquisition of the grammatical structures of their language. Little is known about how little children acquire the rules of their native language; yet, we may distinguish between physiological and psychological aspects.

  4. [The ethical aspects of physiological experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'bertin, S V

    2014-01-01

    A modern classification of invasive procedures developed according to International Bioethical Principles has been presented. The experimental data convincingly demonstrate that using of noninvasive approaches and techniques give a good opportunity to reduce a number of animals recruited in experiment as well as to keep the normal (not distressful) physiological functions of animals. The data presented stress that development of noninvasive techniques is closely related both to scientific and social aspects of our life, allowing the scientists to provide high validity of experimental data obtained as well as to keep themselves as a human beings.

  5. Biotin: biochemical, physiological and clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Hamid M

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the biochemical, physiological and nutritional aspects of the water-soluble vitamin biotin (vitamin H). It is well know now that biotin plays important roles in a variety of critical metabolic reactions in the cell, and thus, is essential for normal human health, growth and development. This is underscored by the serious clinical abnormalities that occur in conditions of biotin deficiency, which include, among other things, growth retardation, neurological disorders, and dermatological abnormalities (reviewed in 1). Studies in animals have also shown that biotin deficiency during pregnancy leads to embryonic growth retardation, congenital malformation and death (Watanabe 1983; Cooper and Brown 1958; Mock et al. 2003; Zempleni and Mock 2000). The aim of this chapter is to provide coverage of current knowledge of the biochemical, physiological, and clinical aspects of biotin nutrition. Many sections of this chapter have been the subject of excellent recent reviews by others (Wolf 2001; McMahon 2002; Mock 2004; Rodriguez-Melendez and Zempleni 2003; Said 2004; Said et al. 2000; Said and Seetheram 2006), and thus, for more information the reader is advised to consider these additional sources.

  6. [Physiological aspects of music and longevity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymnikowa, M

    2015-01-01

    The article provides an overview of the results of studies on the effect of music on the function of various physiological systems of the organism including the nervous, cardiovascular and endocrine systems, also on the effect of Mozart's music and the later mature Baroque music. Particular attention is paid to information on the influence of different kinds of music (classical, jazz and rock), of the nature and of the degree of musical activity (listeners, amateurs and professional performers) on cognitive and behavioral function, on health status, life expectancy and longevity. Structural acoustical attributes of music defining its treatment effect, are described with the comparison of aspects of rock music and of classical music. The article also considers the prospects for using of music in the treatment and prevention of age-associated diseases.

  7. Physiological and molecular aspects of cobalamin transport.

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    Fedosov, Sergey N

    2012-01-01

    Minute doses of a complex cofactor cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B12) are essential for metabolism. The nutritional chain for humans includes: (1) production of Cbl by bacteria in the intestinal tract of herbivores; (2) accumulation of the absorbed Cbl in animal tissues; (3) consumption of food of animal origin. Most biological sources contain both Cbl and its analogues, i.e. Cbl-resembling compounds physiologically inactive in animal cells. Selective assimilation of the true vitamin requires an interplay between three transporting proteins - haptocorrin (HC), intrinsic factor (IF), transcobalamin (TC) - and several receptors. HC is present in many biological fluids, including gastric juice, where it assists in disposal of analogues. Gastric IF selectively binds dietary Cbl and enters the intestinal cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Absorbed Cbl is transmitted to TC and delivered to the tissues with blood flow. The complex transport system guarantees a very efficient uptake of the vitamin, but failure at any link causes Cbl-deficiency. Early detection of a negative B12 balance is highly desirable to prevent irreversible neurological damages, anaemia and death in aggravated cases. The review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of cobalamin transport with emphasis on interaction of corrinoids with the specific proteins and protein-receptor recognition. The last section briefly describes practical aspects of recent basic research concerning early detection of B12-related disorders, medical application of Cbl-conjugates, and purification of corrinoids from biological samples.

  8. Physiology of temperature regulation: comparative aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicego, Kênia C; Barros, Renata C H; Branco, Luiz G S

    2007-07-01

    Few environmental factors have a larger influence on animal energetics than temperature, a fact that makes thermoregulation a very important process for survival. In general, endothermic species, i.e., mammals and birds, maintain a constant body temperature (Tb) in fluctuating environmental temperatures using autonomic and behavioural mechanisms. Most of the knowledge on thermoregulatory physiology has emerged from studies using mammalian species, particularly rats. However, studies with all vertebrate groups are essential for a more complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of Tb. Ectothermic vertebrates-fish, amphibians and reptiles-thermoregulate essentially by behavioural mechanisms. With few exceptions, both endotherms and ectotherms develop fever (a regulated increase in Tb) in response to exogenous pyrogens, and regulated hypothermia (anapyrexia) in response to hypoxia. This review focuses on the mechanisms, particularly neuromediators and regions in the central nervous system, involved in thermoregulation in vertebrates, in conditions of euthermia, fever and anapyrexia.

  9. Polyphenol Oxidases in Crops: Biochemical, Physiological and Genetic Aspects

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    Francesca Taranto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic browning is a colour reaction occurring in plants, including cereals, fruit and horticultural crops, due to oxidation during postharvest processing and storage. This has a negative impact on the colour, flavour, nutritional properties and shelf life of food products. Browning is usually caused by polyphenol oxidases (PPOs, following cell damage caused by senescence, wounding and the attack of pests and pathogens. Several studies indicated that PPOs play a role in plant immunity, and emerging evidence suggested that PPOs might also be involved in other physiological processes. Genomic investigations ultimately led to the isolation of PPO homologs in several crops, which will be possibly characterized at the functional level in the near future. Here, focusing on the botanic families of Poaceae and Solanaceae, we provide an overview on available scientific literature on PPOs, resulting in useful information on biochemical, physiological and genetic aspects.

  10. The biological aspects of physiological anthropology with reference to its five keywords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Koichi

    2005-05-01

    The methodology of physiological anthropology has been defined in the capacity of an independent academic field by five keywords: environmental adaptability, technological adaptability, physiological polymorphism, whole-body coordination and functional potentiality, clearly suggesting the direction of approach to human beings in the field of physiological anthropology. Recently, these keywords have attracted a great deal of attention from physiological anthropologists in Japan. Physiological anthropology is based on a biological framework. From the viewpoint of biology, it is essential to discuss the biological function of human behavior. In this brief conceptual manuscript, the biological aspects of physiological anthropology are discussed in relation to the five keywords.

  11. Physiological and Pharmacological Aspects of the Vas Deferens - an Update

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    David Stewart Koslov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vas deferens, a muscular conduit conveying spermatozoa from the epididymis to the urethra, has been used as a model tissue for smooth muscle pharmacological and physiological advancements. Many drugs, notably α-adrenergic antagonists, have effects on contractility and thus normal ejaculation, incurring significant side effects for patients that may interfere with compliance. A more thorough understanding of the innervation and neurotransmitter pharmacology of the vas has indicated that this is a highly complex structure and a model for co-transmission at the synapse. Recent models have shown clinical scenarios that alter the vas contraction. This review covers structure, receptors, neurotransmitters, smooth muscle physiology, and clinical implications of the vas deferens.

  12. Physiological effects of ovarian hormones: clinical aspects and compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, B; Pedersen, A T

    1996-01-01

    of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease are other considerations. Despite the large number of different hormone treatment regimens available, such problems as continued bleeding and concern about side effects engenders low compliance. To enhance compliance, it is important to ensure that post-menopausal women......Menopause is marked by the permanent cessation of menstrual bleeding. Deprivation of ovarian hormones due to decreasing ovarian activity causes widespread physiological effects. Disturbances in menstrual pattern and hot flashes are major reasons for hormone replacement therapy (HRT), but prevention...... and their physicians are aware of the probable risks and benefits of hormone therapy before deciding whether or not to use preventive HRT....

  13. [Autopharmacology, sloths and physiology. Opinions on certain historical aspects and potential developments in physiology in Liege].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damas, J

    2001-07-01

    We recall the works of Bacq, Lecomte and Goffart, three physiologists from the University of Liège, on neurohumoral transmission, autacoids, sloths and monkeys in order to stress first that Physiology is a natural science of its own, and secondly that physiological studies aim at the understanding of the general mechanisms concurring to homeostasis.

  14. Effects of drag factor on physiological aspects of rowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, D A; Jensen, R L; Williams, S E; Watts, P B

    2008-05-01

    This study examined the effects of two resistances, or "drag factors" on selected physiological variables during incremental progressive rowing tests (seven 3-min stages) on a Concept2 ergometer. Subjects were seven male and seven female university club rowers. Their mean age, body mass and height were 19.6 +/- 1.5 years, 72.7 +/- 8.0 kg, and 172.2 +/- 7.5 cm, respectively. Progressive tests were conducted using drag factors 100 (D100) and 150 (D150) before the spring racing season. Values were determined for the following physiological variables: ventilation (V.E), oxygen uptake (V.O2), heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration (BLC), respiratory exchange ratio (R) and rowing economy (W/V.O2). Comparisons across all six submaximal stages showed no significant difference between D(100) and D(150) for any of the variables measured (p > .05). Maximal V.E(max) was significantly greater at D100 than D150 (p D100 than at D150, though not significantly so. The mean D100-D150 differences in V.E and SR for each stage were significantly correlated (r = 0.76, p < .01), suggesting drag factor may affect V.E via SR.

  15. RESTORATIVE ASPECT OF CASTOR PLANT ON MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY: A REVIEW

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    Attila Kádasi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The castor plant (Ricinus communis L. is a robust perennial shrub of Euphorbiaceae family and different parts of the plant are widely used by various communities and forest dwellers in many regions of the world for treating a variety of ailments. About 80% of world population is still dependent on traditional herbal medicines. The plant is documented to possess beneficial effects as anti-oxidant, antifertility, anti inflammatory, antimicrobial, central nervous system stimulant, anti diabetic, insecticidal and larvicidal and many other medicinal properties. The extracts or the isolated compounds of this plant have been found to have potent activity against various ailments. The aim of this paper is to scrutinize the available literature related to the restorative activity of the castor plant as a herbal medicine on mammalian physiology and to accumulate those scientifically valid data in a nut shell in the form of a mini review.

  16. ACTUAL ASPECTS OF SCHOOL MEALS, AGE APPROPRIATE PHYSIOLOGICAL NEEDS

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    G. O. Magomedov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the current state of school meals, determination of ways of optimization for food, biological values and balanced school meals relevant age-related physiological needs. The greatest contribution to the optimization of school meals can make enriched products of mass consumption, first of necessity, the need and favorite products to children. In this regard, the fol-lowing tasks were defined: analysis of normative documents on creation of school meals , the relevant age-related physiological needs for nutrients and energy for protein, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber and organic acids; definition of the balance of the products of the school menu categories for children aged 7-11 years, 11 - 17; study of the composition of food school menu; comparison of total deviation calorie Breakfast, lunch and development of measures on optimization of the system of school nutrition. In the structure of nutrition of children and adolescents major role bread, drinks, confectionery products as are the sources of energy and nutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, macro - and microelements, organic acids, including polyunsaturated fatty CI slot, Therefore one of the ways of solving of optimization problems of preschool and school meals are of great TRANS-perspective bakery and confectionery products, drinks of high food and biological value and coordination and composition, as on the basic structural elements and micronutrients obtained innovative technology complex processing of raw sources with maximum preservation of their original nutritional value. TA-thus, the performed literature analysis found that rational nutrition of schoolchildren aimed at prevention of alimentary (cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, allergic diseases that meet energy, plastic and other needs of the body, provides the necessary level of metabolism.

  17. THERMOREGULATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS

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    Frank E Marino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Vol 53 (Medicine & Sport Science This collection on the latest interpretation of research data about the relationship between thermoregulation, exercise performance and fatigue is published as the 53rd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE The book aims to explain how the advances in technology and methodology allowed studying the affects of the changing body temperature on metabolism and the role played by the nervous system in shaping human performance under challenging thermal situations. FEATURES This publication provides different interpretations of recent research for a better understanding of the limitations of thermoregulation in nine titles. The presented titles are: The Evolutionary Basis of Thermoregulation and Exercise Performance; Comparative Thermoregulation and the Quest for Athletic Supremacy; Thermoregulation, Fatigue and Exercise Modality; Neuromuscular Response to Exercise Heat Stress; Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction, Endotoxemia and Gastrointestinal Symptoms: The 'Canary in the Coal Mine' during Exercise-Heat Stress?; Effects of Peripheral Cooling on Characteristics of Local Muscle; Cooling Interventions for the Protection and Recovery of Exercise Performance from Exercise-Induced Heat Stress; Ethnicity and Temperature Regulation; Exercise Heat Stress and Metabolism. The evidence for the human's ability to adjust their performance according to the thermal limits in order to preserve cellular homeostasis is particularly noteworthy. AUDIENCE This is a fundamental book for any students and/or researchers involved in the fields of medicine, exercise physiology and human performance with special reference to thermal regulation. ASSESSMENT This publication is a must-read text for all those working in thermal medicine, exercise physiology and human performance fields

  18. Mitochondrial uptake of thiamin pyrophosphate: physiological and cell biological aspects.

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    Veedamali S Subramanian

    Full Text Available Mammalian cells obtain vitamin B1 (thiamin from their surrounding environment and convert it to thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP in the cytoplasm. Most of TPP is then transported into the mitochondria via a carrier-mediated process that involves the mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter (MTPPT. Knowledge about the physiological parameters of the MTPP-mediated uptake process, MTPPT targeting and the impact of clinical mutations in MTPPT in patients with Amish lethal microcephaly and neuropathy and bilateral striatal necrosis are not fully elucidated, and thus, were addressed in this study using custom-made (3H-TPP as a substrate and mitochondria isolated from mouse liver and human-derived liver HepG2 cells. Results showed (3H-TPP uptake by mouse liver mitochondria to be pH-independent, saturable (Km = 6.79±0.53 µM, and specific for TPP. MTPPT protein was expressed in mouse liver and HepG2 cells, and confocal images showed a human (hMTPPT-GFP construct to be targeted to mitochondria of HepG2 cells. A serial truncation analysis revealed that all three modules of hMTPPT protein cooperated (although at different levels of efficiency in mitochondrial targeting rather than acting autonomously as independent targeting module. Finally, the hMTPPT clinical mutants (G125S and G177A showed proper mitochondrial targeting but displayed significant inhibition in (3H-TPP uptake and a decrease in level of expression of the MTPPT protein. These findings advance our knowledge of the physiology and cell biology of the mitochondrial TPP uptake process. The results also show that clinical mutations in the hMTPPT system impair its functionality via affecting its level of expression with no effect on its targeting to mitochondria.

  19. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium: Nutritional aspects of developing replacement heifers.

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    Funston, R N; Martin, J L; Larson, D M; Roberts, A J

    2012-04-01

    Studies in numerous species provide evidence that diet during development can mediate physiological changes necessary for puberty. In cattle, several studies have reported inverse correlations between postweaning growth rate and age at puberty and heifer pregnancy rates. Thus, postweaning growth rate was determined to be an important factor affecting age of puberty, which in turn influences pregnancy rates. This and other research conducted during the late 1960s through the early 1980s indicated puberty occurs at a genetically predetermined size, and only when heifers reach their target BW can increased pregnancy rates be obtained. Guidelines were established indicating replacement heifers should achieve 60 to 65% of their expected mature BW by breeding. Traditional approaches for postweaning development of replacement heifers used during the last several decades have primarily focused on feeding heifers to achieve or exceed an appropriate target BW and thereby maximize heifer pregnancy rates. Intensive heifer development systems may maximize pregnancy rates, but not necessarily optimize profit or sustainability. Since inception of target BW guidelines, subsequent research demonstrated that the growth pattern heifers experience before achieving a critical target BW could be varied. Altering rate and timing of BW gain can result in compensatory growth periods, providing an opportunity to decrease feed costs. Recent research has demonstrated that feeding replacement heifers to traditional target BW increased development costs without improving reproduction or subsequent calf production relative to development systems in which heifers were developed to lighter target BW ranging from 50 to 57% of mature BW.

  20. Environmental Nanoparticles Interactions with Plants: Morphological, Physiological, and Genotoxic Aspects

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    C. Remédios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs are characterized by their small size (less than 100 nm and large surface area, which confer specific physicochemical properties as strength, electrical, and optical features. NPs can be derived from natural or anthropic sources, such as engineered or unwanted/incidental NPs. The composition, dimension, and morphology of engineered NPs enable their use in a variety of areas, such as electronic, biomedical, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, energy, environmental, catalysis, and materials science. As nanotechnology is an innovative and scientific growth area with an exponential production, more information is needed concerning the impacts of these nanomaterials (NMs in the environment and, particularly, in animals/humans health and in plants performance. So, research on NPs as emerging contaminants is therefore a new field in environmental health. This minireview describes, briefly, the NPs characterization and their occurrence in the environment stating air, water, and soil. Finally, particular emphasis is given to the interaction of NPs with plants at different levels: morphology, physiology, and genotoxicity. By analyzing this compiled information, it is evident that research on NPs phytotoxicity is in the beginning, and more comprehensive studies are needed not only on NPs cytotoxicity and genotoxicity but also on the best and the most reliable methods of assessing NPs toxicity.

  1. Physiological aspects of energy metabolism and gastrointestinal effects of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, M; Cummings, J H

    2007-12-01

    The energy values of carbohydrates continue to be debated. This is because of the use of different energy systems, for example, combustible, digestible, metabolizable, and so on. Furthermore, ingested macronutrients may not be fully available to tissues, and the tissues themselves may not be able fully to oxidize substrates made available to them. Therefore, for certain carbohydrates, the discrepancies between combustible energy (cEI), digestible energy (DE), metabolizable energy (ME) and net metabolizable energy (NME) may be considerable. Three food energy systems are in use in food tables and for food labelling in different world regions based on selective interpretation of the digestive physiology and metabolism of food carbohydrates. This is clearly unsatisfactory and confusing to the consumer. While it has been suggested that an enormous amount of work would have to be undertaken to change the current ME system into an NME system, the additional changes may not be as great as anticipated. In experimental work, carbohydrate is high in the macronutrient hierarchy of satiation. However, studies of eating behaviour indicate that it does not unconditionally depend on the oxidation of one nutrient, and argue against the operation of a simple carbohydrate oxidation or storage model of feeding behaviour to the exclusion of other macronutrients. The site, rate and extent of carbohydrate digestion in, and absorption from the gut are key to understanding the many roles of carbohydrate, although the concept of digestibility has different meanings. Within the nutrition community, the characteristic patterns of digestion that occur in the small (upper) vs large (lower) bowel are known to impact in contrasting ways on metabolism, while in the discussion of the energy value of foods, digestibility is defined as the proportion of combustible energy that is absorbed over the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract. Carbohydrates that reach the large bowel are fermented to

  2. Unique aspects of competitive weightlifting: performance, training and physiology.

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    Storey, Adam; Smith, Heather K

    2012-09-01

    development of weightlifters is ~15-20% and ~13-16% greater, respectively, than in other strength and power athletes. In addition, weightlifting training has been shown to reduce the typical sex-related difference in the expression of neuromuscular strength and power. However, this apparent sex-related difference appears to be augmented with increasing adult age demonstrating that women undergo a greater age-related decline in muscle shortening velocity and peak power when compared with men. Weightlifting training and competition has been shown to induce significant structural and functional adaptations of the cardiovascular system. The collective evidence shows that these adaptations are physiological as opposed to pathological. Finally, the acute exercise-induced testosterone, cortisol and growth hormone responses of weightlifters have similarities to that of following conventional strength and hypertrophy protocols involving large muscle mass exercises. The routine assessment of the basal testosterone : cortisol ratio may be beneficial when attempting to quantify the adaptive responses to weightlifting training. As competitive weightlifting is becoming increasingly popular around the world, further research addressing the physiological responses and adaptations of female weightlifters and younger (i.e. ≤17 years of age) and older (i.e. ≥35 years of age) weightlifters of both sexes is required.

  3. Some psycho-physiological aspects of ecstasy in recent research

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    Nora Ahlberg

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this article is to present some psycho-physiological perspectives of recent date concerned with the phenomenon of ecstasy. As almost none of this research has yet been assimilated by comparative religion, the focus here is on illustrating some of the background for renewed speculation on the relationship between psyche and soma. Traditional Western science has usually operated with a distinction between external and internal processes. Perhaps owing to this idea of the independence of our internal processes from our intentional consciousness, reports from other cultures such as those concerning the extraordinary achievements of holy men (e.g. their capacity to lie buried for days, or survive unclothed at very low temperatures have tended to be ignored as fantastic rumours (which, to some extent, is certainly true and myths. In a similar way the varieties of religious ecstatic states have often been countered with a shrug by psychiatrists. The recently renewed interest in consciousness within general psychology, together with what may be called marginal psychology and the drug revolt of youth culture have, however, provoked new speculation concerning human potential, speculation which in due time might also benefit comparative religion. From the perspective of comparative religion the primary concern is with cultural tradition and interpretation. Among our many new potential methods for better understanding ecstatic phenomena by means of experimental methods, biofeedback has been the most sensational one. It is above all the research in biofeedback that has forced many scientists to reconsider their view of the autonomic nervous system as a system completely independent of human will and control.

  4. Aspergillus niger biofilms for celulasas production: some structural and physiological aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Villena, Gretty K.; Marcel Gutiérrez-Correa

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus niger biofilms developed on polyester cloth were evaluated considering two aspects related to the growth on surfaces: structure and physiological behavior focused on cellulase production. The biofilm structure was assessed by using electron scanning microphotographs from inoculation and adsorption to 120 h growth. The microphotographs show that biofilm formation can be divided into three phases: 1) Adhesion, which is strongly increased by Aspergillus spore hydrophobicity; 2) Initi...

  5. Physiological aspects of vetiver grass for rehabilitation in abandoned metalliferous mine wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, J; Chan, G S Y; Zhang, J; Liang, J; Wong, M H

    2003-09-01

    Physiological aspects of why vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides L.) can be tolerant to heavy metals and be used as an alternative method for rehabilitation of abandoned metalliferous mine wastelands have been investigated. The results showed that high proportions of lead and zinc (Pb/Zn) tailing greatly inhibited the leaf growth, dry matter accumulation, and photosynthesis of leaves, but stimulated the accumulation of proline and abscisic acid (ABA), and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT), implying that different mechanisms to detoxify active oxygen species (AOS) existed in different parts of plants. Physiological responses to heavy metal treatments differed greatly between roots and shoots. Nitrogen fertilizer application could greatly alleviate the adverse effects of high proportions of Pb/Zn tailing on vetiver grass growth.

  6. Anorexia in human and experimental animal models: physiological aspects related to neuropeptides.

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    Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueta, Yoichi

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia, a loss of appetite for food, can be caused by various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, firstly, clinical aspects of anorexia nervosa are summarized in brief. Secondly, hypothalamic neuropeptides responsible for feeding regulation in each hypothalamic nucleus are discussed. Finally, three different types of anorexigenic animal models; dehydration-induced anorexia, cisplatin-induced anorexia and cancer anorexia-cachexia, are introduced. In conclusion, hypothalamic neuropeptides may give us novel insight to understand and find effective therapeutics strategy essential for various kinds of anorexia.

  7. A few aspects of the physiology of flowering in photoperiodic sensitive plants

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    E. G. Groenewald

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Three aspects of the physiology of flowering in photoperiodic sensitive plants are discussed. These are the florigen hypothesis, phytochrome and the time measurement mechanism of flowering and genetic-molecular studies involved in flowering. There is evidence that the hypothetical compound, florigen, occurs in plants, but it has never been characterised. There is a family of phytochromes discovered in plants and some of them are involved with the circadian clock and thus with the time measurement mechanism of flowering. The molecular networks that interact to control flowering are being elucidated, by means of genetic-molecular techniques although at an early stage. It has not yet been possible to pinpoint florigen by these methods, but the future looks promising.

  8. Physiological and Medical Aspects That Put Women Soldiers at Increased Risk for Overuse Injuries.

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    Epstein, Yoram; Fleischmann, Chen; Yanovich, Ran; Heled, Yuval

    2015-11-01

    Anthropometric and physiological factors place female soldiers at a disadvantage relative to male soldiers in most aspects of physical performance. Average aerobic and anaerobic fitness levels are lower in women than in men. Thus, women have a lower overall work capacity and must exert themselves more than men to achieve the same output. The lower weight and fat-free mass and the higher body fat of women are associated with lower muscle strength and endurance, placing them at a disadvantage compared with men in performing military tasks such as lifting and carrying weights, or marching with a load. Working at a higher percentage of their maximal capacity to achieve the same performance levels as men, women tire earlier. Their smaller size, skeletal anatomy, and different bone geometry also predispose women to a higher incidence of exercise-related injuries. Consequently, the attrition rate of female soldiers in combat units is higher than that of their male counterparts. This review summarizes the literature on gender-related physiological and anatomical differences that put female soldiers at an increased risk of exercise-related injuries.

  9. Maximising performance in triathlon: applied physiological and nutritional aspects of elite and non-elite competitions.

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    Bentley, David J; Cox, Gregory R; Green, Daniel; Laursen, Paul B

    2008-07-01

    Triathlon is a sport consisting of sequential swimming, cycling and running. The main diversity within the sport of triathlon resides in the varying event distances, which creates specific technical, physiological and nutritional considerations for athlete and practitioner alike. The purpose of this article is to review physiological as well as nutritional aspects of triathlon and to make recommendations on ways to enhance performance. Aside from progressive conditioning and training, areas that have shown potential to improve triathlon performance include drafting when possible during both the swim and cycle phase, wearing a wetsuit, and selecting a lower cadence (60-80 rpm) in the final stages of the cycle phase. Adoption of a more even racing pace during cycling may optimise cycling performance and induce a "metabolic reserve" necessary for elevated running performance in longer distance triathlon events. In contrast, drafting in swimming and cycling may result a better tactical approach to increase overall performance in elite Olympic distance triathlons. Daily energy intake should be modified to reflect daily training demands to assist triathletes in achieving body weight and body composition targets. Carbohydrate loading strategies and within exercise carbohydrate intake should reflect the specific requirements of the triathlon event contested. Development of an individualised fluid plan based on previous fluid balance observations may assist to avoid both dehydration and hyponatremia during prolonged triathlon racing.

  10. Performance Aspects and Physiological Responses in Male Amateur Boxing Competitions: A Brief Review.

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    Slimani, Maamer; Chaabène, Helmi; Davis, Philip; Franchini, Emerson; Cheour, Foued; Chamari, Karim

    2017-04-01

    Slimani, M, Chaabène, H, Davis, P, Franchini, E, Cheour, F, and Chamari, K. Performance aspects and physiological responses in male amateur boxing competitions: a brief review. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1132-1141, 2017-Boxing is one of the most popular striking combat sports in the world. The aim of this review was to present data concerning performance analysis (time-motion and technical-tactical analysis) and physiological responses (i.e., blood lactate concentration [BLC], heart rate, and oxygen consumption) during novice and elite male simulated and official amateur boxing competitions in any age category. The present review shows that boxing competition is a high-intensity intermittent striking combat sport. Typically, the activity-to-rest ratio was higher in elite (18:1) than in novice (9:1) boxers and significant differences were observed between rounds (first round = 16:1, second round = 8:1, and third round = 6:1) in novice boxers. Thus, total stop-time and total stop-frequency increased over subsequent rounds in novice boxers. The technical-tactical aspects in elite and novice boxing bouts were different between rounds and dependent on the match outcome (i.e., winners vs. losers). Particularly, the current review highlights that triple-punch combinations, total combinations, block- and counter-punch combinations, total punches to the head, technical performance effectiveness, and defensive- and offensive-skills effectiveness may have contributed to win in novice and elite boxing competitions. Higher frequencies of technical movements were also observed in elite compared with novice boxers. From a physiological point of view, BLC increased significantly from postround 1 compared with postround 3 in novice boxing match. BLC was also higher in official than in simulated elite boxing matches in senior compared with junior boxers and in medium heavy-weight category compared with light- and medium-weight categories in junior boxing competition. A higher

  11. Cardiac Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors: Novel Aspects of Expression, Signaling Mechanisms, Physiologic Function, and Clinical Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connell, Timothy D.; Jensen, Brian C.; Baker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors (AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have a crucial role in cardiac physiology in health and disease. Alpha1-ARs signal through Gαq, and signaling through Gq, for example, by endothelin and angiotensin receptors, is thought to be detrimental to the heart. In contrast, cardiac alpha1-ARs mediate important protective and adaptive functions in the heart, although alpha1-ARs are only a minor fraction of total cardiac ARs. Cardiac alpha1-ARs activate pleiotropic downstream signaling to prevent pathologic remodeling in heart failure. Mechanisms defined in animal and cell models include activation of adaptive hypertrophy, prevention of cardiac myocyte death, augmentation of contractility, and induction of ischemic preconditioning. Surprisingly, at the molecular level, alpha1-ARs localize to and signal at the nucleus in cardiac myocytes, and, unlike most GPCRs, activate “inside-out” signaling to cause cardioprotection. Contrary to past opinion, human cardiac alpha1-AR expression is similar to that in the mouse, where alpha1-AR effects are seen most convincingly in knockout models. Human clinical studies show that alpha1-blockade worsens heart failure in hypertension and does not improve outcomes in heart failure, implying a cardioprotective role for human alpha1-ARs. In summary, these findings identify novel functional and mechanistic aspects of cardiac alpha1-AR function and suggest that activation of cardiac alpha1-AR might be a viable therapeutic strategy in heart failure. PMID:24368739

  12. Physiological and nutritional aspects of post-exercise recovery: specific recommendations for female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausswirth, Christophe; Le Meur, Yann

    2011-10-01

    Gender-based differences in the physiological response to exercise have been studied extensively for the last four decades, and yet the study of post-exercise, gender-specific recovery has only been developing in more recent years. This review of the literature aims to present the current state of knowledge in this field, focusing on some of the most pertinent aspects of physiological recovery in female athletes and how metabolic, thermoregulatory, or inflammation and repair processes may differ from those observed in male athletes. Scientific investigations on the effect of gender on substrate utilization during exercise have yielded conflicting results. Factors contributing to the lack of agreement between studies include differences in subject dietary or training status, exercise intensity or duration, as well as the variations in ovarian hormone concentrations between different menstrual cycle phases in female subjects, as all are known to affect substrate metabolism during sub-maximal exercise. If greater fatty acid mobilization occurs in females during prolonged exercise compared with males, the inverse is observed during the recovery phase. This could explain why, despite mobilizing lipids to a greater extent than males during exercise, females lose less fat mass than their male counterparts over the course of a physical training programme. Where nutritional strategies are concerned, no difference appears between males and females in their capacity to replenish glycogen stores; optimal timing for carbohydrate intake does not differ between genders, and athletes must consume carbohydrates as soon as possible after exercise in order to maximize glycogen store repletion. While lipid intake should be limited in the immediate post-exercise period in order to favour carbohydrate and protein intake, in the scope of the athlete's general diet, lipid intake should be maintained at an adequate level (30%). This is particularly important for females specializing in

  13. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  14. Cells under pressure - treatment of eukaryotic cells with high hydrostatic pressure, from physiologic aspects to pressure induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Benjamin; Janko, Christina; Ebel, Nina; Meister, Silke; Schlücker, Eberhard; Meyer-Pittroff, Roland; Fietkau, Rainer; Herrmann, Martin; Gaipl, Udo S

    2008-01-01

    The research on high hydrostatic pressure in medicine and life sciences is multifaceted. According to the used pressure head the research has to be divided into two different parts. To study physiological aspects of pressure on eukaryotic cells physiological pressure (pHHP; highly reversible alterations and normally does not affect cellular viability. The treatment of eukaryotic cells with non-physiological pressure (HHP; > or = 100 MPa) reveals different outcomes. Treatment with HHP or = 200 MPa. Moreover, HHP treatment with > 300 MPa leads to necrosis. Therefore, HHP plays a role for the sterilisation of human transplants, of food stuff, and pharmaceuticals. Human tumour cells subjected to HHP > 300 MPa display a necrotic phenotype along with a gelificated cytoplasm, preserve their shape, and retain their immunogenicity. These observations favour the use of HHP to produce whole cell based tumour vaccines. Further experiments revealed that the increment of pressure as well as the pressure holding time influences the cell death of tumour cells. We conclude that high hydrostatic pressure offers both, an economic, easy to apply, clean, and fast technique for the generation of vaccines, and a promising tool to study physiological aspects.

  15. Cerebral blood flow and intracranial pulsatility studied with MRI: measurement, physiological and pathophysiological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waahlin, Anders

    2012-07-01

    During each cardiac cycle pulsatile arterial blood inflates the vascular bed of the brain, forcing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and venous blood out of the cranium. Excessive arterial pulsatility may be part of a harmful mechanism causing cognitive decline among elderly. Additionally, restricted venous flow from the brain is suggested as the cause of multiple sclerosis. Addressing hypotheses derived from these observations requires accurate and reliable investigational methods. This work focused on assessing the pulsatile waveform of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF flows. The overall aim of this dissertation was to explore cerebral blood flow and intracranial pulsatility using MRI, with respect to measurement, physiological and pathophysiological aspects.Two-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D PCMRI) was used to assess the pulsatile waveforms of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF flow. The repeatability was assessed in healthy young subjects. The 2D PCMRI measurements of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF pulsatility were generally repeatable but the pulsatility decreased systematically during the investigation. A method combining 2D PCMRI measurements with invasive CSF infusion tests to determine the magnitude and distribution of compliance within the craniospinal system was developed and applied in a group of healthy elderly. The intracranial space contained approximately two thirds of the total craniospinal compliance. The magnitude of craniospinal compliance was less than suggested in previous studies. The vascular hypothesis for multiple sclerosis was tested. Venous drainage in the internal jugular veins was compared between healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients using 2D PCMRI. For both groups, a great variability in the internal jugular flow was observed but no pattern specific to multiple sclerosis could be found. Relationships between regional brain volumes and potential biomarkers of intracranial cardiac-related pulsatile

  16. Thermoregulatory responses in exercising rats: methodological aspects and relevance to human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Prímola-Gomes, Thales Nicolau; Pires, Washington; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; Hudson, Alexandre Sérvulo Ribeiro; Kunstetter, Ana Cançado; Fonseca, Cletiana Gonçalves; Drummond, Lucas Rios; Damasceno, William Coutinho; Teixeira-Coelho, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Rats are used worldwide in experiments that aim to investigate the physiological responses induced by a physical exercise session. Changes in body temperature regulation, which may affect both the performance and the health of exercising rats, are evident among these physiological responses. Despite the universal use of rats in biomedical research involving exercise, investigators often overlook important methodological issues that hamper the accurate measurement of clear thermoregulatory responses. Moreover, much debate exists regarding whether the outcome of rat experiments can be extrapolated to human physiology, including thermal physiology. Herein, we described the impact of different exercise intensities, durations and protocols and environmental conditions on running-induced thermoregulatory changes. We focused on treadmill running because this type of exercise allows for precise control of the exercise intensity and the measurement of autonomic thermoeffectors associated with heat production and loss. Some methodological issues regarding rat experiments, such as the sites for body temperature measurements and the time of day at which experiments are performed, were also discussed. In addition, we analyzed the influence of a high body surface area-to-mass ratio and limited evaporative cooling on the exercise-induced thermoregulatory responses of running rats and then compared these responses in rats to those observed in humans. Collectively, the data presented in this review represent a reference source for investigators interested in studying exercise thermoregulation in rats. In addition, the present data indicate that the thermoregulatory responses of exercising rats can be extrapolated, with some important limitations, to human thermal physiology.

  17. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND AGROECOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF CADMIUM INTERACTIONS WITH BARLEY PLANTS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A VASSILEV

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is a review of author’s previous publications, unpublished results as well as available literature on barley responses to Cd contamination. The physiological backgrounds of the acute Cd toxicity in barley plants are briefly described. Some data characterizing the chronic Cd toxicity in barley have been also provided in relation to its possible use for seed production and Cd phytoextraction on Cd-contaminated agricultural soils. Information about the main physiological factors limiting growth of Cd-exposed barley plants and grain yield, seedling quality as well as Cd phytoextraction capacity of barley grown in Cd-contaminated soils is presented.

  18. Mercury: Aspects of its ecology and environmental toxicity. [physiological effects of mercury compound contamination of environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of mercury pollution on the environment. The possible sources of mercury contamination in sea water are identified. The effects of mercury on food sources, as represented by swordfish, are analyzed. The physiological effects of varying concentrations of mercury are reported. Emphasis is placed on the situation existing in the Hawaiian Islands.

  19. The learning continuum based on student's level of competence and specific pedagogical learning material on physiological aspects from teachers's opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Ria Fitriyani; Subali, Bambang

    2017-08-01

    The scope of learning continuum at the conceptual knowledge is formulated based on the student's level of competence and specific pedagogical learning material. The purpose of this study is to develop a learning continuum of specific pedagogical material aspects of physiology targeted for students in primary and secondary education. This research was conducted in Province of Yogyakarta Special Region from October 2016 to January 2017. The method used in this study was survey method. The data were collected using questionnaire that had been validated from the aspects of construct validity and experts judgements. Respondents in this study consist of 281 Science/Biology teachers at Public Junior and Senior High Schools in the Province of Yogyakarta Special Region which spread in Yogyakarta city and 4 regencies namely Sleman, Bantul, Kulonprogo, and Gunungkidul. The data were taken using a census. Data were analyzed using a descriptive analysis technique. The results show the learning continuum of physiology based on teachers's opinion from grade VII, VIII, and IX are taught in grade VII, VIII, IX and X on level of C2 (understanding) and the learning continuum of physiology based on teachers's opinion from grade X, XI and XII are taught in grade X and XI on level of C2 (understanding), C3 (applying), and C4 (analyzing) based on teachers's opinions. The conclusion is that many teachers refer to the existing curriculum rather than their own original idea for developing learning continuum.

  20. Acetazolamide in cerebral diagnosis: Physiological and pathophysiological aspects. Acetazolamid in der zerebrovaskulaeren Diagnostik: Physiologische und pathophysiologische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, H.; Franke, W.G.; Templin, A. (Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Dresden (Germany) Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Neurologie, Abt. Neurologie, Dresden (Germany))

    1990-01-01

    The sensitivity in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases using radiotracers can be enhanced by the use of the acetazolamide test. In this paper we present and discuss some physiological and pathophysiological aspects of its mechanism. The physiological action of the carboanhydrase inhibitor is like the action of enhanced pCO{sub 2} in the tissue, thus acting at the site of metabolic regulation. The reaction of the vascular bed is influenced in part by subcortical structures. Pathologically the reaction can be disturbed at first by an altered regulation with the vessels being mechanically intact, e.g. in hypoxia or transient ischemia. Secondly, the mechanics of the vessels may be not intact e.g., in atherosclerosis or surrounding edema. Lastly, the vessels have already dilated, e.g. poststenotically. All these facts have to be taken into consideration interpreting an acetazolamid test. (orig.).

  1. Extracorporeal shockwave: mechanisms of action and physiological aspects for cellulite, body shaping, and localized fat-Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Débora A Oliveira; da Silva, Caroline Nogueira; Grecco, Clovis; Guidi, Renata Michelini; Moreira, Renata Gomes; Coelho, Andresa A; Sant'Ana, Estela; de Souza, José Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT) has had a wide use in rehabilitation, and has presented positive effects in the treatment of unaesthetic affections. The objective of the present study was to search, in the literature, the mechanisms of action and the physiological aspects of shockwaves acting on the biological tissue to improve the condition of cellulite and localized fat. The systematic review of the literature was carried out in the period of September 2016 to February 2017 based on the bibliographic databases such as Lilacs, Medline, PubMed, and SciELO. Fifteen articles were identified in that systematic review, three of which were excluded as they did not make the complete access to the article available or the theme investigated did not encompass the objective of the study. The revision demonstrated that extracorporeal shockwaves present relevant effects on the biological tissue, which leads to the restructuring of skin properties and subcutaneous tissue, thus clinically improving the aspects of cellulite and localized fat.

  2. Performance factors in women's team handball: physical and physiological aspects--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchado, Carmen; Tortosa-Martínez, Juan; Vila, Helena; Ferragut, Carmen; Platen, Petra

    2013-06-01

    Team handball is an Olympic sport played professionally in many European countries. Nevertheless, a scientific knowledge regarding women's elite team handball demands is limited. Thus, the purpose of this article was to review a series of studies (n = 33) on physical characteristics, physiological attributes, physical attributes, throwing velocity, and on-court performances of women's team handball players. Such empirical and practical information is essential to design and implement successful short-term and long-term training programs for women's team handball players. Our review revealed that (a) players that have a higher skill level are taller and have a higher fat-free mass; (b) players who are more aerobically resistant are at an advantage in international level women team handball; (c) strength and power exercises should be emphasized in conditioning programs, because they are associated with both sprint performance and throwing velocity; (d) speed drills should also be implemented in conditioning programs but after a decrease in physical training volume; (e) a time-motion analysis is an effective method of quantifying the demands of team handball and provides a conceptual framework for the specific physical preparation of players. According to our results, there are only few studies on on-court performance and time-motion analysis for women's team handball players, especially concerning acceleration profiles. More studies are needed to examine the effectiveness of different training programs of women's team handball players' physiological and physical attributes.

  3. A survey of the health experiences of international business travelers. Part One--Physiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, H Lynn; Reilly, Sandra M

    2002-10-01

    Occupational health professionals need to know more about the health, worklife, and family life of international business travelers (IBTs). This descriptive correlational study, in two parts, examines the physiological and psychosocial experiences associated with business travel for a sample of 140 employees from western Canada's oil and gas industry. Results for Part One show that 76% of IBTs report travel related health problems, 74% have jet lag, 45% have travelers' diarrhea and gastrointestinal complaints, 12% to 16% have climate adaptation problems, and 2% report accidents and minor injuries. High risk behaviors include not carrying a first aid travel kit (54%); drinking more alcohol than ordinarily (21%); and neglecting food, water, and antimalarial precautions (6% to 14%). Other risk factors include age, length of stay, destination, pre-travel medical examinations, pre-travel advice, and eating and accommodation facilities. Findings show that IBTs are at risk for travel related physiological health problems. Implications for practitioners call for increased occupational health expertise in pre-travel preparation, follow up post-travel and regular health surveillance for employees who travel on international business.

  4. Physiological aspects of legged terrestrial locomotion the motor and the machine

    CERN Document Server

    Cavagna, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a succinct but comprehensive description of the mechanics of muscle contraction and legged terrestrial locomotion. It describes on the one hand how the fundamental properties of muscle tissue affect the mechanics of locomotion, and on the other, how the mechanics of locomotion modify the mechanism of muscle operation under different conditions. Further, the book reports on the design and results of experiments conducted with two goals. The first was to describe the physiological function of muscle tissue (which may be considered as the “motor”) contracting at a constant length, during shortening, during lengthening, and under a condition that occurs most frequently in the back-and-forth movement of the limbs during locomotion, namely the stretch-shortening cycle of the active muscle. The second objective was to analyze the interaction between the motor and the “machine” (the skeletal lever system) during walking and running in different scenarios with respect to speed, step frequency,...

  5. The effects of the arm swing on biomechanical and physiological aspects of roller ski skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegge, Ann Magdalen; Ettema, Gertjan; de Koning, Jos J; Rognstad, Asgeir Bakken; Hoset, Martin; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2014-08-01

    This study analyzed the biomechanical and physiological effects of the arm swing in roller ski skating, and compared leg-skating (i.e. ski skating without poles) using a pronounced arm swing (SWING) with leg-skating using locked arms (LOCKED). Sixteen elite male cross-country skiers performed submaximal stages at 10, 15 and 20kmh(-1) on a 2% inclined treadmill in the two techniques. SWING demonstrated higher peak push-off forces and a higher force impulse at all speeds, but a longer cycle length only at the highest speed (all Pski skating increases the ski forces and aerobic energy cost at low and moderate speeds, whereas the greater forces at high speed lead to a longer cycle length and smaller anaerobic contribution.

  6. [Magnesium: physiological aspects and its implication in normal and preeclamptic pregnancies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Ana Carolina; Díaz, Eulises; Halhali, Ali

    2004-01-01

    The present work provides information about magnesium (Mg) physiology, Mg supplementation during normal pregnancy, and the use of Magnesium Sulfate MgSO4 in preeclampsia and eclampsia. Intestinal absorption, renal excretion and cellular distribution of Mg are described. In addition, this review includes several functions in which Mg is involved such as bone structure, enzymatical activities, cellular signaling, ionic channel regulation and gene expression. Furthermore, Mg supplementation for the prevention of preterm delivery, low birth weight, and preeclampsia are discussed. Results about the use of MgSO4 as treatment of preeclampsia and eclampsia are also revised. Finally, the effects of Mg upon the synthesis, secretion and/or action of vasoactive factors involved in blood pressure and uteroplacental flux regulation are described.

  7. Aspects of the physiology and biochemistry of some plants existing under the influence of atmosphere pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionescu, A.; Grou, E.

    1971-01-01

    The vegetation of the Copsa Mica(Romania) zone is often visibly affected by the noxious elements existing in the atmosphere, especially sulfur dioxide. Comparative investigations were undertaken to examine some physiological and biochemical processes in plants from polluted as well as control zones. Water content (total and fractions of free and bound water), stomata condition and hydrogen ion concentration in cellular sap were analyzed; the results of these analyses showed that at the level of all the studied processes, modifications occur, which are sometimes substantial. In laboratory experiments with Pelargonium plants grown in an atmosphere containing sulfur dioxide, a foliar symptomatology was obtained, as well as a chromatogram of free amino acids different to that of controls

  8. PRONUNCIATION LANGUAGE SUBSYSTEM AND EEG-CORRELATES OF FOREIGN SPEECH PERCEPTION (PSYCHOACOUSTIC AND PHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Evgenevna Deryagina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to identification of psychoacoustic differences between languages of Roman, Germanic and Slavic groups, as factors that hinder the learning of foreign languages and EEG-correlates of perception and recognition of foreign speech, as the process of communication. We used theoretico- methodological analysis of psycholinguistic data, psychoacoustic and physiological (own studies. It was determined that the acoustic characteristics of foreign speech affect cerebration and form s of its functioning through the auditory sensory system. Prosodic and articulatory system of the native language has a significant influence on the perception of foreign speech. Patterns of foreign language speech perception are based on different functions of the cerebral hemispheres. Differences in hemispheric organization of the brain can have a significant impact on the effectiveness of learning languages belonging to the Roman, Germanic and Slavic groups, having acoustic and rhythmical-melodic features.

  9. Physiological and morphological aspects of Aedes aegypti developing larvae: effects of the chitin synthesis inhibitor novaluron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnesi, Luana C; Brito, José M; Linss, Jutta G; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; Valle, Denise; Rezende, Gustavo L

    2012-01-01

    Population control of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is difficult due to many reasons, one being the development of resistance to neurotoxic insecticides employed. The biosynthesis of chitin, a major constituent of insect cuticle, is a novel target for population control. Novaluron is a benzoylphenylurea (BPU) that acts as a chitin synthesis inhibitor, already used against mosquitoes. However, information regarding BPU effects on immature mosquito stages and physiological parameters related with mosquito larval development are scarce. A set of physiological parameters were recorded in control developing larvae and novaluron was administered continuously to Ae. aegypti larvae, since early third instar. Larval instar period duration was recorded from third instar until pupation. Chitin content was measured during third and fourth instars. Fourth instars were processed histochemically at the mesothorax region, stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) for assessment of internal tissues, and labeled with WGA-FITC to reveal chitinized structures. In control larvae: i) there is a chitin content increase during both third and fourth instars where late third instars contain more chitin than early fourth instars; ii) thoracic organs and a continuous cuticle, closely associated with the underlying epidermis were observed; iii) chitin was continuously present throughout integument cuticle. Novaluron treatment inhibited adult emergence, induced immature mortality, altered adult sex ratio and caused delay in larval development. Moreover, novaluron: i) significantly affected chitin content during larval development; ii) induced a discontinuous and altered cuticle in some regions while epidermis was often thinner or missing; iii) rendered chitin cuticle presence discontinuous and less evident. In both control and novaluron larvae, chitin was present in the peritrophic matrix. This study showed quantitatively and qualitatively evidences of novaluron effects on Ae

  10. Physiological and morphological aspects of Aedes aegypti developing larvae: effects of the chitin synthesis inhibitor novaluron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana C Farnesi

    Full Text Available Population control of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is difficult due to many reasons, one being the development of resistance to neurotoxic insecticides employed. The biosynthesis of chitin, a major constituent of insect cuticle, is a novel target for population control. Novaluron is a benzoylphenylurea (BPU that acts as a chitin synthesis inhibitor, already used against mosquitoes. However, information regarding BPU effects on immature mosquito stages and physiological parameters related with mosquito larval development are scarce. A set of physiological parameters were recorded in control developing larvae and novaluron was administered continuously to Ae. aegypti larvae, since early third instar. Larval instar period duration was recorded from third instar until pupation. Chitin content was measured during third and fourth instars. Fourth instars were processed histochemically at the mesothorax region, stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE for assessment of internal tissues, and labeled with WGA-FITC to reveal chitinized structures. In control larvae: i there is a chitin content increase during both third and fourth instars where late third instars contain more chitin than early fourth instars; ii thoracic organs and a continuous cuticle, closely associated with the underlying epidermis were observed; iii chitin was continuously present throughout integument cuticle. Novaluron treatment inhibited adult emergence, induced immature mortality, altered adult sex ratio and caused delay in larval development. Moreover, novaluron: i significantly affected chitin content during larval development; ii induced a discontinuous and altered cuticle in some regions while epidermis was often thinner or missing; iii rendered chitin cuticle presence discontinuous and less evident. In both control and novaluron larvae, chitin was present in the peritrophic matrix. This study showed quantitatively and qualitatively evidences of novaluron effects

  11. Advances in dietary fibre characterisation. 1. Definition of dietary fibre, physiological relevance, health benefits and analytical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champ, Martine; Langkilde, Anna-Maria; Brouns, Fred; Kettlitz, Bernd; Collet, Yves Le Bail

    2003-06-01

    Since 1953, the definition of 'dietary fibre' (DF) has evolved significantly following an international debate based on analytical progress, new nutritional and physiological knowledge and also private interests of the food industry. The overall tendency is towards an extension of the definition by including resistant starches as well as non-digestible oligosaccharides. This broadened definition is indeed based on physiological considerations as these compounds are not digested in the small intestine and become substrates for the colonic microflora, resulting in fermentation products that have a variety of local and possibly also systemic effects. A main reluctance to use this definition, however, is linked to the difficulty to quantify, with a universal method, the various compounds that fulfil the characteristics defined by this broad definition. At this point, if such a definition were adopted, there are two options, not necessarily antagonistic, which would be (1) to sum the content of NSP, resistant starches and non-digestible oligosaccharides quantified by distinct methods or (2) to use the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) method of DF analysis (AOAC 985.29, 991.43) with complementary analyses of the different non-digestible oligosaccharides likely to be present in the food. With none of these solutions being fully satisfying from a scientific but also from a practical point of view, an innovative method has to be proposed within the next decade. The present review describes the various types of DF, effects of DF consumption on physiology and metabolism, past and current definitions, analytical aspects to measure DF and some aspects of DF claims and food labelling.

  12. Physiological and Molecular Aspects of Tolerance to Environmental Constraints in Grain and Forage Legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnane Bargaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the agronomical and environmental advantages of the cultivation of legumes, their production is limited by various environmental constraints such as water or nutrient limitation, frost or heat stress and soil salinity, which may be the result of pedoclimatic conditions, intensive use of agricultural lands, decline in soil fertility and environmental degradation. The development of more sustainable agroecosystems that are resilient to environmental constraints will therefore require better understanding of the key mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to abiotic constraints. This review provides highlights of legume tolerance to abiotic constraints with a focus on soil nutrient deficiencies, drought, and salinity. More specifically, recent advances in the physiological and molecular levels of the adaptation of grain and forage legumes to abiotic constraints are discussed. Such adaptation involves complex multigene controlled-traits which also involve multiple sub-traits that are likely regulated under the control of a number of candidate genes. This multi-genetic control of tolerance traits might also be multifunctional, with extended action in response to a number of abiotic constraints. Thus, concrete efforts are required to breed for multifunctional candidate genes in order to boost plant stability under various abiotic constraints.

  13. The Epithelial-Mesenchymal Interactions: Insights into Physiological and Pathological Aspects of Oral Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, Arvind Babu Rajendra; Jones, Thaon Jon

    2014-01-01

    In the human biological system, the individual cells divide and form tissues and organs. These tissues are hetero-cellular. Basically any tissue consists of an epithelium and the connective tissue. The latter contains mainly mesenchymally-derived tissues with a diversified cell population. The cell continues to grow and differentiate in a pre-programmed manner using a messenger system. The epithelium and the mesenchymal portion of each tissue have two different origins and perform specific functions, but there is a well-defined interaction mechanism, which mediates between them. Epithelial mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) are part of this mechanism, which can be regarded as a biological conversation between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations involved in the cellular differentiation of one or both cell populations. EMIs represent a process that is essential for cell growth, cell differentiation and cell multiplication. EMIs are associated with normal physiological processes in the oral cavity, such as odontogenesis, dentino-enamel junction formation, salivary gland development, palatogenesis, and also pathological processes, such as oral cancer. This paper focuses the role EMIs in odontogenesis, salivary gland development, palatogenesis and oral cancer. PMID:25992230

  14. [RELATIONSHIPS IN THE "NORTHERN FULMAR (FULMAR US GLACIALIS)--TETRABOTHRIUS MINOR (CESTODA: TETRABOTHRIIDAE)" SYSTEM: PHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklina, M M

    2015-01-01

    Relationships between the northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis L., 1761) and cestodes Tetrabothrius minor Loennberg, 1893 (Cestoda: Tetrabothriidae) were studied. The results of calculation of the number of tapeworms in different parts (proximal, medial and distal) of bird intestines are represented. Parameters of protein metabolism in the northern fulmar and cestodes T. minor were investigated. Activity of proteases in different parts of northern fulmar intestine and in the strobila of T. minor was determined. Digestion processes occurring on digestive-absorptive surfaces of the intestine of the northern fulmar and of cestodes were studied. Biochemical indices of blood plasma of the northern fulmar were analyzed in relation to the intensity of invasion and the stage parasite maturation. The highest indices of the invasion of the northern fulmar with T. minor were recorded in the proximal part if the intestine. It was shown that the preferred localization of tapeworms in the proximal department of the intestine was determined by abundance of food and high activity of digestive enzymes in this place. Active hydrolysis of proteins in the intestine of the northern fulmar and on tegument surfaces of T. minor occurred mainly during the process of cavernous digestion. To a greater extent, the physiological state of the northern fulmar depended on the intensity of invasion and on the maturation stage of tapeworms.

  15. Physiological and Molecular Aspects of Tolerance to Environmental Constraints in Grain and Forage Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnane, Bargaz; Mainassara, Zaman-Allah; Mohamed, Farissi; Mohamed, Lazali; Jean-Jacques, Drevon; Rim, Maougal T; Georg, Carlsson

    2015-08-13

    Despite the agronomical and environmental advantages of the cultivation of legumes, their production is limited by various environmental constraints such as water or nutrient limitation, frost or heat stress and soil salinity, which may be the result of pedoclimatic conditions, intensive use of agricultural lands, decline in soil fertility and environmental degradation. The development of more sustainable agroecosystems that are resilient to environmental constraints will therefore require better understanding of the key mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to abiotic constraints. This review provides highlights of legume tolerance to abiotic constraints with a focus on soil nutrient deficiencies, drought, and salinity. More specifically, recent advances in the physiological and molecular levels of the adaptation of grain and forage legumes to abiotic constraints are discussed. Such adaptation involves complex multigene controlled-traits which also involve multiple sub-traits that are likely regulated under the control of a number of candidate genes. This multi-genetic control of tolerance traits might also be multifunctional, with extended action in response to a number of abiotic constraints. Thus, concrete efforts are required to breed for multifunctional candidate genes in order to boost plant stability under various abiotic constraints.

  16. Physiological and hormonal aspects in female domestic pigeons (Columba livia) associated with breeding stage and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X Y; Zhang, M; Jia, Y X; Zou, X T

    2013-10-01

    The present study examined the changes in serum biochemical values, hormone profiles and ovary prolactin receptor (PRLR) gene expression occurring in female domestic pigeons (Columba livia) under different breeding status and experience. The egg-laying pigeons had lower calcium, total protein, albumin, prolactin levels and higher oestrogen levels than those of incubating birds (p < 0.05). First-time breeders had higher (p < 0.05) progesterone levels and lower (p < 0.05) prolactin levels than that of experienced ones. The levels of oestrogen and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) increased with age (p < 0.05). The very old birds showed a pronounced increase (p < 0.05) in PRL, FSH and progesterone and a little decrease in oestrogen. Serum prolactin level was not correlated with the ovary PRLR mRNA expression pattern among all the pigeons. Results showed that serum physiological profile of female pigeons was correlated with breeding status, whereas reproductive hormone levels were correlated with advancing breeding experience. It was concluded that female pigeons had a good ability of recovering from nutrient loss after each breeding attempts, and the degradation of reproductive performance might be attributed to changes in the endocrine system.

  17. The redox control of photorespiration: from biochemical and physiological aspects to biotechnological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keech, Olivier; Gardeström, Per; Kleczkowski, Leszek A; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2016-01-21

    Photorespiration is a complex and tightly regulated process occurring in photosynthetic organisms. This process can alter the cellular redox balance, notably via the production and consumption of both reducing and oxidizing equivalents. Under certain circumstances, these equivalents, as well as reactive oxygen or nitrogen species, can become prominent in subcellular compartments involved in the photorespiratory process, eventually promoting oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins. Keeping these changes under tight control should therefore be of primary importance. In order to review the current state of knowledge about the redox control of photorespiration, we primarily performed a careful description of the known and potential redox-regulated or oxidation sensitive photorespiratory proteins, and examined in more details two interesting cases: the glycerate kinase and the glycine cleavage system. When possible, the potential impact and subsequent physiological regulations associated with these changes have been discussed. In a second part, we reviewed the extent to which photorespiration contributes to cellular redox homeostasis considering, in particular, the set of peripheral enzymes associated with the canonical photorespiratory pathway. Finally, some recent biotechnological strategies to circumvent photorespiration for future growth improvements are discussed in the light of these redox regulations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. The epithelial-mesenchymal interactions: insights into physiological and pathological aspects of oral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, Arvind Babu Rajendra; Jones, Thaon Jon

    2014-03-17

    In the human biological system, the individual cells divide and form tissues and organs. These tissues are hetero-cellular. Basically any tissue consists of an epithelium and the connective tissue. The latter contains mainly mesenchymally-derived tissues with a diversified cell population. The cell continues to grow and differentiate in a pre-programmed manner using a messenger system. The epithelium and the mesenchymal portion of each tissue have two different origins and perform specific functions, but there is a well-defined interaction mechanism, which mediates between them. Epithelial mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) are part of this mechanism, which can be regarded as a biological conversation between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations involved in the cellular differentiation of one or both cell populations. EMIs represent a process that is essential for cell growth, cell differentiation and cell multiplication. EMIs are associated with normal physiological processes in the oral cavity, such as odontogenesis, dentino-enamel junction formation, salivary gland development, palatogenesis, and also pathological processes, such as oral cancer. This paper focuses the role EMIs in odontogenesis, salivary gland development, palatogenesis and oral cancer.

  19. The epithelial-mesenchymal interactions: insights into physiological and pathological aspects of oral tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Babu Rajendra Santosh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the human biological system, the individual cells divide and form tissues and organs. These tissues are hetero-cellular. Basically any tissue consists of an epithelium and the connective tissue. The latter contains mainly mesenchymally-derived tissues with a diversified cell population. The cell continues to grow and differentiate in a pre-programmed manner using a messenger system. The epithelium and the mesenchymal portion of each tissue have two different origins and perform specific functions, but there is a well-defined interaction mechanism, which mediates between them. Epithelial mesenchymal interactions (EMIs are part of this mechanism, which can be regarded as a biological conversation between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations involved in the cellular differentiation of one or both cell populations. EMIs represent a process that is essential for cell growth, cell differentiation and cell multiplication. EMIs are associated with normal physiological processes in the oral cavity, such as odontogenesis, dentino-enamel junction formation, salivary gland development, palatogenesis, and also pathological processes, such as oral cancer. This paper focuses the role EMIs in odontogenesis, salivary gland development, palatogenesis and oral cancer.

  20. [Spectacle lenses in sports: optimization of the imaging properties based on physiological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becken, Wolfgang; Seidemann, Anne; Altheimer, Helmut; Esser, Gregor; Uttenweiler, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    The goal of correction spectacles is to create a sharp image on the retina by the combined optical system of the eye and the spectacle lens for a given ametropia. As a matter of principle, in this optical system an aberration free correction can be achieved in the optical centre of the spectacle lens, but not over the entire range of gaze angles. In spectacle optics large angles play an important role, different from paraxial optics where only rays close to the axis with small angles of incidence are relevant. This generates additional aberrations, the so-called oblique astigmatism, which can only be compensated at the expense of the spherical power. Therefore, every spectacle lens represents apart from the main visual point-, a more or less good compromise. For sports lenses in the currently used curved frames, an additional challenge arises from the fact that their orientation in front of the eye is generally not perpendicular to the principal gaze direction but tilted. In this article the imaging properties of such tilted sports lenses are discussed, and it is described why this results in a minor quality without a specific consideration of the obliqueness. The fact that tilted sports spectacles are also able to possess an improved correction behaviour for all gaze angles is due to individual mathematical optimization methods. The aim of the present article is, based on the underlying physical and physiological effects, to point out the advantages of individually optimized sports spectacle lenses in comparison to tilted lenses generated without applying this sophisticated computational method.

  1. Sperm preparation: state-of-the-art-physiological aspects and application of advanced sperm preparation methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ralf Henkel

    2012-01-01

    For assisted reproduction technologies (ART),numerous techniques were developed to isolate spermatozoa capable of fertilizing oocytes.While early methodologies only focused on isolating viable,motile spermatozoa,with progress of ART,particularly intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI),it became clear that these parameters are insufficient for the identification of the most suitable spermatozoon for fertilization.Conventional sperm preparation techniques,namely,swim-up,density gradient centrifugation and glass wool filtration,are not efficient enough to produce sperm populations free of DNA damage,because these techniques are not physiological and not modeled on the stringent sperm selection processes taking place in the female genital tract.These processes only allow one male germ cell out of tens of millions to fuse with the oocyte.Sites of sperm selection in the female genital tract are the cervix,uterus,uterotubal junction,oviduct,cumulus oophorus and the zona pellucida.Newer strategies of sperm preparation are founded on:(i) morphological assessment by means of‘motile sperm organelle morphological examination (MSOME)'; (ii) electrical charge; and (iii) molecular binding characteristics of the sperm cell.Whereas separation methods based on electrical charge take advantage of the sperm's adherence to a test tube surface or separate in an electrophoresis,molecular binding techniques use Annexin V or hyaluronic acid (HA) as substrates.Techniques in this category are magnet-activated cell sorting,Annexin V-activated glass wool filtration,flow cytometry and picked spermatozoa for ICSI (PICSI) from HA-coated dishes and HA-containing media.Future developments may include Raman microspectrometry,confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic microscopy and polarization microscopy.

  2. Anatomical, functional, physiological and behavioural aspects of the development of mastication in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Révérend, Benjamin J D; Edelson, Lisa R; Loret, Chrystel

    2014-02-01

    Mastication efficiency is defined as the efficiency of crushing food between the teeth and manipulating the resulting particles to form a swallowable food bolus. It is dependent on the orofacial anatomical features of the subject, the coordination of these anatomical features and the consistency of the food used during testing. Different measures have been used to indirectly quantify mastication efficiency as a function of children's age such as observations, food bolus characterisation, muscle activity measurement and jaw movement tracking. In the present review, we aim to describe the changes in the oral physiology (e.g. bone and muscle structure, teeth and soft tissues) of children and how these changes are associated with mastication abilities. We also review previous work on the effect of food consistency on children's mastication abilities and on their level of texture acceptance. The lack of reference foods and differences in testing methodologies across different studies do not allow us to draw conclusions about (1) the age at which mastication efficiency reaches maturity and (2) the effect of food consistency on the establishment of mature mastication efficiency. The effect of food consistency on the development of children's mastication efficiency has not been tested widely. However, both human and animal studies have reported the effect of food consistency on orofacial development, suggesting that a diet with harder textures enhances bone and muscle growth, which could indirectly lead to better mastication efficiency. Finally, it was also reported that (1) children are more likely to accept textures that they are able to manipulate and (2) early exposure to a range of textures facilitates the acceptance of foods of various textures later on. Recommending products well adapted to children's mastication during weaning could facilitate their acceptance of new textures and support the development of healthy eating habits.

  3. Physiology of immunity in the water flea Daphnia magna: environmental and genetic aspects of phenoloxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucklow, Patrick T; Ebert, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the ecological correlates of immunocompetence in Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera), we tested for variation in immune function in relation to feeding conditions, host conditions, and host genotype. We investigated both phenotypic (environmental dependent and condition dependent) as well as genotypic aspects of the prophenoloxidase activating system (Pro-POAS), which has been described as a key factor in invertebrate immunity. Daphnia magna is an ideal study system to disentangle phenotypic and genetic variation because females can reproduce clonally. Well-fed Daphnia showed higher phenoloxidase (PO) activity than Daphnia kept at a low food level. Wounding provoked a higher level of PO activity, indicating that the Pro-POAS was condition dependent. Further, we found clonal variation in PO activity among four clones of D. magna isolated from four different populations. The same four clones were tested for their resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. High resistance corresponded to high PO activity. Our results suggest adaptive variation in PO activity and suggest that its expression is costly. These costs may influence the evolution of the PO activity level and the maintenance of its genotypic variation.

  4. Effect of seedling age and water depth on morphological and physiological aspects of transplanted rice under high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KHAKWANI Abdul Aziz; SHIRAISHI Masaaki; ZUBAIR Muhammad; BALOCH Mohammad Safdar; NAVEED Khalid; AWAN Inayatullah

    2005-01-01

    To study the effect of high temperature, rice seedlings 20, 30, 40 and 50 d were kept at 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm water depth in a water pool. Meteorological findings indicated that water temperature varied up to 10 cm but became stable below this depth.Deep water inflicted higher tiller mortality, minimal increase in dry weight of aerial parts and leaf area, decrease in root length, and decrease in root dry weight especially at 20 cm water depth and produced an unbalanced T/R ratio (top versus root dry weight).However, deep water tended to increase plant length. These parameters, however, excel in shallow water. Older seedlings, with the exception of root dry weight, could not perform well compared to young seedlings in all physiological and morphological aspects.The study revealed that seedlings, particularly young ones, stand well in shallow water and can cope with high temperature.

  5. Load carriage using packs: a review of physiological, biomechanical and medical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, J; Harman, E; Reynolds, K

    1996-06-01

    This paper reviews the biomedical aspects of transporting loads in packs and offers suggestions for improving load-carriage capability. Locating the load mass as close as possible to the body center of gravity appears to result in the lowest energy cost when carrying a pack. Thus, the double pack (half the load on the front of the body and half the load on the back) has a lower energy cost than the backpack. However, backpacks provide greater versatility in most situations. The energy cost of walking with backpack loads increases progressively with increases in load mass, body mass, walking speed or grade; type of terrain also influences energy cost. Predictive equations have been developed for estimating the energy cost of carrying loads during locomotion but these may not be accurate for prolonged (>2 h) or downhill carriage. Training with loads can result in greater energy efficiency since walking with backpack loads over several weeks decreases energy cost. Load-carriage speed can be increased with physical training that involves regular running and resistance training. Erector spinae electrical activity (EMG) is lower during load carriage than in unloaded walking until loads exceed 30-40 kg, at which point erector spinae EMG activity is higher than during unloaded walking. EMGs of the quadriceps and gastrocnemius, but not the tibialis anterior or hamstrings, increase with load. Framed packs with hip belts reduce the electrical activity of the trapezius muscles, presumably by shifting forces from the shoulders to the hips. Increases in the backpack load mass result in increases in forces exerted on the grounds, amount of knee flexion and the forward inclination of the trunk. Compared to backpacks, double packs produce fewer deviations from normal walking. Common injuries associated with prolonged load carriage include foot blisters, stress fractures, back strains, metatarsalgia (foot pain), rucksack palsy (shoulder traction injury) and knee pain. Closed

  6. Current Advances in the Biochemical and Physiological Aspects of the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Thiazolidinediones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán-González-Duhart, D.; Tamay-Cach, F.; Álvarez-Almazán, S.

    2016-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current advances in the biochemical and physiological aspects in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) with thiazolidinediones (TZDs). DM2 is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, triggering the abnormal activation of physiological pathways such as glucose autooxidation, polyol's pathway, formation of advance glycation end (AGE) products, and glycolysis, leading to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory cytokines, which are responsible for the micro- and macrovascular complications of the disease. The treatment of DM2 has been directed toward the reduction of hyperglycemia using different drugs such as insulin sensitizers, as the case of TZDs, which are able to lower blood glucose levels and circulating triglycerides by binding to the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as full agonists. When TZDs interact with PPARγ, the receptor regulates the transcription of different genes involved in glucose homeostasis, insulin resistance, and adipogenesis. However, TZDs exhibit some adverse effects such as fluid retention, weight gain, hepatotoxicity, plasma-volume expansion, hemodilution, edema, bone fractures, and congestive heart failure, which limits their use in DM2 patients. PMID:27313601

  7. Comparing the Local Climate Change and its Effects on Physiological Aspects and Yield of Ramie Cultivated in Different Biophysical Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Subandi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Three experiments in three different biophysical environments were conducted in Jatinangor, Sumedang District, Jatitujuh. Majalengka District and Bandung District of West Java Province, Indonesia. The experiment were conducted to evaluate the environments, seasons, manure, nitrogen and potassium effect on the physiological aspects and yield of ramie plant (Boehmerianivea L. Gaud.The locations diverse at different elevation, rainfall type and soil type and atmospheric regimes. The experiments passed the years 2000-2001. The experiment in Sumedang regency was continued with two other experiments in 2007, and experiment in Bandung district was conducted in 2014.The field experiments design used in all the locations were randomized block design arranged in factorial pattern with two factors and two replications. Climatic analysis is done by comparing the atmospheric data of 2000-2001 and the data of 2002-2007 and the data of 2014. Assumed that all the local atmospheric data are atmospheric data under influence of climatic global change. Results of the experiments were: Jatitujuh region is not suitable for ramie cultivation. Dosage of waterw3=35%-40% of Field Capacity affecting sufficient growth on plant.The minimum dosage at which plant survive to produce yield is representing the most efficient input of production.Water supply for ramie plant could be designed to the most efficient volume to maintain the need of metabolism.

  8. "The Queen Has Been Dreadfully Shocked": Aspects of Teaching Experimental Physiology Using Animals in Britain, 1876-1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the impact of legislation on animal experimentation that has been in effect since 1876 in Great Britain. Focuses on the impact of these laws on the teaching of practical physiology to undergraduate students. Contains 26 references. (DDR)

  9. "The Queen Has Been Dreadfully Shocked": Aspects of Teaching Experimental Physiology Using Animals in Britain, 1876-1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the impact of legislation on animal experimentation that has been in effect since 1876 in Great Britain. Focuses on the impact of these laws on the teaching of practical physiology to undergraduate students. Contains 26 references. (DDR)

  10. The role of glucagon-like peptide 1 in glucose homeostasis and in other aspects of human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franek, Edward; Gajos, Grzegorz; Gumprecht, Janusz; Kretowski, Adam; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara; Małecki, Maciej T

    2009-11-01

    This paper reviews the structure, function, and pathophysiology of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). It describes the physiology and pathophysiology of the incretin axis, of which GLP-1 is a component, as well as the biosynthesis, secretion, activity, and degradation of this intestinal hormone. Effects of GLP-1 on the endocrine function of the pancreas, cardiovascular system, central nervous system, and on water-electrolyte balance have been also presented.

  11. Unraveling the role of dark septate endophyte (DSE) colonizing maize (Zea mays) under cadmium stress: physiological, cytological and genic aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-ling Wang; Tao Li; Gao-yuan Liu; Joshua M. Smith; Zhi-wei Zhao

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that plant root-associated fungi such as dark septate endophytes (DSE) can help plants overcome many biotic and abiotic stresses, of great interest is DSE-plant metal tolerance and alleviation capabilities on contaminated soils. However, the tolerance and alleviation mechanisms involved have not yet been elucidated. In the current study, the regulation and physiological response of Zea mays to its root-associated DSE, Exophiala pisciphila was analyzed under...

  12. Karyological, biochemical, and physiological aspects of Callophysus macropterus (Siluriformes, Pimelodidae from the Solimões and Negro Rivers (Central Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez-Gil H.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Karyological characteristics, i.e., diploid number, chromosome morphology and nucleolus organizer regions (NORs, biochemical characteristics, i.e., electrophoretic analysis of blood hemoglobin and the tissue enzymes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, malate dehydrogenase (MDH, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, and phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI, and physiological characteristics, i.e., relative concentration of hemoglobin and intraerythrocytic concentrations of organic phosphates were analyzed for the species Callophysus macropterus collected from Marchantaria Island (white water system - Solimões River and Anavilhanas Archipelago (black water system - Negro River. Karyological and biochemical data did not reveal significant differences between specimens collected at the two sites. However, the relative distribution of hemoglobin bands I and III (I = 16.33 ± 1.05 and III = 37.20 ± 1.32 for Marchantaria specimens and I = 6.33 ± 1.32 and III = 48.05 ± 1.55 for Anavilhanas specimens and levels of intraerythrocytic GTP (1.32 ± 0.16 and 2.76 ± 0.18 for Marchantaria and Anavilhanas specimens, respectively, but not ATP or total phosphate, were significantly different, indicating a physiological adaptation to the environmental conditions of these habitats. It is suggested that C. macropterus specimens from the two collecting sites belong to a single population, and that they adjusted some physiological characteristics to adapt to local environmental conditions.

  13. Unraveling the role of dark septate endophyte (DSE) colonizing maize (Zea mays) under cadmium stress: physiological, cytological and genic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-ling; Li, Tao; Liu, Gao-yuan; Smith, Joshua M; Zhao, Zhi-wei

    2016-02-25

    A growing body of evidence suggests that plant root-associated fungi such as dark septate endophytes (DSE) can help plants overcome many biotic and abiotic stresses, of great interest is DSE-plant metal tolerance and alleviation capabilities on contaminated soils. However, the tolerance and alleviation mechanisms involved have not yet been elucidated. In the current study, the regulation and physiological response of Zea mays to its root-associated DSE, Exophiala pisciphila was analyzed under increased soil Cd stress (0, 10, 50, 100 mg kg(-1)). Under Cd stress, DSE inoculation significantly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and low-molecular weight antioxidants, while also inducing increased Cd accumulation in the cell wall and conversion of Cd into inactive forms by shoot and root specific regulation of genes related to metal uptake, translocation and chelation. Our results showed that DSE colonization resulted in a marked tolerance to Cd, with a significant decrease in cadmium phytotoxicity and a significant increase in maize growth by triggering antioxidant systems, altering metal chemical forms into inactive Cd, and repartitioning subcellular Cd into the cell wall. These results provide comprehensive evidence for the mechanisms by which DSE colonization bioaugments Cd tolerance in maize at physiological, cytological and molecular levels.

  14. Unraveling the role of dark septate endophyte (DSE) colonizing maize (Zea mays) under cadmium stress: physiological, cytological and genic aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-ling; Li, Tao; Liu, Gao-yuan; Smith, Joshua M.; Zhao, Zhi-wei

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that plant root-associated fungi such as dark septate endophytes (DSE) can help plants overcome many biotic and abiotic stresses, of great interest is DSE-plant metal tolerance and alleviation capabilities on contaminated soils. However, the tolerance and alleviation mechanisms involved have not yet been elucidated. In the current study, the regulation and physiological response of Zea mays to its root-associated DSE, Exophiala pisciphila was analyzed under increased soil Cd stress (0, 10, 50, 100 mg kg−1). Under Cd stress, DSE inoculation significantly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and low-molecular weight antioxidants, while also inducing increased Cd accumulation in the cell wall and conversion of Cd into inactive forms by shoot and root specific regulation of genes related to metal uptake, translocation and chelation. Our results showed that DSE colonization resulted in a marked tolerance to Cd, with a significant decrease in cadmium phytotoxicity and a significant increase in maize growth by triggering antioxidant systems, altering metal chemical forms into inactive Cd, and repartitioning subcellular Cd into the cell wall. These results provide comprehensive evidence for the mechanisms by which DSE colonization bioaugments Cd tolerance in maize at physiological, cytological and molecular levels. PMID:26911444

  15. Unraveling the role of dark septate endophyte (DSE) colonizing maize (Zea mays) under cadmium stress: physiological, cytological and genic aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Ling; Li, Tao; Liu, Gao-Yuan; Smith, Joshua M.; Zhao, Zhi-Wei

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that plant root-associated fungi such as dark septate endophytes (DSE) can help plants overcome many biotic and abiotic stresses, of great interest is DSE-plant metal tolerance and alleviation capabilities on contaminated soils. However, the tolerance and alleviation mechanisms involved have not yet been elucidated. In the current study, the regulation and physiological response of Zea mays to its root-associated DSE, Exophiala pisciphila was analyzed under increased soil Cd stress (0, 10, 50, 100 mg kg-1). Under Cd stress, DSE inoculation significantly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and low-molecular weight antioxidants, while also inducing increased Cd accumulation in the cell wall and conversion of Cd into inactive forms by shoot and root specific regulation of genes related to metal uptake, translocation and chelation. Our results showed that DSE colonization resulted in a marked tolerance to Cd, with a significant decrease in cadmium phytotoxicity and a significant increase in maize growth by triggering antioxidant systems, altering metal chemical forms into inactive Cd, and repartitioning subcellular Cd into the cell wall. These results provide comprehensive evidence for the mechanisms by which DSE colonization bioaugments Cd tolerance in maize at physiological, cytological and molecular levels.

  16. The Wrist Joint Complex: Anatomical, Physiological and Biomechanical Aspects, Characteristics, Classification, and Treatment of Distal Radius Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Medina Gonzalez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The distal radius fracture or wrist, is one of the most common fractures in children and in adults, especially in women. The causes are different, in the children is mainly due to sports injuries, the latter primarily related disorders including elderly osteoporosis. The aim of this work is to do review of the distal radial fracture in which elements of their history, different types of classifications and very updated aspects of the management of patients with this injury is included, including the use of external fixators. The authors address this issue with an extensive literature review and images and figures taken from the literature and made by the authors themselves.

  17. Evolution and challenges of dynamic global vegetation models for some aspects of plant physiology and elevated atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, L. F. C.; Arenque, B. C.; Aidar, S. T.; Moura, M. S. B.; Von Randow, C.; Tourigny, E.; Menezes, R. S. C.; Ometto, J. P. H. B.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) simulate surface processes such as the transfer of energy, water, CO2, and momentum between the terrestrial surface and the atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, carbon assimilation by vegetation, phenology, and land use change in scenarios of varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations. DGVMs increase the complexity and the Earth system representation when they are coupled with atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) or climate models. However, plant physiological processes are still a major source of uncertainty in DGVMs. The maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax), for example, has a direct impact over productivity in the models. This parameter is often underestimated or imprecisely defined for the various plant functional types (PFTs) and ecosystems. Vcmax is directly related to photosynthesis acclimation (loss of response to elevated CO2), a widely known phenomenon that usually occurs when plants are subjected to elevated atmospheric CO2 and might affect productivity estimation in DGVMs. Despite this, current models have improved substantially, compared to earlier models which had a rudimentary and very simple representation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions. In this paper, we describe this evolution through generations of models and the main events that contributed to their improvements until the current state-of-the-art class of models. Also, we describe some main challenges for further improvements to DGVMs.

  18. Evolution and challenges of dynamic global vegetation models for some aspects of plant physiology and elevated atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, L F C; Arenque, B C; Aidar, S T; Moura, M S B; Von Randow, C; Tourigny, E; Menezes, R S C; Ometto, J P H B

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) simulate surface processes such as the transfer of energy, water, CO2, and momentum between the terrestrial surface and the atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, carbon assimilation by vegetation, phenology, and land use change in scenarios of varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations. DGVMs increase the complexity and the Earth system representation when they are coupled with atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) or climate models. However, plant physiological processes are still a major source of uncertainty in DGVMs. The maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax), for example, has a direct impact over productivity in the models. This parameter is often underestimated or imprecisely defined for the various plant functional types (PFTs) and ecosystems. Vcmax is directly related to photosynthesis acclimation (loss of response to elevated CO2), a widely known phenomenon that usually occurs when plants are subjected to elevated atmospheric CO2 and might affect productivity estimation in DGVMs. Despite this, current models have improved substantially, compared to earlier models which had a rudimentary and very simple representation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions. In this paper, we describe this evolution through generations of models and the main events that contributed to their improvements until the current state-of-the-art class of models. Also, we describe some main challenges for further improvements to DGVMs.

  19. Very early passive cycling exercise in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients: physiological and safety aspects--a case series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy Camargo Pires-Neto

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Early mobilization can be performed in critically ill patients and improves outcomes. A daily cycling exercise started from day 5 after ICU admission is feasible and can enhance functional capacity after hospital discharge. In the present study we verified the physiological changes and safety of an earlier cycling intervention (< 72 hrs of mechanical ventilation in critical ill patients. METHODS: Nineteen hemodynamically stable and deeply sedated patients within the first 72 hrs of mechanical ventilation were enrolled in a single 20 minute passive leg cycling exercise using an electric cycle ergometer. A minute-by-minute evaluation of hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic variables was undertaken before, during and after the exercise. Analyzed variables included the following: cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, central venous blood oxygen saturation, respiratory rate and tidal volume, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and blood lactate levels. RESULTS: We enrolled 19 patients (42% male, age 55 ± 17 years, SOFA = 6 ± 3, SAPS3 score = 58 ± 13, PaO2/FIO2 = 223 ± 75. The median time of mechanical ventilation was 1 day (02, and 68% (n=13 of our patients required norepinephrine (maximum concentration = 0.47 µg.kg(-1.min(-1. There were no clinically relevant changes in any of the analyzed variables during the exercise, and two minor adverse events unrelated to hemodynamic instability were observed. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, this very early passive cycling exercise in sedated, critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients was considered safe and was not associated with significant alterations in hemodynamic, respiratory or metabolic variables even in those requiring vasoactive agents.

  20. Physiological aspects of seedling development of coffee grown under colored screens; Aspectos fisiologicos do desenvolvimento de mudas de cafe cultivadas sob telas de diferentes coloracoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrique, Paola de Castro; Alves, Jose Donizeti; Livramento, Darlan Einstein do, E-mail: jdalves@dbi.ufla.b, E-mail: delivramento@dbi.ufla.b [Universidade Federal de Lavras, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia; Deuner, Sidnei, E-mail: sidnei.deuner@cpac.embrapa.b [EMBRAPA Cerrados, Planaltina, DF (Brazil); Goulart, Patricia de Fatima Pereira, E-mail: patriciagoulart@unilavras.edu.b [Centro Universitario de Lavras, MG (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the physiological aspects of the development of coffee seedlings grown under colored screens with different spectral characteristics. Seedlings of Catucai Amarelo 2SL, in the stage known as 'orelha de onca', were arranged in a randomized block design, with five replicates, under structures individually covered with blue, white, gray, black or red screens with 50% shade. Four months after, evaluations were done for seedling growth, pigment content of the leaves, total soluble sugars and starch contents of the leaves and roots. The red screen was the most effective in promoting growth in four out of the seven studied traits: plant height, leaf area and leaf dry weight and total dry matter. For the other characteristics, there was no difference among the screens. The pigment analysis showed that, except for the gray screen, the other ones did not differ for this trait. In leaves, the red screen promoted higher levels of carbohydrates and starch. At the root, carbohydrate contents were higher under the red and black screens. Among the five screen colors, the red one was the most efficient in the production of coffee seedlings with higher vigor and quality, with outstanding carbohydrate contents and biomass. (author)

  1. The Effects of Cold Stress at Germination and Seedling Stages on Antioxidant Enzymes and Some Physiological Aspects of Chickpea (Cicer arientinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wanaei

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of cold stress on antioxidant enzymes and physiological characteristics in chickpea, two separate experiments were conducted at germination and seedling stages. Each experiment with six temperature levels (T1(control=15C°, T2=5C°, T3=0C°, T4=-5C°, T5=-10C° and T6=-15C° and three varieties (V1=Pirouz V2=ILC482 V3=Bivaniej was carried out in a randomized complete block design with three replications at controlled condition in crop physiological laboratory of Kurdistan university at 2009. The results showed that cold treatment increased Catalase and Peroxdase activity, cell membrane injury and H2O2 concentration significantly. The temperature -5C° treatment had the most influence on physiological traits. Based on germination stage trial, ILC482 was known as resistance cultivar and Pirouz showed highest sensitivity to cold treatments. There were positive and significant correlation between H2O2 concentration with Catalase (r = 0.98** and Peroxidase (r = 0.89** at germination stage. Peroxidase activity was about tenfold more of the Catalase activity. In general, the results showed that cold stress increased reactive oxygen species; these product lead to oxidative damages to cell membrane.

  2. The Effect of Group Counseling on Physiological Aspect of Self-care and HbA1C Level of Patients with Diabetes Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Seyedreza Mazlom; Mahbobeh Firooz; Farzane Hasanzade; Seyedali Kimiaee; Aliakbar Raoufsaeb

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most important underlying cause of death in diabetic patients is poor self-care. The effect of education on self-care promotion has been widely investigated; however, the advisory role and impact of the treatment team have been scarcely investigated.  Aim: Determining the effect of group counseling on the psychological aspect of self-care and level of glycosylated hemoglobin in the patients with diabetes type II. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 73 patients with type I...

  3. High cell density culture with S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D for IL-1β production: optimization, modeling, and physiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Carmine; Paciello, Lucia; de Alteriis, Elisabetta; Brambilla, Luca; Parascandola, Palma

    2015-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D, a strain auxotrophic for uracil belonging to the CEN.PK family of the yeast S. cerevisiae, was cultured in aerated fed-batch reactor as such and once transformed to express human interleukin-1β (IL-1β), aiming at obtaining high cell densities and optimizing IL-1β production. Three different exponentially increasing glucose feeding profiles were tested, all of them "in theory" promoting respiratory metabolism to obtain high biomass/product yield. A non-structured non-segregated model was developed to describe the performance of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D during the fed-batch process and, in particular, its capability to metabolize simultaneously glucose and ethanol which derived from the precedent batch growth. Our study showed that the proliferative capacity of the yeast population declined along the fed-batch run, as shown by the exponentially decreasing specific growth rates on glucose. Further, a shift towards fermentative metabolism occurred. This shift took place earlier the higher was the feed rate and was more pronounced in the case of the recombinant strain. Determination of some physiological markers (acetate production, intracellular ROS accumulation, catalase activity and cell viability) showed that neither poor oxygenation nor oxidative stress was responsible for the decreased specific growth rate, nor for the shift to fermentative metabolism.

  4. Human stefin B normal and patho-physiological role: molecular and cellular aspects of amyloid-type aggregation of certain EPM1 mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira ePolajnar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsies are characterised by abnormal electrophysiological activity of the brain. Among various types of inherited epilepsies different epilepsy syndromes, among them progressive myoclonus epilepsies with features of ataxia and neurodegeneration, are counted. The progressive myoclonus epilepsy of type 1 (EPM1, also known as Unverricht-Lundborg disease presents with features of cerebellar atrophy and increased oxidative stress. It has been found that EPM1 is caused by mutations in human cystatin B gene (human stefin B. We first describe the role of protein aggregation in other neurodegenerative conditions. Protein aggregates appear intraneurally but are also excreted, such as is the case with senile plaques of amyloid- β (Aβ that accumulate in the brain parenchyma and vessel walls. A common characteristic of such diseases is the change of the protein conformation towards β secondary structure that accounts for the strong tendency of such proteins to aggregate and form amyloid fibrils. Second, we describe the patho-physiology of EPM1 and the normal and aberrant roles of stefin B in a mouse model of the disease. Furthermore, we discuss how the increased protein aggregation observed with some of the mutants of human stefin B may relate to the neurodegeneration that occurs in rare EPM1 patients. Our hypothesis (Ceru et al., 2005 states that some of the EPM1 mutants of human stefin B may undergo aggregation in neural cells, thus gaining additional toxic function (apart from loss of normal function. Our in vitro experiments thus far have confirmed that 4 mutants undergo increased aggregation relative to the wild-type protein. It has been shown that the R68X mutant forms amyloid-fibrils very rapidly, even at neutral pH and forms perinuclear inclusions, whereas the G4R mutant exhibits a prolonged lag phase, during which the toxic prefibrillar aggregates accumulate and are scattered more diffusely over the cytoplasm. Initial experiments on the G50E

  5. Comparison of individual and combined effects of salinity and deficit irrigation on physiological, nutritional and ornamental aspects of tolerance in Callistemon laevis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Sara; Sánchez-Blanco, M Jesús

    2015-08-01

    The effect of water deficit, salinity and both applied simultaneously on several physiological and morphological parameters in the ornamental plant Callistemon laevis was studied to identify the tolerance mechanisms developed by this species to these sources of stress and to evaluate their adaptability to such conditions. C. laevis plants were grown in pots outdoors and subjected to four irrigation treatments lasting ten months: control (0.8 dS m(-1), 100% water holding capacity), water deficit (0.8 dS m(-1), 50% of the amount of water supplied in control), saline (4.0 dS m(-1), same amount of water supplied as control) and saline water deficit (4.0 dS m(-1), 50% of the water supplied in the control). Water and saline stress, when applied individually, led to a reduction of 12% and 39% of total biomass, respectively, while overall plant quality (leaf color and flowering) was unaffected. However, saline water deficit affected leaf color and flowering and induced an excessive decrease of growth (68%) due to leaf tissue dehydration and a high leaf Cl and Na concentration. Biomass partitioning depended not only on the amount of water applied, but also on the electrical conductivity of the water. Water stress induced active osmotic adjustment and decreased leaf tissue elasticity. Although both Na and Cl concentrations in the plant tissues increased with salinity, Cl entry through the roots was more restricted. In plants submitted to salinity individually, Na tended to remain in the roots and stems, and little reached the leaves. However, plants simultaneously submitted to water and saline stress were not able to retain this ion in the woody parts. The decrease in stomatal conductance and photosynthesis was more marked in the plants submitted to both stresses, the effect of which decreased photosynthesis, and this together with membrane damage delayed plant recovery. The results show that the combination of deficit irrigation and salinity in C. laevis is not recommended

  6. Physiological Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric D.

    The analysis of physiological sound in the peripheral auditory system solves three important problems. First, sound energy impinging on the head must be captured and presented to the transduction apparatus in the ear as a suitable mechanical signal; second, this mechanical signal needs to be transduced into a neural representation that can be used by the brain; third, the resulting neural representation needs to be analyzed by central neurons to extract information useful to the animal. This chapter provides an overview of some aspects of the first two of these processes. The description is entirely focused on the mammalian auditory system, primarily on human hearing and on the hearing of a few commonly used laboratory animals (mainly rodents and carnivores). Useful summaries of non-mammalian hearing are available [1]. Because of the large size of the literature, review papers are referenced wherever possible.

  7. Nasal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Contact ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > ANATOMY > Nasal Physiology Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy ...

  8. Physiological and biomechanical aspects of orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, U; Reilly, T

    1997-12-01

    Orienteering is an endurance running event which differs from other running sports both in its cognitive element and in the type of terrain encountered. The demands of overcoming this terrain are not manifest in significant differences between orienteers and road runners in somatotype, though elite female orienteers have consistently been shown to have higher levels of adiposity (> 19%) than elite road runners. High aerobic power in orienteers (up to 63 and 76 ml/kg/min in women and men, respectively) is coupled with lower anaerobic performance. While leg strength is generally not high when compared with other athletic specialties, female orienteers have relatively good leg flexion strength. The energy cost of running is greatly increased in rough terrain. Oxygen cost was 26% higher while running in a forest when compared with road running. Biomechanical differences in stride pattern contribute towards this increased demand. Despite the high energy demands during competition, orienteers pace themselves such that their mean heart rate remains within the range of 167 to 172 beats/min, despite large fluctuations. The rough terrain encountered in orienteering results not only in a high energy cost but also in a higher incidence of sport-specific injuries, particularly to the ankle. Minor injuries such as cuts and bruises are common during competition.

  9. Nominal aspect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    1991-01-01

    In a general way the notion 'aspect' can be defined as the way in which a property or relation is represented in some dimension. Two kinds of aspect can be distinguished: verbal and nominal aspect. The study of verbal aspect has a long tradition, but nominal aspect has only been introduced recently......, at least in the sense in which it is used here (Rijkhoff 1989b, 1990a, 1990b). After a brief look at the more familiar verbal aspects, each of the nominal aspects is discussed in some detail. Then the relevance of nominal aspect will be considered in connection with (i) certain 'number markers' (which...... will be analysed as nominal aspect markers below), (ii) noun-incorporation, and (iii) predicate nouns....

  10. Physiological Networks: towards systems physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-02-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate new dimensions to the field of systems physiology.

  11. Physiological mechanisms of prosociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonas G

    2017-08-12

    Psychophysiological perspectives can provide unique insights into the nature and motivations of children's prosociality and inform our understanding of individual differences. Here, I review current research on prosociality involving some of the most common physiological measures in developmental psychology, including cortisol, various sympathetic nervous system measures, and high-frequency heart rate variability. The literature has been quite mixed, in part because the link between physiology and prosociality is context-dependent and person-dependent. However, recent advances are refining our understanding of the basic physiological mechanisms of prosociality. Resting physiology that contributes to a balance of regulation and vigilance prepares children to effectively cope with future social challenges, like noticing and attending to the needs of others. Experiencing some arousal is an important aspect of empathy-related responding, but physiological patterns of both heightened and hypoarousal can undermine prosociality. Physiological flexibility in response to others' needs may support emotional and behavioral flexibility important for prosociality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Physiology for engineers applying engineering methods to physiological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to qualitative and quantitative aspects of human physiology. It looks at biological and physiological processes and phenomena, including a selection of mathematical models, showing how physiological problems can be mathematically formulated and studied. It also illustrates how a wide range of engineering and physics topics, including electronics, fluid dynamics, solid mechanics and control theory can be used to describe and understand physiological processes and systems. Throughout the text there are introductions to measuring and quantifying physiological processes using both signal and imaging technologies. Physiology for Engineers describes the basic structure and models of cellular systems, the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and provides an overview of the structure and function of the respiratory and nervous systems. It also includes an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of reacti...

  13. Light quality management in fruit orchards: physiological and technological aspects Manejo de la calidad de la luz en huertos frutales: Aspectos fisiológicos y tecnológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Bastías

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Light quality (sunlight spectrum management promises to provide a new technological alternative to sustainable production in horticultural crops. However, little information exists about physiological and technological aspects on light quality management in fruit crops. Sunlight composition changes widely in orchard canopies, inducing different plant responses in fruit trees mediated by phytochrome (PHY and cryptochrome (CRY activity. High proportion of far-red (FR in relation to red (R light increases shoot elongation, while blue (B light induces shoot dwarfing. Red and ultraviolet (UV light increases fruit skin anthocyanin synthesis, while FR light shows a negative effect. Red and B light can also alter leaf morpho-physiological traits in fruit trees, such palisade thickness, stomatal aperture, and chlorophyll content. Besides improvement of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR availability, the use of reflective films improves UV and R light proportion, with positive effects on PHY mediated-responses (fruit color, fruit weight, shoot growth, as reported in apple (Malus domestica Borkh., peach (Prunus persica (L. Batsch, and sweet cherry (Prunus avium (L. L.. Colored nets widely alter spectral light composition with effects on plant growth, yield, and quality in apple, kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa A. Chev. C.F. Liang & A.R. Ferguson, peach, and blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. orchards. Mechanisms of colored nets seem to be associated to photosynthetic and morphogenetic process regulated by PAR availability, R/B light proportion, and CRY activity. Alteration of light quality affects significantly fruit tree plant responses and could be a useful tool for sustainable (e.g. lower use of chemicals and labor-practices management of yield and quality in modern orchards.El manejo de la calidad de la luz (espectro de la luz solar promete proveer una nueva alternativa tecnológica para la producción sostenible de cultivos hortícolas. Sin

  14. Neuropeptide physiology in helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousley, Angela; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic worms come from two distinct, distant phyla, Nematoda (roundworms) and Platyhelminthes (flatworms). The nervous systems of worms from both phyla are replete with neuropeptides and there is ample physiological evidence that these neuropeptides control vital aspects of worm biology. In each phyla, the physiological evidence for critical roles for helminth neuropeptides is derived from both parasitic and free-living members. In the nematodes, the intestinal parasite Ascaris suum and the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans have yielded most of the data; in the platyhelminths, the most physiological data has come from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) have many varied effects (excitation, relaxation, or a combination) on somatic musculature, reproductive musculature, the pharynx and motor neurons in nematodes. Insulin-like peptides (INSs) play an essential role in nematode dauer formation and other developmental processes. There is also some evidence for a role in somatic muscle control for the somewhat heterogeneous grouping ofpeptides known as neuropeptide-like proteins (NLPs). In platyhelminths, as in nematodes, FLPs have a central role in somatic muscle function. Reports of FLP physiological action in platyhelminths are limited to a potent excitation of the somatic musculature. Platyhelminths are also abundantly endowed with neuropeptide Fs (NPFs), which appear absent from nematodes. There is not yet any data linking platyhelminth NPF to any particular physiological outcome, but this neuropeptide does potently and specifically inhibit cAMP accumulation in schistosomes. In nematodes and platyhelminths, there is an abundance of physiological evidence demonstrating that neuropeptides play critical roles in the biology of both free-living and parasitic helminths. While it is certainly true that there remains a great deal to learn about the biology of neuropeptides in both phyla, physiological evidence presently available points

  15. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  16. Reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Russman, S.E.; Ellis, David H.; Gee, George F.; Mirande, Claire M.

    1996-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the general pattern of avian physiology applies to cranes, we have identified many physiological mechanisms (e.g., effects of disturbance) that need further study. Studies with cranes are expensive compared to those done with domestic fowl because of the crane's larger size, low reproductive rate, and delayed sexual maturity. To summarize, the crane reproductive system is composed of physiological and anatomical elements whose function is controlled by an integrated neural-endocrine system. Males generally produce semen at a younger age than when females lay eggs. Eggs are laid in clutches of two (1 to 3), and females will lay additional clutches if the preceding clutches are removed. Both sexes build nests and incubate the eggs. Molt begins during incubation and body molt may be completed annually in breeding pairs. However, remiges are replaced sequentially over 2 to 3 years, or abruptly every 2 to 3 years in other species. Most immature birds replace their juvenal remiges over a 2 to 3 year period. Stress interferes with reproduction in cranes by reducing egg production or terminating the reproductive effort. In other birds, stress elevates corticosterone levels and decreases LHRH release. We know little about the physiological response of cranes to stress.

  17. Exercise physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The passing of Professor Bengt Saltin on September 12, 2014 truly marks the end of an era. As editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology and one of Bengt’s many collaborators and colleagues, I wanted the Journal to celebrate his many seminal contributions by means of an Editorial. Professor Bent...

  18. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-03-15

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting.

  19. Reproductive Physiology in Cetaceans (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews some works on reproductive physiology in cetaceans with special reference to dolphins from the following aspects: estrous cycle in female dolphins, hormonal profiles during pregnancy, testosterone levels and seasonality in testicular activity, ovulation induction and sperm collection and freezing.

  20. Occupational physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Toomingas, Allan; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus

    2011-01-01

    In a clear and accessible presentation, Occupational Physiology focuses on important issues in the modern working world. Exploring major public health problems-such as musculoskeletal disorders and stress-this book explains connections between work, well-being, and health based on up-to-date research in the field. It provides useful methods for risk assessment and guidelines on arranging a good working life from the perspective of the working individual, the company, and society as a whole.The book focuses on common, stressful situations in different professions. Reviewing bodily demands and r

  1. Biomechanics and physiology in active manual wheelchair propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, L H; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Dallmeijer, A J; Janssen, T W; Rozendaal, L A

    2001-01-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion in daily life and sports is increasingly being studied. Initially, an engineering and physiological perspective was taken. More recently a concomitant biomechanics interest is seen. Themes of biomechanical and physiological studies today are performance enhancing aspects

  2. Fatality of salt stress to plants: Morphological, physiological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fatality of salt stress to plants: Morphological, physiological and biochemical aspects. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Soil salinity affects various physiological and biochemical processes which result in reduced biomass production.

  3. Biomechanics and physiology in active manual wheelchair propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, L H; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Dallmeijer, A J; Janssen, T W; Rozendaal, L A

    2001-01-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion in daily life and sports is increasingly being studied. Initially, an engineering and physiological perspective was taken. More recently a concomitant biomechanics interest is seen. Themes of biomechanical and physiological studies today are performance enhancing aspects

  4. Chemical and physiological aspects of isomers of conjugated fatty acids Aspectos químicos e fisiológicos de isômeros conjugados de ácidos graxos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Bonifácio Teixeira de Carvalho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated fatty acid (CFA is the general term to describe the positional and geometric isomers of polyunsaturated fatty acids with conjugated double bonds. The CFAs of linoleic acid (CLAs are found naturally in foods derived from ruminant animals, meat, or dairy products. The CFAs of α-linolenic acid (CLNAs are found exclusively in various types of seed oils of plants. There are many investigations to assess the effects to health from CFAs consumption, which have been associated with physiological processes that are involved with non transmissible chronic diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and obesity. Conclusive studies about the CFAs effects in the body are still scarce and further research about their participation in physiological processes are necessary. This review aimed to discuss the influence of conjugated fatty acids on physiological processes in animal organism.Ácido graxo conjugado (AGC é o termo geral usado para descrever os isômeros posicionais e geométricos dos ácidos graxos poliinsaturados com duplas ligações conjugadas. Os AGCs do ácido linoléico (ALCs são encontrados naturalmente em alimentos derivados de animais ruminantes, carnes e produtos lácteos. Os AGCs do ácido α-linolênico (ALNCs são encontrados exclusivamente em óleos de sementes de vários tipos de plantas. Desenvolvem-se muitas investigações com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos do consumo de AGCs para a saúde, já que estes têm sido associados a processos fisiológicos relacionados com doenças crônicas não transmissíveis como câncer, aterosclerose, inflamação e obesidade. Estudos conclusivos sobre os efeitos dos AGCs no organismo humano ainda são raros e mais pesquisas sobre sua atuação em processos fisiológicos são necessárias. O objetivo desta revisão é discutir a influência dos ácidos graxos conjugados sobre os processos fisiológicos.

  5. Neonatal cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael H

    2013-11-01

    The pediatric surgeon deals with a large number and variety of congenital defects in neonates that frequently involve early surgical intervention and care. Because the neonatal cardiac physiology is unique, starting with the transition from fetal circulation and including differences in calcium metabolism and myocardial microscopic structure and function, it serves the pediatric surgeon well to have a sound understanding of these principles and how they directly and indirectly affect their plans and treatments. In addition, many patients will have associated congenital heart disease that can also dramatically influence not only the surgical and anesthetic care but also the timing and planning of procedures. Finally, the pediatric surgeon is often called upon to treat conditions and complications associated with complex congenital heart disease such as feeding difficulties, bowel perforations, and malrotation in heterotaxy syndromes. In this article, we will review several unique aspects of neonatal cardiac physiology along with the basic physiology of the major groups of congenital heart disease to better prepare the training and practicing pediatric surgeon for care of these complex and often fragile patients.

  6. Physiology of the fetal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiserud, Torvid

    2005-12-01

    Our understanding of fetal circulatory physiology is based on experimental animal data, and this continues to be an important source of new insight into developmental mechanisms. A growing number of human studies have investigated the human physiology, with results that are similar but not identical to those from animal studies. It is time to appreciate these differences and base more of our clinical approach on human physiology. Accordingly, the present review focuses on distributional patterns and adaptational mechanisms that were mainly discovered by human studies. These include cardiac output, pulmonary and placental circulation, fetal brain and liver, venous return to the heart, and the fetal shunts (ductus venosus, foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus). Placental compromise induces a set of adaptational and compensational mechanisms reflecting the plasticity of the developing circulation, with both short- and long-term implications. Some of these aspects have become part of the clinical physiology of today with consequences for surveillance and treatment.

  7. Physiological aspects and growth of sunflower after application of pre-emergent herbicides = Aspectos fisiológicos e crescimento do girassol após aplicação de herbicidas em pré-emergência.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Matias Reis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available - Studies aim to evaluate effects of different herbicides applied pre-emergence on the characteristics related to sunflower plants growth and physiology. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse using a completely randomized design with five replications and the treatments consisted of application, sunflower pre-emergence, following herbicides: flumioxazin, sulfentrazone, oxyfluorfen, oxadiazon, s-metolachlor, linuron and pendimethalin, and an untreated control. The gas exchange was evaluated at 27 days after herbicide application (DAAs, while the analysis of growth and visual intoxication culture were measured at 50 DAAs. Evaluated the physiological characteristics were not altered by herbicides application. However, these products interfered variously related to growth of sunflower plants characteristics. While sunflower recovered from poisoning caused by the oxadiazon was noted slower growth in culture by application of flumioxazin. We conclude that at the doses evaluated in this study, the herbicide oxyfluorfen, s-metolachlor, linuron, oxadiazon and pendimethalin have potential for application in sunflower pre-emergence. = Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar os efeitos de diferentes herbicidas aplicados em pré-emergência sobre as características relacionadas ao crescimento e à fisiologia das plantas de girassol. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação, utilizando o delineamento inteiramente casualizado com cinco repetições, sendo os tratamentos constituídos da aplicação, em pré-emergência do girassol, dos seguintes herbicidas: flumioxazin, sulfentrazone, oxyfluorfen, oxadiazon, s-metolachlor, linuron e pendimethalin, além de uma testemunha sem aplicação. As avaliações das trocas gasosas foram realizadas aos 27 dias após a aplicação (DAAs dos herbicidas, enquanto as análises de crescimento e intoxicação visual da cultura foram mensuradas aos 50 DAAs. As características fisiológicas avaliadas n

  8. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  9. Potassium physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thier, S O

    1986-04-25

    Potassium is the most abundant exchangeable cation in the body. It exists predominantly in the intracellular fluid at concentrations of 140 to 150 meq/liter and in the extracellular fluid at concentrations of 3.5 to 5 meq/liter. The maintenance of the serum potassium concentration is a complex bodily function and results from the balance between intake, excretion, and distribution between intracellular and extracellular space. Ingested potassium is virtually completely absorbed from and minimally excreted through the intestine under nonpathologic circumstances. Renal excretion of potassium, which is the major chronic protective mechanism against abnormalities in potassium balance, depends on filtration, reabsorption, and a highly regulated distal nephron secretory process. Factors regulating potassium secretion include prior potassium intake, intracellular potassium, delivery of sodium chloride and poorly reabsorbable anions to the distal nephron, the urine flow rate, hormones such as aldosterone and beta-catecholamines, and the integrity of the renal tubular cell. The maintenance of distribution between the inside and outside of cells depends on the integrity of the cell membrane and its pumps, osmolality, pH, and the hormones insulin, aldosterone, beta 2-catecholamines, alpha-catecholamines, and prostaglandins. Both distribution across cell membranes and/or renal excretion of potassium may be altered by pharmacologic agents such as diuretics, alpha- and beta-catechol antagonists and agonists, depolarizing agents, and digitalis. Problems with hypokalemia and hyperkalemia can be analyzed on the basis of potassium physiology and pharmacology; proper treatment depends on an accurate analysis.

  10. Aspectos anatômicos e fisiológicos de plantas de guaco submetidas a diferentes fotoperíodos Anatomical and physiological aspects of guaco plants submitted to different photoperiods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaristo Mauro de Castro

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O guaco (Mikania glomerata Sprengel é espécie de uso medicinal conhecida pela atividade broncodilatadora. Muitos estudos têm evidenciado mudanças nas características anatômicas e fisiológicas de plantas medicinais sob influência de condições de radiação. Neste trabalho analisou-se a influência de fotoperíodos (8; 12; 16 e 20 h na anatomia foliar, nos teores de clorofila e condutância estomática em três regiões da planta. Após 90 dias de tratamento, plantas adultas e com diferentes tamanhos influenciados pelos fotoperíodos foram submetidas às avaliações anatômicas e fisiológicas. Os teores de clorofila foram maiores nos fotoperíodos de 8 e 12 h nas regiões superior e mediana da planta e menores no fotoperíodo de 8 h na região basal. A condutância e densidade estomática apresentaram relação inversa ao aumento do fotoperíodo, sendo significativamente decrescente do ápice para a base da planta. Houve aumento da espessura da epiderme adaxial nas regiões mediana e basal da planta até o fotoperíodo de 16 h. Nestas regiões houve aumento progressivo do parênquima esponjoso até o fotoperíodo de 20 h. Verificou-se modificações no tamanho e organização dos feixes vasculares influenciadas pelos fotoperíodos.Guaco (Mikania glomerata Sprengel is a medicinal species known because of its bronchi-dilating activity. Many studies have indicated changes in anatomical and physiological characteristics of medicinal plants when submitted to different conditions of light. The effect of photoperiods (8; 12; 16 and 20 h on leaf anatomy, content of chlorophyll and stomatal conductance in distinct regions of guaco plants were analyzed. Adult plants of different sizes influenced by distinct photoperiods were submitted to anatomical and physiological analyses. 90 days after starting photoperiod treatments the chlorophyll content was higher in plants submitted to photoperiods of 8 and 12 hours in the superior and intermediary

  11. Conservation physiology of animal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Robert J; Chapman, Jacqueline M; Souliere, Christopher M; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D; Cooke, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  12. Regulatory aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Arthur M.

    1986-07-01

    At this time, there is no US legislation that is specifically aimed at regulating the environmental release of genetically engineered organisms or their modified components, either during the research and development stage or during application. There are some statutes, administered by several federal agencies, whose language is broad enough to allow the extension of intended coverage to include certain aspects of biotechnology. The one possible exception is FIFRA, which has already brought about the registration of several natural microbial pesticides but which also has provision for requiring the registration of “strain improved” microbial pesticides. Nevertheless, there may be gaps in coverage even if all pertinent statutes were to be actively applied to the control of environmental release of genetically modified substances. The decision to regulate biotechnology under TSCA was justified, in part, on the basis of its intended role as a gap-filling piece of environmental legislation. The advantage of regulating biotechnology under TSCA is that this statute, unlike others, is concerned with all media of exposure (air, water, soil, sediment, biota) that may pose health and environmental hazards. Experience may show that extending existing legislation to regulate biotechnology is a poor compromise compared to the promulgation of new legislation specifically designed for this purpose. It appears that many other countries are ultimately going to take the latter course to regulate biotechnology.

  13. Aspectos fisiológicos e clínicos da técnica fonoterapêutica de fonação reversa Reverse phonation - physiologic and clinical aspects of this speech voice therapy modality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Susana Finger

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A fonação reversa é a produção de voz durante a inspiração, realizada espontaneamente em situações como o suspiro. OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão da literatura, descrevendo achados relacionados à utilização da fonação reversa na prática clínica, à anatomofisiologia de sua produção e seus efeitos no trato vocal, e às indicações e contra-indicações da técnica para os distúrbios e para o aperfeiçoamento da voz. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados relatos de mudanças significativas no trato vocal durante a produção da fonação reversa, como o relaxamento dos ventrículos, o afastamento das pregas ventriculares, o aumento da freqüência fundamental, o movimento inverso da onda mucosa, além da facilitação do estudo dinâmico da laringe, quando associada à endoscopia, o que possibilita melhor definição da localização das lesões nas camadas da lâmina própria da mucosa das pregas vocais. CONCLUSÃO: Existem poucos estudos que descrevem o comportamento laríngeo durante a fonação reversa e, para que essa técnica utilizada de forma mais precisa e objetiva, acredita-se que ainda devem ser realizados estudos que visem a comprovar sua eficácia na prática clínica.Reverse phonation is the voice production during inspiration, accomplished spontaneously in situations such as when a person sighs. AIM: to do a literature review, describing discoveries related to the use of the reverse phonation in the clinical practice, the anatomy and physiology of its production and its effects in vocal treatments; and moreover, indications and problems of the technique for speech disorders treatment and voice enhancement. RESULTS: there were reports of significant changes in vocal treatment during with the use of reverse phonation: ventricular distention, ventricular folds separation, increase in the fundamental frequency, mucous wave inverse movement; and it also facilitates the dynamic study of the larynx when associated with

  14. Physiology of bile secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alejandro Esteller

    2008-01-01

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment,in different situations,results in the syndrome of cholestasis.The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed.Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane.This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation.The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bileduct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts.The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed.In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled,cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves.A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included.The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology.

  15. [Human physiology: kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  16. Parathyroid hormone pulsatility:physiological and clinical aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Chiavistelli; Andrea Giustina; Gherardo Mazziotti

    2015-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion is characterized by an ultradian rhythm with tonic and pulsatile components. In healthy subjects, the majority of PTH is secreted in tonic fashion, whereas approximately 30%is secreted in low-amplitude and high-frequency bursts occurring every 10–20 min, superimposed on tonic secretion. Changes in the ultradian PTH secretion were shown to occur in patients with primary and secondary osteoporosis, with skeletal effects depending on the reciprocal modifications of pulsatile and tonic components. Indeed, pathophysiology of spontaneous PTH secretion remains an area potentially suitable to be explored, particularly in those conditions such as secondary forms of osteoporosis, in which conventional biochemical and densitometric parameters may not always give reliable diagnostic and therapeutic indications. This review will highlight the literature data supporting the hypothesis that changes of ultradian PTH secretion may be correlated with skeletal fragility in primary and secondary osteoporosis.

  17. Cervically induced ocular torsion : Physiological and clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bles, W.; Groen, E.L.; Bos, J.E.; Jong, J.M.V.B. de; Lok, J.

    1998-01-01

    Met video-oculografie werd oogtorsie gemeten tijdens kanteling van het hele lichaam, alleen het hoofd en alleen de romp. Gevonden werd dat de cervikale bijdrage aan de oogtorsie tot doel heeft om de vestibulaire compensatoire oogtorsie tijdens actieve hoofdbewegingen tegen te gaan.

  18. Food and symptom generation in functional gastrointestinal disorders: physiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Ricard; Tack, Jan

    2013-05-01

    The response of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) to ingestion of food is a complex and closely controlled process, which allows optimization of propulsion, digestion, absorption of nutrients, and removal of indigestible remnants. This review summarizes current knowledge on the mechanisms that control the response of the GIT to food intake. During the cephalic phase, triggered by cortical food-related influences, the GIT prepares for receiving nutrients. The gastric phase is dominated by the mechanical effect of the meal volume. Accumulation of food in the stomach activates tension-sensitive mechanoreceptors, which in turn stimulate gastric accommodation and gastric acid secretion through the intrinsic and vago-vagal reflex pathways. After meal ingestion, the tightly controlled process of gastric emptying starts, with arrival of nutrients in the duodenum triggering negative feedback on emptying and stimulating secretion of digestive enzymes through the neural (mainly vago-vagal reflex, but also intrinsic) and endocrine (release of peptides from entero-endocrine cells) pathways. Several types of specialized receptors detect the presence of all main categories of nutrients. In addition, the gastrointestinal mucosa expresses receptors of the T1R and T2R families (taste receptors) and several members of the transient receptor potential channel family, all of which are putatively involved in the detection of specific tastants in the lumen. Activation of nutrient and taste sensors also activates the extrinsic and intrinsic neural, as well as entero-endocrine, pathways. During passage through the small bowel, nutrients are progressively extracted, and electrolyte-rich liquid intestinal content with non-digestible residue is delivered to the colon. The colon provides absorption of the water and electrolytes, storage of non-digestible remnants of food, aboral propulsion of contents, and finally evacuation through defecation.

  19. PHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SEED DEVELOPMENT IN A HAWAIIAN PALM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genetic diversity of palms (Arecaceae) is threatened and ex situ conservation efforts are hampered by a poor understanding of their seed biology and storage behavior. Pritchardia remota is fan palm endemic to Hawaii (subtribe Corypheae). Flowering of P. remota occurs mostly during the dry seas...

  20. Stunting syndrome in broilers: physical, physiological, and behavioral aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, F; Nir, I

    1995-01-01

    The effect of stunting syndrome (SS) on young broilers induced by orally administering an inoculum prepared from intestines of SS-affected broiler chicks was studied in two experiments. Depression of growth, feed intake, and feed utilization, respectively, was negatively related to the age of inoculation, i.e., highest at posthatch inoculation (63, 57, and 61%), and intermediate at the ages of 3 (42, 45, and 50%) and 7 d (29, 34, and 53%), whereas at the age of 14 d inoculation was ineffectual and the inoculated chicks performed similarly to the naive controls. Eating behavior was determined by periodically recording the number of chicks in each treatment group exhibiting this behavior, i.e., pecking mash in the feeder or pecking the litter. Eating activity was much higher in inoculated chicks (about 20 to 24%) than in the naive controls (6 to 12%) and as with performance negatively related to the age of inoculation. In chicks inoculated at the age of 14 d, eating activity was quite similar to that of the naive control chicks. Noninoculated chickens raised in the same room as their inoculated counterparts were infected by the disease agents. In some respects the consequences of horizontal infection were similar to those observed in inoculated chicks, i.e., depressed feed intake, growth, and feed utilization and a heavier heart, crop, proventriculus, gizzard, intestine, and gastrointestinal contents. In contrast, the activities of the pancreatic digestive enzymes were more similar to those of the naive controls than to those of the inoculated groups. At the age of 14 d, activities of amylase, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and lipase in the pancreas were lower in the inoculated than in the naive control birds. At the age of 21 d, the results were reversed and activity in the inoculated birds was higher than in the naive control birds. During both periods, the activity of pancreatic lipase was higher in the naive controls than in the inoculated birds. The hyperactivity estimated via a determination of eating activity suggests that SS is an affliction not only of digestion but also of metabolism.

  1. Cervically induced ocular torsion : Physiological and clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bles, W.; Groen, E.L.; Bos, J.E.; Jong, J.M.V.B. de; Lok, J.

    1998-01-01

    Met video-oculografie werd oogtorsie gemeten tijdens kanteling van het hele lichaam, alleen het hoofd en alleen de romp. Gevonden werd dat de cervikale bijdrage aan de oogtorsie tot doel heeft om de vestibulaire compensatoire oogtorsie tijdens actieve hoofdbewegingen tegen te gaan.

  2. [Nutrition physiological aspects in the treatment of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, H

    1976-02-01

    Obesity is one of the most common prosperity diseases. As a consequence of this disease there is a decrease in the expectation of life. Obesity is bascially caused by overeating. The low-caloric reducing diets are differentiated into a low-fat and high-carbohydrate form, and into a carbohydrate-free and high-fat diet. The metabolic advantages and the disadvantages of these two forms of low-caloric diets are discussed with respect to starvation metabolism. It is assumed that without ketoacidosis, at least 100-140 g glucose per day are required to meet the energetic demands of the central nervous system. Since the conversion rate of protein to glucose is about 2:1, during a carbohydrate-free diet about 200-260 g of protein per day would be necessary to meet the glucose requirements of the organism. As such a high-protein supply with food is almost impossible, ketogenesis in the liver must take place as a sort of "glucose-sparing mechanism". Only under these conditions, the otherwise extreme nitrogen catabolism can be avoided during an almost carbohydrate-free diet. However, using a fat-free (600 kcal) diet it is possible to furnish the glucose requirements of the central nervous system by the food supply. Therefore, a compensatory ketoacidosis is not required. Additionally, the fat-free diet does not contain cholesterol. In this way, the hypercholesterinemia which is a common feature in obesity is favourably influenced by the absence of foods of animal origin. Therefore, within a short period a marked decrease in serum cholesterol concentration results by the high-carbohydrate diet. The same is true for the concentration of free fatty acids and serum triglycerides. It is concluded that the high-carbohydrate low-caloric diet is suited best for reduction of body weight.

  3. Growth and physiological aspects of bell pepper ( Capsicum annuum )

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in pots adapted as drainage lysimeters under greenhouse conditions, using ... The increase in irrigation water salinity reduced growth, gas exchanges and the ... of gas exchanges, reducing the effect of saline stress on bell pepper plants.

  4. Evolution of holometabola insect digestive systems: physiological and biochemical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Terra

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available This review takes into account primarily the work done in our laboratory with insects from the major Holometabola orders. Only the most significant data for each insect will be presented and a proposal on the evolution of Holometabola insect digstive systems will be advanced.

  5. Aspects and Polymorphism in AspectJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, David Harel; Ernst, Erik

    2003-01-01

    -oriented programming (AOP). In AOP, pieces of crosscutting behavior are extracted from the base code and localized in aspects, losing as a result their polymorphic capabilities while introducing new and unexplored issues. In this paper, we explore what kinds of polymorphism AOP languages should support, using AspectJ...... as the basis for the presentation. The results are not exclusive to AspectJ---aspectual polymorphism may make aspects in any comparable AOSD language more expressive and reusable across programs, while preserving safety....

  6. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow pot...

  7. AspectKE*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Fan; Masuhara, Hidehiko; Aotani, Tomoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Enforcing security policies to distributed systems is difficult, in particular, when a system contains untrusted components. We designed AspectKE*, a distributed AOP language based on a tuple space, to tackle this issue. In AspectKE*, aspects can enforce access control policies that depend......KE*, and demonstrate usefulness of AspectKE* through a security aspect for a distributed chat system....

  8. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  9. Chewing Over Physiology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; de Arcisio Miranda, Manoel; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the differentareas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it…

  10. Chewing Over Physiology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; de Arcisio Miranda, Manoel; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the differentareas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it…

  11. The impact of "physiological correction" on functional connectivity analysis of pharmacological resting state fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalili-Mahani, N.; Chang, C.; Osch, M.J.; Veer, I.M.; Buchem, van M.A.; Dahan, A.; Beckmann, C.F.

    2013-01-01

    Growing interest in pharmacological resting state fMRI (RSfMRI) necessitates developing standardized and robust analytical approaches that are insensitive to spurious correlated physiological signals. However, in pharmacological experiments physiological variations constitute an important aspect of

  12. Aspect and Reference time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borik, O.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis provides a theory of aspect in Russian based on the notion of Reference time. The main claim advocated in this study is that there are two types of aspect, predicational/telicity aspect and perspective or Reference time aspect. It is argued that these two types should be carefully distin

  13. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow potential brain waves (contingent negativevariation, and eye blink rate or pupil functions, are used as indices for the measurement of the aroma effects

  14. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  15. Applied physiology of swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, J M; Montpetit, R R

    1986-01-01

    Scientific research in swimming over the past 10 to 15 years has been oriented toward multiple aspects that relate to applied and basic physiology, metabolism, biochemistry, and endocrinology. This review considers recent findings on: 1) specific physical characteristics of swimmers; 2) the energetics of swimming; 3) the evaluation of aerobic fitness in swimming; and 4) some metabolic and hormonal aspects related to swimmers. Firstly, the age of finalists in Olympic swimming is not much different from that of the participants from other sports. They are taller and heavier than a reference population of the same age. The height bias in swimming may be the reason for lack of success from some Asian and African countries. Experimental data point toward greater leanness, particularly in female swimmers, than was seen 10 years ago. Overall, female swimmers present a range of 14 to 19% body fat whereas males are much lower (5 to 10%). Secondly, the relationship between O2 uptake and crawl swimming velocity (at training and competitive speeds) is thought to be linear. The energy cost varies between strokes with a dichotomy between the 2 symmetrical and the 2 asymmetrical strokes. Energy expenditure in swimming is represented by the sum of the cost of translational motion (drag) and maintenance of horizontal motion (gravity). The cost of the latter decreases as speed increases. Examination of the question of size-associated effects on the cost of swimming using Huxley's allometric equation (Y = axb) shows an almost direct relationship with passive drag. Expressing energy cost in litres of O2/m/kg is proposed as a better index of technical swimming ability than the traditional expression of VO2/distance in L/km. Thirdly, maximal direct conventional techniques used to evaluate maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) in swimming include free swimming, tethered swimming, and flume swimming. Despite the individual peculiarities of each method, with similar experimental conditions

  16. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eKagias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. Physiological stress can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, which result from an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level.

  17. Physiology of the fetal and transitional circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnemore, Anna; Groves, Alan

    2015-08-01

    The fetal circulation is an entirely transient event, not replicated at any point in later life, and functionally distinct from the pediatric and adult circulations. Understanding of the physiology of the fetal circulation is vital for accurate interpretation of hemodynamic assessments in utero, but also for management of circulatory compromise in premature infants, who begin extrauterine life before the fetal circulation has finished its maturation. This review summarizes the key classical components of circulatory physiology, as well as some of the newer concepts of physiology that have been appreciated in recent years. The immature circulation has significantly altered function in all aspects of circulatory physiology. The mechanisms and significance of these differences are also discussed, as is the impact of these alterations on the circulatory transition of infants born prematurely.

  18. Optimising AspectJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avgustinov, Pavel; Christensen, Aske Simon; Hendren, Laurie

    2005-01-01

    AspectJ, an aspect-oriented extension of Java, is becoming increasingly popular. However, not much work has been directed at optimising compilers for AspectJ. Optimising AOP languages provides many new and interesting challenges for compiler writers, and this paper identifies and addresses three...... all of the techniques in this paper in abc, our AspectBench Compiler for AspectJ, and we demonstrate significant speedups with empirical results. Some of our techniques have already been integrated into the production AspectJ compiler, ajc 1.2.1....

  19. Discovering Early Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baniassad, E.; Clements, P.; Araujo, J.; Moreira, A.; Rashid, A.; Tekinerdogan, B.

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, aspect-oriented software development (AOSD) has focused on the software life cycle's implementation phase: aspects are identified and captured mainly in code. But aspects are evident earlier in the life cycle, such as during requirements gathering and architecture development. Identif

  20. Aspects, Dependencies, and Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitchyan, R; Fabry, J.; Bergmans, Lodewijk; Südholt, M.; Consel, C.

    2007-01-01

    For Aspect-Oriented Software Development (AOSD) the topic of Aspects, Dependencies and Interactions is of high importance across the whole range of development activities – from requirements engineering through to language design. Aspect interactions must be adequately addressed all across the softw

  1. Concepts of Human Physiology in Ayurveda

    OpenAIRE

    Patwardhan, Dr. Kishor

    2008-01-01

    ‘Human Physiology’, or the study of functional aspects of human body, is designated by the term ‘Śarīra Vicaya’ in Ayurvedic literature. The word ‘Vicaya’ means the special or detailed knowledge. Detailed knowledge of normal human body i.e., ‘Śarīra’, is considered helpful in understanding the factors influencing the health. Though most of the basic concepts of human physiology explained in Ayurveda are strikingly similar to the concepts of modern physiology, some concepts like ‘Ātmā’, ‘Ma...

  2. Advances in physiological computing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairclough, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    This edited collection will provide an overview of the field of physiological computing, i.e. the use of physiological signals as input for computer control. It will cover a breadth of current research, from brain-computer interfaces to telemedicine.

  3. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  4. Physiology of sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ron

    2007-07-01

    The elite athlete represents the extreme of the human gene pool, where genetic endowment is developed by an intensive training programme. Sport encompasses many different activities, calling for different physical and mental attributes. Understanding the physiology of exercise provides insights into normal physiological function.

  5. Physiological changes in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    SOMA-PILLAY, Priya; Catherine, Nelson-Piercy; Tolppanen, Heli; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Physiological changes occur in pregnancy to nurture the developing foetus and prepare the mother for labour and delivery. Some of these changes influence normal biochemical values while others may mimic symptoms of medical disease. It is important to differentiate between normal physiological changes and disease pathology. This review highlights the important changes that take place during normal pregnancy.

  6. Aspectos biológicos e fisiológicos do envelhecimento humano e suas implicações na saúde do idoso Biological and physiological aspects of aging and its implications in the health of the elderly Aspectos biologicos y fisiologicos del envejecimiento humano u sus implicaciones en la saude del idoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Trata o presente texto de uma discussão acerca dos principais aspectos biológicos e fisiológicos do corpo humano, vivenciados a partir da idade adulta e principalmente na terceira idade, os quais apresentam-se com maior fragilidade no que se refere aos padrões normais obtidos durante as fases infantil e adultas do indivíduo. O tema desperta a ênfase para as práticas regulares das atividades físicas (exercícios, esportes, danças, lutas, etc. como uma das formas saudáveis para contrapor e atenuar as causas e os efeitos do envelhecimento corporal, que acomete todas as pessoas na terceira idade. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Envelhecimento Biológico – Capacidades Funcionais – Exercícios – Terceira Idade. This text deals with a discussion on the main biological and physiological aspects of the human body that are experienced in adulthood, especially among the elderly, who are more fragile regarding the regular standards obtained during childhood and earlier adulthood. This text emphasizes regular physical activity (exercise, sports, dance, martial arts, etc as one of the healthy ways to oppose and ease the causes and effects of bodily aging that affect the elderly. KEY WORDS: Biological aging - Ffunctional capacities -Eexercise - Elderly,Tthird age Trata el presente texto de una discusión acerca de los principales aspectos biológicos y fisiológicos del cuerpo humano, vivenciados a partir de la edad adulta y principalmente en la tercera edad, los cuales se presentan con mayor fragilidad en lo que se refiere a los modelos normales obtenidos durante las fases infantil y adultas del individuo. El tema despierta el énfasis para las prácticas regulares de las actividades físicas (ejercicios, deportes, danzas, luchas, etc. como una de las formas saludables para contraponer y atenuar las causas y los efectos del envejecimiento corporal, que acomete todas las personas en la tercera edad. PALABRAS CLAVES: Envejecimiento Biológico

  7. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review......Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged...

  8. CH2 - Lighting and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Altomonte

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the designed performances of the new CH2 building in Melbourne, Australia. CH2 is an environmentally significant project that involves biomimicry of natural systems to produce indoor conditions that are conducive to user comfort, health and productivity. This paper focuses on lighting and physiology and examines the solutions chosen for artificial and natural lighting and the likely effects these will have on building occupants. The purpose of the paper is to critically comment on the adopted strategy and, cognisance of contemporary thinking in lighting design, to judge the effectiveness of this aspect of the project with a view to later verification and post-occupancy review. The paper concludes that CH2 is an exemplar of lighting innovation that provides valuable lessons to designers of office buildings, particularly in the Melbourne CSD.

  9. CH2 - Lighting and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Altomonte

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the designed performances of the new CH2 building in Melbourne, Australia. CH2 is an environmentally significant project that involves biomimicry of natural systems to produce indoor conditions that are conducive to user comfort, health and productivity. This paper focuses on lighting and physiology and examines the solutions chosen for artificial and natural lighting and the likely effects these will have on building occupants. The purpose of the paper is to critically comment on the adopted strategy and, cognisance of contemporary thinking in lighting design, to judge the effectiveness of this aspect of the project with a view to later verification and post-occupancy review. The paper concludes that CH2 is an exemplar of lighting innovation that provides valuable lessons to designers of office buildings, particularly in the Melbourne CSD.

  10. Sensory aspects of movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, Tourette's syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed.

  11. Fetal cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychik, J

    2004-01-01

    The cardiovascular system of the fetus is physiologically different than the adult, mature system. Unique characteristics of the myocardium and specific channels of blood flow differentitate the physiology of the fetus from the newborn. Conditions of increased preload and afterload in the fetus, such as sacrococcygeal teratoma and twin-twin transfusion syndrome, result in unique and complex pathophysiological states. Echocardiography has improved our understanding of human fetal cadiovasvular physiology in the normal and diseased states, and has expanded our capability to more effectively treat these disease processes.

  12. Physiology of yeasts in alcoholic fermentation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Pedro M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica This thesis is focused on physiological aspects of the yeasts used in two alcoholic fermentation processes: primary brewing fermentation and fermentation of lactose (particularly lactose derived from cheese whey) to ethanol by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculent strains. The brewing fermentation is probably the most extensively studied alcoholic fermentation process. Nevertheless, developments in brewing tech...

  13. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  14. Nutritional Aspects of Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, C; Brito-de la Fuente, E; Clavé, P; Costa, A; Assegehegn, G

    This chapter describes the nutritional aspects of dysphagia management by starting with the definition of these two conditions (dysphagia and malnutrition) that share three main clinical characteristics: (a) their prevalence is very high, (b) they can lead to severe complications, and (c) they are frequently underrecognized and neglected conditions. From an anatomical standpoint, dysphagia can result from oropharyngeal and/or esophageal causes; from a pathophysiological perspective, dysphagia can be caused by organic or structural diseases (either benign or malignant) or diseases causing impaired physiology (mainly motility and/or perception disorders). This chapter gathers up-to-date information on the screening and diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia, the consequences of dysphagia (aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and dehydration), and on the nutritional management of dysphagic patients. Concerning this last topic, this chapter reviews the rheological aspects of swallowing and dysphagia (including shear and elongational flows) and its influence on the characteristics of the enteral nutrition for dysphagia management (solid/semisolid foods and thickened liquids; ready-to-use oral nutritional supplements and thickening powders), with special focus on the real characteristics of the bolus after mixing with human saliva. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lexical and Grammatical Aspect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Angeliek; Lidz, Jeffrey; Snyder, William; Pater, Joe

    The temporality of a given situation ‘out there in the world’ can be described in many ways. Tense and aspect offer the essential parameters. Lexical aspect characterizes event descriptions; a situation with a sleeping child can be referred to as a state of affairs (be asleep) or as a happening

  16. Physiological regulatory networks: ecological roles and evolutionary constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alan A; Martin, Lynn B; Wingfield, John C; McWilliams, Scott R; Dunne, Jennifer A

    2012-08-01

    Ecological and evolutionary physiology has traditionally focused on one aspect of physiology at a time. Here, we discuss the implications of considering physiological regulatory networks (PRNs) as integrated wholes, a perspective that reveals novel roles for physiology in organismal ecology and evolution. For example, evolutionary response to changes in resource abundance might be constrained by the role of dietary micronutrients in immune response regulation, given a particular pathogen environment. Because many physiological components impact more than one process, organismal homeostasis is maintained, individual fitness is determined and evolutionary change is constrained (or facilitated) by interactions within PRNs. We discuss how PRN structure and its system-level properties could determine both individual performance and patterns of physiological evolution.

  17. Human physiology in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, J.

    1996-01-01

    The universality of gravity (1 g) in our daily lives makes it difficult to appreciate its importance in morphology and physiology. Bone and muscle support systems were created, cellular pumps developed, neurons organised and receptors and transducers of gravitational force to biologically relevant signals evolved under 1g gravity. Spaceflight provides the only microgravity environment where systematic experimentation can expand our basic understanding of gravitational physiology and perhaps provide new insights into normal physiology and disease processes. These include the surprising extent of our body's dependence on perceptual information, and understanding the effect and importance of forces generated within the body's weightbearing structures such as muscle and bones. Beyond this exciting prospect is the importance of this work towards opening the solar system for human exploration. Although both appear promising, we are only just beginning to taste what lies ahead.

  18. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  19. Plant Physiology and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taiz, Lincoln; Zeiger, Eduardo; Møller, Ian Max

    Physiology and Development. As before, Unit III begins with updated chapters on Cell Walls and Signals and Signal Transduction. The latter chapter has been expanded to include a discussion of major signaling molecules, such as calcium ions and plant hormones. A new, unified chapter entitled Signals from......Throughout its twenty-two year history, the authors of Plant Physiology have continually updated the book to incorporate the latest advances in plant biology and implement pedagogical improvements requested by adopters. This has made Plant Physiology the most authoritative, comprehensive......, and widely used upper-division plant biology textbook. In the Sixth Edition, the Growth and Development section (Unit III) has been reorganized and expanded to present the complete life cycle of seed plants from germination to senescence. In recognition of this enhancement, the text has been renamed Plant...

  20. Cognitive Aspects of Prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajfel, Henri

    1969-01-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of a contribution to a symposium on the "Biosocial Aspects of Race," held in London, September, 1968; symposium was published in the "Journal of Biosocial Science," Supplement No. 1, July, 1969. (RJ)

  1. Foundational aspects of security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzikokolakis, Konstantinos; Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Palamidessi, Catuscia

    2014-01-01

    This Special Issue of the Journal of Computer Security focuses on foundational aspects of security, which in recent years have helped change much of the way we think about and approach system security.......This Special Issue of the Journal of Computer Security focuses on foundational aspects of security, which in recent years have helped change much of the way we think about and approach system security....

  2. Role of connexins and pannexins in cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meens, Merlijn J; Kwak, Brenda R; Duffy, Heather S

    2015-08-01

    Connexins and pannexins form connexons, pannexons and membrane channels, which are critically involved in many aspects of cardiovascular physiology. For that reason, a vast number of studies have addressed the role of connexins and pannexins in the arterial and venous systems as well as in the heart. Moreover, a role for connexins in lymphatics has recently also been suggested. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the involvement of connexins and pannexins in cardiovascular physiology.

  3. Physiology and methodology of intermittent resistance training for acyclic sports

    OpenAIRE

    Casas, Adrián

    2008-01-01

    Resistance training for acyclic sports has traditionally been carried out using training methods developed for cyclic sports. These methods were developed from the study of the physiological bases of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), prioritising “central” cardiovascular factors (cardiac) above “peripheral” factors (muscular) and omitting in-depth analysis of muscular behaviour during acyclic resistance. This article intends to: a) analyse certain physiological aspects needed to understand...

  4. The Face of Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul White

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relationship between the physiology of the emotions and the display of character in Victorian Britain. Charles Bell and others had begun to link certain physiological functions, such as respiration, with the expression of feelings such as fear, regarding the heart and other internal organs as instruments by which the emotions were made visible. But a purely functional account of the emotions, which emerged through the development of reflex physiology during the second half of the century, would dramatically alter the nature of feelings and the means of observing them. At the same time, instinctual or acquired sympathy, which had long underpinned the accurate reading of expressions, became a problem to be surmounted by new 'objectively'. Graphic recording instruments measuring a variety of physiological functions and used with increasing frequency in clinical diagnostics became of fundamental importance for tracing the movement of feelings during the period prior to the development of cinematography. They remained, in the form of devices such as the polygraph, a crucial and controversial means of measuring affective states, beneath the potentially deceptive surface of the body.

  5. Starting Physiology: Bioelectrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-01-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The…

  6. Physiology of Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, David W; Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF Far from a simple absence of wakefulness, sleep is an active, regulated, and metabolically distinct state, essential for health and well-being. In this article, the authors review the fundamental anatomy and physiology of sleep and its regulation, with an eye toward interactions between sleep and metabolism.

  7. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  8. Physiological attributes of triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriano, R; Bishop, D

    2010-05-01

    Triathlons of all distances can be considered endurance events and consist of the individual disciplines of swimming, cycling and running which are generally completed in this sequential order. While it is expected that elite triathletes would possess high values for submaximal and maximal measures of aerobic fitness, little is known about how these values compare with those of single-sport endurance athletes. Earlier reviews, conducted in the 1980s, concluded that triathletes possessed lower V(O2(max)) values than other endurance athletes. An update of comparisons is of interest to determine if the physiological capacities of elite triathletes now reflect those of single-sport athletes or whether these physiological capacities are compromised by the requirement to cross-train for three different disciplines. It was found that although differences in the physiological attributes during swimming, cycling and running are evident among triathletes, those who compete at an international level possess V(O2(max)) values that are indicative of success in endurance-based individual sports. Furthermore, various physiological parameters at submaximal workloads have been used to describe the capacities of these athletes. Only a few studies have reported the lactate threshold among triathletes with the majority of studies reporting the ventilatory threshold. Although observed differences among triathletes for both these submaximal measures are complicated by the various methods used to determine them, the reported values for triathletes are similar to those for trained cyclists and runners. Thus, from the limited data available, it appears that triathletes are able to obtain similar physiological values as single-sport athletes despite dividing their training time among three disciplines.

  9. The anatomy and physiology of the avian endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Midge; Pilny, Anthony A

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine system of birds is comparable to that of mammals, although there are many unique aspects to consider when studying the anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry. Avian endocrinology is a field of veterinary medicine that is unfamiliar to many practitioners; however, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding when evaluating companion birds in clinical practice. This article covers the anatomy and physiology of the normal avian, and readers are referred to other articles for a more detailed explanation of altered physiology and pathology.

  10. Organisational aspects of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Jacqueline; Pegram, Anne

    2015-03-04

    Organisational aspects of care, the second essential skills cluster, identifies the need for registered nurses to systematically assess, plan and provide holistic patient care in accordance with individual needs. Safeguarding, supporting and protecting adults and children in vulnerable situations; leading, co-ordinating and managing care; functioning as an effective and confident member of the multidisciplinary team; and managing risk while maintaining a safe environment for patients and colleagues, are vital aspects of this cluster. This article discusses the roles and responsibilities of the newly registered graduate nurse. Throughout their education, nursing students work towards attaining this knowledge and these skills in preparation for their future roles as nurses.

  11. Dehydration: physiology, assessment, and performance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of dehydration assessment and presents a unique evaluation of the dehydration and performance literature. The importance of osmolality and volume are emphasized when discussing the physiology, assessment, and performance effects of dehydration. The underappreciated physiologic distinction between a loss of hypo-osmotic body water (intracellular dehydration) and an iso-osmotic loss of body water (extracellular dehydration) is presented and argued as the single most essential aspect of dehydration assessment. The importance of diagnostic and biological variation analyses to dehydration assessment methods is reviewed and their use in gauging the true potential of any dehydration assessment method highlighted. The necessity for establishing proper baselines is discussed, as is the magnitude of dehydration required to elicit reliable and detectable osmotic or volume-mediated compensatory physiologic responses. The discussion of physiologic responses further helps inform and explain our analysis of the literature suggesting a ≥ 2% dehydration threshold for impaired endurance exercise performance mediated by volume loss. In contrast, no clear threshold or plausible mechanism(s) support the marginal, but potentially important, impairment in strength, and power observed with dehydration. Similarly, the potential for dehydration to impair cognition appears small and related primarily to distraction or discomfort. The impact of dehydration on any particular sport skill or task is therefore likely dependent upon the makeup of the task itself (e.g., endurance, strength, cognitive, and motor skill).

  12. Tuna comparative physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jeffrey B; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2004-11-01

    Thunniform swimming, the capacity to conserve metabolic heat in red muscle and other body regions (regional endothermy), an elevated metabolic rate and other physiological rate functions, and a frequency-modulated cardiac output distinguish tunas from most other fishes. These specializations support continuous, relatively fast swimming by tunas and minimize thermal barriers to habitat exploitation, permitting niche expansion into high latitudes and to ocean depths heretofore regarded as beyond their range.

  13. Hearables: Multimodal physiological in-ear sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Goverdovsky, Valentin; Nakamura, Takashi; Looney, David; Sharp, David J; Papavassiliou, Christos; Morrell, Mary J; Mandic, Danilo P

    2016-01-01

    Future health systems require the means to assess and track the neural and physiological function of a user over long periods of time and in the community. Human body responses are manifested through multiple modalities, such as the mechanical, electrical and chemical; yet current physiological monitors (actigraphy, heart rate) largely lack in both the desired cross-modal and non-stigmatizing aspects. We address these challenges through an inconspicuous and comfortable earpiece, equipped with miniature multimodal sensors, which benefits from the relatively stable position of the ear canal with respect to vital organs to robustly measure the brain, cardiac and respiratory functions. Comprehensive experiments validate each modality within the proposed earpiece, while its potential in health monitoring is illustrated through case studies. We further demonstrate how combining data from multiple sensors within such an integrated wearable device improves both the accuracy of measurements and the ability to deal wit...

  14. Surface electromyography physiology, engineering and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, Dario

    2016-01-01

    The book presents a quantitative approach to the study and use of noninvasively detected electromyographic (EMG) signals, as well as their numerous applications in various aspects of the life sciences. Surface Electromyography: Physiology, Engineering, and Applications is an update of Electromyography: Physiology, Engineering, and Noninvasive Applications (Wiley-IEEE Press, 2004) and focuses on the developments that have taken place over the last decade. The first nine chapters deal with the generation, detection, understanding, interpretation, and modeling of EMG signals. Detection technology, with particular focus on EMG imaging techniques that are based on two-dimensional electrode arrays are also included in the first half of the book. The latter 11 chapters deal with applications, which range fro monitoring muscle fatigue, electrically elicited contractions, posture analysis, prevention of work-related and child-delivery-related neuromuscular disorders, ergonomics, movement analysis, physical therapy, ex...

  15. Macroeconomic aspects of dollarization

    OpenAIRE

    Kolář, Ladislav

    2009-01-01

    The dissertation deals mainly with explanation of the term "de jure dollarization" and confronts the dollarization regime with others. The core of the whole dissertation is to outline the factors which indicate fulfillment of dollarization and the positives or negatives that it brings. It slightly refers to the regional monetary integration in several regions and discovers mutual aspects with the dollarization.

  16. Quantum Chromodynamics: Computational Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to QCD, the QCD phase diagram, and non-equilibrium phenomena in QCD. We emphasize aspects of the theory that can be addressed using computational methods, in particular euclidean path integral Monte Carlo, fluid dynamics, kinetic theory, classical field theory and holographic duality.

  17. [Psychosocial aspects of halitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongh, A. de; Baat, C. de; Horstman, M.

    2012-01-01

    Using a representative sample from the Dutch population, some psychosocial aspects of halitosis were examined. The results of the survey showed that almost 90% of the Dutch population aged 16 years and older were regularly faced with halitosis. Forty percent reported to be exposed to someone with ha

  18. Aspects of Marine Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awkerman, Gary L.

    This publication is designed for use in standard science curricula to develop oceanologic manifestations of certain science topics. Included are teacher guides, student activities, and demonstrations to impart ocean science understanding, specifically, aspects of marine ecology, to high school students. The course objectives include the ability of…

  19. Tense, aspect, and modality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfau, R.; Steinbach, M.; Woll, B.; Pfau, R.; Steinbach, M.; Woll, B.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-linguistically, the grammatical categories tense, aspect, and modality - when they are overtly expressed - are generally realized by free morphemes (such as adverbials and auxiliaries) or by bound inflectional markers. The discussion in this chapter will make clear that this generalization als

  20. Diagnostic aspects of gonorrhoea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Stolz (Ernst)

    1974-01-01

    textabstractIn 1971 an investigation into the epidemiological, clinical, bacteriological and therapeutic aspects of gonorrhoea was started in collaboration with the Bacteriological Laboratory of the University Hospital/Medical Faculty Rotterdam. Jn the framework of this investigation, the data were

  1. A virtual laboratory system for physiology teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KArl Bohme

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available There exist a number of areas in the teaching of physiology which potentially lend themselves to a Computer-Based Learning approach. One such area which has been explored at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU and elsewhere (Dewhurst, 1993; Kwan, 1993 is the use of multimedia tools to simulate aspects of experiments traditionally performed on animals. The use of real animal specimens (for example, frogs or rats for dissection and experimentation is both costly and contrary to the ethics of some students.

  2. [Infantile apnea. The etiopathogenic aspects. I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Târdea, A

    1989-01-01

    The paper reports on etiopathogenesis aspects of apnea, on the basis of the literature data. After showing the importance of the problem and the definitions accepted, the author presents the physiological and physiopathological framework of the breathing control. The paper deals with apnea and periodic breathing associated with evident diseases and procedures, and idiopathic apnea. The central, obstructive and mixed types of apnea and their characteristics are described. The final part of the paper dwells on other mechanisms involved in apnea: gastroesophageal flux, endorphines, increased serum level of catecholamines and abnormal awakening hypoxic threshold, tobacco and coffee consumption.

  3. The human hair: from anatomy to physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffoli, Barbara; Rinaldi, Fabio; Labanca, Mauro; Sorbellini, Elisabetta; Trink, Anna; Guanziroli, Elena; Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi F

    2014-03-01

    Hair is a unique character of mammals and has several functions, from protection of the skin to sexual and social communication. In literature, there are various studies about hair that take into consideration different aspects within many fields of science, including biology, dermatology, cosmetics, forensic sciences, and medicine. We carried out a search of studies published in PubMed up to 2013. In this review, we summarized the principal anatomical and physiological aspects of the different types of human hair, and we considered the clinical significance of the different structures and the distribution of the hair in the human body. This review could be the basis for improvement and progression in the field of hair research. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  4. Muscle Bioenergetic Considerations for Intrinsic Laryngeal Skeletal Muscle Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandage, Mary J.; Smith, Audrey G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Intrinsic laryngeal skeletal muscle bioenergetics, the means by which muscles produce fuel for muscle metabolism, is an understudied aspect of laryngeal physiology with direct implications for voice habilitation and rehabilitation. The purpose of this review is to describe bioenergetic pathways identified in limb skeletal muscle and…

  5. Behavioural aspects of terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistedt, Samuel J

    2013-05-10

    Behavioural and social sciences are useful in collecting and analysing intelligence data, understanding terrorism, and developing strategies to combat terrorism. This article aims to examine the psychopathological concepts of terrorism and discusses the developing roles for behavioural scientists. A systematic review was conducted of studies investigating behavioural aspects of terrorism. These studies were identified by a systematic search of databases, textbooks, and a supplementary manual search of references. Several fundamental concepts were identified that continue to influence the motives and the majority of the behaviours of those who support or engage in this kind of specific violence. Regardless of the psychological aspects and new roles for psychiatrists, the behavioural sciences will continue to be called upon to assist in developing better methods to gather and analyse intelligence, to understand terrorism, and perhaps to stem the radicalisation process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIQUEIRA-BATISTA, Rodrigo; SOUZA, Camila Ribeiro; MAIA, Polyana Mendes; SIQUEIRA, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. Objective: To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Method: Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Results: Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. PMID:28076489

  7. Aspects of B physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1987-10-14

    Various aspects of weak decays are commented on. Probing of the standard model and of phenomena beyond the standard model are discussed, followed by a theoretical view of B mesons and some experimental observations on B mesons. The point is made that any data on B decay would be interesting in that it would provide powerful new constraints in analyses of the standard model and extensions thereof. (LEW)

  8. Electrochemical kinetics theoretical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Vetter, Klaus J

    1967-01-01

    Electrochemical Kinetics: Theoretical Aspects focuses on the processes, methodologies, reactions, and transformations in electrochemical kinetics. The book first offers information on electrochemical thermodynamics and the theory of overvoltage. Topics include equilibrium potentials, concepts and definitions, electrical double layer and electrocapillarity, and charge-transfer, diffusion, and reaction overvoltage. Crystallization overvoltage, total overvoltage, and resistance polarization are also discussed. The text then examines the methods of determining electrochemical reaction mechanisms

  9. LNG project - contractual aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Bruno Almeida

    2008-07-01

    This paper intends to provide from the legal point of view an outline of the main challenges of a LNG project in the upstream, regulatory aspects, liquefaction, financing and midstream through a basic checklist; an overview of the contractual complexity of a LNG project; some basic discussion of particular LNG contract clauses; and a comparative analysis between the classic clauses of a Gas Transportation Agreement (GTA) through a gas pipeline and LNG logistic. (author)

  10. Strategic Aspects of Hegemony

    OpenAIRE

    Robert E. Goodin; Güth, Werner; Snidal, Duncan

    2005-01-01

    Hegemony is a central feature of contemporary international politics but it remains seriously under-theorized. We draw on cooperative game theory to represent and analyze different aspects of hegemony. After developing a general conception of hegemony, we analyze the circumstances under which a Hegemon needs assistance from allies, examine when prospective allies have incentives to cooperate with or challenge Hegemon and evaluate the prospects for exploitation by Hegemon. Throughout, we conne...

  11. MARKETING MIX THEORETICAL ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Išoraitė

    2016-01-01

    Aim of article is to analyze marketing mix theoretical aspects. The article discusses that marketing mix is one of the main objectives of the marketing mix elements for setting objectives and marketing budget measures. The importance of each element depends not only on the company and its activities, but also on the competition and time. All marketing elements are interrelated and should be seen in the whole of their actions. Some items may have greater importance than others; it depends main...

  12. Physiology of Women's Sexual Function: Basic Knowledge and New Findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salonia, Andrea; Giraldi, Annamaria; Chivers, Meredith L

    2010-01-01

    Introduction.  Data concerning the physiology of female sexual functioning are still obtained from animal studies, but an increasing amount of novel evidence comes from human studies. Aim.  To gain knowledge of psychological and biologic physiology of women's sexual functioning, mainly addressing...... sexual arousal and orgasm. Methods.  A broad-based literature review of current knowledge of the psychological and biologic physiology aspects of women's sexual functioning. Results.  A comprehensive understanding of the anatomical, neurobiological, and psychological mechanisms behind sexual function...... and responses is of paramount importance. A biopsychological paradigm was considered when reviewing currently available data, thus considering aspects of: (i) sexual differentiation of the brain, which is critical for sex differentiation in behavior; (ii) central neurobiology of sexual function, highlighting...

  13. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  14. The Leafhoppers: Anatomy, Physiology and Behavior of Feeding and Its Sensory Mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present book contains chapters summarizing all major aspects of the biology of leafhoppers (family Cicadellidae), among the most numerous and important insect pests in the world. Major chapter topics discussed include internal and external morphology, physiology, behavior, reproduction, taxonom...

  15. Network Physiology: Mapping Interactions Between Networks of Physiologic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bartsch, Ronny P.

    The human organism is an integrated network of interconnected and interacting organ systems, each representing a separate regulatory network. The behavior of one physiological system (network) may affect the dynamics of all other systems in the network of physiologic networks. Due to these interactions, failure of one system can trigger a cascade of failures throughout the entire network. We introduce a systematic method to identify a network of interactions between diverse physiologic organ systems, to quantify the hierarchical structure and dynamics of this network, and to track its evolution under different physiologic states. We find a robust relation between network structure and physiologic states: every state is characterized by specific network topology, node connectivity and links strength. Further, we find that transitions from one physiologic state to another trigger a markedly fast reorganization in the network of physiologic interactions on time scales of just a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. This reorganization in network topology occurs simultaneously and globally in the entire network as well as at the level of individual physiological systems, while preserving a hierarchical order in the strength of network links. Our findings highlight the need of an integrated network approach to understand physiologic function, since the framework we develop provides new information which can not be obtained by studying individual systems. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate the development of a new field, Network Physiology.

  16. Insomnia: psychological and neurobiological aspects and non-pharmacological treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molen, Yara Fleury; Carvalho, Luciane Bizari Coin; Prado, Lucila Bizari Fernandes do; Prado, Gilmar Fernandes do

    2014-01-01

    Insomnia involves difficulty in falling asleep, maintaining sleep or having refreshing sleep. This review gathers the existing informations seeking to explain insomnia, including those that focus on psychological aspects and those considered neurobiological. Insomnia has been defined in psychological (cognitive components, such as worries and rumination, and behavioral aspects, such as classic conditioning) and physiological terms (increased metabolic rate, with increased muscle tone, heart rate and temperature). From the neurobiological point of view, there are two perspectives: one which proposes that insomnia occurs in association with a failure to inhibit wakefulness and another that considers hyperarousal as having an important role in the physiology of sleep. The non-pharmacological interventions developed to face different aspects of insomnia are presented.

  17. Insomnia: psychological and neurobiological aspects and non-pharmacological treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Fleury Molen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia involves difficulty in falling asleep, maintaining sleep or having refreshing sleep. This review gathers the existing informations seeking to explain insomnia, including those that focus on psychological aspects and those considered neurobiological. Insomnia has been defined in psychological (cognitive components, such as worries and rumination, and behavioral aspects, such as classic conditioning and physiological terms (increased metabolic rate, with increased muscle tone, heart rate and temperature. From the neurobiological point of view, there are two perspectives: one which proposes that insomnia occurs in association with a failure to inhibit wakefulness and another that considers hyperarousal as having an important role in the physiology of sleep. The non-pharmacological interventions developed to face different aspects of insomnia are presented.

  18. AspectJ in action practical aspect-oriented programming

    CERN Document Server

    Laddad, Ramnivas

    2003-01-01

    A guide to aspect-oriented programming and the AspectJ language, this book provides code examples that enable quick implementation of functionality in a system. Thorough introductions to AOP and AspectJ will help developers learn or advance their knowledge of AspectJ. Examples of everyday situations in which AspectJ solutions can be applied, such as logging, policy enforcement, resource pooling, business logic, thread-safety, authentication and authorization, and transaction management are provided. In addition, design patterns and idioms are covered, as is business rule implementation. The latest technologies, such as JEES, JAAS, and log4j, are explained and connected with AspectJ.

  19. Aristotle on physiology of logos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benéitez Prudencio, José Javier

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a view of Aristotle’s understanding of the relation of human intellect to human body. Given that for Aristotle intellect is a ‘psychic’ capacity or power: does Aristotle think of human understanding as a part or aspect of form (ειδος of the human body, in the way that the other powers (i.e. sensitive and nutritive are both parts of the form of an animal body? This question is still in dispute, but the objective in my inquiry is to justify the possibilities of an Aristotelian’s physiology of mind or thought.

    El presente artículo trata de estudiar la relación del entendimiento humano con el cuerpo en el pensamiento aristotélico. Dado que para Aristóteles la inteligencia constituye una capacidad o facultad ‘psíquica’, podríamos preguntarnos si no piensa, entonces, que sea una parte o un aspecto de la forma (ειδος del cuerpo humano, de la misma manera que se da esta relación con los otras facultades (así, por ejemplo, con la sensación y la nutrición. La cuestión es motivo todavía de disputa. El objetivo de mi investigación radica en justificar las posibilidades de una fisiología aristotélica de la mente o del pensamiento.

  20. Functional aspects of emotions in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittilsen, Silje

    2013-11-01

    There is an ongoing scientific discussion on whether fish have emotions, and if so how they experience them? The discussion has incorporated important areas such as brain anatomy and function, physiological and behavioural responses, and the cognitive abilities that fish possess. Little attention has however, been directed towards what functional aspects emotions ought to have in fish. If fish have emotions - why? The elucidation of this question and an assessment of the scientific evidences of emotions in fish in an evolutionary and functional framework would represent a valuable contribution in the discussion on whether fish are emotional creatures. Here parts of the vast amount of literature from both biology and psychology relating to the scientific field of emotions, animal emotion, and the functional aspects that emotions fulfil in the lives of humans and animals are reviewed. Subsequently, by viewing fish behaviour, physiology and cognitive abilities in the light of this functional framework it is possible to infer what functions emotions may serve in fish. This approach may contribute to the vital running discussion on the subject of emotions in fish. In fact, if it can be substantiated that emotions are likely to serve a function in fish similar to that of other higher vertebrate species, the notion that fish do have emotions will be strengthened.

  1. Single Cell Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Pierre; Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Kettunen, Petronella; Vriz, Sophie; Jullien, Ludovic; Bensimon, David

    The possibility to control at specific times and specific places the activity of biomolecules (enzymes, transcription factors, RNA, hormones, etc.) is opening up new opportunities in the study of physiological processes at the single cell level in a live organism. Most existing gene expression systems allow for tissue specific induction upon feeding the organism with exogenous inducers (e.g., tetracycline). Local genetic control has earlier been achieved by micro-injection of the relevant inducer/repressor molecule, but this is an invasive and possibly traumatic technique. In this chapter, we present the requirements for a noninvasive optical control of the activity of biomolecules and review the recent advances in this new field of research.

  2. [Physiology of the neuropeptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M; Mayas, M D; Carrera, M P; Ramírez- Expósito, M J

    In the present review, the characteristics of mammalian neuropeptides have been studied. Neuropeptides are widely distributed not only in the nervous system but also in the periphery. They are synthesised by neurons as large precursor molecules (pre propeptides) which have to be cleaved and modified in order to form the mature neuropeptides. Neuropeptides may exert actions as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and/or neurohormones. In the neurons, they coexist with classic transmitters and often with other peptides. After their releasing, they bind to especific receptors to exert their action in the target cell. Most of these receptors belongs to a family of G protein coupled receptors. Finally, peptidases are the enzymes involved in the degradation of neuropeptides. Conclusions. In the last years, the number of known neuropeptides and the understanding of their functions have been increased. With these data, present investigations are looking for the treatment of different pathologies associated with alterations in the physiology of neuropeptides.

  3. Forestry certification social aspects

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hamman, J

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available intimidating to respondents. Related to the question of language is the question of race. South Africa's political history has been characterised by colonialist dispossession and racial exclusivity in political decision-making. The effect of this on rural... and environmental aspects of the audit, the forester seems to be more uncomfortable responding to the social auditor. The skill levels required to gain and maintain the trust of the forest management is very high, and the same racial factors play a role...

  4. Fractal aspects of hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Deppman, Airton

    2016-01-01

    The non extensive aspects of $p_T$ distributions obtained in high energy collisions are discussed in relation to possible fractal structure in hadrons, in the sense of the thermofractal structure recently introduced. The evidences of self-similarity in both theoretical and experimental works in High Energy and in Hadron Physics are discussed, to show that the idea of fractal structure of hadrons and fireballs have being under discussion for decades. The non extensive self-consistent thermodynamics and the thermofractal structure allow one to connect non extensivity to intermittence and possibly to parton distribution functions in a single theoretical framework.

  5. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina Gil, D. [Santiago de Compostela Univ. (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  6. Physical and physiological profiles of taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Craig A; Ferreira da Silva Santos, Jonatas; Chaabène, Helmi; Pieter, Willy; Franchini, Emerson

    2014-06-01

    Taekwondo has evolved into a modern-day Olympic combat sport. The physical and physiological demands of modern-day taekwondo competition require athletes to be competent in several aspects of fitness. This review critically explores the physical and physiological characteristics of taekwondo athletes and presents implications for training and research. International taekwondo athletes possess low levels of body fat and a somatotype that characterises a blend of moderate musculoskeletal tissue and relative body linearity. While there is some variation in the maximum oxygen uptake of taekwondo athletes, moderate to high levels of cardio-respiratory fitness are necessary to support the metabolic demands of fighting and to facilitate recovery between consecutive matches. Taekwondo athletes demonstrate high peak anaerobic power characteristics of the lower limbs and this attribute appears to be conducive to achieving success in international competition. The ability to generate and sustain power output using both concentric and 'stretch-shortening cycle' muscle actions of the lower limbs may be important to support the technical and tactical actions in combat. Taekwondo competitors also display moderate to high maximum dynamic strength characteristics of the lower and upper extremities, and moderate endurance properties of the trunk and hip flexor musculature. The dynamic nature of the technical and tactical actions in the sport demand high flexibility of the lower limbs. More extensive research is required into the physical and physiological characteristics of taekwondo athletes to extend existing knowledge and to permit specialised conditioning for different populations within the sport.

  7. Physiological investigation of dysarthria: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Bruce E

    2011-02-01

    Recent years have seen the development and introduction of a range of new physiological instruments for investigating various aspects of articulatory function in persons with dysarthria. Included among these techniques are electromagnetic articulography (EMA), electropalatography (EPG), and pressure-sensing EPG. The aim of this paper is to describe and evaluate these techniques, highlighting their relative advantages, disadvantages, and specific applications in assessing articulation in speakers with dysarthria associated with a variety of neurological disorders. Emphasis will be given to those instruments that enable researchers and clinicians to examine articulatory functions in 3-dimensions, such as 3D-EMA (AG500) and 3D-EPG. In addition the application of pressure-sensing EPG and ultrasonography will be outlined. Each of these physiological techniques will be fully described in terms of their component hardware and underlying principles of operation. The use of each technique in the assessment of dysarthria will be illustrated wherever possible by reference to specific case examples, and especially cases drawn from various neuropathological groups. Research findings reported to date based on each of the above physiological instruments will be reviewed and the research summarized.

  8. Network Physiology reveals relations between network topology and physiological function

    CERN Document Server

    Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; 10.1038/ncomms1705

    2012-01-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate the development of a new field, Network Physiology.

  9. Network physiology reveals relations between network topology and physiological function

    OpenAIRE

    Bashan, Amir; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-01-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiological systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiological network. We find that each physiological state is...

  10. Physiological studies on cultivar-specific resistance of tomato plants to Cladosporium fulvum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrastructural and physiological aspects of cultivar-specific resistance of tomato against Cladosporium fulvum (syn. Fulvia fulva) are subject of this thesis.The ultrastructural study described in the first paper was meant as an introduction to a physiological study of cultivar-specific resistance.

  11. The Physiology of Female Sexual Function and the Pathophysiology of Female Sexual Dysfunction (Committee 13A)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levin, Roy J.; Both, Stephanie; Georgiadis, Janniko; Kukkonen, Tuuli; Park, Kwangsung; Yang, Claire C.

    Introduction: The article consists of six sections written by separate authors that review female genital anatomy, the physiology of female sexual function, and the pathophysiology of female sexual dysfunction but excluding hormonal aspects. Aim: To review the physiology of female sexual function

  12. Neurological aspects of grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Adriana C; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Natalia P; de Mello Schier, Alexandre R; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flavia; Nardi, Antonio E; Machado, Sergio; Pessoa, Tamires M

    2014-01-01

    Despite grief being a universal experience and the increased scientific attention paid to grief and bereavement in recent years, studies that seek to better understand the role of the neurological aspects of grief are still scarce. We found 5 studies that discussed the relationship between the neurological aspects of grief due to the death of a loved one. All studies showed an activation of common areas, i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), insula and amygdala. These findings could indicate that there is a group of areas working together and responding to generate the symptomatology of grief. Because grief is a universal experience, it is essential that the necessary and effective support can be provided to those who experience the loss of someone considered important in their lives, and this requires understanding grief's manifestation, its differential diagnosis in reference to other clinical conditions, mainly psychiatric ones, and adequate forms of intervention and treatment when necessary. Proper understanding and support can help prevent the emergence of more serious health problems.

  13. PRAGMATIC ASPECT OF CITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Sergeevna SIRENKO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the research of the prag-matic aspect of citation in fictional text from the in-tertextual point of view. The theory of intertextuality was formed in the works of M.Bakhtin and devel-oped by Y. Kristeva after the analysis of the works of post-modern writers. So allusion and citation began to be investigated not from the philology point of view only but from the linguistics as well. The pur-pose of the article is to investigate the pragmatic aspect of citation which includes also the investiga-tion of its pragmatic functions. Different views on the citation classification are also mentioned in the article as it is an actual problem in modern linguis-tics. Novels by British writer J. Fforde are the mate-rial for the investigation article because they pos-sess a big amount of intertextual inclusion in the text in general and citation in particular.

  14. Cardiovascular physiology and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Narayana S; Svatikova, Anna; Somers, Virend K

    2003-05-01

    Sleep is a natural periodic suspension of consciousness during which processes of rest and restoration occur. The cognitive, reparative and regenerative accompaniments of sleep appear to be essential for maintenance of health and homeostasis. This brief overview will examine the cardiovascular responses to normal and disordered sleep, and their physiologic and pathologic implications. In the past, sleep was believed to be a passive state. The tableau of sleep as it unfolds is anything but a passive process. The brain's activity is as complex as wakefulness, never "resting" during sleep. Following the demise of the 'passive theory of sleep' (the reticular activating system is fatigued during the waking day and hence becomes inactive), there arose the 'active theory of sleep' (sleep is due to an active general inhibition of the brain) (1). Hess demonstrated the active nature of sleep in cats, inducing "physiological sleep" with electrical stimulation of the diencephalon (2). Classical experiments of transection of the cat brainstem (3) at midpontine level inhibited sleep completely, implying that centers below this level were involved in the induction of sleep (1, 4). For the first time, measurement of sleep depth without awakening the sleeper using the electroencephalogram (EEG) was demonstrated in animals by Caton and in humans, by Berger (1). This was soon followed by discovery of the rapid eye movement sleep periods (REM) by Aserinski and Kleitman (5), demonstration of periodical sleep cycles and their association with REM sleep (6, 7). Multiple studies and steady discoveries (4) made polysomnography, with its ability to perform simultaneous whole night recordings of EEG, electromyogram (EMG), and electrooculogram (EOC), a major diagnostic tool in study of sleep disorders. This facility has been of further critical importance in allowing evaluation of the interaction between sleep and changes in hemodynamics and autonomic cardiovascular control. Consequently the

  15. NORMATIVIDAD FISIOLÓGICA Y NOCIVIDAD AMBIENTAL: ASPECTOS BIOÉTICOS DE LAS METÁFORAS CIENTÍFICAS NORMATIVIDADE FISIOLÓGICA E PREJUÍZO AMBIENTAL: ASPECTOS BIOÉTICOS DAS METÁFORAS CIENTÍFICA PHYSIOLOGICAL REGULATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL HARMFULNESS: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS OF SCIENTIFIC METAPHORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lolas Stepke

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo examina históricamente la influencia social de la fisiología científica como fundamento de la medicina y la tensión entre lo universal y cosmopolita de la ciencia y lo particular del contexto cotidiano. Esta tensión se vincula a la metáfora de la máquina, central en la fisiología del siglo XIX, modificada por las ciencias sociales y humanas, que introducen la historicidad (no la simple temporalidad como factor diferenciador. La normatividad fisiológica encuentra límites de aplicación en la medicina social, en la elaboración de pautas de rendimiento laboral y deportivo y en la consideración de las nocividades ambientales. Se sugiere que la construcción discursiva de las metáforas no explícitas permite establecer el diálogo entre racionalidades y personas y de este modo facilita la deliberación bioéticaEste artigo examina, através de perspectiva da história, a influência social da fisiologia científica como fundamento da medicina, assim como a tensão entre o universal e o cosmopolita, o particular no contexto cotidiano da ciência. Esta tensão está vinculada com a metáfora da máquina que é central na fisiologia do séc. XIX e modificada pelas ciências sociais e humanas que introduziram a historicidade (não a simples temporalidade como fator diferenciador. A normatividade da fisiologia apresenta limites de aplicação na medicina social, na elaboração de pautas de rendimento laborativo e esportivo, bem como na consideração de prejuízos ambientais. Sugere-se que a construção discursiva das metáforas não explícitas permita estabelecer o diálogo entre racionalidades e pessoas e, deste modo, facilitar a deliberação bioéticaThis article examines historically the social influence of scientific physiology as the foundation of medicine and the tension between cosmopolitan and universal science and particular daily contexts. These tension is traced back to the machine metaphor, central in

  16. Physiology of vitreous surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Einar

    2009-02-01

    Vitreous surgery has various physiological and clinical consequences, both beneficial and harmful. Vitrectomy reduces the risk of retinal neovascularization, while increasing the risk of iris neovascularization, reduces macular edema and stimulates cataract formation. These clinical consequences may be understood with the help of classical laws of physics and physiology. The laws of Fick, Stokes-Einstein and Hagen-Poiseuille state that molecular transport by diffusion or convection is inversely related to the viscosity of the medium. When the vitreous gel is replaced with less viscous saline, the transport of all molecules, including oxygen and cytokines, is facilitated. Oxygen transport to ischemic retinal areas is improved, as is clearance of VEGF and other cytokines from these areas, thus reducing edema and neovascularization. At the same time, oxygen is transported faster down a concentration gradient from the anterior to the posterior segment, while VEGF moves in the opposite direction, making the anterior segment less oxygenated and with more VEGF, stimulating iris neovascularization. Silicone oil is the exception that proves the rule: it is more viscous than vitreous humour, re-establishes the transport barrier to oxygen and VEGF, and reduces the risk for iris neovascularization in the vitrectomized-lentectomized eye. Modern vitreous surgery involves a variety of treatment options in addition to vitrectomy itself, such as photocoagulation, anti-VEGF drugs, intravitreal steroids and release of vitreoretinal traction. A full understanding of these treatment modalities allows sensible combination of treatment options. Retinal photocoagulation has repeatedly been shown to improve retinal oxygenation, as does vitrectomy. Oxygen naturally reduces VEGF production and improves retinal hemodynamics. The VEGF-lowering effect of photocoagulation and vitrectomy can be augmented with anti-VEGF drugs and the permeability effect of VEGF reduced with corticosteroids

  17. Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

    1998-01-01

    This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

  18. Physiologically important metal nanoparticles and their toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Jayeeta; Ghosh, Sourav; Datta, Poulami; Gomes, Aparna; Gomes, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been setting benchmarks for the last two decades, but the origins of this technology reach back to ancient history. Today, nanoparticles of both metallic and non-metallic origin are under research and development for applications in various fields of biology/therapeutics. Physiologically important metals are of concern because they are compatible with the human system in terms of absorption, assimilation, excretion, and side effects. There are several physiologically inorganic metals that are present in the human body with a wide range of biological activities. Some of these metals are magnesium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum. These metals are synthesized in the form of nanoparticles by different physical and chemical methods. Physiologically important nanoparticles are currently under investigation for their bio-medical applications as well as for therapeutics. Along with the applicative aspects of nanoparticles, another domain that is of great concern is the risk assessment of these nanoparticles to avoid unnecessary hazards. It has been seen that these nanoparticles have been shown to possess toxicity in biological systems. Conventional physical and chemical methods of metal nanoparticle synthesis may be one possible reason for nanoparticle toxicity that can be overcome by synthesis of nanoparticles from biological sources. This review is an attempt to establish metal nanoparticles of physiological importance to be the best candidates for future nanotechnological tools and medicines, owing to the acceptability and safety in the human body. This can only be successful if these particles are synthesized with a better biocompatibility and low or no toxicity.

  19. Aspects of Color Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, D K

    2001-01-01

    I discuss some aspects of recent developments in color superconductivity in high density quark matter. I calculate the Cooper pair gap and the critical points at high density, where magnetic gluons are not screened. The ground state of high density QCD with three light flavors is shown to be a color-flavor locking state, which can be mapped into the low-density hadronic phase. The meson mass at the CFL superconductor is also calculated. The CFL color superconductor is bosonized, where the Fermi sea is identified as a $Q$-matter and the gapped quarks as topological excitations, called superqualitons, of mesons. Finally, as an application of color supercoductivity, I discuss the neutrino interactions in the CFL color superconductor.

  20. CUSTOMER LOYALTY THEORETICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita IŠORAITĖ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Customer loyalty - is a voluntary user solution for a long time to build relationships with the company. Loyalty is the user's desire for a long time to continue their relationship with a particular company, because loyal customers are those who purchase goods/services of the company from time to time. Loyalty can be treated as a customer desire, willingness to be a regular customer for a long time, buying and using the goods of the chosen companies by recommending them to friends and colleagues. Loyalty can be seen as a multi-dimension, covering behavioral and positional components, where positional aspect reflects customers' approach to business, while the behavioral dimension reveals a frequent and regular shopping, purchase quantity, size, range, availability, etc.

  1. Psychiatric aspects of burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries and their subsequent treatment cause one of the most excruciating forms of pain imaginable. The psychological aspects of burn injury have been researched in different parts of the world, producing different outcomes. Studies have shown that greater levels of acute pain are associated with negative long-term psychological effects such as acute stress disorder, depression, suicidal ideation, and post-traumatic stress disorder for as long as 2 years after the initial burn injury. The concept of allostatic load is presented as a potential explanation for the relationship between acute pain and subsequent psychological outcomes. A biopsychosocial model is also presented as a means of obtaining better inpatient pain management and helping to mediate this relationship.

  2. Formal aspects of resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana-Maria Drigă

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of resilience has represented during the recent years a leading concern both in Romania, within the European Union and worldwide. Specialists in economics, management, finance, legal sciences, political sciences, sociology, psychology, grant a particular interest to this concept. Multidisciplinary research of resilience has materialized throughout the time in multiple conceptualizations and theorizing, but without being a consensus between specialists in terms of content, specificity and scope. Through this paper it is intended to clarify the concept of resilience, achieving an exploration of the evolution of this concept in ecological, social and economic environment. At the same time, the paper presents aspects of feedback mechanisms and proposes a formalization of resilience using the logic and mathematical analysis.

  3. Technological Aspects: High Voltage

    CERN Document Server

    Faircloth, D C

    2013-01-01

    This paper covers the theory and technological aspects of high-voltage design for ion sources. Electric field strengths are critical to understanding high-voltage breakdown. The equations governing electric fields and the techniques to solve them are discussed. The fundamental physics of high-voltage breakdown and electrical discharges are outlined. Different types of electrical discharges are catalogued and their behaviour in environments ranging from air to vacuum are detailed. The importance of surfaces is discussed. The principles of designing electrodes and insulators are introduced. The use of high-voltage platforms and their relation to system design are discussed. The use of commercially available high-voltage technology such as connectors, feedthroughs and cables are considered. Different power supply technologies and their procurement are briefly outlined. High-voltage safety, electric shocks and system design rules are covered.

  4. Aspects of Gond Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Vahia, M N

    2013-01-01

    The Gond community is considered to be one of the most ancient tribes of India with a continuing history of several thousand years. They are also known for their largely isolated history which they have retained through the millennia. Several of their intellectual traditions therefore are a record of parallel aspects of human intellectual growth, and still preserve their original flavour and have not been homogenised by the later traditions of India. In view of this, the Gonds provide a special window to the different currents that constitute contemporary India. In the present study, we summarise their mythology, genetics and script. We then investigate their astronomical traditions and try to understand this community through a survey of 15 Gond villages spread over Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh. We show that they have a distinctly different view of the sky from the conventional astronomical ideas encountered elsewhere in India, which is both interesting and informative. We briefly comment o...

  5. Mobile Learning Aspects and Readiness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hana Mohammed Eltayeb Abdall; Mohammed Osman Ali Hegazi

    2014-01-01

      This paper provide the aspects of mobile learning by presenting the differences techniques and aspects of using mobile devices in education according to the perspective of researches and studies...

  6. Conservation physiology of marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian; Peck, Myron A.; Antognarelli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology...... to different extents, ranging from no explicit consideration to detailed physiological mechanisms, and across scales from a single fish to global fishery resources. Biologists from different sub-disciplines are collaborating to rise to the challenge of projecting future changes in distribution and productivity...

  7. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Souza, Camila Ribeiro; Maia, Polyana Mendes; Siqueira, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. A utilização de robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos tem sido cada vez mais frequente na atualidade, o que permite a emergência de inúmeras questões bioéticas nesse âmbito. Apresentar revisão sobre os aspectos éticos dos usos de robôs em cirurgia. Realizou-se revisão nas bases de dados Pubmed, SciELO e Lilacs cruzando-se os descritores "bioética", "cirurgia", "ética", "laparoscopia" e "robótica". Do total de citações obtidas, selecionou-se 17 artigos, os quais foram utilizados para a elaboração do artigo. Ele contém breve apresentação sobre a robótica, sua inserção na saúde e os aspectos bioéticos da utilização dos robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos. A cirurgia robótica é uma realidade, hoje, em muitas unidades hospitalares, o que torna essencial a reflexão bioética sobre as relações entre profissionais da saúde, autômatos e pacientes.

  8. Starting physiology: bioelectrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-12-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The topic of bioelectrogenesis encompasses multidisciplinary concepts, involves several mechanisms, and is a dynamic process, i.e., it never turns off during the lifetime of the cell. Therefore, to improve the transmission and acquisition of knowledge in this field, I present an alternative didactic model. The design of the model assumes that it is possible to build, in a series of sequential steps, an assembly of proteins within the membrane of an isolated cell in a simulated electrophysiology experiment. Initially, no proteins are inserted in the membrane and the cell is at a baseline energy state; the extracellular and intracellular fluids are at thermodynamic equilibrium. Students are guided through a sequence of four steps that add key membrane transport proteins to the model cell. The model is simple at the start and becomes progressively more complex, finally producing transmembrane chemical and electrical gradients. I believe that this didactic approach helps instructors with a more efficient tool for the teaching of the mechanisms of resting membrane potential while helping students avoid common difficulties that may be encountered when learning this topic.

  9. Hypertension: physiology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John E; Granger, Joey P; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Dubinion, John; George, Eric; Hamza, Shereen; Speed, Joshua; Hall, Michael E

    2012-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension and availability of effective and safe antihypertensive drugs, suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control is still the most important risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and is globally responsible for more than 7 million deaths annually. Short-term and long-term BP regulation involve the integrated actions of multiple cardiovascular, renal, neural, endocrine, and local tissue control systems. Clinical and experimental observations strongly support a central role for the kidneys in the long-term regulation of BP, and abnormal renal-pressure natriuresis is present in all forms of chronic hypertension. Impaired renal-pressure natriuresis and chronic hypertension can be caused by intrarenal or extrarenal factors that reduce glomerular filtration rate or increase renal tubular reabsorption of salt and water; these factors include excessive activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, endothelin, and inflammatory cytokines, or decreased synthesis of nitric oxide and various natriuretic factors. In human primary (essential) hypertension, the precise causes of impaired renal function are not completely understood, although excessive weight gain and dietary factors appear to play a major role since hypertension is rare in nonobese hunter-gathers living in nonindustrialized societies. Recent advances in genetics offer opportunities to discover gene-environment interactions that may also contribute to hypertension, although success thus far has been limited mainly to identification of rare monogenic forms of hypertension. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  10. Physiology in Modelica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Mateják

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modelica is an object-oriented language, in which models can be created and graphically represented by connecting instances of classes from libraries. These connections are not only assignments of values; they can also represent acausal equality. Even more, they can model Kirchhoff’s laws of circuits. In Modelica it is possible to develop library classes which are an analogy of electrical circuit components. The result of our work in this field is Physiolibrary (www.physiolibrary.org – a free, open-source Modelica library for human physiology. By graphical joining instances of Physiolibrary classes, user can create models of cardiovascular circulation, thermoregulation, metabolic processes, nutrient distribution, gas transport, electrolyte regulation, water distribution, hormonal regulation and pharmacological regulation. After simple setting of the parameters, the models are ready to simulate. After simulation, the user can examine variables as their values change over time. Representing the model as a diagram has also great educational advantages, because students are able to better understand physical principles when they see them modeled graphically.

  11. Smolt physiology and endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  12. Polyamines in plant physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galston, A. W.; Sawhney, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The diamine putrescine, the triamine spermidine, and the tetramine spermine are ubiquitous in plant cells, while other polyamines are of more limited occurrence. Their chemistry and pathways of biosynthesis and metabolism are well characterized. They occur in the free form as cations, but are often conjugated to small molecules like phenolic acids and also to various macromolecules. Their titer varies from approximately micromolar to more than millimolar, and depends greatly on environmental conditions, especially stress. In cereals, the activity of one of the major polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, arginine decarboxylase, is rapidly and dramatically increased by almost every studied external stress, leading to 50-fold or greater increases in putrescine titer within a few hours. The physiological significance of this increase is not yet clear, although most recent work suggests an adaptive, protective role. Polyamines produced through the action of ornithine decarboxylase, by contrast, seem essential for DNA replication and cell division. The application of exogenous polyamines produces effects on patterns of senescence and morphogenesis, suggesting but not proving a regulatory role for polyamines in these processes. The evidence for such a regulatory role is growing.

  13. DOSHIC PHYSIOLOGY OF SKIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivprasad Chiplunkar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The balance of dosha  represents the healthy state and imbalance will cause various diseases. In normalcy doshas will be performing their own functions and individual doshas will be having their own specific sites. By telling the various sthana of each dosha, different function that is taken up by individual dosha in different sites has been highlighted.By mentioning ‘sparshanendriyam’ as one of the sthana of vata dosha the sensory functions of skin to vata dosha has been emphasised. By mentioning ‘sparshanam’ as one of the sthana of pittadosha, the function of colouring/pigmentation of skin, which is majorly carried out  by melanocytes by secreting melanin pigment has been highlighted. Meda is one among the sthanas of kapha dosha; this can be considered as the adipose tissue of skin/below skin. Since sweda is mala of meda it can be also considered as the secretions from the eccrine glands.With respect to skin, sensory functions, both tactile and thermal is carried out by vata dosha more specifically vyana vata, pigmentation to the skin carried out by meloncytes by secreting melanin, it is nothing but function of pitta dosha more specifically brajaka pitta with the help of udana vata and finally production of sweat in sweat glands is the function of kapha. So there is the need for further study and research regarding the sthanas of all three doshas in different structures/organs in the body and its physiology.

  14. Physiology of Volition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Mark

    The idea of free will is a conscious awareness of the brain concerning the nature of the movement that it produces. There is no evidence for it to be a driving force in movement generation. This review considers the physiology of movement generation and how the concepts of willing and agency might arise. Both the anatomical substrates and the timing of events are considered. Movement initiation and volition are not necessarily linked, and one line of evidence comes from consideration of patients with disorders of volition. Movement is generated subconsciously, and the conscious sense of willing the movement comes later, but the exact time of this event is difficult to assess because of the potentially illusory nature of introspection. The evidence suggests that movement is initiated in frontal lobe, particularly the mesial areas, and the sense of volition arises as the result of a corollary discharge from premotor and motor areas likely involving the parietal lobe. Agency probably involves a similar region in the parietal lobe and requires both the sense of volition and movement feedback.

  15. Nutritional aspect of nephrolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Saxena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrolithiasis is associated with a variety of abnormalities in urinary composition. These abnormal urinary risk factors are due to dietary indiscretions, physiological-metabolic disturbances or both. Stone disease is morbid and costly, and the recurrence rates may be as high as 30-50% after 5 years. Efforts to prevent stone formation are, therefore, essential. Dietary factors play an important role in kidney stone formation. Tailored dietary recommendations based on metabolic evaluation should be offered to patients for the prevention of recurrence of stone formation. Dietary intervention and subsequent evaluations of therapeutic efficacy should be based on results from multiple 24-h urine collections. Urine flow of >1 ml/kg/h almost eliminates the risk of supersaturation for calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate and uric acid, thus protecting from the formation of corresponding kidney stones. In patients with cystenuria, the required urine flow may even be higher and, in cases such as primary xanthinuria, high fluid intake is required. Milk intake in these patients should be within the RDA of calcium and protein. In children, recommendation of a high fluid intake has only limited success. Nevertheless, each patient should be advised about adequate fluid intake to increase urine volume in accordance with body size. Although children with hypocitraturia may benefit from therapeutic agents that raise the urine citrate concentration, all children bearing residual fragments should be counseled on adequate fluid intake along with potassium citrate treatment to prevent stone regrowth or formation.

  16. AKAPs and Adenylyl Cyclase in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic AMP, generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, adenylyl cyclase, protein kinase A and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review we discuss how interaction of AKAPs with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology. PMID:21978991

  17. Causality in physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Kraemer, Jan F; Penzel, Thomas; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Kurths, Jürgen; Wessel, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Health is one of the most important non-material assets and thus also has an enormous influence on material values, since treating and preventing diseases is expensive. The number one cause of death worldwide today originates in cardiovascular diseases. For these reasons the aim of understanding the functions and the interactions of the cardiovascular system is and has been a major research topic throughout various disciplines for more than a hundred years. The purpose of most of today's research is to get as much information as possible with the lowest possible effort and the least discomfort for the subject or patient, e.g. via non-invasive measurements. A family of tools whose importance has been growing during the last years is known under the headline of coupling measures. The rationale for this kind of analysis is to identify the structure of interactions in a system of multiple components. Important information lies for example in the coupling direction, the coupling strength, and occurring time lags. In this work, we will, after a brief general introduction covering the development of cardiovascular time series analysis, introduce, explain and review some of the most important coupling measures and classify them according to their origin and capabilities in the light of physiological analyses. We will begin with classical correlation measures, go via Granger-causality-based tools, entropy-based techniques (e.g. momentary information transfer), nonlinear prediction measures (e.g. mutual prediction) to symbolic dynamics (e.g. symbolic coupling traces). All these methods have contributed important insights into physiological interactions like cardiorespiratory coupling, neuro-cardio-coupling and many more. Furthermore, we will cover tools to detect and analyze synchronization and coordination (e.g. synchrogram and coordigram). As a last point we will address time dependent couplings as identified using a recent approach employing ensembles of time series. The

  18. Seasonal changes in reindeer physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Reeta Pösö

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal changes in the photoperiod, temperature and availability of food need to be converted to hormonal signals in order to induce adaptations in the physiology of the reindeer. The most reliable of the seasonal changes in the environment is the photoperiod, which affects the reindeer physiology through pineal gland and its hormone, melatonin. Usually there are large diurnal changes in the concentration of melatonin, but in the reindeer the daily rhythm disappears during the arctic summer to return again in the autumn. Seasonal changes in melatonin secretion are involved in the regulation of reproduction, the growth of pelage, thermogenesis, body mass and immune function. Melatonin may exert its effects through gene activation, but the mechanisms are not completely understood. Other hormones that show seasonality are thyroid hormones, insulin and leptin. Thus the observed physiological changes are a result of actions of several hormones. Appetite, energy production and thermogenesis are all vital for survival. During winter, when energy balance is negative, the reindeer uses mainly body fat for energy production. The use of fat stores is economical as the rate of lipolysis is controlled and the use of fatty acids in tissues such as muscle decreases. Only in severe starvation the rate of lipolysis increases enough to give rise to accumulation of ketone bodies. The protein mass is maintained and only in starved individuals muscle protein is used for energy production. The winter feed of the reindeer, the lichens, is poor in nitrogen and the nitrogen balance during winter is strongly negative. Reindeer responds to limited availability of nitrogen by increasing the recycling of urea into rumen. In general the adaptation of reindeer physiology enables the reindeer to survive the winter and although several aspects are known many others require further studies.Abstract in Finnish / Tiivistelmä: Valaistus, lämpötila ja ravinnon saatavuus

  19. Applied physiology of cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, I E

    1984-01-01

    Historically, the bicycle has evolved through the stages of a machine for efficient human transportation, a toy for children, a finely-tuned racing machine, and a tool for physical fitness development, maintenance and testing. Recently, major strides have been made in the aerodynamic design of the bicycle. These innovations have resulted in new land speed records for human powered machines. Performance in cycling is affected by a variety of factors, including aerobic and anaerobic capacity, muscular strength and endurance, and body composition. Bicycle races range from a 200m sprint to approximately 5000km. This vast range of competitive racing requires special attention to the principle of specificity of training. The physiological demands of cycling have been examined through the use of bicycle ergometers, rollers, cycling trainers, treadmill cycling, high speed photography, computer graphics, strain gauges, electromyography, wind tunnels, muscle biopsy, and body composition analysis. These techniques have been useful in providing definitive data for the development of a work/performance profile of the cyclist. Research evidence strongly suggests that when measuring the cyclist's aerobic or anaerobic capacity, a cycling protocol employing a high pedalling rpm should be used. The research bicycle should be modified to resemble a racing bicycle and the cyclist should wear cycling shoes. Prolonged cycling requires special nutritional considerations. Ingestion of carbohydrates, in solid form and carefully timed, influences performance. Caffeine appears to enhance lipid metabolism. Injuries, particularly knee problems which are prevalent among cyclists, may be avoided through the use of proper gearing and orthotics. Air pollution has been shown to impair physical performance. When pollution levels are high, training should be altered or curtailed. Effective training programmes simulate competitive conditions. Short and long interval training, blended with long

  20. Physiology of Visceral Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, G F; Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Pain involving thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic organs is a common cause for physician consultations, including one-third of chronic pain patients who report that visceral organs contribute to their suffering. Chronic visceral pain conditions are typically difficult to manage effectively, largely because visceral sensory mechanisms and factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of visceral pain are poorly understood. Mechanistic understanding is particularly problematic in "functional" visceral diseases where there is no apparent pathology and pain typically is the principal complaint. We review here the anatomical organization of the visceral sensory innervation that distinguishes the viscera from innervation of all other tissues in the body. The viscera are innervated by two nerves that share overlapping functions, but also possess notably distinct functions. Additionally, the visceral innervation is sparse relative to the sensory innervation of other tissues. Accordingly, visceral sensations tend to be diffuse in character, are typically referred to nonvisceral somatic structures and thus are difficult to localize. Early arguments about whether the viscera were innervated ("sensate") and later, whether innervated by nociceptors, were resolved by advances reviewed here in the anatomical and functional attributes of receptive endings in viscera that contribute to visceral pain (i.e., visceral nociceptors). Importantly, the contribution of plasticity (i.e., sensitization) of peripheral and central visceral nociceptive mechanisms is considered in the context of persistent, chronic visceral pain conditions. The review concludes with an overview of the functional anatomy of visceral pain processing. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1609-1633, 2016. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Recent aspects of thyroglobulin in physiology and pathology; Aspects recents de la thyroglobuline en physiologie et pathologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassane Sidibe, E. [Centre Medical Marc Sankale - Fann, Dakar (Senegal); Dangou, J.M. [Laboratoire Anatomo-Pathologie, FMPO - UCAD, Dakar (Senegal); Mbodj, M. [Laboratoire de Biophysique, FMPO - UCAD, Dakar (Senegal)

    2004-06-01

    The thyroglobulin (tg), strongly concentrated in the colloid, through a recycling to the colloid or by transcytosis to the blood stream, (function attributed to an unidentified N -Acetylglucosamine ) is linked to megalin to avoid lysosomal pathway and is delivered by a transepithelial transport (transcytosis). The promoter of this human thyroglobulin is tightly dependent on TTF-1 factor (thyroid-specific transcription factor) and Pax 8. Human recombinant TSH can increase serum baseline levels of thyroglobulin in a study from 25 to 30,000 ng/ml reflecting in part the heterogeneity of the population studied. The 131 Iodide Scan diagnosis and the measurement of serum thyroglobulin are the follow-up cornerstone that offer the opportunity in the detection of recurrence or ongoing cancer in early stage. Until now the thyroglobulin has been used in the same time than nuclear imaging. The Fluorine-18-fluoro deoxyglucose tomography positron emission plays a supplementary role in the localization of thyroid cancer recurrence sites. A control after increased post therapeutic thyroglobulin triggers a 131 Iodide scan and nuclear magnetic resonance study. In the follow-up of thyroidectomized patients with ablative radio-iodide, it is reasonable to treat patients that have an progressive increase of thyroglobulin levels but also to continue tight surveillance in those that have thyroglobulin concentrations that decrease or are stable. Fluorine-18 fluoro deoxyglucose positron emission tomography is useful in the cases with negative 131 Iodide scan and increase thyroglobulin levels. But this method has limits to find minimal disease. It is noteworthy that increased level of thyroglobulin is observed in iodine deficiency with 28.9% of world population concerned with goiter and 2% (11.2 million) with cretinism or 43 millions with mental retardation. Anti-thyroglobulin antibodies affect all the continuum of the clinical phenotype of autoimmune thyroid diseases suggesting a common pathophysiological mechanism. In the detection of focal lymphocytic thyroiditis in elderly positive findings concerning anti-thyroglobulin and anti-thyro-peroxidase show a higher sensitivity in radioimmunology (76%) comparatively to hemagglutination tests (44%) (p < 0,05). Some epitopes in C terminal region of thyroglobulin are associated with Graves' disease. A group of autoantibodies directed to this thyroglobulin region is associated with thyroid ophthalmopathy and can be involved in the development of the disease. A main gene products antithyroid antibodies. This gene is localized on chromosome 2q33 and could be likely 4 CTLA gene. Immunohistochemistry by thyroglobulin allows to authenticate thyroid tissue features. It is necessary to avoid delay of appropriate diagnosis of thyroid occult papillary cancer. (author)

  2. Assessing prebaccalaureate human physiology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, V L

    1998-12-01

    Two surveys were conducted between 1994 and 1996. The purpose of the initial survey was to obtain demographic information about prebaccaulareate human physiology courses. Of the 117 responding physiology departments, 50% offered human physiology at the prebaccalaureate level to 14,185 students during the 1994-1995 academic year. The mean was 245 students per year (+/- 30 SE). Class size was limited by 44% of the respondents. Prebaccaluareate human physiology was offered as a separate course from anatomy by 93% of the departments. Sixty-one percent scheduled the course once a year. The purpose of the second survey was to determine how physiology departments evaluated prebaccalaureate physiology courses and faculty. All responding departments utilized student feedback; 38% of the departments included physiology chair review, 38% peer review, and 9% allied health faculty review. Twenty-eight percent of allied health programs evaluated the course. Results indicated that, whereas a significant number of undergraduate students are enrolled in prebaccaluareate physiology courses annually, those courses appear to lack formal, consistent formative evaluation.

  3. HISTORICAL ASPECTS OF PHALLOPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Kyzlasov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the penis in transgender operations, amputation of the penis, congenital deformities and anomalies of the penis was and remains today an important issue in plastic surgery of the urogenital region. The only method to restore the penis is phalloplasty. In general, over the past decades, generations of clinicians have different ways and flaps for total fallouretheral reconstruction. Thus was formulated the characteristics of an ideal flap for the formation of neophallos, which should be safe, sensitive, without hair, and with long leg. However, despite the fact that the characteristics of a perfect flap, nowadays there is no “gold standard” in the formation of neophallos, as phalloplasty is a fairly complicated surgery, and the choice of method depends on many factors. The choice of methodology is determined by the plastics surgeon and to each patient is individual, depends on the etiology of the disease and the possibility of choosing the form of the donor’s transplant. This article presents a literature review devoted to the historical aspects of phalloplasty. In the article, in chronological order reflected the evolution of the different forming methods neofallos, phallourethrоplasty, describes their advantages and disadvantages.

  4. Cultural aspects of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharajh, Hari D; Abdool, Petal S

    2005-09-08

    Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  5. [Psychosocial aspects of halitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jongh, A; de Baat, C; Horstman, M

    2012-09-01

    Using a representative sample from the Dutch population, some psychosocial aspects of halitosis were examined. The results of the survey showed that almost 90% of the Dutch population aged 16 years and older were regularly faced with halitosis. Forty percent reported to be exposed to someone with halitosis at least once a week, men significantly more frequently than women. Although less strongly than body odour, halitosis was reported as being one of the most severe 'let-downs' in social interactions. The greater the social distance between subjects, the less likely is the chance that a person's attention will be drawn to halitosis experienced. When it comes to an unknown person, the chance was no more than 7%, suggesting that it is problematic to draw a person's attention to the presence of halitosis. Considering the potential social consequences of halitosis is it important that dentists and dental hygienists draw patients' attention to the presence of halitosis, when this is the case, thereby encouraging them to seek adequate treatment.

  6. Hydrodynamic aspect of caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franci Gabrovsek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available From a hydrological point of view, active caves are a series of connected conduits which drain water through an aquifer. Water tends to choose the easiest way through the system but different geological and morphological barriers act as flow restrictions. The number and characteristics of restrictions depends on the particular speleogenetic environment, which is a function of geological, geomorphological, climatological and hydrological settings. Such a variety and heterogeneity of underground systems has presented a challenge for human understanding for many centuries. Access to many underground passages, theoretical knowledge and recent methods (modeling, water pressure-resistant dataloggers, precise sensors etc. give us the opportunity to get better insight into the hydrodynamic aspect of caves. In our work we tried to approach underground hydrodynamics from both theoretical and practical points of view. We present some theoretical background of open surface and pressurized flow in underground rivers and present results of some possible scenarios. Moreover, two case studies from the Ljubljanica river basin are presented in more detail: the cave system between Planinsko polje and Ljubljansko barje, and the cave system between Bloško polje and Cerkniško polje. The approach and methodology in each case is somewhat different, as the aims were different at the beginning of exploration. However, they both deal with temporal and spatial hydrodynamics of underground waters. In the case of Bloško polje-Cerkniško polje system we also explain the feedback loop between hydrodynamics and Holocene speleogenesis.

  7. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  8. Strategic Aspects of Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Edward; Hammerstein, Peter; Hess, Nicole

    Rarely do human behavioral scientists and scholars study language, music, and other forms of communication as strategies—a means to some end. Some even deny that communication is the primary function of these phenomena. Here we draw upon selections of our earlier work to briefly define the strategy concept and sketch how decision theory, developed to explain the behavior of rational actors, is applied to evolved agents. Communication can then be interpreted as a strategy that advances the "fitness interests" of such agents. When this perspective is applied to agents with conflicts of interest, deception emerges as an important aspect of communication. We briefly review costly signaling, one solution to the problem of honest communication among agents with conflicts of interest. We also explore the subversion of cooperative signals by parasites and by plants defending themselves against herbivores, and we touch on biases in human gossip. Experiments with artificial embodied and communicating agents confirm that when there are conflicts of interest among agents, deception readily evolves. Finally, we consider signaling among super-organisms and the possible implications for understanding human music and language.

  9. Gastric cancer: basic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Carlos; Thiel, Alexandra; Machado, José C; Ristimäki, Ari

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a world health burden, ranging as the second cause of cancer death worldwide. Etiologically, GC arises not only from the combined effects of environmental factors and susceptible genetic variants but also from the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. In the last years, molecular oncobiology studies brought to light a number of genes that are implicated in gastric carcinogenesis. This review is intended to focus on the recently described basic aspects that play key roles in the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants of the genes IL-10, IL-17, MUC1, MUC6, DNMT3B, SMAD4, and SERPINE1 have been reported to modify the risk of developing GC. Several genes have been newly associated with gastric carcinogenesis, both through oncogenic activation (GSK3β, CD133, DSC2, P-Cadherin, CDH17, CD168, CD44, metalloproteinases MMP7 and MMP11, and a subset of miRNAs) and through tumor suppressor gene inactivation mechanisms (TFF1, PDX1, BCL2L10, XRCC, psiTPTE-HERV, HAI-2, GRIK2, and RUNX3). It also addressed the role of the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its importance as a potential molecular target for therapy.

  10. Gestational surrogacy: Psychosocial aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Ruiz-Robledillo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Innovation in assisted reproductive technologies together with increased infertility and new family structures are increasing the use of gestational surrogacy as a means to have children. Before, during and after the process, it is necessary to study the psychosocial characteristics of triad members: the gestational surrogate, intended parents, and offspring. Research has indicated positive adaptation to the process and benefits for all members of the triad. Altruism is the main motivation of surrogates. Notably, psychological well-being has been found to be higher in individuals who have become parents through surrogacy than in those who have used egg donation or have followed a natural process of conception. Moreover, no differences in psychosocial characteristics have been observed in the offspring, compared with children born through natural conception or egg donation. Results highlight the positive aspects of surrogacy. Future research should investigate psychosocial factors that modulate the process, acting as risk and protective factors for well-being of the triad members, and identify the optimal profiles of surrogates for the process to be a success.

  11. Cassava biology and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Mabrouk A

    2004-11-01

    Cassava or manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), a perennial shrub of the New World, currently is the sixth world food crop for more than 500 million people in tropical and sub-tropical Africa, Asia and Latin America. It is cultivated mainly by resource-limited small farmers for its starchy roots, which are used as human food either fresh when low in cyanogens or in many processed forms and products, mostly starch, flour, and for animal feed. Because of its inherent tolerance to stressful environments, where other food crops would fail, it is often considered a food-security source against famine, requiring minimal care. Under optimal environmental conditions, it compares favorably in production of energy with most other major staple food crops due to its high yield potential. Recent research at the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) in Colombia has demonstrated the ability of cassava to assimilate carbon at very high rates under high levels of humidity, temperature and solar radiation,which correlates with productivity across all environments whether dry or humid. When grown on very poor soils under prolonged drought for more than 6 months, the crop reduce both its leaf canopy and transpiration water loss, but its attached leaves remain photosynthetically active, though at greatly reduced rates. The main physiological mechanism underlying such a remarkable tolerance to drought was rapid stomatal closure under both atmospheric and edaphic water stress, protecting the leaf against dehydration while the plant depletes available soil water slowly during long dry periods. This drought tolerance mechanism leads to high crop water use efficiency values. Although the cassava fine root system is sparse, compared to other crops, it can penetrate below 2 m soil,thus enabling the crop to exploit deep water if available. Leaves of cassava and wild Manihot possess elevated activities of the C4 enzyme PEP carboxylase but lack the leaf Kranz anatomy typical of C4

  12. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION: PSYCHOLINGUISTIC ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrofanova, I.I.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers language as the organization of the speech of any person in any situation, without which it is impossible to characterize the internal structure of the speech stream. Language is exactly a system of guidelines necessary for the activity in the social world. Communication is primarily nothing but as a way of making one or another correction in the image of the interlocutor’s world. In order for a language to serve as a means of communication, it must have a single or a similar understanding of reality behind it. Conversely, the unity of understanding the reality and the unity of coherence presuppose the possibility of adequate communication. A mandatory component of communication is the communicative act, that is, the act of sharing information between people. The speech, i.e. the natural sound language is an important means of conveying information that defines this aspect of the communication process as verbal communication. The idea of dialogue as the space, in which the exchange of information takes place, is defined as initial. Essentially, it is the dialogue that in this case acts as the backbone principle in dealing with problems of language. It is here that the essence of social and psychological transition to the analysis of communication is most visibly concentrated. An individual essentially "lives" in the world of Another person’s worlds, and studying the words of this person, he or she studies the "world" of Another person. Thus, the dialogue is not merely the interaction (verbal with another person, but, ultimately, the interaction with the world of culture.

  13. Computational Aspects of Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannakakis, Mihalis

    Equilibria play a central role in game theory and economics. They characterize the possible outcomes in the interaction of rational, optimizing agents: In a game between rational players that want to optimize their payoffs, the only solutions in which no player has any incentive to switch his strategy are the Nash equilibria. Price equilibria in markets give the prices that allow the market to clear (demand matches supply) while the traders optimize their preferences (utilities). Fundamental theorems of Nash [34] and Arrow-Debreu [2] established the existence of the respective equilibria (under suitable conditions in the market case). The proofs in both cases use a fixed point theorem (relying ultimately on a compactness argument), and are non-constructive, i.e., do not yield an algorithm for constructing an equilibrium. We would clearly like to compute these predicted outcomes. This has led to extensive research since the 60’s in the game theory and mathematical economics literature, with the development of several methods for computation of equilibria, and more generally fixed points. More recently, equilibria problems have been studied intensively in the computer science community, from the point of view of modern computation theory. While we still do not know definitely whether equilibria can be computed in general efficiently or not, these investigations have led to a better understanding of the computational complexity of equilibria, the various issues involved, and the relationship with other open problems in computation. In this talk we will discuss some of these aspects and our current understanding of the relevant problems. We outline below the main points and explain some of the related issues.

  14. Cultural Aspects of Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari D. Maharajh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  15. Archaea: Evolution, Physiology, and Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Introduced by Crafoord Prize winner Carl Woese, this volume combines reviews of the major developments in archaeal research over the past 10-15 years with more specialized articles dealing with important recent breakthroughs. Drawing on major themes presented at the June 2005 meeting held in Muni...... and technological context, and include accounts of cutting-edge research developments. The book spans archaeal evolution, physiology, and molecular and cellular biology and will be an essential reference for both graduate students and researchers....... to honor the archaea pioneers Wolfram Zillig and Karl O. Stetter, the book provides a thorough survey of the field from its controversial beginnings to its ongoing expansion to include aspects of eukaryotic biology. The editors have assembled articles from the premier researchers in this rapidly burgeoning...

  16. Chromatin remodeling in cardiovascular development and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pei; Hang, Calvin T; Yang, Jin; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2011-02-04

    Chromatin regulation provides an important means for controlling cardiac gene expression under different physiological and pathological conditions. Processes that direct the development of normal embryonic hearts and pathology of stressed adult hearts may share general mechanisms that govern cardiac gene expression by chromatin-regulating factors. These common mechanisms may provide a framework for us to investigate the interactions among diverse chromatin remodelers/modifiers and various transcription factors in the fine regulation of gene expression, essential for all aspects of cardiovascular biology. Aberrant cardiac gene expression, triggered by a variety of pathological insults, can cause heart diseases in both animals and humans. The severity of cardiomyopathy and heart failure correlates strongly with abnormal cardiac gene expression. Therefore, controlling cardiac gene expression presents a promising approach to the treatment of human cardiomyopathy. This review focuses on the roles of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors and chromatin-modifying enzymes in the control of gene expression during cardiovascular development and disease.

  17. Ozone Damages to Mediterranean Crops: Physiological Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Fagnano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this brief review we analyzed some aspects of tropospheric ozone damages to crop plants. Specifically, we addressed this issue to Mediterranean environments, where plant response to multiple stresses may either exacerbate or counteract deleterious ozone effects. After discussing the adequacy of current models to predict ozone damages to Mediterranean crops, we present a few examples of physiological responses to drought and salinity stress that generally overlap with seasonal ozone peaks in Southern Italy. The co-existence of multiple stresses is then analyzed in terms of stomatal vs. non-stomatal control of ozone damages. Recent results on osmoprotectant feeding experiments, as a non-invasive strategy to uncouple stomatal vs. non stomatal contribution to ozone protection, are also presented. In the final section, we discuss critical needs in ozone research and the great potential of plant model systems to unravel multiple stress responses in agricultural crops.

  18. Archaea: Evolution, Physiology, and Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Introduced by Crafoord Prize winner Carl Woese, this volume combines reviews of the major developments in archaeal research over the past 10-15 years with more specialized articles dealing with important recent breakthroughs. Drawing on major themes presented at the June 2005 meeting held in Muni...... and technological context, and include accounts of cutting-edge research developments. The book spans archaeal evolution, physiology, and molecular and cellular biology and will be an essential reference for both graduate students and researchers....... to honor the archaea pioneers Wolfram Zillig and Karl O. Stetter, the book provides a thorough survey of the field from its controversial beginnings to its ongoing expansion to include aspects of eukaryotic biology. The editors have assembled articles from the premier researchers in this rapidly burgeoning...

  19. Cathepsins of lepidopteran insects: Aspects and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikhedkar, Nidhi; Summanwar, Aarohi; Joshi, Rakesh; Giri, Ashok

    2015-09-01

    Molecular understanding of lepidopteran physiology has revealed that proteases consist of one of the central regulatory/reacting system for insect growth and survival. Among the various proteases, cathepsins are the most crucial cellular proteases, which play vital roles during insect development. In the present review, we have discussed various aspects of the lepidopteran insect cathepsins, emphasizing their roles in processes like development, growth, metamorphosis, apoptosis and immunity. Cathepsins are categorized into different types on the basis of their sequence diversification, leading to variation in structure and catalytic function. Cathepsins exhibit tissue and stage specific expression pattern which is fine-tuned by a delicate balance of expression, compartmentalization, zymogen activation, inhibition by protein inhibitors and degradation. The indispensability of cathepsins as cellular proteases in the above mentioned processes proposes them as novel targets for designing effective and specific insect controlling strategies.

  20. Nitric oxide and thermogenesis--challenge in molecular cell physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otasevic, Vesna; Korac, Aleksandra; Buzadzic, Biljana; Stancic, Ana; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Korac, Bato

    2011-06-01

    Only recently we can link thermogenesis, mitochondria, nitric oxide, and redox regulation in biochemical terms. Currently, we are discussing these processes from the aspect of fundamental principles of molecular physiology. Thus, the present article highlights both cell physiology and the principles of the maintenance of energy homeostasis in organisms. Energy homeostasis means much more than simple combustion; adipose tissues at this point of evolution development are related to a broad spectrum of metabolic disturbances and all aspects of cellular remodeling (i.e. structural, metabolic and endocrine changes). Therefore, this paper addresses not only thermogenesis but also energy homeostasis, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production, proliferation and differentiation of brown adipocytes, their life and death, mitochondriogenesis and angiogenesis. These processes will be united by molecular players of oxidation/reduction reactions, thus creating the principles based on the redox regulation.

  1. Genetic and physiology basis of the quality of livestock products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Mele

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The animal research gives more attention, for more than twenty years, to the improvement of food quality, because this aspect plays an important role in the consumer choice. In this paper are browsed the principal foods of animal origin (milk, meat and eggs, paying attention on the actual genetic and physiologic knowledge, which influence the quality characteristic. Particularly, we examined the role of Quantitative Genetic in bovine and swine and the growing knowledge about animal genomes and individuation of QTL. Information on genomic regions that control QTL, allow to organize genetic improvement programs, using Markers Assisted Selection (MAS and Markers Assisted Introgression (MAI. Moreover are reported the knowledge about metabolic processes that influence quality especially on lipid and protein component. About other productions are considered the physiology of eggs production and the genetic improvement of hens. Finally the qualitative aspects about poultry and rabbit meat and the actual genetic improvement strategy are reported.

  2. Understanding the physiology of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2013-03-01

    The physiology of schizophrenia includes complex genetic and environmental interactions. Current treatment largely focuses on positive symptoms, but many patients with schizophrenia present with additional symptoms and conditions that hinder their social and occupational functioning. The study of the physiology of this disorder has expanded beyond dopamine dysfunction to include the glutamate, serotonin, and nicotinic/acetylcholine systems, as well as physiologic abnormalities such as diabetes and inflammation. Clinicians who understand these additional problem areas can incorporate them into their assessment and treatment plans for patients with schizophrenia. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  3. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron in the gut: molecular aspects of their interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocco, M A; Ainora, M E; Gasbarrini, G; Gasbarrini, A

    2007-08-01

    The gut microflora can be considered a metabolically active organ composed of a vast and complex community of microorganisms that has an important role in the stability and functional activity of the intestinal ecosystem. Recently, thanks to microarray technology, a global screening of the microflora's regulated genes has allowed the analysis of the complex bacteria-host interplay. In particular, most of our knowledge comes from studies on Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a prominent member of the intestinal microflora of mice and humans. The results of published studies have revealed that Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron modulate the expression of a large quantity of genes implicated in different aspect of host physiology. This review aims to illustrate the specific contributions of this intestinal microorganism in three important aspects of host physiology: mucosal barrier reinforcement, immune system modulation and nutrients metabolism. In particular, we focus on recent insights about the molecular mechanisms by which Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron help the host in these important functions.

  4. The conservation physiology of seed dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Schaefer, H Martin

    2012-06-19

    At a time when plant species are experiencing increasing challenges from climate change, land-use change, harvesting and invasive species, dispersal has become a very important aspect of plant conservation. Seed dispersal by animals is particularly important because some animals disperse seeds to suitable sites in a directed fashion. Our review has two aims: (i) to highlight the various ways plant dispersal by animals can be affected by current anthropogenic change and (ii) to show the important role of plant and (particularly) animal physiology in shaping seed-dispersal interactions. We argue that large-bodied seed dispersers may be particularly important for plant conservation because seed dispersal of large-seeded plants is often more specialized and because large-bodied animals are targeted by human exploitation and have smaller population sizes. We further argue that more specialized seed-dispersal systems on island ecosystems might be particularly at risk from climate change both owing to small population sizes involved but also owing to the likely thermal specialization, particularly on tropical islands. More generally, the inherent vulnerability of seed-dispersal mutualisms to disruption driven by environmental change (as well as their ubiquity) demands that we continue to improve our understanding of their conservation physiology.

  5. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, S. G.; Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  6. The conservation physiology of seed dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2012-01-01

    At a time when plant species are experiencing increasing challenges from climate change, land-use change, harvesting and invasive species, dispersal has become a very important aspect of plant conservation. Seed dispersal by animals is particularly important because some animals disperse seeds to suitable sites in a directed fashion. Our review has two aims: (i) to highlight the various ways plant dispersal by animals can be affected by current anthropogenic change and (ii) to show the important role of plant and (particularly) animal physiology in shaping seed–dispersal interactions. We argue that large-bodied seed dispersers may be particularly important for plant conservation because seed dispersal of large-seeded plants is often more specialized and because large-bodied animals are targeted by human exploitation and have smaller population sizes. We further argue that more specialized seed-dispersal systems on island ecosystems might be particularly at risk from climate change both owing to small population sizes involved but also owing to the likely thermal specialization, particularly on tropical islands. More generally, the inherent vulnerability of seed-dispersal mutualisms to disruption driven by environmental change (as well as their ubiquity) demands that we continue to improve our understanding of their conservation physiology. PMID:22566677

  7. Welfare aspects in rabbit rearing and transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Cavani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The review starts with the description of the rabbits’ (Oryctolagus cuniculus main habits and the current situation concerning the rabbit husbandry and management systems, as well as their effects on the welfare of these animals. As far as the intensive rabbit husbandry systems are concerned, the main problems are related to the time since rabbits have been domesticated and their adaptive capacity and coping styles as respects the farming environment and management systems. Both these aspects have implications in the present and future of rabbit rearing for different purposes. Examples are given on the effects of different housing and management systems on rabbit welfare, as well as examples of the ethological, physiological and productive indicators used to evaluate these effects. Transportation and, more generally, preslaughter phases including catching, fasting and lairage at the abattoir are considered major stressors for farmed rabbits and might have deleterious effects on health, well-being, performance, and finally, product quality. A general statement of the recent scientific studies considering the effects of pre-slaughter factors on physiological and productive measurements are reported. Finally, some indications in order to improve rabbit welfare, already present at the European level, are also outlined, together with the European Food Safety Authority opinions.

  8. Prototyping and Composing Aspect Languages: using an Aspect Interpreter Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, W.K.; Bergmans, Lodewijk; Aksit, Mehmet

    2008-01-01

    Domain specific aspect languages (DSALs) are becoming more popular because they can be designed to represent recurring concerns in a way that is optimized for a specific domain. However, the design and implementation of even a limited domain-specific aspect language can be a tedious job. To address

  9. abc: The AspectBench Compiler for AspectJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allan, Chris; Avgustinov, Pavel; Christensen, Aske Simon;

    2005-01-01

    abc is an extensible, optimising compiler for AspectJ. It has been designed as a workbench for experimental research in aspect-oriented programming languages and compilers. We outline a programme of research in these areas, and we review how abc can help in achieving those research goals...

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF ASPECTS USING COLOURED PETRINETS AND ASPECT REALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.SOWMYADEVI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available a major impediment to program comprehension, maintenance and resolvability is the existence of crosscutting concerns scattered across different modules tangled with implementations of other concerns. Presence of crosscutting concerns in software systems can lead to bloated and inefficient software systems that are difficult to evolve, hard to analyse, difficult to reuse and costly to maintain. Aspect-oriented programming is a complementary programming technique to the object-oriented programming. It provides tools for managing so called cross-cutting concerns. The concept of aspect orientation with presentation of a method could modulate crosscutting concerns into the single manageable unit called, aspect. This method will solve many problems such as tangling and scattering of code. But the identification and specification of crosscutting concerns and considering it as aspects is not an easy job. The proposed method defines requirements and concerns in the formal form by Petri Nets and named them as requirement nets and concern nets. Concern nets with dependencies which there are between requirement nets, model the final system. The execution of final modelled software system based on Petri Nets and monitoring its transitions, shows crosscutting concerns which are candidate aspects. In this paper, we propose a formal method based on Petri Nets, for the identification of aspect and finding out the most dominant aspect. Then the aspect realization is done by using programming language with some case study.

  11. Physiological mechanisms of thermoregulation in reptiles: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E

    2005-11-01

    The thermal dependence of biochemical reaction rates means that many animals regulate their body temperature so that fluctuations in body temperature are small compared to environmental temperature fluctuations. Thermoregulation is a complex process that involves sensing of the environment, and subsequent processing of the environmental information. We suggest that the physiological mechanisms that facilitate thermoregulation transcend phylogenetic boundaries. Reptiles are primarily used as model organisms for ecological and evolutionary research and, unlike in mammals, the physiological basis of many aspects in thermoregulation remains obscure. Here, we review recent research on regulation of body temperature, thermoreception, body temperature set-points, and cardiovascular control of heating and cooling in reptiles. The aim of this review is to place physiological thermoregulation of reptiles in a wider phylogenetic context. Future research on reptilian thermoregulation should focus on the pathways that connect peripheral sensing to central processing which will ultimately lead to the thermoregulatory response.

  12. Medical electronics and physiological measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, T.

    1989-07-01

    This article describes some recent developments in physiological measurement since the last `special issue' in 1978. Nine examples are given covering mature applications, new techniques and some `ideas for the future'. The need for good scientists in this interesting and challenging area is stressed. Physiological measurement is challenging because human physiology is complex. The examples described in this article illustrate some areas where cooperation between basic scientists, engineers, clinicians and, not least, patients has led to remarkable advances in our understanding of man and his physiology. Many challenges still lie ahead. There is no doubt that good quality graduates, with fresh minds and fresh enthusiasm, are needed to build on the foundation that has already been laid.

  13. Survey of Departments of Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, William F.

    1977-01-01

    Presents data of the 1976 survey of departments of physiology. Includes comparison to 1974 and 1975 data for number of academic positions available, department budgets, graduate students and post doctoral fellows, and salaries. (SL)

  14. Olfaction: anatomy, physiology and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Benignus, Vernon A.; Prah, James D.

    1982-01-01

    The anatomy, physiology and function of the olfactory system are reviewed, as are the normal effects of olfactory stimulation. It is speculated that olfaction may have important but unobtrusive effects on human behavior.

  15. Survey of Departments of Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, William F.

    1977-01-01

    Presents data of the 1976 survey of departments of physiology. Includes comparison to 1974 and 1975 data for number of academic positions available, department budgets, graduate students and post doctoral fellows, and salaries. (SL)

  16. An Earth-Based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grothberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving micro G for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in micro G. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of micro G by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary physiology, including cardiac output, central venous pressures, lung volumes, and pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of micro G on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventilation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching, and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of micro G will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  17. A physiological perspective on the neuroscience of eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Nori

    2014-09-01

    I present the thesis that 'being physiological,' i.e., analyzing eating under conditions that do not perturb, or minimally perturb, the organism's endogenous processes, should be a central goal of the neuroscience of eating. I describe my understanding of 'being physiological' based on [i] the central neural-network heuristic of CNS function that traces back to Cajal and Sherrington, [ii] research on one of the simpler problems in the neuroscience of eating, identification of endocrine signals that control eating. In this context I consider natural meals, physiological doses and ranges, and antagonist studies. Several examples involve CCK. Next I describe my view of the cutting edge in the molecular neuroscience of eating as it has evolved from the discovery of leptin signaling through the application of optogenetic and pharmacogenetic methods. Finally I describe some novel approaches that may advance the neuroscience of eating in the foreseeable future. I conclude that [i] the neuroscience of eating may soon be able to discern 'physiological' function in the operation of CNS networks mediating eating, [ii] the neuroscience of eating should capitalize on methods developed in other areas of neuroscience, e.g., improved methods to record and manipulate CNS function in behaving animals, identification of canonical regional circuits, use of population electrophysiology, etc., and [iii] subjective aspects of eating are crucial aspects of eating science, but remain beyond mechanistic understanding.

  18. Physiological Control of Germline Development

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard, E. Jane Albert; Korta, Dorota Z.; Dalfó, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The intersection between developmental programs and environmental conditions that alter physiology is a growing area of research interest. The C. elegans germ line is emerging as a particularly sensitive and powerful model for these studies. The germ line is subject to environmentally regulated diapause points that allow worms to withstand harsh conditions both prior to and after reproduction commences. It also responds to more subtle changes in physiological conditions. Recent studies demons...

  19. Seasonal changes in reindeer physiology

    OpenAIRE

    A. Reeta Pösö

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal changes in the photoperiod, temperature and availability of food need to be converted to hormonal signals in order to induce adaptations in the physiology of the reindeer. The most reliable of the seasonal changes in the environment is the photoperiod, which affects the reindeer physiology through pineal gland and its hormone, melatonin. Usually there are large diurnal changes in the concentration of melatonin, but in the reindeer the daily rhythm disappears during the arctic sum...

  20. Physiologically relevant organs on chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, Kyungsuk; Hong, Soon Gweon; Healy, Kevin E; Lee, Luke P

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in integrating microengineering and tissue engineering have generated promising microengineered physiological models for experimental medicine and pharmaceutical research. Here we review the recent development of microengineered physiological systems, or also known as "ogans-on-chips", that reconstitute the physiologically critical features of specific human tissues and organs and their interactions. This technology uses microengineering approaches to construct organ-specific microenvironments, reconstituting tissue structures, tissue-tissue interactions and interfaces, and dynamic mechanical and biochemical stimuli found in specific organs, to direct cells to assemble into functional tissues. We first discuss microengineering approaches to reproduce the key elements of physiologically important, dynamic mechanical microenvironments, biochemical microenvironments, and microarchitectures of specific tissues and organs in microfluidic cell culture systems. This is followed by examples of microengineered individual organ models that incorporate the key elements of physiological microenvironments into single microfluidic cell culture systems to reproduce organ-level functions. Finally, microengineered multiple organ systems that simulate multiple organ interactions to better represent human physiology, including human responses to drugs, is covered in this review. This emerging organs-on-chips technology has the potential to become an alternative to 2D and 3D cell culture and animal models for experimental medicine, human disease modeling, drug development, and toxicology.

  1. Postmenopausal osteoporosis - clinical, biological and histopathological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Oana Roxana; Popescu, Mihaela; Novac, Liliana; Mogoantă, LaurenŢiu; Pavel, LaurenŢiu Petrişor; Vicaş, Răzvan Marius; Trăistaru, Magdalena Rodica

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common disorders in postmenopausal women, affecting the quality of life and increasing the risk for fractures in minor traumas. Changes in the bone microarchitecture causes static changes in the body and affects motility. In this study, we analyzed two groups of women, one with physiological menopause and one with surgically induced menopause. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was suspected based on the clinical symptoms and confirmed by assessing bone mineral density by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Comparing some clinical and biological aspects there was noted that a much higher percentage of women with surgically induced menopause exhibited increases in body mass index, changes in serum lipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, blood glucose, serum calcium, magnesemia and osteocalcin. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in the histopathological aspects of bone tissue examined from these two groups. In all patients, there was identified a significant reduction in the number of osteocytes and osteoblasts, the expansion of haversian channels, reducing the number of trabecular bone in the cancellous bone with wide areola cavities often full of adipose tissue, non-homogenous demineralization of both the compact bone and the cancellous bone, atrophy and even absence of the endosteal, and the presence of multiple microfractures. Our study showed that early surgically induced menopause more intensely alters the lipid, carbohydrate and mineral metabolism, thus favoring the onset of osteoporosis.

  2. Tense and Aspect in English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen-Nielsen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    In the 1990's the author cooperated with Carl Bache on a grammar of English. It turned out that the views they had previously arrived at individually on tense and aspect could be combined by operating with a fused system involving four ordered choices resulting in sixteen tense-aspect forms...

  3. Aspects of spirituality concerning illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Rene; Tiesinga, Lucas J.; Jochemasen, Henk; Post, Doeke

    2007-01-01

    The spiritual dimension of illness, health and care may be seen as a unique aspect in addition to the physical, mental and social dimension. This contribution describes experiences of patients, nurses and hospital chaplains in relation to the spiritual aspects of being ill. Qualitative research was

  4. Practical aspects of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillaart, Sabrina Ada Hendrika Maria van den

    2013-01-01

    The thesis describes studies on practical aspects of cervical cancer, concering surgical considerations, and aspects of tumour behaviour and tumour spread. The thesis comprises studies on: the comparison of nerve-sparing and non-nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer; a new surgical

  5. Aspects of spirituality concerning illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Rene; Tiesinga, Lucas J.; Jochemasen, Henk; Post, Doeke

    2007-01-01

    The spiritual dimension of illness, health and care may be seen as a unique aspect in addition to the physical, mental and social dimension. This contribution describes experiences of patients, nurses and hospital chaplains in relation to the spiritual aspects of being ill. Qualitative research was

  6. Physiological Studies of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gunda

    industrial production by employing flow cytometry for viability assessment, cell size comparison, intracellular pH (pHi) determination and cell sorting. The physiological studies of L. lactis were complemented by examining the growth behavior, glucose consumption, lactate production, culturability on solid...... was found to facilitate the differentiation and accurate quantification of L. lactis cells in different physiological states, which agreed with the reproductive viability of reference samples and of exponential cells. The high viability of one particular L. lactis strain demonstrated its robustness during......, cell size comparison and pHi determination reflected the increasing physiological impairment during this accelerated stability test, while a preincubation in buffer led to inconsistent flow cytometric results. The comparison of reproductive and growth-independent viability suggested the presence...

  7. Stimulating Student Interest in Physiology: The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hwee-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz (IMSPQ) was initiated in 2003 during the author's last sabbatical from the University of Malaya. At this inaugural event, there were just seven competing teams from Malaysian medical schools. The challenge trophy for the IMSPQ is named in honor of Prof. A. Raman, who was the first Malaysian Professor of…

  8. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  9. Verb aspect, alternations and quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetla Koeva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Verb aspect, alternations and quantification In this paper we are briefly discuss the nature of Bulgarian verb aspect and argue that the verb aspect pairs are different lexical units with different (although related meaning, different argument structure (reflecting categories, explicitness and referential status of arguments and different sets of semantic and syntactic alternations. The verb prefixes resulting in perfective verbs derivation in some cases can be interpreted as lexical quantifiers as well. Thus the Bulgarian verb aspect is related (in different way both with the potential for the generation of alternations and with the prefixal lexical quantification. It is shown that the scope of the lexical quantification by means of verbal prefixes is the quantified verb phrase and the scope remains constant in all derived alternations. The paper concerns the basic issues of these complex problems, while the detailed description of the conditions satisfying particular alternation or particular lexical quantification are subject of a more detailed study.

  10. Laboratory Aspects of Hyperprolactinemia Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rykova, O.V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the modern laboratory aspects of diagnosing hyperprolactinemia and monitoring the effectiveness of treatment according to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Hyperprolactinemia: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline 2011.

  11. Motivational aspects of sport volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Mičinec, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Title: The motivational aspects of sport volunteerism. Objectives: The main aim of this bachelor work is to find out motivational aspects of sport volunteers, who have taken part in sport event. Methods: In this thesis was used quality method to get informations - specifically it was a structure interview with associated questions. Results: It was find out that it is appropriate to get those volunteers with inner motivation. These volunteers do not need to be so much motivated by external mot...

  12. DigitalHuman (DH): An Integrative Mathematical Model ofHuman Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Robert L.; Summers, Richard L.; lIescu, Radu; Esters, Joyee; Coleman, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models and simulation are important tools in discovering the key causal relationships governing physiological processes and improving medical intervention when physiological complexity is a central issue. We have developed a model of integrative human physiology called DigitalHuman (DH) consisting of -5000 variables modeling human physiology describing cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, endocrine, neural and metabolic physiology. Users can view time-dependent solutions and interactively introduce perturbations by altering numerical parameters to investigate new hypotheses. The variables, parameters and quantitative relationships as well as all other model details are described in XML text files. All aspects of the model, including the mathematical equations describing the physiological processes are written in XML open source, text-readable files. Model structure is based upon empirical data of physiological responses documented within the peer-reviewed literature. The model can be used to understand proposed physiological mechanisms and physiological interactions that may not be otherwise intUitively evident. Some of the current uses of this model include the analyses of renal control of blood pressure, the central role of the liver in creating and maintaining insulin resistance, and the mechanisms causing orthostatic hypotension in astronauts. Additionally the open source aspect of the modeling environment allows any investigator to add detailed descriptions of human physiology to test new concepts. The model accurately predicts both qualitative and more importantly quantitative changes in clinically and experimentally observed responses. DigitalHuman provides scientists a modeling environment to understand the complex interactions of integrative physiology. This research was supported by.NIH HL 51971, NSF EPSCoR, and NASA

  13. Electronic Textbook in Human Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broering, Naomi C.; Lilienfield, Lawrence S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the development of an electronic textbook in human physiology at the Georgetown University Medical Center Library that was designed to enhance learning and visualization through a prototype knowledge base of core instructional materials stored in digital format on Macintosh computers. The use of computers in the medical curriculum is…

  14. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunao eUchida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. Thus, research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960’s, with a focus primarily on sleep EEG (CNS sleep changes. Those early studies found only small effects of exercise on sleep. More recent sleep research has explored not only CNS functioning, but somatic physiology as well. As physical exercise mostly affects somatic functions, endocrine and autonomic nervous system (ANS changes that occur during sleep should be affected by daytime exercise. Since endocrinological, metabolic and autonomic changes can be measured during sleep, it should be possible to assess exercise effects on somatic physiology in addition to CNS sleep quality, building from standard polysomnographic (PSG techniques. Incorporating measures of somatic physiology in the quantitative assessment of sleep could further our understanding of sleep's function as an auto-regulatory, global phenomenon.

  15. The Limits of Exercise Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Brendan M; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-01-01

    Many of the established positive health benefits of exercise have been documented by historical discoveries in the field of exercise physiology. These investigations often assess limits: the limits of performance, or the limits of exercise-induced health benefits. Indeed, several key findings have...

  16. Physiological specialization of Stagonospora nodorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septoriosis is a harmful disease of wheat, widespread all over the world, including Russia. Stagonospora nodorum (Berk.) Castellani and E.G. Germano is one of the main agents of Septoria wheat diseases. There is no information on physiological specialization of this pathogen. Not many authors stud...

  17. Physiological adaptation in desert birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, JB; Tieleman, BI; Williams, Joseph B.

    2005-01-01

    We call into question the idea that birds have not evolved unique physiological adaptations to desert environments. The rate at which desert larks metabolize energy is lower than in mesic species within the same family, and this lower rate of living translates into a lower overall energy requirement

  18. Applied physiology of water polo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H K

    1998-11-01

    Water polo has been played for over a century. While the rules of the game have evolved considerably over this time, the sport has consistently remained, physiologically, a highly demanding activity. Much attention has been paid to the technical and strategic elements of the game; however, despite the potential for improvements in athletic performance and the maintenance of athletes' health, there are few published studies (particularly in English) on the physical and physiological demands and adaptations to water polo training and competition. Game analyses have demonstrated that water polo is an 'intermittent' sport comprised of intense bursts of activity of movements required for playing water polo also place considerable demands on the neuromuscular system. Observations of the frequency and duration of the different activities, and of the physiological responses to participating in a water polo match, are initial sources of information for designing training programmes specific to the game and to the different playing positions. The physical and physiological attributes of elite water polo players offer some insight into the minimum requirements for participation and the adaptations that result from training and competition. Further systematic documentation and experimentation are required to facilitate the design and specification of individual training programmes and to better understand the long term effects of water polo on athletes' health.

  19. PHYSIOLOGIC BASIS OF NASAL OPERATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilding, A. C.

    1950-01-01

    To be successful, intranasal operations must be so designed as to restore the normal physiologic function of the nose. It is impossible with impunity to operate upon the interior of the nose as though it were simply an air flue and on the sinuses as though they were boxes. PMID:15400563

  20. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals Andreas...825-2025 email: andreas.fahlman@tamucc.edu Peter L. Tyack School of Biology Sea Mammal Research Unit Scottish Oceans Institute...OBJECTIVES This project is separated into three aims: Aim 1: Develop a new generation of tags/data logger for marine mammals that will

  1. Physiological aspects of the subcellular localization of glycogen in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is stored in skeletal muscle fibers as glycogen, a branched-chain polymer observed in electron microscopy images as roughly spherical particles (known as β-particles of 10-45 nm in diameter), which are distributed in distinct localizations within the myofibers and are physically associate...... of these phenomena may prove vital in elucidating the mechanisms that integrate basic cellular events with changing glycogen content....

  2. a/alpha-control of DNA repair in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: genetic and physiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heude, M; Fabre, F

    1993-03-01

    It has long been known that diploid strains of yeast are more resistant to gamma-rays than haploid cells, and that this is in part due to heterozygosity at the mating type (MAT) locus. It is shown here that the genetic control exerted by the MAT genes on DNA repair involves the a1 and alpha 2 genes, in a RME1-independent way. In rad18 diploids, affected in the error-prone repair, the a/alpha effects are of a very large amplitude, after both UV and gamma-rays, and also depends on a1 and alpha 2. The coexpression of a and alpha in rad18 haploids suppresses the sensitivity of a subpopulation corresponding to the G2 phase cells. Related to this, the coexpression of a and alpha in RAD+ haploids depresses UV-induced mutagenesis in G2 cells. For srs2 null diploids, also affected in the error-prone repair pathway, we show that their G1 UV sensitivity, likely due to lethal recombination events, is partly suppressed by MAT homozygosity. Taken together, these results led to the proposal that a1-alpha 2 promotes a channeling of some DNA structures from the mutagenic into the recombinational repair process.

  3. Myocardial ischemic conditioning: Physiological aspects and clinical applications in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousselmi, Radhouane; Lebbi, Mohamed Anis; Ferjani, Mustapha

    2014-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion is a major determinant of myocardial impairment in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The main goal of research in cardioprotection is to develop effective techniques to avoid ischemia-reperfusion lesions. Myocardial ischemic conditioning is a powerful endogenous cardioprotective phenomenon. First described in animals in 1986, myocardial ischemic conditioning consists of applying increased tolerance of the myocardium to sustained ischemia by exposing it to brief episodes of ischemia-reperfusion. Several studies have sought to demonstrate its effective cardioprotective action in humans and to understand its underlying mechanisms. Myocardial ischemic conditioning has two forms: ischemic preconditioning (IPC) when the conditioning stimulus is applied before the index ischemia and ischemic postconditioning when the conditioning stimulus is applied after it. The cardioprotective action of ischemic conditioning was reproduced by applying the ischemia-reperfusion stimulus to organs remote from the heart. This non-invasive manner of applying ischemic conditioning has led to its application in clinical settings. Clinical trials for the different forms of ischemic conditioning were mainly developed in cardiac surgery. Many studies suggest that this phenomenon can represent an interesting adjuvant to classical cardioprotection during on-pump cardiac surgery. Ischemic conditioning was also tested in interventional cardiology with interesting results. Finally, advances made in the understanding of mechanisms that underlie the cardioprotective action of ischemic conditioning have paved the way to a new form of myocardial conditioning which is pharmacological conditioning.

  4. Welfare aspects of stocking density in farmed rainbow trout, assessed by behavioural and physiological methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Danielle Caroline

    to detrimentally affect welfare in rainbow trout. Several studies have endeavoured to make specific recommendations for maximum stocking density limits for rainbow trout. However, wide discrepancies exist, highlighting the fact that it has been a challenge to identify density limits that promote optimal welfare...... were investigated. At this density of 140 kg m–3, the lower oxygen consumption rates and lower quantity of scale loss collected from the tanks suggested reduced levels of social hierarchy related aggressive encounters. Higher brain serotonergic activity in the brain stem of individuals held...

  5. PHYSIOLOGY AND GENETIC ASPECTS OF THE REGULATION OF EXPRESSION MILK PROTEIN GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Bulla

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For the genetic improvement of milk composition and milk yield, both the typing of different protein variants and knowledge about the regulation of expression of the different milk protein genes are important. Some of the processing properties of milk are dependent on the milk composition. Information about the DNA sequence and genes involved in the expression of the milk protein genes,therefore,is big importance for genetic improvement of these traits in animals breeding programmes.In recent years more data has become available concerning the regulation of expression of the milk protein genes and as might have been expected from the complex multihormonal control of these genes it appears to be rather complex. Although several mammary gland specific factors that play a role in expression of some of these genes have been identified,none of these factors has been shown to be involved in the expression of all or the majority of the milk protein genes.

  6. Environment contamination by mycotoxins and their occurrence in food and feed: Physiological aspects and economical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capcarova, Marcela; Zbynovska, Katarina; Kalafova, Anna; Bulla, Jozef; Bielik, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The contamination of food and feed by mycotoxins as toxic metabolites of fungi is a risk not only for consumers resulting in various embarrassment regarding health status and well-being, but also for producers, companies and export market on the ground of economic losses and ruined stability of economic trade. As it is given in historical evidence, the contamination of food by mycotoxins is a topic as old as a history of mankind, finding some evidence even in the ancient books and records. Nowadays, the mycotoxins are used in modern biotechnological laboratories and are considered an agent for targeting the specific cells (e.g., defected cells to eliminate them). However, this promising procedure is only the beginning. More concern is focused on mycotoxins as abiotic hazard agents. The dealing with them, systematic monitoring, and development of techniques for their elimination from agricultural commodities are worldwide issues concerning all countries. They can be found alone or in co-occurrence with other mycotoxins. Thus, this review aims to provide widened information regarding mycotoxins contamination in environment with the consequences on health of animals and humans. The inevitability for more data that correctly determine the risk points linked to mycotoxins occurrence and their specific reactions in the environment is demonstrated. This review includes various symptoms in animals and humans that result from mycotoxin exposure. For better understanding of mycotoxin's impact on animals, the sensitivities of various animal species to various mycotoxins are listed. Strategies for elimination and preventing the risks of mycotoxins contamination as well as economical approach are discussed. To complete the topic, some data from past as historical evidences are presented.

  7. Physiological and cytological aspects of Inga vera subsp. affinis embryos during storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, J.M.R.; Davide, L.C.; Silva, da E.A.A.; Davide, A.C.; Pereira, R.C.P.; Lammeren, van A.A.M.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    The remarkably short storability of recalcitrant seeds has prevented their inclusion in programs of ex situ conservation. The causes of their desiccation sensitivity and rapid decline in viability during storage are not fully elucidated yet. In this study the highly recalcitrant, fully viable

  8. Alternative strategies to improve the beneficial effects of exercise throughout life : dietary and physiological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.T. Mankowski (Robert Tomasz)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract It is certain that the aging process leads to death, but decreasing the levels of pathology throughout life improves the quality of life and extends life span. Therefore, this dissertation focuses on alternative strategies that may contribute to improving the aging process

  9. Aspects involved in the (patho)physiology of the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenvoorden, Ilse

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is an increasing problem in our Western society. Many of the features of the metabolic syndrome, like obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis are established risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Growing evidence supports the important role of body

  10. Physiological function and ecological aspects of fatty acid-amino acid conjugates in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Naoko

    2016-07-01

    In tritrophic interactions, plants recognize herbivore-produced elicitors and release a blend of volatile compounds (VOCs), which work as chemical cues for parasitoids or predators to locate their hosts. From detection of elicitors to VOC emissions, plants utilize sophisticated systems that resemble the plant-microbe interaction system. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs), a class of insect elicitors, resemble compounds synthesized by microbes in nature. Recent evidence suggests that the recognition of insect elicitors by an ancestral microbe-associated defense system may be the origin of tritrophic interactions mediated by FACs. Here we discuss our findings in light of how plants have customized this defense to be effective against insect herbivores, and how some insects have successfully adapted to these defenses.

  11. Oxygen uptake, energy expenditure and oxygen supply dependency : physical, physiological and clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. Vermeij

    1990-01-01

    textabstractIn the first part of this thesis, the assessment of aerobic energy metabolism as a means to guide caloric supply to spontaneously breathing and mechanically ventilated subjects is studied (chapters 2 and 3). In the second part of this thesis the relation between aerobic energy metabolism

  12. Some physiological aspects of the insecticidal action of diflubenzuron, an inhibitor of chitin synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosscurt, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    Diflubenzuron is the common name for 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea, the active ingredient of the insecticide Dimilin.Diflubenzuron was discovered in 1971 as a larvicide. Evidence was provided by several authors that the larvicidal effect of this compound was caused by its interferen

  13. Aspects involved in the (patho)physiology of the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenvoorden, Ilse

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is an increasing problem in our Western society. Many of the features of the metabolic syndrome, like obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis are established risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Growing evidence supports the important role of body

  14. The feasibility and physiological aspects of anesthesia and surgery without homologous blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Lapin (Ronny)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractThe modern practice of medicine has an ever-increasing dependency on the blood bank industry. Indeed, on many occasions there is an unwarranted and inappropriate use of hemotherapy. The first recorded blood transfusion was given to Pope Innocent VIII in 1492 (Narengo-Rowe, 1982). three b

  15. The feasibility and physiological aspects of anesthesia and surgery without homologous blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Lapin (Ronny)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractThe modern practice of medicine has an ever-increasing dependency on the blood bank industry. Indeed, on many occasions there is an unwarranted and inappropriate use of hemotherapy. The first recorded blood transfusion was given to Pope Innocent VIII in 1492 (Narengo-Rowe, 1982). three

  16. Aspectos da fisiologia de cenoura minimamente processada Physiological aspects of minimally processed carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milza M. Lana

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available O processamento mínimo de hortaliças compreende as operações que eliminam as partes não comestíveis, seguidas pelo corte em tamanhos menores, tornando-as prontas para consumo imediato e mantendo a condição de produto in natura. A oferta e o interesse do consumidor por esses produtos têm sido crescentes, tanto para o mercado institucional (restaurantes e cozinhas industriais, como para o consumidor final. A cenoura é, dentre as hortaliças, uma das principais espécies comercializadas nessa forma, ou seja, ralada, picada em cubos ou rodelas ou na forma de mini-cenoura (`baby-carrot'. As operações de processamento causam uma série de estresses e alterações metabólicas indesejáveis que reduzem a vida útil da hortaliça processada em relação ao produto inteiro. Dentre as principais, incluem-se o aumento da taxa respiratória e da transpiração, a deterioração microbiana, a produção de metabólitos secundários e a degradação de membranas lipídicas. São apresentados os efeitos de diversos fatores como cultivares, formas de corte, tratamentos químicos, uso de revestimentos, irradiação, atmosfera modificada e refrigeração sobre a magnitude das alterações fisiológicas resultantes do processamento.Minimal processing of vegetables involves the elimination of non-edible parts followed by cutting into smaller pieces, so that the product obtained is ready-to-eat and fresh-like. The demand for minimally processed vegetables by consumers and by food service industry has increased. Carrot is among the most popular vegetables marketed this way, that is shredded, cut as slices or cubes and as baby-carrot. Minimal processing operations induce stress and undesirable metabolic changes that reduce the product shelf life in relation to the intact organs from which they were obtained. These metabolic changes include increase in respiration and transpiration rate, pathological breakdown, synthesis of secondary compounds and membrane lipid breakdown. The effect of many factors as cultivars, cutting direction, chemical treatments, edible coatings, irradiation, modified atmosphere and refrigeration, upon the severity of metabolic changes induced by processing are presented.

  17. Seasonal aspects of reproductive physiology in captive male maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger 1815).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, L O; Melo-Junior, A A; Spercoski, K M; Morais, R N; Souza, F F

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the seasonality of andrological characteristics and hormonal profile of captive maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger 1811). Three adult males were evaluated from the Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração Scientific Breeding Center in Araxá, MG, Brazil, over 13 months. Semen was collected 2-3 times weekly and analysed. Scrotal circumference, biometrics and testicular volume were measured. Stool samples were collected 2-3 times weekly to analyse corticosteroid and testosterone metabolite concentrations. A success rate of 100% was achieved in the collection attempts during the breeding season (BS) and 77.8% during the non-breeding season (NBS). The interval to achieve penile erection was 1-5 min in the BS and 6-10 in the NBS (p < 0.001). Of the ejaculates collected, 80.0% contained sperm during BS, while 28.6% did during the NBS. The ejaculate had only one fraction, was odourless, predominantly translucent (72.4%), with a watery appearance, pH 6.7 and osmolarity of 352.8 mOsmol. Seasonal influences were seen in ejaculate volume (1.3 ml vs 0.4 ml), number of spermatozoa per ejaculate (73.9 × 10(6) vs 6.1 × 10(6) ) and percentage of live sperm (82.0% vs 66.1%) between the BS and NBS (p < 0.05), respectively. A high percentage of major sperm defects were observed in both seasons (50.1% in BS; 65.7% in NBS). Testicular volume was larger (p < 0.05; right testicles 13.1 cm(3) in BS vs 4.0 cm(3) in NBS, while left testicles 12.9 cm(3) in BS vs 5.3 cm(3) in NBS) and testicular consistency increased in the BS. No difference was seen in the basal faecal metabolite concentrations of testosterone; however, the corticosteroid concentrations were higher in the BS. Based on these results, it is possible to conclude that the collection of semen is feasible in captive maned wolves without compromising libido, seminal characteristics and reproductive behaviour and that sperm production is influenced by seasonality; however, it appears that there is no seasonal influence on basal testosterone concentrations.

  18. Physiological and transcriptomic aspects of urea uptake and assimilation in Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérigout, Patricia; Lelandais, Maud; Bitton, Frédérique; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Briand, Xavier; Meyer, Christian; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2008-07-01

    Urea is the major nitrogen (N) form supplied as fertilizer in agriculture, but it is also an important N metabolite in plants. Urea transport and assimilation were investigated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Uptake studies using (15)N-labeled urea demonstrated the capacity of Arabidopsis to absorb urea and that the urea uptake was regulated by the initial N status of the plants. Urea uptake was stimulated by urea but was reduced by the presence of ammonium nitrate in the growth medium. N deficiency in plants did not affect urea uptake. Urea exerted a repressive effect on nitrate influx, whereas urea enhanced ammonium uptake. The use of [(15)N]urea and [(15)N]ammonium tracers allowed us to show that urea and ammonium assimilation pathways were similar. Finally, urea uptake was less efficient than nitrate uptake, and urea grown-plants presented signs of N starvation. We also report the first analysis, to our knowledge, of Arabidopsis gene expression profiling in response to urea. Our transcriptomic approach revealed that nitrate and ammonium transporters were transcriptionally regulated by urea as well as key enzymes of the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway. AtDUR3, a high-affinity urea transporter in Arabidopsis, was strongly up-regulated by urea. Moreover, our transcriptomic data suggest that other genes are also involved in urea influx.

  19. Physiologic aspects of designing hidden information systems based on visible optical radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brailovskii V. V.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology and experimental results of the study of human eye sensitivity in central and peripheral vision field to the visible light pulses. The experimental results show that transmission systems based on visible rays can work in hidden mode. Conditions providing hidden transmission differ significantly for day and night light levels. At low light levels (at night the non-perceptive nature of the pulsed light which is applied in the information transfer process should be used. In this case an optical transmitter is perceived as «usual» illuminant. In daylight, light pulse can be invisible at certain values of duration and frequency of the light pulses for central and peripheral vision. For example, light pulses with the duration of 5•10–6 s in the range from 20 to 200 Hz are «invisible».

  20. Genetic and physiological aspects of postharvest flower longevity in Asiatic hybrid lilies (Lilium L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen-Muisers, van der J.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    In The Netherlands Lilium is economically the fourth overall flower crop for cut flower production. Longevity is a main quality characteristic for cut flowers. During postharvest handling of Asiatic hybrid lilies pretreatment with chemical solutions containing silver is carried out to ensure a satis

  1. Alternative strategies to improve the beneficial effects of exercise throughout life : dietary and physiological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.T. Mankowski (Robert Tomasz)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract It is certain that the aging process leads to death, but decreasing the levels of pathology throughout life improves the quality of life and extends life span. Therefore, this dissertation focuses on alternative strategies that may contribute to improving the aging

  2. Case of Swyer-James syndrome. In relation to the etiologic and physiological aspect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Ohtani, Naoshi; Kimura, Sohichi; Izuchi, Rokuro; Iio, Masaaki (National Sanatorium of Nakano, Tokyo (Japan)); Fujinami, Kenji

    1982-09-01

    Infantile infections are thought to constitute one of the main bases of the etiology of Swyer-James syndrome. This case seems to support the above theory allowing for the anamnesis of the pleuritis at 2 years of age, bronchographical findings - bilateral but markedly left-sided bud-like bronchiectatic changes - and left pulmonary angiographical findings - simultaneous appearance of pulmonary arteries and veins with scarce capillary image. Concerning the ventilation of this syndrome, /sup 133/Xe inhalation test showed a ''Pendelluft'' phenomenon, shift of /sup 133/Xe from the healthy to the affected lung on forced expiration.

  3. Some physiological aspects of the insecticidal action of diflubenzuron, an inhibitor of chitin synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosscurt, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    Diflubenzuron is the common name for 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea, the active ingredient of the insecticide Dimilin.

    Diflubenzuron was discovered in 1971 as a larvicide. Evidence was provided by several authors that the larvicidal effect of this compound was caused by its

  4. Nutritional aspects of short-chain fructooligosaccharides: natural occurrence, chemistry, physiology and health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornet, F R J; Brouns, F; Tashiro, Y; Duvillier, V

    2002-09-01

    Short-chain fructooligosaccharides occur in a number of edible plants, such as chicory, onions, asparagus, wheat... They are a group of linear fructose oligomers with a degree of polymerisation ranging from n = 1 up to 5 (oligosaccharides). Short-chain fructooligosaccharides, to a large extent, escape digestion in the human upper intestine and reach the colon where they are totally fermented mostly to lactate, short chain fatty acids (acetate, propionate and butyrate), and gas, like dietary fibres. As a consequence of their fermentation, their caloric value is approximately 2 Kcal/g. A faecal bulking effect of fructooligosaccharides has been observed in humans. An important property of short-chain fructooligosaccharides is the stimulation of bifidobacterial growth specifically while suppressing the growth of potentially harmful species such as, for example, Clostridium perfringens in the colon. It is associated with a decrease in faecal pH, an increase in faecal or colonic organic acids, a decrease in the production of nitrogenous end products in urine and stools, a decrease in faecal bacterial enzymatic activities and a modification in faecal neutral sterols. The short-chain fructooligosaccharides enhance magnesium absorption in humans and have been shown, in animal models, to reduce colon tumour development by enhancing both colon butyrate concentrations and local immune system effectors.

  5. Neuroanatomy and physiology of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis: clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Midge

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the anatomy of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the somatotrophic axis, and neurohypophysis.

  6. Aspects on respiratory physiology of cultured Sea bream, Sparidentex hasta (Valenciennes 1830, Kingdom of Bahrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Zainal

    2016-06-01

    The fish regulatory ability to withstand declining oxygen concentration in the water was limited. A typical steep straight line relationship was found between oxygen consumption rate and oxygen concentration indicating a non regulatory ability and extreme in-tolerance to hypoxia. Therefore, the fish is considered as oxy-conformer, i.e., unable to continue metabolism at anaerobic condition. Correlation between minimum (basic oxygen consumption rate and body weight was of non-linear form. The present study provides comparative data to base on for further prospective related studies on juvenile Sea bream and other fish species.

  7. Productive, Qualitative, and Physiological Aspects of Layer Hens Fed with Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Belloni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Laying hens reared under tropical conditions are usually under heat stress. Propolis is known for its pharmaceutical properties, such as increasing cell tolerance to hyperthermia, because of its antioxidants effects. This study aimed at evaluating the influence of different dietary propolis inclusion levels on the performance, egg quality, and bird surface temperature of layers. In this experiment 120 55-wk-old Isa Brown(r layers were distributed according to a completely randomized experimental design into four treatments (0, 1, 2 and 3% dietary propolis inclusion levels, with three replicates of ten birds each. Performance and egg quality parameters, and birds' surface temperature were evaluated. Egg production, egg mass, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio were influenced by the treatments. Bird surface temperature was not affected by propolis dietary inclusion. The egg yolk color changed with the treatment (p<0.05 when brightness and red and yellow concentration were considered. Evaluators noted a slight difference among treatments during the sensory analysis. The use of propolis in the hens' diet did not improve performance and worsened the eggs' quality.

  8. Physiological and clinical aspects of uterine contractility during the postpartum period in cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bajcsy, Árpád Csaba

    2005-01-01

    The individual studies, presented in separate chapters of this thesis, were designed to get answers to certain methodological problems and biological questions associated with the myometrial function of early postpartum dairy cows. Chapter 1 introduces the topic by briefly summarizing the events

  9. Network Physiology: Mapping interactions between complex physiological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2016-01-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where multi-component organ systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact to optimize and coordinate their function. Organ-to-organ interactions occur at multiple levels and spatiotemporal time scales to produce distinct physiologic states: wake and sleep; light and deep sleep; consciousness and unconsciousness. Disrupting organ communications can lead to dysfunction of individual systems or to collapse of the entire organ...

  10. Biofield Physiology: A Framework for an Emerging Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Levin, Michael; McCraty, Rollin; Bat, Namuun; Ives, John A; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Oschman, James L

    2015-11-01

    Biofield physiology is proposed as an overarching descriptor for the electromagnetic, biophotonic, and other types of spatially-distributed fields that living systems generate and respond to as integral aspects of cellular, tissue, and whole organism self-regulation and organization. Medical physiology, cell biology, and biophysics provide the framework within which evidence for biofields, their proposed receptors, and functions is presented. As such, biofields can be viewed as affecting physiological regulatory systems in a manner that complements the more familiar molecular-based mechanisms. Examples of clinically relevant biofields are the electrical and magnetic fields generated by arrays of heart cells and neurons that are detected, respectively, as electrocardiograms (ECGs) or magnetocardiograms (MCGs) and electroencephalograms (EEGs) or magnetoencephalograms (MEGs). At a basic physiology level, electromagnetic activity of neural assemblies appears to modulate neuronal synchronization and circadian rhythmicity. Numerous nonneural electrical fields have been detected and analyzed, including those arising from patterns of resting membrane potentials that guide development and regeneration, and from slowly-varying transepithelial direct current fields that initiate cellular responses to tissue damage. Another biofield phenomenon is the coherent, ultraweak photon emissions (UPE), detected from cell cultures and from the body surface. A physiological role for biophotons is consistent with observations that fluctuations in UPE correlate with cerebral blood flow, cerebral energy metabolism, and EEG activity. Biofield receptors are reviewed in 3 categories: molecular-level receptors, charge flux sites, and endogenously generated electric or electromagnetic fields. In summary, sufficient evidence has accrued to consider biofield physiology as a viable scientific discipline. Directions for future research are proposed.

  11. [Psychological aspects of induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sz Makó, Hajnalka; Veszprémi, Béla

    2011-01-01

    The present paper, based on the results of international studies, is focused on the reconsideration of the psychological aspects of induced abortion. By presenting a narrow cross-section of the Hungarian demographic data, we would like to emphasise the necessity and the significance of a deeper understanding of the subject. Factors behind the decision-making, short- and long term outcomes of the intervention influencing primarily the mental health of women and partner-relationship aspects are discussed in details. While acknowledging the complexity of the subject deriving from the legal, ethical, moral, religious, medical, social and sociological concerns, our aim is to call attention to the psychological aspects of induced abortion and the importance of psychological care of women undergoing surgical operation.

  12. Dynamic aspects of musical imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Andrea R

    2012-04-01

    Auditory imagery can represent many aspects of music, such as the starting pitches of a tune or the instrument that typically plays it. In this paper, I concentrate on more dynamic, or time-sensitive aspects of musical imagery, as demonstrated in two recently published studies. The first was a behavioral study that examined the ability to make emotional judgments about both heard and imagined music in real time. The second was a neuroimaging study on the neural correlates of anticipating an upcoming tune, after hearing a cue tune. That study found activation of several sequence-learning brain areas, some of which varied with the vividness of the anticipated musical memory. Both studies speak to the ways in which musical imagery allows us to judge temporally changing aspects of the represented musical experience. These judgments can be quite precise, despite the complexity of generating the rich internal representations of imagery. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Practical Aspects of CMOS Layout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stassen, Flemming

    1996-01-01

    The topics covered in these notes are the practical aspects and limitations of layout, when random process variations result in electrical parameters, which are not constant but rather statistically distributed.The focus is on design methods for reducing or eliminating the effects. The notes cover...... three aspects:1) to introduce layout structures robust to process variations2) to present simplistic models for analog building blocks with the aim of analysing consequences of parameter variations3) to present the basic noise considerations which guide the layout of supply structures etc....

  14. Technical aspects of data communication

    CERN Document Server

    MacNamara, John E

    1988-01-01

    Technical Aspects of Data Communication, Third Edition provides information pertinent to the technical aspects of data communication. This book discusses a simple asynchronous interface implemented with a specialized integrated circuit called a UART.Organized into 28 chapters, this edition begins with an overview of the interface standards ranging from the classic EIA-232-D to the EIA-530. This text then describes modems and modem control, with material on high-speed modems and error-correcting modems. Other chapters discuss hardware and software methods. This book discusses as well digital tr

  15. Mathematical aspects of natural dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Although the origin of Earth's and other celestial bodies' magnetic fields remains unknown, we do know that the motion of electrically conducting fluids generates and maintains these fields, forming the basis of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and, to a larger extent, dynamo theory. Answering the need for a comprehensive, interdisciplinary introduction to this area, ""Mathematical Aspects of Natural Dynamos"" provides a foundation in dynamo theory before moving on to modeling aspects of natural dynamos.Bringing together eminent international contributors, the book first introduces governing equatio

  16. SPAM -- Technological and Legal Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Banday, M Tariq

    2011-01-01

    In this paper an attempt is made to review technological, economical and legal aspects of the spam in detail. The technical details will include different techniques of spam control e.g., filtering techniques, Genetic Algorithm, Memory Based Classifier, Support Vector Machine Method, etc. The economic aspect includes Shaping/Rate Throttling Approach/Economic Filtering and Pricing/Payment based spam control. Finally, the paper discusses the legal provisions for the control of spam. The scope of the legal options is limited to USA, European Union, New Zealand, Canada, Britain and Australia.

  17. PHYSIOLOGY OF ACID BASE BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid-base, electrolyte, and metabolic disturbances are common in the intensive care unit. Almost all critically ill patients often suffer from compound acid-base and electrolyte disorders. Successful evaluation and management of such patients requires recognition of common patterns (e.g., metabolic acidosis and the ability to dissect one disorder from another. The intensivists needs to identify and correct these condition with the easiest available tools as they are the associated with multiorgan failure. Understanding the elements of normal physiology in these areas is very important so as to diagnose the pathological condition and take adequate measures as early as possible. Arterial blood gas analysis is one such tool for early detection of acid base disorder. Physiology of acid base is complex and here is the attempt to simplify it in our day to day application for the benefit of critically ill patients.

  18. Anatomy and physiology of cisternostomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iype Cherian; Giovanni Grasso; Antonio Bernardo; Sunil Munakomi

    2016-01-01

    Cisternostomy is defined as opening the basal cisterns to atmospheric pressure.This technique helps to reduce the intracranial pressure in severe head trauma as well as other conditions when the so-called sudden "brain swelling" troubles the surgeon.We elaborated the surgical anatomy of this procedure as well as the proposed physiology of how cisternostomy works.This novel technique may change the current trends in neurosurgery.

  19. Diabetes mellitus, part 1: physiology and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Muralitharan

    In part 1 of this 2-part article the author discusses the physiology and complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), a chronic and progressive disorder which affects all ages of the population. The number of people diagnosed with diabetes is approximately 1.8 million and an estimated further 1 million are undiagnosed (Department of Health, 2005). In the UK, 1-2% of the population have diabetes and among school children this is approximately 2 in 1000 (Watkins, 1996). There are two main types of diabetes--type 1 and type 2 (Porth, 2005). The aetiology of DM is unknown; however, genetic and environmental factors have been linked to its development. Type 1 results from the loss of insulin production in the beta cells of the pancreas, and type 2 from a lack of serum insulin or poor uptake of glucose into the cells. Diabetes causes disease in many organs in the body, which may be life-threatening if untreated. Complications such as heart disease, vascular disease, renal failure and blindness (Roberts, 2005) have all been reported. The increased prevalence may be caused by factors such as environmental aspects, diet, an ageing population and low levels of physical exercise.

  20. [C-peptide physiological effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, A O; Granstrem, O K

    2013-02-01

    In the recent years there were numerous evidences that C-peptide, which was previously considered as a product of insulin biosynthesis, is one of the key regulators of physiological processes. C-peptide via heterotrimeric G(i/o) protein-coupled receptors activates a wide range of intracellular effector proteins and transcription factors and, thus, controls the inflammatory and neurotrophic processes, pain sensitivity, cognitive function, macro- and microcirculation, glomerular filtration. These effects of C-peptide are mainly expressed in its absolute or relative deficiency occurred in type 1 diabetes mellitus and they are less pronounced when the level of C-peptide is close to normal. Replacement therapy with C-peptide prevents many complications of type 1 diabetes, such as atherosclerosis, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and nephropathy. C-peptide interacts with the insulin hexamer complexes and induces their dissociation and, as a result, regulates the functional activity of the insulin signaling system. At the same time, C-peptide at the concentrations above physiological may demonstrate pro-inflammatory effects on the endothelial cells and cause atherosclerotic changes in the vessels, which should be considered in the study of pathogenic mechanisms of complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus, where the level of C peptide is increased, as well as in the development of approaches for C-peptide application in clinic. This review is devoted contemporary achievements and unsolved problems in the study of C-peptide, as an important regulator of physiological and biochemical processes.

  1. Physiology of psychogenic movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Mark

    2010-08-01

    Psychogenic movement disorders (PMDs) are common, but their physiology is largely unknown. In most situations, the movement is involuntary, but in a minority, when the disorder is malingering or factitious, the patient is lying and the movement is voluntary. Physiologically, we cannot tell the difference between voluntary and involuntary. The Bereitschaftspotential (BP) is indicative of certain brain mechanisms for generating movement, and is seen with ordinarily voluntary movements, but by itself does not indicate that a movement is voluntary. There are good clinical neurophysiological methods available to determine whether myoclonus or tremor is a PMD. For example, psychogenic myoclonus generally has a BP, and psychogenic stimulus-sensitive myoclonus has a variable latency with times similar to normal reaction times. Psychogenic tremor will have variable frequency over time, be synchronous in the two arms, and might well be entrained with voluntary rhythmic movements. These facts suggest that PMDs share voluntary mechanisms for movement production. There are no definitive tests to differentiate psychogenic dystonia from organic dystonia, although one has been recently reported. Similar physiological abnormalities are seen in both groups. The question arises as to how a movement can be produced with voluntary mechanisms, but not be considered voluntary.

  2. Physiology of in vitro culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jesús Cañal

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The culture procedures described up to the eighties, did not made any mention to the environmental control of in vitro plant development. However, growth rate, development and many of the physiologic-morphologic features of the in vitro grown plants are influenced by the culture vessel. The increasing knowledge about the environmental control of culture vessels under sterile conditions, is helping to change micorpropagation procedures. The in vitro environment with lower rate ventilation, brings about low flow rates of matter and energy, with minimum variations of temperature, high relative humidity and large daily changes of the concentration of CO2 inside the culture vessel. The type of culture vessel (size, shape, fabric and closing system can influence the evolution of the atmosphere along the time of culture. Although submitted to different stresses factors plant can be grown in vitro, but plants can be faulty in their anatomy, morphology and physiology. As a consequence, these plants shown a phenotype unable to survive to ex vitro conditions. Different strategies can be used to control the atmosphere along the different phases of micropropagation, in heterotrophic, mixotrophic or autotrophic cultures. The election of the best strategy will be based on different factors as species, number of transplantes required, or quality-price relationship. enviromental control, tissue culture, micropropagation Keywords: in vitro enviromental, characteristic physiology,

  3. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamical compensation in physiological circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Omer; Swisa, Avital; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval; Alon, Uri

    2016-11-08

    Biological systems can maintain constant steady-state output despite variation in biochemical parameters, a property known as exact adaptation. Exact adaptation is achieved using integral feedback, an engineering strategy that ensures that the output of a system robustly tracks its desired value. However, it is unclear how physiological circuits also keep their output dynamics precise-including the amplitude and response time to a changing input. Such robustness is crucial for endocrine and neuronal homeostatic circuits because they need to provide a precise dynamic response in the face of wide variation in the physiological parameters of their target tissues; how such circuits compensate their dynamics for unavoidable natural fluctuations in parameters is unknown. Here, we present a design principle that provides the desired robustness, which we call dynamical compensation (DC). We present a class of circuits that show DC by means of a nonlinear feedback loop in which the regulated variable controls the functional mass of the controlling endocrine or neuronal tissue. This mechanism applies to the control of blood glucose by insulin and explains several experimental observations on insulin resistance. We provide evidence that this mechanism may also explain compensation and organ size control in other physiological circuits.

  5. Physiological Changes during Pregnancy. Its Relevance for the Anesthesiologist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Julio Ojeda González

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy, labor and delivery are closely related to important anatomical and physiological changes that the anesthesiologist must be aware of in order to conduct an appropriate management of these patients during perioperative period. While dealing with general anesthesia, several physiological changes that pregnant women go through should be considered, mainly those related to the anatomy of the airway that can condition a difficult airway access. In the case of regional anesthesia, besides being a blind procedure, it must overcome physical barriers that appear because of the increased abdominal size. Choosing the appropriate anesthesia procedure is a decision that depends on the obstetric needs and the anesthesiologist’s criteria. The objective of this review is to provide anaesthesiologists with some important considerations on the previously mentioned aspects.

  6. Psychological aspects of pediatric anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Drašković Biljana; Simin Jovana M.; Kvrgić Ivana M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery and anesthesia cause a significant emotional stress in both parents and children. Since the consequences of this stress develop immediately after surgery and can last even when the hospital treatment is over, the role of the anesthesiologist is to ensure psychological as well as physiological well-being of the patient. In order to reduce emotional stress induced by anesthesia and operation, the anesthesiologist has to understand certain developmenta...

  7. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Månsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs.

  8. Microbial Aspects of Anaerobic BTEX Degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Combined with conventional methods, developments in both geochemical (delineation of redox processes) and molecular microbial methods (analysis of 16S rDNA genes and functional genes) have allowed us to study in details microorganisms and genes involved in the anaerobic degradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) under specific redox conditions. This review summarizes recent research in this field. The potential for anaerobic BTEX degradation is widely spread. Specific groups of microorganisms appear to be involved in degradation under different redox conditions. Members of the Azoarcus/Thauera cluster perform BTEX degradation under denitrifying conditions, Geobacteraceae under Fe (III) reducing conditions and Desulfobacteriaceae under sulfate reducing conditions. The information so far obtained on biochemistry and molecular genetics of BTEX degradation indicates that each BTEX compound is funneled into the central benzyol-CoA pathway by a different peripheral pathway. The peripheral pathways of per BTEX compound show similarities among different physiological groups of microorganisms. We also describe how knowledge obtained on the microbial aspects of BTEX degradation can be used to enhance and monitor anaerobic BTEX degradation.

  9. Probabilistic aspects of ocean waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battjes, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Background material for a special lecture on probabilistic aspects of ocean waves for a seminar in Trondheim. It describes long term statistics and short term statistics. Statistical distributions of waves, directional spectra and frequency spectra. Sea state parameters, response peaks, encounter

  10. Psychosocial Aspects of Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszycki, Lee H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents an overview of medical and psychosocial aspects of heart transplantation, with a focus on the program at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Describes social workers' interventions which help patients and families to achieve optimal psychosocial functioning before and after transplantation. (Author/ABL)

  11. Probabilistic aspects of ocean waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battjes, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Background material for a special lecture on probabilistic aspects of ocean waves for a seminar in Trondheim. It describes long term statistics and short term statistics. Statistical distributions of waves, directional spectra and frequency spectra. Sea state parameters, response peaks, encounter pr

  12. Hispathologic aspects of Lyme Borreliosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Johannes de

    1994-01-01

    As a result of the recent interest in Lyme disease a large number of papers has been published on its different aspects. The purpose of this thesis is to present a comprehensive study of the most important histopathological manifestations based on the experience obtained during the last 11 years. In

  13. Coal mining in socioeconomic aspect

    OpenAIRE

    ZALOZNOVA YU. S.

    2014-01-01

    The article investigate the correlation of economic and social factors in the development of coal mining on example of vertically integrated companies with both domestic and foreign assets. The effect of socioeconomic aspects which have led to the American paradox of coal is studied to understand the essence of the coal mining industry at the present stage of the global economic management.

  14. Vascular regulation of adult neurogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato eSawada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells in the mammalian adult brain continuously produce new neurons throughout life. Accumulating evidence in rodents suggests that various aspects of adult neurogenesis, including the genesis, migration, and maturation of new neurons, are regulated by factors derived from blood vessels and their microenvironment. Brain injury enhances both neurogenesis and angiogenesis, thereby promoting the cooperative regeneration of neurons and blood vessels. In this paper, we briefly review the mechanisms for the vascular regulation of adult neurogenesis in the ventricular-subventricular zone under physiological and pathological conditions, and discuss their clinical potential for brain regeneration strategies.

  15. Vulvar and Vaginal Atrophy: Physiology, Clinical Presentation, and Treatment Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal atrophy is a common condition associated with decreased estrogenization of the vaginal tissue. Symptoms include vaginal dryness, irritation, itching, soreness, burning, dyspareunia, discharge, urinary frequency, and urgency. It can occur at any time in a woman's life cycle, although more commonly in the postmenopausal phase, during which the prevalence is approximately 50%. Despite the high prevalence and the substantial effect on quality of life, vulvovaginal atrophy often remains underreported and undertreated. This article aims to review the physiology, clinical presentation, assessment, and current recommendations for treatment, including aspects of effectiveness and safety of local vaginal estrogen therapies.

  16. Molecular aspects of tumor cell migration and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are crucial steps in many physiological events. However, they are also implicated in the physiopathology of many diseases, such as cancer. To spread through the tissues, tumor cells use mechanisms that involve several molecular actors: adhesion receptor families, receptor tyrosine kinases, cytoskeleton proteins, adapter and signalling proteins interplay in a complex scenario. The balance of cellular signals for proliferation and survival responses also regulates migratory behaviours of tumor cells. To complicate the scene of crime drug resistance players can interfere thus worsening this delicate situation. The complete understanding of this molecular jungle is an impossible mission: some molecular aspects are reviewed in this paper.

  17. Instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Watanabe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animal models offer possibilities of physiology knowledge, pathogenesis of disease and action of drugs that are directly related to quality nursing care. This integrative review describes the current state of the instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models, including the main recommendations of ethics committees that focus on animal welfare and raises questions about the impact of their findings in nursing care. Data show that, in Brazil, the progress in ethics for the use of animals for scientific purposes was consolidated with Law No. 11.794/2008 establishing ethical procedures, attending health, genetic and experimental parameters. The application of ethics in handling of animals for scientific and educational purposes and obtaining consistent and quality data brings unquestionable contributions to the nurse, as they offer subsidies to relate pathophysiological mechanisms and the clinical aspect on the patient.

  18. Neurophysiological aspects of musical auditory stimulation on the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Lima Ferreira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The literature has shown that musical stimulation can influence the cardiovascular system, however, the neurophysiological aspects of this influence are not yet fully elucidated. Objective: This study describes the influence of music on the neurophysiological mechanisms in the human body, specifically the variable blood pressure, as well as the neural mechanisms of music processing. Methods: Searches were conducted in Medline, PEDro, Lilacs and SciELO using the intersection of the keyword “music” with the keyword descriptors “blood pressure” and “neurophysiology”. Results: There were selected 11 articles, which indicated that music interferes in some aspects of physiological variables. Conclusion: Studies have indicated that music interferes on the control of blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate, through possible involvement of limbic brain areas which modulate hypothalamic-pituitary functions. Further studies are needed in order to identify the mechanisms by which this influence occurs.

  19. Physiological Parameters Database for Older Adults

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Physiological Parameters Database for Older Adults is available for download and contains physiological parameters values for healthy older human adults (age 60...

  20. Aspects on Aspect : Theory and Applications of Grammatical Aspect in Spanish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González González, P.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis provides an overview of disciplines related to the grammatical phenomenon of aspect. There are several claims advocated in this thesis, according to the different disciplines dealt with in each chapter. Chapter 1 claims that intra-sentential semantic structure contains three potential le

  1. Aspects on Aspect : Theory and Applications of Grammatical Aspect in Spanish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González González, P.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis provides an overview of disciplines related to the grammatical phenomenon of aspect. There are several claims advocated in this thesis, according to the different disciplines dealt with in each chapter. Chapter 1 claims that intra-sentential semantic structure contains three potential le

  2. Aspects on Aspect : Theory and Applications of Grammatical Aspect in Spanish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González González, P.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis provides an overview of disciplines related to the grammatical phenomenon of aspect. There are several claims advocated in this thesis, according to the different disciplines dealt with in each chapter. Chapter 1 claims that intra-sentential semantic structure contains three potential

  3. Upper gastrointestinal physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldum, Helge L; Kleveland, Per M; Fossmark, Reidar

    2015-06-01

    Nordic research on physiology and pathophysiology of the upper gastrointestinal tract has flourished during the last 50 years. Swedish surgeons and physiologists were in the frontline of research on the regulation of gastric acid secretion. This research finally led to the development of omeprazole, the first proton pump inhibitor. When Swedish physiologists developed methods allowing the assessment of acid secretion in isolated oxyntic glands and isolated parietal cells, the understanding of mechanisms by which gastric acid secretion is regulated took a great step forward. Similarly, in Trondheim, Norway, the acid producing isolated rat stomach model combined with a sensitive and specific method for determination of histamine made it possible to evaluate this regulation qualitatively as well as quantitatively. In Lund, Sweden, the identification of the enterochromaffin-like cell as the cell taking part in the regulation of acid secretion by producing and releasing histamine was of fundamental importance both physiologically and clinically. Jorpes and Mutt established a center at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm for the purification of gastrointestinal hormones in the 1960s, and Danes followed up this work by excelling in the field of determination and assessment of biological role of gastrointestinal hormones. A Finnish group was for a long period in the forefront of research on gastritis, and the authors' own studies on the classification of gastric cancer and the role of gastrin in the development of gastric neoplasia are of importance. It can, accordingly, be concluded that Nordic researchers have been central in the research on area of the upper gastrointestinal physiology and diseases.

  4. Physiological and biochemical responses of Ricinus communis seedlings to different temperatures: a metabolomics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro de Jesus, P.R.; Fernandez, L.G.; Delmondez de Castro, R.; Ligterink, W.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Compared with major crops, growth and development of Ricinus communis is still poorly understood. A better understanding of the biochemical and physiological aspects of germination and seedling growth is crucial for the breeding of high yielding varieties adapted to various growing enviro

  5. Extravehicular activities limitations study. Volume 1: Physiological limitations to extravehicular activity in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Paul A.; Monson, Conrad B.; Santoro, Robert L.; Sears, William J.; Peterson, Donald H.; Smith, Malcolm

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a comprehensive literature search on physiological aspects of EVA. Specifically, the topics covered are: (1) Oxygen levels; (2) Optimum EVA work; (3) Food and Water; (4) Carbon dioxide levels; (5) Repetitive decompressions; (6) Thermal, and (7) Urine collection. The literature was assessed on each of these topics, followed by statements on conclusions and recommended future research needs.

  6. Physiological and biochemical responses of Ricinus communis seedlings to different temperatures: a metabolomics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro de Jesus, P.R.; Fernandez, L.G.; Delmondez de Castro, R.; Ligterink, W.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Compared with major crops, growth and development of Ricinus communis is still poorly understood. A better understanding of the biochemical and physiological aspects of germination and seedling growth is crucial for the breeding of high yielding varieties adapted to various growing

  7. Fish cardiovascular physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Johanna; Weber, E Scott; Marty, Gary D; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Fish patients with cardiovascular disorders present a challenge in terms of diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic options. Veterinarians can approach these cases in fish using methods similar to those employed for other companion animals. Clinicians who evaluate and treat fish in private, aquarium, zoologic, or aquaculture settings need to rely on sound clinical judgment after thorough historical and physical evaluation. Pharmacokinetic data and treatments specific to cardiovascular disease in fish are limited; thus, drug types and dosages used in fish are largely empiric. Fish cardiovascular anatomy, physiology, diagnostic evaluation, monitoring, common diseases, cardiac pathologic conditions, formulary options, and comprehensive references are presented with the goal of providing fish veterinarians with clinically relevant tools.

  8. Physiologic mastectomy via flank laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew J; Barrington, George M; Parish, Steve M

    2008-11-01

    Physiologic mastectomy can be used as a salvage procedure in cases of chronic suppurative mastitis, gangrenous mastitis, or chronic, severe mastitis associated with organisms liberating endotoxin or exotoxin. The surgical technique involves ligation of the major arterial blood supply (external pudendal artery) to the corresponding half of the mammary gland, which results in decreased systemic absorption of toxins and gland atrophy. The technique is performed with the cow standing, and it is relatively atraumatic. This procedure is a simple, yet effective alternative to radical mastectomy for unresponsive mastitis cases in genetically or otherwise valuable cattle.

  9. Central aspects of jaw motor control in the rat. An electrophysiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minkels, Robert Frederik

    1993-01-01

    This thesis is based upon four neurophysiological investigations on central aspects of jaw-motor control and a technique for the construction of a new cuff electrode for small nerves. The experiments were performed at the Department of Neurobiology and Oral Physiology of the State University of Gron

  10. On the combined analysis of proximate and ultimate aspects in diel vertical migration (DVM) research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringelberg, J.; Van Gool, E.

    2003-01-01

    Although evolutionary ecologists agree that proximate and ultimate aspects are two sides of one coin, they are seldom interested in studies on physiological and behavioural mechanisms at the base of ecological phenomena. Nevertheless, these mechanisms are objects of selection and evolved to realise

  11. Bengt Saltin and exercise physiology: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    This perspective highlights some of the key contributions of Professor Bengt Saltin (1935-2014) to exercise physiology. The emergence of exercise physiology from work physiology as his career began is discussed as are his contributions in a number of areas. Saltin's open and question-based style of leadership is a model for the future of our field.

  12. Ethical aspect price decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubor Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Price decision making in a marketing program framework creatings is a complicated and delicated part of marketing management, especially to keep in sight culminating of mass external factors. In a market economies price policy as a marketing mix instrument rarely is regulated by the law, which opening the ethical aspect questions of price decision making process. The ethics in the price decision making means consideration of the inner law of the individual (marketing managers and/or consumers, whose irreverence does not entail any juridical sanctions, rather its application is sanctioned by the self - awareness. The acception and stability of the ethical aspect price decision making are determined by the characteristic of selected marketing environment.

  13. Liposarcome dorsal: aspect clinique rare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbessi, Odry; Arrob, Adil; Fiqhi, Kamal; Khalfi, Lahcen; Nassih, Mohammed; El Khatib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Décrit la première fois par Virchow en 1860, le liposarcome est une tumeur mésenchymateuse rare. Cette rareté est relative car les liposarcomes représentent quand même 14 à 18% de l'ensemble des tumeurs malignes des parties molles et ils constituent le plus fréquent des sarcomes des parties molles. Pour la majorité des auteurs, il ne se développerait jamais sur un lipome ou une lipomatose préexistant. Nous rapportons un cas de volumineux liposarcome de la face dorsale du tronc. L'histoire de la maladie, l'aspect clinique inhabituel « de tumeur dans tumeur », l'aspect de la pièce opératoire nous fait évoquer la possibilité de la transformation maligne d'un lipome bénin préexistant. PMID:26113914

  14. Technical aspects of enteral nutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Keymling, M

    1994-01-01

    Advances in technical aspects of enteral feeding such as the manufacture of tubes from polyurethane or silicone have helped promote the science of enteral nutrition. Nasoenteral tubes have few complications, apart from a high unwanted extubation rate and some reluctance from patients because of cosmetic unacceptability. Needle jejunostomy has low morbidity but can only be placed at laparotomy. Percutaneous gastrotomy (in all its different guises) has been established as a low risk procedure a...

  15. SECONDARY VERTEBRAL MALIGNOMA - RADIOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rade R. Babic

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral bones are among the bones of osteoarticular system which are most often affected by secondary malignoma.In the paper we present radiodiagnostical aspects of secondary malignoma in vertebral bones by conventional radiograms, and we illustrate and describe radiodiagnostic characteristics of the osteoplastic, osteolytic and osteolytic-osteoplastic metastasis.Author conclude that the diagnosis of metastasis in vertebral bones is always important for TNM classification, and that their character often points to the primary locus of malignoma.

  16. Formal aspects of component software

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Meng; Schatz, B.

    2014-01-01

    This issue includes extended versions of selected best papers from the 7th International Workshop on Formal Aspects of Component Software (FACS 2010) held in Guimarães, Portugal on October 14–16, 2010. The component-based software development approach has emerged as a promising paradigm to cope with an ever increasing complexity of present-day software solutions by bringing sound production and engineering principles into software engineering. However, many conceptual and technological iss...

  17. CONTRACT ASSIGNMENT – THEORETICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan NAZAT

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This project aims to study in detail the theoretical aspects concerning the contract assignment, as provided by the relevant regulation, and the doctrine corresponding to old and current regulations. In this respect, this project aims to give the reader a comprehensive look on the institution in question, the regulation offered by the current Civil Code is reviewed taking into account the national and international doctrine.

  18. Aspects of Household Cooling Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Mrzyglod, Matthias; Holzer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Actually available household cooling appliances in the highest efficiency class may consume less then 10W average electrical power. To achieve such power consumptions special challenges for the cooling system had to overcome. The related cooling system design has to consider several effects, which arise from the corresponding low cooling capacity demand, start/stop cycles and additional power consumptions by control accessories. The lecture provides symptomatic aspects of cooling technology, ...

  19. Economical aspect of website memorability

    OpenAIRE

    Miłosz, Marek; Luján Mora, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The economic model for estimation of hidden costs of using websites is presented in this paper. These costs are the result of productivity loss in connection with the use of poorly, non-usability designed web pages. One of the elements of usability is memorability. This aspect is considered in detail. The experiment to determine the loss of time due to poor memorability are presented.

  20. Mechanical Aspects of Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Liebschner, Michael; Bucklen, Brandon; Wettergreen, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    Tissue engineering describes an initiative whereby a deficit of tissue may be replaced with an engineered construct, typically thought to be some combination of a structural support element and a cellular element. There are several mechanical aspects that come into play during the design of such a construct. First, the way in which the mechanical behavior of a tissue is characterized varies depending on the tissue type. For example, one would not consider the ultimate strength of a non–load-b...

  1. New aspects of canine pyometra

    OpenAIRE

    Hagman, Ragnvi

    2004-01-01

    Pyometra is a common and lethal disease in bitches characterised by uterine bacterial infection leading to subsequent systemic illness. The objectives of the present thesis were to investigate the incidence of the disease in relation to breed and age, to assess bacteriological aspects of pyometra and to evaluate the involvement of endotoxin and prostaglandin F2α in the pathogenesis. Animal insurance data revealed age- and breed-dependent differences in the incidence of pyometra. On average 23...

  2. Molecular aspects of mammalian fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hector Serrano; Dolores Garcia-Suarez

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian fertilization is a highly regulated process, much of which are not clearly understood. Here we present some information in order to elaborate a working hypothesis for this process, beginning with the sperm modifications in the epidydimis up to sperm and egg plasmalemma interaction and fusion. We also discuss the still poorly understood capacitation process, the phenomenon of sperm chemo-attraction that brings the capacitated sperm to interact with the oocyte vestments and certain aspects of the acrosome reaction.

  3. Nose: Applied aspects in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dammaningala Venkataramaiah Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents.

  4. Quality Aspects in Particulate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkus, Henk G.

    The quality of particle size analysis for the purpose of control of product quality consists of several parts. First, the most relevant parameter(s) have to be chosen to represent the quality of a specific product in a specific application. Some background is given, but an optimum answer to any new product with new properties can only be found by thorough investigation, knowledge and experience. Secondly, the quality aspects of both technique and total procedure for measurement have to be considered in relation to the requirements set for product performance and an adequate procedure selected. The quality aspects of a technique include measurement range, analysis time, precision, noise, drift, bias, accuracy, resolution, sensitivity, lower detection limit, traceability, and investment and labor costs. A quantitative description for these aspects is given together with the major error sources. Altogether, it is advised to set up a protocol for each PSD measurement method in relation to the given application(s), in which all choices made are clearly described.

  5. Lexical and grammatical aspect in language acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Stoicescu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relation between lexical and grammatical aspect in child Romanian. It tests the predictions of the Aspect First Hypothesis against the data of one Romanian speaking child. It finds that the Aspect First Hypothesis is not confirmed by child Romanian in its strong interpretation. However, the data supports the prototype reinterpretation of the Aspect First Hypothesis.

  6. Electrocyte physiology: 50 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Michael R

    2013-07-01

    Weakly electric gymnotiform and mormyrid fish generate and detect weak electric fields to image their worlds and communicate. These multi-purpose electric signals are generated by electrocytes, the specialized electric organ (EO) cells that produce the electric organ discharge (EOD). Just over 50 years ago the first experimental analyses of electrocyte physiology demonstrated that the EOD is produced and shaped by the timing and waveform of electrocyte action potentials (APs). Electrocytes of some species generate a single AP from a distinct region of excitable membrane, and this AP waveform determines EOD waveform. In other species, electrocytes possess two independent regions of excitable membrane that generate asynchronous APs with different waveforms, thereby increasing EOD complexity. Signal complexity is further enhanced in some gymnotiforms by the spatio-temporal activation of distinct EO regions with different electrocyte properties. For many mormyrids, additional EOD waveform components are produced by APs that propagate along stalks that connect postsynaptic regions to the main body of the electrocyte. I review here the history of research on electrocyte physiology in weakly electric fish, as well as recent discoveries of key phenomena not anticipated during early work in this field. Recent areas of investigation include the regulation of electrocyte activity by steroid and peptide hormones, the molecular evolution of electrocyte ion channels, and the evolutionary selection of ion channels expressed in excitable cells. These emerging research areas have generated renewed interest in electrocyte function and clear future directions for research addressing a broad range of new and important questions.

  7. The glycemic index: physiological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Amin; Wong, Julia M W; Mirrahimi, Arash; Srichaikul, Korbua; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2009-08-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a physiological assessment of a food's carbohydrate content through its effect on postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Evidence from trials and observational studies suggests that this physiological classification may have relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with overconsumption and inactivity leading to central obesity and insulin resistance. The glycemic index classification of foods has been used as a tool to assess potential prevention and treatment strategies for diseases where glycemic control is of importance, such as diabetes. Low GI diets have also been reported to improve the serum lipid profile, reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, and aid in weight control. In cross-sectional studies, low GI or glycemic load diets (mean GI multiplied by total carbohydrate) have been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), with reduced CRP concentrations, and, in cohort studies, with decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, some case-control and cohort studies have found positive associations between dietary GI and risk of various cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and prostate. Although inconsistencies in the current findings still need to be resolved, sufficient positive evidence, especially with respect to renewed interest in postprandial events, suggests that the glycemic index may have a role to play in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  8. Physiological Effects of Touching Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harumi Ikei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to clarify the physiological effects of touching wood with the palm, in comparison with touching other materials on brain activity and autonomic nervous activity. Eighteen female university students (mean age, 21.7  ±  1.6 years participated in the study. As an indicator of brain activity, oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb concentrations were measured in the left/right prefrontal cortex using near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy. Heart rate variability (HRV was used as an indicator of autonomic nervous activity. The high-frequency (HF component of HRV, which reflected parasympathetic nervous activity, and the low-frequency (LF/HF ratio, which reflected sympathetic nervous activity, were measured. Plates of uncoated white oak, marble, tile, and stainless steel were used as tactile stimuli. After sitting at rest with their eyes closed, participants touched the materials for 90 s. As a result, tactile stimulation with white oak significantly (1 decreased the oxy-Hb concentration in the left/right prefrontal cortex relative to marble, tile, and stainless steel and (2 increased ln(HF-reflected parasympathetic nervous activity relative to marble and stainless steel. In conclusion, our study revealed that touching wood with the palm calms prefrontal cortex activity and induces parasympathetic nervous activity more than other materials, thereby inducing physiological relaxation.

  9. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  10. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny P Bartsch

    Full Text Available We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS, we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  11. Gestation-Specific Changes in the Anatomy and Physiology of Healthy Pregnant Women: An Extended Repository of Model Parameters for Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, André; Ince, Ibrahim; Meyer, Michaela; Willmann, Stefan; Eissing, Thomas; Hempel, Georg

    2017-04-11

    In the past years, several repositories for anatomical and physiological parameters required for physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in pregnant women have been published. While providing a good basis, some important aspects can be further detailed. For example, they did not account for the variability associated with parameters or were lacking key parameters necessary for developing more detailed mechanistic pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, such as the composition of pregnancy-specific tissues. The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide an updated and extended database of anatomical and physiological parameters in healthy pregnant women that also accounts for changes in the variability of a parameter throughout gestation and for the composition of pregnancy-specific tissues. A systematic literature search was carried out to collect study data on pregnancy-related changes of anatomical and physiological parameters. For each parameter, a set of mathematical functions was fitted to the data and to the standard deviation observed among the data. The best performing functions were selected based on numerical and visual diagnostics as well as based on physiological plausibility. The literature search yielded 473 studies, 302 of which met the criteria to be further analyzed and compiled in a database. In total, the database encompassed 7729 data. Although the availability of quantitative data for some parameters remained limited, mathematical functions could be generated for many important parameters. Gaps were filled based on qualitative knowledge and based on physiologically plausible assumptions. The presented results facilitate the integration of pregnancy-dependent changes in anatomy and physiology into mechanistic population physiologically based pharmacokinetic models. Such models can ultimately provide a valuable tool to investigate the pharmacokinetics during pregnancy in silico and support informed decision making regarding

  12. Lichen physiology and cell biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on topics relating to mineral element accumulation in bog lichens, nitrogen losses from diazotrophic lichens, influence of automobile exhaust and lead on the oxygen exchange of lichens, temporal variation in lichen element levels, and lead and uranium uptake by lichens. Other topics include the architecture of the concentric bodies in the mycobiont of Peltigera praetextata; multiple enzyme forms in lichens, photosynthesis, water relations multiple enzyme forms in lichens, photosynthesis, water relations and thallus structure of strictaceae lichens; and aspects of carbohydrate metabolism in lichens. The distribution of uranium and companion elements in lichen heath associated with undisturbed uranium deposits in the Canadian Arctic is also discussed.

  13. Ghrelin in obesity, physiological and pharmacological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Castro, Paula; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the physiological and pharmacological aspects of ghrelin. Obesity can be defined as an excess of body fat and is associated with significant disturbances in metabolic and endocrine function. Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic. In obesity there is a decreased growth hormone (GH) secretion, and the altered somatotroph secretion in obesity is functional. Ghrelin is a peptide that has a unique structure with 28 amino-acids and an n-octanoyl ester at its third serine residue, which is essential for its potent stimulatory activity on somatotroph secretion. The pathophysiological mechanism responsible for GH hyposecretion in obesity is probably multifactorial, and there is probably a defect in ghrelin secretion. Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic factor, and has been found to be reduced in obese humans. Ghrelin levels in blood decrease during periods of feeding. Due to its orexigenic and metabolic effects, ghrelin has a potential benefit in antagonizing protein breakdown and weight loss in catabolic conditions such as cancer cachexia, renal and cardiac disease, and age-related frailty. Theoretically ghrelin receptor antagonists could be employed as anti-obesity drugs, blocking the orexigenic signal. By blocking the constitutive receptor activity, inverse agonists of the ghrelin receptor may lower the set-point for hunger, and could be used for the treatment of obesity. In summary, ghrelin secretion is reduced in obesity, and could be partly responsible for GH hyposecretion in obesity, ghrelin antagonist or partial inverse agonists should be considered for the treatment of obesity.

  14. Aspects of spirituality concerning illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, René; Tiesinga, Lucas J; Jochemsen, Henk; Jochemasen, Henk; Post, Doeke

    2007-12-01

    The spiritual dimension of illness, health and care may be seen as a unique aspect in addition to the physical, mental and social dimension. This contribution describes experiences of patients, nurses and hospital chaplains in relation to the spiritual aspects of being ill. Qualitative research was performed with the design of a focus group study, consisting of 13 focus groups with a total of 67 participants. A purposive sample was used comprising patients, nurses and hospital chaplains working in oncology, cardiology and neurology in different institutions and regions in the Netherlands. The qualitative analysis consisted of open coding and the determining of topics, followed by the subsequent attachment of substantial dimensions and characteristic fragments. Data were analysed by using the computer program KWALITAN. Spirituality play various roles in patients lives during their illness. There is a wide range of topics that may have an individual effect on patients. Despite differences in emphasis, the topics play a role in different patient categories. Although the spiritual topics seem to manifest themselves more clearly in long-term care relationships, they may also play a role during brief admittance periods (such as treatment decisions). The spiritual topics that arise from this study offer caregivers a framework for signalling the spiritual needs of patients. The question is not whether spirituality is a relevant focus area in care, but how and to what degree it plays a role with individual patients. Follow up research should aim at further exploration of spiritual aspects in care, the relationship between spirituality and health and at effective training of caregivers.

  15. DESIGN ASPECTS IN AIRPLANE EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENUŞ Marilena

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes to present a few important aspects from aerodynamics and aerospace technology. It also, presents important points regarding the improvement of airplanes as a result of research in shape modelling, materials, aerodynamics and 3d design. Several examples based on constructive structures are offered. The embodiment design of a traditional airplane is presented in order to offer directions of conceptual development for improving its performance parameters and shapes. The virtual scale models are created by computer in Catia V5, in order to provide the validation of the features and the performance of aerodynamic configuration in the wind tunnel.

  16. Procedural Aspects Regarding International Arbitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlingher Remus Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Socio-economic changes have led to significant changes with regard to the institutions regulated by the 1865 Code of Civil Procedure and other laws, such as Law no. 105/1992 on the regulation of private international law. Among the institutions that have undergone these reconfigurations in the regulation of the Code of Civil Procedure, which entered into force in 2013, one that stands out is arbitration. Our study will analyze the main aspects of private international law arbitration: arbitration agreement, the arbitral tribunal, the proceedings in the matter, as well as the recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards

  17. Immunological aspects of cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the innate and adaptive immune systems make a crucial contribution to the antitumour effects of conventional chemotherapy-based and radiotherapy-based cancer treatments. Moreover, the molecular and cellular bases of the immunogenicity of cell death that is induced by cytotoxic agents are being progressively unravelled, challenging the guidelines that currently govern the development of anticancer drugs. Here, we review the immunological aspects of conventional cancer treatments and propose that future successes in the fight against cancer will rely on the development and clinical application of combined chemo- and immunotherapies.

  18. International aspect of ecological innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkola Viktoriya Yurіyivna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the international aspect of ecological innovations. Today one of the most significant factors to achieve sustainable development in Ukraine is to activate the ecologically oriented innovative activity. This requires new approaches creation for the innovative processes management system at different economic levels. Ecological or “green” start-ups consist in realization of ideas by non-typical way, how it is possible to save ecology and to gain material benefits. All win in business-model of the similar projects: governments save on waste disposal, citizens are awarded for ecological way of life, and sponsors realize social responsibility.

  19. Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry 40

    CERN Document Server

    White, Ralph E

    2007-01-01

    This volume in the acclaimed series Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry starts with a dedication to the late Professor Brian Conway who for 50 years helped to guide this series to its current prominence. The remainder of the volume is then devoted to the following topics: PEM fuel cells; the use of graphs in electrochemical reaction newtworks; nanomaterials in Lithium-ion batteries; direct methanolf fuel cells (two chapters); fuel cell catalyst layers. The book is for electrochemists, electrochemical engineers, fuel cell workers and energy generation workers.

  20. [Aesthetic aspects of eyelid reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, S; Arnaud, D; Rousseau, P; Belmahi, A; Duron, J-B; Gary-Bobo, A; Malet, T; Darsonval, V; Bardot, J

    2013-10-01

    In eyelid reconstruction, filling the defect is not sufficient. In young patients, the aim is to obtain a reconstructed eyelid, as normal as possible. In elderly patients, the large amount of available skin and the good quality of scars seem to be favorable. But weakening and stretching of the connective tissue and eyelid structures and deficient production of tears may compromise the functional result. In every case, restoring aspect and function are going together. The purpose of this chapter is to show how different techniques may be used in eyelid reconstruction with good cosmetic result. Different cases are carefully described and illustrated. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. Aspect-oriented programming evaluated

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinschmager, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Aspect-oriented-programming is a relatively new technique that has evolved on top of the already well-established approach of object-oriented programming. When it is used correctly, it promises to remove many redundant parts of a code that appear repeatedly in an application, essentially untangling the original code. Thus, it can lead to a cleaner, more separated software design, to greater modularity and maintainability. Time-savings in software engineering can also be huge cost-savings, and anything that increases software quality is a welcome sight in an industr

  2. Symphonic electronic music: social aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enfi A.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article «Sympho-electronic music as deep-essential psychotherapy's tool of art-humanitarian practice» we provide definitions and characteristics of the new musicological concepts: «sympho-electronic music» (SEM, and show many benefits of using this music in depth-essential psychotherapy of art-humanitarian creativity, based on the implementation of major principles and basic medical-psychological aspects of the Essence Coding Theory (ECT. Demonstrated a specific example example of the use of SEM in psychotherapeutic practice.

  3. Ecophysiological aspects of Cirsium arvense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heilmann, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Even if an existing agricultural holistic production system works without specific measures of control of Cirsium arvense (L. SCOP. scientific questions of pedogene probiotic aspects are left to be answered. Changes in soil structure and pH-Value are not as much due to the conditions of soil but depend on the influences of the Creeping thistle. Investigations of soils with/without thistles at the University of Hohenheim show high differences which hint at saprotroph contributions to nutrition. Thistle growth, rhizome dormancy and subterranean embryogeny are discussed as a nutrition model of thistles as mixotroph plants which can take advantage of organic substances in the soil.

  4. Nonlinear aspects of astrobiological research

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Several aspects of mathematical astrobiology are discussed. It is argued that around the time of the origin of life the handedness of biomolecules must have established itself through an instability. Possible pathways of producing a certain handedness include mechanisms involving either autocatalysis or, alternatively, epimerization as governing effects. Concepts for establishing hereditary information are discussed in terms of the theory of hypercycles. Instabilities toward parasites and possible remedies by invoking spatial extent are reviewed. Finally, some effects of early life are discussed that contributed to modifying and regulating atmosphere and climate of the Earth, and that could have contributed to the highly oxidized state of its crust.

  5. Nutritional aspects related to endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Halpern

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY This literature review analyzed the evidence on nutritional aspects related to the pathogenesis and progression of endometriosis. Diets deficient in nutrients result in changes in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and promote epigenetic abnormalities, that may be involved in the genesis and progression of the disease. Foods rich in omega 3 with anti-inflammatory effects, supplementation with Nacetylcysteine, vitamin D and resveratrol, in addition to the increased consumption of fruits, vegetables (preferably organic and whole grains exert a protective effect, reducing the risk of development and possible regression of disease. Dietary re-education seems to be a promising tool in the prevention and treatment of endometriosis.

  6. Children's physiological responses to childcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Harriet J; Groeneveld, Marleen G

    2017-06-01

    This review focuses on children's physiological responses to out-of-home childcare. The finding that children's cortisol levels are higher at childcare than at home has been well-replicated. Here we summarize recent evidence examining possible correlates of elevated cortisol levels. Reviewed studies suggest that childcare quality matters, whereas group sizes and type of care do not. As for child characteristics, elevated cortisol at childcare is more pronounced in toddlers than in infants, and in inhibited and aggressive children. We discuss recent advances focusing on hair cortisol analysis and immunomarkers of stress, and suggest that there is a need for experimental and longitudinal studies to examine causal relations and possible negative long-term consequences for children's health and development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vitamin E: Emerging aspects and new directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Francesco; Azzi, Angelo; Birringer, Marc; Cook-Mills, Joan M; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Frank, Jan; Cruciani, Gabriele; Lorkowski, Stefan; Özer, Nesrin Kartal

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of vitamin E will have its 100th anniversary in 2022, but we still have more questions than answers regarding the biological functions and the essentiality of vitamin E for human health. Discovered as a factor essential for rat fertility and soon after characterized for its properties of fat-soluble antioxidant, vitamin E was identified to have signaling and gene regulation effects in the 1980s. In the same years the cytochrome P-450 dependent metabolism of vitamin E was characterized and a first series of studies on short-chain carboxyethyl metabolites in the 1990s paved the way to the hypothesis of a biological role for this metabolism alternative to vitamin E catabolism. In the last decade other physiological metabolites of vitamin E have been identified, such as α-tocopheryl phosphate and the long-chain metabolites formed by the ω-hydroxylase activity of cytochrome P-450. Recent findings are consistent with gene regulation and homeostatic roles of these metabolites in different experimental models, such as inflammatory, neuronal and hepatic cells, and in vivo in animal models of acute inflammation. Molecular mechanisms underlying these responses are under investigation in several laboratories and side-glances to research on other fat soluble vitamins may help to move faster in this direction. Other emerging aspects presented in this review paper include novel insights on the mechanisms of reduction of the cardiovascular risk, immunomodulation and antiallergic effects, neuroprotection properties in models of glutamate excitotoxicity and spino-cerebellar damage, hepatoprotection and prevention of liver toxicity by different causes and even therapeutic applications in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. We here discuss these topics with the aim of stimulating the interest of the scientific community and further research activities that may help to celebrate this anniversary of vitamin E with an in-depth knowledge of its action as vitamin.

  8. Ventricular hypertrophy--physiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1986-01-01

    Adult cardiac myocytes are incapable of mitosis. Dead cells are replaced by connective tissue so that after myocardial infarction (MI), function can only be restored by compensatory hypertrophy of the surviving myocardium. In physiological hypertrophy in response to exercise, high altitude, or mild hypertension, additional myoplasm expands cell diameter in an orderly fashion; Z-lines are in register and the normal ratio of volume densities of contractile elements, mitochondria, and capillaries is conserved. In hypertrophy induced by aortic or pulmonary artery banding or by experimental or congenital hypertension, the borderline between physiological and pathological hypertrophy may be crossed, causing disorganization of fibers and an unfavourable contractile element to capillary ratio. There was, therefore, a need for a graded model of hypertrophy, which involves simulating an altitude of 6,000 m at sea level by supplying rabbits with appropriate nitrogen/oxygen mixtures. In this environment, 50% right ventricular hypertrophy can be achieved without alteration of left ventricular weight or hematocrit. Longer exposures produced 100% right ventricular hypertrophy, with only moderate increases in hematocrit and left ventricular weight. It is well known that adrenergic stimulation causes cardiac hypertrophy, and it has been suggested that release of a trophic factor from sympathetic nerves, either noradrenaline or a protein, might be a necessary stimulus for growth. If so, long-term treatment of post-MI patients with beta-adrenergic blocking agents could inhibit a desirable compensatory hypertrophy of the surviving myocardium. In the above model it has been found, however, that neither beta-blockade nor chemical sympathectomy with guanethidine or 6-hydroxydopamine had any effect on the hypertrophy, nor did treatment with verapamil or nifedipine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradleigh eHocking

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to ripening and the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g. blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples. This review works towards an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved

  10. Is sexual concordance related to awareness of physiological states?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suschinsky, Kelly D; Lalumière, Martin L

    2012-02-01

    Sexual concordance refers to the degree to which two aspects of human sexual arousal (genital response and self-reported sexual arousal) correspond with each other. Researchers have consistently reported a sex difference in sexual concordance: The relationship between genital responses and reported feelings of sexual arousal in men is positive and large, whereas the relationship in women is positive but much smaller than that seen in men. The study of interoception--people's awareness of their physiological states--reveals a similar sex difference: Men are more aware of a variety of (non-genital) responses (e.g., heart rate) than women in the laboratory. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether the sex difference in sexual concordance was related to a broader sex difference in interoception. Twenty men and 20 women were presented with twelve 90 s sexual and non-sexual film clips while their genital responses, heart rate, and respiration rate were measured. Participants also estimated their physiological responses. As expected, men were significantly more sexually concordant than women. Men were also significantly more aware of their heart rate, but there was no significant sex difference in respiration rate awareness. Sexual concordance was not significantly correlated with either heart rate or respiration rate awareness. The results suggest that the sex difference in sexual concordance may be a unique phenomenon, separate from general awareness of physiological states.

  11. Application of magnetic resonance techniques for imaging tumour physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbs, M. [Saint George' s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1999-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques have the unique ability to measure in vivo the biochemical content of living tissue in the body in a dynamic, non-invasive and non-destructive manner. MR also permits serial investigations of steady-state tumour physiology and biochemistry, as well as the response of a tumour to treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and a mixture of the two techniques (spectroscopic imaging) allow some physiological parameters, for example pH, to be 'imaged'. Using these methods, information on tissue bioenergetics and phospolipid membrane turnover, pH, hypoxia, oxygenation, and various aspects of vascularity including blood flow, angiogenesis, permeability and vascular volume can be obtained. In addition, MRS methods can be used for monitoring anticancer drugs (e.g. 5FU, ifosfamide) and their metabolites at their sites of action. The role of these state-of-the-art MR methods in imaging tumour physiology and their potential role in the clinic are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Building bone tissue: matrices and scaffolds in physiology and biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riminucci M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of bone in physiology involves timed secretion, deposition and removal of a complex array of extracellular matrix proteins which appear in a defined temporal and spatial sequence. Mineralization itself plays a role in dictating and spatially orienting the deposition of matrix. Many aspects of the physiological process are recapitulated in systems of autologous or xenogeneic transplantation of osteogenic precursor cells developed for tissue engineering or modeling. For example, deposition of bone sialoprotein, a member of the small integrin-binding ligand, N-linked glycoprotein family, represents the first step of bone formation in ectopic transplantation systems in vivo. The use of mineralized scaffolds for guiding bone tissue engineering has revealed unexpected manners in which the scaffold and cells interact with each other, so that a complex interplay of integration and disintegration of the scaffold ultimately results in efficient and desirable, although unpredictable, effects. Likewise, the manner in which biomaterial scaffolds are "resorbed" by osteoclasts in vitro and in vivo highlights more complex scenarios than predicted from knowledge of physiological bone resorption per se. Investigation of novel biomaterials for bone engineering represents an essential area for the design of tissue engineering strategies.

  13. Mechanistic aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Moïse, Alexander R.

    2014-01-08

    Carotenoid synthesis is based on the analysis of the phenotype of several mutant strains of tomato lacking carotenoid synthetic genes. Carotenoids are tetraterpenes derived through the condensation of the five-carbon (C5) universal isoprenoid precursors isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). A recently developed concept that could explain the role of the poly-cis pathway in carotenoid synthesis is that the intermediates of this pathway have additional physiological roles that extend beyond serving as precursors of lycopene. This concept is based on the analysis of the phenotype of several mutant strains of tomato lacking carotenoid synthetic genes. The feedback regulation of early carotenoid synthetic genes in response to a block in upstream metabolism represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the mechanism and regulation of carotenoid synthesis and of metabolic regulation in general. The molecular details of a signaling pathway that regulates carotenogenesis in response to the levels of carotenoid precursors are still unclear.

  14. Psychological aspects of pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drasković, Biljana; Simin, Jovana M; Kvrgić, Ivana M

    2015-01-01

    Surgery and anesthesia cause a significant emotional stress in both parents and children. Since the consequences of this stress develop immediately after surgery and can last even when the hospital treatment is over, the role of the anesthesiologist is to ensure psychological as well as physiological well-being of the patient. In order to reduce emotional stress induced by anesthesia and operation, the anesthesiologist has to understand certain developmental phases that children go through and to identify situations which a child could potentially see as a danger or a threat. This can usually be achieved by careful preoperative assessment and by administering preoperative sedation. During the preoperative visit to the patient, the anesthesiologist can evaluate the levels of anxiety of both parents and children as well as assess the child's medical condition.

  15. [Current aspects of paediatric cholesteatomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J P; Volkenstein, S; Minovi, A; Dazert, S

    2013-05-01

    Cholesteatomas can be subclassified into genuine and acquired forms. Whilst epidermoid formations are the generally accepted cause of genuine cholesteatomas, metaplasia, immigration, proliferation and retraction pocket theories have all been proposed to explain the development of acquired cholesteatomas. Clinically, paediatric cholesteatomas exhibit more extensive and aggressive growth than those arising in adulthood. Molecular biological differences in terms of angiogenesis, cytokine expression and particularly the more marked inflammatory responses of the perimatrix could potentially explain these clinical differences. The surgical therapy of paediatric cholesteatomas should be adapted to the individual pathological findings, although where possible a canal wall up procedure is preferred during initial surgery. The "inside-out" mastoidectomy tracking-technique combines the benefits of a good surgical overview with those of a physiological postoperative auditory canal.

  16. Nanoparticles skin absorption: New aspects for a safety profile evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larese Filon, Francesca; Mauro, Marcella; Adami, Gianpiero; Bovenzi, Massimo; Crosera, Matteo

    2015-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) skin absorption is a wide issue, which needs to be better understood. The attempt of this review is to summarize the scientific evidence concerning open questions, i.e.: the role of NPs intrinsic characteristics (size, shape, charge, surface properties), the penetration of NPs through the intact or impaired skin barrier, the penetration pathways which should be considered and the role of NPs interaction in physiological media. The outcomes suggest that one main difference should be made between metal and non-metal NPs. Both kinds have a secondary NPs size which is given after interaction in physiological media, and allows a size-dependent skin penetration: NPs⩽4nm can penetrate and permeate intact skin, NPs size between 4 and 20nm can potentially permeate intact and damaged skin, NPs size between 21 and 45nm can penetrate and permeate only damaged skin, NPs size>45nm cannot penetrate nor permeate the skin. Other aspects play an important role, mostly for metal NPs, i.e., dissolution in physiological media, which can cause local and systemic effects, the sensitizing or toxic potential and the tendency to create aggregates. This paper suggests a decision tree to evaluate the potential risk for consumers and workers exposed to NPs.

  17. Translational physiology: from molecules to public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Douglas R

    2013-07-15

    The term 'translational research' was coined 20 years ago and has become a guiding influence in biomedical research. It refers to a process by which the findings of basic research are extended to the clinical research setting (bench to bedside) and then to clinical practice and eventually health policy (bedside to community). It is a dynamic, multidisciplinary research approach. The concept of translational physiology applies the translational research model to the physiological sciences. It differs from the traditional areas of integrative and clinical physiology by its broad investigative scope of basic research to community health. Translational physiology offers exciting opportunities, but presently is under-developed and -utilized. A key challenge will be to expand physiological research by extending investigations to communities of patients and healthy (or at risk) individuals. This will allow bidirectional physiological investigation throughout the translational continuum: basic research observations can be studied up to the population level, and mechanisms can be assessed by 'reverse translation' in clinical research settings and preclinical models based on initial observations made in populations. Examples of translational physiology questions, experimental approaches, roadblocks and strategies for promotion are discussed. Translational physiology provides a novel framework for physiology programs and an investigational platform for physiologists to study function from molecular events to public health. It holds promise for enhancing the completeness and societal impact of our work, while further solidifying the critical role of physiology in the biomedical research enterprise.

  18. Investigating legal aspects of cyberbullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Simone; Smith, Peter K; Blumberg, Herbert H

    2012-11-01

    In the UK schools are required by law to protect students from bullying; the responsibility of teachers to govern such behaviour has been extended outside the school setting to include cyberbullying. In this investigation, cyberbullying in secondary education is explored from the student perspective using a qualitative method of enquiry. Reported awareness and understanding about the legal aspects of cyberbullying are investigated; consideration is given to legislation, cybercrime, children's rights, school sanctions and safeguarding responsibilities. A total of 197 male and female students aged between 11 and 14 years old participated. Despite the availability of information on guidelines and legislation at national, local, and school level, this does not appear to have reached ground level of the individual student. There is a considerable gap between what students should know and what they report to be aware of with regard to legal aspects of cyberbullying. To address concerns of keeping up with the pace of change in cyberbullying, a collaborative approach is required with young people and adults sharing expertise.

  19. Mobile agent driven by aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Hannad

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Domain application of mobile agents is quite large. They are used for network management and the monitoring of complex architecture. Mobile agent is also essential into specific software architecture such that adaptable grid architecture. Even if the concept of mobile agent seems to be obvious, the development is always complex because it needs to understand network features but also security features and negotiation algorithms. We present a work about an application of aspects dedicated to mobile agent development over a local network. At this level, the underlying protocol is called jini and allows managing several essential concepts such that short transaction and permission management. Three subsets of aspects are defined in this work. A part is for the description of agent host and its security level, accessible resource, etc. A second part is about mobile agent and their collaboration. This means how they can operate on an agent host with the respect of the execution context. All the results are illustrated through a distributed monitoring application called DMA. Its main objective is the observation of component servers.

  20. Endoscopic Aspects of Gastric Syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Souza Varella Frazão

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Considered as a rare event, gastric syphilis (GS is reported as an organic form of involvement. Low incidence of GS emphasizes the importance of histopathological analysis. Objective. We aim to characterize GS endoscopic aspects in an immunocompetent patient. Case Report. A 23-year-old man presented with epigastric pain associated with nausea, anorexia, generalized malaise and 11 kg weight loss that started 1 month prior to his clinical consultation. Physical examination was normal except for mild abdominal tenderness in epigastrium. Endoscopy observed diminished gastric expandability and diffuse mucosal lesions, from cardia to pylorus. Gastric mucosa was thickened, friable, with nodular aspect, and associated with ulcers lesions. Gastric biopsies were performed, and histopathological analysis resulted in dense inflammatory infiltration rich in plasmocytes. Syphilis serologies were positive for VDRL and Treponema pallidum reagents. Immunohistochemical tests were positive for Treponema pallidum and CD138. The patient was treated with penicillin, leading to resolution of his clinical complaints and endoscopic findings. Conclusion. Diagnosis suspicion of GS is important in view of its nonspecific presentation. Patients with gastric symptoms that mimic neoplastic disease should be investigated thoroughly based on the fact that clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings can easily be mistaken for lymphoma or plastic linitis.

  1. Physiology can contribute to better understanding, management, and conservation of coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illing, Björn; Rummer, Jodie L

    2017-01-01

    Coral reef fishes, like many other marine organisms, are affected by anthropogenic stressors such as fishing and pollution and, owing to climate change, are experiencing increasing water temperatures and ocean acidification. Against the backdrop of these various stressors, a mechanistic understanding of processes governing individual organismal performance is the first step for identifying drivers of coral reef fish population dynamics. In fact, physiological measurements can help to reveal potential cause-and-effect relationships and enable physiologists to advise conservation management by upscaling results from cellular and individual organismal levels to population levels. Here, we highlight studies that include physiological measurements of coral reef fishes and those that give advice for their conservation. A literature search using combined physiological, conservation and coral reef fish key words resulted in ~1900 studies, of which only 99 matched predefined requirements. We observed that, over the last 20 years, the combination of physiological and conservation aspects in studies on coral reef fishes has received increased attention. Most of the selected studies made their physiological observations at the whole organism level and used their findings to give conservation advice on population dynamics, habitat use or the potential effects of climate change. The precision of the recommendations differed greatly and, not surprisingly, was least concrete when studies examined the effects of projected climate change scenarios. Although more and more physiological studies on coral reef fishes include conservation aspects, there is still a lack of concrete advice for conservation managers, with only very few published examples of physiological findings leading to improved management practices. We conclude with a call to action to foster better knowledge exchange between natural scientists and conservation managers to translate physiological findings more

  2. Intragroup Emotions: Physiological Linkage and Social Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvelä, Simo; Kätsyri, Jari; Ravaja, Niklas; Chanel, Guillaume; Henttonen, Pentti

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how technologically mediating two different components of emotion—communicative expression and physiological state—to group members affects physiological linkage and self-reported feelings in a small group during video viewing. In different conditions the availability of second screen text chat (communicative expression) and visualization of group level physiological heart rates and their dyadic linkage (physiology) was varied. Within this four person group two participants formed a physically co-located dyad and the other two were individually situated in two separate rooms. We found that text chat always increased heart rate synchrony but HR visualization only with non-co-located dyads. We also found that physiological linkage was strongly connected to self-reported social presence. The results encourage further exploration of the possibilities of sharing group member's physiological components of emotion by technological means to enhance mediated communication and strengthen social presence. PMID:26903913

  3. Intragroup emotions: physiological linkage and social presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo eJärvelä

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how technologically mediating two different components of emotion – communicative expression and physiological state – to group members affects physiological linkage and self-reported feelings in a small group during video viewing. In different conditions the availability of second screen text chat (communicative expression and visualization of group level physiological heart rates and their dyadic linkage (physiology was varied. Within this four person group two participants formed a physically co-located dyad and the other two were individually situated in two separate rooms. We found that text chat always increased heart rate synchrony but HR visualization only with non-co-located dyads. We also found that physiological linkage was strongly connected to self-reported social presence. The results encourage further exploration of the possibilities of sharing group member’s physiological components of emotion by technological means to enhance mediated communication and strengthen social presence.

  4. Physiology education in North American dental schools: the basic science survey series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Medha; Shaw, David H; Pate, Ted D; Lambert, H Wayne

    2014-06-01

    As part of the Basic Science Survey Series for Dentistry, members of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Physiology, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics Section surveyed directors of physiology courses in North American dental schools. The survey was designed to assess, among other things, faculty affiliation and experience of course directors, teaching methods, general course content and emphasis, extent of interdisciplinary (shared) instruction, and impact of recent curricular changes. Responses were received from forty-four of sixty-seven (65.7 percent) U.S. and Canadian dental schools. The findings suggest the following: substantial variation exists in instructional hours, faculty affiliation, class size, and interdisciplinary nature of physiology courses; physiology course content emphasis is similar between schools; student contact hours in physiology, which have remained relatively stable in the past fifteen years, are starting to be reduced; recent curricular changes have often been directed towards enhancing the integrative and clinically relevant aspects of physiology instruction; and a trend toward innovative content delivery, such as use of computer-assisted instruction, is evident. Data from this study may be useful to physiology course directors, curriculum committees, and other dental educators with an interest in integrative and interprofessional education.

  5. Brain vascular and hydrodynamic physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Protecting the brain in vulnerable infants undergoing surgery is a central aspect of perioperative care. Understanding the link between blood flow, oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption leads to a more informed approach to bedside care. In some cases, we need to consider how high can we let the partial pressure of carbon dioxide go before we have concerns about risk of increased cerebral blood volume and change in intracranial hydrodynamics? Alternatively, in almost all such cases, we have to address the question of how low can we let the blood pressure drop before we should be concerned about brain perfusion? This review, provides a basic understanding of brain bioenergetics, hemodynamics, hydrodynamics, autoregulation and vascular homeostasis to changes in blood gases that is fundamental to our thinking about bedside care and monitoring. PMID:24331089

  6. Wireless Sensor Network for Wearable Physiological Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    P. S. Pandian; K. P. Safeer; Pragati Gupta; D. T. Shakunthala; B. S. Sundersheshu; V. C. Padaki

    2008-01-01

    Wearable physiological monitoring system consists of an array of sensors embedded into the fabric of the wearer to continuously monitor the physiological parameters and transmit wireless to a remote monitoring station. At the remote monitoring station the data is correlated to study the overall health status of the wearer. In the conventional wearable physiological monitoring system, the sensors are integrated at specific locations on the vest and are interconnected to the wearable data acqui...

  7. Effects of insemination quantity on honey bee queen physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Tarpy, David R; Grozinger, Christina M

    2007-10-03

    Mating has profound effects on the physiology and behavior of female insects, and in honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens, these changes are permanent. Queens mate with multiple males during a brief period in their early adult lives, and shortly thereafter they initiate egg-laying. Furthermore, the pheromone profiles of mated queens differ from those of virgins, and these pheromones regulate many different aspects of worker behavior and colony organization. While it is clear that mating causes dramatic changes in queens, it is unclear if mating number has more subtle effects on queen physiology or queen-worker interactions; indeed, the effect of multiple matings on female insect physiology has not been broadly addressed. Because it is not possible to control the natural mating behavior of queens, we used instrumental insemination and compared queens inseminated with semen from either a single drone (single-drone inseminated, or SDI) or 10 drones (multi-drone inseminated, or MDI). We used observation hives to monitor attraction of workers to SDI or MDI queens in colonies, and cage studies to monitor the attraction of workers to virgin, SDI, and MDI queen mandibular gland extracts (the main source of queen pheromone). The chemical profiles of the mandibular glands of virgin, SDI, and MDI queens were characterized using GC-MS. Finally, we measured brain expression levels in SDI and MDI queens of a gene associated with phototaxis in worker honey bees (Amfor). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that insemination quantity significantly affects mandibular gland chemical profiles, queen-worker interactions, and brain gene expression. Further research will be necessary to elucidate the mechanistic bases for these effects: insemination volume, sperm and seminal protein quantity, and genetic diversity of the sperm may all be important factors contributing to this profound change in honey bee queen physiology, queen behavior, and social interactions in the colony.

  8. Effects of insemination quantity on honey bee queen physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie-Jeanne Richard

    Full Text Available Mating has profound effects on the physiology and behavior of female insects, and in honey bee (Apis mellifera queens, these changes are permanent. Queens mate with multiple males during a brief period in their early adult lives, and shortly thereafter they initiate egg-laying. Furthermore, the pheromone profiles of mated queens differ from those of virgins, and these pheromones regulate many different aspects of worker behavior and colony organization. While it is clear that mating causes dramatic changes in queens, it is unclear if mating number has more subtle effects on queen physiology or queen-worker interactions; indeed, the effect of multiple matings on female insect physiology has not been broadly addressed. Because it is not possible to control the natural mating behavior of queens, we used instrumental insemination and compared queens inseminated with semen from either a single drone (single-drone inseminated, or SDI or 10 drones (multi-drone inseminated, or MDI. We used observation hives to monitor attraction of workers to SDI or MDI queens in colonies, and cage studies to monitor the attraction of workers to virgin, SDI, and MDI queen mandibular gland extracts (the main source of queen pheromone. The chemical profiles of the mandibular glands of virgin, SDI, and MDI queens were characterized using GC-MS. Finally, we measured brain expression levels in SDI and MDI queens of a gene associated with phototaxis in worker honey bees (Amfor. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that insemination quantity significantly affects mandibular gland chemical profiles, queen-worker interactions, and brain gene expression. Further research will be necessary to elucidate the mechanistic bases for these effects: insemination volume, sperm and seminal protein quantity, and genetic diversity of the sperm may all be important factors contributing to this profound change in honey bee queen physiology, queen behavior, and social interactions in the

  9. Some Elementary Aspects of Means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mowaffaq Hajja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We raise several elementary questions pertaining to various aspects of means. These questions refer to both known and newly introduced families of means, and include questions of characterizations of certain families, relations among certain families, comparability among the members of certain families, and concordance of certain sequences of means. They also include questions about internality tests for certain mean-looking functions and about certain triangle centers viewed as means of the vertices. The questions are accessible to people with no background in means, and it is also expected that these people can seriously investigate, and contribute to the solutions of, these problems. The solutions are expected to require no more than simple tools from analysis, algebra, functional equations, and geometry.

  10. THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF FILMMUSIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egorova Tatiana K.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, author analyzes the theoretical aspects of the film music study taking into account with modern realities in the development of world film-process and attempts to its scientific understanding. Need for innovation in this area is long overdue, because the existing on this topic nonfiction no longer meets the new aesthetic and art-practical achievements and innovations in the film music development at the XXI century. Related to the phenomenon of music in screen arts a number of new terms and concepts require a certain adjustment as well. Their range of action is not yet fully defined. Author of the article offered her version of their content-semantic interpretation (largely experimental designed to promote new research methods for the film music study.

  11. Macroeconomic aspects of financial liberalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirdala Rajmund

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The positive and the negative macroeconomic aspects of the financial liberalization for the developing and emerging economies are well described in the present literature. But it is not easy to clearly summarize the final effects of the financial integration on the certain country. For instance the argument about the growth benefits of the capital account liberalization is likely to be inadequate considering the financial crises in the emerging markets at the end of the last century. On the other hand, many authors (especially in the financial literature report that the equity market liberalizations help to significantly boost the economic growth. There are also some examples on the microeconomic level (firm level or industry level when the international financial integration brings certain benefits to the integrated enterprises and the capital flows restriction leads to the distortionary effects. In the paper we analyze the macroeconomic effects of the capital flows liberalization.

  12. Medical aspects of nuclear armament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janse, M.J.; Schene, A.; Koch, K.

    1983-06-18

    The authors highlight a few medical, biological and psycological aspects of the use of nuclear weapons, drawing attention to their viewpoint that doctors should actively participate in the fight against nuclear armament. The short and long-term radiation effects on man and ecology are presented based on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki experiences. The danger of human error within this framework is emphasised and it is suggested that it is the medical profession's duty to point out how the effect of stress and boredom can lead to a nuclear catastrophe. Medical expertise may also help in the identification of unstable personalities among those who have access to nuclear weapons and in the understanding of the psycology of international conflicts and the psychopathology of those leaders who would use nuclear war as an instrument of national policy. Finally the effects of the nuclear war threat on children and teenagers are considered.

  13. [Clinical aspects of witchcraft delusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkovskiĭ, V E

    2005-01-01

    To distinguish clinical variants and to specify nosologic entity of witchcraft delusions, 69 patients (10 males, aged 15-72 years) have been examined. It was found that witchcraft delusions exist in passive and active forms. In a passive form, the patient is sure that unknown (mystic) power damaged him/her; in an active form the patient, possessing a gift for unusual abilities, can influence the others (bewitches, heals, etc). Five clinical syndromes, in the structure of which the above delusions were found, namely, paranoiac-hypochondriac, hallucination-paranoid, depressive-paranoid, paraphrenic and delirious, were identified. Psychoses of schizophrenia spectrum were diagnosed in 52 patients, organic--in 8, alcoholic--in 7 and recurrent depressive disorder--in 2. Clinical significance of witchcraft delusions is closely related to its social aspect. Being combined with ideas of persecution, poisoning and damage, it results in the brutal forms of delusions defense and may be considered as an unfavorable prognostic trait.

  14. Comparative Aspects of Canine Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Tomoko Nishiya

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Melanomas are malignant neoplasms originating from melanocytes. They occur in most animal species, but the dog is considered the best animal model for the disease. Melanomas in dogs are most frequently found in the buccal cavity, but the skin, eyes, and digits are other common locations for these neoplasms. The aim of this review is to report etiological, epidemiological, pathological, and molecular aspects of melanomas in dogs. Furthermore, the particular biological behaviors of these tumors in the different body locations are shown. Insights into the therapeutic approaches are described. Surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and the outcomes after these treatments are presented. New therapeutic perspectives are also depicted. All efforts are geared toward better characterization and control of malignant melanomas in dogs, for the benefit of these companion animals, and also in an attempt to benefit the treatment of human melanomas.

  15. Osteoporosis, Global and Iranian Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Larijani

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis, characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue leading to enlarged bone fragility and a consequent increase in fracture risk is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly people. The mortality rate in elderly persons with hip fracture approaches 20%. Half of them will be disabled in the remained life. Iranian Multicenter Osteoporosis Study (IMOS developed by Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (EMRC-TUMS and Ministry of Health and Medical Education in 2000. The aim of this study with more than 6000 participitants, was to determine normal range of BMD in Iranian population and assessing the current calcium and vitamin D status in Iran. The results were used for determining the normrmogram of BMD in Iranians and prevalence of Vit-D deficinecy among them. This document outlines all aspects of osteoporosis including risk factors, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of osteoporosis.

  16. Psychological aspects of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça Cardoso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is accompanied by important psychological distress experienced by both patient and family. From the moment of the diagnosis on, the patient has to develop a great number of mechanisms and tasks of adjustment to the illness and its circumstances. The high prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders during the course of cancer increases in the end stage disea‐ se. Therefore, a global plan of intervention integrating somatic and psychological/ psychiatric care throughout all the phases of the illness is crucial in the treatment of these patients. Health professionals working on this field can also experience emotional reactions to their patients’ suffering. They should be aware of the emotional aspects involved and develop training to help them intervene adequately with the patient and the family. The articulation between oncologists, palliative care professionals, and mental health care teams can be of great help in providing good quality of care to cancer patients.

  17. Theoretical aspects of Chiral Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Leutwyler, H

    2015-01-01

    Many of the quantities of interest at the precision frontier in particle physics require a good understanding of the strong interaction at low energies. The present talk reviews the theoretical framework used in this context. In particular, I draw attention to the fact that applications of effective field theory methods in the low energy domain involve two different aspects: dependence of the quantities of interest on the quark masses and dependence on the momenta. While the lattice approach gives an excellent handle on the low energy constants that govern the quark mass dependence, the most efficient tool to pin down the momentum dependence is dispersion theory. At the same time, the dispersive analysis enlarges the energy range where the effective theory applies. In the meson sector, the interplay of the various sources of information has led to a coherent framework that describes the low energy structure at remarkably high resolution. The understanding of the low energy properties in the baryon sector is l...

  18. Genetic Aspects of Nephrotic Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Shivani

    SSNS. In Study IV we performed a literature study on published disease causing variants in SRNS and based upon available evidence we developed a practical diagnostic algorithm for genetic evaluation of patients with SRNS. Several gene variants are involved in the pathogenesis of SRNS and genetic...... steroid dependence or become frequent relapsers. Repeated courses of corticosteroid treatment often cause significant associated morbidity. Familial occurrence of SSNS is rare and suggests a potential genetic origin. However, very little data on molecular genetics of familial SSNS is available...... in literature and no causal genes have yet been identified. Genetic aspects of NS bear important implications in therapeutic decisions and genetic counselling in SRNS patients and family members. During the present Ph.D. project we have studied the influence of genetic factors in patients with SRNS and familial...

  19. The normative aspect of learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Merete

    2015-01-01

    The paper addresses how normative aspects of learning, in terms of individual understanding, motivation and valuation, are part of the learning process itself. In order to understand motivation as more than just inner psychological processes it is helpful to conceptualize how motives of learning...... are constituted from the perspective of the individual struggling to come to terms with what it considers valuable to learn. In this paper, learning is understood as the interplay between individual and world, while the individual – according to Hegel –stands midway between particularity and universality....... Learning is, inspired by the philosophy of John Dewey and G.W. Hegel, seen as an inquiring process consisting of continuous evaluation of the individual’s own understanding. The idea, when focusing on normativity, individuality and learning, is not to prescribe how learning must be facilitated...

  20. Cosmological Aspects of Spontaneous Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    De Simone, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We investigate cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis driven by a scalar field, and present general constraints that are independent of the particle physics model. The relevant constraints are obtained by studying the backreaction of the produced baryons on the scalar field, the cosmological expansion history after baryogenesis, and the baryon isocurvature perturbations. We show that cosmological considerations alone provide powerful constraints, especially for the minimal scenario with a quadratic scalar potential. Intriguingly, we find that for a given inflation scale, the other parameters including the reheat temperature, decoupling temperature of the baryon violating interactions, and the mass and decay constant of the scalar are restricted to lie within ranges of at most a few orders of magnitude. We also discuss possible extensions to the minimal setup, and propose two ideas for evading constraints on isocurvature perturbations: one is to suppress the baryon isocurvature with nonquadratic scal...

  1. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brazdova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility.

  2. Aspect in Greek Future Forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Medieval Greek had three future periphrases making use of a finite verb and an infinitive: μέλλω + INF, ἔχω + INF, θέλω + INF. Given the parallel nature of the periphrases as well as the fact that the infinitive existed in both a perfective and an imperfective version, it might be expected...... of the Modern Greek verbal system: μέλλω + INF has a much higher ratio of imperfective infinitives than the two other periphrases especially in AD I, ἔχω + INF starts out using only the perfective infinitive when referring to the future, and θέλω + INF distinguishes for aspect before it gains future meaning...

  3. Aspects Regarding the Leasing Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor HADA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present legal aspects regarding leasing in Romania, and to take a look at the characteristics of the operational and financial leasing. The costs of the financial and operational leasing are also analyzed, as is the case study that approaches the cost of a bank loan. By using three examples of a real company, we wish to identify the components for each type of leasing and for the bank loan. The actuarial cost of leasing is determined with the help of an Excel method, which was adapted for this type of equation. By the end af the article, we wish to prove that leasing is beneficial for economic agents.

  4. ElevationOther_ASPECT10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Used ElevationDEM_DEM10M and the Arc/Info ASPECT command to create this data layer representing compass direction of the aspect (rounded to whole numbers). Input...

  5. BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS IN INSURANCE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroe Andreea

    2013-07-01

    In this paper there are showed and debated some situation in which psychological effects like loss aversion, reference point, status-quo and framming effects can influence the deccision of the consumer and are not consistent with the standard economic model.In addition to this aspects, Cumulative Prspect Theory enhance the fact that decision makers overestimate low peobabilities and underestimate high probabilities,thus buying inadequate insurance in many situation.in thiss sense, in order to support this idea I tried to make a qualitative presentation of the model used on the insurance market using Prelec function which is the function related with the Cumulative Prospect Theory which can be used in the insurance context.The weak points of the theory of expected utility are explained through this new perspectives and nevertheless aspects like insensivity to bad news concerning incomes,elasticity of price,displacements of status-quo and default,disposition effect and equity premium are taken into consideration.As example,I chose a Kunreuther experiment about insurance decision in with is underlyined the fact that for moderate risk people buy insurance with premiums that exceed the expected loss.There are demands for low deductibles in the the markets for extended guarantees and insurances for mobile phones where was observed that the insurance underwriting rate increases with the probability of loss keeping the expected loss constant.It is better to mention that the theory and the model that are presented here comes as complementary to the economic standard theory not as a substitute.

  6. Retrospective Analysis of Inflight Exercise Loading and Physiological Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Buxton, R. E.; De Witt, J. K.; Guilliams, M. E.; Hanson, A. M.; Peters, B. T.; Pandorf, M. M. Scott; Sibonga, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    -duration missions onboard the ISS and have had access to exercise on the T2 and the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED). The specific exercise prescriptions vary for each astronaut. General exercise summary metrics will be developed to quantify exercise intensities, volumes, and durations for each subject. Where available, ground reaction force data will be used to quantify mechanical loading experienced by each astronaut. These inflight exercise metrics will be investigated relative to changes in pre- to post-flight bone and muscle health to identify which specific variables are related with improved or degraded physiological outcomes. The information generated from this analysis will fill gaps related to typical bone loading characterization, exercise performance capability, exercise volume and efficiency, and importance of exercise hardware. In addition, methods for quantification of exercise loading for use in monitoring the exercise programs during future space missions will be explored with the intent to inform exercise scientists and trainers as to the critical aspects of inflight exercise prescriptions.

  7. Auditory pathways: anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, James O

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the anatomy and physiology of the auditory pathways. After a brief analysis of the external, middle ears, and cochlea, the responses of auditory nerve fibers are described. The central nervous system is analyzed in more detail. A scheme is provided to help understand the complex and multiple auditory pathways running through the brainstem. The multiple pathways are based on the need to preserve accurate timing while extracting complex spectral patterns in the auditory input. The auditory nerve fibers branch to give two pathways, a ventral sound-localizing stream, and a dorsal mainly pattern recognition stream, which innervate the different divisions of the cochlear nucleus. The outputs of the two streams, with their two types of analysis, are progressively combined in the inferior colliculus and onwards, to produce the representation of what can be called the "auditory objects" in the external world. The progressive extraction of critical features in the auditory stimulus in the different levels of the central auditory system, from cochlear nucleus to auditory cortex, is described. In addition, the auditory centrifugal system, running from cortex in multiple stages to the organ of Corti of the cochlea, is described.

  8. Virtual physiological human: training challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, Patricia V; Narracott, Andrew V; McCormack, Keith; Bisbal, Jesus; Martin, Carlos; Bijnens, Bart; Brook, Bindi; Zachariou, Margarita; Freixa, Jordi Villà I; Kohl, Peter; Fletcher, Katherine; Diaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2010-06-28

    The virtual physiological human (VPH) initiative encompasses a wide range of activities, including structural and functional imaging, data mining, knowledge discovery tool and database development, biomedical modelling, simulation and visualization. The VPH community is developing from a multitude of relatively focused, but disparate, research endeavours into an integrated effort to bring together, develop and translate emerging technologies for application, from academia to industry and medicine. This process initially builds on the evolution of multi-disciplinary interactions and abilities, but addressing the challenges associated with the implementation of the VPH will require, in the very near future, a translation of quantitative changes into a new quality of highly trained multi-disciplinary personnel. Current strategies for undergraduate and on-the-job training may soon prove insufficient for this. The European Commission seventh framework VPH network of excellence is exploring this emerging need, and is developing a framework of novel training initiatives to address the predicted shortfall in suitably skilled VPH-aware professionals. This paper reports first steps in the implementation of a coherent VPH training portfolio.

  9. Physiologic amputation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeri; Hall, Virginia

    2014-03-01

    Acute limb ischemia is a complication of severe peripheral arterial disease that can be a threatening limb as well as life. Multiple procedures exist today to help revascularize extremities; however, even with the latest technologies, surgical amputation of the limb may still be necessary. Cryoamputation, or physiologic amputation, is a method used to treat patients who are hemodynamically unstable for the operating room and who are in need of urgent amputation owing to arterial ischemia. This procedure is used in the rare instance where not only a persons' limb is threatened, but also their life. This is a case study regarding one patient who presented to the hospital with limb-threatening ischemia who became hemodynamically unstable owing to the rhabdomyolysis associated with the ischemia of his lower extremity. Cryoamputation was used to stabilize the patient and prevent further deterioration, so that he could safely undergo surgical amputation of the limb without an increase in mortality risk. Cryoamputation must be followed by formal surgical amputation when the patient is hemodynamically stabilized. It is not a limb salvaging, procedure but it is a life-saving procedure. This case study demonstrates the usefulness of the procedure and discusses the technique used for cryoamputation.

  10. Physiological demands of competitive basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narazaki, K; Berg, K; Stergiou, N; Chen, B

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess physiological demands of competitive basketball by measuring oxygen consumption (VO2) and other variables during practice games. Each of 12 players (20.4 +/- 1.1 years) was monitored in a 20-min practice game, which was conducted in the same way as actual games with the presence of referees and coaches. VO2 was measured by a portable system during the game and blood lactate concentration (LA) was measured in brief breaks. Subjects were also videotaped for time-motion analysis. Female and male players demonstrated respective VO2 of 33.4 +/- 4.0 and 36.9 +/- 2.6 mL/kg/min and LA of 3.2 +/- 0.9 and 4.2 +/- 1.3 mmol/L in the practice games (P>0.05). They spent 34.1% of play time running and jumping, 56.8% walking, and 9.0% standing. Pre-obtained VO(2max) was correlated to VO(2) during play (r=0.673) and to percent of duration for running and jumping (r=0.935 and 0.962 for females and males, respectively). This study demonstrated a greater oxygen uptake for competitive basketball than that estimated based on a previous compendium. The correlation between aerobic capacity and activity level suggests the potential benefit of aerobic conditioning in basketball.

  11. Obesity and Asthma: Physiological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Brashier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity induces some pertinent physiological changes which are conducive to either development of asthma or cause of poorly controlled asthma state. Obesity related mechanical stress forces induced by abdominal and thoracic fat generate stiffening of the lungs and diaphragmatic movements to result in reduction of resting lung volumes such as functional residual capacity (FRC. Reduced FRC is primarily an outcome of decreased expiratory reserve volume, which pushes the tidal breathing more towards smaller high resistance airways, and consequentially results in expiratory flow limitation during normal breathing in obesity. Reduced FRC also induces plastic alteration in the small collapsible airways, which may generate smooth muscle contraction resulting in increased small airway resistance, which, however, is not picked up by spirometric lung volumes. There is also a possibility that chronically reduced FRC may generate permanent adaptation in the very small airways; therefore, the airway calibres may not change despite weight reduction. Obesity may also induce bronchodilator reversibility and diurnal lung functional variability. Obesity is also associated with airway hyperresponsiveness; however, the mechanism of this is not clear. Thus, obesity has effects on lung function that can generate respiratory distress similar to asthma and may also exaggerate the effects of preexisting asthma.

  12. Self-Consciousness and Aspects of Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Jonathan M.; Briggs, Stephen R.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between public and private self-consciousness and social and personal aspects of identity. Public self-consciousness correlated more strongly with social than with personal aspects of identity, and private self-consciousness correlated more strongly with personal than with social aspects. Discusses implications for…

  13. [Future aspect of robotic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Mitsuo; Sugimachi, Keizo

    2002-04-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has become a standard options of surgery. We have introduced a master-slave manipulator "da Vinci" to the clinical situation in July 2000, and developed new operative techniques, which are safer and more tender for patients than before. Up to now, a total of 45 patients underwent a robot-assisted endoscopic surgery using "da Vinci" system. Several procedures including laparoscopic splenectomy and thoracoscopic mediastinal tumor extirpation were first performed in the world. This system provided surgeons with motion scaling, physiological tremor elimination, and high-resolution 3-dimensional vision. Thanks to those sophisticated functions, all surgical procedures, which have been limited due to endoscopic circumstances, were performed much easily and safely than before. Every effort to develop a new type of robotic has been made in collaboration with other fields of scientists. A next-generation robotic surgery is required to equip new functions including tactile sensation system, a real-time navigation system and tele-operation system. Robotic surgery is believed to be one of the most promising and important fields of surgery in the near future.

  14. Theoretical aspects of Systems Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Mariano; Palombo, Alessandro; Cucina, Alessandra

    2013-05-01

    The natural world consists of hierarchical levels of complexity that range from subatomic particles and molecules to ecosystems and beyond. This implies that, in order to explain the features and behavior of a whole system, a theory might be required that would operate at the corresponding hierarchical level, i.e. where self-organization processes take place. In the past, biological research has focused on questions that could be answered by a reductionist program of genetics. The organism (and its development) was considered an epiphenomenona of its genes. However, a profound rethinking of the biological paradigm is now underway and it is likely that such a process will lead to a conceptual revolution emerging from the ashes of reductionism. This revolution implies the search for general principles on which a cogent theory of biology might rely. Because much of the logic of living systems is located at higher levels, it is imperative to focus on them. Indeed, both evolution and physiology work on these levels. Thus, by no means Systems Biology could be considered a 'simple' 'gradual' extension of Molecular Biology.

  15. [Apoptosis: cellular and clinical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvschall, H; Mosekilde, L

    1997-04-01

    Removal of damaged cells is essential for the maintenance of life in multicellular organisms. The process of self destruction, apoptosis, eliminates surplus or damaged cells as part of the pathophysiological defence system. Apoptosis is essential in structural and functional organogenesis during embryological development. The physiological regulation of tissue kinetics is a product of both cell proliferation and cell death. Internal and external regulatory stimuli regulate the balance between apoptosis and mitosis by genetic interaction. Apoptosis is characterized by condensation of chromatine as a result of DNA degradation, formation of blebs in the plasma and nuclear membranes, condensation of cytoplasma, formation of vesicular apoptotic bodies, and phagocytosis by neighbouring cells without inflammatory response. A number of observations indicate that programmed cell death plays an important role in the regulation of cytofunctional homeostasis and defense against accumulation of damaged cells, eg with DNA alterations. Dysregulation of the apoptotic gene program, eg by mutations, may not only lead to loss or degeneration of tissue, but also to hyperproliferative and tumorigenic disorders. New evidence indicates that apoptosis regulation is important both in aging processes and diseases such as: neuropathies, immunopathies, viral infections, cancer, etc. Pharmacological intervention designed to modulate apoptosis seems to raise new possibilities in the treatment of disease.

  16. A kinase-anchoring proteins and adenylyl cyclase in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W

    2011-10-01

    3'-5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology, including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, AC, protein kinase A, and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review, we discuss how the interaction of A kinase-anchoring proteins with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology.

  17. Fractional flow reserve and resting indices for coronary physiologic assessment: Practical guide, tips, and tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Fabien; Pighi, Michele; Ly, Hung Q

    2017-02-04

    Physiologic assessment using fractional flow reserve (FFR) to guide percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) has been demonstrated to improve clinical outcomes, compared to angiography-guided PCI. Recently, resting indices such as resting Pd/Pa, "instantaneous wave-free ratio", and contrast medium induced FFR have been evaluated for the assessment of the functional consequences of coronary lesions. Herein, we review and discuss the use of FFR and other indices for the functional assessment of coronary lesions. This review will cover theoretical aspects, as well as practical points and common pitfalls related to coronary physiological assessment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Physiological factors influencing capillary growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egginton, S

    2011-07-01

    (1) Angiogenesis (growth of new capillaries from an existing capillary bed) may result from a mismatch in microvascular supply and metabolic demand (metabolic error signal). Krogh examined the distribution and number of capillaries to explore the correlation between O(2) delivery and O(2) consumption. Subsequently, the heterogeneity in angiogenic response within a muscle has been shown to reflect either differences in fibre type composition or mechanical load. However, local control leads to targetted angiogenesis in the vicinity of glycolytic fibre types following muscle stimulation, or oxidative fibres following endurance training, while heterogeneity of capillary spacing is maintained during ontogenetic growth. (2) Despite limited microscopy resolution and lack of specific markers, Krogh's interest in the structure of the capillary wall paved the way for understanding the mechanisms of capillary growth. Angiogenesis may be influenced by the response of perivascular or stromal cells (fibroblasts, macrophages and pericytes) to altered activity, likely acting as a source for chemical signals modulating capillary growth such as vascular endothelial growth factor. In addition, haemodynamic factors such as shear stress and muscle stretch play a significant role in adaptive remodelling of the microcirculation. (3) Most indices of capillarity are highly dependent on fibre size, resulting in possible bias because of scaling. To examine the consequences of capillary distribution, it is therefore helpful to quantify the area of tissue supplied by individual capillaries. This allows the spatial limitations inherent in most models of tissue oxygenation to be overcome generating an alternative approach to Krogh's tissue cylinder, the capillary domain, to improve descriptions of intracellular oxygen diffusion. © 2010 The Author. Acta Physiologica © 2010 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  19. Physiology and Pharmacology of Ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Pierre; Giuliano, François

    2016-10-01

    Ejaculation is the final stage of coitus in mammalian male and is mandatory for natural procreation. Two synchronized phases, emission and expulsion, form the ejaculatory response and involve specific organs and anatomical structures. The peripheral events leading to ejaculation are commanded by autonomic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) and somatic divisions of the nervous system. The autonomic and somatic motor efferents originate in spinal nuclei located in thoracolumbar and lumbosacral segments. Co-ordinated activation of autonomic and somatic spinal nuclei is orchestrated by a group of lumbar spinal interneurons defined as the spinal generator of ejaculation. The generator of ejaculation together with the autonomic and somatic spinal nuclei constitutes a spinal network that is under the strong influence of stimulating or inhibiting genital sensory and supraspinal inputs. A brain circuitry dedicated to ejaculation has been delineated that is part of a more global network controlling other aspects of the sexual response. This circuitry includes discrete neuronal populations distributed in all divisions of the brain. The corollary to the expanded CNS network is the variety of neurotransmitter systems participating in the ejaculatory process. Among them, serotonin neurotransmission plays a key role and its targeting led to the development of the first registered pharmacological treatment of premature ejaculation in human beings. Critical gaps remain in the understanding of neurophysiopharmacology of ejaculation and management of ejaculatory disorders in human beings needs improvement. Because the ejaculatory response in laboratory animals and in human beings shares many similarities, the use of animal models will certainly provide further advances in the field.

  20. Cardiac anatomy and physiology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaghan, M

    1998-04-01

    This article reviews the normal anatomy and physiology of the heart. Understanding the normal anatomic and physiologic relationships described in this article will help perioperative nurses care for patients who are undergoing cardiac procedures. Such knowledge also assists nurses in educating patients about cardiac procedures and about activities that can prevent, reverse, or improve cardiac illness.

  1. Design Projects in Human Anatomy & Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzotto, Kristin; Ortiz, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    Very often, some type of writing assignment is required in college entry-level Human Anatomy and Physiology courses. This assignment can be anything from an essay to a research paper on the literature, focusing on a faculty-approved topic of interest to the student. As educators who teach Human Anatomy and Physiology at an urban community college,…

  2. Teaching Stress Physiology Using Zebrafish ("Danio Rerio")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Michael; Dhawale, Shree; Mustafa, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    A straightforward and inexpensive laboratory experiment is presented that investigates the physiological stress response of zebrafish after a 5 degree C increase in water temperature. This experiment is designed for an undergraduate physiology lab and allows students to learn the scientific method and relevant laboratory techniques without causing…

  3. Physiological Coping: A Model for Teaching Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porth, Carol M.

    1977-01-01

    The author discusses the use of a teaching model she developed for use in a pathophysiology. The model is based on the physiological component of C. Roy's adaptation model, which encourages students to look for physiological cues and apply relevant knowledge in patient care through a problem-solving approach. (TA)

  4. Physiology and biochemistry of honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite their tremendous economic importance, honey bees are not a typical model system for studying general questions of insect physiology. This is primarily due to the fact that honey bees live in complex social settings which impact their physiological and biochemical characteristics. Not surpris...

  5. Towards Individualized Physiology Lecturing in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye Samuel

    physiology slides, animations, diagrams and problem illustrations and real life case films in digital form. ... Patient-based physiology learning. Ripatti and Hänninen ... source leaving still a deeper cognitive understanding aside. This is to ... throughout the whole school time. ... now the on-line computerized systems provide.

  6. Physiological Bases of Bulimia, and Antidepressant Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getzfeld, Andrew R.

    This paper reviews the literature on the physiological causes of bulimia and investigates the rationale behind the usage of antidepressant medication in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. No definite conclusions can be stated regarding the physiology of bulimia, but a number of hypotheses are suggested. It appears that the hypothalamus is involved…

  7. Design Projects in Human Anatomy & Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzotto, Kristin; Ortiz, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    Very often, some type of writing assignment is required in college entry-level Human Anatomy and Physiology courses. This assignment can be anything from an essay to a research paper on the literature, focusing on a faculty-approved topic of interest to the student. As educators who teach Human Anatomy and Physiology at an urban community college,…

  8. Wireless Sensor Network for Wearable Physiological Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Pandian

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Wearable physiological monitoring system consists of an array of sensors embedded into the fabric of the wearer to continuously monitor the physiological parameters and transmit wireless to a remote monitoring station. At the remote monitoring station the data is correlated to study the overall health status of the wearer. In the conventional wearable physiological monitoring system, the sensors are integrated at specific locations on the vest and are interconnected to the wearable data acquisition hardware by wires woven into the fabric. The drawbacks associated with these systems are the cables woven in the fabric pickup noise such as power line interference and signals from nearby radiating sources and thereby corrupting the physiological signals. Also repositioning the sensors in the fabric is difficult once integrated. The problems can be overcome by the use of physiological sensors with miniaturized electronics to condition, process, digitize and wireless transmission integrated into the single module. These sensors are strategically placed at various locations on the vest. Number of sensors integrated into the fabric form a network (Personal Area Network and interacts with the human system to acquire and transmit the physiological data to a wearable data acquisition system. The wearable data acquisition hardware collects the data from various sensors and transmits the processed data to the remote monitoring station. The paper discusses wireless sensor network and its application to wearable physiological monitoring and its applications. Also the problems associated with conventional wearable physiological monitoring are discussed.

  9. Physiological Activity and Attitudes toward Disabled Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Michael D.; Deichmann, John

    1980-01-01

    Investigated whether physiological reactions of college students viewing videotapes showing three scene types (disabled people, able-bodied people, and neutral scenes) could be discriminated by scene type. Participants for the study were selected by their scores on the Attitudes toward Disabled Persons (ATDP) Scale. Physiological measures showed…

  10. Physiological characteristics of an aging Olympic athlete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Fritzdorf, Stephen;

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the physiological basis of continued world-class performance of a world-class rower who won medals (3 gold and 2 bronze) at five consecutive Olympic Games.......To investigate the physiological basis of continued world-class performance of a world-class rower who won medals (3 gold and 2 bronze) at five consecutive Olympic Games....

  11. Aspects of the Tutte polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ok, Seongmin

    This thesis studies various aspects of the Tutte polynomial, especially focusing on the Merino-Welsh conjecture. We write T(G;x,y) for the Tutte polynomial of a graph G with variables x and y. In 1999, Merino and Welsh conjectured that if G is a loopless 2-connected graph, then T(G;1,1) ≤ max{T(G;2......-Welsh conjecture. Assume the graph G is loopless, bridgeless and has n vertices and m edges. If m ≤ 1.066 n then T(G;1,1) ≤ T(G;2,0). If m ≥ 4(n-1) then T(G;1,1) ≤ T(G;0,2). I improve in this thesis Thomassen's result as follows: If m ≤ 1.29(n-1) then T(G;1,1) ≤ T(G;2,0). If m ≥ 3.58(n-1) and G is 3-edge...

  12. SOYBEAN - MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF BREEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Sudarić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The book Soybean: Molecular Aspects of Breeding focuses recent progress in our understanding of the genetics and molecular biology of soybean. This book is divided into four parts and contains 22 chapters. Part I, Molecular Biology and Biotechnology focuses advances in molecular biology and laboratory procedures that have been developed recently to manipulate DNA. Part II, Breeding for abiotic stress covers proteomics approaches form as a powerful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of the plant responses to various types of abiotic stresses. Part III, Breeding for biotic stress addresses issues related to application of molecular based strategies in order to increase soybean resistance to various biotic factors. Part IV, Recent Technology reviews recent technologies into the realm of soybean monitoring, processing and product use. While the information accumulated in this book is of primary interest for plant breeders, valuable insights are also offered to agronomists, molecular biologists, physiologists, plant pathologists, food scientists and students. The book is a result of efforts made by many experts from different countries (USA, Japan, Croatia, Serbia, China, Canada, Malawi, Iran, Hong Kong, Brasil, Mexico.

  13. [Legal aspects of ritual circumcision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, M; Schott, G E; Rascher, W; Bender, A W

    2009-12-01

    Female circumcision (genital mutilation) is a criminal violation of human rights under German law. Even with consent of the person to be circumcised and/or her legal representative this procedure must not be carried out since a consent to female circumcision is unethical and therefore void. As much consent as there is on female circumcision the legal situation with ritual male circumcision is very unclear. In practice and unnoticed by the public male circumcision is carried out - be it for medical or ritual reasons - without deeper-going reflexions on the clearness of the medical indication or the legal situation with ritual circumcision. From the medical aspect there are big differences between female and male circumcision but also certain parallels. Various reasons, partly founded in prejudice and misinformation, make people refrain from regarding circumcision of boys also as illegal. Contrary to the prevailing opinion male circumcision also represents a bodily harm which a doctor can only carry out after a preoperative interview and with the consent of the affected person. Since ritual male circumcision does not serve the wellbeing of a child it is not possible for the parents to give their consent to the circumcision in lieu of the child. Male circumcision is only permitted if the child has given his consent and is thus only legally permitted if the child has reached an age at which he is mature enough to understand the meaning and extent of such an action which is hardly the case before he has completed his 16 (th) year.

  14. Cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Andrea De; Kobayashi, Takeshi [SISSA,Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste,Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-08-24

    We investigate cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis driven by a scalar field, and present general constraints that are independent of the particle physics model. The relevant constraints are obtained by studying the backreaction of the produced baryons on the scalar field, the cosmological expansion history after baryogenesis, and the baryon isocurvature perturbations. We show that cosmological considerations alone provide powerful constraints, especially for the minimal scenario with a quadratic scalar potential. Intriguingly, we find that for a given inflation scale, the other parameters including the reheat temperature, decoupling temperature of the baryon violating interactions, and the mass and decay constant of the scalar are restricted to lie within ranges of at most a few orders of magnitude. We also discuss possible extensions to the minimal setup, and propose two ideas for evading constraints on isocurvature perturbations: one is to suppress the baryon isocurvature with nonquadratic scalar potentials, another is to compensate the baryon isocurvature with cold dark matter isocurvature by making the scalar survive until the present.

  15. Some Aspects of PDC Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poláčik, Ján; Pospíšil, Jiří

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, aspects of pulsed direct current (PDC) water splitting are described. Electrolysis is a simple and well-known method to produce hydrogen. The efficiency is relatively low in normal conditions using conventional DC. PDC in electrolysis brings about many advantages. It increases efficiency of hydrogen production, and performance of the electrolyser may be smoothly controlled without compromising efficiency of the process. In our approach, ultra-short pulses are applied. This method enhances efficiency of electrical energy in the process of decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen. Efficiency depends on frequency, shape and width of the electrical pulses. Experiments proved that efficiency was increased by 2 to 8 per cent. One of the prospects of PDC electrolysis producing hydrogen is in increase of efficiency of energy storage efficiency in the hydrogen. There are strong efforts to make the electrical grid more efficient and balanced in terms of production by installing electricity storage units. Using hydrogen as a fuel decreases air pollution and amount of carbon dioxide emissions in the air. In addition to energy storage, hydrogen is also important in transportation and chemical industry.

  16. ASPECTS OF INTEGRATION MANAGEMENT METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemy Varshapetian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available For manufacturing companies to succeed in today's unstable economic environment, it is necessary to restructure the main components of its activities: designing innovative product, production using modern reconfigurable manufacturing systems, a business model that takes into account the global strategy and management methods using modern management models and tools. The first three components are discussed in numerous publications, for example, (Koren, 2010 and is therefore not considered in the article. A large number of publications devoted to the methods and tools of production management, for example (Halevi, 2007. On the basis of what was said in the article discusses the possibility of the integration of only three methods have received in recent years, the most widely used, namely: Six Sigma method - SS (George et al., 2005 and supplements its-Design for six sigm? - DFSS (Taguchi, 2003; Lean production transformed with the development to the "Lean management" and further to the "Lean thinking" - Lean (Hirano et al., 2006; Theory of Constraints, developed E.Goldratt - TOC (Dettmer, 2001. The article investigates some aspects of this integration: applications in diverse fields, positive features, changes in management structure, etc.

  17. Clinical aspects of phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Borysowski, Jan; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Pawełczyk, Zdzisław; Rogóż, Paweł; Kłak, Marlena; Wojtasik, Elżbieta; Górski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Phage therapy (PT) is a unique method of treatment of bacterial infections using bacteriophages (phages)-viruses that specifically kill bacteria, including their antibiotic-resistant strains. Over the last decade a marked increase in interest in the therapeutic use of phages has been observed, which has resulted from a substantial rise in the prevalence of antibiotic resistance of bacteria, coupled with an inadequate number of new antibiotics. The first, and so far the only, center of PT in the European Union is the Phage Therapy Unit (PTU) established at the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Wrocław, Poland in 2005. This center continues the rich tradition of PT in Poland, which dates from the early 1920s. The main objective of this chapter is to present a detailed retrospective analysis of the results of PT of 153 patients with a wide range of infections resistant to antibiotic therapy admitted for treatment at the PTU between January 2008 and December 2010. Analysis includes the evaluation of both the efficacy and the safety of PT. In general, data suggest that PT can provide good clinical results in a significant cohort of patients with otherwise untreatable chronic bacterial infections and is essentially well tolerated. In addition, the whole complex procedure employed to obtain and characterize therapeutic phage preparations, as well as ethical aspects of PT, is discussed.

  18. Aspects of Malpractice in Prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2017-06-09

    Crowns, fixed partial dentures, and removable dentures are the popular prosthetic dental restorations in current dental practice. Prosthodontic rehabilitation of the mouth, particularly in advanced and complex cases, requires careful planning, adequate clinical skills, and exacting technical standards. While a successful outcome is the ultimate goal for any prosthodontic treatment, complications, injuries, dissatisfaction, and/or failure may occur. When such events develop as a result of negligence or violation of standards of care, they are considered under the term of malpractice and may incur ethical and medico-legal implications. This paper reviews and highlights some aspects of malpractice in prosthodontics. The current state of prosthodontic malpractice on a global level will also be evaluated. Standards of prosthodontic care, current literature of prosthodontic malpractice, where and how prosthodontic malpractice occurs, and recommendations for the future are presented. A thorough understanding of what is quality prosthodontic care and what disrupts this care can be a useful guard against professional litigation and may protect patients from poor quality of dental prosthetic care. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Biophysical Aspects of Transmembrane Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovich, Sandor

    2005-01-01

    Transmembrane signaling is one of the most significant cell biological events in the life and death of cells in general and lymphocytes in particular. Until recently biochemists and biophysicists were not accustomed to thinking of these processes from the side of a high number of complex biochemical events and an equally high number of physical changes at molecular and cellular levels at the same time. Both types of researchers were convinced that their findings are the most decisive, having higher importance than the findings of the other scientist population. Both casts were wrong. Life, even at cellular level, has a number of interacting physical and biochemical mechanisms, which finally build up the creation of an "excited" cell that will respond to particular signals from the outer or inner world. This book handles both aspects of the signalling events, and in some cases tries to unify our concepts and help understand the signals that govern the life and death of our cells. Not only the understanding, bu...

  20. [RATIONAL ASPECTS OF BACTERIOPHAGES USE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarina, A A; Kataeva, L V; Karpukhina, N F

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of existing aspects of bacteriophage use and study features of their lytic activity by using various techniques. Effect of monophages and associated bacteriophages (staphylococci, piopolyvalent and piocombined, intestiphage, pneumonia klebsiella and polyvalent klebsiella produced by "Microgen") was studied with 380 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 279 cultures of Klebsiella pneumoniae in liquid and solid nutrient media. From patients with intestinal disorder, sensitivity was analyzed to 184 strains of Salmonella genus bacteria 18 serological variants to salmonella bacteriophages, 137 strains of Escherichia coli (lactose-negative, hemolytic), as well as some members of OKA groups (21 serovars) to coli-proteic and piopolyvalent bacteriophages. Lytic ability of the piobacteriophage against Klebsiella and Proteus genus bacteria was determined. Staphylococcus aureus was sensitive to staphylococcus bacteriophage in 71.6% of cases and to piobacteriophage--in 86.15% of cases. A 100% lytic ability of salmonella bacteriophage against Salmonella spp. was established. Sensitivity of E. coli of various serogroups to coli-proteic and piobacteriophage was 66 - 100%. Klebsiella, Proteus genus bacteria were sensitive to piobacteriophage in only 35% and 43.15% of cases, respectively. A more rational use of bacteriophages is necessary: development of a technique, evaluation of sensitivity of bacteria to bacteriophage, introduction of corrections into their production (expansion of bacteriophage spectra, determination and indication of their concentration in accompanying documents).

  1. Biological aspects of gender disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsello, S M; Di Donna, V; Senes, P; Luotto, V; Ricciato, M P; Paragliola, R M; Pontecorvi, A

    2011-12-01

    The scientific community is very interested in the biological aspects of gender disorders and sexual orientation. There are different levels to define an individual's sex: chromosomal, gonadic, and phenotypic sex. Concerning the psychological sex, men and women are different by virtue of their own gender identity, which means they recognize themselves as belonging to a determinate sex. They are different also as a result of their own role identity, a set of behaviors, tendencies, and cognitive and emotional attitudes, commonly defined as "male" and "female". Transsexuality is a disorder characterized by the development of a gender identity opposed to phenotypic sex, whereas homosexuality is not a disturbance of gender identity but only of sexual attraction, expressing sexual orientation towards people of the same sex. We started from a critical review of literature on genetic and hormonal mechanisms involved in sexual differentiation. We re-examined the neuro-anatomic and functional differences between men and women, with special reference to their role in psychosexual differentiation and to their possible implication in the genesis of homosexuality and identity gender disorders. Homosexuality and transsexuality are conditions without a well defined etiology. Although the influence of educational and environmental factors in humans is undeniable, it seems that organic neurohormonal prenatal and postnatal factors might contribute in a determinant way in the development of these two conditions. This "organicistic neurohormal theory" might find support in the study of particular situations in which the human fetus is exposed to an abnormal hormonal environment in utero.

  2. Ethical aspects in public relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voza Danijela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic aim of this paper is to explore public relations practitioners' different perceptions of professional ethics depending on gender, age, educational level and years of experience. Analysis of professional ethics in Serbian public relations, has gained the ability to introduce all relevant aspects that should act in order to reach the positive developments and improve the existing situation in the field of ethics in public relations. The conclusion may be derived from this research is that business ethics in public relations in Serbia is at a high level. However, we must accept these results with caution, because very critical and sensitive issues of ethics lead to the interviewees to give fulsome answers that prove and practical examples. In order to obtain relevant results in future studies need to be, above all, changed the manner of conducting the survey. So, you need a personal approach with full respect for the respondents of anonymity. Business ethics in Serbia deserves much more attention and through education and research, as well as direct examples of business practice. .

  3. Psychological aspects of peacekeeping operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. V. K. Raju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peacekeeping operations are but one aspect of the systems of peace that have evolved over the past seven decades in a world that is riven with violence of all kinds. With the end of cold war in the late eighties of the last century we have come to see much intrastate violence, in addition to usual interstate hostilities and war, arising out of religious, political, ethnic and economic differences between people. In the changed scenario peacekeeping operations have become complex politico-military-humanitarian efforts. A soldier, trained for conventional military operations, is obliged to participate in the unconventional operations of waging peace in alien lands often in volatile and violent situations and in the process he stands to get exposed to widely variable demands for adjustment that have the potential to bring to the fore many maladaptive responses. Peacekeeping operations also have the potential to offer opportunities for growth and resilience. India is a major player in peacekeeping activities for well over sixty years all over the world. It is necessary for the commanders and mental health professionals to understand the multifarious factors that impinge on the peacekeeping soldier′s mind and the emerging patterns of responses thereof for effective management trained manpower and fulfillment of mission objectives

  4. Geotechnical Aspects of Explosive Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Shakeran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosive Compaction (EC is the ground modification technique whereby the energy released from setting off explosives in subsoil inducing artificial earthquake effects, which compact the soil layers. The efficiency of EC predominantly depends on the soil profile, grain size distribution, initial status, and the intensity of energy applied to the soil. In this paper, in order to investigate the geotechnical aspects, which play an important role in performance of EC, a database has been compiled from thirteen-field tests or construction sites around the world, where EC has been successfully applied for modifying soil. This research focuses on evaluation of grain size distribution and initial stability status of deposits besides changes of soil penetration resistance due to EC. Results indicated suitable EC performance for unstable and liquefiable deposits having particle sizes ranging from gravel to silty sand with less than 40% silt content and less than 10% clay content. However, EC is most effective in fine-to-medium sands with a fine content less than 5% and hydraulically deposited with initial relative density ranging from 30% to 60%. Moreover, it has been observed that EC can be an effective method to improve the density, stability, and resistance of the target soils.

  5. [Neuropsychological aspects of nicotine craving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Miguel Ángel; Sanjuan, Rocío; Fernández-Santaella, M Carmen; Vila, Jaime; Montoya, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Craving has been defined as the motivation to self-administer a substance previously consumed. It has been hypothesized that craving contributes significantly to compulsive drug use and relapse after a period of abstinence in humans. Neuropsychological and brain-imaging studies have identified numerous brain regions that may be involved in craving. In this paper, the neuropsychological mechanisms of craving for nicotine are reviewed, focusing on three systems that appear to be involved in craving states. First of all, the reward system, responsible for the development of dependence and craving. Secondly, the emotional and associative system, which is related to conditioned craving. And third, the system involved in the neural basis of cognitive and decision making processes. The most influential theoretical models on craving are also reviewed, including those based on conditioning mechanisms, on cognitive mechanisms and on cognitive-behavioral mechanisms, as well as the neurobiological model. Factors related to the evaluation and treatment of craving are also discussed, with particular emphasis on clinical aspects. Finally, we stress the importance of a multidisciplinary approach for achieving a common model on craving and improving the diagnostic tools and treatment strategies.

  6. Cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Andrea; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis driven by a scalar field, and present general constraints that are independent of the particle physics model. The relevant constraints are obtained by studying the backreaction of the produced baryons on the scalar field, the cosmological expansion history after baryogenesis, and the baryon isocurvature perturbations. We show that cosmological considerations alone provide powerful constraints, especially for the minimal scenario with a quadratic scalar potential. Intriguingly, we find that for a given inflation scale, the other parameters including the reheat temperature, decoupling temperature of the baryon violating interactions, and the mass and decay constant of the scalar are restricted to lie within ranges of at most a few orders of magnitude. We also discuss possible extensions to the minimal setup, and propose two ideas for evading constraints on isocurvature perturbations: one is to suppress the baryon isocurvature with nonquadratic scalar potentials, another is to compensate the baryon isocurvature with cold dark matter isocurvature by making the scalar survive until the present.

  7. Psychiatric aspects of air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, A

    1996-02-01

    Psychological and toxic effects of air pollution can lead to psychiatric symptoms, including anxiety and changes in mood, cognition, and behavior. Increased levels of some air pollutants are accompanied by an increase in psychiatric admissions and emergency calls and, in some studies, by changes in behavior and a reduction in psychological well-being. Numerous toxic pollutants interfere with the development and adult functioning of the nervous system. Manifestations are often insidious or delayed, but they can provide a more sensitive indicator of toxic effects than cancer rates or mortality data. Other medical effects of air pollution, such as asthma, can indirectly affect psychological health. The sick building syndrome and multiple chemical sensitivity are conditions with toxicologic and psychiatric aspects. Psychosocial stress can cause symptoms similar to those of organic mental disorders. Reactions to stress depend on cultural, individual, and situational variables. We must understand these factors to be able to alleviate and prevent the consequences of environmental trauma. Expanded research is recommended in three main areas: (1) how people perceive and cope with environmental health risks, (2) the effects of air pollution on behavior and neuropsychological functioning, and (3) neurotoxicologic evaluation of air pollutants with both behavioral and in vitro studies.

  8. Psychopathy: Legal and neuroscientific aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Ortega-Escobar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychopathy is characterised by emotional disturbances that affect interpersonal behaviour and decision-making. The objective of this paper is to review the most recent contributions to the field of neuroscience of psychopathy and the implications that this disorder has on the criminal legal field. In regards to this last aspect, we evaluate the issue of psychopaths’ accountability and the incidence of psychopathy in many other penal institutions. In terms of the contributions of neuroscience, we will focus on the orbitofrontal (ofPFC and ventromedial (vmPFC regions of the frontal lobes and on the amygdala. Data spanning from the nineteenth century to the present indicate that damage to the ofPFC and vmPFC is the basis of behaviours that have been referred to as pseudopsychopathic. The earlier during brain development the damage occurs, the more likely these behaviours will resemble those of psychopaths. The damage to the amygdala is rather related to impairments in the ability to distinguish facial expressions of fear and the capacity to feel emotions. Damage to ofPFC, vmPFC, and amygdala are highly relevant to the expression of pseudopsychopathic behaviours.

  9. Breast Cancer 2012 - New Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolberg, H-C; Lüftner, D; Lux, M P; Maass, N; Schütz, F; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Janni, W; Kümmel, S

    2012-07-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, however potentially promising combinations do not always achieve a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also inherited genetic properties of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Also health-economic aspects are more frequently being taken into consideration so that health-economic considerations may also play a part. This review is based on information from the recent annual congresses. The latest of these are the 34th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2011 and the ASCO Annual Meeting 2012. Among their highlights are the clinically significant results from the CLEOPATRA, BOLERO-2, EMILIA and SWOG S0226 trials on the therapy for metastatic breast cancer as well as further state-of-the-art data on the adjuvant use of bisphosphonates within the framework of the ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, NSABP-B34 and GAIN trials.

  10. Computational aspects of premixing modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, D.F. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Witt, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    In the steam explosion research field there is currently considerable effort being devoted to the modelling of premixing. Practically all models are based on the multiphase flow equations which treat the mixture as an interpenetrating continuum. Solution of these equations is non-trivial and a wide range of solution procedures are in use. This paper addresses some numerical aspects of this problem. In particular, we examine the effect of the differencing scheme for the convective terms and show that use of hybrid differencing can cause qualitatively wrong solutions in some situations. Calculations are performed for the Oxford tests, the BNL tests, a MAGICO test and to investigate various sensitivities of the solution. In addition, we show that use of a staggered grid can result in a significant error which leads to poor predictions of `melt` front motion. A correction is given which leads to excellent convergence to the analytic solution. Finally, we discuss the issues facing premixing model developers and highlight the fact that model validation is hampered more by the complexity of the process than by numerical issues. (author)

  11. Geometrical aspects of quantum spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, P.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group

    1996-05-11

    Various geometrical aspects of quantum spaces are presented showing the possibility of building physics on quantum spaces. In the first chapter the authors give the motivations for studying noncommutative geometry and also review the definition of a Hopf algebra and some general features of the differential geometry on quantum groups and quantum planes. In Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 the noncommutative version of differential calculus, integration and complex structure are established for the quantum sphere S{sub 1}{sup 2} and the quantum complex projective space CP{sub q}(N), on which there are quantum group symmetries that are represented nonlinearly, and are respected by all the aforementioned structures. The braiding of S{sub q}{sup 2} and CP{sub q}(N) is also described. In Chapter 4 the quantum projective geometry over the quantum projective space CP{sub q}(N) is developed. Collinearity conditions, coplanarity conditions, intersections and anharmonic ratios is described. In Chapter 5 an algebraic formulation of Reimannian geometry on quantum spaces is presented where Riemannian metric, distance, Laplacian, connection, and curvature have their quantum counterparts. This attempt is also extended to complex manifolds. Examples include the quantum sphere, the complex quantum projective space and the two-sheeted space. The quantum group of general coordinate transformations on some quantum spaces is also given.

  12. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel ePrax

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopologue profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds.

  13. Medical and Scientific Aspects of Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Edmund R., Ed.; Newsom, Mary M., Ed.

    The 24 contributions to this volume were written by coaches, sport scientists, and medical authorities who surveyed recent research on biomechanics, physiology, psychology, nutrition, treatment of injuries, and training techniques for cyclists. There are four sections: (1) biomechanics and physiology; (2) research: techniques and results; (3)…

  14. Medical and Scientific Aspects of Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Edmund R., Ed.; Newsom, Mary M., Ed.

    The 24 contributions to this volume were written by coaches, sport scientists, and medical authorities who surveyed recent research on biomechanics, physiology, psychology, nutrition, treatment of injuries, and training techniques for cyclists. There are four sections: (1) biomechanics and physiology; (2) research: techniques and results; (3)…

  15. Alterations in physiology and anatomy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng Kien; Tan, Eng Loy

    2013-12-01

    Pregnant women undergo profound anatomical and physiological changes so that they can cope with the increased physical and metabolic demands of their pregnancies. The cardiovascular, respiratory, haematological, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems all undergo important physiological alterations and adaptations needed to allow development of the fetus and to allow the mother and fetus to survive the demands of childbirth. Such alterations in anatomy and physiology may cause difficulties in interpreting signs, symptoms, and biochemical investigations, making the clinical assessment of a pregnant woman inevitably confusing but challenging. Understanding these changes is important for every practicing obstetrician, as the pathological deviations from the normal physiological alterations may not be clear-cut until an adverse outcome has resulted. Only with a sound knowledge of the physiology and anatomy changes can the care of an obstetric parturient be safely optimized for a better maternal and fetal outcome.

  16. The Effects Of An Exercise Physiology Program on Physical Fitness Variables, Body Satisfaction, and Physiology Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Arlette C.; Rosenblatt, Evelyn S.; Kempner, Lani; Feldman, Brandon B.; Paolercio, Maria A.; Van Bemden, Angie L.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of an exercise physiology program on high school students' physical fitness, body satisfaction, and physiology knowledge. Intervention students received exercise physiology theory and active aerobic and resistance exercise within their biology course. Data from student surveys and measurements indicated that the integrated…

  17. [Thrombotic microangiopathies: HUS/TTP. Physiopathological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Avalos, J C

    2000-01-01

    confirmation of these findings is needed. We postulate that the abnormal cleavage of the vWF subunit, with formation of different multimers with increased platelet aggregating capacity is an important mechanism to increase the microcirculatory thrombosis, but it is only a partial aspect in a more complex and unknown thrombogenic stimulation secondary to the endothelial lesion or activation. Better knowledge of the endothelial physiology and the genetic polymorphism of the endothelial cell, the clonation of vWF-cleavage protease, etc., will provide valuable tools for the understanding of these fascinating entities.

  18. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    This dissertation examines the use of electric fields as one mechanism for controlling combustion as flames are partially extinguished when impinging on nearby surfaces. Electrical aspects of flames, specifically, the production of chemi-ions in hydrocarbon flames and the use of convective flows driven by these ions, have been investigated in a wide range of applications in prior work but despite this fairly comprehensive effort to study electrical aspects of combustion, relatively little research has focused on electrical phenomena near flame extinguishment, nor for flames near impingement surfaces. Electrical impinging flames have complex properties under global influences of ion-driven winds and flow field disturbances from the impingement surface. Challenges of measurements when an electric field is applied in the system have limited an understanding of changes to the flame behavior and species concentrations caused by the field. This research initially characterizes the ability of high voltage power supplies to respond on sufficiently short time scales to permit real time electrical flame actuation. The study then characterizes the influence of an electric field on the impinging flame shape, ion current and flow field of the thermal plume associated with the flame. The more significant further examinations can be separated into two parts: 1) the potential for using electric fields to control the release of carbon monoxide (CO) from surface-impinging flames, and 2) an investigation of controlling electrically the heat transfer to a plate on which the flame impinges. Carbon monoxide (CO) results from the incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels and, while CO can be desirable in some syngas processes, it is usually a dangerous emission from forest fires, gas heaters, gas stoves, or furnaces where insufficient oxygen in the core reaction does not fully oxidize the fuel to carbon dioxide and water. Determining how carbon monoxide is released and how heat transfer

  19. ASPECTS OF ECOFEMINISM IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perticas Diana Claudia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ecofeminism can be understood as the relationship between the manner in which women are treated in society and on how the environment is treated and protected. Ecofeminism starts from the idea according to which "nature is a feminist issue". The explanation for this is based on the feminist philosophy according to which the connection between woman and nature is a strong one, due to the fact that she is the one who gives birth, thus helping nature to regenerate itself. Without women, female plants and animals, the planet could not develop, perpetuate and the end would be death. Furthermore, another explanation related to the first is that animals and people in their capacity as mothers are able to provide a greater amount of love, care, protection, both to their offspring and to nature. This paper aims to analyze the manner in which women are harmed by the environmental degradation in Romania and also the principles that have governed and still govern the current economy. Nowadays society is lead largely by male gender persons. The main accusations against current policies is that they seek concrete and immediate results, such as those related to economic growth, inflation rate etc. in terms of strictly economic indicators such as: gross domestic product, net national product, gross national product etc.. On the contrary, ecofeminist policies suggest that the emphasis should be placed on quality of life issues, which within itself analyzes both economic and also social and environmental aspects. Is not this the reproach for decades now that is brought to current economic policies? The fact that they do not take into account issues related to environmental degradation, in time led to negative consequences in the world whose costs are unimaginable.

  20. [Human orgasm from the physiological perspective--part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałecki, Piotr; Depko, Andrzej; Jedrzejewska, Sylwia; Talarowska, Monika

    2012-07-01

    Physiological phenomenon of sexuality occurring in both sexes that brings physical and mental satisfaction, and often affects the quality of life is an orgasm. The ability to experience regular orgasms affects relationship with partner. The definition of orgasm is not an easy task. The way of experiencing it is subjective, and the possibility of observing significantly reduced. Contemporary works on the phenomenon of orgasm are concentrated on several aspects: biological perspective (neurophysiological and biochemical determinants of orgasm), psychological perspective and on the differences in its course in both sexes. In sexology are two models of sexual response: a linear model of sexual response (by W. Masters and V. Johnson, and H. S. Kaplan) and the circular model of sexual response (created by R. Basson). The ability to experiencing an orgasm is inherent in men. In women, that phenomenon is acquired, is the consequence of further experience.